Podcasts about Fillmore

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Latest podcast episodes about Fillmore

The Empire Never Ended
173: The F-Files II - Demonic UFOs at the Most Jersey Family Monastery (teaser)

The Empire Never Ended

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2023 1:44


TENE opens the F-Files once again to investigate the demonic UFOlogy of the Most Holy Family Monastery, a small sedevacantist cell originally from Berlin, New Jersey that now runs its mostly online operation from a compound in Fillmore, New York. Subscribe to  patreon.org/tenepod and twitter.com/tenepod.

Stephen Bly Down A Western Trail
Get A Jesus Heart

Stephen Bly Down A Western Trail

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 46:09 Transcription Available


FAMILY, Season 3, Episode 3, "Get A Jesus Heart" audio podcast by award-winning western author Stephen Bly. Your family challenges, issues, and problems improve when you get a Jesus heart. Recorded at Fillmore Bible Church, Fillmore, California, 1984. Sponsored by BlyBooks.com Legacy Series.  "Save Your Family. Get a Jesus Heart." blog post article found here:  https://www.blybooks.com/2023/01/jesus-heart-re-design/ Sign Up on BlyBooks.com on blog page to receive RSS feed by email for podcast blog notices. Related blog article with podcast embed will arrive every Tuesday and Thursday. Look to the right of the LINK PAGE for “Subscribe to the Blog via Email” and “Enter your email address”. Would greatly appreciate if you a) SUBSCRIBE, b) RATE, c) REVIEW the podcast. PODCAST WEBSITE URL: https://www.buzzsprout.com/1777501FULL PODCAST INFO: https://bit.ly/3xCxckS Music by WinkingFoxMusic from Pixabay

The Good Shepherd and the Child
Mystery of God Meets the Mystery of the Child with Lynda Catalano

The Good Shepherd and the Child

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 27:31


“Whoever humbles himself like this child is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven.” Matthew 18:4  Submit a Podcast Listener Question HERE!     Lynda Catalano returns to the podcast to help us understand what are the mysteries of God as well as the mysteries of the child and how they are compatible to each other. Also how we, the adults, can be better matchmakers for this relationship.  Lynda Catalano has been a catechist at Trinity Church in Fillmore, California for 30 years. She works weekly in the atrium with groups of 3 to 6-year-olds, 6 to 9-year-olds, and 9 to 12-year-olds. She has led Levels I, II and III catechist formation throughout the United States and internationally including serving on national formation teams. Lynda is bi-lingual in Spanish and has also offered catechist formation in Spanish. She is a member of the Formation Leader Discernment Committee and served on teams for the Formation Leader Training Courses for the United States Association of the Catechesis of the Good Shepherd. Lynda is retired from teaching kindergarten and first graders in a public school. She has four adult children and three beautiful grandchildren.   Good Shepherd and the Child: A Joyful Journey     Life in the Vine: The Joyful Journey Continues     Maria Montessori Speaks to Parents: A Selection of Articles    Episode 15 – Chapter 1: God and the Child Together– The Good Shepherd and the Child: A Joyful Journey with Marty O'Bryan    Episode 16 – Chapter 2: Helping the Child with Maggie Radzik    Episode 17 – Chapter 3: Practical Suggestions with Lynne Worthington    Episode 18 – Chapter 4: Sources of Nourishment with Claudia Margarita Schmitt    Episode 20 – Living the Domestic Church with Jaclyn Ruli      AUDIO VERSION of The Religious Potential of the Child by Sofia Cavalletti, read by Rebekah Rojcewicz.  CGSUSA has created a Premium Podcast Channel for this audiobook through Podbean.  The cost is $29.00 and does include the audio version of all chapters of The Religious Potential of the Child, 3rd Edition all read by Rebekah Rojcewicz.  We have provided both video overview instructions and written instructions on accessing this audiobook.  Please use these resources. Unlike the regular podcast, which will remain free and available on many podcast players/apps, this new resource is available only on the Podbean App, which you may download from the IOS App store or the Google Play App store. Learn more here!  Step by step instructions here!     Learn more about the Catechesis of the Good Shepherd at www.cgsusa.org     Follow us on Social Media-  Facebook at “The United States Association of the Catechesis of the Good Shepherd”  Instagram-  cgsusa  Twitter- @cgsusa  Pinterest- Natl Assoc of Catechesis of the Good Shepherd USA  YouTube- oneofhisheep     

Hyperspace Heroes Podcast - The Legend of Brown Squadron
Hyperspace Heroes Podcast Episode 22 - Death Sticks & Legos

Hyperspace Heroes Podcast - The Legend of Brown Squadron

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 86:37


Welcome to the Hyperspace Heroes Podcast, where 3 OG Star Wars fans are just trying to make their way in the Star Wars podcast universe. Episode 22 features one of our co-workers, the locally infamous Tommy Rioux who has begun his journey into Star Wars Lego. We talk Lego, the Lego Summer Special, Collection Corner and D23 announcements. Join Brown Squadron as we hit hyperspace and blast into another verbal expedition into a galaxy far, far, away. Check out Brandon's podcast, Talking Bay 94. It is well worth the time as he is a great interviewer and is currently on the top of Brown Leader's playlist. Hyperspace Heroes Podcast can be listened to on all major podcasting platforms. Intro/Outro Music: MJH (Instrumental) Pachyderm / Licensed under Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/ legalcodeSource: Free Music Archive https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Pachyderm/Live_at_the_Fillmore_instrumental_version/Pachyderm_-_Live_at_the_Fillmore_Ultra-Deluxe_Instrumental_Version_-_06_MHJ_instrumental Pachyderm is an indie/psych group from Pittsburgh, PA. The band was formed in 2012 when a few longtime friends and high school classmates got together in a basement to cover their favorite songs. As the band grew and evolved they traded covers for original music and began to develop a live improvisational chemistry that would come to define their sound. They released their debut self-titled EP in January 2015, a blues and garage-rock influenced set that compiles four highlights from the band's early material. After the EP's release, the band took a drastic sonic turn, opting for more lush, mellow, and psychedelic textures. This approach culminated in their first full-length album Live at the Fillmore, released in August of 2016. Learn more about Pachyderm at pachydermband.bandcamp.com/ and www.facebook.com/pachydermband/.

Weencast
Ep. 51: 12/11/2022, The Fillmore, Silver Spring, MD

Weencast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 56:06


Once upon a time the demon god boognish predicted that in the Christmas season of 2022 Ween would play their 1,000th show. With a little help from Brownbase, the brown crowd spent the last few months making 1,000th show stickers, pins, shirts, and just about anything else they could think of to celebrate. Shortly after everyone got all of their stuff ready for a Brown Christmas Brownbase added some old shows to the overall show count making the technical 1,000th show already to have happened...oh well, its still fun that the band hit the milestone! Even if it wasn't the 1,000th show, the band took care of us for sure! This marks the second time that Ween lands at The Fillmore in Silver Spring Maryland, a small city suburb of Baltimore. The crowd nestled in nicely for a long winters show at this club for the last Ween show of the year. The band blazed through the set with just about perfect sound and banged out zingers like "Sweet Texas Fire", "Mononucleosis", "Vallejo", and after someone asked for a basket of chips, and for the first time in four years; "Polo Asado". Join us as we talk about the final Ween show of the year, the perfect precursor to the holiday season, and the "1,000th Show" celebration. Enjoy! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/weencastpodcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/weencastpodcast/support

J.R. watches Star Trek for the first time

Another season of Lower Decks is done! Some chances are taken! We give lots of awards!Podcast breakdown:0:00 -- nuqneH9:40 -- "Hear All, Trust Nothing"16:57 -- "A Mathematically Perfect Redemption"23:16 -- "Crisis Point 2: Paradoxus"34:00 -- "Trusted Sources"40:07 -- "The Stars at Night"53:05 -- Podcast awards and rankings1.03:25 -- Season awards and rankings1.24:03 -- Qapla' and outtakesHey! We're on Spotify!Hey! Head on over to the Yours, Mine, & Theirs blog and also the Yours, Mine, & Theirs Facebook group!Surely you are already, but you'd better go here if you wanna watch new Star Trek episodes!Leave a voicemail at (801) 896-4542!Remember to rate and comment on iTunes!Remember to join the Facebook page!Comment on anything we've said or anything we will say. jrwatchesstartrek@gmail.com OR yoursminetheirspodcast@gmail.com.Direct MP3 DownloadiTunes SubscriptionRSS Feed

Essential Ingredients Podcast
024: We Are the Regeneration Generation! with Ryland Engelhart

Essential Ingredients Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 26:26


“We can be the regeneration generation, and our food system is the mechanism to do that..” —Ryland Engelhart   The world is changing. The way we live, the way we work, the way we interact with each other and with the world around us - it's all changing. And we are the generation that is leading this change.   We are the generation that is breaking down barriers and opening up new possibilities. We are the generation that is using our creativity and our passion to build a better future. We are the generation that can help our planet heal. We are the regeneration generation!    And that starts with transforming our food system. The food industry has been one of the biggest contributors to our planet's deteriorating condition— but we can change all that. And that change is happening right now!    Kiss The Ground, is a documentary that provides a clear picture of how big our impact is on our environment and reveals a sound and practical solution to climate change. Co-founded by Ryland Engelhart, its nonprofit partner, Kiss The Ground is actively leading the citizens of the earth to the possibilities of regeneration.    Tune in to this week's episode as Justine and Ryland discuss how we can turn food into a transformational experience, how culture and emotions are inseparable aspects of food, what it means to be committed but not attached, how knowing our farmers can help us get a wider perspective on regeneration, and how we can become better stewards of the earth.  Meet Ryland: Ryland Engelhart co-founded Kiss the Ground in 2013 and plays a leadership role in the organization as the Chief Mission Officer; he is a producer of the Kiss the Ground film released on Netflix and host of the Kiss the Ground Podcast. As a 15-year entrepreneur, he is also the co-owner and prior Mission Fulfillment Officer of the nationally recognized plant-based restaurants Cafe Gratitude and Gracias Madre, located in Southern California, and co-creator of the documentary film, May I Be Frank.    He is a passionate speaker on the topics of sacred commerce and regenerative agriculture, tools for building community, food is medicine, and the practice of love and gratitude. Ryland is also a dedicated husband and father and lives on a 17-acre regenerative organic farm in Fillmore, CA, where he is learning to practice what he preaches.   Facebook Twitter Instagram  Linkedin   Connect with Kiss The Ground  Website Facebook Twitter Instagram LinkedIn YouTube   Connect with Café Gratitude Website Facebook Instagram   Connect with Gracias Madre Website Connect with NextGen Purpose: Website Facebook Instagram  LinkedIn YouTube Episode Highlights: 01:48 The Matrix of Life 06:17 Food and Games and Life   12:11 Cafe Gratitude to Gracias Madre 17:08 Committed But Not Attached  20:45 The Regeneration Generation 23:30 Be an Advocate for Soil Health

Como lo oyes
Como lo oyes - Canciones nuevas para que nos gusten los lunes - 19/12/22

