Podcasts about Cabernet

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Best podcasts about Cabernet

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Latest podcast episodes about Cabernet

gone cold podcast - texas true crime
The Joplin & Trice Murders in Blue Mound, Texas Part 3: Damage Control

gone cold podcast - texas true crime

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 32:01


After Fort Worth Star-Telegram newspaper reporters uncovered relatively solid evidence that 17-year-old Terry Trice did not kill Wayne, Fae, Brian, and Kevin Joplin, Tarrant County Sheriff Lon Evans became heavily involved in the investigation. In fact, it seemed as though he didn't want anyone making any decisions or talking to any reports other than himself and his Chief Deputy Earl Brown. Damage control began. As the Sheriff and his right hand man sorted through mistakes made by both the Blue Mound Police Chief and his own deputies, Lon Evans became frustrated at the lack of cooperation from the sole surviving Joplin family member. Part 3 of ?If you have any information about the 1976 Joplin Family murders, please contact the Blue Mound Police at (817)232-0665To buy tickets for a live podcast at the Winehaus in Fort Worth, featuring gone cold, True Crime Cases With Lanie, True Consequences, and Cults, Crimes, and Cabernet, go to: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/true-crime-live-tickets-328948101627Find gone cold – texas true crime on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by using @gonecoldpodcast and on YouTube at: youtube.com/c/gonecoldpodcastThe Fort Worth Star-Telegram, D Magazine's Article “Reopening the Blue Mound Massacre,” and Court Documents were used as sources for this episode#JusticeForTheJoplinFamily #JusticeForTerryTrice #BlueMound #BlueMoundTX #FortWorth #Texas #TX #TexasTrueCrime #GoneCold #GoneColdPodcast #TrueCrime #TrueCrimePodcast #ColdCase #Murder #UnsolvedMurder #Unsolved #FamilyAnnihilator

Flyover Boys
Episode 32- Conspiracy Tyson Time

Flyover Boys

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 121:56


The boys are back at it and it's a fun one, sorry for the week off. Topics discussed:  We got multiple returning guests joining us including LA Brad and Josh aka mobourbonhunter on IG. We got updates from a Californian on thermostats, crime, and EV's. Brett and Brad's upcoming member guest tourney this weekend. Brad and bikers, Greg's potentially in the cattle industry, Booze and the World Cup, Upcoming concerts and Boybands, Bourbon news and updates from Josh, Your next reality show, Tyson and the chicken biz, Blake's got lists, We play another round of Conspiracy name association game and we all pick our NFL teams to own. Drinks of the Week, Cali edition: Oaktoberfest by Firestone Walking Brewing and a lovely 2018 Cabernet by Stags' Leap in Napa. Instagram http://Instagram.com/flyoverboys Any questions for an upcoming show shoot us a line at flyoverboyspod@gmail.com

gone cold podcast - texas true crime
The Joplin Family Murders in Blue Mound, Texas Part 2: Terry Trice

gone cold podcast - texas true crime

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 36:13


After the murders of Wayne, Fae, Brian, and Kevin Joplin on February 23rd, 1976, both Blue Mound Police Chief Gary Erwin and Tarrant County Deputies who assisted at the scene thought the case was open and shut: a family friend, 17 year old Terry Trice, killed them all and was trying to make out with two vintage firearms when he was surprised, shot, and killed by Gregg Joplin after he came home. Within two days, however, as reporters for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram and D Magazine uncovered facts about Terry Trice that authorities had not, it seemed almost certain he hadn't committed any crime at all. Part 2 of ?If you have any information about the 1976 Joplin Family murders, please contact the Blue Mound Police at (817)232-0665This episode deals with suicide. If you are experiencing emotional distress and / or contemplating suicide, please call the national suicide prevention helpline by dialing 988. Someone is available to speak with you there 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.To bid on a giant bundle of merch from more than 25 podcasts, the proceeds of which will go directly to the Leon Laureles go fund me, check out the Fall Line Podcast's Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/falllinepodcast/ on September 14-16.To buy tickets for a live podcast at the Winehaus in Fort Worth, featuring gone cold, True Crime Cases With Lanie, True Consequences, and Cults, Crimes, and Cabernet, go to: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/true-crime-live-tickets-328948101627Find gone cold – texas true crime on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by using @gonecoldpodcast and on YouTube at: youtube.com/c/gonecoldpodcastThe Fort Worth Star-Telegram, The Dallas Morning News, D Magazine's Article “Reopening the Blue Mound Massacre,” and Court Documents were used as sources for this episode#JusticeForTheJoplinFamily #BlueMound #BlueMoundTX #FortWorth #Texas #TX #TexasTrueCrime #GoneCold #GoneColdPodcast #TrueCrime #TrueCrimePodcast #ColdCase #Murder #UnsolvedMurder #Unsolved #FamilyAnnihilator

Cults, Crimes, and Cabernet
Welcome to Cults, Crimes & Cabernet!

Cults, Crimes, and Cabernet

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 1:06


Welcome to the Cults, Crimes & Cabernet podcast!

Cork & Taylor Wine Podcast
Episode 59: Yoav Gilat, Cannonball and Angels & Cowboys Wines

Cork & Taylor Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 42:37


We are back after our two week hiatus and we welcome Yoav Gilat of Cannonball and Angels & Cowboys Fame. Yoav launched Cannonball Wines with 20 + years of diverse experience in consumer goods & beverages. Born and raised in Israel, Yoav moved to the UK in 1994 & studied Law at the University of Kent. Following graduation, Yoav practiced law for three years before moving on to Tymco Beer Ltd., where he managed business development for brands including; Red Bull, Corona, Beringer, Masi, Fonseca, Planeta & others. Yoav then pursued his MBA at Columbia Business School & Haas School of Business/Berkeley & further deepened his industry experience by providing strategy & marketing services to Constellation with their brands; Blackstone Winery & The Campari Group – SKYY Vodka. Today, Yoav oversees all day-to-day operations as well as the company's distributor & international sales networks in over 60 markets. True to the Cannonball spirit, Yoav is a professional scuba diver & Cabernet is his “go-to” varietal. Very insightful to say the least!Don't forget to Subscribe, Rate and Review! Please please It only takes a few minutes and helps me/the show grow. The more subscribers, reviews and rates helps us to get discovered! Also, follow us on our Facebook @corkandtaylor and Instagram accounts @corkandtaylorpodcast.Also, Please consider supporting the show as it would be appreciated. This helps me offset  expenses to continue to run and grow the Cork & Taylor Wine Podcast. Thanks! Lukehttps://www.patreon.com/corkandtaylor

Everyday Wine with Kris Levy
Ep. 49: Golf, Wine, and a Shared Passion between Father and Son with Paul Levy

Everyday Wine with Kris Levy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 25:43


Following a two-year term as the 40th PGA President, Paul K. Levy was named PGA Honorary President at the 2018 PGA Annual Meeting. Previously, he also served two-year terms each as PGA Vice President and PGA Secretary.   As PGA President, Levy was influential in the decision to relocate the PGA Headquarters to Frisco, Texas, and spearheaded growing the employment consultant arm of PGA of America‘s Career Services and executive search. The $550 million PGA Frisco development will bring 26 PGA of America championships, approximately 150 jobs and a new Northern Texas PGA Section Headquarters.   Let's dive into his wine story!   [00:01 – 06:45] Opening Segment Let's welcome my dad, Paul Levy, to the show! How Paul got into golf, food, and beverage Holistic Golf and Country Club Experience Paul's Wine Origin Story   [06:46 – 14:03] Golf, Wine, and a Shared Passion between Father and Son How to Sell Wine at a Club Finding talent for the food and beverage team Educating the staff and members of a country club on wine   [14:04 – 21:13] Professional Advice for Country Clubs A piece of advice for the new country clubs Wine training and tasting country club staff The Need for Great Managers in the Golf Industry   [21:14 – 25:43] Closing Segment Learn everything you need to grow your wine, business, or brand with Wine Business Bootcamp where I help other wine producers master the fundamentals of digital marketing, nail their customer experience, and convert more wine tasters into their wine clubs and other offers. Just send me a dm or email at kris@krislevy.comwith the subject: Wine Business Bootcamp Favorite Wine Cabernet Favorite go-to pairing Cabernet and charcuterie Wine Resource The internet Club Manager Association of America   Connect with Paul Email: paul@kkandw.com Website: https://kkandw.com/     Let's continue the Everyday Wine Conversations and connect with me through Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn, or feel free to shoot me an email at kris@krislevy.co. You can also check out my website at ​www.​klevywineco.com.   TELL US WHAT YOU THINK! LEAVE A REVIEW + help us get the word out there! Share this podcast to someone who wants to join the wine conversations. Go ahead and take a screenshot, share this to your stories, and tag me on Instagram!   JOIN THE CLUB through this link and handpick wines every month, from up and coming wineries, winemaker owned brands and wineries with unique stories while supporting those wineries directly. You can also join our Facebook Group to connect with other wine lovers, get special tips and tricks, and take your wine knowledge to a whole new level.   Tweetable Quotes:   “Golf courses have to always keep in mind that every part of food and beverage is part of the experience.” – Paul Levy   “At the end of the day, the golf industry is really in need of top-of-the-line general managers.” – Paul Levy  

The Bones Booth: A Bones Podcast
The Bones Booth S04E25 - The Critic in the Cabernet

The Bones Booth: A Bones Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 125:46


In this week's episode of The Bones Booth, Maggie, Taryn, Andrew, and Aqeel discuss the twenty-fifth episode of season four of Bones, "The Critic in the Cabernet."

Wine Soundtrack - USA
Talley Vineyard - Brian Talley

Wine Soundtrack - USA

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 37:47


Each vintage is a unique blend from our estate vineyards, truly representing the signature style of Talley Vineyards. With their varying microclimates and soils, each of our estate vineyards has a slightly different story to tell.Each vintage is a unique blend from our estate vineyards, truly representing the signature style of Talley Vineyards. With their varying microclimates and soils, each of our estate vineyards has a slightly different story to tell.

The Wine Vault
Episode 321 - Bar Dog Cabernet Sauvignon

The Wine Vault

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 41:02


Bar Dog Cabernet Sauvignon In this episode, Rob and Scott continue their search for a decent Californian designate Cabernet by reviewing Bar Dog Cabernet.  So come join us, on The Wine Vault.

National Day Calendar
August 28, 2022 - National Power Rangers Day | National Red Wine Day

National Day Calendar

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 3:30


Welcome to August 28th, 2022 on the National Day Calendar. Today we celebrate cheesy shows and seeing red. If you're a fan of Zordon or Rita Repulsa, then you know exactly what we're celebrating today. Although this kid's show was pieced together with old footage from a Japanese TV show, Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers was a huge hit in 1993. Five teenagers transformed into...well Power Rangers, who then merged into a giant robot that fought monsters. Yeah, it sounds crazy, but if you grew up in the 90s, this was THE show to watch. And your neighborhood was probably full of every color of Ranger on Halloween. On National Power Rangers Day, celebrate with a walk down memory lane and watch some old episodes. The special effects are cheesy but the lessons on teamwork are priceless! Though folks enjoy wine all year long, the end of Summer begins the seasonal celebration of the varietals known as reds. Merlot, Cabernet and Pinot Noir all pair well with the richer foods we all love to indulge in during cooler weather. And the good news is that reds are actually healthier for you than whites. The rule of thumb is that dryer wines are better for you than sweeter ones. And young wines, which tend to be darker, are healthier than the older, lighter ones. Moderation in all things is the key to a healthy life, but on National Red Wine Day, have fun indulging in the drink that's the very symbol of celebration.   I'm Anna Devere and I'm Marlo Anderson. Thanks for joining us as we Celebrate Every  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Italian Wine Podcast
Ep. 1056 Rebecca Severs Interviews Giovanni Nordera | Clubhouse Ambassador's Corner

Italian Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 55:21


Welcome to Episode 1056 Stevie Kim moderates Clubhouse's Ambassadors Corner – In this episode Rebecca Severs interviews Giovanni Nordera (Pasqua Winery). These sessions are recorded from Clubhouse and replayed here on the Italian Wine Podcast! Listen in on this series as Italian Wine Ambassadors all over the world chat with Stevie and their chosen wine producer. Which producer would you interview if you had your pick? About about today's guest host: Rebecca Severs is from Memphis, TN. Her passion for wine and love of Italy was the inspiration for her to become a restaurateur at an early age. She and her husband opened Bari Ristorante e Enoteca nearly 20 years ago. She is the owner, front of the house manager, and wine buyer for the restaurant and they are proud to say that they are the only restaurant in Memphis that has an all Italian wine list. In 2017, she decided to dive into her love for wine a little further and became a Certified Italian Wine Professional in 2017 through Napa Wine Academy. She is currently a Vinitaly Academy student and travels to Italy whenever she gets the chance. To learn more visit: Website: www.Barimemphis.com Instagram: @Rebecca@Bari and @Bariristorante Facebook: Rebecca Bari and Bari Ristorante e Enoteca Twitter: @BariRistorante Linkedin: Rebecca Severs About today's guest producer: Born in 1978, Giovanni is originally from Vicenza, a small town near Verona. He joined Pasqua in 2005, he is now technical director of production. He graduated in Viticulture and Oenology from the University of Udine. After his studies, he gained several international experiences as an oenologist at Hamilton Russell in South Africa, in Chile at Santa Rita and Vina Morandè studying the oenological aspects and the various fermentation techniques on different local varieties. He spent time at the university of Bordeaux, France, where he was able to study viticulture topics in particular the effects of cycadella (empoasca vitis) on the vineyard. Giovanni has also worked at Piovene Porto Godi, a family winery as a consultant and at a winery in St Emilion where he supervised the vinification of Chardonnay and Sauvignon and local red varieties such as Merlot and Cabernet. His international experience has given him a very broad knowledge of the wine world. Fluent in English and French, Giovanni is also an avid skier, a surfer, loves the sea and the mountains. He has two children Tommaso and Letizia. If you want to learn more visit: www.pasqua.it/it/home/ More about the moderator Stevie Kim: Stevie hosts Clubhouse sessions each week (visit Italian Wine Club & Wine Business on Clubhouse), these recorded sessions are then released on the podcast to immortalize them! She often also joins Professor Scienza in his shows to lend a hand keeping our Professor in check! You can also find her taking a hit for the team when she goes “On the Road”, all over the Italian countryside, visiting wineries and interviewing producers, enjoying their best food and wine – all in the name of bringing us great Pods! To find out more about Stevie Kim visit: Facebook: @steviekim222 Instagram: @steviekim222 Website: https://vinitalyinternational.com/wordpress/ Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodcast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/

thinkfuture with kalaboukis
644 Charting The Non-Linear Future with Gary Benger @ Unfettered Journey

thinkfuture with kalaboukis

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 55:44


Gary F. Bengier is a writer, philosopher, and technologist. After a career in Silicon Valley, Gary pursued passion projects, studying astrophysics and philosophy. He's spent the last two decades thinking about how to live a balanced, meaningful life in a rapidly evolving technological world. This self-reflective journey infuses his novel with insights about our future and the challenges we will face in finding purpose. Before turning to write speculative fiction, Gary worked in a variety of Silicon Valley tech companies. He was eBay's Chief Financial Officer and led the company's initial and secondary public offerings. Gary has an MBA from Harvard Business School and an MA in philosophy from San Francisco State University. He has two children with Cynthia, his wife of forty-five years. When not traveling the world, he raises bees and makes a nice Cabernet at the family's Napa vineyard. He and his family live in San Francisco. https://garyfbengier.com/ https://ideateandexecute.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thinkfuture/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thinkfuture/support

