Podcasts about ucsf

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  • 799PODCASTS
  • 2,529EPISODES
  • 39mAVG DURATION
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  • Oct 21, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about ucsf

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Latest podcast episodes about ucsf

Dr. GPCR Podcast
#52 with Dr. Benjamin Myers

Dr. GPCR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 105:47


About Dr. Benjamin Myers Ben Myers is an assistant professor at the University of Utah School of Medicine in Salt Lake City, UT, and an investigator with the Huntsman Cancer Institute. Ben's research focuses on Smoothened and other class F GPCRs which play essential roles in embryonic development and in cancer. His group studies the unusual signaling mechanisms employed by these atypical 7-transmembrane receptors, combining biochemical and structural approaches with cell biology and in vivo models. These studies have revealed new and unexpected ways for membrane lipids to regulate GPCR activity and for GPCRs to control intracellular kinases. More recently, Ben's lab has begun studying GPCR signaling pathways that operate within the primary cilium, a tiny antenna-shaped structure at the cell surface with critical links to development, physiology, and disease. Ben studied developmental and cancer signaling as a postdoctoral fellow with Philip Beachy at Stanford University. Prior to that, Ben received his Ph.D. from UCSF in 2008, where he worked with David Julius on the structure, function, and physiology of ion channels and GPCRs in the nervous system. ------------------------------------------- Imagine a world in which the vast majority of us are healthy. The #DrGPCR Ecosystem is all about dynamic interactions between us who are working towards exploiting the druggability of #GPCR's. We aspire to provide opportunities to connect, share, form trusting partnerships, grow, and thrive together. To build our #GPCR Ecosystem, we created various enabling outlets. For more details, visit our website http://www.DrGPCR.com/Ecosystem/ ------------------------------------------- Are you a #GPCR professional? - Register to become a Virtual Cafe speaker http://www.drgpcr.com/virtual-cafe/ - Subscribe to our Monthly Newsletter http://www.drgpcr.com/newsletter/ - Listen and subscribe to #DrGPCR Podcasts http://www.drgpcr.com/podcast/ - Support #DrGPCR Ecosystem with your Donation. http://www.drgpcr.com/sponsors/ - Reserve your spots for the next #DrGPCR Virtual Cafe http://www.drgpcr.com/virtual-cafe/

KGO 810 Podcast
October 19, 2021: UCSF's Dr. Peter Chin-Hong: Mix-matching vaccines & COVID immunity

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 13:59


Peter Chin-Hong, MD, Professor in the UCSF Health Division of Infectious Diseases See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Mark Thompson Show Podcast
October 19, 2021: UCSF's Dr. Peter Chin-Hong: Mix-matching vaccines & COVID immunity

The Mark Thompson Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 13:59


Peter Chin-Hong, MD, Professor in the UCSF Health Division of Infectious Diseases See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Mental Health and Psychiatry (Video)
From Climate Stress to Activation: The Critical Role of the Health Professional

Mental Health and Psychiatry (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 58:55


The climate crisis is impacting health, and health care professionals have a pivotal role as advocates for change. The climate crisis must be mitigated by vast reductions in carbon use. Physicians share how they have promoted advocacy, as well as effective ways of messaging, and how leaders serve as trusted sources of information for policymakers and local institutions, and change agents. Panelists: Mark Coleman, MS, author and nature meditation teacher; host, Nature Summit; Robin Cooper, MD, Volunteer Associate Clinical Professor, UCSF Dept. of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences; co-founder, Climate Psychiatry Alliance; Edward Maibach, PhD, Mason Distinguished University Professor, George Mason University; Ashley McClure, MD, co-founder, Climate Health Now; Kimberly Williams, PhD, PHR, Executive Director, The National Medical Association; Program Manager, Georgia Clinicians for Climate Action. Moderated by Elissa Epel, PhD, Vice Chair for Adult Psychology, UCSF. Series: "Emotional Well-Being in Times of Crisis" [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show ID: 37479]

Science (Video)
From Climate Stress to Activation: The Critical Role of the Health Professional

Science (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 58:55


The climate crisis is impacting health, and health care professionals have a pivotal role as advocates for change. The climate crisis must be mitigated by vast reductions in carbon use. Physicians share how they have promoted advocacy, as well as effective ways of messaging, and how leaders serve as trusted sources of information for policymakers and local institutions, and change agents. Panelists: Mark Coleman, MS, author and nature meditation teacher; host, Nature Summit; Robin Cooper, MD, Volunteer Associate Clinical Professor, UCSF Dept. of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences; co-founder, Climate Psychiatry Alliance; Edward Maibach, PhD, Mason Distinguished University Professor, George Mason University; Ashley McClure, MD, co-founder, Climate Health Now; Kimberly Williams, PhD, PHR, Executive Director, The National Medical Association; Program Manager, Georgia Clinicians for Climate Action. Moderated by Elissa Epel, PhD, Vice Chair for Adult Psychology, UCSF. Series: "Emotional Well-Being in Times of Crisis" [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show ID: 37479]

Health and Medicine (Video)
From Climate Stress to Activation: The Critical Role of the Health Professional

Health and Medicine (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 58:55


The climate crisis is impacting health, and health care professionals have a pivotal role as advocates for change. The climate crisis must be mitigated by vast reductions in carbon use. Physicians share how they have promoted advocacy, as well as effective ways of messaging, and how leaders serve as trusted sources of information for policymakers and local institutions, and change agents. Panelists: Mark Coleman, MS, author and nature meditation teacher; host, Nature Summit; Robin Cooper, MD, Volunteer Associate Clinical Professor, UCSF Dept. of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences; co-founder, Climate Psychiatry Alliance; Edward Maibach, PhD, Mason Distinguished University Professor, George Mason University; Ashley McClure, MD, co-founder, Climate Health Now; Kimberly Williams, PhD, PHR, Executive Director, The National Medical Association; Program Manager, Georgia Clinicians for Climate Action. Moderated by Elissa Epel, PhD, Vice Chair for Adult Psychology, UCSF. Series: "Emotional Well-Being in Times of Crisis" [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show ID: 37479]

Around the County with Supervisor Jim Desmond
COVID-19 Will Soon Be Endemic?

Around the County with Supervisor Jim Desmond

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 18:14


Today, we sat down with Dr. Monica Gandhi, infectious diseases and HIV doctor at UCSF. We spoke to Dr. Gandhi about her thoughts on COVID-19 transitioning from a pandemic to an endemic. It was a fascinating talk and I encourage to listen to our conversation! Op-Ed: https://www.wsj.com/articles/covid-endemic-vaccines-measles-smallpox-pandemic-coronavirus-11633015316

Mental Health and Psychiatry (Video)
Pandemic Burnout and Regeneration for Our New World: One Year Later

Mental Health and Psychiatry (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 58:54


A panel of leaders in mental health and science discuss combatting pandemic fatigue, share short meditations, and revisit their previous discussion on personal and communal lessons and hopes for rejuvenating our lives, science and healthcare, self-care, and our earth. Panelists: Elizabeth Blackburn, PhD, Professor Emeritus, UCSF Dept. of Biochemistry and Biophysics; Eve Ekman, PhD, teaching faculty, UCSF Osher Center for Integrative Medicine; Trudy Goodman, PhD, founder, InsightLA; Jack Kornfield, PhD, founder, Spirit Rock Meditation Center; Dan Siegel, MD, Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, UCLA School of Medicine; founder, Mindsight Institute. Moderated by Elissa Epel, PhD, Vice Chair for Adult Psychology, UCSF. Series: "Emotional Well-Being in Times of Crisis" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 37476]

Health and Medicine (Video)
Pandemic Burnout and Regeneration for Our New World: One Year Later

Health and Medicine (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 58:54


A panel of leaders in mental health and science discuss combatting pandemic fatigue, share short meditations, and revisit their previous discussion on personal and communal lessons and hopes for rejuvenating our lives, science and healthcare, self-care, and our earth. Panelists: Elizabeth Blackburn, PhD, Professor Emeritus, UCSF Dept. of Biochemistry and Biophysics; Eve Ekman, PhD, teaching faculty, UCSF Osher Center for Integrative Medicine; Trudy Goodman, PhD, founder, InsightLA; Jack Kornfield, PhD, founder, Spirit Rock Meditation Center; Dan Siegel, MD, Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, UCLA School of Medicine; founder, Mindsight Institute. Moderated by Elissa Epel, PhD, Vice Chair for Adult Psychology, UCSF. Series: "Emotional Well-Being in Times of Crisis" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 37476]

Ear Snacks
Tissues: How to Sneeze and Cellular Lego Kits

Ear Snacks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 28:39


Andrew & Polly investigate the science of sneezing, how tissues are made, how the amazing human body protects itself, and how we can all protect each other when we...ah...ah...achoo! Thanks to Wow in the World's Mindy Thomas for playing “Should I Pick It?” and communicating so much gooey science from her New York Times best-selling book The How and The Wow of the Human Body. And thanks to pediatric surgeon Dr. Willie Moses from UCSF for using his imaginary laparoscope to reveal the secrets of the cellular LEGO kit inside all of us. Thanks to the families who support our work at patreon.com/earsnacks! And thanks to the four fantastic kids -- Emily from Scotland, Mila from Wyoming, Valentino from Italy, and Izzy from California -- who helped us think about tissues inside and outside our bodies!  Thanks to this episode's sponsors! Thanks to MIT Kids Press. Get Ada and the Galaxies wherever books are sold Thanks iD Tech Pro. To save $150 on weekly, small-group semesters, go to idtech.com/EARSNACKS and use promo code EARSNACKS. You can also get started with a 1-on-1 tutoring lesson for just $49.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
October 12, 2021: Dr. George Rutherford & Chris Merrill - COVID

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 41:32


Dr. George Rutherford from UCSF answers Chris's questions about breakthrough cases of Covid.  Chris explains his family's recent experience with the Covid virus. Everyone in his family was vaccinated and they all got sick. Their symptoms varied. He thought it was a cold at first. Then he had a low ringing in his ears that lasted nearly two weeks, in addition to losing his sense of taste and smell. Chris and his family are nearly completely recovered. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Mind Pump: Raw Fitness Truth
1661: How to Learn to Pistol Squat, the Muscle & Performance Benefits of Spiking Insulin, Meat Based Protein Powder Review & More