Como lo oyes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 58:49


Dan Auerbach (The Black Keys) añade otro gran descubrimiento, el de los Hermanos Gutiérrez para la lista de artistas soberbios que está produciendo en los últimos años (Marcus King, Zela Day, Yola o Early James o Nikki Lane, la rebelde del country cuyo nuevo álbum es el mejor de su discografía. Neil Young y otro documento de sus archivos, “Toast”, junto a Crazy Horse. Y el estuche de las actuaciones de Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers en el Fillmore. Y el disco alrededor de la biografía de Lind Ronstadt con Jackson Browne, Peter Ronstadt, Emmylou Harris, Dolly Parton o Lalo Guerrero. Y Gessamí Boada ha grado una auténtica joya. DISCO 1 HERMANOS GUTIÉRREZ & Dan Auerbach Tres Hermanos (6) DISCO 2 EARLY JAMES & SIERRA FERRELL Real Low Down Lonesome (6) DISCO 3 NIKKI LANE Try Harder (5) DISCO 4 MICHELLE BRANCH Not My Lover (4) DISCO 5 MY KID BROTHER Shoulders (6) DISCO 6 BUILT TO SPILL Spiderweb (6) DISCO 7 VALERIE JUNE Tonight I’ll Be Staying Here With You (7) DISCO 8 NEIL YOUNG & CRAZY HORSE Quit (1) DISCO 9 TOM PETTY & THE HEART BREAKERS Ain’t No Sunshine (CD 1 - 19) DISCO 10 JACKSON BROWNE with LOS CENZONTLES The Dreamer (FEELS LIKE HOME - 6) DISCO 11 ANTONIO SÁNCHEZ &. SILVANA ESTRADA El agua y la miel (13) DISCO 12 MOMI MAIGA & SILVIA PÉREZ CRUZ Sidiya (10) DISCO 13 LOUIS PHILLIPE Le Voyageur (5) DISCO 14 GESSAMÍ BOADA Un Instant (1) Escuchar audio

Cannabis Coffee Hour
Kirkland's Hemp #197

Cannabis Coffee Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 45:16


Rob talks Kirklands, Tom Petty at The Fillmore covers and the environmental benefits of industrial Hemp. Ep. 197

Heartland POD
High Country - Government and Politics News from the American West - 12.7.2022

Heartland POD

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 16:43


Song playsIntro by hostWelcome to High Country - politics in the American West. My name is Sean Diller; regular listeners might know me from Heartland Pod's Talking Politics, every Monday.Go to heartlandpod.com for information on all our political podcasts, and a link to support our work on Patreon. Sign up as an Official PODhead for just $5 per month to access all our premium podcast segments and political writing. To join the conversation on Twitter, find us at THE Heartland POD. Alright! Let's get into it: NEVADA CURRENT:Tribes in six states awarded $73MM in new high-speed internet grants.Three Nevada tribes will receive $11.6 million for high-speed internet, in the latest round of “internet for all” grants, federal officials announced Wednesday.The funding will directly connect more than 800 homes on tribal lands in Nevada to high-speed internet, improving access to education, jobs, and healthcare on tribal lands.Secretary of Commerce Gina Raimondo said“The Biden administration is committed to fostering meaningful partnerships with Tribal Nations, which have been vital to our goal of connecting everyone in America, with affordable, reliable, high-speed Internet service,” So far, about $1.6 billion has been awarded to 121 tribal nations with funding from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law that passed last year. Those funds have connected more than 3,100 unserved Native American households that previously had no connectivity to high-speed Internet, as well as businesses and community institutions.These awards are part of a series of commitments the Biden administration announced Wednesday to strengthen nation-to-nation engagement between the federal government and Tribal Nations.The Walker River Paiute Tribe in Mineral County will receive more than $6 million to install fiber internet directly to more than 400 households, 22 community institutions, and 10 tribal businesses. The Duckwater Shoshone Tribe in Nye County is set to receive more than $3 million to install fiber internet to nearly 80 homes and 11 tribal institutions. The Fallon Paiute Shoshone Tribe in Churchill County will be awarded nearly $2 million to directly connect more than 300 households.Nevada Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto, who has pushed for more broadband funding on tribal lands, praised the announcement Wednesday.“Throughout my time in the Senate, I've worked to make sure Tribes in Nevada have access to critical broadband,” she said. “I made sure these funds would get to Tribes in Nevada in a timely and efficient fashion, and I'm committed to helping Nevadans in every community access the critical educational, business, health care, and cultural resources that the internet provides.”Additionally, the national Affordable Connectivity Program - ACP - provides a discount of $30 per month toward Internet service for eligible households, and up to $75 per month for households on qualifying tribal lands. You're eligible for the benefit If you currently receive SNAP benefits, are on Medicaid, or earn less than 200% of the federal poverty line. That's about $27K for a single person household, or $55K for a family of four.To Apply, visit AffordableConnectivity.govCOLORADO SUN: Colorado Democrats ready to move on gun safety laws.A host of changes to Colorado's gun laws, from a ban on assault weapons to tweaks to the existing red flag law, are already being considered by Democrats at the state Capitol in response to the shooting last month at an LGBTQ nightclub in Colorado Springs. “Pretty much everything is on the table,” according to Senate President Steve Fenberg, a Boulder Democrat. “The question now is: What is the highest priority?”Democrats will return to the Colorado Capitol in early January with expanded majorities in both the House and Senate, and facing pressure to act after the state's latest mass shooting. Five people were killed and more than a dozen others wounded in a Nov. 19 attack on Club Q, allegedly carried out by a 22-year-old shooter armed with a semi-automatic, AR-15-style rifle.“Tay” Anderson, a Denver School board member, posted on Twitter that Democrats should immediately use their majority at the Capitol to pass an assault weapons ban.Saying “If folks refuse to act, vote them out,”Senate President Fenberg, who said gun control conversations were underway even before the Club Q shootings, said a ban on assault weapons is certainly a possibility. The challenge is figuring out how to write the law - how to define what an assault weapon is, what should happen to weapons already in the possession of Colorado residents, and how to address people traveling through Colorado to neighboring states where the weapons are permitted. It's more likely that Democrats pursue other changes to Colorado's gun laws first, such as raising the minimum age to purchase a rifle or shotgun to 21 from 18. The minimum age to purchase handguns in Colorado is already 21. Sen. Tom Sullivan, a Centennial Democrat, is working on changing the minimum age to purchase a gun. He initially wanted to raise the age only for so-called assault weapons, but thinks a broader change would be easier. “That will save us having to come up with a definition of what assault weapons are,” said Sullivan, whose son, Alex, was murdered in the 2012 Aurora theater shooting. “And that seems to be the consensus that we're hearing from the rest of the Democratic caucus.”There are also discussions about enacting a waiting period that looks like those passed in California and Hawaii, which have 10- and 14-day waiting periods, respectively. Illinois has a 72-hour waiting period after purchases a firearm, before they can access it.Colorado already requires universal background checks on all gun purchases, and has laws limiting gun magazines to 15 rounds, and requiring the safe storage of firearms. People whose guns are lost or stolen must make a report with law enforcement, as well, and there is a statute temporarily barring people convicted of certain violent misdemeanors from purchasing firearms.Colorado counties and municipalities are also now allowed to enact gun regulations that are more stringent than the state's policies after the legislature in 2021 repealed a preemption law.When it comes to Colorado's red flag law, a 2019 policy that lets judges order the temporary seizure of firearms from people deemed a significant risk to themselves or others - legislators might expand the list of who can petition a judge to initiate a red flag proceeding. Right now, law enforcement and family members are effectively the only groups allowed to petition a judge to order a seizure. Gov. Jared Polis has expressed support for adding district attorneys to the list, and others have suggested the attorney general's office, and teachers should be allowed to request seizures as well. The Colorado legislature reconvenes on Jan. 9.COLORADO NEWSLINE:  $35 insulin price cap coming to Medicare in January.A recent U.S. Department of Health and Human Services report showed drug companies increased prices for several drugs by more than 500% since 2016. But starting next month, a $35 cap on insulin prices will go into effect for millions of Medicare recipients. The lower pricing is one of the first of several policy measures Americans will see under the Inflation Reduction Act, passed without a single Republican vote and signed into law in August.The insulin cap benefits Medicare Part D recipients, who also no longer have to meet a deductible on their insulin. A $35 cap on insulin pumps for Medicare Part B recipients goes into effect July 1, according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Medicare patients spent $1 billion on insulin in 2020, and an estimated 16.5% of people with diabetes rationed their insulin in the past year, which can be extremely harmful to their health or even fatal.According to an analysis of the impact of the Inflation Reduction Act from the Center for American Progress, an elderly middle class couple could save as much as $2,400 per year on insulin.ARIZONA MIRROR: AZ SOS Katie Hobbs recommends criminal prosecutions for Cochise County supervisors who refused to certify their election results. Hobbs wrote to Attorney General Mark Brnovich and Cochise County Attorney Brian McIntyre, that without repercussions, the decision of supervisors Tom Crosby and Peggy Judd not to certify their results could encourage future violations, further eroding election integrity in the state, and stomping on the will of Arizona voters. “Supervisors Crosby and Judd's actions not only demonstrate a complete disregard for the law but also jeopardize Arizona's democracy,” she wrote. “Had a court not intervened, the failure of these two Supervisors to uphold their duty would have disenfranchised thousands of Cochise County voters. This blatant act of defying Arizona's election laws risks establishing a dangerous precedent that we must discourage.” Crosby and Judd threw the Arizona state certification process into disarray last month, when they delayed their official canvassing of the midterm election results in Cochise County, citing bogus claims that electronic tabulators didn't meet required standards. It was only after a court ordered them to complete their statutorily mandated duties that they did so on Dec. 1, days after the Nov. 28 deadline. Their actions put the official statewide canvass in jeopardy, as Hobbs must meet a Dec. 5 deadline to certify the results. She can only push that deadline as far as Dec. 8. If she decided to go ahead with the process without the results from Cochise County, a heavily Republican region, more than 47,000 voters could have seen their ballots ignored and a number of races would have flipped in favor of Democratic candidates. The responsibilities of county supervisors are clearly laid out in state law and the state's Election Procedures Manual, Hobbs said, and they are non-negotiable. And, Crosby and Judd were given ample notification of the consequences.“Supervisors Crosby and Judd knew they had a statutory requirement to canvass the election by November 28, but instead chose to act in violation of the law, putting false election narratives ahead of Cochise County's voters,” Hobbs wrote. Hobbs, who was elected governor in the election, wrote that the two Republicans violated several state laws, with penalties ranging from a class 3 misdemeanor to a class 6 felony. If Crosby and Judd were convicted of a felony, their right to vote would be revoked. They also stand to lose their elected office: State law deems an elected office vacant if the officeholder is convicted of a felony or any “offense involving a violation of the person's official duties”. This is the second call for an investigation into the Supervisors possibly criminal acts - Earlier this week, former Attorney General Terry Goddard and Maricopa County Attorney Richard Romley wrote to outgoing AG Brnovich requesting he hold Crosby and Judd accountable.It's likely that Attorney General-elect Kris Mayes will make the final decision on whether to prosecute, once she takes office in January. In a statement, she said she agrees with the request from Hobbs' office to begin an investigation, and said that it is through that process that a decision on what further response, if any, is appropriate.COURTHOUSE NEWS SERVICE: Didn't we do this aJustices signal support for web designer who won't help gay couples with weddingsThe conservative majority appeared ready to answer a question the high court dodged four years ago: Must creative businesses put aside their religious beliefs to accommodate the beliefs of protected groups? WASHINGTON (CN) — A six-year crusade came to a head at the Supreme Court on Monday, pitting Colorado's nondiscrimination law against a Christian website designer who refuses to create wedding websites for same-sex couples. It was unsurprising that the narrow question at the center of the case perplexed many of the justices, since the high court passed up on answering it only four years ago. In Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission, the court ruled in favor of a cakemaker refusing his services to a same-sex couple, but declined to expand the ruling much beyond the case in front of them. Lorie Smith's case brings that topic to a head. Stating that her Christian beliefs confine marriage only to heterosexual couples, Smith argues that Colorado's anti-discrimination laws - protecting LGBTQ+ Coloradans as well as others -  violate her free speech rights. Smith's attorney argued that “Colorado is declaring her speech a public accommodation, and insists that she create and speak messages that violate her conscience.” After two and a half hours of arguments, the conservative majority appeared inclined to agree.The liberal wing of the court expressed concern that a ruling for Smith could snowball into a free speech loophole allowing discrimination. Justice Sonia Sotomayor questioned where the court would draw the line, on what kind of discrimination would be permitted - noting that the same arguments could be made for interracial marriage or even for excluding people with disabilities. The hypothetical-heavy arguments included almost every culture-wars issue on the books including discrimination on race, religion, sexual orientation and political preference. These scenarios conveyed a worry by some justices about how far even a narrow ruling in the case could extend. Colorado Solicitor General Eric Olson said Smith's request for a free-speech exemption clause to the Colorado Anti-Discrimination Act would equate to a “license to discriminate.” “The free speech protection the company seeks here is sweeping, because it would apply not just to sincerely held religious beliefs as in this case, but also to all sorts of racist, sexist and bigoted views,” Olson said. “This rule would allow another web design company to say no to interracial couples, an ad agency could refuse to run ads for women-led businesses, and a tech consulting company could refuse to serve the web designer here, because it disagreed with her views on marriage. Where exactly to draw the line between free speech and anti-discrimination laws eluded many of the justices. This was partly because Smith brought the justices a preenforcement suit - she filed her suit against the state of Colorado before any same-sex couple actually requested her services. This creates difficulties for the justices in deciding a ruling. Justice Elena Kagan said the reason for the multitude of hypotheticals during oral argument was due to the lack of facts in the case - which make the justices' ruling all the more difficult. Kagan said “It really depends on the facts, and on what exactly Ms. Smith is being asked or compelled to do.”I could definitely be wrong, but as far as I can tell, the actual free speech claim isn't really justiciable without a real action from the state against the business owner. Seems like it's not ripe, as they say.But the court, in its infinite power, could rule on whether the 1st Amendment Free Speech clause of the Constitution provides an out for companies looking to discriminate against certain customers. You might be thinking, doesn't the U.S. Constitution protect all Americans from discrimination based on sex? It does - but that protection only applies to discriminatory actions by the state. So the state can't deny you a marriage license because of your sex or your partner's sex. The state can't deny you employment or throw you in jail, either - anymore.Here, it's a business that wants the right to turn away same-sex couples, and the state is looking to enforce a state anti-discrimination law - which may or may not conflict with the business owner's protected free speech.It's not a slam dunk that the conservative Supreme Court will rule for the anti-gay web designer, though. No small number of right-wing attorneys have made their entire careers using anti-discrimination laws on behalf of white people, to unravel protections for marginalized groups. If college admissions boards, for example, decide that admitting too many white students is not the ‘statement' they want to make - the ruling against the gay couple might undermine its own rulings on affirmative action practices.The Supreme Court has a highly interesting - and highly secretive - process of passing opinions back and forth to each other. Picking apart each other's arguments, and putting their heads together before the actual ruling comes out. We won't get much of a picture into that, but you can bet this year's Supreme Court clerks are going to be busy. CONCERT PICK OF THE WEEK: Allman Family Revival - featuring Duane Betts, Cody and Luther Dickinson, Samantha Fish, Jimmy Hall, Maggie Rose, Larry McCray, Orbi Orbison, Donovan Frankenreiter, and the River Kittens. And whether you go to the concert or not - Check out the River Kittens. St. Louis' homegrown duo of Soulful, Harmonious, Folk music. They're awesome.Upcoming shows in Nashville, St. Louis, Denver, Phoenix, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, and the tour closes out at the Fillmore in San Francisco next Saturday Dec 17th.Welp, that's it for me! From Denver I'm Sean Diller. Original reporting for the stories in today's show comes from Courthouse News Service, Colorado Sun, Nevada Current, Arizona Mirror, Colorado Newsline, and Denver's Westword.Thank you for listening! See you next time.