Wine for Normal People
Ep 438: The Grape Miniseries -- País

Wine for Normal People

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 42:50 Very Popular


País, known as Criolla Chica in Argentina, and Mission in the US,  was brought by the Spanish conquistadores and was South America's most planted grape for centuries until an economic boom in Chile and waves of migration in Argentina brought new and interesting grapes to these nations. Argentina has plantings of the grape, California now barely any, so Chile is the epicenter of the grape, where it is thought of as the locals' grape – something low quality and common that has been around forever but has never made more than cheap, bulk wine or wine for local consumption.  País (a.k.a., Criolla Chica or Mission), "Mission Grapes" by Hey Fritters is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0.   But in 2007, the 200+ year old vines caught the attention of Europeans who were making wine in Chile and they began experimenting. The grape was made into sparkling wine and then into funky natural wines, which gained a following in France and in the capital city of Chile, Santiago. Today, there is revived interest in this grape, and it is making everything from Beaujolais Nouveau-like styles to some more complex, spicy, herbal yet fruit wines with great tannins and acidity. In this episode we explore the origins of this grape and what makes it so fascinating.    Here are the show notes: We discuss the overview of the grape – it's called Criolla Chica in Argentina, Mission in California, and it is grown in Peru where it is distilled into Pisco and makes some natural wine, as well as Bolivia where it is called Missionera. We will refer to the grape only as País because Chile is the epicenter of growing!   We discuss the styles of wine that País makes: rosé, sparkling, lighter and easy drinking wine, and a fortified wine called Angelica, that can last for decades     The Grape Origins: País was probably the first vitis vinifera grape to come from the Old World, we tell the alleged story of Hernán Cortes hating the native grapes and demanding that better grapes be brought. He mandated that sacramental wine be made using grapes grown from cuttings from the Old World, so the high yielding Listán Preto was brought from Castilla-La Mancha and the Canary Islands where it had been growing to make wine to restock ships for the journey across the sea.   In the vineyard País is a big cropper with big, irregular berries. It has a lot of water in the grapes which can result in a low concentration of flavor The grape is easy to cultivate, is drought resistant, and has very deep roots, especially when grown on well-drained, granite rich slopes. It likes hot, dry climates. For these reasons it deserves our attention – it could have a bright future with climate change, although it needs careful management to be good. There are many 200+ year old vines in Chile, trained in bushes. Many of them have potential to be great.      Winemaking:  Winemakers must grapple with the fact that the wine lacks concentration of fruit flavor, and that it has a rustic, rough mouthfeel due to the types of tannins in the grape. It can also have low acidity or, if picked too early, too much acidity.  Techniques to manage the grape include carbonic maceration to increase fruitiness, saignee to increase intensity, and gentle pressing and traditional winemaking to keep the balance in the wines.  Terms we discuss: Zaranda – a bamboo mat that sits over the fermentation vat. Winemakers apply gentle pressure for less tannic, more acidic wines. Grapes are then crushed by foot and left to ferment in the traditional winemaking method Pipas — large pipe-shaped vats made from native beechwood. Used for short-term aging   País Wine/Flavors País is very light in color, and light in body. Depending on how the tannins are managed, the wine can be balanced or have really rough tannins The aromas and flavors range. The wines can be spicy and complex, with earthy, herbal, black pepper, and red fruit notes. It can also be simple with red fruit notes like pomegranate, and floral notes. It's often compared to Beaujolais     Food Pairings:  Mediterranean origin food. Think about Spanish tapas or Greek meze. Lentils, black beans burgers, beans, tacos, Spanish rice     Regions Chile Today, about ~7,250 ha/17,915 acres of País grow all over Chile -- from the Atacama Desert in the north to the southern regions of Maule, Bio Bio, and Itata, where the majority of plantings lie Was a much larger part of Chile's plantings until the mid 1800s when the mining boom made some Chileans very wealthy, and they used that money to set up vineyards and winemaking operations to make French varietal wine – Cabernet usurped País.  The grape was relegated to poor regions,  especially Maule, Bío Bío, and Itata where it was kept alive by the traditional local wine, Pipeño – fizzy, light, often sweet red made of País. The grape was so cheap and undervalued that growers and winemakers have no incentive to work with it  In 2006-2007, producers like Miguel Torres of Spain and young winemaker, Louis-Antoine Luyt who was trained in Beaujolais and is a natural wine advocate began making impressive sparkling and red of País. As the wine improved in quality, others became interested in making País and blends using the grape – Bouchon, Roberto Henriquez, and Concha y Toro are some examples One of Luyt's wine labels   Argentina  According to Amanda Barnes, author of the “Wines of South America”,  “Criolla” means a person or thing of Spanish-descent, born or developed in the Americas. Music, food, people, and grapes can be Criolla. Criolla grapes are a family of grape varieties that include the first vines, and part of that is Criolla Chica.  Producers that are experimenting: Cara Sur in Barreal, San Juan  Rocamadre in Paraje Altamira (Mendoza) from old vines Vallisto in Salta     California Called Mission grape  -- Established in 1769 with the Franciscan missions, Junipero Serra Died with Prohibition, today about 400 acres left, some producers in Amador, Calaveras, Santa Barbara, and Lodi still grow the grapes and some make early drinking, natural wine of it A traditional wine and the one that was esteemed at the time was Angelica, a sticky sweet wine that apparently tastes like molasses, dried figs, caramel, and nuts. The Mission Grape, growing in Lodi, CA. Photo: Lodi Growers Assoc It's an interesting time for País. I think this is the beginning of a journey with this grape and we'll keep you posted on new developments!  Maule, Itata and Bío Bío are in southern Chile. Map (C) WFNP   Sources to learn more: SouthAmericaWineGuide.com, Criolla Grape Varieties, Amanda Barnes País - Decanter China – great article by MW Julien Boulard Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pais Quench: The epic tale of País, the people's grape Wines of Chile: País  ____________________________________________________ Thanks to our sponsors this week:   Wine Spies uncovers incredible wines at unreal prices - on Zinfandel, Barolo, Champagne...you name it - up to 75% off! It's not a club and there's no obligation to buy. They have a build-a-case option, so you can mix and match wines while enjoying free shipping on every purchase. Visit www.winespies.com/normal you'll get $10 credit to use on your first order! Check them out today!   If you think our podcast is worth the price of a bottle or two of wine a year, please become a member of Patreon... you'll get even more great content, live interactions and classes!  www.patreon.com/winefornormalpeople   To register for an AWESOME, LIVE WFNP class with Elizabeth go to: www.winefornormalpeople.com/classes

California Wine Country
Miro Cellars

California Wine Country

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 28:07


Miro Cellars owner and winemaker Miro Tcholakov is back on California Wine Country with Steve Jaxon and Dan Berger. Miro was on this show exactly 5 years ago, on this episode of August 16, 2017. The last time he was on was 2 years ago, on this episode of September 2, 2020. Barry Herbst from Bottle Barn also joins the show in the studio. Born in northern Bulgaria, Miro got his first wine glass from his grandfather when he was six. His region includes the Danubian plains, which are hilly actually, about 30 km south of the Danube. There has always been a lot of viticulture there. He learned about wine at home and that led to him studying viticulture in Bulgaria. Then he participated in a study-abroad program in the US 32 years ago. It's part of an international exchange program that is still in place. He worked in Napa for a while, then he worked for Dry Creek Vineyards, which is celebrating their 50th anniversary. Over nine years he rose through the ranks to assistant winemaker. He is also still the winemaker for Trenta-Due Wines, this is his 23rd harvest and he also started his own brand, Milo, twenty years ago. Dan Berger tells about how Miro got started in Napa when Napa was ascendent, and when Sonoma County was not yet as well-known. Miro has successfully found small properties with great fruit and his wines are mostly vineyard designates. Click the logo to visit our sponsor Bottle Barn online for the coolest bargains on wine, beer and spirits. Ribolla Gialla The first wine they taste is a Ribolla Gialla, which is an Italian name. Ribolla is a proper name of uncertain origin and gialla means yellow. It's from Friuli, near Slovenia. It isn't more popular because it's hard to get growers to plant it. People around here just don't know it. Bottle Barn stocks it, and if they're out of it today they will have more soon. Bottle Barn also has the Zinfandel and the Cabernet Sauvignon. Miro is famous for his red wines but he also makes white wines for Trenta-Due. Dan likes his reds because they are explosive with their aromatics but they are good with food too. Miro's Zinfandel is an Alexander Valley appellation. 2021 was a tricky harvest and a lot of people didn't make any red wine at all that year. Miro's normal vineyards up there were damaged by smoke taint but some other places were spared by chance. This wine did not have smoke taint but it is not labeled with a vineyard designate because it is a one-off. For 2022 he is back to his usual vineyard supplier. Dan likes the structure because it is elegant and could take a little bit of chilling. Miro talks about how hard Zinfandel can be for a winemaker. It gets stressed easily from heat and sometimes the wine just doesn't want to ferment anymore and it forces the winemaker to deal with it. It's a mystery. “I think I can sense when it's about to give up,” says Miro. Click the logo to visit our sponsor Rodney Strong for the latest on the 2022 Summer Concert series. An Under-the-Radar Cabernet Next they taste the Miro Cabernet from Dry Creek Valley. The vineyard also provides him with Petit Syrah grapes. This Cab comes from old vines, big burly old vines, probably 80 to 90 years old. With dry farming and old vines, the yields are very low. This vineyard is on a Zinfandel territory, as most of the old vines in that bench land are Zin. This Cab is on the fruity side. It has interesting spice aromas, and cherries and berries. It's relatively soft, as young as it is. Dan Berger says this Cabernet will age 20 years. The danger with the old vine dry farmed grapes is that they can turn to raisins very quickly. This sells for $19.99 per bottle, and Dan says it would be a decent value at $55.

Wine Soundtrack - USA
Etude Winery - Jon Priest

Wine Soundtrack - USA

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 28:05


Established in 1982, Etude was founded on the philosophy that winemaking begins in the vineyard, long before harvest, and that superior grape growing allows our winemakers to craft wines of exceptional varietal expression and finesse. This ethos remains unwavering as the winery continues to build upon its established legacy of exemplary Pinot Noir. The integration of this tenet allows for the continual cultivation of the highest-quality wines, reflective of the profound influences of the land and the seasons, as well as the hand of its stewards.Etude, which in French means “study,” specializes in a selection of aromatic whites and classical red varietals, such as Chardonnay, Pinot Gris, Pinot Blanc, Pinot Noir and Cabernet Sauvignon. Though modeled after the best in Burgundy, Bordeaux and Alsace, these wines clearly speak to their New World origins, offering rich, concentrated fruit with elegant structure and an opulent mouthfeel for the reds, and lifted, delicate fruit with vibrant acidity and freshness for the whites. Our Estate Pinot Noirs, including a highly esteemed bottling made from rare heirloom selections and two single-vineyard offerings, are vinified from grapes grown on the Etude estate vineyards at Grace Benoist Ranch, nestled in the cool Carneros region. Other wines derived from our estate vineyards at Grace Benoist Ranch include our white wine selections of Chardonnay, Pinot Blanc and Pinot Gris. The fruit for our Cabernet Sauvignon is sourced from superlative terroirs within the districts of Oakville, Rutherford and Coombsville, as part of the greater Napa Valley landscape.

The Wine Show Australia
Julian Langworthy - Deep Woods Estate (Margaret River)

The Wine Show Australia

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 9:22


Julian tells Jill and Simon what it was like to be named 2023 Best Value Winery in the recent 2023 Halliday awards. They are making some seriously good Cabernet, in fact they won World's Best Cabernetmand the Chardonnay's are stunning also. @thewineshowaustralia @deepwoodsestate @winecompanion

XChateau - Navigating the Business of Wine
De-mystifying Wine in China w/ Ian Ford & Nichole Mao, Nimbility Asia

XChateau - Navigating the Business of Wine

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 35:59


As one of the biggest alcohol markets in the world, China is slowly waking up to wine. Ian Ford, Founding Partner, and Nichole Mao, Partner of Nimbility Asia, walk through how the Chinese wine market has changed, what has led to success, and the current wine trends in the country. With significant growth potential, the Chinese market is a critical global wine market to grasp and understand. Support the show on Patreon!Detailed Show Notes: Nimbility AsiaIt doesn't transact wines; not an importerActs like an export team for producersCreates GTM strategy and aligns w/ the right partnersCreates research reports for data-driven decision makingServes China (biggest market), S Korea (#2), Indonesia, India, AustraliaJapan & China ~75% of wine shipments into AsiaChinese wine consumerStill very early stages for wine, not a daily drink for most people2019 - 1.3 L wine/capita/year vs 51.9L for Portugal, 12.2L for US~0.2L wine/capita/year 10-20 years ago - wine was for gifting, banqueting, and hosting, not home consumptionCoastal cities (including Beijing & Shanghai) have young consumers that go to wine bars, bistros, drink at homeThe growing trend of home consumption, helped by e-commerce, gifting still existsChinese alcohol marketbig, dynamic alcohol market - strong food & drink culture, no religious objections, very social cultureThe largest beer market in the world, dominated by domestic productionBeer is a daily consumption itemCraft beer is stunted by regulations requiring a large minimum volumeSome craft beers (e.g., Boxing Cat, Great Leap) started as brewpubsChina wine market50-60M 9L cases imported, expected to double in next 10-15 years~100-120M 9L cases of domestic wine, hard to measureBig domestic producers - Great Wall, Changyu, DynastyEmerging quality producers - Silver Heights, Grace VineyardSuccess in ChinaConsumer awareness creates customer pull (e.g., Casillero del Diablo, Penfolds)Cluttered marketing environmentUnique digital landscape (no Instagram, Facebook, Twitter)Penfolds Example (pre-tariffs) - Grange provides halo, central to the story (good formula for success), profit driver is 300k cases of Bin 407 & 389 at ~$400-450/9L case, also sold ~800-1,000 cases of Rawson's Retreat entry-level wineLafite Example - Los Vascos (Chile) has higher demand due to Lafite affiliationSommeliers and lifestyle KOLs (key opinion leaders) can helpSocial media amplification is massivePopular regions / wines stylesMass market - more price and style driven, like fruity, easy drinking style around ~100 RMB/bottle (~$15); Chile doing well; Cabernet and Shiraz are recognized varietiesFine Wine - Burgundy has been the “hot bun” the last two years - pricing rising dramatically, can't get enough; also helping NZ Pinot NoirVery diverse market (e.g., natural wine bars in Chengdu)Premium sparkling rising (e.g., Champagne, aged Cava)More adventurous wine consumers (e.g., blind tasting clubs that compete with each other)Rosé is a very small, but growing categoryFortified, sweet wines are tinySustainable/organic help and are important for the future, but not big today Get access to library episodes See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Trailer Park Diaries
The Goyim, The Baker, The Cabernet Maker

Trailer Park Diaries

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 31:08


Welcome back Trailer Tribe! Bottoms Up! Season 2 is off to a flaming hot Cheeto start with “The Trailer Trasharita” as the ladies tear into a new diary, My Always. The writer is Zoey, a young newlywed, who is shocked to find herself contemplating cheating on her very perfect husband. Zoey's tragic childhood trauma is revealed. Vicki thanks Murray the Plumber for awakening her dormant sexual desires. A question arises, was Vicki, who was still married but had moved into her garage, cheating when she first got with her now husband, Lou? Shawn is still confused how anyone can have sexual desires for anyone named Murray.  Cocktail: Trailer Trash-arita || Vodka, Mountain Dew, Crushed Cheeto rim + a Cheeto at the bottom Follow hosts Vicki and Shawn on social media! Vicki Barbolak: https://www.instagram.com/vickibarbolak/?hl=en https://www.facebook.com/VickiBarbolakComedy https://twitter.com/VickiBarbolak  Shawn Pelofsky: https://www.instagram.com/shawnpelofsky/?hl=en https://twitter.com/shawnpelofsky/

SoCal Restaurant Show
Show 486, August 6, 2022: Steven Kent Mirassou, Steven Kent Winery, Livermore Part One

SoCal Restaurant Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 10:05


“The Steven Kent Winery was started in 1996 with one mission: to make Cabernet in the Livermore Valley that rivals in quality the greatest red wines made anywhere in the world.” “By the turn of the last century, Livermore Valley … Continue reading → The post Show 486, August 6, 2022: Steven Kent Mirassou, Steven Kent Winery, Livermore Part One appeared first on SoCal Restaurant Show.