Mind Pump: Raw Fitness Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 70:59


In this episode of Quah (Q & A), Sal, Adam & Justin answer Pump Head questions about the best way to progress to a full unassisted pistol squat, developing quads when you are glute dominant or glutes when you are quad dominant, spiking insulin before the gym or after the workout, and the quality of carnivore/meat based protein powders. Ben Greenfield, Captain Springboard and Pseudoscience. (5:17) What is semen retention, and are there any benefits? (15:34) What message are we trying to send our children? (18:55) Attack of the fruit flies! (22:25) X-men, no more? (24:16) Woman's depression was cured by targeted electrical brain stimulation, a first, pioneered by UCSF researchers. (25:57) Alarming news with Sal: US homicides increased 30% in 2020. (31:23) Rad is coming back to theaters! (33:53) Irresponsible purchases with Mind Pump. (36:10) Your worst fans are usually the people closest to you. (44:26) #Quah question #1 – What is the best way to progress to a full unassisted pistol squat? (49:24) #Quah question #2 – What is harder to develop, quads when you are glute dominant or glutes when you are quad dominant? (54:46) #Quah question #3 – What is more important, spiking insulin before the gym or after the workout? (58:46) #Quah question #4 – What do you think about carnivore or meat-based protein powders? (1:03:39) Related Links/Products Mentioned October Promotion: MAPS Anabolic and NO BS 6-Pack Formula – Get Both for $59.99!    How A Simple Stick Developed Into One Of The Most Advanced Muscle Self-Quantification & Isometric Training Tools That Exists. - Ben Greenfield Podcast w/Justin Andrews NCI Certifications x Mind Pump Semen Retention: Origin, How to, Purported Benefits, Risks Mind Pump #1660: Wokeism, Equity & Social Justice With Gad Saad The maker of popular selfie app Facetune just landed $135 million at a unicorn valuation Portion of South San Jose under state quarantine for oriental fruit flies Marvel May Change X-Men Name To Make It More Inclusive A custom brain implant lifted a woman's severe depression Homicides up 30 percent in largest increase on record, FBI says RAD Heads Back to Theaters for One Night to Celebrate 35th Anniversary Visit NED for an exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! Visit LivON Labs for an exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! Visit Paleo Valley for an exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! **Promo code “Mindpump15” at checkout for 15% discount** Step-By-Step Instruction on How to Pistol Squat – Mind Pump TV Two Ankle Mobility Exercises To Increase Your Squat Depth! - Mind Pump TV The Myth of Optimal Protein Intake – Mind Pump Blog Do I Need a Protein Shake Every Time I Workout? - Mind Pump Blog Mind Pump Podcast – YouTube Mind Pump Free Resources People Mentioned Ben Greenfield Fitness (@bengreenfieldfitness)  Instagram Dr. Gad Saad (@doctorgadsaad)  Instagram Bodybuilding.com (@bodybuildingcom)  Instagram Jon Call (@jujimufu)  Instagram

Health and Medicine (Video)
Anti-Racism and Building an Inclusive Culture

Health and Medicine (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 59:28


The race equity movement has left us with greater awareness of the urgent need for changes in the way we interact and run our businesses and institutions. This discussion features a frank discussion on what one psychiatry department has done to address interpersonal and systemic racism, as well as insight from an expert on a compassion-based approach for insightfully seeing and discussing race, and being actively anti-racist. Panelists: Rhonda Magee, JD, Professor of Law, University of San Francisco; Michelle Porche, EdD, Associate Adjunct Professor, UCSF Dept. of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences; Matthew State, MD, PhD, Oberndorf Family Distinguished Professor and Chair, UCSF Dept. of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Moderated by Elissa Epel, PhD, Vice Chair for Adult Psychology, UCSF. Series: "Emotional Well-Being in Times of Crisis" [Public Affairs] [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 37477]

Mental Health and Psychiatry (Video)
Anti-Racism and Building an Inclusive Culture

Mental Health and Psychiatry (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 59:28


The race equity movement has left us with greater awareness of the urgent need for changes in the way we interact and run our businesses and institutions. This discussion features a frank discussion on what one psychiatry department has done to address interpersonal and systemic racism, as well as insight from an expert on a compassion-based approach for insightfully seeing and discussing race, and being actively anti-racist. Panelists: Rhonda Magee, JD, Professor of Law, University of San Francisco; Michelle Porche, EdD, Associate Adjunct Professor, UCSF Dept. of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences; Matthew State, MD, PhD, Oberndorf Family Distinguished Professor and Chair, UCSF Dept. of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Moderated by Elissa Epel, PhD, Vice Chair for Adult Psychology, UCSF. Series: "Emotional Well-Being in Times of Crisis" [Public Affairs] [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 37477]

Ask Dr Jessica
Let's talk about children and headaches!

Ask Dr Jessica

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 26:23


In this weeks episode, Dr Jessica Hochman interviews Dr. Amy Gelfand, accomplished pediatric neurologist and headache specialist about pediatric headaches. We review the most common pediatric headaches: tension headaches, migraine headaches and post traumatic headaches. We discuss how to prevent headaches and how to treat headaches. We also review myths about migraines (like does eating chocolate really trigger a migraines?!) and when to see a doctor. We review warning signs for headache emergencies. If you or someone you know suffers from migraines/headaches, this is a discussion you'll especially enjoy. Dr. Gelfand attended Harvard Medical School, and completed her Pediatric Residency and Child Neurology training at UCSF.  She is a board certified Child Neurologist and is currently the Director of Pediatric Headache at UCSF.  

Ask Dr Jessica
Answering all of your questions about melatonin and children!

Ask Dr Jessica

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 18:27


In this weeks episode, Dr Jessica Hochman interviews Dr. Amy Gelfand about children and melatonin.  Many over-the-counter products with melatonin are being marketed as a sleep aid for children, but what do we know about these products? Are they safe for children? Does melatonin help children sleep? Does it help treat pediatric headaches? Are there side effects?  Is it possible for kids to get dependent on these products? We discuss all of this and more!Dr Gelfand is an accomplished pediatric neurologist and headache specialist, and she has researched melatonin and children--exploring melatonin as a means to prevent pediatric headaches (see her publication links below).  Dr. Gelfand attended Harvard Medical School, and completed her Pediatric Residency and Child Neurology training at UCSF.  She is a board certified Child Neurologist and is currently the Director of Pediatric Headache at UCSF.  

Pediheart: Pediatric Cardiology Today
Pediheart Podcast #181: Delirium In The Pediatric Postoperative Cardiac Patient

Pediheart: Pediatric Cardiology Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 29:01


This week we enter the world of cardiac critical care to discuss delirium in the postoperative pediatric cardiac patient. We speak with nursing scientist, Professor Sandra Staveski of UCSF about a recent large multicenter study she conducted on this topic. How prevalent is this problem and why is it an important morbidity to tackle and reduce? How can nursing interventions reduce this problem and how can the ICU team working together identify and manage this problem? Dr. Staveski shares her deep nursing and critical care knowledge with us this week. DOI: 10.1097/PCC.0000000000002591

KQED’s Forum
Two Californians win Nobel Prize for Research on How We Sense Touch, Temperature and Pain

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 37:27


Two California scientists, David Julius from UCSF and Ardem Patapoutian from San Diego's Scripps Research, have won the 2021 Nobel Prize for medicine. In their work, which focuses on the biology of our senses, Julius and Patapoutian identified receptors that allow the cells in your body to sense touch and temperature. Their findings hold potential medical applications for better treatment of chronic pain. We talk with the prize-winning researchers about their work.

6-8 Weeks: Perspectives on Sports Medicine
Episode 58: Foot and Ankle Injuries - Getting a Step Ahead with Dr. Adam Bitterman

6-8 Weeks: Perspectives on Sports Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 18:32


Foot and ankle injuries are common amongst professional athletes and weekend warriors. Listen to our chat with Dr Adam Bitterman of Northwell Health as we talk about these injuries.

Health and Medicine (Video)
Building Stress Resilience to Withstand the Next Crisis

Health and Medicine (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 59:20


This discussion focuses on the mental health challenges and lessons learned at UCSF during the pandemic, with a focus on building institutional resources to prepare for future challenges. Panelists: Maga Jackson-Triche, MD, MSHS, Health Sciences Clinical Professor, UCSF Dept. of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences; Christine Mangurian, MD, MAS, Professor of Clinical Psychiatry and Vice Chair for Diversity and Health Equity, UCSF Dept. of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences; Robert Rodriguez, MD, Professor, UCSF Dept. of Emergency Medicine. Moderated by Elissa Epel, PhD, Vice Chair for Adult Psychology, UCSF. Series: "Emotional Well-Being in Times of Crisis" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 37474]

Mental Health and Psychiatry (Video)
Building Stress Resilience to Withstand the Next Crisis

Mental Health and Psychiatry (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 59:20


This discussion focuses on the mental health challenges and lessons learned at UCSF during the pandemic, with a focus on building institutional resources to prepare for future challenges. Panelists: Maga Jackson-Triche, MD, MSHS, Health Sciences Clinical Professor, UCSF Dept. of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences; Christine Mangurian, MD, MAS, Professor of Clinical Psychiatry and Vice Chair for Diversity and Health Equity, UCSF Dept. of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences; Robert Rodriguez, MD, Professor, UCSF Dept. of Emergency Medicine. Moderated by Elissa Epel, PhD, Vice Chair for Adult Psychology, UCSF. Series: "Emotional Well-Being in Times of Crisis" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 37474]

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Dr Ina Park and Log Off Movement's Celine Bernhardt-Lanier and Aliza Kopans