Taking It Down
Tom Petty Live at the Fillmore, Wednesday on Netflix, The English on Amazon Prime, and the Guardians of the Galaxy's Christmas Special

Taking It Down

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 44:16


The whole gang of Taking It Down is back to talk about the latest from legendary rock group Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers with their recent release of Live at the Fillmore, a twenty-night stand recorded perfectly (2:30). After the discussion, what's with the hoopla around the new Netflix series Wednesday, an extension in the classic story of The Addams Family (10:31)? After a break, Blaine and Donovan revel in the beauty and fascination of The English on Amazon Prime Video (16:29). To finish the episode, the group questions where The Guardians of the Galaxy's Christmas Special stands in the plethora of similar, holiday-themed television (34:21). The Alabama Take brings you all the entire family of podcasts and writings -- all with no ads! Yet we still have some bills to pay. If there's nothing in the shop to interest you, feel free to make a donation: venture to Buy Me A Coffee or visit our Venmo and PayPal to help to keep the site, the writings, and podcasts going.  

Farm Talk with Paul Ward
The Largest Grower of Roses West of the Rockies is in Fillmore, CA!

Farm Talk with Paul Ward

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 26:49 Transcription Available


In this episode, Paul has the opportunity to sit down and speak with Scott Kittich, owner of Otto & Sons Nursery in Fillmore. Not only is Otto & Sons the largest growers of roses this side of the Rocky Mountains, the robust 40+ acre nursery includes acres of citrus trees, stone fruits, and perennial favorites. Whether you lean towards Floribunda, Grandiflora or Hybrid Tea roses, Scott and his knowledgeable staff can help avid home gardeners - and beginners alike - select from a variety of colors and fragrances.  Beware! Not all plants are suited for the growing condition of Ventura Country! Water availability, soil conditions, and climate are all important factors that must be considered when selecting a varietal. Just because plants may be available at *some* stores, doesn't mean they're right for Ventura County.  Passionate about the care of roses, Otto & Sons also offer in-person pursuing classes on Saturdays in the month of January. Can't make it to class? You're in luck! During Covid, Scott and his team recorded and shared many care videos on the nursery's website. While recording this episode, Scott let us in on an interesting piece of trivia….There are more citrus trees located in residential landscaping in California than in all commercial farms combined.   Can you guess which famous celebrity singers have enjoyed Otto & Sons roses? For a hint, you'll have to watch the interview! ________________________ Have ideas for future episodes? We'd love to answer your questions - leave a comment! For any home buying or home selling needs in the Ventura County area of California, please reach out to Paul@HomeAndRanchTeam.com or visit www.HomeAndRanchTeam.com   A special THANK YOU to our sponsors! Farm Talk with Paul Ward would not be possible without the support of our sponsors, May Alcala from Escrow Hub and Karly Rosalez from The Money Store. Supporting our sponsors ensures Farm Talk can provide listeners with the best possible episodes

METAL UP YOUR PODCAST - All Things Metallica
Episode 310 - 30th Anniversary Shows (Night 1)

METAL UP YOUR PODCAST - All Things Metallica

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 91:36


Since we're camped out in 2011, it's only fitting to revisit the 30th Anniversary shows the boys put on at The Fillmore in San Francisco, in excruciating detail. In this episode we talk through everything from night one. A few of the many things we discuss are Diamond Head, Jason Newsted, Apocalyptica, The Soul Rebels Brass Band, David Mustaine's recent comments, fan excitement, live debuts and much more.If you think Metal Up Your Podcast has value, please consider taking a brief moment to leave a positive review and subscribe on iTunes  here:https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/metal-up-your-podcast-all-things-metallica/id1187775077You can further support the show by becoming a patron. All patrons of Metal Up Your Podcast at the $5 level receive volumes 1-4 of our Cover Our World Blackened EP's for free. Additionally, patrons are invited to come on the show to talk about any past Metallica show they've been to and are given access to ask our guests like Ray Burton, Halestorm, Michael Wagener, Jay Weinberg of Slipknot and members of Metallica's crew their very own questions. Be a part of what makes Metal Up Your Podcast special by becoming a PATRON here:http://www.patreon.com/metalupyourpodcastJoin the MUYP Discord Server:https://discord.gg/nBUSwR8tPurchase Ethan's new album  HERE!Purchase/Stream Lunar Satan:https://distrokid.com/hyperfollow/lunarsatan/lunar-satanPurchase/Stream Clint's album VAMPIRE:https://distrokid.com/hyperfollow/clintwells/vampirePurchase/Stream Ethan's album Let It Burn:https://ethanluck.bandcamp.com/album/let-it-burn-2Official Website:http://metalupyourpodcast.comPurchase/Stream our Cover Our World Blackened Volumes and Quarantine Covers:https://metalupyourpodcast.bandcamp.comFollow us on all social media platforms.Write in at:metalupyourpodcastshow@gmail.com

How Did This Get Made?
The Oogieloves in the Big Balloon Adventure LIVE!

How Did This Get Made?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 70:52


Finish sucking your milkshakes because Paul, June, and Jason are LIVE from the Fillmore in Detroit to discuss the 2012 mega-flop The Oogieloves in front of an especially ornery audience. Despite June and Jason's plea to cut this entire episode, the crew discuss Christopher Lloyd only speaking through bongos, J. Edgar the horny vacuum cleaner, reveal the film's shocking budget, and ask “Is this movie actually about hospice care?”  Buy Drop Dead Fred LIVE on Vinyl: https://hdtgm.bandcamp.com/Go to www.hdtgm.com for tour dates, tickets, and more.Follow Paul on Letterboxd https://letterboxd.com/paulscheer/HDTGM Discord: discord.gg/hdtgmPaul's Discord: https://discord.gg/paulscheerCheck out Paul and Rob Huebel live on Twitch (https://www.twitch.tv/friendzone) every Thursday 8-10pm ESTSubscribe to The Deep Dive with Jessica St. Clair and June Diane Raphael here: listen.earwolf.com/deepdiveSubscribe to Unspooled with Paul and Amy Nicholson here: listen.earwolf.com/unspooledCheck out The Jane Club over at www.janeclub.comCheck out new HDTGM merch over at https://www.teepublic.com/stores/hdtgmWhere to Find Jason, June & Paul:@PaulScheer on Instagram & Twitter@Junediane on IG and @MsJuneDiane on TwitterJason is Not on Twitter

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 158: “White Rabbit” by Jefferson Airplane