The Wine Vault
Episode 318 - The Cali and France Cabernet Comparison

The Wine Vault

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 90:18


Dry Creek Vineyards Dry Creek Valley Cabernet Chateau Haura In this episode, Rob, Scott, and Becky seek to discover the differences between how Cabernet is presented in California and France.  To do this they review the Dry Creek Vineyards Cabernet from California, and the Chateau Haura from Graves in Bordeaux, France.  So come join us, on The Wine Vault.

SoCal Restaurant Show
Show 486, August 6, 2022: Steven Kent Mirassou, Steven Kent Winery, Livermore Part Two

SoCal Restaurant Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 14:14


“The Steven Kent Winery was started in 1996 with one mission: to make Cabernet in the Livermore Valley that rivals in quality the greatest red wines made anywhere in the world.” “By the turn of the last century, Livermore Valley … Continue reading → The post Show 486, August 6, 2022: Steven Kent Mirassou, Steven Kent Winery, Livermore Part Two appeared first on SoCal Restaurant Show.

Sustainable Winegrowing with Vineyard Team
143: Can Barrier Sprays Protect Against Smoke Taint in Wine?

Sustainable Winegrowing with Vineyard Team

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 39:26


“When smoke impact in the vineyard is great enough to impact the fruit and causes inferior wine, then we start calling it smoke taint.” explains Anita Oberholster, Professor Cooperative Extension Enology in the Department of Viticulture and Enology at the University of California, Davis. During a wildfire event, the lignin in vegetation is broken down, releasing volatile phenols. While there are naturally occurring phenols in grapes, this release causes an excess which can impact the final product. Some tainted wines smell like camp fire, smoky, BBQ, and even bacon. New research shows there is an aftertaste, an aroma you perceive in the back of your throat, that creates that ash tray character. Fruity aromas natural to some varieties can mask smoky aromas quite well. While green aromas like green pepper bring out the undesirable smoky traits. Some varieties may stand up to smoke taint better than others but there has not been a definitive research project on this yet due to the complexity of the testing process. Barrier spray research is still in its infancy. Early testing shows that barrier sprays need to be used preventatively. One trial showed a slight impact that could make a positive difference in a light smoke taint situation. The additional challenge with sprays is that they need to be washed off which uses a lot of water. Listen in for Anita's number one tip for growers. References: Anita Oberholster, UC Davis Viticulture and Enology Webpage Key Information on Smoke Effect in Grapes and Wine: What can be done to identify and reduce smoke effect in grape and wine production? (Western Australia Agriculture Authority) Grower-Winery Contracts and Communications about Smoke Exposure to Oregon's 2020 Wine Grape Harvest SIP Certified Step-by-Step: How to do small scale fermentations Sustainable Ag Expo November 14-16, 2022 | Use code PODCAST for $50 off The Australian Research Institute Smoke Taint Resources Get More Subscribe wherever you listen so you never miss an episode on the latest science and research with the Sustainable Winegrowing Podcast. Since 1994, Vineyard Team has been your resource for workshops and field demonstrations, research, and events dedicated to the stewardship of our natural resources. Learn more at www.vineyardteam.org. Transcript Craig Macmillan  0:00  And with me today is Dr. Anita Oberholster . She is Professor of Cooperative Extension, enology in the department of Viticulture and Enology, UC Davis. And today we're gonna talk about smoke taint. Welcome to the show.   Anita Oberholster  0:11  Thank you. Thank you for having me.   Craig Macmillan  0:13  This is a problem that has gotten a lot of attention in the last few years in California, I think a lot of us was surprised to find out it's been a topic of conversation in Australia for much longer than that. And yet, we still have a lot of questions. And we still don't have a lot of answers. But we're making progress. We're learning more about this. So first off, can you define what smoke taint is?   Anita Oberholster  0:35  Sure. So the first thing I would want to say is that, you know, when a vineyard is exposed to smoke, we talk about smoke impact, this potential smoke impact. Smoke taint is actually a sensory term. So that is when you have something that causes a decrease in quality or fault in the wine, then we start calling it taint. So when smoke impact in the vineyard is great enough that it impacts the fruit in such a way that it makes wine that is inferior and has a fault, then it is smoke taint. So smoke impact in grapes causes potentially smoked taint in wine. That clear?   Craig Macmillan  1:16  Absolutely. So there would be smoke impact then, as a standalone, what would be smoke impact?   Anita Oberholster  1:21  Okay, so smoke impact would be that there was fresh enough smoke that the grapevines were exposed to that the grapes absorb some of the volatile phenols coming from the smoke, so that it's more than normal. So smoke impact would be there were some absorption that took place. So grape composition is not totally what it was before smoke exposure, that would be smoke impact.   Craig Macmillan  1:47  And then smoke taint is what happens when you turn it into wine. The aromas that you get from that?   Anita Oberholster  1:51  Yes, and if the smoke impact was enough, because if you only have a little bit of absorption, that may still be a result in a wine that has no problems, right. So the smoke impact has to be at a certain significant level before we see a problem in the wines. So it's very important to know just a little bit of absorption do not always equal a problem in the winery.   Craig Macmillan  2:16  What kinds of aromas in terms of like descriptors and also then what kind of compounds, their aromas are compounds, what kind of compounds are we talking about?   Anita Oberholster  2:27  Okay, so I'm gonna get a little bit scientific.   Craig Macmillan  2:29  Do it please.   Anita Oberholster  2:30  So if you think of smoke, right, if we think a wildfire smoke, you have a lot of vegetation burning . So 15 to 25% of wood is lignin now lignin is what give celery its crunch, okay, so it's what it's the fiber you food. It's what gives wood its structure, its hardiness. When lignin burns, it actually release a lot of compounds. When it breaks down, we call thermal degradation. It releases a lot of compounds that we call volatile phenols. It's a whole range of compounds. And these compounds are naturally present in grapes. So that is something to remember, naturally, in different grape varieties in different regions would have natural, a certain amount. Now you have an excess amount in the air that can absorb onto those grapes because grapes are little little sponges, that absorbs the extra volatile phenols. Now if you have an excessive amount of volatile phenols, then it can result in wines with off flavors. Now what we talk about here is on the nose, you can get very campfire, smoky, BBQ, bacon, medicinal and the list goes on, aromas, but what for me is very distinctive, I call smoke taint, we call it a ritrum nasal character, or people talk about an aftertaste, it's actually an aroma you perceive in the back of your throat because what happens when these volatile phenols absorbed onto grapes, part of their defense mechanism is they attach sugars to it so as soon as you add sugars to it, this moment of fear now there was a really small compounds that's volatile and you can smell becomes non volatile because it is now larger in weight. But when you make wines both the free and without, so both of those with sugars on and those who have no sugars on, gets released into the wine. That rates your changes within the enzamatic activity, the pH of wine. And when you taste a wine, you have enzymes in your saliva that can actually release that bound. And we think it's that action that gives you that ashy character in the back of your throat. So it's a ritual nasal character because the back of your nose is connected to your throat as we all know when you have a cold and basically that release makes you perceive it and it's like an ashtray character if you can imagine an old campfire in the morning but that smells like if you licked that what that would taste like or if you smoking you have the old ashes there. I mean, I used to as a kid, my dad used to smoke a pipe, put the old coal pipe in your mouth and suck on it, that kind of taste. So obviously, that's very awful. So that would not be something that will increase the quality of your wine. So that for me is smoke taint. I have to caution that if you smell like, you know, smoke or something in wine, and only that, that doesn't always mean smoke taint. And there's other things that can happen in the wine that could also give you those characters. And you know, even barrel aging, some barrels can give you smoky character. So I want to caution people not to smell smoke and go oh, this is what tainted. Really focus on is there that aftertaste character that ritrum nasal, ashy character that's really distinctive.   Craig Macmillan  5:48  Are there particular compounds that are kind of hallmarks that either are the most commonly found in wines that are identified as having ssmoke taint from a descriptor standpoint. Or ones that just tend to travel with those descriptors, even if they're not the compound itself? You know, what I'm talking about, like a proxy? What are those? And where did it come from?   Anita Oberholster  6:05  Yeah, so we do have, you know, and we can thank our Australian researchers for that, because they've been working on this for much longer. And they have found about seven key volatile phenols, I can list them guaiacol, 4-methylguaiacol, syringol, 4-methylsyringol, p-cresol, o-cresol and m-cresol. they have identified six individual bound compounds that also correlate with smoke. So they've actually isolated them looked at them showed that they correlate with smoky characters, and the distinctive smoke taint character in wine. However, research continues. Even analyzing all those compounds, does not give you 100% predictive power, it's only about 70%. So we do think that there are more compounds that we need to keep on looking for. And that's something we're actively researching, but also the matrix. So the matrix is everything but what you're talking about. So for wine, it would be everything but the volatile phenols. We know that how much phenolic or color, polysaccharides, proteins, alcohol, sugar is in that wine, all of that influence the perception of smoke. So that can also be why the predictive power isn't that great. It could be everything else, not just the mark compounds. For instance, we know like fruity aromas can mask the smokiness quite well. But green characters like you know, the green pepper character or grassy characters, they actually uplift, smokiness, that's from research coming from South Africa. Very complex, everything in the wine influences something else.   Craig Macmillan  7:41  You know, that actually just remind me of another another question. Do we know? Are there certain varieties that seem to be much more prone to either suffering from smoke impact or if they do suffer from smoke impact, having being identified as having smoke taint later on down the line?   Anita Oberholster  7:57   Yes, you know, it's it's difficult. We really need more data. We we know, a variety like Pinot Noir, for instance, seems to be pretty prone to showing smoke. But is that because they absorb more? Is it something to do with the skin structure? Or is it just because they many times make wines where most simpler matrix is then, for instance, a full bodied Cabernet Sauvignon? And it's really difficult to know, we know that, for instance, Syrah naturally have very high levels of volatile phenols and can handle additional volatile phenols come from smoke quite well. That doesn't mean you can't get smoke impacted Syrahs. I've seen them. But so Syrah seems to be more robust. It seems to ask you know, Pinot Noir definitely more sensitive, say then Cabernet Sauvignon. Cabernet, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot. I think the Petite Verdot perhaps a little bit more sensitive to the Cabernet Sauvignon but this is more based on anecdotal experience, rather than having enough research data to really piece it out. For us to really determine this, we would have to intentionally smoke different varieties so that they actually at the same ripeness point gets exposed to exactly the same volatile phenol compositions and smoke composition, and then evaluate them. As you can imagine, that's not easy to do.   Craig Macmillan  9:20  No, it's not. Maybe I'm misremembering this, but I think I read an article where researchers were tenting rows of vines, and then building fires at one end and then blowing the smoke into the tent. And I was like, that's genius. But then in the, in the conclusions, right, the discussion, limitation, it's like, yes, but did we use the right wood? Is the intensity right? Is this over top, you know, you know, all these other variables and you're like, oh, God, you know, holy crap, what are we going to do? You know. And a lot of it's going to end up being what work that you guys are doing, which is just real in the field research when things happen, you just go study it as best you can. Yeah, you know, so it's gonna be a long time for us to figure a lot of these things out.   Anita Oberholster  10:03  Yeah, we do a combination of it. But it's not easy. We've done some intentional smoking last year. And you know, we built a tank, it was like 36 feet by seven feet by 10 feet to cover for vines in our Vineyard. Just to test barior sprays, right. And then to figure out what to burn, we had some natural ash that we analyze. So Tom Collins in Washington State University, he used to burn natural vegetation and gave up because to keep it consistently the same, to know that everything was exposed to exactly the same smoke. It's difficult. So we've moved to like using pellets, but then not all pellets give up the same depending on what what they're made of, and usually hard work. And what we usually burns here in California is soft wood. So yeah, it's tricky. We had to play around with a lot of different fires to figure out which source material we should be using for for our intentional smoking. And we will keep investigating, we're trying to mimic the real situation as much as possible, but it's not perfect.   Craig Macmillan  11:06  What is the window, or the progression of the windows for smoke impact on grapes when they're most vulnerable?   Anita Oberholster  11:13  Yeah, you know, unfortunately, I have to tell you, basically, from the moment you have a berry,. There was this research in Australia on Merlot vines where they actually intentionally spoke, expost ir to smoke over three seasons at different growth stages. And they did find in that study, the most sensitive was from verasion on onwards. So from sugar accumulation onwards, right, our color change onwards. However, we've had many instances of now our vineyards that were only exposed to smoke before veraion. At pea size even and still ended up making smoke impacted wines. So I want to caution I would say the risk gets higher from verasion onwards. But unfortunately, you're not safe if your smoke exposure was earlier.   Craig Macmillan  12:04  So it's an issue no matter what, basically.   Anita Oberholster  12:07  Yes, unfortunately.   Craig Macmillan  12:08  That's unfortunately, but also, that's good to know, that's really, really good to know, because I think we're thinking, oh, you know, it's a tiny berry and its all waxy and you know, it's not going to be an issue. And then, you know, four months later, three months later, suddenly, it's a problem.   Anita Oberholster  12:20  I also heard this rumor of my grapes are fine, because they were overripe with smoke exposure. Now, unfortunately, that does not work either. It will absorb smoke, even if it's very ripe. The enzyme activity within the berry do decrease somewhat. So there might be a difference in how much they actually attach sugars to it, or, like these volatile phenols. But they're still sensitive, you still have a risk, there's unfortunately no period that you don't have a risk if you have a berry on the vine.   Craig Macmillan  12:50  Got it. Oh, related. This reminds me of something. So the volatile phenols that we're talking about. These are compounds that are out in the air. They're part of smoking in quotes, but they're not ash. Ash is something's completely different, right?   Anita Oberholster  13:05  Yeah. So ash is carbon, mostly right? So what can happen and this is the confusing thing. When you have a fire ,volatile phenols are very small, you can't see them, right. So what you see is the debris or the particulate matter, volatile phenols on their own actually break down very quickly, they phyto oxidize in the air within hours. But now they can absorb on to particulate matter. So they can absorb onto the ash. And when they absorb onto the ash, we do not know how that impacts their degradation. So there's where the issue comes. So and this is why we say only when smoke is fresh, is there any kind of relation between particulate matter and risk of smoke exposure. The older that ash gets, the older that smoke gets, the less it contains volatile phenol, phenols. And the lower your risk of smoke impact, if that makes sense.   Craig Macmillan  14:02  I was just going to ask you about that. You've mentioned freshness in some of your other work. How fresh is fresh and how does it change over time? And is there any way I can sleep at night thinking that this has been out there for three days or whatever?   Anita Oberholster  14:14  Yeah, you know, it's difficult, So basically at the moment, fresh ash is defined as anything less than 24 hours old. Now that's based on anecdotal data. The Australians had a fire, all the smoke moved in a column over the ocean and came back as one big column over  McLaren Vale. And it was more than 24 hours later, and McLaren Vale was fine, there was no impact. So that was all anecdotal, but my own observations really do confirm that. I'm not saying you have no risk if the smoke is older than 24 hours, but your risk definitely substantially decrease. The older that smoke gets. Because what happens the volatile phenols starts breaking down, even those absorbed onto particulate matter starts breaking down. So after you know two, three days eyes that smoke is particulate matter. It doesn't contain the compounds that can absorb onto the grapes and into the graves and cause a problem.   Craig Macmillan  15:10  We've talked about time, in fact about windkow. Let's pretend Craig's a grower, I was at once but I am not now. What can I do? What should I do? What should I not? Do I have any kind of agency in this process?   Anita Oberholster  15:21  I wish I could tell grapegrowers what to do. I have some cautionary tales. If I can put it that way. Please, please. So what I would say is currently, we do not recommend anything. We've looked at some berry sprays, things they can spray onto the berry to protect it against the volatile phenols in the air. We've tried kaolin or surround, you know, the claim. Yep, yep. And it has shown some efficacy. So if you want to spray that on, you can try it. But it's not a silver bullet. In laboratory conditions. This is now 100% coverage, I saw about a 30% decrease in the amount of volatile phenols absorbing from smoke. But now remember, in a vineyard setting, you're not going to get 100% coverage, you may get 30 to 40% coverage. But it's a fact where if you only have a little bit of smoke exposure, that every little bit of prevention could actually mean the difference so that you end up with grapes that's not impacted and make good wine. This is always going to be preventative. Growers might have heard of the study that you looked at Praka, and it showed really, really good efficacy. However, after that initial study, there's been two more studies that showed no efficacy, and some that actually showed it resulted in the absorption of more of volatile phenols. So I'm cautioning against using Praka.  