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 116:10


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more On Today's Show 32 minute News Recap Dr Ina Park begins at 34 mins  From InaPark.net : I was born and raised in the San Francisco Bay Area.  My parents are immigrants from South Korea who had an arranged marriage and ended up actually liking each other.  Being a first-generation Asian kid in the US, the extent of my sex education from my parents was, “don't have sex before you get married or we will kick you out of the house.” (In case you are wondering, I was already sexually active by the time I received this advice) My career in sexual health began as a peer educator at the University of California-Berkeley, where I dressed up as a giant condom and performed a live demo with a prophylactic and a banana on the steps of Sproul Hall.  After that there was no looking back: sexual health, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and HIV prevention have been a steady presence in my life ever since.  After receiving my medical degree from UCLA, I completed residency in Family Medicine at Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles.  I then followed my husband to the University of Minnesota-School of Public Health for my master's degree. I possess a deep love for Minnesota, but two winters there was enough for me.  I settled back in California, where I completed a fellowship in Sexually Transmitted Diseases at the UC San Francisco School of Medicine (UCSF).  After all this training it was time to get a real job.  I'm now an Associate Professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at UCSF.  I also serve as the Medical Director of the California Prevention Training Center and a Medical Consultant for the Division of STD Prevention at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  A few years ago, I decided that my time on this earth would be best spent making people feel better about their sex lives, reducing stigma around STIs, conducting good science and sharing it with the world as best I can.  So I decided to try my hand at writing a book about STIs, Strange Bedfellows, and someone (who is not related to me) thought it was good enough to publish.  Writing a book is similar to pregnancy and childbirth; it's a hell of a lot harder than it looks, and when it's over you need a few years to forget how bad it was before you can think of doing it again.  I live in Berkeley with my husband and two sons.  If I had more time, I would plant vegetables, pickle them, knit and brew bone broth.  I don't do any of those things.  I do practice yoga, and feebly attempt to meditate from time to time, but most of my waking hours are spent parenting and thinking about syphilis.   If you'd like me to come and speak to your group about my book or generally about the topic of sex and STIs or sexual health, please contact me here Buy Strange Bedfellows ------------------------------------------------------------- 1:22 At LOG OFF, we are passionate about lowering social media's impact on mental health while teaching teenage users and their parents about how to navigate the vast inner -workings of life on social media. Celine Bernhardt-Lanier is a Franco-American  high school senior and the CEO of LOG OFF. In 2020, she launched a digital wellbeing initiative by helping teens connect better with others, their true selves, and nature as a means to promote healthier use of technology. A teen leader on the boards of Fairplay and LookUp.live, Celine is a certified digital wellness educator with the Digital Wellness Institute, and a guest student of Stanford University's Digital Wellness course. She is the creator of a digital wellbeing resource for parents, adult professionals and youth; She also is the author of an article on “Nomophobia” and digital wellbeing in the United States and Spain. Celine also is a global speaker and moderator through podcasts, youth summits, and other events for youth and adult audiences worldwide. Aliza Kopans is a first-year at Brown University and a Digital Wellness Youth Activist serving on Fairplay's Action Network Advisory Board and LookUp.Live's Teen Leadership Council. Co-creator of "Dear Parents," a digital well-being resource from teens to parents and co-founder of "Tech(nically) Politics," a youth-led movement aimed at changing governmental regulations of digital spaces, Aliza is dedicated to creating change towards a human—not screen—focused world. Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page

KQED’s Forum
First Oral COVID-19 Treatment Shows Promise

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 24:55


Drug company Merck is applying for emergency use authorization in the U.S. for a new oral treatment for COVID-19 that trials suggest cuts the risk of hospitalization or death by half. We'll talk with UCSF's Dr. Monica Gandhi about the promising new treatment, get the latest coronavirus numbers for the Bay Area, and hear what to expect now that flu season is around the corner.

That's Cool News | A weekly breakdown of positive Science & Tech news.
77. Supercooling Solves Heart Transplant Issues, Successful Test of Bioartificial Kidney, Possible Planet Orbiting Three Stars

That's Cool News | A weekly breakdown of positive Science & Tech news.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 30:34


News Timestamps: Supercooling advances human tissue preservation | MedicalXPress (01:44) DeepMind develops AI that can forecast the weather | Silicon Angle (08:12) The Kidney Project successfully tests a prototype bioartificial kidney | UCSF (13:57) World's Fastest Electric Car Charger Offers a Full Charge in 15 Minutes | PCMag (21:23) Scientists May Have Discovered The First Planet Orbiting Three Stars At Once | Interesting Engineering (25:29) ----more---- Podcast Links: Website: https://thatscoolnews.com/ Review The Podcast: https://thatscoolnews.com/review Email List: https://thatscoolnews.com/email Follow On Social Media: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thatscoolnews/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Thats_Cool_News  Join the Community: Discord: https://thatscoolnews.com/discord Facebook Group: https://thatscoolnews.com/group

Mental Health and Psychiatry (Video)
Pandemic Transitions: From Collective Grief to Joy

Mental Health and Psychiatry (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 59:19


In the wake of the pandemic and systemic social injustice, we are facing vast collective grief. Renowned therapists Jack Saul and Esther Perel discuss ways to witness and move through grief using creative expression, toward experiencing fresh joy and purpose in our new world. Speakers: Esther Perel, MFT, family therapist and Jack Saul, PhD, trauma therapist and leader of communal resilience movements. Moderated by Elissa Epel, PhD, Vice Chair for Adult Psychology, UCSF. Series: "Emotional Well-Being in Times of Crisis" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 37475]

Health and Medicine (Video)
Pandemic Transitions: From Collective Grief to Joy

Health and Medicine (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 59:19


In the wake of the pandemic and systemic social injustice, we are facing vast collective grief. Renowned therapists Jack Saul and Esther Perel discuss ways to witness and move through grief using creative expression, toward experiencing fresh joy and purpose in our new world. Speakers: Esther Perel, MFT, family therapist and Jack Saul, PhD, trauma therapist and leader of communal resilience movements. Moderated by Elissa Epel, PhD, Vice Chair for Adult Psychology, UCSF. Series: "Emotional Well-Being in Times of Crisis" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 37475]

6-8 Weeks: Perspectives on Sports Medicine
Episode 57: Diversity In Orthopedic Surgery and Delivering Equitable Care - Chatting with Dr. Neeraj Patel

6-8 Weeks: Perspectives on Sports Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 25:08


Health care disparities are present in medicine, particularly in orthopedic surgery. Listen to our frank discussion with Dr. Neeraj Patel as we talk about issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion in orthopedic surgery.

What Brings You In Today?
A Conversation with Dr. Emily Silverman, Creator of the Nocturnists

What Brings You In Today?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 39:18


As an internal medicine resident at the University of California, San Fransisco, Dr. Emily Silverman created the Nocturnists, a narrative medicine podcast and live show that strives to use the power of storytelling to cultivate community and improve the field of medicine. The Nocturnists was one of our biggest influences in starting WBYIT, and we are so grateful to have had the opportunity to speak with Dr. Silverman for this episode. Dr. Silverman tells us about her own inspirations for the Nocturnists—a love for the arts and a need to address the tough, existential questions at the core of what it mean to be a physician. She also shares her experience building the Nocturnists organization from the ground up and the backstory behind one of her published pieces, Comic Relief (link below). Dr. Silverman is an author and Assistant Professor of Medicine at UCSF. Visit www.thenocturnists.com to learn more about Dr. Silverman's work and https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/article-abstract/2738556 to read her piece, Comic Relief.

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
A New Era of Experiential Medicine: From Video Games to Psychedelics

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 67:12


A fundamental challenge of our health-care system is the enhancement of cognition for millions of people who suffer from psychiatric and neurological conditions. Despite 70 years of global effort in attempting to identify molecules deliverable as pills to accomplish this goal, we have largely failed to deliver truly effective, accessible and low-side-effect treatments for cognitive impairments associated with medical conditions, including depression, anxiety, PTSD, ADHD and dementia. It is important to be aware that for thousands of years we humans have been creating experiences to enhance the quality of our lives and support our mental health. However, this approach has largely been marginalized as “alternative” and has not been embraced within the core of mainstream medicine. Dr. Adam Gazzaley will describe his mission to develop and validate experiences as medicine by integrating neuroscience-guided design, invention and experimentation. In this talk, he will discuss his invention of a closed-loop video game that has now become the first FDA-cleared video game for any medical condition, and the first digital treatment for ADHD. He will share how the next generation of experiential medicine will incorporate advances in artificial intelligence, sensory immersion, virtual reality, multimodal physiological recordings and noninvasive electrical brain stimulation. He will conclude with a deep dive into his newest undertakings to explore the intricacies and possibilities of one of man's oldest experiential medicines—psychedelics. Dr. Adam Gazzaley obtained an M.D. and Ph.D. in neuroscience at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, completed neurology residency at the University of Pennsylvania and postdoctoral training in cognitive neuroscience at the University of California, Berkeley. He is currently the David Dolby Distinguished Professor of Neurology, Physiology and Psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco and the founder and executive director of Neuroscape, a translational neuroscience center at UCSF engaged in technology creation and scientific research. MLF ORGANIZER Patty James NOTES MLF: Health & Medicine SPEAKERS Dr. Adam Gazzaley M.D., Ph.D., David Dolby Distinguished Professor of Neurology, Physiology and Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco; Founder and Executive Director, Neuroscape Patty James M.S., N.C. Nutritionist; Chef; Author—Moderator In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on September 22nd, 2021 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

KGO 810 Podcast
September 20, 2021 - Talking COVID: UCSF's Dr. Peter Chin-Hong on Risky Activities

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 37:02


DR PETER CHIN-HONG See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Pat Thurston Show Podcast
September 20, 2021 - Talking COVID: UCSF's Dr. Peter Chin-Hong on Risky Activities

The Pat Thurston Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 37:02


DR PETER CHIN-HONG See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Curbsiders Internal Medicine Podcast
#295 Advance Your Care Planning with Dr. Rebecca Sudore

The Curbsiders Internal Medicine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 60:40