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022


Episode one hundred and fifty-eight of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “White Rabbit”, Jefferson Airplane, and the rise of the San Francisco sound. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-three-minute bonus episode available, on "Omaha" by Moby Grape. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Erratum I refer to Back to Methuselah by Robert Heinlein. This is of course a play by George Bernard Shaw. What I meant to say was Methuselah's Children. Resources I hope to upload a Mixcloud tomorrow, and will edit it in, but have had some problems with the site today. Jefferson Airplane's first four studio albums, plus a 1968 live album, can be found in this box set. I've referred to three main books here. Got a Revolution!: The Turbulent Flight of Jefferson Airplane by Jeff Tamarkin is written with the co-operation of the band members, but still finds room to criticise them. Jefferson Airplane On Track by Richard Molesworth is a song-by-song guide to the band's music. And Been So Long: My Life and Music by Jorma Kaukonen is Kaukonen's autobiography. Some information on Skip Spence and Matthew Katz also comes from What's Big and Purple and Lives in the Ocean?: The Moby Grape Story, by Cam Cobb, which I also used for this week's bonus. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript Before I start, I need to confess an important and hugely embarrassing error in this episode. I've only ever seen Marty Balin's name written down, never heard it spoken, and only after recording the episode, during the editing process, did I discover I mispronounce it throughout. It's usually an advantage for the podcast that I get my information from books rather than TV documentaries and the like, because they contain far more information, but occasionally it causes problems like that. My apologies. Also a brief note that this episode contains some mentions of racism, antisemitism, drug and alcohol abuse, and gun violence. One of the themes we've looked at in recent episodes is the way the centre of the musical world -- at least the musical world as it was regarded by the people who thought of themselves as hip in the mid-sixties -- was changing in 1967. Up to this point, for a few years there had been two clear centres of the rock and pop music worlds. In the UK, there was London, and any British band who meant anything had to base themselves there. And in the US, at some point around 1963, the centre of the music industry had moved West. Up to then it had largely been based in New York, and there was still a thriving industry there as of the mid sixties. But increasingly the records that mattered, that everyone in the country had been listening to, had come out of LA Soul music was, of course, still coming primarily from Detroit and from the Country-Soul triangle in Tennessee and Alabama, but when it came to the new brand of electric-guitar rock that was taking over the airwaves, LA was, up until the first few months of 1967, the only city that was competing with London, and was the place to be. But as we heard in the episode on "San Francisco", with the Monterey Pop Festival all that started to change. While the business part of the music business remained centred in LA, and would largely remain so, LA was no longer the hip place to be. Almost overnight, jangly guitars, harmonies, and Brian Jones hairstyles were out, and feedback, extended solos, and droopy moustaches were in. The place to be was no longer LA, but a few hundred miles North, in San Francisco -- something that the LA bands were not all entirely happy about: [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Who Needs the Peace Corps?"] In truth, the San Francisco music scene, unlike many of the scenes we've looked at so far in this series, had rather a limited impact on the wider world of music. Bands like Jefferson Airplane, the Grateful Dead, and Big Brother and the Holding Company were all both massively commercially successful and highly regarded by critics, but unlike many of the other bands we've looked at before and will look at in future, they didn't have much of an influence on the bands that would come after them, musically at least. Possibly this is because the music from the San Francisco scene was always primarily that -- music created by and for a specific group of people, and inextricable from its context. The San Francisco musicians were defining themselves by their geographical location, their peers, and the situation they were in, and their music was so specifically of the place and time that to attempt to copy it outside of that context would appear ridiculous, so while many of those bands remain much loved to this day, and many made some great music, it's very hard to point to ways in which that music influenced later bands. But what they did influence was the whole of rock music culture. For at least the next thirty years, and arguably to this day, the parameters in which rock musicians worked if they wanted to be taken seriously – their aesthetic and political ideals, their methods of collaboration, the cultural norms around drug use and sexual promiscuity, ideas of artistic freedom and authenticity, the choice of acceptable instruments – in short, what it meant to be a rock musician rather than a pop, jazz, country, or soul artist – all those things were defined by the cultural and behavioural norms of the San Francisco scene between about 1966 and 68. Without the San Francisco scene there's no Woodstock, no Rolling Stone magazine, no Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, no hippies, no groupies, no rock stars. So over the next few months we're going to take several trips to the Bay Area, and look at the bands which, for a brief time, defined the counterculture in America. The story of Jefferson Airplane -- and unlike other bands we've looked at recently, like The Pink Floyd and The Buffalo Springfield, they never had a definite article at the start of their name to wither away like a vestigial organ in subsequent years -- starts with Marty Balin. Balin was born in Ohio, but was a relatively sickly child -- he later talked about being autistic, and seems to have had the chronic illnesses that so often go with neurodivergence -- so in the hope that the dry air would be good for his chest his family moved to Arizona. Then when his father couldn't find work there, they moved further west to San Francisco, in the Haight-Ashbury area, long before that area became the byword for the hippie movement. But it was in LA that he started his music career, and got his surname. Balin had been named Marty Buchwald as a kid, but when he was nineteen he had accompanied a friend to LA to visit a music publisher, and had ended up singing backing vocals on her demos. While he was there, he had encountered the arranger Jimmy Haskell. Haskell was on his way to becoming one of the most prominent arrangers in the music industry, and in his long career he would go on to do arrangements for Bobby Gentry, Blondie, Steely Dan, Simon and Garfunkel, and many others. But at the time he was best known for his work on Ricky Nelson's hits: [Excerpt: Ricky Nelson, "Hello Mary Lou"] Haskell thought that Marty had the makings of a Ricky Nelson style star, as he was a good-looking young man with a decent voice, and he became a mentor for the young man. Making the kind of records that Haskell arranged was expensive, and so Haskell suggested a deal to him -- if Marty's father would pay for studio time and musicians, Haskell would make a record with him and find him a label to put it out. Marty's father did indeed pay for the studio time and the musicians -- some of the finest working in LA at the time. The record, released under the name Marty Balin, featured Jack Nitzsche on keyboards, Earl Palmer on drums, Milt Jackson on vibraphone, Red Callender on bass, and Glen Campbell and Barney Kessell on guitars, and came out on Challenge Records, a label owned by Gene Autry: [Excerpt: Marty Balin, "Nobody But You"] Neither that, nor Balin's follow-up single, sold a noticeable amount of copies, and his career as a teen idol was over before it had begun. Instead, as many musicians of his age did, he decided to get into folk music, joining a vocal harmony group called the Town Criers, who patterned themselves after the Weavers, and performed the same kind of material that every other clean-cut folk vocal group was performing at the time -- the kind of songs that John Phillips and Steve Stills and Cass Elliot and Van Dyke Parks and the rest were all performing in their own groups at the same time. The Town Criers never made any records while they were together, but some archival recordings of them have been released over the decades: [Excerpt: The Town Criers, "900 Miles"] The Town Criers split up, and Balin started performing as a solo folkie again. But like all those other then-folk musicians, Balin realised that he had to adapt to the K/T-event level folk music extinction that happened when the Beatles hit America like a meteorite. He had to form a folk-rock group if he wanted to survive -- and given that there were no venues for such a group to play in San Francisco, he also had to start a nightclub for them to play in. He started hanging around the hootenannies in the area, looking for musicians who might form an electric band. The first person he decided on was a performer called Paul Kantner, mainly because he liked his attitude. Kantner had got on stage in front of a particularly drunk, loud, crowd, and performed precisely half a song before deciding he wasn't going to perform in front of people like that and walking off stage. Kantner was the only member of the new group to be a San Franciscan -- he'd been born and brought up in the city. He'd got into folk music at university, where he'd also met a guitar player named Jorma Kaukonen, who had turned him on to cannabis, and the two had started giving music lessons at a music shop in San Jose. There Kantner had also been responsible for booking acts at a local folk club, where he'd first encountered acts like Mother McCree's Uptown Jug Champions, a jug band which included Jerry Garcia, Pigpen McKernan, and Bob Weir, who would later go on to be the core members of the Grateful Dead: [Excerpt: Mother McCree's Uptown Jug Champions, "In the Jailhouse Now"] Kantner had moved around a bit between Northern and Southern California, and had been friendly with two other musicians on the Californian folk scene, David Crosby and Roger McGuinn. When their new group, the Byrds, suddenly became huge, Kantner became aware of the possibility of doing something similar himself, and so when Marty Balin approached him to form a band, he agreed. On bass, they got in a musician called Bob Harvey, who actually played double bass rather than electric, and who stuck to that for the first few gigs the group played -- he had previously been in a band called the Slippery Rock String Band. On drums, they brought in Jerry Peloquin, who had formerly worked for the police, but now had a day job as an optician. And on vocals, they brought in Signe Toley -- who would soon marry and change her name to Signe Anderson, so that's how I'll talk about her to avoid confusion. The group also needed a lead guitarist though -- both Balin and Kantner were decent rhythm players and singers, but they needed someone who was a better instrumentalist. They decided to ask Kantner's old friend Jorma Kaukonen. Kaukonen was someone who was seriously into what would now be called Americana or roots music. He'd started playing the guitar as a teenager, not like most people of his generation inspired by Elvis or Buddy Holly, but rather after a friend of his had shown him how to play an old Carter Family song, "Jimmy Brown the Newsboy": [Excerpt: The Carter Family, "Jimmy Brown the Newsboy"] Kaukonen had had a far more interesting life than most of the rest of the group. His father had worked for the State Department -- and there's some suggestion he'd worked for the CIA -- and the family had travelled all over the world, staying in Pakistan, the Philippines, and Finland. For most of his childhood, he'd gone by the name Jerry, because other kids beat him up for having a foreign name and called him a Nazi, but by the time he turned twenty he was happy enough using his birth name. Kaukonen wasn't completely immune to the appeal of rock and roll -- he'd formed a rock band, The Triumphs, with his friend Jack Casady when he was a teenager, and he loved Ricky Nelson's records -- but his fate as a folkie had been pretty much sealed when he went to Antioch College. There he met up with a blues guitarist called Ian Buchanan. Buchanan never had much of a career as a professional, but he had supposedly spent nine years studying with the blues and ragtime guitar legend Rev. Gary Davis, and he was certainly a fine guitarist, as can be heard on his contribution to The Blues Project, the album Elektra put out of white Greenwich Village musicians like John Sebastian and Dave Van Ronk playing old blues songs: [Excerpt: Ian Buchanan, "The Winding Boy"] Kaukonen became something of a disciple of Buchanan -- he said later that Buchanan probably taught him how to play because he was such a terrible player and Buchanan couldn't stand to listen to it -- as did John Hammond Jr, another student at Antioch at the same time. After studying at Antioch, Kaukonen started to travel around, including spells in Greenwich Village and in the Philippines, before settling in Santa Clara, where he studied for a sociology degree and became part of a social circle that included Dino Valenti, Jerry Garcia, and Billy Roberts, the credited writer of "Hey Joe". He also started performing as a duo with a singer called Janis Joplin. Various of their recordings from this period circulate, mostly recorded at Kaukonen's home with the sound of his wife typing in the background while the duo rehearse, as on this performance of an old Bessie Smith song: [Excerpt: Jorma Kaukonen and Janis Joplin, "Nobody Loves You When You're Down and Out"] By 1965 Kaukonen saw himself firmly as a folk-blues purist, who would not even think of playing rock and roll music, which he viewed with more than a little contempt. But he allowed himself to be brought along to audition for the new group, and Ken Kesey happened to be there. Kesey was a novelist who had written two best-selling books, One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest and Sometimes A Great Notion, and used the financial independence that gave him to organise a group of friends who called themselves the Merry Pranksters, who drove from coast to coast and back again in a psychedelic-painted bus, before starting a series of events that became known as Acid Tests, parties at which everyone was on LSD, immortalised in Tom Wolfe's book The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. Nobody has ever said why Kesey was there, but he had brought along an Echoplex, a reverb unit one could put a guitar through -- and nobody has explained why Kesey, who wasn't a musician, had an Echoplex to hand. But Kaukonen loved the sound that he could get by putting his guitar through the device, and so for that reason more than any other he decided to become an electric player and join the band, going out and buying a Rickenbacker twelve-string and Vox Treble Booster because that was what Roger McGuinn used. He would later also get a Guild