Podcasts about haight ashbury

Neighborhood in San Francisco, California, United States

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Best podcasts about haight ashbury

Latest podcast episodes about haight ashbury

Bureau of Lost Culture
BUREAU OF LOST CULTURE - Flashing on the Sixties Part 2

Bureau of Lost Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2023 65:00


Feeding the Woodstock thousands, acid, the Summer of Love, the Haight Ashbury, Timothy Leary, anti-Vietnam war protests, the problems of free love and living in communes, the Monterey pop festival, The Diggers, Wavy Gravy, Owsley, Bob and Sarah Dylan, Peter Coyote, helping Dennis Hopper though a bad trip.. In this episode we sat down again with 80 year old photographer LISA LAW in her home in Mexico to hear more extraordinary tales from the her life on the frontiers of counterculture.   We take up the tales as Lisa arrives in San Francisco in 1967, follow her behind the scenes at the Woodstock, Texas and Monterey Pop festivals, through the ups and downs of family life and motherhood whilst always taking photographs of a society in the turmoils of radical change.   Thanks to Roger Burton for the introduction to Lisa. During the episode we hear Tim Leary at 'The Human Be In' in San Francisco and the poet Adrian Mitchell reciting his poem To Whom it May Concern (Tell Me Lies about Viet Nam). For more on Lisa, her film, book and images: www.flashingonthesixties.com/ For more on the Bureau: www.bureauoflostculture.com   Images copyright Lisa Law   #Dylan, #TheVelvetUnderground, #JanisJoplin, #TheBeatles, #OtisRedding, #PeterFonda, #DenisHopper, #TimothyLeary, #RamDass, #AllenGinsberg, KenKesey, #thehogfarm, #themerrypranksters, #wavygravy, #peterpaulandmary #haightashbury, #hippies, #psychedelicmushrooms, #lisalaw, #vietnamwar  

The Opperman Report
San Francisco Homicide Inspector 5-Henry-7: My Inside Story of the Night Stalker, City Hall Murders, Zebra Killings, Chinatown Gang Wars, an

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2023 51:06


After the Summer of Love and the heyday of the Haight-Ashbury in the 1960s, San Francisco mutated over the next two decades into a city under siege by serial killers, radical under-ground extremists, antiestablishment groups, gangs, and drug wars. The rise in violence brought a spike in murders that put unprecedented pressure on the San Francisco Police Department and its storied homicide squad. Inspector Frank Falzon represents the best of those elite detectives.

Jim Foster: Conversations On The Coast
Castleman: Killer Weed

Jim Foster: Conversations On The Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 22:18


In "Killer Weed," author Michael Castleman writes the fourth in his Ed Rosenbery mystery series in which a Silicon Valley billionaire hires Ed to research the hippie era centered in the Haight-Ashbury district in San Francisco, while a popular mayoral candidate and ex-hippie drug dealer is assassinated present-day as Ed's wife is serving on the campaign. This discussion with the author took place on a 2013 episode of "Conversations On The Coast with Jim Foster" originating in San Francisco, California.

Bay Current
Our autonomaous future is here! A ride-along in a driverless car

Bay Current

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 19:32


You've seen driverless cars cruising around San Francisco, but would you actually ride in a car without a human being behind the wheel? Bay Current host Matt Pitman did just that, in a Waymo SUV, cruising around SF's Haight Ashbury neighborhood.

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 158: “White Rabbit” by Jefferson Airplane