Advance your care planning with tips from our esteemed guest, Dr. Rebecca Sudore, @prepareforcare (UCSF). She helps us up our ACP game by defining advance care planning, and giving clear examples of how it can be incorporated into a busy primary care practice. It's her life's mission is to improve advance care planning and medical decision-making for culturally and ethnically diverse older adults. She is the creator of an interactive ACP website called PREPARE For Your Care, (after this episode, we are sure you'll be sending patients there for advance care planning!) Free CME for this episode at curbsiders.vcuhealth.org! Episodes | Subscribe | Spotify | Swag! | Top Picks | Mailing List | thecurbsiders@gmail.com | Free CME! Credits Written by: Leah Witt, MD Produced by: Leah Witt, MD & Molly Heublein, MD Reviewer: Lingsheng Li, MD Infographic and Cover Art: Leah Witt, MD Hosts:Matthew Watto MD, FACP; Paul Williams MD, FACP, Leah Witt, MD    Editor: Matthew Watto MD (written materials); Clair Morgan of nodderly.com Guest: Rebecca Sudore, MD Sponsor: Grammarly grammarly.com/curb Get 20% off Grammarly Premium by signing up at grammarly.com/curb Sponsor: Green Chef greenchef.com/curb100 Go to GreenChef.com/curb100 and use code curb100 to get $100 off including free shipping!” CME Partner: VCU Health CE The Curbsiders are partnering with VCU Health Continuing Education to offer FREE continuing education credits for physicians and other healthcare professionals. Visit curbsiders.vcuhealth.org. Show Segments Intro, disclaimer, guest bio Guest one-liner Picks of the Week Case from Kashlak Part 1: General ACP Defining Advance Care Planning Case from Kashlak Part 1: Dementia & ACP Surrogate decision-makers POLST Outro

KCRW's Left, Right & Center
Cliffs, drugs and taxes

KCRW's Left, Right & Center

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 55:26


Democrats have spent weeks talking about their big spending plans, and now they're talking about how to pay for them. Some ideas: tax increases on corporations and wealthy Americans, a capital gains tax regimen, and allowing the government to negotiate drug prices directly with pharmaceutical companies which would cut what the government pays and cutting costs for other American consumers. But can progressives and moderates agree on how to do these things? And how much will the scope of the plan shrink in the process? Then there are the cliffs: hello, a government shutdown is looming September 30, and the debt limit needs to be raised. Can Democrats manage to squeeze out a compromise by the end of the month? And how will that affect the fate of the spending plan? The FDA is reviewing the case for a COVID booster shot. Should Americans be getting a third (or fourth, or fifth…) shot when the rest of the world remains unvaccinated? DR. PETER CHIN-HONG of UCSF talks with the panel about the disagreement among the Biden administration, the medical community and public health officials about whether booster shots are needed now, and how to balance a vaccination campaign and a booster strategy. Also: California Gov. Gavin Newsom soundly defeated a recall effort. Does this tell us anything about next year's midterm election? And finally: Josh thinks Larry Elder is NOT the future of the California GOP. Also, why Tim might take heat from space Twitter after we publish this.

6-8 Weeks: Perspectives on Sports Medicine
Episode 56: Sports Injury Analysis, Social Media, and Physical Therapy - Catching Up With Dr Rajpal Brar

6-8 Weeks: Perspectives on Sports Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 18:51


Listen to our latest podcast with Dr. Rajpal Brar, DPT, of 3CB Performance as we discuss sports injury analysis, social media, and his strategies rehabbing athletes.

InJoy Success Podcast
Episode #166: Victoria Albina - Feminist Wellness Embodied

InJoy Success Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 47:18


Highlights: [9:33] Where do you lie to yourself? [19:12] Going ventral vagal [24:30] Starting thought work   Meet Victoria Albina:  Victoria is a Certified Life Coach, UCSF-trained Family Nurse Practitioner, functional medicine expert, and Breathwork Meditation Guide with a passion for helping women realize that they are their own best healers... so they can break free from codependency, perfectionism and people-pleasing... and ultimately RECLAIM their joy. She is the host of the Feminist Wellness Podcast, holds a Masters degree in Public Health from Boston University School of Public Health and a BA in Latin American Studies from Oberlin College. Victoria has been working in health & wellness for over 20 years and lives on occupied Lenapee territory in New York's Hudson Valley. What I love about Victoria is that she is the epitome of Heart and Mind Coherence, of science and spirituality. She's solidly grounded in functional medicine practices and the latest in neuroscience as well as the wisdom she's garnered from her own spiritual journey. But perhaps most impressive is her absolute superpower of being able to create and hold the space for the people she works with to connect with their own innate wisdom. Victoria is the embodiment of the old saying, “Give someone a fish, you feed them for a day… teach someone to fish, and you will feed them for a lifetime.” She is on a mission to help as many people as possible unshackle themselves from limiting beliefs, codependency, perfectionism and anything else that stands in the way from them realizing the truth of who they are and powerfully creating the life they've always dreamed of. So, whether you are building a business, wanting to improve your relationships, working to manifest a lifelong dream, or simply committed to experiencing your fullest self… this is the episode for you.   Connect with Victoria:  Website Instagram: @victoriaalbinawellness Podcast: Feminist Wellness Facebook LinkedIn ... If you're interested in learning more about challenges and how you can use them to maximize your reach, increase your impact and grow your coaching business just click here : http://mychallengecreator.com/

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers
622: Surgeon and Scientist Studying Signal Transduction in Head and Neck Cancer - Dr. Jennifer Grandis

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 35:07


Dr. Jennifer Grandis is a Professor in the Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Director of the Clinical and Translational Science Institute, and Associate Vice Chancellor of Clinical and Translational Research at the University of California, San Francisco. She is also an American Cancer Society Professor. Jennifer is a Cancer Biologist as well as a head and neck surgeon. Her research revolves around understanding the key features of head and neck cancer that can be used to develop more effective treatments. Jennifer and her husband like to go running every morning with their dogs near their home in San Francisco. She makes sure to dedicate time in her day for reading, and she also listens to books on her phone when traveling. Reading and cooking are two activities that bring Jennifer great happiness. Jennifer received her B.A. in Biology and Art History at Swarthmore College and was awarded her M.D. from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. She completed her residency and an Infectious Disease Fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and went on to serve on the faculty there for over 20 years before accepting her current position at UCSF. Jennifer has received many honors and awards during her career, including the Peggy Wheelock Award for Excellence in Research, Mentoring, and Promotion of Women in Science from the University of Nebraska, as well as the University of Pittsburgh's Provost's Award for Excellence in Mentoring, Philip Hench Distinguished Alumnus Award, Chancellor's Distinguished Research Award, Scientific Leadership Award, promotion to Distinguished Professor of Otolaryngology, and more. Jennifer is also an Elected Member of the Association of American Physicians, the American Society for Clinical Investigation, and the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. Jennifer joined us in this interview to tell us all about her journey through life and science.

Studio CMO
060 | How Collaboration Changed HIMSS21 for Innovaccer | Dipty Desai | Studio CMO

Studio CMO

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 30:25


For two years prior to the pandemic, marketing executives were bemoaning the effectiveness and the future of trade shows. When the world shut live events down, organizations pivoted to online. Would in-person events return? If so, would they be even more ineffective as those before the pandemic? Industries outside of healthcare looked to HIMSS as a major in-person trade show to gauge their own financial and human investment in events for 2021-22. Innovaccer's success at HIMSS is a blueprint for others. About Our Guest Dipty Desai, PhD serves as Director of Marketing for strategic partnerships at Innovaccer. Her thrilling career has woven through healthcare and biosciences with a stint at NASA. She holds her undergraduate and masters' degrees from the University of Bombay, studied genetics at Penn State, received her PhD at UCSF, and completed a post-doctoral research fellowship at Stanford.  While at NASA, she took her research from Stanford and helped adapt technology to study the effects of zero gravity at the cellular level. She brings a lifetime of connections to Innovaccer. Show Notes Innovaccer mounted a very successful experience at HIMSS21 through: encouraging infectious passion about their solution and their company culture building team unity defining the roles for team members and booth staff creating a transferable methodology for engaging passersby and leads in the booth using a team to evaluate, grade, and contact leads to set appointments during the show Their trade show savvy would have been nothing without the fact their HealthTech solution works and has integrity. Links Mentioned on This Episode Find out more about Innovaccer. Four Trade Show Lessons from HIMSS 2021 Overcoming the Three Curses of the HealthTech Technical Founder

The Pat Thurston Show Podcast
September 9, 2021: Pat Thurston: Contra Costa County records 20 new deaths, officials warn virus could last ‘5 to 10 years'

The Pat Thurston Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 34:15


UCSF's George Rutherfod joins the show to discuss this. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KQED’s Forum
California Nursing Shortage, Made Worse by the Pandemic, Expected to Persist

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 20:59


California faces a shortfall of more than 40,000 full-time equivalent registered nurses, a gap that's expected to last until 2026, according to a new UCSF report. The COVID-19 pandemic has forced experienced nurses to quit the field owing to exhaustion and burnout, and hospitals are struggling to fill positions. We'll talk about the toll the staffing shortage is taking on nurses, patients and hospitals and how to mitigate it.

The Mark Thompson Show Podcast
September 8, 2021: UCSF's Dr. Peter Chin-Hong on the new COVID Mu variant

The Mark Thompson Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 12:51


Peter Chin-Hong, MD, is a Professor in the UCSF Health Division of Infectious Diseases. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Living Mirrors with Dr. James Cooke
Mellody Hayes on individual and societal transformation | Living Mirrors #65

Living Mirrors with Dr. James Cooke

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 93:28


Dr. Mellody Hayes is a physician, writer and speaker, who focuses on psychedelic medicine. She is a graduate of Harvard and UCSF medical school, and was a cofounder of Decriminalize Nature, a leading force behind psychedelic decriminalisation. Her writings have been published in Scientific American and Los Angeles Times and she's been behind multiple projects in the psychedelic space including a ketamine clinic that provides psychedelic psychotherapy. We discussed the role of psychedelics in individual and societal transformation and how the two are connected.