Thunderbird six-string guitar and a Standel Super Imperial amp, following the same principle of buying the equipment used by other guitarists he liked, as they were what Zal Yanovsky of the Lovin' Spoonful used. He would use them for all his six-string playing for the next couple of years, only later to discover that the Lovin' Spoonful despised them and only used them because they had an endorsement deal with the manufacturers. Kaukonen was also the one who came up with the new group's name. He and his friends had a running joke where they had "Bluesman names", things like "Blind Outrage" and "Little Sun Goldfarb". Kaukonen's bluesman name, given to him by his friend Steve Talbot, had been Blind Thomas Jefferson Airplane, a reference to the 1920s blues guitarist Blind Lemon Jefferson: [Excerpt: Blind Lemon Jefferson, "Match Box Blues"] At the band meeting where they were trying to decide on a name, Kaukonen got frustrated at the ridiculous suggestions that were being made, and said "You want a stupid name? Howzabout this... Jefferson Airplane?" He said in his autobiography "It was one of those rare moments when everyone in the band agreed, and that was that. I think it was the only band meeting that ever allowed me to come away smiling." The newly-named Jefferson Airplane started to rehearse at the Matrix Club, the club that Balin had decided to open. This was run with three sound engineer friends, who put in the seed capital for the club. Balin had stock options in the club, which he got by trading a share of the band's future earnings to his partners, though as the group became bigger he eventually sold his stock in the club back to his business partners. Before their first public performance, they started working with a manager, Matthew Katz, mostly because Katz had access to a recording of a then-unreleased Bob Dylan song, "Lay Down Your Weary Tune": [Excerpt: Bob Dylan, "Lay Down Your Weary Tune"] The group knew that the best way for a folk-rock band to make a name for themselves was to perform a Dylan song nobody else had yet heard, and so they agreed to be managed by Katz. Katz started a pre-publicity blitz, giving out posters, badges, and bumper stickers saying "Jefferson Airplane Loves You" all over San Francisco -- and insisting that none of the band members were allowed to say "Hello" when they answered the phone any more, they had to say "Jefferson Airplane Loves You!" For their early rehearsals and gigs, they were performing almost entirely cover versions of blues and folk songs, things like Fred Neil's "The Other Side of This Life" and Dino Valenti's "Get Together" which were the common currency of the early folk-rock movement, and songs by their friends, like one called "Flower Bomb" by David Crosby, which Crosby now denies ever having written. They did start writing the odd song, but at this point they were more focused on performance than on writing. They also hired a press agent, their friend Bill Thompson. Thompson was friends with the two main music writers at the San Francisco Chronicle, Ralph Gleason, the famous jazz critic, who had recently started also reviewing rock music, and John Wasserman. Thompson got both men to come to the opening night of the Matrix, and both gave the group glowing reviews in the Chronicle. Record labels started sniffing around the group immediately as a result of this coverage, and according to Katz he managed to get a bidding war started by making sure that when A&R men came to the club there were always two of them from different labels, so they would see the other person and realise they weren't the only ones interested. But before signing a record deal they needed to make some personnel changes. The first member to go was Jerry Peloquin, for both musical and personal reasons. Peloquin was used to keeping strict time and the other musicians had a more free-flowing idea of what tempo they should be playing at, but also he had worked for the police while the other members were all taking tons of illegal drugs. The final break with Peloquin came when he did the rest of the group a favour -- Paul Kantner's glasses broke during a rehearsal, and as Peloquin was an optician he offered to take them back to his shop and fix them. When he got back, he found them auditioning replacements for him. He beat Kantner up, and that was the end of Jerry Peloquin in Jefferson Airplane. His replacement was Skip Spence, who the group had met when he had accompanied three friends to the Matrix, which they were using as a rehearsal room. Spence's friends went on to be the core members of Quicksilver Messenger Service along with Dino Valenti: [Excerpt: Quicksilver Messenger Service, "Dino's Song"] But Balin decided that Spence looked like a rock star, and told him that he was now Jefferson Airplane's drummer, despite Spence being a guitarist and singer, not a drummer. But Spence was game, and learned to play the drums. Next they needed to get rid of Bob Harvey. According to Harvey, the decision to sack him came after David Crosby saw the band rehearsing and said "Nice song, but get rid of the bass player" (along with an expletive before the word bass which I can't say without incurring the wrath of Apple). Crosby denies ever having said this. Harvey had started out in the group on double bass, but to show willing he'd switched in his last few gigs to playing an electric bass. When he was sacked by the group, he returned to double bass, and to the Slippery Rock String Band, who released one single in 1967: [Excerpt: The Slippery Rock String Band, "Tule Fog"] Harvey's replacement was Kaukonen's old friend Jack Casady, who Kaukonen knew was now playing bass, though he'd only ever heard him playing guitar when they'd played together. Casady was rather cautious about joining a rock band, but then Kaukonen told him that the band were getting fifty dollars a week salary each from Katz, and Casady flew over from Washington DC to San Francisco to join the band. For the first few gigs, he used Bob Harvey's bass, which Harvey was good enough to lend him despite having been sacked from the band. Unfortunately, right from the start Casady and Kantner didn't get on. When Casady flew in from Washington, he had a much more clean-cut appearance than the rest of the band -- one they've described as being nerdy, with short, slicked-back, side-parted hair and a handlebar moustache. Kantner insisted that Casady shave the moustache off, and he responded by shaving only one side, so in profile on one side he looked clean-shaven, while from the other side he looked like he had a full moustache. Kantner also didn't like Casady's general attitude, or his playing style, at all -- though most critics since this point have pointed to Casady's bass playing as being the most interesting and distinctive thing about Jefferson Airplane's style. This lineup seems to have been the one that travelled to LA to audition for various record companies -- a move that immediately brought the group a certain amount of criticism for selling out, both for auditioning for record companies and for going to LA at all, two things that were already anathema on the San Francisco scene. The only audition anyone remembers them having specifically is one for Phil Spector, who according to Kaukonen was waving a gun around during the audition, so he and Casady walked out. Around this time as well, the group performed at an event billed as "A Tribute to Dr. Strange", organised by the radical hippie collective Family Dog. Marvel Comics, rather than being the multi-billion-dollar Disney-owned corporate juggernaut it is now, was regarded as a hip, almost underground, company -- and around this time they briefly started billing their comics not as comics but as "Marvel Pop Art Productions". The magical adventures of Dr. Strange, Master of the Mystic Arts, and in particular the art by far-right libertarian artist Steve Ditko, were regarded as clear parallels to both the occult dabblings and hallucinogen use popular among the hippies, though Ditko had no time for either, following as he did an extreme version of Ayn Rand's Objectivism. It was at the Tribute to Dr. Strange that Jefferson Airplane performed for the first time with a band named The Great Society, whose lead singer, Grace Slick, would later become very important in Jefferson Airplane's story: [Excerpt: The Great Society, "Someone to Love"] That gig was also the first one where the band and their friends noticed that large chunks of the audience were now dressing up in costumes that were reminiscent of the Old West. Up to this point, while Katz had been managing the group and paying them fifty dollars a week even on weeks when they didn't perform, he'd been doing so without a formal contract, in part because the group didn't trust him much. But now they were starting to get interest from record labels, and in particular RCA Records desperately wanted them. While RCA had been the label who had signed Elvis Presley, they had otherwise largely ignored rock and roll, considering that since they had the biggest rock star in the world they didn't need other ones, and concentrating largely on middle-of-the-road acts. But by the mid-sixties Elvis' star had faded somewhat, and they were desperate to get some of the action for the new music -- and unlike the other major American labels, they didn't have a reciprocal arrangement with a British label that allowed them to release anything by any of the new British stars. The group were introduced to RCA by Rod McKuen, a songwriter and poet who later became America's best-selling poet and wrote songs that sold over a hundred million copies. At this point McKuen was in his Jacques Brel phase, recording loose translations of the Belgian songwriter's songs with McKuen translating the lyrics: [Excerpt: Rod McKuen, "Seasons in the Sun"] McKuen thought that Jefferson Airplane might be a useful market for his own songs, and brought the group to RCA. RCA offered Jefferson Airplane twenty-five thousand dollars to sign with them, and Katz convinced the group that RCA wouldn't give them this money without them having signed a management contract with him. Kaukonen, Kantner, Spence, and Balin all signed without much hesitation, but Jack Casady didn't yet sign, as he was the new boy and nobody knew if he was going to be in the band for the long haul. The other person who refused to sign was Signe Anderson. In her case, she had a much better reason for refusing to sign, as unlike the rest of the band she had actually read the contract, and she found it to be extremely worrying. She did eventually back down on the day of the group's first recording session, but she later had the contract renegotiated. Jack Casady also signed the contract right at the start of the first session -- or at least, he thought he'd signed the contract then. He certainly signed *something*, without having read it. But much later, during a court case involving the band's longstanding legal disputes with Katz, it was revealed that the signature on the contract wasn't Casady's, and was badly forged. What he actually *did* sign that day has never been revealed, to him or to anyone else. Katz also signed all the group as songwriters to his own publishing company, telling them that they legally needed to sign with him if they wanted to make records, and also claimed to RCA that he had power of attorney for the band, which they say they never gave him -- though to be fair to Katz, given the band members' habit of signing things without reading or understanding them, it doesn't seem beyond the realms of possibility that they did. The producer chosen for the group's first album was Tommy Oliver, a friend of Katz's who had previously been an arranger on some of Doris Day's records, and whose next major act after finishing the Jefferson Airplane album was Trombones Unlimited, who released records like "Holiday for Trombones": [Excerpt: Trombones Unlimited, "Holiday For Trombones"] The group weren't particularly thrilled with this choice, but were happier with their engineer, Dave Hassinger, who had worked on records like "Satisfaction" by the Rolling Stones, and had a far better understanding of the kind of music the group were making. They spent about three months recording their first album, even while continually being attacked as sellouts. The album is not considered their best work, though it does contain "Blues From an Airplane", a collaboration between Spence and Balin: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Blues From an Airplane"] Even before the album came out, though, things were starting to change for the group. Firstly, they started playing bigger venues -- their home base went from being the Matrix club to the Fillmore, a large auditorium run by the promoter Bill Graham. They also started to get an international reputation. The British singer-songwriter Donovan released a track called "The Fat Angel" which namechecked the group: [Excerpt: Donovan, "The Fat Angel"] The group also needed a new drummer. Skip Spence decided to go on holiday to Mexico without telling the rest of the band. There had already been some friction with Spence, as he was very eager to become a guitarist and songwriter, and the band already had three songwriting guitarists and didn't really see why they needed a fourth. They sacked Spence, who went on to form Moby Grape, who were also managed by Katz: [Excerpt: Moby Grape, "Omaha"] For his replacement they brought in Spencer Dryden, who was a Hollywood brat like their friend David Crosby -- in Dryden's case he was Charlie Chaplin's nephew, and his father worked as Chaplin's assistant. The story normally goes that the great session drummer Earl Palmer recommended Dryden to the group, but it's also the case that Dryden had been in a band, the Heartbeats, with Tommy Oliver and the great blues guitarist Roy Buchanan, so it may well be that Oliver had recommended him. Dryden had been primarily a jazz musician, playing with people like the West Coast jazz legend Charles Lloyd, though like most jazzers he would slum it on occasion by playing rock and roll music to pay the bills. But then he'd seen an early performance by the Mothers of Invention, and realised that rock music could have a serious artistic purpose too. He'd joined a band called The Ashes, who had released one single, the Jackie DeShannon song "Is There Anything I Can Do?" in December 1965: [Excerpt: The Ashes, "Is There Anything I Can Do?"] The Ashes split up once Dryden left the group to join Jefferson Airplane, but they soon reformed without him as The Peanut Butter Conspiracy, who hooked up with Gary Usher and released several albums of psychedelic sunshine pop. Dryden played his first gig with the group at a Republican Party event on June the sixth, 1966. But by the time Dryden had joined, other problems had become apparent. The group were already feeling like it had been a big mistake to accede to Katz's demands to sign a formal contract with him, and Balin in particular was getting annoyed that he wouldn't let the band see their finances. All the money was getting paid to Katz, who then doled out money to the band when they asked for it, and they had no idea if he was actually paying them what they were owed or not. The group's first album, Jefferson Airplane Takes Off, finally came out in September, and it was a comparative flop. It sold well in San Francisco itself, selling around ten thousand copies in the area, but sold basically nothing anywhere else