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022


Episode one hundred and fifty-eight of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “White Rabbit”, Jefferson Airplane, and the rise of the San Francisco sound. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-three-minute bonus episode available, on "Omaha" by Moby Grape. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Erratum I refer to Back to Methuselah by Robert Heinlein. This is of course a play by George Bernard Shaw. What I meant to say was Methuselah's Children. Resources I hope to upload a Mixcloud tomorrow, and will edit it in, but have had some problems with the site today. Jefferson Airplane's first four studio albums, plus a 1968 live album, can be found in this box set. I've referred to three main books here. Got a Revolution!: The Turbulent Flight of Jefferson Airplane by Jeff Tamarkin is written with the co-operation of the band members, but still finds room to criticise them. Jefferson Airplane On Track by Richard Molesworth is a song-by-song guide to the band's music. And Been So Long: My Life and Music by Jorma Kaukonen is Kaukonen's autobiography. Some information on Skip Spence and Matthew Katz also comes from What's Big and Purple and Lives in the Ocean?: The Moby Grape Story, by Cam Cobb, which I also used for this week's bonus. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript Before I start, I need to confess an important and hugely embarrassing error in this episode. I've only ever seen Marty Balin's name written down, never heard it spoken, and only after recording the episode, during the editing process, did I discover I mispronounce it throughout. It's usually an advantage for the podcast that I get my information from books rather than TV documentaries and the like, because they contain far more information, but occasionally it causes problems like that. My apologies. Also a brief note that this episode contains some mentions of racism, antisemitism, drug and alcohol abuse, and gun violence. One of the themes we've looked at in recent episodes is the way the centre of the musical world -- at least the musical world as it was regarded by the people who thought of themselves as hip in the mid-sixties -- was changing in 1967. Up to this point, for a few years there had been two clear centres of the rock and pop music worlds. In the UK, there was London, and any British band who meant anything had to base themselves there. And in the US, at some point around 1963, the centre of the music industry had moved West. Up to then it had largely been based in New York, and there was still a thriving industry there as of the mid sixties. But increasingly the records that mattered, that everyone in the country had been listening to, had come out of LA Soul music was, of course, still coming primarily from Detroit and from the Country-Soul triangle in Tennessee and Alabama, but when it came to the new brand of electric-guitar rock that was taking over the airwaves, LA was, up until the first few months of 1967, the only city that was competing with London, and was the place to be. But as we heard in the episode on "San Francisco", with the Monterey Pop Festival all that started to change. While the business part of the music business remained centred in LA, and would largely remain so, LA was no longer the hip place to be. Almost overnight, jangly guitars, harmonies, and Brian Jones hairstyles were out, and feedback, extended solos, and droopy moustaches were in. The place to be was no longer LA, but a few hundred miles North, in San Francisco -- something that the LA bands were not all entirely happy about: [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Who Needs the Peace Corps?"] In truth, the San Francisco music scene, unlike many of the scenes we've looked at so far in this series, had rather a limited impact on the wider world of music. Bands like Jefferson Airplane, the Grateful Dead, and Big Brother and the Holding Company were all both massively commercially successful and highly regarded by critics, but unlike many of the other bands we've looked at before and will look at in future, they didn't have much of an influence on the bands that would come after them, musically at least. Possibly this is because the music from the San Francisco scene was always primarily that -- music created by and for a specific group of people, and inextricable from its context. The San Francisco musicians were defining themselves by their geographical location, their peers, and the situation they were in, and their music was so specifically of the place and time that to attempt to copy it outside of that context would appear ridiculous, so while many of those bands remain much loved to this day, and many made some great music, it's very hard to point to ways in which that music influenced later bands. But what they did influence was the whole of rock music culture. For at least the next thirty years, and arguably to this day, the parameters in which rock musicians worked if they wanted to be taken seriously – their aesthetic and political ideals, their methods of collaboration, the cultural norms around drug use and sexual promiscuity, ideas of artistic freedom and authenticity, the choice of acceptable instruments – in short, what it meant to be a rock musician rather than a pop, jazz, country, or soul artist – all those things were defined by the cultural and behavioural norms of the San Francisco scene between about 1966 and 68. Without the San Francisco scene there's no Woodstock, no Rolling Stone magazine, no Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, no hippies, no groupies, no rock stars. So over the next few months we're going to take several trips to the Bay Area, and look at the bands which, for a brief time, defined the counterculture in America. The story of Jefferson Airplane -- and unlike other bands we've looked at recently, like The Pink Floyd and The Buffalo Springfield, they never had a definite article at the start of their name to wither away like a vestigial organ in subsequent years -- starts with Marty Balin. Balin was born in Ohio, but was a relatively sickly child -- he later talked about being autistic, and seems to have had the chronic illnesses that so often go with neurodivergence -- so in the hope that the dry air would be good for his chest his family moved to Arizona. Then when his father couldn't find work there, they moved further west to San Francisco, in the Haight-Ashbury area, long before that area became the byword for the hippie movement. But it was in LA that he started his music career, and got his surname. Balin had been named Marty Buchwald as a kid, but when he was nineteen he had accompanied a friend to LA to visit a music publisher, and had ended up singing backing vocals on her demos. While he was there, he had encountered the arranger Jimmy Haskell. Haskell was on his way to becoming one of the most prominent arrangers in the music industry, and in his long career he would go on to do arrangements for Bobby Gentry, Blondie, Steely Dan, Simon and Garfunkel, and many others. But at the time he was best known for his work on Ricky Nelson's hits: [Excerpt: Ricky Nelson, "Hello Mary Lou"] Haskell thought that Marty had the makings of a Ricky Nelson style star, as he was a good-looking young man with a decent voice, and he became a mentor for the young man. Making the kind of records that Haskell arranged was expensive, and so Haskell suggested a deal to him -- if Marty's father would pay for studio time and musicians, Haskell would make a record with him and find him a label to put it out. Marty's father did indeed pay for the studio time and the musicians -- some of the finest working in LA at the time. The record, released under the name Marty Balin, featured Jack Nitzsche on keyboards, Earl Palmer on drums, Milt Jackson on vibraphone, Red Callender on bass, and Glen Campbell and Barney Kessell on guitars, and came out on Challenge Records, a label owned by Gene Autry: [Excerpt: Marty Balin, "Nobody But You"] Neither that, nor Balin's follow-up single, sold a noticeable amount of copies, and his career as a teen idol was over before it had begun. Instead, as many musicians of his age did, he decided to get into folk music, joining a vocal harmony group called the Town Criers, who patterned themselves after the Weavers, and performed the same kind of material that every other clean-cut folk vocal group was performing at the time -- the kind of songs that John Phillips and Steve Stills and Cass Elliot and Van Dyke Parks and the rest were all performing in their own groups at the same time. The Town Criers never made any records while they were together, but some archival recordings of them have been released over the decades: [Excerpt: The Town Criers, "900 Miles"] The Town Criers split up, and Balin started performing as a solo folkie again. But like all those other then-folk musicians, Balin realised that he had to adapt to the K/T-event level folk music extinction that happened when the Beatles hit America like a meteorite. He had to form a folk-rock group if he wanted to survive -- and given that there were no venues for such a group to play in San Francisco, he also had to start a nightclub for them to play in. He started hanging around the hootenannies in the area, looking for musicians who might form an electric band. The first person he decided on was a performer called Paul Kantner, mainly because he liked his attitude. Kantner had got on stage in front of a particularly drunk, loud, crowd, and performed precisely half a song before deciding he wasn't going to perform in front of people like that and walking off stage. Kantner was the only member of the new group to be a San Franciscan -- he'd been born and brought up in the city. He'd got into folk music at university, where he'd also met a guitar player named Jorma Kaukonen, who had turned him on to cannabis, and the two had started giving music lessons at a music shop in San Jose. There Kantner had also been responsible for booking acts at a local folk club, where he'd first encountered acts like Mother McCree's Uptown Jug Champions, a jug band which included Jerry Garcia, Pigpen McKernan, and Bob Weir, who would later go on to be the core members of the Grateful Dead: [Excerpt: Mother McCree's Uptown Jug Champions, "In the Jailhouse Now"] Kantner had moved around a bit between Northern and Southern California, and had been friendly with two other musicians on the Californian folk scene, David Crosby and Roger McGuinn. When their new group, the Byrds, suddenly became huge, Kantner became aware of the possibility of doing something similar himself, and so when Marty Balin approached him to form a band, he agreed. On bass, they got in a musician called Bob Harvey, who actually played double bass rather than electric, and who stuck to that for the first few gigs the group played -- he had previously been in a band called the Slippery Rock String Band. On drums, they brought in Jerry Peloquin, who had formerly worked for the police, but now had a day job as an optician. And on vocals, they brought in Signe Toley -- who would soon marry and change her name to Signe Anderson, so that's how I'll talk about her to avoid confusion. The group also needed a lead guitarist though -- both Balin and Kantner were decent rhythm players and singers, but they needed someone who was a better instrumentalist. They decided to ask Kantner's old friend Jorma Kaukonen. Kaukonen was someone who was seriously into what would now be called Americana or roots music. He'd started playing the guitar as a teenager, not like most people of his generation inspired by Elvis or Buddy Holly, but rather after a friend of his had shown him how to play an old Carter Family song, "Jimmy Brown the Newsboy": [Excerpt: The Carter Family, "Jimmy Brown the Newsboy"] Kaukonen had had a far more interesting life than most of the rest of the group. His father had worked for the State Department -- and there's some suggestion he'd worked for the CIA -- and the family had travelled all over the world, staying in Pakistan, the Philippines, and Finland. For most of his childhood, he'd gone by the name Jerry, because other kids beat him up for having a foreign name and called him a Nazi, but by the time he turned twenty he was happy enough using his birth name. Kaukonen wasn't completely immune to the appeal of rock and roll -- he'd formed a rock band, The Triumphs, with his friend Jack Casady when he was a teenager, and he loved Ricky Nelson's records -- but his fate as a folkie had been pretty much sealed when he went to Antioch College. There he met up with a blues guitarist called Ian Buchanan. Buchanan never had much of a career as a professional, but he had supposedly spent nine years studying with the blues and ragtime guitar legend Rev. Gary Davis, and he was certainly a fine guitarist, as can be heard on his contribution to The Blues Project, the album Elektra put out of white Greenwich Village musicians like John Sebastian and Dave Van Ronk playing old blues songs: [Excerpt: Ian Buchanan, "The Winding Boy"] Kaukonen became something of a disciple of Buchanan -- he said later that Buchanan probably taught him how to play because he was such a terrible player and Buchanan couldn't stand to listen to it -- as did John Hammond Jr, another student at Antioch at the same time. After studying at Antioch, Kaukonen started to travel around, including spells in Greenwich Village and in the Philippines, before settling in Santa Clara, where he studied for a sociology degree and became part of a social circle that included Dino Valenti, Jerry Garcia, and Billy Roberts, the credited writer of "Hey Joe". He also started performing as a duo with a singer called Janis Joplin. Various of their recordings from this period circulate, mostly recorded at Kaukonen's home with the sound of his wife typing in the background while the duo rehearse, as on this performance of an old Bessie Smith song: [Excerpt: Jorma Kaukonen and Janis Joplin, "Nobody Loves You When You're Down and Out"] By 1965 Kaukonen saw himself firmly as a folk-blues purist, who would not even think of playing rock and roll music, which he viewed with more than a little contempt. But he allowed himself to be brought along to audition for the new group, and Ken Kesey happened to be there. Kesey was a novelist who had written two best-selling books, One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest and Sometimes A Great Notion, and used the financial independence that gave him to organise a group of friends who called themselves the Merry Pranksters, who drove from coast to coast and back again in a psychedelic-painted bus, before starting a series of events that became known as Acid Tests, parties at which everyone was on LSD, immortalised in Tom Wolfe's book The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. Nobody has ever said why Kesey was there, but he had brought along an Echoplex, a reverb unit one could put a guitar through -- and nobody has explained why Kesey, who wasn't a musician, had an Echoplex to hand. But Kaukonen loved the sound that he could get by putting his guitar through the device, and so for that reason more than any other he decided to become an electric player and join the band, going out and buying a Rickenbacker twelve-string and Vox Treble Booster because that was what Roger McGuinn used. He would later also get a Guild Thunderbird six-string guitar and a Standel Super Imperial amp, following the same principle of buying the equipment used by other guitarists he liked, as they were what Zal Yanovsky of the Lovin' Spoonful used. He would use them for all his six-string playing for the next couple of years, only later to discover that the Lovin' Spoonful despised them and only used them because they had an endorsement deal with the manufacturers. Kaukonen was also the one who came up with the new group's name. He and his friends had a running joke where they had "Bluesman names", things like "Blind Outrage" and "Little Sun Goldfarb". Kaukonen's bluesman name, given to him by his friend Steve Talbot, had been Blind Thomas Jefferson Airplane, a reference to the 1920s blues guitarist Blind Lemon Jefferson: [Excerpt: Blind Lemon Jefferson, "Match Box Blues"] At the band meeting where they were trying to decide on a name, Kaukonen got frustrated at the ridiculous suggestions that were being made, and said "You want a stupid name? Howzabout this... Jefferson Airplane?" He said in his autobiography "It was one of those rare moments when everyone in the band agreed, and that was that. I think it was the only band meeting that ever allowed me to come away smiling." The newly-named Jefferson Airplane started to rehearse at the Matrix Club, the club that Balin had decided to open. This was run with three sound engineer friends, who put in the seed capital for the club. Balin had stock options in the club, which he got by trading a share of the band's future earnings to his partners, though as the group became bigger he eventually sold his stock in the club back to his business partners. Before their first public performance, they started working with a manager, Matthew Katz, mostly because Katz had access to a recording of a then-unreleased Bob Dylan song, "Lay Down Your Weary Tune": [Excerpt: Bob Dylan, "Lay Down Your Weary Tune"] The group knew that the best way for a folk-rock band to make a name for themselves was to perform a Dylan song nobody else had yet heard, and so they agreed to be managed by Katz. Katz started a pre-publicity blitz, giving out posters, badges, and bumper stickers saying "Jefferson Airplane Loves You" all over San Francisco -- and insisting that none of the band members were allowed to say "Hello" when they answered the phone any more, they had to say "Jefferson Airplane Loves You!" For their early rehearsals and gigs, they were performing almost entirely cover versions of blues and folk songs, things like Fred Neil's "The Other Side of This Life" and Dino Valenti's "Get Together" which were the common currency of the early folk-rock movement, and songs by their friends, like one called "Flower Bomb" by David Crosby, which Crosby now denies ever having written. They did start writing the odd song, but at this point they were more focused on performance than on writing. They also hired a press agent, their friend Bill Thompson. Thompson was friends with the two main music writers at the San Francisco Chronicle, Ralph Gleason, the famous jazz critic, who had recently started also reviewing rock music, and John Wasserman. Thompson got both men to come to the opening night of the Matrix, and both gave the group glowing reviews in the Chronicle. Record labels started sniffing around the group immediately as a result of this coverage, and according to Katz he managed to get a bidding war started by making sure that when A&R men came to the club there were always two of them from different labels, so they would see the other person and realise they weren't the only ones interested. But before signing a record deal they needed to make some personnel changes. The first member to go was Jerry Peloquin, for both musical and personal reasons. Peloquin was used to keeping strict time and the other musicians had a more free-flowing idea of what tempo they should be playing at, but also he had worked for the police while the other members were all taking tons of illegal drugs. The final break with Peloquin came when he did the rest of the group a favour -- Paul Kantner's glasses broke during a rehearsal, and as Peloquin was an optician he offered to take them back to his shop and fix them. When he got back, he found them auditioning replacements for him. He beat Kantner up, and that was the end of Jerry Peloquin in Jefferson Airplane. His replacement was Skip Spence, who the group had met when he had accompanied three friends to the Matrix, which they were using as a rehearsal room. Spence's friends went on to be the core members of Quicksilver Messenger Service along with Dino Valenti: [Excerpt: Quicksilver Messenger Service, "Dino's Song"] But Balin decided that Spence looked like a rock star, and told him that he was now Jefferson Airplane's drummer, despite Spence being a guitarist and singer, not a drummer. But Spence was game, and learned to play the drums. Next they needed to get rid of Bob Harvey. According to Harvey, the decision to sack him came after David Crosby saw the band rehearsing and said "Nice song, but get rid of the bass player" (along with an expletive before the word bass which I can't say