I've looked at EMP barrier, I've only done one study 100% coverage. So keep that in mind. And one of their compilations, jin3e showed something very similar to surround not better. But in a similar similar realm. Here's the problem with whatever you put on, you need to wash it off. At this stage, it seems the volatile phenols absorbs onto the barrier instead of absorbing onto the berry. However, if that barrier is still there, when you pick the grapes and make the wine, it dissolves from the barrier into your wine, so you're no better off, you still have to wash it off. And that's the problem because removing that clay from the berries, that's very difficult and will need a lot of water, which is my other problem with the solution. We are continually looking at other barrier sprays, if we can find something that potential you don't have to rinse off. Because that would obviously logistically and for many other reasons be a better option. There's something else I would like to say. Some of these studies looked at compounds I just mentioned, like Praka in some of the studies and actually made it worse. We are concerned a lot of applications use the stickers, many times it's oil to get the compact stick to the berry. If there's too much oil in whatever you are applying, it seems like it doesn't dry out. And if you have something wet on the outside of the barrier that increases the volume of the berry, or potentially is a liquid and the outside of which the volatile phenols can absorb and then absorb for concentrate in that liquid and then go into the berry. That may be why in some circumstances, some compounds are making it worse. Some berry sprays are making it worse. We saw people applying fungusicides and things like that that also made absorption worse. So currently, really if there's smoke in the air, and you do not have to apply something to your grapes, don't. We're really worried about applying anything while there's smoke in the air. If you want to apply something as a protection, the only things that showed some efficacy is basically surround or potentially some of these EMP various sprays you have to do it preventative, you need to do it before there's any smoke. So you're going to do this not knowing whether you actually need this protection or not. When the smoke is there, it's too late. Please do not apply anything to you grapes, your vines while there's smoke in the air. Wait until the smoke clears. If you do have to apply fungicides and other things. That's important. The other thing also there's been some studies looking at leaf removal or not leaf removal. Now the thing is the volatile phenols can also absorb onto leaves. And actually when you have a big canopy, that canopy can actually sort of protect your grapes because the volatile phenols is absorbing onto the leaves, not onto your grape bunches.   Craig Macmillan  19:40  We don't believe or we don't know at this point or we don't believe that those things aren't going to be transported from a mature lead back to the berries just like I'm transporting all these other precursors and amino acids and you know excetera?   Anita Oberholster  19:52  Yes, good question. So here's the thing. There's one study that looked at this and showed that translocation from the leaves to the grapevine bunches is possible. Now here's the problem, we think it's very limited, because we still see more advantage from having a canopy there than not having a canopy. So here's the thing. There's a study that looked at a big canopy that looked at leaf removal before smoke, and then looked at leaf removal after smoke. Now, having the big canopy resulted in grapes with the least impact from the smoke than those that had leaf removal before smoke, worst impact as you can think, because the berries were totally exposed. And then the leaf removal off the smoke did help with the smoke impact in the final wines. However, there's other studies that didn't see a great impact by doing leaf removal. And there's a risk with doing leaf removal. Because if you do leaf removal, and there's another fire, or more smoke than you might do just made it worse. And obviously we are in California, you actually sometimes need some shade for your berries. So we are concerned about sunburn and other things like that. So we're not, even in Australia, I've talked to them as well, they're not recommending leaf removal, we think that risk is too high in the benefit too low at this stage. We are I'm just started a study at Oakville experimental station where we can look at translocation between leaf and vines a little bit more and get a better and I should say leafs and grapes and get a better idea about the kinetics of this translocation. When does it happen? Does it only happen when you also have sugar translocation happening? We would no more than a couple of years.   Craig Macmillan  21:32  That's good. And I hope that everything continues apace. I'm very pleased to see how much research has been funded in this area. And also the collaboration. I think that the whole West Coast working together I think is a fantastic thing. And I hope that we can continue that model going forward. This isn't one of those problems where you know, we got a supply side grower, and then we have a consumer, the winery. And often we draw a line between those two. This is an issue that somehow we got to find a way of working together on this, we've got to find a way of finding some balance in terms of what the outcomes are going to be or what's going to happen. At this point qhat do you what do you think about that? What are what are things that you've come across that seemed like they made the community that if you will function or where things just clearly were problems that were going to be really, really bad? In kind of the more like logistical, social, economic realms?   Anita Oberholster  22:20  Yes, I guess communication is key, right. And I do feel that this is a heavy burden that should be carried equally by the grape grower and the winemaker, there's been a little bit of everything. You have the situations where some grape contracts were canceled with no rhyme or reason, it seems like. And then you have the situations where you have winemakers that talk to their grape growers. Made bucket fermentations with their grapes, brought them in, tasted together, looked at the data, had a discussion. And that's really optimal. So what I really would like to see is that before there's a smoke event, before harvest, right, in the offseason, there needs to be clear communication about how this process is going to work. You know, the grape grow needs to know, okay, what stands in my contract? Okay, what does that mean? When are we going to evaluate the grapes? Who's going to pay for the testing? Who needs to take the samples, take it to the lab? Do we do bucket fermentations? Who do the bucket fermentations? Who's going to taste these wines? And all of these things optimally should be about communication and a shared experience right effort between the grape grower and the winemaker, that's really the best situation. So for growers, I would say, talk to the winery and make sure that there are steps in place, don't assume they are there, make sure that they are actually in place and what they are, what's going to be your responsibility. How's that conversation going to go? If there is a smoke event, it's really important. But also for growers, you know, I'm recommending, I know that testing is really expensive. However, if you can, for crop insurance, you need a sample of each block of each variety, which is a lot. But even if you can just take a composite sample, you know, 300 berries in a bag. I mean 100 If you don't have a lot of grapes, in a bag, throw it in your freezer. Every couple of weeks from verasion. I would say our risk for smoke exposure really exponentially goes up from verasion onwards. So I would say from verasion, take a berry sample, throw it in your freezer. If don't need it, you don't need it. But if there's a smoke event, then you can go back to your pre smoke sample. You can have that analyzed with your harvest sample. And you can see what's the difference? Because the problem is we do not have public baseline. And we're at baseline I mean for the main varieties, what is normal for your area, what is the normal amount of volatile phenols. Because this is the problem we're all doing testing, and then say, now we're supposed to know what's elevated. How do you know what's elevated if you don't know what's normal. And then like I just said, you can get smoke impact without wine taint, right? How much elevation do you need before it actually results in a wine that's tainted, and that's what we're also trying to address. But we're only now this season will be our second year for baseline. Trying to determine baseline for the seven main varieties in California to at least as a reference when you get numbers back from the lab so that you can interpret it more easily. And we're also doing threshold studies in wine. That is, how much of these compounds can be in a specific wine matrix before it results in a decrease in quality. That's what we're trying to do. I call it the two bookends. If we have the two bookends, then contracts can be more specific, perhaps they can even have numbers in them. Now numbers is difficult because we just don't have enough data to know whether what is a good number to put in a contract. I mean, there's some numbers out there based on guaiacol and 4-methylguaiacol. That's only two of the seven free vlatine phenols. That doesn't even take the bound into account. So this is something I do want to tell a grower and this is really important. Crop insurance is based on only guaiacol and 4-methylguaiacol, only to marker compounds. Here's the problem, you may have smoke impacting your berries, and that guaiacol and 4-methylguaiacol number is below quantification limits, right? So you think you're good, no problem. The issue is most of these free volatile phenols depending on when grapes are exposed to smoke can be in the bound form. So you don't see it. But now the winemaker takes those grapes, he makes wine during the winemaking process, up to 30% of that bound can be released to free. And now suddenly you have a problem because it made wine that impacted but according to crop insurance, your data did not show smoke impact. And this is why we're really telling people to do small scale fermentations. And I know don't ask a grower to do fermentation is not a small ask. So that would be great if your winery was prepared to do it. But it's not that difficult. I do have a video on my website. I cringe saying this. But it was done overnight. But there you go,   Craig Macmillan  27:31  There will be a link to that particular video, by the way, I think I thought it was great. I thought it was I thought was fantastic. It is a little intimidating, I have to admit, but it was really, really good and a lot of numbers and a lot of things. But but you got it, you got to do it, you got to do it. Right. I mean, there's no other sense.   Anita Oberholster  27:45  I think, you know, I tried to on the fly, in my brain, make it so that somebody in a kitchen can do it, using things that you may have at on hand right to make the wine. So the advantage here is crop insurance meeting us halfway. They said so long as you can show chain of custody, so long as I bucket fermentation actually represents that block for that specific variety, they will take that wine number so that one you can take that bucket fermentation and get that analyzed for guaiacol and 4-methylguaiacol. That may still show safe and then why may still end up being smoke impacted six, nine months later that unfortunately do happen. However, your chances is much greater that it will show you impact if you had impact just because you had that 20 to 30% that can be released during the primary fermentation process. And this is why we recommend that. Now that you know the story gets convoluted because there's some people now saying but grape analysis and wine analysis gives you the same number. There's some researchers out there saying that. And it's true for how they looked at the grapes, the grape number and the wine number was the same. However, most labs will take the grapes, homogenize it spin down the juice and analyze the juice. That's not an extensible amount of skin contact you really to get the same amount that will end up in the wine, you need at least five days of contact.   Craig Macmillan  29:15  Okay, there is the key.   Anita Oberholster  29:16  And so that's why I'm saying just do not do a mini fermentation because you need that skin contact time. Researchers that say that grapes on wine they get the same number by analysis is because for their sample prepping the grapes, they did something like a five day course.   Craig Macmillan  29:31  But also because if you have an active fermentation, you are having some enzymatic activity that's going to break those glucosides and set those phenols the variable freeness free and that's what's happening in reality. So that's that's part of it.   Anita Oberholster  29:45  Good point. So this is what happening. Yes. So especially in the beginning, as soon as you crush your groups, there's enzymes within the cells of the groups and then gets released and they can release the sugars from the volatile phenols. Now during the winemaking process in the beginning until the alcohol formation gets too high, the alcohol do inhibit these enzymes, you get that release. And then after that, you also have the fact that wine has a low pH between three and four. And so you get some acid release as well, because they're acid liable, meaning that they do release the sugars over time. But that type of reuse is slow.   Craig Macmillan  30:24  That's a good question. Is there an unknown effect of pH on this? You know, you talk, you talked about a target pH that many winemakers would like to have. But I know that it was along the central coast, it's not unusual to be three, seven push and three, eight going from there. And in other spots, making white wines with three twos. Do we know what the what the effect is?   Anita Oberholster  30:42  Okay, so here's the thing, I'm not recommending acidifying your wines to a ridiculous low pH and then adjusting it to get to get more to release. The thing is, there is a pH effect, but it's not very strong. So in the range of wine, this is why after wine is made, these bound compounds are actually pretty stable over five, six years, you may get another 10 15% releasing, okay. So that they don't actually release a lot at the wine range pH. So in a short period of time, I don't think it's worth doing that kind of thing. Just to give you some context in the lab, if we're trying to hydrolyze basically to remove all the sugars from the volatile phenols. We adjust the pH with hydrochloric acid or sulfiric acid to pH one.   Craig Macmillan  31:33  Oh my god!   Anita Oberholster  31:34  Then we heat it at 100 degrees Celsius for one hour. And it still does not release that.   Craig Macmillan  31:43  Holy cow.   Anita Oberholster  31:44  So just want to say this is extreme conditions. Because you know, in 2020, somebody contacted me and asked that winemaker wants me to spray to tartaric acid on my grapes to break down the glycosides. Now, obviously, that is a lot of unnecessary labor, because it's gonna do nothing to those bound, volatile phenols.   Craig Macmillan  32:05  That's gonna be an uncontrollable situation, man.   Anita Oberholster  32:07  Yeah, so that kind of thing. You know, I have to say, I want to invite growers. If somebody asked you to do something weird, or something you think is really not needed, you're obviously free to contact me and I will share my knowledge which they may forward to the winemaker.   Craig Macmillan  32:24  Well, it's part of the communication.   Anita Oberholster  32:25  I actually have a cooperative extension specialist for the for the enology side for the wine side, I true believer, all wines, and all good wines are made in the vineyard. Yeah, I you know, I'm a farmer's daughter. So I get it. So I really do want to look out for both sides. Because where would a winery be without grapes?   Craig Macmillan  32:45  And where would a grape poor be without wineries?   Anita Oberholster  32:47  Exactly right. So it's a two way street. And we need to figure this out together. You know, it's a difficult situation. And unfortunately, we don't know that much more than 2020. But I think we know more about how to prepare ourselves. And sometimes not, you know, knowledge is power, even just knowing what we don't know, is power. And just being more informed is power, right? The more you understand about the problem, the smaller the chance that somebody can come and tell you something that's totally wrong, and get you to do something that actually makes matters worse, which wastes your time or waste your money and is not going to help.   Craig Macmillan  33:27  So we only got about another minute here left, we got to wrap up. What, is there one thing that you would recommend to a grape grower on this topic related to this topic?   Anita Oberholster  33:37  I would say please store berry samples. Buy a freezer, and store samples. There's so many people that's now in litigation, and they asked my help. And I can't help them because they don't have a grape sample. And even the sample you sent to the labs that were smoke impacted those samples. Keep reference samples of them too. You never know when you need to go back to them. It breaks my heart when I can't help them prove what they're trying to tell me because they just don't have the samples to analyze. It's really important and and please talk to your winery, make sure that you know what steps to take. Talk to your crop insurance know what steps to take to ensure that you're at least covered if you need it.   Craig Macmillan  34:25  Where can people find out more about you and your work?   Anita Oberholster  34:28  So you know, I'm on the viticulture enology, the Department of Viticulture and Enology website, just look under personnel. I'm there, my contact details are there. There's a link to my bio and some of the work that I do and you know, just send me an email. It's very important to say persistence is key. I do receive more than 100 emails per day. So it's sometimes difficult to get to everybody and sometimes I really miss important emails. That's a shame. So it's really good when people actually send a repeat.   Craig Macmillan  34:59  Okay, Hey, good advice. So our guest today has been Dr. Anita Oberholster  Professor Cooperative Extension Enology in the department of Viticulture and Enology, UC Davis,. Thank you so much for being a guest. This is a hugely important topic and obviously isn't going away. And the science on this is developing. Golly, probably by the month. You know, as I watched the literature, there's new publications on this topic globally. Every issue of something so keep up the good work, keep us informed. We'd love to have you back in the future and we'll talk some more about what we learned.   Anita Oberholster  35:29  Absolutely. It was great talking to you   Transcribed by https://otter.ai

CheapWineFinder Podcast
Jacob's Creek Shiraz Cabernet 2020-91 Million Wine Drinkers Can't Be Wrong

CheapWineFinder Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 6:27


Jacob's Creek Shiraz Cabernet 2020Jacob's Creek is a worldwide wine brand.They sell millions of bottles of wine each year and their portfolio is not that big.This is a wine that I found for $5.99, but it drinks like a bottle of much more expensive wine.Check out www.cheapwinefinder.com and listen to the Podcast for all the details!!!