in the country -- the group's local reputation hadn't extended outside their own immediate scene. It didn't help that the album was pulled and reissued, as RCA censored the initial version of the album because of objections to the lyrics. The song "Runnin' Round This World" was pulled off the album altogether for containing the word "trips", while in "Let Me In" they had to rerecord two lines -- “I gotta get in, you know where" was altered to "You shut the door now it ain't fair" and "Don't tell me you want money" became "Don't tell me it's so funny". Similarly in "Run Around" the phrase "as you lay under me" became "as you stay here by me". Things were also becoming difficult for Anderson. She had had a baby in May and was not only unhappy with having to tour while she had a small child, she was also the band member who was most vocally opposed to Katz. Added to that, her husband did not get on well at all with the group, and she felt trapped between her marriage and her bandmates. Reports differ as to whether she quit the band or was fired, but after a disastrous appearance at the Monterey Jazz Festival, one way or another she was out of the band. Her replacement was already waiting in the wings. Grace Slick, the lead singer of the Great Society, had been inspired by going to one of the early Jefferson Airplane gigs. She later said "I went to see Jefferson Airplane at the Matrix, and they were making more money in a day than I made in a week. They only worked for two or three hours a night, and they got to hang out. I thought 'This looks a lot better than what I'm doing.' I knew I could more or less carry a tune, and I figured if they could do it I could." She was married at the time to a film student named Jerry Slick, and indeed she had done the music for his final project at film school, a film called "Everybody Hits Their Brother Once", which sadly I can't find online. She was also having an affair with Jerry's brother Darby, though as the Slicks were in an open marriage this wasn't particularly untoward. The three of them, with a couple of other musicians, had formed The Great Society, named as a joke about President Johnson's programme of the same name. The Great Society was the name Johnson had given to his whole programme of domestic reforms, including civil rights for Black people, the creation of Medicare and Medicaid, the creation of the National Endowment for the Arts, and more. While those projects were broadly popular among the younger generation, Johnson's escalation of the war in Vietnam had made him so personally unpopular that even his progressive domestic programme was regarded with suspicion and contempt. The Great Society had set themselves up as local rivals to Jefferson Airplane -- where Jefferson Airplane had buttons saying "Jefferson Airplane Loves You!" the Great Society put out buttons saying "The Great Society Really Doesn't Like You Much At All". They signed to Autumn Records, and recorded a song that Darby Slick had written, titled "Someone to Love" -- though the song would later be retitled "Somebody to Love": [Excerpt: The Great Society, "Someone to Love"] That track was produced by Sly Stone, who at the time was working as a producer for Autumn Records. The Great Society, though, didn't like working with Stone, because he insisted on them doing forty-five takes to try to sound professional, as none of them were particularly competent musicians. Grace Slick later said "Sly could play any instrument known to man. He could have just made the record himself, except for the singers. It was kind of degrading in a way" -- and on another occasion she said that he *did* end up playing all the instruments on the finished record. "Someone to Love" was put out as a promo record, but never released to the general public, and nor were any of the Great Society's other recordings for Autumn Records released. Their contract expired and they were let go, at which point they were about to sign to Mercury Records, but then Darby Slick and another member decided to go off to India for a while. Grace's marriage to Jerry was falling apart, though they would stay legally married for several years, and the Great Society looked like it was at an end, so when Grace got the offer to join Jefferson Airplane to replace Signe Anderson, she jumped at the chance. At first, she was purely a harmony singer -- she didn't take over any of the lead vocal parts that Anderson had previously sung, as she had a very different vocal style, and instead she just sang the harmony parts that Anderson had sung on songs with other lead vocalists. But two months after the album they were back in the studio again, recording their second album, and Slick sang lead on several songs there. As well as the new lineup, there was another important change in the studio. They were still working with Dave Hassinger, but they had a new producer, Rick Jarrard. Jarrard was at one point a member of the folk group The Wellingtons, who did the theme tune for "Gilligan's Island", though I can't find anything to say whether or not he was in the group when they recorded that track: [Excerpt: The Wellingtons, "The Ballad of Gilligan's Island"] Jarrard had also been in the similar folk group The Greenwood County Singers, where as we heard in the episode on "Heroes and Villains" he replaced Van Dyke Parks. He'd also released a few singles under his own name, including a version of Parks' "High Coin": [Excerpt: Rick Jarrard, "High Coin"] While Jarrard had similar musical roots to those of Jefferson Airplane's members, and would go on to produce records by people like Harry Nilsson and The Family Tree, he wasn't any more liked by the band than their previous producer had been. So much so, that a few of the band members have claimed that while Jarrard is the credited producer, much of the work that one would normally expect to be done by a producer was actually done by their friend Jerry Garcia, who according to the band members gave them a lot of arranging and structural advice, and was present in the studio and played guitar on several tracks. Jarrard, on the other hand, said categorically "I never met Jerry Garcia. I produced that album from start to finish, never heard from Jerry Garcia, never talked to Jerry Garcia. He was not involved creatively on that album at all." According to the band, though, it was Garcia who had the idea of almost doubling the speed of the retitled "Somebody to Love", turning it into an uptempo rocker: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Somebody to Love"] And one thing everyone is agreed on is that it was Garcia who came up with the album title, when after listening to some of the recordings he said "That's as surrealistic as a pillow!" It was while they were working on the album that was eventually titled Surrealistic Pillow that they finally broke with Katz as their manager, bringing Bill Thompson in as a temporary replacement. Or at least, it was then that they tried to break with Katz. Katz sued the group over their contract, and won. Then they appealed, and they won. Then Katz appealed the appeal, and the Superior Court insisted that if he wanted to appeal the ruling, he had to put up a bond for the fifty thousand dollars the group said he owed them. He didn't, so in 1970, four years after they sacked him as their manager, the appeal was dismissed. Katz appealed the dismissal, and won that appeal, and the case dragged on for another three years, at which point Katz dragged RCA Records into the lawsuit. As a result of being dragged into the mess, RCA decided to stop paying the group their songwriting royalties from record sales directly, and instead put the money into an escrow account. The claims and counterclaims and appeals *finally* ended in 1987, twenty years after the lawsuits had started and fourteen years after the band had stopped receiving their songwriting royalties. In the end, the group won on almost every point, and finally received one point three million dollars in back royalties and seven hundred thousand dollars in interest that had accrued, while Katz got a small token payment. Early in 1967, when the sessions for Surrealistic Pillow had finished, but before the album was released, Newsweek did a big story on the San Francisco scene, which drew national attention to the bands there, and the first big event of what would come to be called the hippie scene, the Human Be-In, happened in Golden Gate Park in January. As the group's audience was expanding rapidly, they asked Bill Graham to be their manager, as he was the most business-minded of the people around the group. The first single from the album, "My Best Friend", a song written by Skip Spence before he quit the band, came out in January 1967 and had no more success than their earlier recordings had, and didn't make the Hot 100. The album came out in February, and was still no higher than number 137 on the charts in March, when the second single, "Somebody to Love", was released: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Somebody to Love"] That entered the charts at the start of April, and by June it had made number five. The single's success also pushed its parent album up to number three by August, just behind the Beatles' Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band and the Monkees' Headquarters. The success of the single also led to the group being asked to do commercials for Levis jeans: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Levis commercial"] That once again got them accused of selling out. Abbie Hoffman, the leader of the Yippies, wrote to the Village Voice about the commercials, saying "It summarized for me all the doubts I have about the hippie philosophy. I realise they are just doing their 'thing', but while the Jefferson Airplane grooves with its thing, over 100 workers in the Levi Strauss plant on the Tennessee-Georgia border are doing their thing, which consists of being on strike to protest deplorable working conditions." The third single from the album, "White Rabbit", came out on the twenty-fourth of June, the day before the Beatles recorded "All You Need is Love", nine days after the release of "See Emily Play", and a week after the group played the Monterey Pop Festival, to give you some idea of how compressed a time period we've been in recently. We talked in the last episode about how there's a big difference between American and British psychedelia at this point in time, because the political nature of the American counterculture was determined by the fact that so many people were being sent off to die in Vietnam. Of all the San Francisco bands, though, Jefferson Airplane were by far the least political -- they were into the culture part of the counterculture, but would often and repeatedly disavow any deeper political meaning in their songs. In early 1968, for example, in a press conference, they said “Don't ask us anything about politics. We don't know anything about it. And what we did know, we just forgot.” So it's perhaps not surprising that of all the American groups, they were the one that was most similar to the British psychedelic groups in their influences, and in particular their frequent references to children's fantasy literature. "White Rabbit" was a perfect example of this. It had started out as "White Rabbit Blues", a song that Slick had written influenced by Alice in Wonderland, and originally performed by the Great Society: [Excerpt: The Great Society, "White Rabbit"] Slick explained the lyrics, and their association between childhood fantasy stories and drugs, later by saying "It's an interesting song but it didn't do what I wanted it to. What I was trying to say was that between the ages of zero and five the information and the input you get is almost indelible. In other words, once a Catholic, always a Catholic. And the parents read us these books, like Alice in Wonderland where she gets high, tall, and she takes mushrooms, a hookah, pills, alcohol. And then there's The Wizard of Oz, where they fall into a field of poppies and when they wake up they see Oz. And then there's Peter Pan, where if you sprinkle white dust on you, you could fly. And then you wonder why we do it? Well, what did you read to me?" While the lyrical inspiration for the track was from Alice in Wonderland, the musical inspiration is less obvious. Slick has on multiple occasions said that the idea for the music came from listening to Miles Davis' album "Sketches of Spain", and in particular to Davis' version of -- and I apologise for almost certainly mangling the Spanish pronunciation badly here -- "Concierto de Aranjuez", though I see little musical resemblance to it myself. [Excerpt: Miles Davis, "Concierto de Aranjuez"] She has also, though, talked about how the song was influenced by Ravel's "Bolero", and in particular the way the piece keeps building in intensity, starting softly and slowly building up, rather than having the dynamic peaks and troughs of most music. And that is definitely a connection I can hear in the music: [Excerpt: Ravel, "Bolero"] Jefferson Airplane's version of "White Rabbit", like their version of "Somebody to Love", was far more professional, far -- and apologies for the pun -- slicker than The Great Society's version. It's also much shorter. The version by The Great Society has a four and a half minute instrumental intro before Slick's vocal enters. By contrast, the version on Surrealistic Pillow comes in at under two and a half minutes in total, and is a tight pop song: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "White Rabbit"] Jack Casady has more recently said that the group originally recorded the song more or less as a lark, because they assumed that all the drug references would mean that RCA would make them remove the song from the album -- after all, they'd cut a song from the earlier album because it had a reference to a trip, so how could they possibly allow a song like "White Rabbit" with its lyrics about pills and mushrooms? But it was left on the album, and ended up making the top ten on the pop charts, peaking at number eight: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "White Rabbit"] In an interview last year, Slick said she still largely lives off the royalties from writing that one song. It would be the last hit single Jefferson Airplane would ever have. Marty Balin later said "Fame changes your life. It's a bit like prison. It ruined the band. Everybody became rich and selfish and self-centred and couldn't care about the band. That was pretty much the end of it all. After that it was just working and living the high life and watching the band destroy itself, living on its laurels." They started work on their third album, After Bathing at Baxter's, in May 1967, while "Somebody to Love" was still climbing the charts. This time, the album was produced by Al Schmitt. Unlike the two previous producers, Schmitt was a fan of the band, and decided the best thing to do was to just let them do their own thing without interfering. The album took months to record, rather than the weeks that Surrealistic Pillow had taken, and cost almost ten times as much money to record. In part the time it took was because of the promotional work the band had to do. Bill Graham was sending them all over the country to perform, which they didn't appreciate. The group complained to Graham in business meetings, saying they wanted to only play in big cities where there were lots of hippies. Graham pointed out in