without incurring the wrath of Apple). Crosby denies ever having said this. Harvey had started out in the group on double bass, but to show willing he'd switched in his last few gigs to playing an electric bass. When he was sacked by the group, he returned to double bass, and to the Slippery Rock String Band, who released one single in 1967: [Excerpt: The Slippery Rock String Band, "Tule Fog"] Harvey's replacement was Kaukonen's old friend Jack Casady, who Kaukonen knew was now playing bass, though he'd only ever heard him playing guitar when they'd played together. Casady was rather cautious about joining a rock band, but then Kaukonen told him that the band were getting fifty dollars a week salary each from Katz, and Casady flew over from Washington DC to San Francisco to join the band. For the first few gigs, he used Bob Harvey's bass, which Harvey was good enough to lend him despite having been sacked from the band. Unfortunately, right from the start Casady and Kantner didn't get on. When Casady flew in from Washington, he had a much more clean-cut appearance than the rest of the band -- one they've described as being nerdy, with short, slicked-back, side-parted hair and a handlebar moustache. Kantner insisted that Casady shave the moustache off, and he responded by shaving only one side, so in profile on one side he looked clean-shaven, while from the other side he looked like he had a full moustache. Kantner also didn't like Casady's general attitude, or his playing style, at all -- though most critics since this point have pointed to Casady's bass playing as being the most interesting and distinctive thing about Jefferson Airplane's style. This lineup seems to have been the one that travelled to LA to audition for various record companies -- a move that immediately brought the group a certain amount of criticism for selling out, both for auditioning for record companies and for going to LA at all, two things that were already anathema on the San Francisco scene. The only audition anyone remembers them having specifically is one for Phil Spector, who according to Kaukonen was waving a gun around during the audition, so he and Casady walked out. Around this time as well, the group performed at an event billed as "A Tribute to Dr. Strange", organised by the radical hippie collective Family Dog. Marvel Comics, rather than being the multi-billion-dollar Disney-owned corporate juggernaut it is now, was regarded as a hip, almost underground, company -- and around this time they briefly started billing their comics not as comics but as "Marvel Pop Art Productions". The magical adventures of Dr. Strange, Master of the Mystic Arts, and in particular the art by far-right libertarian artist Steve Ditko, were regarded as clear parallels to both the occult dabblings and hallucinogen use popular among the hippies, though Ditko had no time for either, following as he did an extreme version of Ayn Rand's Objectivism. It was at the Tribute to Dr. Strange that Jefferson Airplane performed for the first time with a band named The Great Society, whose lead singer, Grace Slick, would later become very important in Jefferson Airplane's story: [Excerpt: The Great Society, "Someone to Love"] That gig was also the first one where the band and their friends noticed that large chunks of the audience were now dressing up in costumes that were reminiscent of the Old West. Up to this point, while Katz had been managing the group and paying them fifty dollars a week even on weeks when they didn't perform, he'd been doing so without a formal contract, in part because the group didn't trust him much. But now they were starting to get interest from record labels, and in particular RCA Records desperately wanted them. While RCA had been the label who had signed Elvis Presley, they had otherwise largely ignored rock and roll, considering that since they had the biggest rock star in the world they didn't need other ones, and concentrating largely on middle-of-the-road acts. But by the mid-sixties Elvis' star had faded somewhat, and they were desperate to get some of the action for the new music -- and unlike the other major American labels, they didn't have a reciprocal arrangement with a British label that allowed them to release anything by any of the new British stars. The group were introduced to RCA by Rod McKuen, a songwriter and poet who later became America's best-selling poet and wrote songs that sold over a hundred million copies. At this point McKuen was in his Jacques Brel phase, recording loose translations of the Belgian songwriter's songs with McKuen translating the lyrics: [Excerpt: Rod McKuen, "Seasons in the Sun"] McKuen thought that Jefferson Airplane might be a useful market for his own songs, and brought the group to RCA. RCA offered Jefferson Airplane twenty-five thousand dollars to sign with them, and Katz convinced the group that RCA wouldn't give them this money without them having signed a management contract with him. Kaukonen, Kantner, Spence, and Balin all signed without much hesitation, but Jack Casady didn't yet sign, as he was the new boy and nobody knew if he was going to be in the band for the long haul. The other person who refused to sign was Signe Anderson. In her case, she had a much better reason for refusing to sign, as unlike the rest of the band she had actually read the contract, and she found it to be extremely worrying. She did eventually back down on the day of the group's first recording session, but she later had the contract renegotiated. Jack Casady also signed the contract right at the start of the first session -- or at least, he thought he'd signed the contract then. He certainly signed *something*, without having read it. But much later, during a court case involving the band's longstanding legal disputes with Katz, it was revealed that the signature on the contract wasn't Casady's, and was badly forged. What he actually *did* sign that day has never been revealed, to him or to anyone else. Katz also signed all the group as songwriters to his own publishing company, telling them that they legally needed to sign with him if they wanted to make records, and also claimed to RCA that he had power of attorney for the band, which they say they never gave him -- though to be fair to Katz, given the band members' habit of signing things without reading or understanding them, it doesn't seem beyond the realms of possibility that they did. The producer chosen for the group's first album was Tommy Oliver, a friend of Katz's who had previously been an arranger on some of Doris Day's records, and whose next major act after finishing the Jefferson Airplane album was Trombones Unlimited, who released records like "Holiday for Trombones": [Excerpt: Trombones Unlimited, "Holiday For Trombones"] The group weren't particularly thrilled with this choice, but were happier with their engineer, Dave Hassinger, who had worked on records like "Satisfaction" by the Rolling Stones, and had a far better understanding of the kind of music the group were making. They spent about three months recording their first album, even while continually being attacked as sellouts. The album is not considered their best work, though it does contain "Blues From an Airplane", a collaboration between Spence and Balin: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Blues From an Airplane"] Even before the album came out, though, things were starting to change for the group. Firstly, they started playing bigger venues -- their home base went from being the Matrix club to the Fillmore, a large auditorium run by the promoter Bill Graham. They also started to get an international reputation. The British singer-songwriter Donovan released a track called "The Fat Angel" which namechecked the group: [Excerpt: Donovan, "The Fat Angel"] The group also needed a new drummer. Skip Spence decided to go on holiday to Mexico without telling the rest of the band. There had already been some friction with Spence, as he was very eager to become a guitarist and songwriter, and the band already had three songwriting guitarists and didn't really see why they needed a fourth. They sacked Spence, who went on to form Moby Grape, who were also managed by Katz: [Excerpt: Moby Grape, "Omaha"] For his replacement they brought in Spencer Dryden, who was a Hollywood brat like their friend David Crosby -- in Dryden's case he was Charlie Chaplin's nephew, and his father worked as Chaplin's assistant. The story normally goes that the great session drummer Earl Palmer recommended Dryden to the group, but it's also the case that Dryden had been in a band, the Heartbeats, with Tommy Oliver and the great blues guitarist Roy Buchanan, so it may well be that Oliver had recommended him. Dryden had been primarily a jazz musician, playing with people like the West Coast jazz legend Charles Lloyd, though like most jazzers he would slum it on occasion by playing rock and roll music to pay the bills. But then he'd seen an early performance by the Mothers of Invention, and realised that rock music could have a serious artistic purpose too. He'd joined a band called The Ashes, who had released one single, the Jackie DeShannon song "Is There Anything I Can Do?" in December 1965: [Excerpt: The Ashes, "Is There Anything I Can Do?"] The Ashes split up once Dryden left the group to join Jefferson Airplane, but they soon reformed without him as The Peanut Butter Conspiracy, who hooked up with Gary Usher and released several albums of psychedelic sunshine pop. Dryden played his first gig with the group at a Republican Party event on June the sixth, 1966. But by the time Dryden had joined, other problems had become apparent. The group were already feeling like it had been a big mistake to accede to Katz's demands to sign a formal contract with him, and Balin in particular was getting annoyed that he wouldn't let the band see their finances. All the money was getting paid to Katz, who then doled out money to the band when they asked for it, and they had no idea if he was actually paying them what they were owed or not. The group's first album, Jefferson Airplane Takes Off, finally came out in September, and it was a comparative flop. It sold well in San Francisco itself, selling around ten thousand copies in the area, but sold basically nothing anywhere else in the country -- the group's local reputation hadn't extended outside their own immediate scene. It didn't help that the album was pulled and reissued, as RCA censored the initial version of the album because of objections to the lyrics. The song "Runnin' Round This World" was pulled off the album altogether for containing the word "trips", while in "Let Me In" they had to rerecord two lines -- “I gotta get in, you know where" was altered to "You shut the door now it ain't fair" and "Don't tell me you want money" became "Don't tell me it's so funny". Similarly in "Run Around" the phrase "as you lay under me" became "as you stay here by me". Things were also becoming difficult for Anderson. She had had a baby in May and was not only unhappy with having to tour while she had a small child, she was also the band member who was most vocally opposed to Katz. Added to that, her husband did not get on well at all with the group, and she felt trapped between her marriage and her bandmates. Reports differ as to whether she quit the band or was fired, but after a disastrous appearance at the Monterey Jazz Festival, one way or another she was out of the band. Her replacement was already waiting in the wings. Grace Slick, the lead singer of the Great Society, had been inspired by going to one of the early Jefferson Airplane gigs. She later said "I went to see Jefferson Airplane at the Matrix, and they were making more money in a day than I made in a week. They only worked for two or three hours a night, and they got to hang out. I thought 'This looks a lot better than what I'm doing.' I knew I could more or less carry a tune, and I figured if they could do it I could." She was married at the time to a film student named Jerry Slick, and indeed she had done the music for his final project at film school, a film called "Everybody Hits Their Brother Once", which sadly I can't find online. She was also having an affair with Jerry's brother Darby, though as the Slicks were in an open marriage this wasn't particularly untoward. The three of them, with a couple of other musicians, had formed The Great Society, named as a joke about President Johnson's programme of the same name. The Great Society was the name Johnson had given to his whole programme of domestic reforms, including civil rights for Black people, the creation of Medicare and Medicaid, the creation of the National Endowment for the Arts, and more. While those projects were broadly popular among the younger generation, Johnson's escalation of the war in Vietnam had made him so personally unpopular that even his progressive domestic programme was regarded with suspicion and contempt. The Great Society had set themselves up as local rivals to Jefferson Airplane -- where Jefferson Airplane had buttons saying "Jefferson Airplane Loves You!" the Great Society put out buttons saying "The Great Society Really Doesn't Like You Much At All". They signed to Autumn Records, and recorded a song that Darby Slick had written, titled "Someone to Love" -- though the song would later be retitled "Somebody to Love": [Excerpt: The Great Society, "Someone to Love"] That track was produced by Sly Stone, who at the time was working as a producer for Autumn Records. The Great Society, though, didn't like working with Stone, because he insisted on them doing forty-five takes to try to sound professional, as none of them were particularly competent musicians. Grace Slick later said "Sly could play any instrument known to man. He could have just made the record himself, except for the singers. It was kind of degrading in a way" -- and on another occasion she said that he *did* end up playing all the instruments on the finished record. "Someone to Love" was put out as a promo record, but never released to the general public, and nor were any of the Great Society's other recordings for Autumn Records released. Their contract expired and they were let go, at which point they were about to sign to Mercury Records, but then Darby Slick and another member decided to go off to India for a while. Grace's marriage to Jerry was falling apart, though they would stay legally married for several years, and the Great Society looked like it was at an end, so when Grace got the offer to join Jefferson Airplane to replace Signe Anderson, she jumped at the chance. At first, she was purely a harmony singer -- she didn't take over any of the lead vocal parts that Anderson had previously sung, as she had a very different vocal style, and instead she just sang the harmony parts that Anderson had sung on songs with other lead vocalists. But two months after the album they were back in the studio again, recording their second album, and Slick sang lead on several songs there. As well as the new lineup, there was another important change in the studio. They were still working with Dave Hassinger, but they had a new producer, Rick Jarrard. Jarrard was at one point a member of the folk group The Wellingtons, who did the theme tune for "Gilligan's Island", though I can't find anything to say whether or not he was in the group when they recorded that track: [Excerpt: The Wellingtons, "The Ballad of Gilligan's Island"] Jarrard had also been in the similar folk group The Greenwood County Singers, where as we heard in the episode on "Heroes and Villains" he replaced Van Dyke Parks. He'd also released a few singles under his own name, including a version of Parks' "High Coin": [Excerpt: Rick Jarrard, "High Coin"] While Jarrard had similar musical roots to those of Jefferson Airplane's members, and would go on to produce records by people like Harry Nilsson and The Family Tree, he wasn't any more liked by the band than their previous producer had been. So much so, that a few of the band members have claimed that while Jarrard is the credited producer, much of the work that one would normally expect to be done by a producer was actually done by their friend Jerry Garcia, who according to the band members gave them a lot of arranging and structural advice, and was present in the studio and played guitar on several tracks. Jarrard, on the other hand, said categorically "I never met Jerry Garcia. I produced that album from start to finish, never heard from Jerry Garcia, never talked to Jerry Garcia. He was not involved creatively on that album at all." According to the band, though, it was Garcia who had the idea of almost doubling the speed of the retitled "Somebody to Love", turning it into an uptempo rocker: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Somebody to Love"] And one thing everyone is agreed on is that it was Garcia who came up with the album title, when after listening to some of the recordings he said "That's as surrealistic as a pillow!" It was while they were working on the album that was eventually titled Surrealistic Pillow that they finally broke with Katz as their manager, bringing Bill Thompson in as a temporary replacement. Or at least, it was then that they tried to break with Katz. Katz sued the group over their contract, and won. Then they appealed, and they won. Then Katz appealed the appeal, and the Superior Court insisted that if he wanted to appeal the ruling, he had to put up a bond for the fifty thousand dollars the group said he owed them. He didn't, so in 1970, four years after they sacked him as their manager, the appeal was dismissed. Katz appealed the dismissal, and won that appeal, and the case dragged on for another three years, at which point Katz dragged RCA Records into the lawsuit. As a result of being dragged into the mess, RCA decided to stop paying the group their songwriting royalties from record sales directly, and instead put the money into an escrow account. The claims and counterclaims and appeals *finally* ended in 1987, twenty years after the lawsuits had started and fourteen years after the band had stopped receiving their songwriting royalties. In the end, the group won on almost every point, and finally received one point three million dollars in back royalties and seven hundred thousand dollars in interest that had accrued, while Katz got a small token payment. Early in 1967, when the sessions for Surrealistic Pillow had finished, but before the album was released, Newsweek did a big story on the San Francisco scene, which drew national attention to the bands there, and the first big event of what would come to be called the hippie scene, the Human Be-In, happened in Golden Gate Park in January. As the group's audience was expanding rapidly, they asked Bill Graham to be their manager, as he was the most business-minded of the people around the group. The first single from the album, "My Best Friend", a song written by Skip Spence before he quit the band, came out in January 1967 and had no more success than their earlier recordings had, and didn't make the Hot 100. The album came out in February, and was still no higher than number 137 on the charts in March, when the second single, "Somebody to Love", was released: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Somebody to Love"] That entered the charts at the start of April, and by June it had made number five. The single's success also pushed its parent album up to number three by August, just behind the Beatles' Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band and the Monkees' Headquarters. The success of the single also led to the group being asked to do commercials for Levis jeans: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Levis commercial"] That once again got them accused of selling out. Abbie Hoffman, the leader of the Yippies, wrote to the Village Voice about the commercials, saying "It summarized for me all the doubts I have about the hippie philosophy. I realise they are just doing their 'thing', but while the Jefferson Airplane grooves with its thing, over 100 workers in the Levi Strauss plant on the Tennessee-Georgia border are doing their thing, which consists of being on strike to protest deplorable working conditions." The third single from the album, "White Rabbit", came out on the twenty-fourth of June, the day before the Beatles recorded "All You Need is Love", nine days after the release of "See Emily Play", and a week after the group played the Monterey Pop Festival, to give you some idea of how compressed a time period we've been in recently. We