StartUp Health NOW Podcast
Dr. Bob Wachter and Dr. Howard Krein on Achieving Health Moonshots in a COVID World

StartUp Health NOW Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 51:39


On a recent Fireside Chat, Startup Health's Chief Medical Officer Howard Krein, MD, PhD, caught up with Bob Wachter, MD, renowned UCSF internist, bestselling author, and former podcast host of 'In the Bubble - From the Frontlines.' Over the last 18 months, Dr. Bob – who coined the term “hospitalist” and is a national leader in quality, patient safety, and the digitization of medicine – became a trusted voice on COVID. Our candid conversation covered navigating COVID and the after-COVID world, the state of digital innovation, and the future of healthcare. Entrepreneurs: How to get investment from StartUp Health startuphealth.com Investors: How to invest in StartUp Health Moonshots healthmoonshots.com Want more content like this? You can subscribe to the podcast as well as other health innovation updates at startuphealth.com/content. Sign up for StartUp Health Insider™ to get funding insights, news, and special updates delivered to your inbox.

Healthy Wealthy & Smart
556: Dr. Rachel Zoffness, The Money & Science of Pain Management

Healthy Wealthy & Smart

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 54:22


In this episode, Co-President of the American Association of Pain Psychology, Dr. Rachel Zoffness, talks about treating chronic pain. Today, Rachel talks about the failed biomedical model, pain neuroscience, and effective non-pharmaceutical pain treatments. When is the right time to refer someone to a pain coach? What are some multidisciplinary approaches to pain management? Hear about the biopsychosocial nature of pain, how pain treatment in the US is actually about money, how thoughts and emotions affect pain, and The Pain Management Workbook, all on today's episode of The Healthy, Wealthy & Smart Podcast.   Key Takeaways “What science tells us is pain is not purely biomedical. It's actually this different and more complex thing, which is biopsychosocial.” “Pain is complex, and doing one single thing over years and years that has not worked, is probably not the right way to go.” “Pain is never purely physical. It's always also emotional.” “Unless we're taking care of our thoughts and emotions, we're actually not really treating this thing we call pain effectively.” “If it's okay to go to soccer coach to get better at playing soccer, it is surely okay to go to a pain coach to get better at living with chronic pain.” “96% of medical schools in the US and Canada have zero dedicated compulsory pain education.” “Pain, by definition, is a subjective experience.” “Keep doing exactly what you're doing and follow your gut. Trust your intuition, and know that following the path of the thing that you love is the thing that's going to bring you to where you need to be professionally.”   More about Rachel Zoffness Dr. Rachel Zoffness is a pain psychologist and an Assistant Clinical Professor at the UCSF School of Medicine, where she teaches pain education for medical residents. She serves as pain education faculty at Dartmouth and completed a visiting professorship at Stanford University. Dr. Zoffness is the Co-President of the American Association of Pain Psychology, and serves on the board of the Society of Pediatric Pain Medicine. She is the author of The Pain Management Workbook, an integrative, evidence-based treatment protocol for adults living with chronic pain; and The Chronic Pain and Illness Workbook for Teens, the first pain workbook for youth. She also writes the Psychology Today column “Pain, Explained.” Dr. Zoffness is a 2021 Mayday Fellow and consults on the development of integrative pain programs around the world. She was trained at Brown University, Columbia University, UCSD, SDSU, NYU, and St. Luke's-Mt. Sinai Hospital.   Suggested Keywords Pain, Psychosocial, Emotional, Physical, Neuroscience, Treatment, Thoughts, Management, Healthy, Wealthy, Smart, Coach, Physiotherapy, Healing,   Dr. Zoffness Latest Podcast: Healing Our Pain Pandemic Dr. Zoffness's Book: The Pain Management Workbook   To learn more, follow Rachel at: Website:          https://www.zoffness.com Twitter:            Dr. Zoffness Instagram:       @therealdoczoff LinkedIn:         Rachel Zoffness   Subscribe to Healthy, Wealthy & Smart: Website:                      https://podcast.healthywealthysmart.com Apple Podcasts:          https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/healthy-wealthy-smart/id532717264 Spotify:                        https://open.spotify.com/show/6ELmKwE4mSZXBB8TiQvp73 SoundCloud:               https://soundcloud.com/healthywealthysmart Stitcher:                       https://www.stitcher.com/show/healthy-wealthy-smart iHeart Radio:                https://www.iheart.com/podcast/263-healthy-wealthy-smart-27628927   Read the full transcript here:  00:00 Okay, so whenever so I, you will know when we're recording because like I said, I'll do like I'll do a quick clap. And then I'll just say, hey, doctor's office. Welcome to the podcast and off we go. Okay, ready? Perfect. Okay. Hi, Dr. softness. Welcome to the podcast, I am excited to have you on today to talk about chronic pain and treating patients with chronic pain. So this is a real treat. So thanks for coming on. I think you are very cool. Karen Litzy. And I'm excited to be here. Excellent. So what I what we're going to talk about today, just so the listeners knows, we're going to talk about kind of treating chronic pain from a bio psychosocial standpoint versus a biomedical standpoint. So I know a lot of people have no idea what those terms mean. So doctor's office, would you mind filling in the listeners as to what a biomedical model is and what a bio psychosocial model is? to kind of set the tone for the rest of the podcast?   01:10 I totally Can I talk about this all the time, because it makes me so mad. Okay. So the biomedical model is the one that we all know the best, because it's the way we've been treating pain for many decades. And the biomedical model of treating pain and health in general, is essentially viewing and understanding and treating pain as a problem that is purely the result of bio biological or biomedical processes like tissue damage and system dysfunction, and on anatomical issues, and then throwing pills and procedures at it. That is how we've been treating pain for many decades. And of course, we know it isn't working, we have an opioid epidemic, the opioid epidemic is getting worse during the COVID pandemic. People are really suffering, chronic pain is on the rise. It's not being cured. It's not magically disappearing. incidence isn't even decreasing. So the way we're doing it is broken, and also very expensive for people living with pain. However, what science tells us is that pain is not purely biomedical. It has never been purely biomedical. It's actually this different and more complex thing, which surprises nobody, which is bio psychosocial, which is a big and complicated word, but makes intuitive sense, once we start talking about it, I think to people who have experienced pain, which means that yes, of course there are biological processes at work when we're living with pain, acute and chronic. And I can say what those mean to short term pain versus long term pain, longer term pain.   03:02 Yes, and there are also many other processes that work too. So if you imagine this Venn diagram of three overlapping bubbles, which I draw a lot, but I cannot draw right now, we've got the biological or the biomedical bubble on the top. And then we've got the psychological bubble. And that's the one that I struggle to explain to people the most, because I think there's so much stigma around this idea that cognitive and psychological processes might be involved in this experience we call pain because there's so much shame and embarrassment and stigma around anything to do with psychology, which is so unfortunate. But in this psychology bubble of pain, there's a lot of stuff that I think people know intuitively can amplify or reduce pain. So there's thoughts about your body and about your pain and just thoughts you're having about life in general. There's emotions, like stress and anxiety and depression, even suicidality. And we know that negative emotions amplify pain. And we know that positive emotions can sort of turn pain volume down, there's memories of past pain experiences. And those are stored in a part of your brain called the hippocampus. And we know research shows that memories of past pain experiences can change your current experience of pain. And also in the psychology bubble, we've got coping behaviors. So that's quite literally how you deal with the pain you have. And a lot of us who have lived with pain, and that does include me engage in a lot of coping behaviors that make sense in the moment. But actually, they can make pain feel worse over time. And a great example of that is the resting indefinitely plan or the doing nothing plan, as I like to call it which is totally, you know, normal and natural for those of us who pay into Engage in because when your body is telling you, you know that you're hurting, it's understandable that the thing you think you're supposed to do is stop all activity. But ultimately, what we know about that particular coping behavior is that it makes chronic pain in particular worse over time. So the do nothing plan or the stay home or rest indefinitely plan is a coping behavior that lives in the psychology bubble that can actually make pain feel worse. And of course, there's coping behaviors that can make pain feel less bad, like the counterintuitive things like leaving your house and seeing people and walking and getting out into the sunshine. And, you know, these things that we don't necessarily know can help pain. And then the third, overlapping bubble, and our bio, psychosocial Venn diagram, is the social or the sociological domain of pain. And that's what I like to call the everything else bubble. So it's socio economic status. And family and friends have culture and race and ethnicity and access to care, and socio economic status, and history of trauma and early adverse childhood experiences, and culture, and context. And environment, like quite literally, everything else your environment, believe it not changes the pain you feel. And in the middle of those three things, and I know that's a lot of things, is pain. So when we try and pretend that pain is just this simple biomedical thing, the treatments don't work. And I think all of us who have lived with pain know that our pain is much more complicated and sticky. I know that was a lot of words.   06:44 No, and, and I'm glad that you described everything in the way that you did, because I think that gives the listeners a really good idea of what's in each of those bubbles. Number one, and number two, how complex pain actually is. Exactly, it's not. So if I think if the listeners take away anything from this conversation, if pain is complex, and doing one single thing repeatedly over years, and years and years and years, that has not worked, it's probably not the right way to go.   07:15 That's right. And you know, the other misconception that we all understandably have is that, you know, the way to treat pain is just by going to your physician. And, of course, that makes perfect sense. But we have this misconception in western medicine, that either you have physical pain, and you see a physician, or you have emotional pain, and you go to a therapist, or a psychologist, someone like me, and the really fascinating thing about pain, and the reason I love studying it, and treating it and talking about it so much is that neuroscience tells us that pain is never purely physical, it's always also emotional, because the part of your brain called the limbic system actually processes pain 100% of the time. So pain is always both physical and emotional. But most people don't know that most people have never been told that. But the limbic system plays a huge role in the experience of pain. And we know that, you know, emotions are always changing pain volume all the time. So this idea that pain is either physical or emotional, is not actually a thing, you know, and the way we treat pain by going to a physician exclusively is not actually nine times out of 10, probably more than that going to actually, you know, be the answer for any sort of chronic pain problem.   