turn that if they wanted to keep having any kind of success, they needed to play places other than San Francisco, LA, New York, and Chicago, because in fact most of the population of the US didn't live in those four cities. They grudgingly took his point. But there were other arguments all the time as well. They argued about whether Graham should be taking his cut from the net or the gross. They argued about Graham trying to push for the next single to be another Grace Slick lead vocal -- they felt like he was trying to make them into just Grace Slick's backing band, while he thought it made sense to follow up two big hits with more singles with the same vocalist. There was also a lawsuit from Balin's former partners in the Matrix, who remembered that bit in the contract about having a share in the group's income and sued for six hundred thousand dollars -- that was settled out of court three years later. And there were interpersonal squabbles too. Some of these were about the music -- Dryden didn't like the fact that Kaukonen's guitar solos were getting longer and longer, and Balin only contributed one song to the new album because all the other band members made fun of him for writing short, poppy, love songs rather than extended psychedelic jams -- but also the group had become basically two rival factions. On one side were Kaukonen and Casady, the old friends and virtuoso instrumentalists, who wanted to extend the instrumental sections of the songs more to show off their playing. On the other side were Grace Slick and Spencer Dryden, the two oldest members of the group by age, but the most recent people to join. They were also unusual in the San Francisco scene for having alcohol as their drug of choice -- drinking was thought of by most of the hippies as being a bit classless, but they were both alcoholics. They were also sleeping together, and generally on the side of shorter, less exploratory, songs. Kantner, who was attracted to Slick, usually ended up siding with her and Dryden, and this left Balin the odd man out in the middle. He later said "I got disgusted with all the ego trips, and the band was so stoned that I couldn't even talk to them. Everybody was in their little shell". While they were still working on the album, they released the first single from it, Kantner's "The Ballad of You and Me and Pooneil". The "Pooneil" in the song was a figure that combined two of Kantner's influences: the Greenwich Village singer-songwriter Fred Neil, the writer of "Everybody's Talkin'" and "Dolphins"; and Winnie the Pooh. The song contained several lines taken from A.A. Milne's children's stories: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "The Ballad of You and Me and Pooneil"] That only made number forty-two on the charts. It was the last Jefferson Airplane single to make the top fifty. At a gig in Bakersfield they got arrested for inciting a riot, because they encouraged the crowd to dance, even though local by-laws said that nobody under sixteen was allowed to dance, and then they nearly got arrested again after Kantner's behaviour on the private plane they'd chartered to get them back to San Francisco that night. Kantner had been chain-smoking, and this annoyed the pilot, who asked Kantner to put his cigarette out, so Kantner opened the door of the plane mid-flight and threw the lit cigarette out. They'd chartered that plane because they wanted to make sure they got to see a new group, Cream, who were playing the Fillmore: [Excerpt: Cream, "Strange Brew"] After seeing that, the divisions in the band were even wider -- Kaukonen and Casady now *knew* that what the band needed was to do long, extended, instrumental jams. Cream were the future, two-minute pop songs were the past. Though they weren't completely averse to two-minute pop songs. The group were recording at RCA studios at the same time as the Monkees, and members of the two groups would often jam together. The idea of selling out might have been anathema to their *audience*, but the band members themselves didn't care about things like that. Indeed, at one point the group returned from a gig to the mansion they were renting and found squatters had moved in and were using their private pool -- so they shot at the water. The squatters quickly moved on. As Dryden put it "We all -- Paul, Jorma, Grace, and myself -- had guns. We weren't hippies. Hippies were the people that lived on the streets down in Haight-Ashbury. We were basically musicians and art school kids. We were into guns and machinery" After Bathing at Baxter's only went to number seventeen on the charts, not a bad position but a flop compared to their previous album, and Bill Graham in particular took this as more proof that he had been right when for the last few months he'd been attacking the group as self-indulgent. Eventually, Slick and Dryden decided that either Bill Graham was going as their manager, or they were going. Slick even went so far as to try to negotiate a solo deal with Elektra Records -- as the voice on the hits, everyone was telling her she was the only one who mattered anyway. David Anderle, who was working for the label, agreed a deal with her, but Jac Holzman refused to authorise the deal, saying "Judy Collins doesn't get that much money, why should Grace Slick?" The group did fire Graham, and went one further and tried to become his competitors. They teamed up with the Grateful Dead to open a new venue, the Carousel Ballroom, to compete with the Fillmore, but after a few months they realised they were no good at running a venue and sold it to Graham. Graham, who was apparently unhappy with the fact that the people living around the Fillmore were largely Black given that the bands he booked appealed to mostly white audiences, closed the original Fillmore, renamed the Carousel the Fillmore West, and opened up a second venue in New York, the Fillmore East. The divisions in the band were getting worse -- Kaukonen and Casady were taking more and more speed, which was making them play longer and faster instrumental solos whether or not the rest of the band wanted them to, and Dryden, whose hands often bled from trying to play along with them, definitely did not want them to. But the group soldiered on and recorded their fourth album, Crown of Creation. This album contained several songs that were influenced by science fiction novels. The most famous of these was inspired by the right-libertarian author Robert Heinlein, who was hugely influential on the counterculture. Jefferson Airplane's friends the Monkees had already recorded a song based on Heinlein's The Door Into Summer, an unintentionally disturbing novel about a thirty-year-old man who falls in love with a twelve-year-old girl, and who uses a combination of time travel and cryogenic freezing to make their ages closer together so he can marry her: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "The Door Into Summer"] Now Jefferson Airplane were recording a song based on Heinlein's most famous novel, Stranger in a Strange Land. Stranger in a Strange Land has dated badly, thanks to its casual homophobia and rape-apologia, but at the time it was hugely popular in hippie circles for its advocacy of free love and group marriages -- so popular that a religion, the Church of All Worlds, based itself on the book. David Crosby had taken inspiration from it and written "Triad", a song asking two women if they'll enter into a polygamous relationship with him, and recorded it with the Byrds: [Excerpt: The Byrds, "Triad"] But the other members of the Byrds disliked the song, and it was left unreleased for decades. As Crosby was friendly with Jefferson Airplane, and as members of the band were themselves advocates of open relationships, they recorded their own version with Slick singing lead: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Triad"] The other song on the album influenced by science fiction was the title track, Paul Kantner's "Crown of Creation". This song was inspired by The Chrysalids, a novel by the British writer John Wyndham. The Chrysalids is one of Wyndham's most influential novels, a post-apocalyptic story about young children who are born with mutant superpowers and have to hide them from their parents as they will be killed if they're discovered. The novel is often thought to have inspired Marvel Comics' X-Men, and while there's an unpleasant eugenic taste to its ending, with the idea that two species can't survive in the same ecological niche and the younger, "superior", species must outcompete the old, that idea also had a lot of influence in the counterculture, as well as being a popular one in science fiction. Kantner's song took whole lines from The Chrysalids, much as he had earlier done with A.A. Milne: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Crown of Creation"] The Crown of Creation album was in some ways a return to the more focused songwriting of Surrealistic Pillow, although the sessions weren't without their experiments. Slick and Dryden collaborated with Frank Zappa and members of the Mothers of Invention on an avant-garde track called "Would You Like a Snack?" (not the same song as the later Zappa song of the same name) which was intended for the album, though went unreleased until a CD box set decades later: [Excerpt: Grace Slick and Frank Zappa, "Would You Like a Snack?"] But the finished album was generally considered less self-indulgent than After Bathing at Baxter's, and did better on the charts as a result. It reached number six, becoming their second and last top ten album, helped by the group's appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show in September 1968, a month after it came out. That appearance was actually organised by Colonel Tom Parker, who suggested them to Sullivan as a favour to RCA Records. But another TV appearance at the time was less successful. They appeared on the Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour, one of the most popular TV shows among the young, hip, audience that the group needed to appeal to, but Slick appeared in blackface. She's later said that there was no political intent behind this, and that she was just trying the different makeup she found in the dressing room as a purely aesthetic thing, but that doesn't really explain the Black power salute she gives at one point. Slick was increasingly obnoxious on stage, as her drinking was getting worse and her relationship with Dryden was starting to break down. Just before the Smothers Brothers appearance she was accused at a benefit for the Whitney Museum of having called the audience "filthy Jews", though she has always said that what she actually said was "filthy jewels", and she was talking about the ostentatious jewellery some of the audience were wearing. The group struggled through a performance at Altamont -- an event we will talk about in a future episode, so I won't go into it here, except to say that it was a horrifying experience for everyone involved -- and performed at Woodstock, before releasing their fifth studio album, Volunteers, in 1969: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Volunteers"] That album made the top twenty, but was the last album by the classic lineup of the band. By this point Spencer Dryden and Grace Slick had broken up, with Slick starting to date Kantner, and Dryden was also disappointed at the group's musical direction, and left. Balin also left, feeling sidelined in the group. They released several more albums with varying lineups, including at various points their old friend David Frieberg of Quicksilver Messenger Service, the violinist Papa John Creach, and the former drummer of the Turtles, Johnny Barbata. But as of 1970 the group's members had already started working on two side projects -- an acoustic band called Hot Tuna, led by Kaukonen and Casady, which sometimes also featured Balin, and a project called Paul Kantner's Jefferson Starship, which also featured Slick and had recorded an album, Blows Against the Empire, the second side of which was based on the Robert Heinlein novel Back to Methuselah, and which became one of the first albums ever nominated for science fiction's Hugo Awards: [Excerpt: Jefferson Starship, "Have You Seen The Stars Tonite"] That album featured contributions from David Crosby and members of the Grateful Dead, as well as Casady on two tracks, but  in 1974 when Kaukonen and Casady quit Jefferson Airplane to make Hot Tuna their full-time band, Kantner, Slick, and Frieberg turned Jefferson Starship into a full band. Over the next decade, Jefferson Starship had a lot of moderate-sized hits, with a varying lineup that at one time or another saw several members, including Slick, go and return, and saw Marty Balin back with them for a while. In 1984, Kantner left the group, and sued them to stop them using the Jefferson Starship name. A settlement was reached in which none of Kantner, Slick, Kaukonen, or Casady could use the words "Jefferson" or "Airplane" in their band-names without the permission of all the others, and the remaining members of Jefferson Starship renamed their band just Starship -- and had three number one singles in the late eighties with Slick on lead, becoming far more commercially successful than their precursor bands had ever been: [Excerpt: Starship, "We Built This City on Rock & Roll"] Slick left Starship in 1989, and there was a brief Jefferson Airplane reunion tour, with all the classic members but Dryden, but then Slick decided that she was getting too old to perform rock and roll music, and decided to retire from music and become a painter, something she's stuck to for more than thirty years. Kantner and Balin formed a new Jefferson Starship, called Jefferson Starship: The Next Generation, but Kantner died in January 2016, coincidentally on the same day as Signe Anderson, who had occasionally guested with her old bandmates in the new version of the band. Balin, who had quit the reunited Jefferson Starship due to health reasons, died two years later. Dryden had died in 2005. Currently, there are three bands touring that descend directly from Jefferson Airplane. Hot Tuna still continue to perform, there's a version of Starship that tours featuring one original member, Mickey Thomas, and the reunited Jefferson Starship still tour, led by David Frieberg. Grace Slick has given the latter group her blessing, and even co-wrote one song on their most recent album, released in 2020, though she still doesn't perform any more. Jefferson Airplane's period in the commercial spotlight was brief -- they had charting singles for only a matter of months, and while they had top twenty albums for a few years after their peak, they really only mattered to the wider world during that brief period of the Summer of Love. But precisely because their period of success was so short, their music is indelibly associated with that time. To this day there's nothing as evocative of summer 1967 as "White Rabbit", even for those of us who weren't born then. And while Grace Slick had her problems, as I've made very clear in this episode, she inspired a whole generation of women who went on to be singers themselves, as one of the first prominent women to sing lead with an electric rock band. And when she got tired of doing that, she stopped, and got on with her other artistic pursuits, without feeling the need to go back and revisit the past for ever diminishing returns. One might only wish that some of her male peers had followed her example.