talked in the last episode about how there's a big difference between American and British psychedelia at this point in time, because the political nature of the American counterculture was determined by the fact that so many people were being sent off to die in Vietnam. Of all the San Francisco bands, though, Jefferson Airplane were by far the least political -- they were into the culture part of the counterculture, but would often and repeatedly disavow any deeper political meaning in their songs. In early 1968, for example, in a press conference, they said “Don't ask us anything about politics. We don't know anything about it. And what we did know, we just forgot.” So it's perhaps not surprising that of all the American groups, they were the one that was most similar to the British psychedelic groups in their influences, and in particular their frequent references to children's fantasy literature. "White Rabbit" was a perfect example of this. It had started out as "White Rabbit Blues", a song that Slick had written influenced by Alice in Wonderland, and originally performed by the Great Society: [Excerpt: The Great Society, "White Rabbit"] Slick explained the lyrics, and their association between childhood fantasy stories and drugs, later by saying "It's an interesting song but it didn't do what I wanted it to. What I was trying to say was that between the ages of zero and five the information and the input you get is almost indelible. In other words, once a Catholic, always a Catholic. And the parents read us these books, like Alice in Wonderland where she gets high, tall, and she takes mushrooms, a hookah, pills, alcohol. And then there's The Wizard of Oz, where they fall into a field of poppies and when they wake up they see Oz. And then there's Peter Pan, where if you sprinkle white dust on you, you could fly. And then you wonder why we do it? Well, what did you read to me?" While the lyrical inspiration for the track was from Alice in Wonderland, the musical inspiration is less obvious. Slick has on multiple occasions said that the idea for the music came from listening to Miles Davis' album "Sketches of Spain", and in particular to Davis' version of -- and I apologise for almost certainly mangling the Spanish pronunciation badly here -- "Concierto de Aranjuez", though I see little musical resemblance to it myself. [Excerpt: Miles Davis, "Concierto de Aranjuez"] She has also, though, talked about how the song was influenced by Ravel's "Bolero", and in particular the way the piece keeps building in intensity, starting softly and slowly building up, rather than having the dynamic peaks and troughs of most music. And that is definitely a connection I can hear in the music: [Excerpt: Ravel, "Bolero"] Jefferson Airplane's version of "White Rabbit", like their version of "Somebody to Love", was far more professional, far -- and apologies for the pun -- slicker than The Great Society's version. It's also much shorter. The version by The Great Society has a four and a half minute instrumental intro before Slick's vocal enters. By contrast, the version on Surrealistic Pillow comes in at under two and a half minutes in total, and is a tight pop song: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "White Rabbit"] Jack Casady has more recently said that the group originally recorded the song more or less as a lark, because they assumed that all the drug references would mean that RCA would make them remove the song from the album -- after all, they'd cut a song from the earlier album because it had a reference to a trip, so how could they possibly allow a song like "White Rabbit" with its lyrics about pills and mushrooms? But it was left on the album, and ended up making the top ten on the pop charts, peaking at number eight: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "White Rabbit"] In an interview last year, Slick said she still largely lives off the royalties from writing that one song. It would be the last hit single Jefferson Airplane would ever have. Marty Balin later said "Fame changes your life. It's a bit like prison. It ruined the band. Everybody became rich and selfish and self-centred and couldn't care about the band. That was pretty much the end of it all. After that it was just working and living the high life and watching the band destroy itself, living on its laurels." They started work on their third album, After Bathing at Baxter's, in May 1967, while "Somebody to Love" was still climbing the charts. This time, the album was produced by Al Schmitt. Unlike the two previous producers, Schmitt was a fan of the band, and decided the best thing to do was to just let them do their own thing without interfering. The album took months to record, rather than the weeks that Surrealistic Pillow had taken, and cost almost ten times as much money to record. In part the time it took was because of the promotional work the band had to do. Bill Graham was sending them all over the country to perform, which they didn't appreciate. The group complained to Graham in business meetings, saying they wanted to only play in big cities where there were lots of hippies. Graham pointed out in turn that if they wanted to keep having any kind of success, they needed to play places other than San Francisco, LA, New York, and Chicago, because in fact most of the population of the US didn't live in those four cities. They grudgingly took his point. But there were other arguments all the time as well. They argued about whether Graham should be taking his cut from the net or the gross. They argued about Graham trying to push for the next single to be another Grace Slick lead vocal -- they felt like he was trying to make them into just Grace Slick's backing band, while he thought it made sense to follow up two big hits with more singles with the same vocalist. There was also a lawsuit from Balin's former partners in the Matrix, who remembered that bit in the contract about having a share in the group's income and sued for six hundred thousand dollars -- that was settled out of court three years later. And there were interpersonal squabbles too. Some of these were about the music -- Dryden didn't like the fact that Kaukonen's guitar solos were getting longer and longer, and Balin only contributed one song to the new album because all the other band members made fun of him for writing short, poppy, love songs rather than extended psychedelic jams -- but also the group had become basically two rival factions. On one side were Kaukonen and Casady, the old friends and virtuoso instrumentalists, who wanted to extend the instrumental sections of the songs more to show off their playing. On the other side were Grace Slick and Spencer Dryden, the two oldest members of the group by age, but the most recent people to join. They were also unusual in the San Francisco scene for having alcohol as their drug of choice -- drinking was thought of by most of the hippies as being a bit classless, but they were both alcoholics. They were also sleeping together, and generally on the side of shorter, less exploratory, songs. Kantner, who was attracted to Slick, usually ended up siding with her and Dryden, and this left Balin the odd man out in the middle. He later said "I got disgusted with all the ego trips, and the band was so stoned that I couldn't even talk to them. Everybody was in their little shell". While they were still working on the album, they released the first single from it, Kantner's "The Ballad of You and Me and Pooneil". The "Pooneil" in the song was a figure that combined two of Kantner's influences: the Greenwich Village singer-songwriter Fred Neil, the writer of "Everybody's Talkin'" and "Dolphins"; and Winnie the Pooh. The song contained several lines taken from A.A. Milne's children's stories: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "The Ballad of You and Me and Pooneil"] That only made number forty-two on the charts. It was the last Jefferson Airplane single to make the top fifty. At a gig in Bakersfield they got arrested for inciting a riot, because they encouraged the crowd to dance, even though local by-laws said that nobody under sixteen was allowed to dance, and then they nearly got arrested again after Kantner's behaviour on the private plane they'd chartered to get them back to San Francisco that night. Kantner had been chain-smoking, and this annoyed the pilot, who asked Kantner to put his cigarette out, so Kantner opened the door of the plane mid-flight and threw the lit cigarette out. They'd chartered that plane because they wanted to make sure they got to see a new group, Cream, who were playing the Fillmore: [Excerpt: Cream, "Strange Brew"] After seeing that, the divisions in the band were even wider -- Kaukonen and Casady now *knew* that what the band needed was to do long, extended, instrumental jams. Cream were the future, two-minute pop songs were the past. Though they weren't completely averse to two-minute pop songs. The group were recording at RCA studios at the same time as the Monkees, and members of the two groups would often jam together. The idea of selling out might have been anathema to their *audience*, but the band members themselves didn't care about things like that. Indeed, at one point the group returned from a gig to the mansion they were renting and found squatters had moved in and were using their private pool -- so they shot at the water. The squatters quickly moved on. As Dryden put it "We all -- Paul, Jorma, Grace, and myself -- had guns. We weren't hippies. Hippies were the people that lived on the streets down in Haight-Ashbury. We were basically musicians and art school kids. We were into guns and machinery" After Bathing at Baxter's only went to number seventeen on the charts, not a bad position but a flop compared to their previous album, and Bill Graham in particular took this as more proof that he had been right when for the last few months he'd been attacking the group as self-indulgent. Eventually, Slick and Dryden decided that either Bill Graham was going as their manager, or they were going. Slick even went so far as to try to negotiate a solo deal with Elektra Records -- as the voice on the hits, everyone was telling her she was the only one who mattered anyway. David Anderle, who was working for the label, agreed a deal with her, but Jac Holzman refused to authorise the deal, saying "Judy Collins doesn't get that much money, why should Grace Slick?" The group did fire Graham, and went one further and tried to become his competitors. They teamed up with the Grateful Dead to open a new venue, the Carousel Ballroom, to compete with the Fillmore, but after a few months they realised they were no good at running a venue and sold it to Graham. Graham, who was apparently unhappy with the fact that the people living around the Fillmore were largely Black given that the bands he booked appealed to mostly white audiences, closed the original Fillmore, renamed the Carousel the Fillmore West, and opened up a second venue in New York, the Fillmore East. The divisions in the band were getting worse -- Kaukonen and Casady were taking more and more speed, which was making them play longer and faster instrumental solos whether or not the rest of the band wanted them to, and Dryden, whose hands often bled from trying to play along with them, definitely did not want them to. But the group soldiered on and recorded their fourth album, Crown of Creation. This album contained several songs that were influenced by science fiction novels. The most famous of these was inspired by the right-libertarian author Robert Heinlein, who was hugely influential on the counterculture. Jefferson Airplane's friends the Monkees had already recorded a song based on Heinlein's The Door Into Summer, an unintentionally disturbing novel about a thirty-year-old man who falls in love with a twelve-year-old girl, and who uses a combination of time travel and cryogenic freezing to make their ages closer together so he can marry her: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "The Door Into Summer"] Now Jefferson Airplane were recording a song based on Heinlein's most famous novel, Stranger in a Strange Land. Stranger in a Strange Land has dated badly, thanks to its casual homophobia and rape-apologia, but at the time it was hugely popular in hippie circles for its advocacy of free love and group marriages -- so popular that a religion, the Church of All Worlds, based itself on the book. David Crosby had taken inspiration from it and written "Triad", a song asking two women if they'll enter into a polygamous relationship with him, and recorded it with the Byrds: [Excerpt: The Byrds, "Triad"] But the other members of the Byrds disliked the song, and it was left unreleased for decades. As Crosby was friendly with Jefferson Airplane, and as members of the band were themselves advocates of open relationships, they recorded their own version with Slick singing lead: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Triad"] The other song on the album influenced by science fiction was the title track, Paul Kantner's "Crown of Creation". This song was inspired by The Chrysalids, a novel by the British writer John Wyndham. The Chrysalids is one of Wyndham's most influential novels, a post-apocalyptic story about young children who are born with mutant superpowers and have to hide them from their parents as they will be killed if they're discovered. The novel is often thought to have inspired Marvel Comics' X-Men, and while there's an unpleasant eugenic taste to its ending, with the idea that two species can't survive in the same ecological niche and the younger, "superior", species must outcompete the old, that idea also had a lot of influence in the counterculture, as well as being a popular one in science fiction. Kantner's song took whole lines from The Chrysalids, much as he had earlier done with A.A. Milne: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Crown of Creation"] The Crown of Creation album was in some ways a return to the more focused songwriting of Surrealistic Pillow, although the sessions weren't without their experiments. Slick and Dryden collaborated with Frank Zappa and members of the Mothers of Invention on an avant-garde track called "Would You Like a Snack?" (not the same song as the later Zappa song of the same name) which was intended for the album, though went unreleased until a CD box set decades later: [Excerpt: Grace Slick and Frank Zappa, "Would You Like a Snack?"] But the finished album was generally considered less self-indulgent than After Bathing at Baxter's, and did better on the charts as a result. It reached number six, becoming their second and last top ten album, helped by the group's appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show in September 1968, a month after it came out. That appearance was actually organised by Colonel Tom Parker, who suggested them to Sullivan as a favour to RCA Records. But another TV appearance at the time was less successful. They appeared on the Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour, one of the most popular TV shows among the young, hip, audience that the group needed to appeal to, but Slick appeared in blackface. She's later said that there was no political intent behind this, and that she was just trying the different makeup she found in the dressing room as a purely aesthetic thing, but that doesn't really explain the Black power salute she gives at one point. Slick was increasingly obnoxious on stage, as her drinking was getting worse and her relationship with Dryden was starting to break down. Just before the Smothers Brothers appearance she was accused at a benefit for the Whitney Museum of having called the audience "filthy Jews", though she has always said that what she actually said was "filthy jewels", and she was talking about the ostentatious jewellery some of the audience were wearing. The group struggled through a performance at Altamont -- an event we will talk about in a future episode, so I won't go into it here, except to say that it was a horrifying experience for everyone involved -- and performed at Woodstock, before releasing their fifth studio album, Volunteers, in 1969: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Volunteers"] That album made the top twenty, but was the last album by the classic lineup of the band. By this point Spencer Dryden and Grace Slick had broken up, with Slick starting to date Kantner, and Dryden was also disappointed at the group's musical direction, and left. Balin also left, feeling sidelined in the group. They released several more albums with varying lineups, including at various points their old friend David Frieberg of Quicksilver Messenger Service, the violinist Papa John Creach, and the former drummer of the Turtles, Johnny Barbata. But as of 1970 the group's members had already started working on two side projects -- an acoustic band called Hot Tuna, led by Kaukonen and Casady, which sometimes also featured Balin, and a project called Paul Kantner's Jefferson Starship, which also featured Slick and had recorded an album, Blows Against the Empire, the second side of which was based on the Robert Heinlein novel Back to Methuselah, and which became one of the first albums ever nominated for science fiction's Hugo Awards: [Excerpt: Jefferson Starship, "Have You Seen The Stars Tonite"] That album featured contributions from David Crosby and members of the Grateful Dead, as well as Casady on two tracks, but  in 1974 when Kaukonen and Casady quit Jefferson Airplane to make Hot Tuna their full-time band, Kantner, Slick, and Frieberg turned Jefferson Starship into a full band. Over the next decade, Jefferson Starship had a lot of moderate-sized hits, with a varying lineup that at one time or another saw several members, including Slick, go and return, and saw Marty Balin back with them for a while. In 1984, Kantner left the group, and sued them to stop them using the Jefferson Starship name. A settlement was reached in which none of Kantner, Slick, Kaukonen, or Casady could use the words "Jefferson" or "Airplane" in their band-names without the permission of all the others, and the remaining members of Jefferson Starship renamed their band just Starship -- and had three number one singles in the late eighties with Slick on lead, becoming far more commercially successful than their precursor bands had ever been: [Excerpt: Starship, "We Built This City on Rock & Roll"] Slick left Starship in 1989, and there was a brief Jefferson Airplane reunion tour, with all the classic members but Dryden, but then Slick decided that she was getting too old to perform rock and roll music, and decided to retire from music and become a painter, something she's stuck to for more than thirty years. Kantner and Balin formed a new Jefferson Starship, called Jefferson Starship: The Next Generation, but Kantner died in January 2016, coincidentally on the same day as Signe Anderson, who had occasionally guested with her old bandmates in the new version of the band. Balin, who had quit the reunited Jefferson Starship due to health reasons, died two years later. Dryden had died in 2005. Currently, there are three bands touring that descend directly from Jefferson Airplane. Hot Tuna still continue to perform, there's a version of Starship that tours featuring one original member, Mickey Thomas, and the reunited Jefferson Starship still tour, led by David Frieberg. Grace Slick has given the latter group her blessing, and even co-wrote one song on their most recent album, released in 2020, though she still doesn't perform any more. Jefferson Airplane's period in the commercial spotlight was brief -- they had charting singles for only a matter of months, and while they had top twenty albums for a few years after their peak, they really only mattered to the wider world during that brief period of the Summer of Love. But precisely because their period of success was so short, their music is indelibly associated with that time. To this day there's nothing as evocative of summer 1967 as "White Rabbit", even for those of us who weren't born then. And while Grace Slick had her problems, as I've made very clear in this episode, she inspired a whole generation of women who went on to be singers themselves, as one of the first prominent women to sing lead with an electric rock band. And when she got tired of doing that, she stopped, and got on with her other artistic pursuits, without feeling the need to go back and revisit the past for ever diminishing returns. One might only wish that some of her male peers had followed her example.