08:37 And so I'm glad that you brought that up that yes, we know emotions play a role in pain. And as a matter of fact, the International Association for the Study of pain, change their definition of pain in 2019, I believe to include that it is an emotional experience. And I think that really set the stage for greater discussion and research, which I think is amazing. But when you say to someone,   09:05 let's see, can I interrupt the flow to say, they did change the definition, but the the word emotion was always in there? Oh, was it? It was? Okay.   09:16 Let me so when we talk about kind of the emotional part of pain, and I have had patients say this to me, which probably meant I was explaining it incorrectly, and I take full responsibility for that. And I'm sure you've heard this before his patients saying, so you're saying it's all in my head. Totally. And how do you react to that?   09:42 Yeah. I love that. You asked that question. I think probably the worst thing about being a pain psychologist is you know, you're the last stop on the train. You're the last person anyone wants to see nobody wants to go to a psychologist or a mental health professional for a physical experience like pain. And I know you can't see me, but I'm putting air quotes around the word physical. Because again, pain is not a purely physical experience. It's physical and emotional. But of course, no one wants to go to a pain psychologist for pain, right? You think you're supposed to go to a physician, and a referral to a psychologist means you must be crazy or mentally ill or the pain is on your head. And no, that's not what it means at all. And I find that the way that I most effectively target that is by explaining, believe it or not pain neuroscience. And I, I usually do that in the simplest way, I know how just by distilling down that, that, you know, it's easy to believe that pain is something that lives exclusively in the body, right? Like, if you have back pain, it's so easy to believe that that pain lives exclusively in your back. But what we know and what neuroscience has taught us is that actually, it's your brain working in concert with your body that's constructing this experience we call pain. And we know that because of this condition called phantom limb pain, wherein, you know, someone will lose a limb like an arm or a leg and will continue to feel terrible pain in the missing body part. And if pain lived exclusively in the body, no limb should mean no pain. So if you the fact that you can continue to have terrible leg pain, when you have no leg tells us that pain can't possibly live exclusively in the body. And I find that when I explain this to the patients who come see me, first of all, there's more buy in that the role of the brain in pain is really significant. And second of all, it sort of gives me some leverage to then explain that, again, one of the parts of the brain. And one of the most influential, influential parts of the brain that processes pain is your limbic system, which is your brain's emotion center. So unless we're taking care of your thoughts and emotions, we're actually not really treating this thing we call pain effectively, we're just treating one small component of it. So that's, you know, and I also always, by the way, validate that, of course, you have, you know, of course, it feels like someone's saying that the pain is on your head, or that it's a psychological problem. Because of this, again, this like false and ridiculous divide we have in western medicine between physical pain and emotional pain, when neuroscience has known for decades that that's not actually a real distinction, like your head is connected to your body 100% of the time, you know?   12:24 Yeah, absolutely. And as let's say, as a practitioner who's not a pain psychologist, a physical therapist, occupational therapist, maybe your yoga Pilates, and you are working with someone with persistent pain? How, how can we encourage our patients or recommend to our patients, that, hey, you might really benefit from seeing a pain psychologist, without them thinking that we're telling them they're crazy? Yeah.   12:57 I do think that taking 30 seconds, or maybe even 60, to explain, you know, this basic painter science thing. And the phantom limb thing is a really, really effective strategy. So anybody can use that. That piece of information. You don't have to be a pain psychologist. So that's thing one is just like taking a few moments to talk about how pain works in the brain. I think patients are so grateful to learn that no one's ever told them this before you're going to be the first person to ever let them know. And then the other thing that I always do is a trick that I learned from a really nerdy journal article I read years ago by a guy named Scott powers. And he said that one trick that we can use is to call pain psychologists or you know, therapists who are trained in things like cognitive behavioral therapy for pain, pain coaches, and I love that. So I usually tell physicians and other allied health professionals to refer to me as a pain coach. And the way I pitch that to families and tell other health care providers to pitch it to their patients is to say, if it's okay to go to a soccer coach, to get better at playing soccer, it is surely okay to go to a pain coach to get better at living with chronic pain. Because living with pain is so hard. And you deserve support. You know, and usually that removes the stigma and the stigma, especially when you present that in conjunction with some science that supports the role of the brain and the role of cognitions and the read the role of emotions and coping behaviors. In the experience of pain, I find that that really is super effective.   14:41 Yeah, that's really helpful and a great way to frame how to frame that recommendation to someone coming from someone like me coming from a PT because people often come to physical therapists I mean, it's in the name Because they want us to heal or to fix their physical problem, which in this case is persistent pain or chronic pain. And so then that leads me to my next question is, as a physical therapist or as someone who's working with the body, when do we refer this person to a pain coach or pain psychologist?   15:25 I'm curious to know what you're going to think of my answer. Ready? Here's my answer. I once had a friend who said to me, man, like, everyone's always going around talking about how many miles they ran today. And you know, how you like the Strava app, like, you know, how many miles they biked? And how many hours they did yoga this week? And can you imagine what it would be like if everybody, you know, came, came to each other and started bragging about how many hours they spent working on their shit? Like, what I spent three hours working on my anxiety today, or like my family stuff? Or like, my complicated relationship is, like, just why do we prioritize working on the body over working on our minds? You know, it's so strange. So my honest answer is if you're ever treating a patient who's living with chronic pain, and again, that's pain that's lasted three or more months, I think it's worth a referral to a pain psychologist or therapist who's trained in cognitive behavioral therapy. I just, I can't imagine any human being who wouldn't benefit from the opportunity to navigate the complicated experience that is living with pain and having someone in the role of support and coping behavior coach is just, you know, and partner and in processing, the experience of it just just seems to me like such a great gift to be able to give to patients.   16:51 And my answer to how I react to it is I agree. And, and again, this takes into a takes into account really this multi discipline, multi disciplinary approach to pain and approach to pain treatments and management. And so in your opinion, what makes that multidisciplinary approach effective for that patient?   17:20 I mean, what the research shows is that trying to approach and treat pain from just one angle is usually not sufficient, because as we were saying at the beginning, pain is such a complex, bio psychosocial thing. So if we're just looking at the biomedical components, we're not really doing our job, if we're just looking at the psychosocial components, we're not really doing our job. So, you know, a multidisciplinary team as a team made up of, you know, psychologists and pts, and OTS and physicians and nurses and biofeedback providers, and all these different people who are sort of coming at this complicated things from maybe slightly different angles and perspectives. And when we do that, what the research shows is, we have the most robust outcomes, the care is most effective, and the most comprehensive, and people walk away with a whole tool belt of tools to use when treating their pain, you know, across scenarios and across symptoms. So multi disciplinary is really like, how can we all come together as a team with our unique backgrounds and our unique training because, you know, as you know, trainings, especially in the United States, the disciplines are also siloed. You know, like, psychologists are trained in this one way, and pts are doing this thing over here. And OTS are over there. And anesthesiologists are over there as physiatrist. Or, I mean, it's just it's so fractured. So a multidisciplinary team is hopefully working together to target this complex animal that we call chronic pain. And what's really interesting is, you know, I have a private practice, where I see a lot of patients with chronic pain. But I feel like the bulk of my work sometimes is coordinating care with this really complicated treatment team. And I'm seeing a really complicated patient right now who has crps complex regional pain syndrome, which is a really tricky, chronic pain syndrome. And, you know, the way that we his case has been so complicated. It's been many years of treatment. And I think today as a team, we finally decided upon a treatment plan. And it really wasn't until we all were talking that that came together and jelled. So I think that's one of the most important components of treatment actually.   19:38 Yeah, I, I agree. And and when you're in private practice, like you said, sometimes it can be a little bit more difficult, but the more communication you have with people on that team, again, we're doing all of this for the person in the center and that's the patient and so being being able to provide vied so much coordinated care for that patient. Like you said, the research has shown that this is that this works versus a piecemeal, one person's doing this over here. And someone's doing this over here, and they're hearing, and then the patient's hearing contradictory treatment plans. And so it gets really confusing.   20:21 Yeah, it gets super confusing when there's, it's almost like too many cooks in the kitchen, if you're not working together, because they're getting all this different advice from all these different people. And oftentimes, and I'm sure you've seen this, too, they're on, you know, 40, they've tried 40 different medications by the time they've gotten to you. And, you know, I mean, I think what it leads to is like, this treatment, burnout, where like, our patients are just so burned out on all the treatments they've tried, and they have this sense of hopelessness, like, nothing's gonna work. Nothing's working. So far. I've tried all these things. I've seen 40,000 million doctors, and, you know, I've, yeah, I've tried herbs. And yeah,   20:58 I've heard that from people like, they're like, I don't want to go to one like I'm all doctored out, if I have to go see one more doctor, or take one more medication, or do one more procedure, or one more scan, like I'm done. I don't want to do this anymore. Yeah. And I blame them. Yeah, it's exhausting. It's totally exhausting. And you know, we've been talking about things that don't work. Right. So we talked about all that being on medication after medication, opioids, we know these, they don't work for people with chronic pain. So let's talk about non pharmacological treatments. And what does work or what can work for people with chronic pain, so I'll throw it over to you.   21:44 Yeah, so non pharmacological treatments, there's like a whole host of them, there's a wide range of them. And there's a lot of literature on a bunch of different things. So what I use the most in my practice, because I really love it and have found it to be so effective is cognitive behavioral therapy, or CBT, which is different by the way than CB, cb, D, that's something different CBT cognitive behavioral therapy. And an arm off of that is a treatment called Act, which is acceptance and Commitment Therapy, which is become very big in the PT world, which by the way, originated from CBT, and was adapted for pain. There, there's also Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction, or mbsr, which has a huge literature base for the treatment of chronic pain. And there's other things too, like biofeedback, I happen to really love as a treatment for pain. And there's a whole host of other things, too. But, yeah, God,   22:43 I was gonna say, could you explain briefly what biofeedback is so that people understand what that is? Exactly.   