Killin' It In Real Estate
Killin' It In Real Estate - Law, Learning, & Luscious Wine

Killin' It In Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 30:58


Have you ever thought about taking classes to become a Broker? Me too. Seems a little daunting, doesn't it? Well, sit down with Heather Walton, Stephanie Garomon, and I as we discuss a broker class that focuses on real estate law. Will it magically make us attorneys? No. But will it provide a road map for potential issues that Realtors® see daily? Yes. And if you're thinking about taking this course at  Bucks County Real Estate Institute, you'll be not only instructed but also entertained by esteemed Realtor® and Attorney (and past podcast guest!) Alex Shnayder. Learn more and sign up today! When you've finished the class (or just finished *thinking* about taking your career as a Realtor® to the next level), sit down and enjoy a glass of sweet Riesling in honor of Heather, or chill with a glass of Cabernet, Stephanie's favorite. 

Cults, Crimes, and Cabernet
Virginia : Alicia Showalter Reynolds

Cults, Crimes, and Cabernet

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 41:25


On Saturday March 2nd, 1996 Alicia Showalter Reynolds was on her way to Charlottesville, Virginia to meet her mother for a day of shopping. This was about a three hour drive from her Baltimore home where she lived with her husband. Alicia would never make that mother-daughter day. Her vehicle was found abandoned that evening and it would take two months to find her remains. f you have any information please contact Virginia State Police Culpeper Division at 1-800-572-2260, or the Bureau of Criminal Investigation at 1-888-300-0156. Patreon & Apple Subscriptions heard it first. #virginia #unsolved #murder #unsolvedmystery #unsolvedmurder #truecrime #truecrimecommunity #aliciashowalterreynolds #missing #cultscrimesandcabernet #popacork #nomatterwhere #nomatterwho

The Wine Vault
Episode 317 - Cantine Spinelli Abruzzo IGT Cabernet Sauvignon

The Wine Vault

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 58:32


Cantine Spinelli Abruzzo IGT Cabernet Sauvignon In this episode, Rob and Scott abandon their search in California for a great value priced Cabernet and instead look in Italy at the Spinelli Abruzzo Cabernet.  Will Italy prove to be superior in every way to base Cali Cabs, or will they long for a bottle of Liberty School? We shall see... on The Wine Vault.

True Consequences
Live at CrimeCon with Cults, Crimes, & Cabernet

True Consequences

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 40:32


The Moab Newlywed Murders - Kylen Schulte and Crystal Turner. This is a recording from a live show that I did with Cults, Crimes, & Cabernet at CrimeCon. Learn more about Cults, Crimes and Cabernet at https://www.cultscrimescabernet.com/my links can be found here: https://linktr.ee/trueconsequencesReferences: https://www.abc4.com/news/local-news/new-details-released-in-murder-of-couple-near-moab/https://www.abc4.com/news/local-news/looking-at-everything-investigators-in-petito-case-moab-double-homicide-share-information/?ipid=promo-link-block1https://www.the-sun.com/news/4747250/update-kylen-schulte-crystal-turner-homicide-search-warrants/https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murders_of_Kylen_Schulte_and_Crystal_Turner#cite_note-14https://www.reddit.com/r/KylenandCrystal/comments/s9gm7p/kylen_schulte_crystal_turner_timeline_starting/https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V0AYOuUpndIhttps://www.abc4.com/news/gabby-petito/police-gabby-petito-disappearance-double-homicide-of-moab-couple-not-related/https://www.moabsunnews.com/news/article_c44d44d4-173e-11ec-87ad-0ffd8f2da905.htmlhttps://www.abc4.com/news/local-news/warrant-seeks-new-information-in-moab-double-homicide-of-kylen-schulte-crystal-turner/https://www.kulr8.com/news/state/helena-man-searches-for-clues-after-daughter-killed-in-utah/article_320479c5-5f74-5a99-976f-7ace94b6d33b.htmlhttps://www.abc4.com/news/local-news/we-know-nothing-questions-remain-in-double-homicide-of-kylen-schulte-crystal-turner/https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B3-dSYGCFQohttps://www.sltrib.com/news/2022/02/22/possible-suspect-revealed/https://www.ksl.com/article/50270693/grand-county-seeking-digital-evidence-connected-to-double-killinghttps://www.abc4.com/justice-files-2/the-justice-files-in-search-of-a-killer-3/https://kutv.com/news/local/warrants-in-moab-murders-reveal-second-vehicle-multiple-gunshots-creepy-man-drugshttps://www.abc4.com/news/local-news/two-bodies-discovered-in-grand-county-cause-of-death-identities-unclear/https://www.abc4.com/news/local-news/second-10k-reward-offered-as-investigation-of-moab-double-homicide-continues/https://www.abc4.com/news/local-news/new-details-released-in-murder-of-couple-near-moab/https://www.abc4.com/news/gabby-petito/private-investigator-cant-rule-out-connection-between-brian-laundrie-moab-double-homicide/https://www.abc4.com/news/local-news/neither-one-deserved-this-possible-homicide-causing-concern-heartache-in-moab/https://www.foxnews.com/us/moab-murders-crystal-turner-kylen-schultehttps://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/2-newlywed-women-found-shot-death-their-utah-campsite-n1277450

California Wine Country
Steve Situm from Carol Shelton Wines

California Wine Country

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 18:45


Dan and Steve. Steve Situm from Carol Shelton Wines is our guest today on California Wine Country with Steve Jaxon and Dan Berger. Steve Jaxon begins by reading the story from Carol Shelton's website, about how her mother played a game with her where she had to identify spices by their scent. She has been making wine for forty-two years and was the winemaker for Rodney Strong who made all of their award-winning wines. Since she did not get the recognition that she thought she deserved, she started her own label under her own name. Carol Shelton has been on California Wine Country on this February 6, 2019 episode, and again on this other episode from July 22, 2020. Steve Situm started in wine in 1962 as a salesperson, and he worked with many of the greatest labels in the business. He considers her to be the greatest winemaker he has ever worked with. Dan Berger says that Carol Shelton is also great at selecting vineyards. It takes years of analysis before she purchases a vineyard. Steve Situm has been in wine sales since the early 1960s. Carol Shelton wines are in 43 states and “the wine speaks for itself” when he is making a sales presentation. Carol Shelton tells her story on her website about the resistance she encountered as a woman winemaker. Dan remembers that Carols was making wine in the mid and late 1970s and later, in the 1980s she showed a sixth sense for varietal character and personality in wine. Click the logo to visit our sponsor Rodney Strong for the latest on the 2022 Summer Concert series. The 2021 Coquille Blanc Rhone-style blend is a good example of that. This has Grenache Blanc, Roussanne, Marsanne and Viogner, the four best of the Rhone varieties. Carol's style is all about balance. She also uses no pesticides and organically farmed fruit. Carol Shelton Wines tasting room is 3354-B Coffey Lane in Santa Rosa, in the Coffey Business Park. Reservations are required at the website or by calling (707) 575-3441. There is nothing like the wines that Carol Shelton makes. Now they are tasting the Coquille Rouge, the other blend. Dan mentions that in the 1940s and 50s, the wines coming from this region were rather generic blends all called “Burgundy.” This blend is similar to those but it is more stylish in the way it represents the Rhone Valley in France. Some of these wines are from 100-year-old vines in Contra Costa County. There are 5 varieties in this blend, all barrel fermented in French oak. Dan says there is nothing like this coming from any winery, with a great bouquet and a silky finish. Steve mentions this is Carol Shelton's signature style. It is also an incredible value, at about $26. Click the logo to visit our sponsor Bottle Barn online for the coolest bargains on wine, beer and spirits. Carol Shelton has more awards than any winemaker in the country. She has been awarded Winemaker of the Year eight times. Four of her wines have been in the Wine Spectator's Top 100 in the last eight years. The third wine tasted is a Rockpile reserve. The vineyard is gorgeous, says Dan. Carol Shelton recommended that the grower make some changes which had a great effect on the wine. The wine gets about 18 months in mostly French oak. It tastes more like a Cabernet than a Zinfandel, he thinks. This 2019 is as good as the 2018, which was the best Dan tasted that year. At well under $40 at Bottle Barn, it is a great value.

Ciao Bella!
Lorenzo Lisi Dreams In Cabernet

Ciao Bella!

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 25:48


Lorenzo Lisi dreams in cabernet and pinot noir. Known as the man behind PierLuigi, one of Rome's top restaurants, Lisi is also putting his guests to bed with bottles, vineyards and winemakers  and an enviable wine list at his boutique Hotel dei Ricci. Open your favorite appellation with Erica and Lorenzo.   For show notes and more visit https://ciaobella.co/podcast Ciao Bella INSTAGRAM: @ericafirpo TWITTER  @moscerina

Wine Wednesday
In Love with Santa Ynez

Wine Wednesday

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 28:27


Randy and Carrie chat about Carrie's vacation up in Santa Ynez wine country, where she tried four new wineries.

Nine One Wine Podcast
Doorbell Ditchers and Boxed Wine feat. Jake Coursen

Nine One Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 60:57


Episode 31 is joined by Rutherford legend Jake Coursen. The April 2022 and April 1998 police log were reviewed while the group enjoyed a delicious bottle of Jacob Franklin Petite Sirah from the Chavez Leeds  Vineyard, a Zinfandel from the historic Morisoli Vineyard and a Cabernet from Hoffman Lane. Highlights of the episode include wandering cows, misplaced cars, and landscapers gone rogue. Tune in for another episode full of childhood memories in the Rutherford Dust and lighthearted crime. 

The Wine Conversation
▻ Tor Kenward

The Wine Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 67:02


Elin McCoy talks to Tor Kenward of Tor in our "Great Wine Lives" series – a fascinating conversation from the man who has been at the heart of the Napa Valley since 1977, who brought the great chefs to California, including Julia Child and now makes award-winning Cabernet from Napa's greatest vineyards.More information at wine-conversation.com

Cinemavino
Network (Cabernet)

Cinemavino

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 43:24


For this episode, we screen a landmark movie:  Sidney Lumet's Network.  This masterpiece satire examines the outsized influence of television on our daily lives.  It continues… The post Network (Cabernet) appeared first on Cinemavino.

XChateau - Navigating the Business of Wine
Gaining Perspective w/ Collaborations w/ Juan Munoz-Oca, Ste Michelle Wine Estates

XChateau - Navigating the Business of Wine

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 45:10


A lot can be learned through collaborating. Even how to stay calm during a pandemic when your Italian partner is in the thick of it. Calm with the perspective of 26 generations of winemaking and having survived two World Wars. Juan Munoz-Oca, Head Winemaker for Ste Michelle Wine Estates, Washington State's leading wine company, describes what he's learned and the process of collaborating with other luminaries of the wine world, including the Antinori Family, Dr Loosen, and Michel Gassier from the Rhone Valley.  Detailed Show Notes: Juan's backgroundIn WA with Ste Michelle Wine Estates ("SMWE") for 21 yearsHead of winemaking for the entire groupSte Michelle Wine EstatesBased in WA state - 6 wineries (Chateau Ste Michelle ("CSM"), Columbia Crest, 14 Hands, Spring Valley, Northstar, Col Solare)OR (Erath), CA (Stag's Leap Wine Cellars, Conn Creek, Patz & Hall)Built the WA wine region, produces ~⅔ of the wine in the stateThe largest producer of Riesling in the worldCollaborations - all w/ Chateau Ste MichelleCol Solare - Red Mountain, Cabernet, 50/50 JV w/ the Antinori Family (Italy), planted a vineyard in the early 2000s, built a winery in 2006, started in the mid-90sEroica - Riesling with Ernie Loosen (Mosel, Germany) started in the 1990sTenet - Columbia Valley; Syrah, Grenache, Mourvedre; w/ Michel Gassier & Philippe Cambie (deceased)What drove the collaborations? A personal touch and relationshipWA is a young grape-growing region that only started quality winemaking in the late 90s -> wanted to bring attention to the region and gain knowledgeEx-CEOs important to establishing collaborations - Allen Shoup (founded Longshadows Winery, which has 7 wines and 7 collaborations); Ted Baseler - was part of marketing team when Col Solare was launched and started Eroica with Ernie LoosenCollaboration processWinemaking - spring (taste previous vintage, blend, walk the vineyards), late summer (get a feel for the grapes, walk the vineyards), winter (taste wines - e.g., 250-300 lots of Riesling for Eroica)Renzo (Antinori's head winemaker) comes more often due to SMWE's partnership w/ Antinori on Stag's Leap Wine CellarsCSM winemaking team does day-to-day workSales & Marketing - up to the partners, SMWE salesforce sells the wine, SMWE marketing works with partners and does most of the workSMWE imports the entire Antinori portfolio, so they have a broader collaborationKey benefitsEnjoyment of making wine togetherGetting a global perspectiveWinemaking informs the rest of the portfolio's winemaking (e.g., extended lees aging for Riesling from Ernie Loosen, keeping more leaves in the canopy for Syrah from Michel Gassier)Collaboration business modelsCol Solare - 50/50 JV, including vineyards, winery, & inventory; work together closely on marketingEroica - 50/50 for inventory and brand, no other assets; up to 200k cases in a big year; most marketing done by SMWE, less from LoosenTenet - Michel Gassier gets a portion of earnings and an annual fee that covers his travel; as small as 300 casesHave business meetings 2x/year for sales and marketing strategyKeys to success for collaborationsHave a clearly articulated visionKeep an open mind to learn from the otherDesired new collaborationsSparkling wine w/ Nicolas Feuillatte (Champagne)Argentine wine / Malbec w/ Catena Family - loves their focus on terroir Get access to library episodes See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Wine Vault
Episode 312 - Duckhorn Vineyards Napa Valley Cabernet

The Wine Vault

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 66:28


Duckhorn Vineyards In this episode, Rob, Scott, and Becky review Duckhorn's Napa Valley Cabernet.  So come join us, on The Wine Vault.

Cabernet & True Crime
Episode 53: ”Yeah, Sure, This Guy's Regular...”

Cabernet & True Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 24:27


Cabernet and True Crime is a (kind of) weekly podcast that covers the more unusual and uncommon true crime cases. Each week, your host, Jana, breaks down the narrative of a specific true crime case— turning it into a conversational learning experience for you… and sometimes herself! Join me in the place where good wine and true crime come together.

True Crime Binge
90: Whitney & Melissa

True Crime Binge

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 48:23


This week's guests are Whitney and Melissa, hosts of “Cults, Crimes, & Cabernet.” The podcast is light-hearted in nature, but Whitney and Melissa have also dedicated themselves to advocating for victims by assisting in investigations and helping to bring awareness to unsolved cases. Bob chats with the ladies about science, COVID friend circles, and the absurdity of dry counties. They also discuss the infamous case of the disappearance of Brandon Lawson, and Whitney and Melissa's connection to a recent update in the case.

On va déguster
Le cabernet d'Anjou

On va déguster

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 4:39


durée : 00:04:39 - La Chronique vin - par : Jérôme Gagnez - Incarnation des merveilleux vins de plaisir du val de Loire, le cabernet est un rosé demi sec dont la production est une ancienne tradition angevine.

Cinemavino
Palm Springs (Cabernet)

Cinemavino

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 31:36


Part four of our wedding series brings us to a recent classic.  On the surface, Palm Springs might sound a bit too much like Groundhog Day.  But dig a little deeper, and this is a much darker and philosophical counterpart.  In a brief synopsis, a young woman (Cristin Milioti) attends her sister's wedding, where she meets a kooky, […] The post Palm Springs (Cabernet) appeared first on Cinemavino.