america tv love music american new york history black church children chicago hollywood disney master apple uk rock washington mexico british san francisco west holiday washington dc arizona ohio spanish arts alabama spain tennessee detroit revolution strange north record fame island heroes jews nazis empire rev stone vietnam matrix ocean tribute southern california catholic beatles mothers cd crown cia philippines rolling stones west coast thompson oz elvis wizard finland rock and roll xmen pakistan bay area volunteers parks villains snacks garcia dolphins reports ashes turtles nest lives bob dylan purple big brother bands medicare san jose airplanes northern americana invention woodstock omaha lsd cream satisfaction ballad elvis presley pink floyd belgians newsweek republican party dino added californians marvel comics peter pan medicaid other side state department katz antioch grateful dead chronicle baxter alice in wonderland rock and roll hall of fame miles davis peace corps spence lovin family tree triumphs carousel buchanan mixcloud charlie chaplin tilt san francisco chronicle sly would you like frank zappa santa clara kt national endowment starship janis joplin headquarters ayn rand schmitt chaplin hippies slick monkees steely dan concierto bakersfield triad old west garfunkel rock music rca elektra runnin sketches buddy holly milne greenwich village white rabbit phil spector village voice get together haskell zappa byrds ravel spoonful levis jerry garcia heartbeats doris day jefferson airplane stranger in a strange land fillmore brian jones glen campbell george bernard shaw steve ditko bolero david crosby my best friend wyndham levi strauss all you need lonely hearts club band whitney museum superior court harry nilsson methuselah jacques brel judy collins sgt pepper heinlein dryden ed sullivan show tom wolfe buffalo springfield weavers bessie smith great society rca records robert heinlein objectivism altamont jefferson starship ken kesey run around bob weir this life john phillips acid tests holding company golden gate park sly stone aranjuez ricky nelson bill graham haight ashbury elektra records grace slick san franciscan ditko bluesman carter family john sebastian tennessee georgia family dog colonel tom parker abbie hoffman bill thompson mercury records town criers roger mcguinn balin tommy oliver charles lloyd jorma fillmore east smothers brothers rickenbacker merry pranksters van dyke parks gary davis one flew over the cuckoo mystic arts hot tuna john wyndham monterey pop festival milt jackson jorma kaukonen antioch college jackie deshannon we built this city dave van ronk mothers of invention echoplex cass elliot monterey jazz festival yippies fillmore west mickey thomas slicks moby grape roy buchanan ian buchanan wellingtons jimmy brown jack nitzsche quicksilver messenger service paul kantner kesey al schmitt marty balin fred neil kantner casady surrealistic pillow all worlds jack casady blues project bob harvey bobby gentry skip spence john hammond jr billy roberts jac holzman papa john creach tilt araiza
GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST
Long Strange Tech, part 2