22:50 I'm so glad you asked. I've been doing this for so long that I forget. I just forget that. Certain things are not known entities. But I also did not know what biofeedback was when I first started treating chronic pain. And so I'll someone said to me, oh, you're treating patients with pain, you should refer them to biofeedback. And I said, You know, I don't refer my patients to things that I don't understand. So I did a buttload, of reading about biofeedback for pain, and I got a bunch of books. And then I found myself a biofeedback provider. And I went to this gentleman, his name is Dr. Eric pepper. Dr. Pepper is just a great name for any doctor. And He is a professor at the University of San Francisco and I admired him right away, he was obviously very smart. And he sat me down in a chair. And he hooked me up to this machine. And he said, This machine is going to read a bunch of your biological outputs, it's going to read muscle tension, galvanic skin response, your finger temperature, and a bunch of other things, your heart rate. And I was like, what that's really interesting. And he showed me which monitor was, you know, giving me feedback about which thing and hopefully you're picking up on the fact that there's biological processes that you're getting feedback about? And he said, and now I'm going to teach you to raise your finger temperature to 90 degrees, using your mind. And I said, Excuse me, sir. I am a scientist. And I do not believe in Voodoo. And he said, Well, how about you just try it out and see how it goes. So he did a couple of techniques with me had me close my eyes, he did some relaxation strategies, and diaphragmatic breathing, and he used imagery of like hot soup and hot air flowing down my arms from my shoulders into my fingertips, and autogenic training and autogenic phrases and that's when you say things to yourself that are suggestive like my arms are heavy and warm. My hands are heavy and warm. And as I was doing, as I was doing all these things, I noticed, because the machines were giving me feedback about my biology, that my hand temperature was going up. And within two sessions, I was able to warm my hands using my mind. And I am a person with chronically cold hands, because I'm stressed out all the time. And no one had ever told me that cold hands and feet, by the way, are a sign that you are stressed out. So I can now warm my hands on command, which is absolute magic. And when I teach it to my patients, they oftentimes say things like, Oh my god, I can make fireballs with my hands with my mind, what else can I do? And that's exactly what we want. For people living with pain, this idea that the mind and body are connected 100% of the time, and that you have more agency and control over your body than you thought you did. And you can make changes to formerly unconscious biological processes like skin temperature and muscle tension and pain. And biofeedback teaches you some skills to do that. Which is why I really like it so much.   26:13 Yeah, it sounds so like sci fi doctor who kind of stuff. Dr. Pepper. Exactly. Yeah, right. Exactly. Right. But yeah, it just sounds like Wait, what? But yes, I mean, I've never I have not done biofeedback myself, but it is something that I'm just constantly interested in for the exact reasons that you just said, like, Whoa, I can control what my body does. This is pretty cool.   26:41 It's worth it, I highly recommend it. It is so worth it. It's it makes you feel like, you know, it's this sense of like, if you almost feel like the Incredible Hulk like gotta have all this untapped power and potential that I just didn't even know about.   26:55 Yeah, it's, it's wild. Thank you for giving us that kind of definition of biofeedback, because I guarantee a lot of people who are listening did not know that at all. I didn't either, I totally didn't either. Very, very cool. So now, all of this, these non pharmacological treatments, CBT, a CT, biofeedback, we can maybe put physical therapy, occupational therapy into that as well. I mean, obviously, all of these things, cost the system money cost the patient money. But let's talk about the money aspect of treating pain, especially here in the United States. So what, you know, when people think about treat treatment of chronic pain, they often don't think about the money involved. So I will throw it over to you to kind of elaborate on that, and what does what that means for the patient and for the system.   27:52 You're actually making me realize that when you asked me about non farm approaches, I of course, immediately went to like, you know, like psychological treatments for pain. But yeah, of course, you're right, PT, OT, all these things, of course, are all the things and approaches. Yeah, absolutely. So yeah, it was a really sad day for me, when I realized that the treatment of pain historically has actually been about money. That was a really sad wake up call for me. So I used to be a member of this organization called the American pain society, it was very well established, very well known organization. And they went belly up after it came out. And I don't know if this is proven or not. But I should say, after they were accused of taking money from Big Pharma, to promote the use of opioids for the treatment of pain, despite the fact that it was known that opioids a were highly addictive, and habit forming and B sensitize the brain to pain over time and are therefore not actually effective. Because if you go off of them, as most people who have tried this, no, pain feels worse, your brain is actually more sensitive to pain. And so they went belly up, and they were, and then I read this book that was formative for me, by Anna Lemke. Le MBKE, who is now a friend of mine, called drug dealer, MD, drug dealer, MD, a very controversial and very compelling title. It is a thin, little book, I think it came out in 2016. If I'm not mistaken, I read it. Or I should say, I consumed it in a couple of hours. And I am not someone who writes in books. But I must have written on every page of this book. You must be joking. Oh Mfg. Like curse words and exclamation points. Because essentially, it's the story of how pain medicine has been about earning a buck off of people who are suffering and as we all know, with these lawsuits that are now how Like with the Sackler family and a lot of and also big pharma, you know, what we're learning is that despite the fact that these people and these companies have known for many, many years that opioids are highly addictive, highly habit forming not actually effective over time. And, you know, especially in high doses. Yeah, it's sort of this story of like, you know, follow the money. It's sort of horrifying. So, you know, I also have had conversations with physician colleagues who say things to me, it's a true story that, you know, it's clear that pain psychology plays a huge role in pain and pain management, and would be hugely helpful as with all of these psychosocial treatments, but that a lot of the times because insurance doesn't reimburse these treatments, they either don't get recommended, or they don't get integrated into pain management programs, even at hospitals sometimes, because insurance reimbursement is so crappy, which is just like another eye opening moment like we wait. So you're saying that, you know, these things work? You say that, you know, they're effective, but we're not recommending them and we're not hiring pain psychologists, because insurance doesn't reimburse. So again, it's a money thing. What? So the effective treatments are out there, they're known entities. But, you know, big pharma has billions of dollars to, you know, promote this idea that pain is a purely biomedical problem that requires a purely biomedical solution. So as long as you believe that you're going to buy into that model, and you know, as long as insurance companies are not reimbursing non farm approaches to pain, then you know, we're going to say stay stuck in this loop of treating pain, like a biomedical problem when we know it's a bio psychosocial one. So it's really complicated. Just this discovery that pain medicine has historically really been about the dollar. And it's sort of nauseating and horrifying.   31:56 Well, I mean, I think you can take away pain from that and just say medicine.   32:00 Yeah. Insert health condition here.   32:03 Yeah, yeah, I think it doesn't matter what it is, right? Because it's always going to come back to following the money and where, where can you get the biggest bang for your buck? And unfortunately, that, like you said, Those non pharmacological treatments are oftentimes not covered. So you're getting zero bang for your buck. So as a business, which a hospital is, even if it's not for profit, or an outpatient clinic, are you going to do things you're not going to get reimbursed for? Right, you know,   32:35 no, you know, that's true. And like, I don't mean to sound on empathic. Like, of course, yes, hospitals are businesses, and they have to stay open, and they have to earn money. So so the question for me, like, as I roll along, in this world of this totally insane world of pain medicine, and build my own business, by the way, like, how do we change the system? Like, yeah, we really are patient, patient centric, and like our goal, actually, at the end of the day, is to help our patients get well, what needs to change first, like, does public perception and understanding of pain need to change first? Like, do we need to be training our healthcare providers across disciplines better, like in PT, school, and in OT, school, and in psychology programs like mine, where By the way, I was in school for 40 100 years, and I got zero training and pain, like in my undergrad, brown neuroscience class, we learned about pain, and I became obsessed, and then like, wrote papers and stuff, but but that was it, like not, I have two master's degrees never learned about pain. At no point in my PhD program, did we get training and pain? So? So like, do we need to go, you know, backwards and insert pain education programs in medical schools? Yeah, I know, I know, you and I have talked about this, like the statistic that I'm obsessed with, like 96% of medical schools, in the united in the United States and Canada have zero dedicated compulsory pain education. So it's like, where do we start with this problem, isn't it? Do we like go after the insurance companies and reimbursement rates? where like, where the it's the system is so broken, I sometimes get discouraged, like, where do we start? But I think I actually think what you're doing is a really great place to start, like educating healthcare providers, and the general public about pain, and getting enough people riled up and angry about the way pain has been mistreated, and the way we're Miss educating our health care providers are just not even bothering. Maybe that's the place to start. Like maybe if there's enough of a clamor, and enough people are pissed off about it. Something will change.   34:38 Yeah. And and I agree, I think education, education, education, it has to start there. And especially in medicine, in medical school, especially with the physicians who are oftentimes they are the frontline providers, right, your your regular, your local PCP, primary care physician is often your frontline person and But they're also the people who were traditionally prescribing opioids for everyone, when they would come in with back pain instead of saying, Hmm, maybe maybe you need to see a physical therapist or a pain psychologist, let's sit down and talk to you. How can we let's find out what your needs are, what your bio psychosocial needs are. And so I think if, as the practitioner if you're not getting any education in that you don't know what you don't know. So you're not going to do it. And then I agree, I think, and I think insurance companies need to reimburse doctors and therapists across the board to talk to their patients. Talking doesn't get reimbursed procedures get reimbursed. Right. Right. What's the most important part of diagnosis when you're with a patient? talking to them, understanding what's going on with them, like that is paramount, and that needs to be reimbursed. But insurance companies won't do that they won't reimburse you for talking with your patient. Especially if you're like a PT, we get reimbursed by codes. And and none of those codes are, I'm going to really sit down and try and get into the nuts and bolts of what my patient's problem is. So   36:20 yeah, we need to code for pain, education, community, healthcare provider to patient.   36:25 Yeah, yeah. And some people say, Oh, you could use like the neuromuscular, neuromuscular treatment code for that. But there should be a code for let's talk to our patients, there should be a code for the subjective exam. Yep. Yeah. Oh, yeah. Because how were you supposed to learn about their bio psycho social situation, if you can't talk to them? And ask those probing questions, ask those open ended questions, like you said, In the beginning, bio, psychosocial, a lot of things go into that bucket. And we as the practitioners need to learn as much as we can about all those things that go into that bucket, if we're going to treat this patient efficiently.   37:10 There's so many things in the bucket. And I think, when we assess issues that have to do with pain, we really are assessing the biomedical bucket like 99% of the time. And, you know, if we really are thinking about this as this Venn diagram with three bubbles, if you're only assessing or looking at the biological domain of pain, you're literally missing two thirds of the pain problem. It's just wild to think about it that way. Yeah, if not more? Yeah, yeah, exactly more right now. So like, maybe all of us should be assessing for history of trauma. And maybe all of us should be assessing for aces, the adverse childhood experiences, which we know there's like this slew of studies that show that aces impact, you know, the development of chronic pain and illness and adults, maybe we should all be assessing for, you know, abuse and, you know, poor access to care. And just like so many things that we need to assess for if we're actually going to, you know, do a workup of pain, and instead of just this, you know, tell me about your anatomical issues. And let me do some scans.   