THE TRUTH IS BARREL PROOF
I.W. HARPER CABERNET CASK RESERVE

THE TRUTH IS BARREL PROOF

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 3:57


On this episode of Sundays' Sip Sonja is taking through the taste notes of I.W. HARPER . This expression finish in Cabernet packs some interesting flavors. To more about I.W. HARPER and all their expressions visit https://www.iwharper.com. Be sure to follow Sonja on her Instagram @so_dramgood. Looking for a new glass to try your whiskey? Check out WHISDOM GLASS (https://whiskeywhisdom.com/?via=hoodsommelier ) Use code TTIBP to get 10% of your first purchase. #bourbon #whiskey #Tennessee --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hoodsom/support

The Red Box Politics Podcast
Wine Times with Matt Chorley

The Red Box Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 36:16


Today's episode comes courtesy of our sister podcast: Wine Times.Dabbling in wines from across the globe with Suzi and Will is the journalist and broadcaster Matt Chorley - who has an astute love for sauvignon blanc. As well as tasting three great wines Matt discusses why he believes people should pay less attention to politics, Will talks about his love for savoury wine and Suzi reflects on some of the greatest highlights from the 80's.2020 Sauvignon Gris, Château Le Coin, Bordeaux, France2020 Albastrele Blanc de Cabernet, Moldova2016 Johnny Q Shiraz Viognier, AustraliaAll the wines in the series are available at www.sundaytimeswineclub.co.uk See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Wine Smart - The Power to Buy and Sell

On the western flank of Napa Valley lies Mount Veeder AVA, 16,000 acres of mountainous, ruggedly beautiful land. Mount Veeder AVA has two major influences that cool it and drive the style of wines made from its vineyards. Invest 10-minutes to find out why you need to be in the know regarding this AVA.

Talking Dicks Comedy Podcast: A podcast with a touch of crass.
Talking Dicks Comedy Podcast Vol 187: A pod that John Hinckley listens to.

Talking Dicks Comedy Podcast: A podcast with a touch of crass.

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 65:22


The boys talk about the Ronald Reagan shooter, John Hinckley.Romas drinks Cabernet during the pod because he's fancy.Ducharme is well rested on His Pillow ™ not My Pillow ™ .https:/patreon.com/thetwodickshttps://www.instagram.com/thetalkingdickscomedypodcast/https://twitter.com/DicksTwohttps://www.facebook.com/thetwodickshttps://www.facebook.com/The-Talking-Dicks-Comedy-Podcast-107101331446404Support the show

Sustainable Winegrowing with Vineyard Team
135: Cold Hardiness of Grapevines

Sustainable Winegrowing with Vineyard Team

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 35:18


There are three levels of cold hardiness in grapes and understanding these can help growers select and manage the best varieties for their region. Imed Dami, Professor of Viticulture in the Department of Horticulture and Crop Science at The Ohio State University, explains cold tolerance and new information about the role of abscisic acid in ripening. First an overview of cold hardiness. The first level is very cold tender. A lot of these varieties are grown in California and they are not native to North America. Second, are cold hardy, or tolerant grapes. These are the native species to North America. And third are hybrid crosses. The majority of grapes being farmed fall into this category. New research is being done on abscisic acid, a plant hormone that induces dormancy. When sprayed around version, it can help send the plants into dormancy earlier and maintain a deeper dormancy which makes the grapevines more cold tolerant.   References: 2022-06-03 Roller Crimper Tailgate (Register) Abscisic Acid and Cold Hardiness in Grapes Buckeye Appellation Foliar Applied Abscisic Acid Increases ‘Chardonnay' Grapevine Bud Freezing Tolerance during Autumn Cold Acclimation Foliar Application of Abscisic Acid Increases Freezing Tolerance of Field-grown Vitis vinifera Cabernet franc Grapevines (Abstract only) Imed Dami (email) SIP Certified Sustainable Ag Expo November 14-16, 2022 Winter Injury to Grapevines and Methods of Protection Get More Subscribe wherever you listen so you never miss an episode on the latest science and research with the Sustainable Winegrowing Podcast. Since 1994, Vineyard Team has been your resource for workshops and field demonstrations, research, and events dedicated to the stewardship of our natural resources. Learn more at www.vineyardteam.org. Transcript Craig Macmillan  0:00  Our guest today is Imed Dami. He's Professor of Viticulture in the Department of Horticulture and Crop Science at The Ohio State University. Thanks for being on the show, Imed. So you're doing some pretty interesting work there in the Midwest or East, depending on who you ask. So you work in Ohio, and you work in cold hardiness of grapes, grape vines, which is the work you've been doing for quite a fair amount of time. Now, you did that as well, in your graduate work. What can you tell us about what the climatic conditions are like in Ohio, especially in regards to cold weather, that may not be seen another grape growing region to the US. So other listeners may not be familiar with kind of the challenges there are.   Imed Dami  0:35  So in terms of the growing season in Ohio, it could be similar to many other grape growing regions in the country. However, during the dormant season, in the winter, it is different, it is much colder in Ohio. So the way we determine you know, how cold it is, in Ohio, is there is this maps, it's called the plant called hardness map developed by USDA. And these maps are based on lowest temperature for 30 years during the coldest month of the year. So they put that information together, you know, and they come up with averages, and then they divide, you know, each state into different zones based on those minimum temperature. Okay. So for example, in Ohio, we have three zone. The minimum temperature range between zero and minus 15 fahrenheit. So that is cold. And then they designate you know, these zones, like a number and the letter. So, for example, in Ohio, we have the three zones, you know, designated as six B, six A and five B. However, the majority of the state falls in the what we call six A's zone, where temps range between minus five to minus 15. So that is very cold. So, how do we relate this to the grapes? Grape vines, typically, they start to see cold damage at temperature of zero fahrenheit, or lower. So you could see, you know, like grown grapes in the majority of the location in Ohio is challenging, you know, just because of how cold it gets during the winter. Just to give you like a point of reference, these numbers, you know, of the zones, the higher the number, the milder the winter is. So, for example, in California, the majority of the grape growing region, they fall in the region of 9, 10, and 11 zones. And in those zones, the minimum temperature doesn't fall below freezing. So that's why in California, you don't hear any, you know, problems about cold damage during the winter.   Craig Macmillan  2:44  That's in that brings up an interesting point. So, you know, you say damage happening at zero degrees fahrenheit, why is it the vine damaged and cell walls breaking and whatnot, when we get below freezing? If that vine is full of, you know, water, that it's taken up in the fall and things like that? Why is it why does it need to get so cold before we see damage?   Imed Dami  3:03  That's a good question. So the, the plants in general, they have a different mechanism of survival, you know, to cold. So when it comes to grape vines, the most sensitive part of the vine are the buds. And these buds, the way they survive winter is with the mechanism that we call a super cooling. So what super cooling is, is basically, the water or the solution, and the plant remains liquid, even below freezing temperatures. So that's how the grapevines you know, buds survive those minimum temperatures. So that is the mechanism by which grape vines survive. Of course, when you have a super cooling up to a point, in general, plants could super cool down to like minus 40 Fahrenheit, which is very cold. But it ranges you know, from let's say, like I said, you know, just below freezing all the way down to that. And the difference is the type of grape variety or species which I will be talking about later on.   Craig Macmillan  4:08  What is severe cold damage on grapes look like? Again, a lot of folks outside of the Midwest or the northern United States may not have ever seen anything like it before. And what kind of economic impacts are there?   Imed Dami  4:19  Sure, the vines you know, they have this parts that are above ground, and any part above the ground that is exposed to those minimum temperature could sustain cold damage. And then because there are different parts, the one that is the most sensitive are the buds, like I mentioned earlier, the way you identify a cold damage is by cutting through the bud. And then the typically, the buds are alive, they look green, and then when they are damaged, they look brown, so it's very easy to tell, you know, by visual observation. And then within grapevines, we have what we call the combpound buds, they call them compound because there is a primary, secondary, and tertiary bud. Primary bud actually is where the fruit comes from. Unfortunately, that is the most sensitive to cold. So what that means is every time you have cold damage, the primary bud is damaged, that means that's going to become like a loss, you know, in crops. And then the other tissue that is important that could also sustain damage is what we call the vascular tissues. These are basically the pipeline's you know, in the grapevine, primarily what we call the phloem, and the cambium. And those two actually, same thing, when you will cut through the cane, you know, or the corridor or the trunk, you'll see the color change to brown, which indicates cold damage. Though the worst case scenario is not only you have the canes damaged the cordon, the trunk, but also the whole vine, and basically, cold actually could cause complete vine death. So in terms of economic impact, it depends on the severity of the plant part that is damaged. So if you have only buds damaged, that's typically becomes you know, like a more like a crop loss. Same thing with more severe damage with the vascular tissue, let's say in cane, cordon, or trunk, you lose, you know, those parts of the vine like a cane, you may lose it or the cordon, or the trunk. The most severe damage is vine death, basically, the whole vine dies. In terms of economic impact for the vine damage. Actually, there is a study done in New York, where they estimated the loss, you know, from a dead vine due to cold. And their estimate is a loss of $155 per vine, and this is for vinifera. So if you extrapolate that to per acre is equivalent to $125,000 per acre in terms of losses. And the main reason is not only you have to buy new vines, you have to replace you know, remove the vines, do the replanting, and then also, the main thing is you have a loss of production for four years. And then basically, when we talk about wine grapes, you're not only losing the grapes, you are also losing the product, which is why for four years, and that's why the number is so high and significant.   Craig Macmillan  7:20  That's a good question. So if you have a bad winter, and you go in and you evaluate buds, and they're dead, and you then go into the cordon and look and say oh, that's not good. And then you work your way down into the trunk, and look at that, is it ever the case that you will hit a spot where there's still some vinifera that's alive towards where the rootstock graft union is that you could graft on to or that you might get some latent buds to come out.   Imed Dami  7:45  So, actually, I will talk about this later on in terms of the practices, you know, in the vineyard when we talk about grafted vines, which is, you know, common for vinifera. The reason why I mentioned this, because typically here we also grow hybrids, they're not grafte. With the grafted vines, you typically hear in the east, we mound soil around the graft union. So at the base of the trunk, you know, you see this what we call mounting or healing up around the vine. And the main reason is to protect you know, that graph tune because it's very sensitive. And then also the base of that trunk to avoid any damage in case of the worst case scenario, like you said. When do you have damaged, you know, all the way of the cordon and then the trunks. If you have that situation, then you save the base of that trunk. And then you have regrowth, you know, of the vine. So that's typically how it is done, it is not common here to graft over, you know, the vines when they are damaged. But that is typically the practice, you know,   Craig Macmillan  8:48  Which reminds you something else. So is this a temperature over time kind of a curve? Or is it a threshold? Once we hit this temperature it's done or is it need to be at a temperature for a period of time before the damage really shows up?   Imed Dami  9:03  Typically, when you reach like the temperature outside, you basically have the temperature outside and then the temperature of the tissue. When we talk about the small tissue like gray buds, they reach an equilibrium between the two. So as soon as it gets cold, you know, let's say two minus 10 in the outside it will be minus 10 in the buds as well. So in that case, you know, the the freezing of the water is instantaneous. It's like immediately. When you have tissues that are bigger, like the cordon or the trunks because they're thicker you know, just like you take a piece of wood you know and then the temperature usually outside is colder colder than the temperature in the trunk. So it takes more time for trunk to get damaged. You know it may be like hours before it really, yeah. So typically here in our situation, you know, when we have some these big events like the polar vortex back in 2014 Not only it got cold, but it's  stayed cold for a long time. And those are the worst scenarios, you know, because not only a damaging or the bad, but also, it damaged the trunks as well, because it's so cold, you know, for a long time.   Craig Macmillan  10:11  When we see this kind of an event, are we looking at a 100% loss across the vineyard?   Imed Dami  10:16  No, not typically. So, again, you know, I'd be mentioning this later on. The vines, you know, they tolerate cold based on their genetic makeup. So there are some varieties like the vinifera, they are very cold tender, they may sustained some damage, or more damaged than more cold tolerant or resistant varieties, like, you know, Concord, or some of the native grapes, you know, here grown in the east. So there are differences, you know, that you see, in terms of cold damage.   Craig Macmillan  10:49  Tell me more, you mentioned hybrids before and we're talking about different varieties, what can you tell us about the cold tolerance to cold hardiness of different varieties and what the genetic background might be on those and how plant breeding has addressed this problem maybe.   Imed Dami  11:03  So as I mentioned earlier, the cold hardens is actually a genetic trait. So what that means is the genetic makeup of each variety determines the cold hardens level of that variety. So it is in the genes, you know, of the viru. Based on that we have, like mainly three groups of grape types, if you want to call them The first group, what we call very cold, tender or cold sensitive, these are the group of the species vitis vinifera, these are basically the varieties grown in California. And the main reason why they're so tender, because they're not native to North America, they are used to more what we call a Mediterranean climate, you know, which is characterized by mild winters. So when we imported them here, and we grow them like in climates, like here in Ohio, it is very challenging because they're so tender. The other group, kind of the other extreme is what we call the cold hardy group, you know, or cold tolerant. These are native grapes. These are native species to North America, and we find them a lot here in eastern US, like vitis labrusca, an example of variety, like very popular varieties Concord. We also have other species like vitis riparia. So these are all native to this region. And those species are very cold, hard, you know, because they're used to the type of climate, you know, they are grown in. And then the third group is what we call the hybrid. So the hybrids are crosses between the vinifera and the native grapes. And the main reason why they develop these crosses is the vinifera basically provide the quality of the fruit, and eventually the wine. And then the native grapes provide the cold hardiness. In our industry, and generally, in the east, most of the grapes we grow actually are hybrids, because they tolerate a more cold, you know, than the vinifera. And there are several examples of varieties, old varieties like Vidal. Seyval, example of Chambourcin. And, and then we have now like a lot of new hybrids, like Traminette, Chardonel, are varieties are developed from New York program. And then we also have other very cold hardy do they call it super hardy varieties from the University of Minnesota like Frontenac, Marquette. These are very hardy varieties. And they are hybrids.   Craig Macmillan  13:28  Yeah, they were developed in Minnesota that have to be pretty darn hardy. You can see the challenge there. Tell us about your work around abscisic acid, I know that that's related to cold hardiness, that's related to sugar and other things. First of all, tell us what what is abscisic acid, ABA, what is abscisic acid.   Imed Dami  13:48  So abscisic acid acid actually is a plant hormone, it is naturally produced by the plan. And typically it is, it is associated with a lot of like physiological response by the plant. And one of them actually induces dormancy. Our idea when we use the abscisic acid is we try to kind of enhance dormancy by applying abscisic acid, you know. So we are adding more abscisic acid to the plant that produces its ow. And by doing that we could, our hypothesis at the time is can we change the dormancy like in terms of occurrence, you know, can we make it happen earlier because the earlier the vines enter into dormancy, the more prepared they are for the winter. And then number two, yeah, and then number two is the level of dormancy, the more dormant the vines, the better they do in the winter. And so when we applied abscisic acid actually did both. So while we are pleased with the responses. And then eventually vines, you know, not only they enter into dormancy earlier in the season, they also have a deeper dormancy. But then that actually was reflected later on in more cold hardy response by the vines that are treated with abscisic acid. So it was really a very positive response, you know, by applying that product. It was the first time this product was used in grapevines. And we're very excited to know by the response.   Craig Macmillan  15:21  How is it applied?   Imed Dami  15:22  We looked at the timing, you know, when is the best time to apply it. And what we found is actually, right after verasion during fruit ripening, when the leaves are still on the vines, you know, actually, the fruit is still maturing, we found that is the best time to apply abacisic acid. So this is basically sprayed, you know, it's a liquid, that you spray it on the canopy. And then that's it, then basically, we look at the response, you know, later in the fall, and then during the winter, so.   Craig Macmillan  15:56  You also mentioned a deeper dormancy. What does that mean? When is deeper dormancy?   Imed Dami  16:03  A deeper dormancy, that means the vines, you know, basically, during the fall, they began to enter into what we call dormant, you know, basically, they go into a state of like, asleep. When they do that, sometimes they don't go like into what I call, like a deep sleep, you know, and then that has to do with the climate, the conditions, you know, that they were exposed to every year depends also on the vine health, etc. When the vines enter into deeper dormancy, that means it takes more time and more effort to wake them up. And then when they are more dormant, they actually gain a more cold hardiness as compared to when they're not as as dominant. So, so that's what we mean by deeper dormancy.   Craig Macmillan  16:55  And that can be achieved by applying abscisic acid into the canopy, right around verasion?   Imed Dami  17:02  Yeah, we weren't able to do that. Exactly. So again, you know, like anything else. When you apply a product, you know, it works in some varieties, it doesn't work in others. It works in some climates, you know, not under others. So, we see sometimes this kind of inconsistency. But when we have a controlled environment, let's say in a greenhouse, we consistently see the response to abscisic acid by the plants. So basically, absciscic acid you could think of it as it mimics the environmental cues that typically the vines, you know, get from the environment because the vine, for the vines that go dormant and begin acclimating it has to have two clues from the. It's short days, as soon as the days become shorter, the vines you know, start to get dormant. And then the second clue or cue is the temperature. When he started to get colder, the virus begin to become more dominant and become more cold tolerant. So those are the two. And then we could replace those two cues, actually, by applying ABA.   Craig Macmillan  18:10  You know, actually, this brings up something that often or continually be been kind of confused about. How does the vine sense photoperiod? If the leaves are falling off or becoming cut off from the rest of the vine, is there another organ or way that the vine can sense what's going on with the light?   Imed Dami  18:30  Well, actually, they do that sensing when the leaves are still on.   Craig Macmillan  18:33  They do. Okay.   Imed Dami  18:34  Yeah, so the receptors really actually are by the leafs you know, and I think that's why probably even when we applied the ABA was more effective, you know, when the vines still have their leaves on. So that I mean when you think about like short days, you know, during the growing season that starts back in June. So it's such like a way early see and then actually, by that time the vines begin already sensing you know, this short days, they begin the process actually of cold acclimation. So cold acclamation, or we call the hardening off of the vines. Actually, it begins right when the fruit begins to ripen during verasion. So it happened like way early, you know, like in the summer, basically, you talking about July, you know, and you start to see the tissue, as they, as the fruit is ripening the vines actually at the same time is preparing for the winter at the same time. And then it will continue after the leaves are dropped. And then the vines become more sensitive to the temperature rather than the full period. So it becomes the second step is based mainly on the temperature.   Craig Macmillan  19:38  Interesting, interesting.   Imed Dami  19:39  And that's why during the winter because that is the coldest month, the vines you know, they sense these cold temperatures, and they reach actually their maximum cold hardens during the winter because they need it.   Craig Macmillan  19:51  And then it's the response to the warming temperatures that brings them out of dormancy.   Imed Dami  19:54  Exactly. And that basically happened like late winter like right now or early spring and that's why basically, the winds, you know, begin to wake up. And that phenomenon is typically driven exclusively by temperature. As it starts warming up, you know, in the spring, the vines, you know, begin to do, what we call deacclimate. So that means they lose their cold hardness, and then they start growing again.   Craig Macmillan  20:18  What can growers do, are specific practical things that growers can do to prepare for, or manage, or prevent damage to vines in these really cold areas.   Imed Dami  20:30  Sure, yes. In terms of like things that the growers could do, there are three main category, if you want to call them. The first one is what we call a preventative. So how do you prepare for the cold before even it happens. One of the main ways to do that actually is site selection. You have to have a very good site to grow the grapes, and avoid, you know, this minimum temperatures. So that is very critical. You know, especially for us here in the east. The other thing is selecting the proper variety. So like I mentioned, we have variety that are very sensitive dive right at a more cold hardy. So it's very important to match the cold hardness of that variety with the site where you're going to grow them. You cannot grow for example, vinifera in a site where it gets to minus 10, you know, every year, that is not possible. The other thing in terms of practices. And again, this is more unique, you know, to eastern US, is we train vines with multiple trunks. If you look at the vines, you know, in California, they all have a single trunk. For us here we have multiple trunks. So you could see a vine with two trunks, you know, they look like they are two vines, but they're not like one vine with two or more trunks. And the main reason is when we have a cold event, that cold event doesn't kill both of those trunks kills one and not the other, so they don't die simultaneously. So that is kind of like a kind of an insurance, you know, practice. And typically we see this in almost all grapevines. When we have injuries, you see one trying to get damaged and not the other. The other thing that I mentioned earlier, is we heal up the vines to protect the grafting union. So this practice actually is done every year, it is done in the fall, and then the vines have to be dehilled, or removing those mounds in the spring. So this is a common practice that we use for vinifera here in the east. And then the third one is what we call cultural practices. In terms of fertilization, crop management, anything basically improves fruit quality also is favorable for improving cold hardiness. In terms of during the cold event, the main thing that our growers, you know, some of them they use is what we call the wind machines. So when machines I know for example, in California, they're very common not to use for spring crops, but here we could use them for spring frost events as well as cold events in the winter, they are an effective tool. So finally, what I call practices by the grower after you do, you have like a cold event. So even though you do everything by the book, you don't have a good site, you have good varieties, you know, a suitable variety then you do the multiple trunks and cultural management, you still it gets cold enough, you know that you have damage. In that case, vines are trained or adjusted, you know, depends on severity of the damage. So for example, when we have only bud injury, we adjust pruning to compensate for those losses. And by doing that you could have a normal crop even though you lost some of the buds. So for example, if you lose 30% of the bugs, you could compensate pruning by adding you know 30% more buds you know, then how you typically prune those vines. And by doing so, you could have normal crop up to a point of course. Another more severe damage when we have trunk damage and basically die back you know of the vines. In that situation, we have to retrain the shoots. And typically the way we retain thse you know is kind of unique in the east. Like I said, we do multiple shoots or multiple trunks, it's very important to do that. And then the size of those shoots are important. We have to select shoots or canes that are pencil size. The main reason is big shoots or large canes we call them bullcanes are not favorable because they are more damaged by the cold. So selection of these shoots and canes, and how many shoots you trained are typical practices, you know, for retraining, winter damage vines.   Craig Macmillan  24:35  Well, is it better to cane prune or spur prune? Does that make a difference?   Imed Dami  24:40  Yeah, it doesn't. If your vines you know are typically prune spur or cane you know, it doesn't make difference. However, when you have injury after the fact and your vines let's say they are cane prune. What we found is it is best if you convert those vines into spur prune. And this is only when you have a severe damage of the buds. We found that when you do spur pruning, you had a better recovery, better crop than cane pruned vines. Again, this situation is only true when the vines sustained damage and like more severe damage of the buds. Then you could convert the virus into spur pruning. And then of course, you know, you could always go back to your original in our pruning later on to cane pruning, again, after like year one of the winter injury.   Craig Macmillan  25:31  All right, what, what's the best timing for pruning in a cold situation?   Imed Dami  25:36  In our situation here, timing, you know, is not critical. However, when you have large large vineyards, you know, you have to prune like over many months, we typically recommend that you prune the cold hardy varieties first, and the main reason is, you know, if you get like a cold damage, you haven't pruned you know, the code sensitive yet. So you could still leave, you know, more buds or more canes, like I mentioned, with the pruning adjustment. You leave the sense of variety last in terms of pruning, so we prune those last. That is kind of typical recommendation for our growers.   Craig Macmillan  26:09  Tell me a little bit about the role of ABA and sugar.   Imed Dami  26:15  One of our research focus, I mentioned, you know, ABA, but before that, actually, we looked at sugars. And what we found is like sugar production by the vines go hand in hand with the cold hardness of the vines as well. So what I mean by that is during the fall, when cold hardness keeps increasing during the fall, the sugar concentration also increases in the vine, in the bud and the vascular tissues. And then when it reaches the cold hardens its maximum during the winter, the level of sugar is also reached maximum at the time. And then in the spring, when the vine lose hardness, the level of sugars goes down again. So there's a very close relationship between cold hardiness and sugar accumulation. And one of the explanation is the sugars that are produced more by the vines, you know, is because they they provide what we call protection to the tissues, you know, they call them cryoprotectant. What we found in our research also is there is a specific group of sugars that we call raffinose family oligosaccharides, RFO. And these are like larger sugars, they have even closer relationship with cold hardiness and cold acclimation as well as dormancy. So in our recent research, what we found is when we apply abscisic acid to the plant, actually, that acts as a signal to produce sugars in the vine. So basically, ABA and induces sugar production. And we have demonstrated that in our recent research, and this is why we have this close relationship, you know, between the ABA role, and sugar production in the vines.   Craig Macmillan  27:50  Does that affect the sugar accumulation in the cluster? And the berries?   Imed Dami  27:53  No.   Craig Macmillan  27:54  Interesting.   Imed Dami  27:56  Because, you know, the time when the sugars are accumulating, let's say in the winter, the clusters are already gone, you know. So the vines actually, they don't only not only they accumulate sugars in the clusters, at the same time, they are accumulating sugars in the dormant tissues. They do it faster. Of course, once the vines are harvested, they do it at the bigger, faster rate, you know, so they call that actually kind of becomes like a major pool of sugar accumulations, you know. And that's how the vines you know, they have to have this reserves to overwinter, you know, properly.   Craig Macmillan  28:27  We've talked about a lot of different things. But is there one, one thing that you'd recommend to our listeners that are facing cold hardiness issues? What's the top? What's the top thing?   Imed Dami  28:38  The top thing? Wow, you know, like I mentioned earlier, it is very simple. I mean, really, in our industry, even though we've been around for a long time, one of the major issue and challenge, you know, in the east is selecting, you know, the proper variety in a given site. And that is really, it's work in progress. It's you know, like, in Europe, you know, they found this matching that we call terroir, over hundreds of years, you know. Even in California, you know, it's still a young industry. So imagine here in the east, we are still really learning about the best varieties, you know, in the best sites, and especially a lot of these hybrids are new to our industry. So we're trying to find you know, that match because really, and for me, that's I always find that the most challenging, you know, to our grower to find out, so.   Craig Macmillan  29:28  Where can people find out more about you and your work?   Imed Dami  29:30  One of the ways is, obviously my email address I could give it to you could contact me directly. It's dami.1.@osu.edu. And then there's more information in our website. You could Google grape wherever you know, Ohio and it will show up you know, it is called Buckeye Appalachian. There's a lot of information there about what I talked about. And then also it talks about our extension work you know, working with our industry as well. So I would say those are two good ways or resources, you know, to find out. In terms of information called harness. I mean, I know this is a long title. But we published you know, years ago, a book on cold hardiness of grapevines, it is available through Michigan State Extension. It is called Winter Injury to Grapevines and Methods of Protection. Everything I talked about, with a lot of details, and with more technical stuff, you know. It's like a over 100 pages book. And it is really an excellent resource, you know, for any growers, especially dealing with cold damage.   Craig Macmillan  30:51  That's fantastic. We're out of time for today, I want to think a guest, Imed Dami, Professor of Viticulture in the Department of Horticulture and Crop Science at The Ohio State University. This has been a fascinating conversation, for me. It's not an area that I really knew very much about, and I feel much more educated than I did. That's a book I might need to get from my bookshelf.   Imed Dami  31:12  Sure.   Craig Macmillan  31:13  So I want to thank you. I want to thank you again Imed. Check out our website for more podcasts. We've got many different topics and many different speakers at the Vineyard Team website. And thank you all again for listening to Sustainable Winegrowing with the Vineyard Team.   Transcribed by https://otter.ai