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 89:28


The Deadcast concludes its dive into the Grateful Dead's entanglement with technology, exploring Jerry Garcia's digital graphics obsession, how Dead Head online communities helped shape the emergent internet, lyricist John Perry Barlow's manifestoes, & more. Guests: Paul Martin, Mary Eisenhart, David Gans, Steve Silberman, Bob Bralove, Dan English, Doug Oade, Christian Crumlish, Charlie Miller, John Markoff, Erik Davis, Michael CaloreSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

music san francisco tech oregon dead strange band cats beatles rolling stones doors guitar bob dylan psychedelics woodstock lsd vinyl pink floyd cornell neil young jimi hendrix warner brothers grateful dead john mayer ripple avalon janis joplin chuck berry music podcasts classic rock dawg wilco phish rock music prog huey lewis american beauty dave matthews band music history vampire weekend hells angels jerry garcia merle haggard red rocks jefferson airplane fillmore ccr dark star los lobos truckin' seva deadheads watkins glen allman brothers band dso buffalo springfield bruce hornsby arista my morning jacket altamont ken kesey bob weir pigpen acid tests dmb long strange trip psychedelic rock warren haynes bill graham jim james music commentary haight ashbury billy strings trey anastasio erik davis fare thee well phil lesh family dog robert hunter jam bands don was winterland rhino records veneta mickey hart david lemieux time crisis merry pranksters wall of sound charlie miller disco biscuits david grisman live dead nrbq string cheese incident relix steve silberman ramrod neal casal john markoff steve parish oteil burbridge jug band john perry barlow jgb quicksilver messenger service david browne jerry garcia band jesse jarnow mother hips david fricke circles around the sun deadcast david gans jrad ratdog acid rock sugar magnolia touch of grey we are everywhere brent mydland jeff chimenti ken babbs box of rain christian crumlish mars hotel new riders of the purple sage sunshine daydream vince welnick aoxomoxoa capital theater owlsley stanley
GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST
Long Strange Tech, part 1