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The Lo Fi Show
Episode 263: Wa-Tata Matta You

The Lo Fi Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022


Tony starts off reading out the history of the Ball corporation for some weird reason. Tony gets Covid. We review the concert Mercyful Fate and Kreator at the Fillmore. We feature our friend’s band, Dune,TX as our break song. Follow them on Spotify to support hard working musicians.

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST
Long Strange Tech, part 2

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 89:28


The Deadcast concludes its dive into the Grateful Dead's entanglement with technology, exploring Jerry Garcia's digital graphics obsession, how Dead Head online communities helped shape the emergent internet, lyricist John Perry Barlow's manifestoes, & more. Guests: Paul Martin, Mary Eisenhart, David Gans, Steve Silberman, Bob Bralove, Dan English, Doug Oade, Christian Crumlish, Charlie Miller, John Markoff, Erik Davis, Michael CaloreSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

music san francisco tech oregon dead strange band cats beatles rolling stones doors guitar bob dylan psychedelics woodstock lsd vinyl pink floyd cornell neil young jimi hendrix warner brothers grateful dead john mayer ripple avalon janis joplin chuck berry music podcasts classic rock dawg wilco phish rock music prog huey lewis american beauty dave matthews band music history vampire weekend hells angels jerry garcia merle haggard red rocks jefferson airplane fillmore ccr dark star los lobos truckin' seva deadheads watkins glen allman brothers band dso buffalo springfield bruce hornsby arista my morning jacket altamont ken kesey bob weir pigpen acid tests dmb long strange trip psychedelic rock warren haynes bill graham jim james music commentary haight ashbury billy strings trey anastasio erik davis fare thee well phil lesh family dog robert hunter jam bands don was winterland rhino records veneta mickey hart david lemieux time crisis merry pranksters wall of sound charlie miller disco biscuits live dead david grisman nrbq string cheese incident relix steve silberman ramrod neal casal john markoff jug band john perry barlow steve parish oteil burbridge jgb quicksilver messenger service david browne jerry garcia band jesse jarnow mother hips david fricke circles around the sun deadcast david gans jrad ratdog acid rock sugar magnolia touch of grey we are everywhere brent mydland jeff chimenti ken babbs box of rain christian crumlish mars hotel new riders of the purple sage sunshine daydream aoxomoxoa vince welnick capital theater owlsley stanley
Hyperspace Heroes Podcast - The Legend of Brown Squadron
Hyperspace Heroes Podcast Episode 28 - Interview w/ Brandon Wainerdi, Host of the Talking Bay 94 Podcast

Hyperspace Heroes Podcast - The Legend of Brown Squadron

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 77:57


Welcome to the Hyperspace Heroes Podcast, where 3 OG Star Wars fans are just trying to make their way in the Star Wars podcast universe. This episode we have the amazing Brandon Wainerdi of Talking Bay 94 Podcast, Mondo News, Funko, Fangoria & Star Wars Insider. Brandon's podcast is all 1 on 1 interviews with Star Wars industry people and full of behind the scenes stories and information. We talk a lot of collecting through the episode and when we wrap up with Collection Corner and Star Wars news. Join Brown Squadron as we hit hyperspace and blast into another verbal expedition into a galaxy far, far, away. Check out Brandon's podcast, Talking Bay 94. It is well worth the time as he is a great interviewer and is currently on the top of Brown Leader's playlist. Hyperspace Heroes Podcast can be listened to on all major podcasting platforms. Intro/Outro Music: MJH (Instrumental) Pachyderm / Licensed under Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/ legalcodeSource: Free Music Archive https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Pachyderm/Live_at_the_Fillmore_instrumental_version/Pachyderm_-_Live_at_the_Fillmore_Ultra-Deluxe_Instrumental_Version_-_06_MHJ_instrumental Pachyderm is an indie/psych group from Pittsburgh, PA. The band was formed in 2012 when a few longtime friends and high school classmates got together in a basement to cover their favorite songs. As the band grew and evolved they traded covers for original music and began to develop a live improvisational chemistry that would come to define their sound. They released their debut self-titled EP in January 2015, a blues and garage-rock influenced set that compiles four highlights from the band's early material. After the EP's release, the band took a drastic sonic turn, opting for more lush, mellow, and psychedelic textures. This approach culminated in their first full-length album Live at the Fillmore, released in August of 2016. Learn more about Pachyderm at pachydermband.bandcamp.com/ and www.facebook.com/pachydermband/.

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST
Long Strange Tech, part 1

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 71:46


The Deadcast explores the Grateful Dead's long-term cosmic entanglement with the California technology world & the architecture of the internet itself, featuring biomusic pioneer Ned Lagin, Dead Heads at the Stanford AI Lab & Apple, sonic heroes from Alembic & Meyer Sound, & more.Guests: Ned Lagin, Ron Wickersham, Susan Wickersham, Daniel Kottke, John Meyer, Helen Meyer, Paul Martin, Andy Moorer, Steve Silberman, Erik Davis, John MarkoffSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

music california apple san francisco tech oregon dead strange band cats beatles rolling stones doors guitar bob dylan psychedelics woodstock lsd vinyl pink floyd cornell neil young jimi hendrix warner brothers grateful dead john mayer ripple avalon janis joplin chuck berry music podcasts classic rock dawg wilco phish rock music prog huey lewis american beauty dave matthews band music history vampire weekend hells angels jerry garcia merle haggard red rocks jefferson airplane fillmore ccr dark star los lobos truckin' seva deadheads watkins glen allman brothers band dso paul martin buffalo springfield bruce hornsby arista my morning jacket altamont ken kesey bob weir pigpen acid tests dmb long strange trip psychedelic rock warren haynes bill graham jim james music commentary haight ashbury billy strings trey anastasio erik davis fare thee well phil lesh family dog robert hunter jam bands don was winterland rhino records veneta mickey hart david lemieux time crisis john meyer merry pranksters wall of sound disco biscuits live dead david grisman nrbq string cheese incident relix steve silberman ramrod neal casal jug band john perry barlow steve parish jgb oteil burbridge quicksilver messenger service david browne jerry garcia band alembic jesse jarnow mother hips david fricke circles around the sun deadcast jrad ratdog acid rock sugar magnolia touch of grey we are everywhere brent mydland jeff chimenti ken babbs meyer sound box of rain mars hotel new riders of the purple sage sunshine daydream aoxomoxoa capital theater vince welnick helen meyer owlsley stanley
Podcasts – Parks and Cons
Episode 736 - The House at Haunted Hill, Fillmore Graves, & More Halloween Home Haunts

Podcasts – Parks and Cons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 45:15


This time, we have an episode packed with Halloween events from our record-breaking night! Listen in and enjoy! Please, consider joining The Parks and Cons Crew, https://www.patreon.com/ParksAndCons!

180 grados
180 grados - Kaiser Chiefs, Gorillaz, Oliver Sim y Self Esteem - 08/11/22

180 grados

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 59:49


Kaiser Chiefs regresan con contundencia y presentan 'How 2 Dance', un rompepistas que hoy protagoniza este podcast junto a 'Baby Queen', de Gorillaz, un remix de Oliver Sim y la reinterpretación que Self Esteem ha hecho de 'The 345'. GORILLAZ – Baby Queen PHOENIX - Identical DORIAN - Energía Rara (David Van Bylen Remix) REPION – Barrio Somavilla SPOON – The Hardest Cut (Adrian Sherwood Reconstruction) TOM PETTY & THE HEARTBREAKERS - Call Me the Breeze (Live at the Fillmore, 1997) SHEGO - Lucky VALIENTE BOSQUE – Tú Te Lo Pierdes ANNABEL LEE – Natural Para Vogue ANNA OF THE NORTH - Meteorite SELF ESTEEM - The 345 OLIVER SIM - GMT (Wolfgang Tillmans Marc Krether Remix) LOLA MARSH – Shot Shot Cherry BONEY M – Ma Baker KAISER CHIEFS - How 2 Dance DAVID BREWIS - The Last Day Escuchar audio

Hyperspace Heroes Podcast - The Legend of Brown Squadron
Hyperspace Heroes Podcast Episode 27 - Rebel Alliance 90210 (Andor Episodes 7, 8 & 9 Review)

Hyperspace Heroes Podcast - The Legend of Brown Squadron

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 79:55


Welcome to the Hyperspace Heroes Podcast, where 3 OG Star Wars fans are just trying to make their way in the Star Wars podcast universe. For this episode we do our best to re-create an Andor 3 episode arc by discussing Andor episodes 7, 8 and 9. We wrap up with Collection Corner and Star Wars news. Join Brown Squadron as we hit hyperspace and blast into another verbal expedition into a galaxy far, far, away. Hyperspace Heroes Podcast can be listened to on all major podcasting platforms. Intro/Outro Music: MJH (Instrumental) Pachyderm / Licensed under Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/ legalcodeSource: Free Music Archive https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Pachyderm/Live_at_the_Fillmore_instrumental_version/Pachyderm_-_Live_at_the_Fillmore_Ultra-Deluxe_Instrumental_Version_-_06_MHJ_instrumental Pachyderm is an indie/psych group from Pittsburgh, PA. The band was formed in 2012 when a few longtime friends and high school classmates got together in a basement to cover their favorite songs. As the band grew and evolved they traded covers for original music and began to develop a live improvisational chemistry that would come to define their sound. They released their debut self-titled EP in January 2015, a blues and garage-rock influenced set that compiles four highlights from the band's early material. After the EP's release, the band took a drastic sonic turn, opting for more lush, mellow, and psychedelic textures. This approach culminated in their first full-length album Live at the Fillmore, released in August of 2016. Learn more about Pachyderm at pachydermband.bandcamp.com/ and www.facebook.com/pachydermband/.

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST
REWIND: Europe ‘72: Denmark

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 124:02


We present an encore of the Deadcast's Denmark episode from earlier this year to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Europe ‘72's proper release, as well as to get you ready for (or debrief you from) the Meet-Up At The Movies presentation of the Dead's historic Danish telecast.Guests: Sam Cutler, Steve Parish, Mountain Girl, Donna Jean Godchaux MacKay, Ben Haller, Alan Trist, Jim Sullivan, Gijsbert Hanekroot, John Morris, Sam Field, David Lemieux, MC Taylor, Lars Bennike, Bjørn Lindstrøm, Hans Francke, Jens Skovby, Palle Lykke, Lars Movin, Graeme Boone, Shaugn O'DonnellSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.