Everyday Wine with Kris Levy
Ep 39: Running the Family Wine Business with a Father Daughter Duo

Everyday Wine with Kris Levy

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 33:30


Welcome back to another episode of The Everyday Wine Aficionado Podcast, today let me introduce you to  Eric and Riley of Flanagan Wines.Flanagan Wines was born out of Eric's love for wine. He visited wine-growing regions around the world from New Zealand to Greece and was fascinated by how the same grape variety produced different wines in different locations.  This led to an interest in great vineyard sites and a focus on the soils and the climate that made each unique.  In 1999, he chose to act on his  interest by purchasing 40 acres on the heights of Bennett Mountain and planting their first vineyard. He now produces wines from several of the most highly regarded vineyard sites in Sonoma County. Flanagan Wines is becoming known for making great wines from the best vineyards in Sonoma County.  Let's dive into his wine story!   [00:01 - 08:42] Opening Segment  I introduce our guestS for this episode, Eric and Riley Eric and Riley talk about how they started in the wine business and the strategies that made the business grow [08:43 - 17:18] Things to Consider When Starting a Winery Riley on making wines intentional Making Rosé using the Saignee method How you could sell the wine Their wines are known for being varietally correct  Right location Start making the best wine then focus on the marketing plan What factors influenced their approach to the wine industry? Make the best wine at the most suitable vineyard site and farming Take good care of the customers Owning a vineyard is pure hard work. It's not as glamorous as it looks but the farmers ensure customers get the best experience [17:19 - 24:38] Wine Business Is Not for Everyone How to maintain work-life balance Be the best and make friends with the people n the industry Enjoy the events and the responsibilities that come with it Eric and Riley's advice if you'd like to start your own wine business  Decide what you want to do and don't change that You are your brand Have your cashflow ready and be prepared for the risks [24:39 - 33:30] The Tasting Round Learn everything you need to grow your wine, business, or brand with Wine Business Bootcamp where I help other wine producers master the fundamentals of digital marketing, nail their customer experience, and convert more wine tasters into their wine clubs and other offers. Just send me a dm or email at kris@krislevy.com with the subject: Wine Business Bootcamp Favorite go-to wine after a long day   Pilsner or Sauvignon Blanc Favorite Go-to Pairing Riley: Oysters and Sauvignon Blanc, popcorn with Manchego and Chardonnay Eric: mature triple cream with VNA, Cabernet with gouda Wine and Vineyard Resources People Working with different vineyard management Connect with Eric and Riley at https://flanaganwines.com/ Let's continue the Everyday Wine Conversations and connect with me through Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn, or feel free to shoot me an email at kris@krislevy.co. You can also check out my website at ​www.​klevywineco.com.   TELL US WHAT YOU THINK! LEAVE A REVIEW + help us get the word out there! Share this podcast to someone who wants to join the wine conversations. Go ahead and take a screenshot, share this to your stories, and tag me on Instagram!    JOIN THE CLUB through this link and handpick wines every month, from up and coming wineries, winemaker owned brands and wineries with unique stories while supporting those wineries directly. You can also join our Facebook Group to connect with other wine lovers, get special tips and tricks, and take your wine knowledge to a whole new level.   Tweetable Quotes: “Always respect your customers and take great care of them.” - Eric“The best part about being in this industry is you get to actually hang out with people and connect with them and become a part of their lives and meet amazing people. And we have awesome customers. But it's a two-way street and you have people bringing you into the best parts of their lives. You have to show up and be real. And it requires a certain sense of vulnerability, I think, to create real friendships with people. And it took a while for me to understand that that was okay. You know, a lot of jobs where it's actually about making friends.” - Riley“There's nothing really a creative to the brand, except that I love the freaking wine.”  - Eric   “If people start by buying bulk juice and slapping a label on it, and coming up with cute marketing ideas, that's different. But that's not about wine. That's not about making a wine you love or believe in, that's about making a product that isn't good, but that makes you money. And if you were going to do that, I would say you might as well do it in a different field with better margins. You know, like, if you just want to do that, then go to a different if you don't care about wine, then you don't need to be in the wine business. It's not the best business to be in anyway. So if you're going to be in it, make sure that you're in it because you really love wine and you love the idea of making great wines and you care about that. And then that will sustain you through the dark days, hopefully.” - Eric

Missing Maura Murray
292 // Brandon Lawson's Likely Recovery - Live @ Crime Con '22