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 71:46


The Deadcast explores the Grateful Dead's long-term cosmic entanglement with the California technology world & the architecture of the internet itself, featuring biomusic pioneer Ned Lagin, Dead Heads at the Stanford AI Lab & Apple, sonic heroes from Alembic & Meyer Sound, & more.Guests: Ned Lagin, Ron Wickersham, Susan Wickersham, Daniel Kottke, John Meyer, Helen Meyer, Paul Martin, Andy Moorer, Steve Silberman, Erik Davis, John MarkoffSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

music california apple san francisco tech oregon dead strange band cats beatles rolling stones doors guitar bob dylan psychedelics woodstock lsd vinyl pink floyd cornell neil young jimi hendrix warner brothers grateful dead john mayer ripple avalon janis joplin chuck berry music podcasts classic rock dawg wilco phish rock music prog huey lewis american beauty dave matthews band music history vampire weekend hells angels jerry garcia merle haggard red rocks jefferson airplane fillmore ccr dark star los lobos truckin' seva deadheads watkins glen allman brothers band dso paul martin buffalo springfield bruce hornsby arista my morning jacket altamont ken kesey bob weir pigpen acid tests dmb long strange trip psychedelic rock warren haynes bill graham jim james music commentary haight ashbury billy strings trey anastasio erik davis fare thee well phil lesh family dog robert hunter jam bands don was winterland rhino records veneta mickey hart david lemieux time crisis john meyer merry pranksters wall of sound disco biscuits david grisman live dead nrbq string cheese incident relix steve silberman ramrod neal casal steve parish jgb oteil burbridge jug band john perry barlow quicksilver messenger service david browne jerry garcia band alembic jesse jarnow mother hips david fricke circles around the sun deadcast jrad ratdog acid rock sugar magnolia touch of grey we are everywhere brent mydland jeff chimenti ken babbs meyer sound box of rain mars hotel new riders of the purple sage sunshine daydream capital theater vince welnick aoxomoxoa helen meyer owlsley stanley
The Opperman Report
About Jasun Horsley

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 53:25


Jasun Horsley spent his early life fleeing from a sense of unreality and has been trying to get to the bottom of it ever since. A childhood love of superheroes became an adolescent passion for movies and eventually transmogrified into an obsession with the occult. In forty-five years of earthly existence, he has been a New York barfly, a Hollywood wanna-be, a sorcerer-chaser in Mexico, an acid-eater on Haight-Ashbury. He had an End-Times community in Taos, was destitute in North Africa, begged in Paris, lived with Benedictine monks in France, ran with the bulls in Pamplona, had alien encounters in Navarra, apprenticed with a shaman in Guatemala, lost his mind in Columbia, made digital movies in London, edited a newspaper in Oaxaca, read Tarot in Portugal, saw UFOs in Patmos, ran an existential detective agency, and followed a guru in Canada. He is currently working with Dave Oshana and laying the groundwork for his next incarnation. While sure his life is fiction, he has yet to meet the author. He has written several books under the names Jake and Jason Horsley and Aeolus Kephas, and had a run of podcasts, "Stormy Weather" and "Warty Theorems." His official website is www.auticulture.com

The Opperman Report
About Jasun Horsley

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 53:25


Jasun Horsley spent his early life fleeing from a sense of unreality and has been trying to get to the bottom of it ever since. A childhood love of superheroes became an adolescent passion for movies and eventually transmogrified into an obsession with the occult. In forty-five years of earthly existence, he has been a New York barfly, a Hollywood wanna-be, a sorcerer-chaser in Mexico, an acid-eater on Haight-Ashbury. He had an End-Times community in Taos, was destitute in North Africa, begged in Paris, lived with Benedictine monks in France, ran with the bulls in Pamplona, had alien encounters in Navarra, apprenticed with a shaman in Guatemala, lost his mind in Columbia, made digital movies in London, edited a newspaper in Oaxaca, read Tarot in Portugal, saw UFOs in Patmos, ran an existential detective agency, and followed a guru in Canada. He is currently working with Dave Oshana and laying the groundwork for his next incarnation. While sure his life is fiction, he has yet to meet the author. He has written several books under the names Jake and Jason Horsley and Aeolus Kephas, and had a run of podcasts, "Stormy Weather" and "Warty Theorems." His official website is www.auticulture.com

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST
REWIND: Europe ‘72: Denmark

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 124:02


We present an encore of the Deadcast's Denmark episode from earlier this year to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Europe ‘72's proper release, as well as to get you ready for (or debrief you from) the Meet-Up At The Movies presentation of the Dead's historic Danish telecast.Guests: Sam Cutler, Steve Parish, Mountain Girl, Donna Jean Godchaux MacKay, Ben Haller, Alan Trist, Jim Sullivan, Gijsbert Hanekroot, John Morris, Sam Field, David Lemieux, MC Taylor, Lars Bennike, Bjørn Lindstrøm, Hans Francke, Jens Skovby, Palle Lykke, Lars Movin, Graeme Boone, Shaugn O'DonnellSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

music europe san francisco oregon dead band cats beatles rolling stones doors denmark bj guitar bob dylan psychedelics danish woodstock lsd vinyl pink floyd cornell neil young jimi hendrix warner brothers grateful dead john mayer ripple avalon janis joplin chuck berry music podcasts classic rock dawg wilco phish rock music prog huey lewis american beauty dave matthews band music history vampire weekend hells angels jerry garcia merle haggard red rocks jefferson airplane fillmore ccr dark star los lobos truckin' seva deadheads watkins glen allman brothers band dso john morris buffalo springfield bruce hornsby arista my morning jacket altamont ken kesey lindstr bob weir pigpen acid tests dmb long strange trip psychedelic rock warren haynes bill graham jim james music commentary haight ashbury billy strings trey anastasio fare thee well phil lesh family dog jim sullivan robert hunter jam bands don was winterland rhino records veneta mickey hart david lemieux time crisis merry pranksters wall of sound disco biscuits david grisman nrbq live dead string cheese incident relix ramrod neal casal steve parish jgb oteil burbridge jug band john perry barlow quicksilver messenger service david browne jerry garcia band jesse jarnow mother hips david fricke circles around the sun deadcast jrad ratdog acid rock sugar magnolia touch of grey we are everywhere brent mydland jeff chimenti ken babbs box of rain mars hotel new riders of the purple sage sunshine daydream vince welnick aoxomoxoa capital theater owlsley stanley
GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST

The Grateful Deadcast celebrates Bobby Weir's 75th with the birthday boy himself, exploring Weir's world with Don Was, Jeff Chimenti, members of the expanded Wolfpack, & orchestral collaborator Giancarlo Aquilanti. Guests: Bobby Weir, Don Was, Jeff Chimenti, Barry Sless, Giancarlo AquilantiSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Biblioteca Del Metal
Journey - (No Dejes De Creer En El Rock)

Biblioteca Del Metal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 111:06


Colabora Con Biblioteca Del Metal: En Twitter - https://twitter.com/Anarkometal72 Y Donanos Unas Propinas En BAT. Para Seguir Con El Proyecto De la Biblioteca Mas Grande Del Metal. Muchisimas Gracias. La Tienda De Biblioteca Del Metal: Encontraras, Ropa, Accesorios,Decoracion, Ect... Todo Relacionado Al Podcats Biblioteca Del Metal Y Al Mundo Del Heavy Metal. Descubrela!!!!!! Ideal Para Llevarte O Regalar Productos Del Podcats De Ivoox. (Por Tiempo Limitado) https://teespring.com/es/stores/biblioteca-del-metal-1 Journey es una banda de rock creada en 1973 en San Francisco, Estados Unidos, por el teclista Gregg Rolie y el guitarrista Neal Schon, integrantes originales de Santana. De estilo rock progresivo en sus inicios, fue cambiando a un estilo más melódico con la incorporación del vocalista Steve Perry en 1978, quien con su voz convirtió a la banda en una de las más destacadas de los años 1980, con ventas de más de 75 millones de discos en todo el mundo convirtiéndolos en uno de los artistas más exitosos de todos los tiempos​ Journey alcanzó la cima del éxito en 1981 con el álbum Escape, que contenía canciones como «Open Arms», «Who's Crying Now» y «Don't Stop Believin'». Durante ese período, la banda lanzó una serie de canciones de éxito, incluyendo «Don't Stop Believin'» de 1981, el más vendido en la historia de iTunes​​​ Las raíces de Journey se encuentran en San Francisco, donde en 1971 el representante de Carlos Santana, Walter Herbie Herbert, decidió organizar una banda de músicos, originalmente llamada The Golden Gate Rhythm Section. Insatisfecho con la dirección musical que buscaba Santana, el teclista/vocalista Gregg Rolie y el guitarrista Neal Schon dejaron la banda en 1972. Prairie Prince de The Tubes, el bajista Ross Valory de Frumious Bandersnatch, y el guitarrista rítmico George Tickner fueron añadidos al nuevo proyecto. Tras un infructuoso concurso radial que buscaba un nombre para el grupo, Jack Villanueva​ sugirió el nombre "Journey.".​ La primera aparición pública del grupo fue en Winterland en la víspera de año nuevo en 1973. Al día siguiente volaron a Hawái a tocar en el Crater Festival. A comienzos de 1973, Prairie Prince se reunió con su antiguo grupo, The Tubes, así que Herbert trajo a Aynsley Dunbar, un baterista que había tocado con John Lennon, Frank Zappa, John Mayall, Jeff Beck, Bonzo Dog Band, Mothers of Invention, Lou Reed, y David Bowie. El 5 de febrero de 1974, la nueva conformación del grupo debutó en el Great American Music Hall, asegurando un contrato con Columbia Records. Journey lanzó su álbum homónimo en 1975. Ese mismo año Journey invitó a Albert King a uno de sus conciertos. El disco mostraba el considerable talento de la banda para la música jazz-fusión y el rock progresivo. El guitarrista rítmico Tickner dejó la banda poco antes de la grabación del segundo álbum del grupo, Look into the Future (1976), el cual le bajó el tono al sonido progresivo del primer disco, pero retuvo su base de jazz-fusión. El siguiente disco, Next, intentó reducir la duración de sus canciones para apelar a una mayor audiencia, e incluyó a Neal Schon cantando varias de las canciones, pero aun así, el éxito comercial seguía eludiéndoles. Con las ventas mediocres de Next el grupo fue presionado por el estudio para cambiar de dirección y buscar un nuevo cantante. Como resultado, Journey trajo a Robert Fleischman. Nativo del sur de California, Fleischman había estado tocando con un grupo de Chicago cuando su representante, Barry Fey, lo trajo a Denver en 1977 para una entrevista con ejecutivos de un estudio. "Estaba nevando mucho y no sabíamos si los ejecutivos iban a lograr llegar a la reunión, pero luego aparecieron muchas personas de la Costa Oeste y de la Costa Este" recuerda Fleischman.​​ Él fue "descubierto" por un ejecutivo de la CBS en dicha reunión, y un par de semanas después, fue enviado a San Francisco para una audición con Journey. A Fleischman le fue notificado que la banda buscaba un estilo más popular, similar al de Foreigner o Boston, por lo que Fleischman supo que su vocalización inspirada por Robert Plant de Led Zeppelin sería un extra. Sin embargo, la potencia de la banda a la que él se intentaba unir, lo impresionó. En su primera sesión de estudio juntos, Fleishman señala, "Era como... tener fuegos artificiales en la bolsa de atrás. Ellos llevaban tanto tiempo tocando juntos, y lo hacían tan bien, que era grandioso tocar con gente así".​ Dichas sesiones produjeron el tema "For You," que luego aparecería en Time, y "Wheel in the Sky," que luego fue re-editada sin Fleischman para el disco Infinity. Fleischman salió de gira con la banda a inicios del año siguiente, pero su lugar en el grupo tenía las horas contadas. Mantuvo a su propio representante, Barry Fey, lo cual demostró ser una constante confrontación con el representante de Journey, Herbie Herbert. Adicionalmente, Herbert parecía no estar dispuesto a dejar que la nueva dirección de la banda saliera a relucir de inmediato, lo cual terminó en situaciones como que Fleischman tenía que agitar una pandereta mientras el resto del grupo seguía tocando sus canciones antiguas para su grupo de seguidores jazz-fusión. Fleischman también chocó con otros miembros del grupo debido a que, aparentemente, no era un escritor de canciones muy productivo.​ El representante Herbie Herbert había oído mencionar al cantante Steve Perry, quien había pasado recientemente por la ruptura de su grupo Alien Project. Tras oír una demo de Perry (que Jack Villanueva le había hecho llegar), Herbie supo que había que hacer un cambio. Tras un interesante entretiempo durante el que Perry fue presentado a la banda (se le dijo a Fleischman que Perry era el primo portugués de Villanueva), Fleischman fue despedido. Perry hizo su debut público con Journey en el Old Waldorf en San Francisco, el 28 de octubre de 1977. Perry conoció a Schon, y la pareja rápidamente escribió su primera canción, "Patiently", que aparecería en el disco Infinity de 1978. Perry aportó su voz de contratenor, limpia y poderosa, a canciones como "Lights," "Wheel in the Sky," y "Anytime." Además, el productor de Queen, Roy Thomas Baker (originalmente traído por Fleischman) ayudó a darle más capas al sonido de la banda. Los cambios funcionaron, y Journey saltó al estrellato. Infinity llegó al puesto Nº 21 en ventas de discos y le dio a Journey su primer disco de platino. Sin embargo, no todos los miembros del grupo estaban felices con la nueva dirección musical. En septiembre de 1978, el baterista Aynsley Dunbar fue despedido y reemplazado por Steve Smith,​​ quien había estudiado jazz en la prestigiosa escuela Berklee en Boston, Massachusetts. El siguiente álbum de la banda, Evolution produjo el primer sencillo Top 20 de Journey, "Lovin', Touchin', Squeezin.'" El álbum Departure (1980) extendió el ascenso del grupo, llegando al n.º 8 en ventas de discos. «Any Way You Want It» fue un éxito Top 25 con amplia difusión en la radio. Luego, Journey fue a Japón a grabar la banda sonora de la película Dream After Dream, a petición del director de dicho filme. En este punto, los conciertos en vivo eran llenados por fanáticos que favorecían la nueva dirección musical del grupo, con algunos celebrando a Perry como alguna vez se hizo con Elvis Presley (sin embargo, el grupo tocaba sus viejas canciones durante los descansos de Perry tras bambalinas). Journey estaba destinado al éxito en gran escala, y a inicios de 1981 lanzó un disco en vivo llamado Captured, grabado durante los conciertos de la gira Departure en 1980. Las primeras 5 canciones del disco fueron del concierto del 8 de agosto en el Fórum de Montreal (Quebec). Otras 2 fueron de conciertos en Tokio y el resto del Cobo Hall en Detroit. Exhausto de tanto salir de gira, Rolie dejó el grupo, siendo esta la segunda vez que abandonaba una banda exitosa en su carrera.​ Recomendó a Jonathan Cain de The Babys para que lo reemplazara.​ Como si pudiera predecir el ambiente musical de los 1980s, Cain favoreció el uso del sintetizador por encima del órgano Hammond de Rolie. El grupo sabía que se les estaba uniendo un gran teclista, pero ignoraban lo poderoso de las habilidades de Cain para escribir canciones. En 1981, el séptimo disco de estudio de Journey, Escape llegó al n.º 1 de las listas, y finalmente se convirtió en su disco más vendido y popular, siendo 9 veces disco de platino. Los sencillos «Who's Crying Now», «Don't Stop Believin'» y «Open Arms» llegaron al Top 10. El trabajado sonido de la banda, encabezada por el distintivo sonido (y pronto, ampliamente imitado) de Steve Perry, se convirtió en una presencia popular en la radio. El canal MTV grabó uno de sus dos conciertos a sala llena en Houston, Texas, el 6 de noviembre de 1981 en frente de más de 20.000 aficionados.​ En particular, «Don't Stop Believin'» mostraba lo bien logrado del rango de contratenor de Perry en conjunto con el piano de Cain y la dinámica guitarra de Schon. «Open Arms», que estuvo 6 semanas en el n.º 2 en las listas de popularidad, ayudaron a establecer a Journey como el estándar del rock de los años ochenta. Tal éxito le valió poco a Journey con los críticos de música. La Rolling Stone Record Guide de 1983 le dio a cada uno de sus discos solo una estrella, y el crítico Dave Marsh escribió que «Journey era un callejón sin salida para el rock de San Francisco... excesiva trivialidad... banalidad... una explotación de un acto cínico». Marsh luego añadió Escape como uno de los peores discos en llegar al n.º 1 en la historia. Con justicia o no, los críticos a menudo categorizaban a Journey con otros actos de rock corporativo como Foreigner, Asia y Survivor. Journey también fue uno de los primeros grupos en ser patrocinado por una empresa grande, Budweiser, al cual mencionaban en las portadas de sus discos. Esto contribuyó a su imagen negativa de rock corporativo, o más precisamente, rock patrocinado por empresas. El representante Herbie Herbert, sin embargo, comentó al respecto que «se debe sembrar mientras dure la primavera»[11] La banda claramente había cortado con sus raíces hippies de Haight-Ashbury. En 1982, la banda aportó la canción «Only Solutions» a la película Tron de Disney. Casualmente, ese mismo año Journey se volvió el primer grupo en inspirar un videojuego: el arcade Journey por Bally/Midway, y Journey Escape de Data Age, para el Atari 2600. El próximo disco de Journey, Frontiers (1983), continuó su éxito comercial. Llegó al n.º 2 de ventas, y produjo 4 sencillos exitosos, de los cuales «Faithfully» y «Separate Ways» llegaron a n.º 12 y 8, respectivamente. La presencia de Cain continuó siendo fuerte en este disco, tanto por ser cantautor (él solo escribió «Faithfully») como por su uso de sintetizadores. Había llegado la era de MTV, y la popularidad de Journey se incrementó por un vídeo musical de corte documental acerca de «Faithfully», que mostraba a varios miembros del grupo con sus familias de gira, y que ayudó a que la canción se ganara un lugar, junto con «Turn the Page» de Bob Seger y «The Load's Out» de Jackson Browne, como una canción favorita para conciertos. Las escenas del documental fueron rodadas en Estadio JFK en Filadelfia, Pensilvania, con más de 80.000 aficionados presentes.​ Poco tiempo después, la banda recibió una petición de un joven moribundo de 16 años llamado Kenny Sykaluk, quien luchaba contra la fibrosis quística. Kenny quería conocer a la banda. Journey honró el deseo de Kenny, y no sólo lo visitaron en su cama, sino que le obsequiaron un walkman con su último sencillo, «Only the Young». Kenny murió en menos de un día después. En el episodio de Behind the Music de Journey, Jonathan Cain lloró al recordar la visita a Kenny, mientras que Neal Schon dijo que dicha visita «cambió mi forma de ver la vida». El cantante Steve Perry recibió mucho del crédito por el éxito de Journey. En 1984, lanzó un disco como solista, Street Talk, el cual tuvo éxito y lanzó un sencillo popular, cuyo vídeo fue emitido en MTV, llamado «Oh Sherrie». Perry también grabó Don't Fight It (1982), con Kenny Loggins. El guitarrista Neal Schon produjo dos discos con Jan Hammer en 1981 y 1983, y en 1985 fue parte del proyecto Hagar Schon Aaronson Shrieve (junto a Sammy Hagar, Kenny Aaronson y Michael Shrieve). Tras el lanzamiento de su disco en solitario, Perry tomó el control de la dirección musical en estudio de la banda. Para decepción del representante Herbie Herbert, el bajista Ross Valory y el baterista Steve Smith fueron despedidos de la banda por diferencias musicales y profesionales, y en 1986 Journey lanzó su álbum Raised on Radio como un trío Perry, Schon, y Cain. Varios músicos de estudio llenaron las dos vacantes, entre ellos el ahora jurado de American Idol, Randy Jackson y el establecido músico de estudio Larrie Londin. La producción se detuvo constantemente, debido a la decadente salud de la madre de Perry, Mary Pereira. Al final, el álbum vendió dos millones de copias. Una truncada gira le siguió, presentando a Jackson en el bajo y a Mike Baird en la batería. Luego, Perry, exhausto de tantas giras, sufriendo por la reciente muerte de su madre (con quien tuvo una relación muy cercana) y el colapso de su relación de 6 años con Sherrie Swafford, dejó Journey en 1987, terminando el recorrido de la banda en la cima. A pesar de trabajar en un proyecto en solitario en 1989 titulado Against The Wall, el cual finalmente fue desechado, Steve Perry abandonó la industria musical por varios años antes de grabar «For the Love of Strange Medicine» en 1994 y lanzar un compilado de grandes éxitos en 1998. Neal Schon y Jonathan Cain hicieron equipo con los ex-Babys (la antigua banda de Cain), John Waite y Ricky Phillips, formando Bad English con el baterista Deen Castronovo en 1988. Además, cada uno grabó discos en solitario. Luego, Schon y Castronovo se unieron al grupo del cuñado de Schon, Hardline. Steve Smith se metió de lleno en su proyecto de jazz, Vital Information, el cual eventualmente llegó a desarrollar un grupo de fanáticos de tamaño respetable. En 1991, Ross Valory, Steve Smith, y Greg Rolie se unieron a The Storm con el cantante Kevin Chalfant y el guitarrista Josh Ramos. De 1987 a 1995, Journey observó cómo crecía la venta de sus discos. Lanzaron tres recopilatorios, los cuales lograron excelentes ventas. En 1993, Kevin Chalfant (de The Storm) tocó con los miembros de Journey en algunos conciertos, y Schon, Cain, Valory, Smith y Rolie consideraron brevemente una reunión bajo el nombre de Journey con Chalfant como cantante, pero al final tal proyecto no fructificó. Ese año, Steve Perry propuso volver a la banda bajo la condición de que se cambiara de representante. Herbie Herbert fue despedido y se eligió a Irving Azoff, y en 1995 Perry volvió una vez más a Journey. En 1995, la formación que tenía Journey en 1981 volvió a juntarse. Perry, Schon, Smith, Cain, y Valory volvieron al estudio y produjeron el famoso disco Trial by Fire en 1996, que incluye los éxitos «When You Love a Woman» y «Message of Love», nominado a un Grammy. Tras el éxito de Trial by Fire, los miembros de Journey se prepararon para una gira prometedora. La sensación causada en los medios y la emoción alrededor de volver a ver a la banda de gira fueron intensas, pero todo esto llegó a un abrupto final cuando Perry se lastimó la cadera en una caminata en Háwai. Perry probablemente iba a necesitar un reemplazo de cadera. A pesar de esto, le fue difícil tomar una decisión respecto a su estado de salud (pues le era imposible presentarse en el escenario sin someterse a dicha cirugía), pero en 1998 la banda lo presionó para que tomara una decisión. Cuando Perry rehusó a operarse, Cain y Schon decidieron continuar la banda sin él. El baterista Steve Smith decidió dejar la banda en esa misma época, para volver a Vital Information. En febrero de 2001, la banda participó en un episodio de Behind the Music en VH1, pero algunos comentarios hechos durante la grabación del programa contribuyeron a calentar los ánimos entre Perry y el resto de la banda. Ese mismo año, Herbie Herbert ofreció una entrevista en la que él daba su propia opinión acerca de la historia del grupo.[12] Luego, en 2003, Robert Fleischman comentó su propia participación en el grupo.[13] En 1998 Journey se vio buscando baterista y cantante. La plaza de baterista fue llenada por Deen Castronovo, compañero de Schon y Cain en Bad English, y que entonces tocaba con Hardline. El nuevo cantante fue Steve Augeri, anteriormente de Tyketto y Tall Stories. Augeri había abandonado el negocio de la música y trabajaba como gerente en una tienda de The Gap en Nueva York. Augeri recibió una llamada telefónica de Schon, quien había escuchado su demo. Schon lo invitó a audicionar para la banda y, a pesar de no haber cantado mucho en tiempos recientes, impresionó a los miembros de Journey lo suficiente como para obtener el trabajo. El parecido de Augeri con Perry, tanto visual, vocal, y hasta en su nombre, causó cierto revuelo entre los fanáticos más antiguos, ayudado por la popularidad de internet y sus foros. Algunos fanes rechazaron a un Journey sin Steve Perry. Otros se volvieron verdaderos fanes de Steve Augeri, culpando a Perry por la decaída popularidad de la banda. Pero la mayoría de los fanáticos dudaron del cambio y (tras oírlo en vivo o en disco) aceptaron a Steve Augeri. Además de su talento, esto tenía mucho que ver con la personalidad del nuevo cantante: era extremadamente amable y simpático con cada nuevo fanático que conocía. La nueva formación de Journey rápidamente volvió a trabajar, grabando una canción para la película Armageddon llamada «Remember Me». En 2001, lanzaron su siguiente disco de estudio, Arrival. El disco originalmente fue publicado en Japón a finales de 2000, pero debido a que algunas de las canciones del disco se filtraron y terminaron en internet con comentarios mayormente negativos de los fanes por su sonido de balada, Journey decidió demorar un poco el lanzamiento de dicho disco en Estados Unidos y añadir dos canciones más pesadas para la versión estadounidense. «All the Way», de dicho disco, se convirtió en un éxito menor. En 2003, la banda lanzó un CD con cuatro canciones titulado Red 13, cuyo diseño de portada fue escogido en un concurso de fanes. En 2005, la banda se embarcó en su gira de 30 aniversario, regalando copias promocionales de su último lanzamiento de estudio, Generations para ganadores seleccionados en cada concierto. Tales conciertos, que duraban tres horas, eran divididos en dos partes: la primera con material de la época de su mayor fama (algunas de esas canciones, tocadas en vivo por primera vez en décadas), mientras que la segunda parte comprendía Escape y otros. La reputación de Journey ante la crítica no mejoró al cabo del tiempo: la edición de 2004 del Rolling Stone Album Guide llama a Journey el «acto de karaoke perfecto», y no le da más de dos estrellas y media (de cinco posibles) a ninguno de sus discos. Varias bandas tributo de Journey se han formado por todo Estados Unidos, con distintos grados de éxito (usualmente en escala local), y el cantante Kevin Chalfant de The Storm ocasionalmente se juntaba con The Gregg Rolie Band para tocar algunos éxitos de Journey de la época 1978-1980. Aunque ha sido criticado como un grupo de orden corporativo, Journey ha retenido una masa de fanes fiel a lo largo de su carrera; su música aparece en programas de TV y películas. La radio a menudo toca sus éxitos, exponiendo su música a nuevas generaciones de oyentes. Journey ganó nuevas atenciones en la década del 2000, debido a que Randy Jackson, tras su participación con Journey, se convirtió en un ejecutivo musical muy exitoso, y luego en juez de American Idol. Vídeos de Jackson con la banda se han mostrado en el programa, y varios de los participantes han intentado cantar canciones de Journey. Los más recordados han sido Clay Aiken cantando «Open Arms» en una semifinal (y luego a dúo con Kelly Clarkson en una gira de conciertos), y Elliott Yamin, también con dicha canción, en la semifinal de 2006. Judy Torres lanzó una versión del sencillo «Faithfully» en 2005. La canción «Don't Stop Believin'» se convirtió en un himno de batalla de la Serie Mundial de 2004, donde los campeones Medias Rojas de Boston ganaron la serie tras ir abajo 3 juegos a 0 contra los Yankees en la serie de división de la Liga Americana y también en 2005, donde en el desfile de la victoria de los Chicago White Sox, Steve Perry fue invitado para que cantara con miembros del equipo. El 6 de febrero de 2005 «Don't Stop Believin'» salió en un anuncio de FedEx, en el que salía Burt Reynolds y que fue programado durante el Super Bowl XXXIX. En diciembre de 2005, «Don't Stop Believin'» llegó al n.º 13 en la lista Hot Digital Songs, y fue nominada para dos categorías en unos premios de VH1. En julio de 2007, la canción apareció en la escena final de la serie de HBO The Sopranos. Petra Haden lanzó un cover de la canción en septiembre de 2007. En 2003, Journey fue admitido al Salón de la Fama de la Música de San Francisco. A la ceremonia asistieron Gregg Rolie, Jonathan Cain, Steve Smith, Ross Valory, Neal Schon, Aynsley Dunbar, Deen Castronovo, y Steve Augeri. Dos años más tarde, el 21 de enero de 2005, Journey recibió una estrella en el Paseo de la Fama de Hollywood, y Steve Perry apareció de sorpresa en la ceremonia. Las relaciones con el resto del grupo mejoraron, pero Perry dijo que no había posibilidad de una reunión con su antigua banda en el futuro cercano. Diez miembros de Journey se juntaron ese día: Perry, Augeri, Cain, Castronovo, Dunbar, Fleischman, Schon, Smith, George Tickner, y Valory. En 2009, la serie Glee, del canal Fox, hace varias referencias a Journey en diferentes capítulos de la primera temporada, siendo Don't Stop Believin' la canción principal del primer capítulo de la serie. En la temporada final, se realiza un «Journey Medley». En julio de 2006, Steve Augeri comenzó a experimentar problemas con su voz y fue obligado a renunciar. Anunció que dejaría la banda por un tiempo debido a una infección en la garganta que requería que dejara descansar a sus cuerdas vocales.  La banda trajo a Jeff Scott Soto para sustituirlo. Además, Deen Castronovo, quien llevaba tiempo cantando los coros e incluso sustituyendo a Augeri como cantante, cantó en power ballads como «Faithfully» y «Open Arms». El 19 de diciembre de 2006 la banda emitió un comunicado en su página oficial, donde nombraban a Soto como vocalista permanente.​ Sin embargo, el 12 de junio de 2007, Journey anunció la salida de Soto.​ El breve periodo de Jeff Scott Soto como vocalista se parece al igualmente breve periodo de Robert Fleischman en la misma posición en 1977, de la cual salió la decisión de contratar a Steve Perry. Los fanes especulan​ que la banda persigue la misma cadena de sucesos que hace 30 años les dio resultado. En septiembre de 2007, empezaron a circular fotos del poco conocido cantante Arnel Pineda con Journey. En el sitio oficial de Journey se da el comunicado oficial que Arnel Pineda será el nuevo vocalista oficial. Pineda tocaba con el grupo The Zoo​ el cual se dedicaba a tocar versiones de varias bandas. Neal Schon lo encontró por YouTube. Se contactó con él y luego de una soberbia audición fue incorporado a la banda. Su primera presentación oficial con Journey se realizó el 21 de febrero del 2008 en el Festival Internacional de la Canción de Viña del Mar en Chile con una transmisión televisiva en conjunto para 80 países y en vivo por señales locales, de cable y el afamado canal A&E. Pineda derrochó energía y logró cautivar a todo el público con su voz muy parecida a la de Steve Perry y su gran presencia escénica, rejuveneciendo a la banda y dejando en segundo plano su carácter de absoluto novato. Los periódicos y sitios de Internet de foros audiovisuales tipo YouTube se plagaron a los pocos minutos de sendos elogios para el nuevo vocalista y a su vez la prensa especializada nacional como extranjera alabó la presentación del grupo.​ Journey dio luego un concierto en el Estadio San Carlos de Apoquindo de Santiago, Chile, el 23 de febrero del 2008 junto a Peter Frampton y Earth, Wind & Fire, constituyéndose Chile en la única parada que se realizaría en Sudamérica con un gran éxito. Su siguiente álbum, Revelation, debutó en el n.º 5 en las listas de Billboard, vendiendo más de 196.000 unidades en sus dos primeras semanas y manteniéndose en el top 20 durante 6 semanas.​Journey también encontró el éxito en las listas contemporáneas, donde el sencillo «After All These Years» pasó más de 23 semanas alcanzando el número 9.​ Los ingresos procedentes de la gira del 2008 la convirtieron en una de las más taquilleras del año, recaudando más de 35 millones de dólares.​ El 18 de diciembre de 2008, el álbum Revelation fue certificado disco de platino por la RIAA.​​ El segundo álbum de la banda con Pineda, Eclipse, fue lanzado el 24 de mayo de 2011, y debutó en el n.º 13 en el Billboard 200.​ En noviembre de 2011, Journey lanzó su segunda recopilación de grandes éxitos, titulada Journey: Greatest Hits: Volume 2, que incluye canciones escogidas por el exvocalista Steve Perry. Durante la gira del año 2015, el baterista Deen Castronovo fue reemplazado por el músico de sesión Omar Hakim.​ Luego la banda anunció que Steve Smith retornaría nuevamente a ocupar el puesto de baterista en Journey. 25 de Junio 2021 nuevo single de Journey «The Way We Used To Be» es la primera canción que se estrena con la formación actual de Journey, compuesta por el guitarrista Neal Schon, el cantante Arnel Pineda y el teclista Jonathan Cain junto con las últimas incorporaciones: el batería Narada Michael Walden, el bajista Randy Jackson y teclista y cantante Jason Derlatka. A lo largo de diferentes entrevistas, el guitarrista Neal Schon ha dado a entender que esta nueva entrega discográfica está bastante avanzada, y que con suerte verá la luz antes de que termine el presente ejercicio. “Ya tenemos como seis temas rockeros», comentaba Schon en una entrevista con Rock & Review de FOX17 a finales del pasado año, y añadía que publicaran unos tres singles antes de estrenar el álbum completo e iniciar su gira de presentación. 29 de Julio de 2021 Deen Castronovo vuelve a Journey El guitarrista de Journey, Neal Schon, ha confirmado en las redes sociales que el ex baterista Deen Castronovo se ha reincorporado a la banda. Schon confirmó el regreso de Castronovo en una serie de comentarios en Facebook debajo de una historia del San Francisco Chronicle sobre Journey, que compartió el miércoles. Un fan comentó en la publicación, «Entonces, ¿Deen Castronovo está de vuelta en la banda ahora a tiempo completo?» a lo que Schon respondió simplemente, «Sí». Respondiendo a otro fan que imploró a la banda que «traigan de vuelta a Deen de nuevo», escribió Schon, «Deen ha vuelto. Ahora somos dobles (2) bateristas con Narada [Michael Walden, que se unió a la banda en 2020]». Schon no reveló hasta qué punto Castronovo participará en los espectáculos de Journey inmediatos y futuros. El guitarrista insinuó del regreso de Castronovo el martes cuando tuiteó una foto que parecía ser de los ensayos del concierto del viernes por la noche de la banda en el Aragon Ballroom en Chicago, que precede a la actuación del domingo de Journey en Lollapalooza. «Ok … Doble problema Chicago @NaradaMWalden @DeenTheDrummer Narada Michael Walden y el regreso de Deen Castronovo a la batería @AragonBallroom @lollapalooza», subtituló Schon en su publicación.​ Don't stop believin Monster «Any Way You Want It» - Caddyshack (1980)

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