Missing Maura Murray

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 65:26


This episode was originally published on Crawlspace on May 4th, 2022. In this panel discussion recorded from Crime Con 2022 in Las Vegas, Tim Pilleri and Lance Reenstierna are joined by Ladessa Hendrix, Jason Watts, John Lordan, Melissa & Whitney from Cults, Crimes, and Cabernet to speak about the disappearance and likely recovery of Brandon Lawson. Brandon went missing from Bronte, Texas on August 9th, 2013. For more information go to http://www.missingbrandonlawson.com/p/case-questions.html If you have information in Brandon's disappearance please call the Coke County Sheriff's Office at 325-453-2717. Follow the Help Find Brandon Lawson FB page: https://www.facebook.com/helpfindbrandonlawson/ Check out John Lordan's work at https://lordanarts.wixsite.com/johnlordan/lordanarts Check out Cults, Crimes, and Cabernet: https://www.cultscrimescabernet.com/ Check out the new Crawlspace Discussion Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/talkcrawlspace/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/crawlspacepod  Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Crawlspacepodcast  Follow us on Instagram: https://www.Instagram.com/Crawlspacepodcast Follow us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@crawlspacepodcast Join the Crawlspace Discussion Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/talkcrawlspace/ The music for Crawlspace was produced by David Flajnik. Listen to his music here: https://www.pond5.com/artist/bigdsound  Check out our entire network at http://crawlspace-media.com/ Crawlspace Media is part of the Glassbox Media Network. Check them out here: https://glassboxmedia.com/ Go to https://smile.amazon.com/ to connect your existing Amazon account to donate to PI's For the Missing. Follow Private Investigations For the Missing https://investigationsforthemissing.org/ http://piftm.org/donate https://twitter.com/PIFortheMissing https://www.facebook.com/PIFortheMissing/ https://www.instagram.com/investigationsforthemissing/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Crawlspace: True Crime & Mysteries
Bonus // Crawlspace Crypt - CrimeCon 22 Recap

Crawlspace: True Crime & Mysteries

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 51:30


This is a bonus episode that is also airing on our subscription service feed. For episodes like this (and much more!) subscribe here: https://crawlspace.supportingcast.fm/ Tim and Lance recap CrimeCon22 which took place in Las Vegas, April 29th - May 1st. They cover everything from the amazing Brandon Lawson panel featuring Ladessa Hendrix, Jason Watts, John Lordan and Melissa & Whitney from Cults, Crimes & Cabernet to the phenomenon now and forever known as SlenderLeg. Check out our Missing subscription service where we have a bonus show and ad-free episodes as well! https://missing.supportingcast.fm/ Follow John Lordan on Twitter: https://twitter.com/LordanArts Check out John's site: lordanarts.com Subscribe to Brainscratch: https://www.youtube.com/lordanarts Follow Cults, Crimes & Cabernet on Twitter: https://twitter.com/CultsCrimesCab and subscribe to their show here: https://t.co/s4lTglvT8V Stay up to date with all CrimeCon news here: https://www.crimecon.com/ Follow CrimeCon on Twitter: https://twitter.com/CrimeCon Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/crawlspacepod  Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Crawlspacepodcast  Follow us on Instagram: https://www.Instagram.com/Crawlspacepodcast Follow us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@crawlspacepodcast Check out our entire network at http://crawlspace-media.com/ Crawlspace Media is part of the Glassbox Media Network. Check them out here: https://glassboxmedia.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Todd Durkin IMPACT Show
The Gift of Grit, Grief, and Gratitude | Ep. 248 with Lisa Herrington

Todd Durkin IMPACT Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 73:10


  This is the story of a former intern and employee, turned business owner, who has gone from personal tragedy to amazing triumph. Today's show is going to help anyone who is down & out, in a funk, grieving, experiencing loss, or needing hope for a brighter tomorrow. It really is an inspirational story of a young woman who has used tremendous grit and gratitude to overcome deep loss and grief.   10-years ago to the week, coach Lisa Herrington gave birth to her twin boys. Unfortunately, one of a parent's worst nightmares happened when one of her sons did not make it. It was a dark, paralyzing time of her life when she hit the depths of despair and depression.   After grieving and processing the loss over a period of years, Lisa and her husband Greg Herrington, have turned darkness into an amazing light. She has started a non-profit foundation in her son Brady's name, written a book on grief, serves parents who have endured similar losses, and continues to change lives at her FIT House gym in Davis, Ca.   Today's podcast is NOT about grief. It's actually an empowering story of a woman and family who have turned this tragedy into some amazing IMPACT.  Here is what you can expect in today's IMPACT SHOW: - How Lisa's time as an intern and trainer at FQ10 set her up for career success. - The 7 phases of grief and how each is an important part of the healing process.  -Identifying triggers and finding the tools to manage grief.  -The importance of physical & emotional fitness is in the healing process.  -Ways to honor your loss and move forward.  -The importance of the Brady Randolph Herrington Community Foundation and how she loves leading her foundation. - What it's like being a Mom of 4 kids now and how they still honor Brady today. - The power of laughter, crying, and gratitude in healing and living life.   This episode addresses the important topic of loss and how to work through the healing process and find your joy and gratitude again. It is about grit and it is about gratitude. It's about understanding how easy it is to lose yourself when you are going through loss of any kind, much less the tragedy of losing a child. It is about making a list of who you were and what you loved about yourself ‘before,' that will help you through the journey and give you the strength to find yourself again. This episode is about surviving. It is about turning tragedy into triumph. It is about taking all you've learned during your journey and helping others through theirs.    Enjoy the show. I think you are going to FEEL it all in this one. If you find value in today's IMPACT Show, please share it on Facebook, IG or text the link to a friend, family member, or colleague who would benefit from hearing it. This will help fulfill our mission to spread positive IMPACT world-wide and make this world a better place to be.    Tag and follow me on social media: IG: @ToddDurkin  Twitter: @ToddDurkin FB: @ToddDurkinFQ10     Follow Lisa Herrington: IG: @LisaHerrington Websites:  livefitwithlisa.com &  fithousedavis.com Email:  lherrington@gmail.com  Book: Your Amazing Itty Bitty Grief Book, Amazon     About Lisa Herrington:   Lisa Herrington is the Co-Founder and Owner of FIT House Davis. After almost a decade in marketing and public relations, she followed her passion, took the leap and opened a full-service boutique fitness studio which employs 40+ people and offers 70+ classes per week. After losing her first-born son (a twin) she realized how important exercise was not just for the physical body, but for the mind. She often refers to her line of work as movement therapy; an act that strengthens the body, mind, and soul.   Lisa is a best-selling author and manages the Brady Randolph Herrington Community Foundation, while also being a mom of 4, wife, and lover of waterskiing, snow- skiing, the ocean and a good Cabernet.   For a more in depth view of Lisa's interview on our podcast, check out the blog post she wrote: Thoughts on Grief, Grit, and Gratitude…from the Airport     Join the TD Community for FREE: Simply text me “IMPACT” to 619-304-2216 and you are on your way to receiving exclusive content and even more motivation & inspiration. Sign-up TODAY!   ** Want more details or want to attend my live “Coaching Greatness” event on May 12th - 13th. Simply email my teammate Frank Pucher at Frankpucher1112@gmail.com today and REGISTER TODAY!   ** Get the God-Sized Dreams Planner now for just $20.00. Go to www.ToddDurkin.com and do your “10 forms of wealth” and “3-in-30”. Offer good until May 31st.   ** IMPACT Scholarships for graduating HS seniors around the U.S. are now available. Go to www.ToddDurkin.com and apply today. Deadline to apply is May 31st. Please forward this information to ANY graduating HS senior you know.     Please keep your questions coming so I can highlight you on the podcast!!    If you have a burning question and want to be featured on the IMPACT show, go to www.todddurkin.com/podcast, fill out the form, and submit your questions!      Don't forget that if you want more keys to unlock your potential and propel your success, you can order my book GET YOUR MIND RIGHT at www.todddurkin.com/getyourmindright or anywhere books are sold.   Get Your Mind Right now available on AUDIO: https://christianaudio.com/get-your-mind-right-todd-durkin-audiobook-download   Want more Motivation and Inspiration?? Sign up for my newsletter The TD Times that comes out on the 10th of every month full of great content  www.todddurkin.com     ABOUT:   Todd Durkin is one of the world's leading coaches, trainers, and motivators. It's no secret why some of the world's top athletes have trained with him for nearly two decades. He's a best-selling author, a motivational speaker, and founded the legendary Fitness Quest 10 in San Diego, CA. He currently coaches fellow trainers, coaches, and life-transformers in his Todd Durkin Mastermind group. Here, he mentors and shares his 25-years of wisdom in the industry on business, leadership, marketing, training, and personal growth.   Todd was a coach on the NBC & Netflix show “STRONG.” He's a previous Jack LaLanne Award winner, a 2-time Trainer of the Year. Todd and his wife Melanie head up the Durkin IMPACT Foundation (501-c-3) that has raised over $250,000 since it started in 2013. 100% of all proceeds go back to kids and families in need. To learn more about Todd, visit www.ToddDurkin.com and www.FitnessQuest10.com.   Join his fire-breathing dragons' community and receive regular motivational and inspirational emails. Visit www.ToddDurkin.com and opt-in to receive his value-rich content.   Connect with Todd online in the following places: You can listen to Todd's podcast, The IMPACT Show, by going to www.todddurkin.com/podcast.   You can get any of his books by clicking here!  (Get Your Mind Right, WOW BOOK, The IMPACT Body Plan)

Crawlspace: True Crime & Mysteries
279 // Brandon Lawson's Likely Recovery - Live @ Crime Con '22

Crawlspace: True Crime & Mysteries

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 64:34


In this panel discussion recorded from Crime Con 2022 in Las Vegas, Tim Pilleri and Lance Reenstierna are joined by Ladessa Hendrix, Jason Watts, John Lordan, Melissa & Whitney from Cults, Crimes, and Cabernet to speak about the disappearance and likely recovery of Brandon Lawson. Brandon went missing from Bronte, Texas on August 9th, 2013. For more information go to http://www.missingbrandonlawson.com/p/case-questions.html If you have information in Brandon's disappearance please call the Coke County Sheriff's Office at 325-453-2717. Follow the Help Find Brandon Lawson FB page: https://www.facebook.com/helpfindbrandonlawson/ Check out John Lordan's work at https://lordanarts.wixsite.com/johnlordan/lordanarts Check out Cults, Crimes, and Cabernet: https://www.cultscrimescabernet.com/ Check out the new Crawlspace Discussion Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/talkcrawlspace/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/crawlspacepod  Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Crawlspacepodcast  Follow us on Instagram: https://www.Instagram.com/Crawlspacepodcast Follow us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@crawlspacepodcast Join the Crawlspace Discussion Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/talkcrawlspace/ The music for Crawlspace was produced by David Flajnik. Listen to his music here: https://www.pond5.com/artist/bigdsound  Check out our entire network at http://crawlspace-media.com/ Go to https://smile.amazon.com/ to connect your existing Amazon account to donate to PI's For the Missing. Follow Private Investigations For the Missing https://investigationsforthemissing.org/ http://piftm.org/donate https://twitter.com/PIFortheMissing https://www.facebook.com/PIFortheMissing/ https://www.instagram.com/investigationsforthemissing/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Wine for Normal People
Ep 421: Alternatives to A Favorite - Cabernet Sauvignon

Wine for Normal People

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 36:08 Very Popular


Inspired by a question from a Patron, we give you an original list of wines that are true alternatives to Cabernet if you love the OG and you want to branch out. We come up with 7 solid ideas that are similar but different enough to make them interesting.   The original idea for this list was from Patron Serl Z. and Leigh W. gets credit for naming this series.  People were so excited for these new ideas, we may just make it into a series! We begin by discussing the main characteristics of Cabernet Sauvignon: Flavors: Black fruit –especially blackcurrant, black cherry, black plum, blackberry -- earth in Old World versions, fruit in New World versions. The wine occasionally shows mint, eucalyptus, thyme, or green pepper notes. With oak Cab smells and tastes like tobacco, pencil shavings, cigar box, leather Generally tannic with good acidity. Some can be age-worthy if they have good tannin structure and acidity (backbone) Flavors depend on terroir, winemaking, oak aging   Alternatives: Mourvèdre/Monastrell/Mataro (Bandol in France, Monastrell from southern Spain, and GSM blends from the US and Australia) – dark fruit, intense flavor, long aging Douro Tinto/ Touriga Nacional (Portugal)– dusty tannins with sweet fruit, violets, leather, tobacco, big tannins Alentejo/Alentejano (Portugal) – for people who like juicy, fruity Cabs with soft tannins. These wines are a blend of Alfrocheiro, Alicante Bouschet, Aragonez, Castelão, Syrah, Touriga Nacional, Trincadeira, and, not surprisingly, Cabernet Sauvignon Sagrantino di Montefalco (Umbria, Italy)-- Sagrantino grape is full bodied, tannic with earth, cherry, smoke and sometimes spicy notes that evolve into leather and tobacco with time. Similar to Cabernet, Sagrantino is astringent in youth and mellows with time Malbec (Cahors, France, Argentina) -- Not all Malbec is created equal. If you want wines that are similar to Cabernet, choose Cahors, which is earthier, heavier, stronger, more tannic and often more terroir-driven. For Argentina, look for wines from sub-regions of Mendoza with older vines and elevation. These areas make wines with stronger tannin, darker fruit, and more acidity. They aren't as plush as many Malbec. In the Luján de Cuyo valley of Mendozalook for Vistalba and Las Compuertas. In the Valle de Uco, Tunuyán, which includes Paraje Altamira and   Petit Verdot (Virginia, Napa, and many other New World regions make varietal Petit Verdot, it's native home is Bordeaux, where it is part of the Bordeaux blend). Although known for what it brings to the Bordeaux blend, varietal Petit Verdot can be a great Cab alternative. The grapes are thick skinned, and the wines have black fruit, herbs, spice, and dark flower notes. The wine has high acidity and tannins, making it a great sub.   Tannat (Madiran, Uruguay, Virginia, Texas, Paso Robles and Santa Cruz Mountains in California other parts of the US. Also Argentina, Brazil, Australia). John S. – this one's for you! Tannat is often blended with with Cabernet Sauvignon to tame its tannins! In Madiran the wine is far harsher than Cab but in Uruguay, it is more like blackberry, plum, dark raspberry, earth, and spice. It has soft tannins, high alcohol, and is pretty delicious. It resembles a lighter style Cabernet from the North Coast of Sonoma   Cabernet Franc (on the list with lots of caveats so this is like a 7.5!). Cabernet Franc is the parent of Cabernet Sauvignon but it's much earthier, tea-like, and has a lot of red fruit notes. It is nowhere near as tannic as Cabernet and its flavors are really different. Still, it's not as soft as Merlot and because it can exhibit the herbs and pyrazine (green pepper) of Cabernet Sauvignon, I'm adding it to the list   At the end of the show I mention some cheat regions – good places to get blends with a healthy hit of Cabernet in them: Bordeaux, South African Bordeaux Blends, Hawkes Bay from New Zealand are three I mention!   Please let me know if you like this theme. If so, we'll do more shows like this! _____________________________________________________ Thanks to our sponsors this week: Our new sponsor: Wine Spies! Wine Spies uncovers incredible wines at unreal prices - on Zinfandel, Barolo, Champagne...you name it - up to 75% off! It's not a club and there's no obligation to buy. They have a build-a-case option, so you can mix and match wines while enjoying free shipping on every purchase. Visit www.winespies.com/normal you'll get $20 credit to use on your first order! Check them out today! If you think our podcast is worth the price of a bottle or two of wine a year, please become a member of Patreon... you'll get even more great content, live interactions and classes!  www.patreon.com/winefornormalpeople   To register for an AWESOME, LIVE WFNP class with Elizabeth go to: www.winefornormalpeople.com/classes