38:14 Right, right, on a scale of zero to 10. How would your pain? Oh, it's a 10 out of 10? Well, this is like my little soapbox is what I hate. I see this a lot in physical therapy, student Facebook groups, things like that. Yep. And you know where I'm going with this? They'll say, Oh, well, if someone comes to me, and they're 10, out of 10, I'm going to call the ambulance because they must need to be in the emergency room. Poor education, that therapist was not educated on pain. No, I've not. No, that's wild. Yeah, I hear this all the time. Or those similar Sam 10 out of 10. It's a really, because if like I chopped your hand off, that would be 10 out of 10. So what's your pain now?   38:57 Right? Like this? Right? This lack of awareness that pain, by definition is a subjective human experience. And whatever your patient says it is, that is what it is. And you you actually don't get to argue with them about it. You don't negotiate down someone's pain. Right. And I mean, I think what I've learned over time about pain is there's really valuable clinical information when your patient tells you, like I hear a lot of times like 11 out of 10 literally what your patient is communicating to you is I can't handle this anymore. It's beyond my capacity to cope with this level of suffering. That is what they're saying to you. And usually also, at least for me as someone who really, really likes and appreciates the pain catastrophizing scale, the PCs, which is a potentially controversial term, some people don't like the term catastrophizing, I happen to appreciate it. I think it's very valuable, but don't want to go down that rabbit hole. But the pain catastrophizing scale, but they're also telling me is that when people tell me their pains, Out of 10 or an 11 out of 10, there's a high likelihood that their thoughts around their pain are very intense and catastrophic, and that they're having very intense emotions around their pain too. So it's good clinical information. You know, like you said, You can't bargain with someone about their pain number. Yes, we don't pain haggle. Right. Right. It's not like being at the market. No, like a price price that you get on fish. But but there's rich clinical information in there, if you're willing to, like, Listen for it, they're telling me that they're having an emotional experience that's beyond their ability to   40:37 navigate. Right to cope. And, and that's where I think like, I'll ask that question to all of my patients, because for me, that's my window to crawl in, and really get down to maybe the psycho or the social part of their pain experience. So like you said, if someone says to me, oh, my pain is like, it's at 12 out of 10. Today, and I'll say, Okay, well, can you tell me a little bit more about that? You know, what are you? What are you? What are your feelings around that? Or what's going on at home? What are your responsibilities at home? How does, you know? How does that play into why this pain is? 12? out of 10? Today, right? Right, you know, so it is, like, I always ask the question, but it's a nice way to kind of get in and be able to ask more questions. And, and just because someone says their pain is 12 out of 10, it doesn't mean you call the ambulance, they shouldn't be in the emergency room, they probably worked all day have to go home and have two kids to take care of. Yeah. And they're doing all of this at a 12 out of 10. because like you said, they've reached the end of their way to the ladder. And our job as clinicians is to increase their capacity to handle that. And how and to do that, like you said before, through a multidisciplinary approach to pain management is really the way to go. Because now you have more people who can add to that capacity. Yep. So anyway, that's my soapbox. I will come down stepping down from the soapbox. I appreciate your soapbox. I think Kevin, I'm Sherif share box, but it drives me crazy. Okay, so we talked a lot about different treatments. And I want to talk about treatment that you have created the pain management workbook. So let's talk about that. And how this book that you wrote, can help people who are experiencing pain.   42:40 One of the nicest emails I got in the last couple of weeks was from someone named Karen Litzy, who responded to my email and said that she really liked the pain management workbook and was referring to her patients. And I happen to admire Karen Litzy. So I was really flattered by that. So so the pain management workbook isn't on its own, like some new fangled treatment plan. But rather, I got really frustrated by what I felt like was a lack of resources out there for people living with pain, and also for healthcare providers. In particular, you know, I am a nerd, like a real nerd. And I think pain is just so interesting, and complex and fascinating that I have like, amassed all of these books and journal articles and, you know, resources. But I felt like there really wasn't something that synthesized it in language that all of us can understand and easily give to our patients. So I took a lot of stuff that I loved and was reading, like there's a book called pain, the science of suffering, that I happen to really love. And there's all this work by Lorimer, Moseley, and Adrian low in the PT world, I happen to really love the way I love the language they use for explaining pain. And there's all this neuroscience literature out there that I think is so fascinating and so useful, like melzack, and walls, gate control, theory of pain, and all the things that have evolved from there. You know, and there's all these workbooks on cognitive behavioral therapy for pain, but I couldn't find something that, in my mind, put together all of it into one resource that, you know, anybody with pain can pick up and use right away and use have exercises and guided audio and handouts and all that stuff. So So I wanted to create something that was very user friendly, and I felt like especially during COVID, having accessible and affordable resources could not be more important because here we are talking about how pain at the end of the day is often about money and care is so expensive, and you know, cognitive behavioral therapy and these other things that are not easily or readily reimbursed, end up costing families and patients, sometimes many 1000s of dollars and it should Then be that way. So I literally took everything I was doing in my practice, and everything I was reading and stuck it in a workbook. So it's a lot of pain education. And I have to say, you know, a big thanks to Lorimer Moseley, and Adrian Lowe, who both of them were kind enough to agree to read through my pain education content and give me feedback and consultations and edits, which was like, so kind, and they didn't even charge me anything. And I offered to pay them both. And I wish they had taken my money. But yeah, I wanted them to vet the content. So there's this pain education piece, and then it's a series of chapters of tools. So, you know, again, affordable, accessible care isn't just, by the way, here's how pain works. It's now what can I do about it? So I wanted to make sure that I was offering, like a tool belt of options for healthcare providers to offer their patients like here are 17 different pain management strategies that have evidence of effectiveness that come straight out of the literature, you know, pick a few that work for you, whether it's mindfulness or using guided imagery, or, you know, cognitive strategies, or, you know, sleep hygiene and nutritional tips, like, how do we put this all together to create a unique pain management plan for each one of our unique patients who walk through our door with a unique profile of suffering. So that's how that happened. And I should also say that the book almost did not happen, because my deadline was in 2020, which, as everyone knows, was a shit show of the year. My, my bandwidth was zero, I would sit down to edit, you know, my lovely publishers would send me a couple of chapters, and they'd say, here are some edits, go ahead and make some changes. And I like, couldn't even read through the work I had written, I like my brain just was on overdrive. And I was trying to process what it meant that we were in the middle of a global pandemic. And I sent them an email, and I was like, you guys, I don't think I can do it. So the book almost didn't happen. But in December, it was actually shockingly painstakingly born. So I'm more proud of it than anything I've ever done. I don't know if anyone will ever read it. But I, I'm very proud of it. So I hope it's of use to health care providers to people living with pain.   47:21 Yeah, absolutely. And is this only for adults.   47:25 So the pain management workbook I wrote in language that's usable for everybody. I mean, it's not only for adults, it's. So the book I actually wrote first is called the chronic pain and illness workbook for teens. So it has a lot of similar content, but I wrote it for kids, because there just isn't anything out there for kids. And there's even less for health care providers who are working with kids with pain. So this is adapted from that it has like twice as much content, I would say and is expanded content. So the pain management workbook is sort of intended to be for everybody. And the chronic pain and illness workbook for teens is more specifically for kids in the health care providers working with them. But I've been told by people who just have that book that they have used it successfully with adult patients, too. So   48:14 yeah, so excellent. And where can people find all of this and find you if they want to get in touch with you? They have questions. They want the book, they just want to chat, where can they find you.   48:24 So the pain management workbook. And the chronic pain and illness workbook for teens are both on Amazon. And they're like 20 bucks, which is so much less expensive than around of cognitive behavioral therapy. But I do recommend oftentimes to healthcare providers that they offer the book to their patients, and then offer to go through it with them. Because it's just so nice to have a pain coach to be going through a treatment protocol with. But of course, it can be used as a self help book, you know, on your own. I   48:50 just like love that. I   48:51 love the supportive model. So yeah, there are those are on Amazon. And yeah, I have a really dorky website that has a ton of resources on it. It's just my last name. It's softness, calm. And there's a resources page with like, apps and websites and books and podcasts and guided audio and all sorts of stuff for people living with pain and their healthcare providers. And I also joined Twitter during the pandemic, because I don't know, it seemed like social media was where everybody was, and I couldn't see any of my friends and I couldn't go to conferences. I couldn't have conversations with cool people like you. So I joined Twitter and Twitter, my Twitter handle is at doctors office. That's been really interesting and fun. It's been a really interesting platform. That's I think that's actually how I found you. And then I'm also on Instagram where I post some pain education content too. And that's at the real Doc's off, because I couldn't think of a better name and I got really nervous because social media makes me nervous. So   49:49 well, at least now people know where to find you. How to get in touch with you where to get your book. So this is great. This was a great talk. I you know, I could keep going on and on and on too. about this, I could do like a 10 hour podcast, just on on pain alone. Because it's something I'm passionate about. And it's there's just not enough good information out there for people to access. So hopefully people listening to this will then access some of your resources and education, education education right. Now, before we end, I have one last question for you. And that's knowing where you are now in your life. And in your career, what advice would you give to your younger self?   50:33 What advice would I give to my younger self? Oh, wow, you know, the advice I would give to my younger self is keep doing exactly what you're doing and follow your gut. And trust your intuition and know that following the path of the thing that you love is the thing that's going to bring you to the place you need to be professionally. Like, I wanted to live at the intersection of medicine and psychology, and education and science writing. And I couldn't figure out how to do that. So I had all these different jobs. You know, I was like, a science teacher at the Wildlife Conservation Society. And I was a science writer at a Science Magazine, and I worked at the NYU child Study Center, and I got a PhD and I just couldn't, but but I think, you know, organically what happened over time, just from following my passion, my like, actual passion is that I was able to do all these things. So now I have a private practice. And I'm seeing patients, and I'm writing books. And I have a column in Psychology Today called pain explained where I do a lot of science writing about pain, and I'm teaching pain education at Dartmouth, and at UCSF, which I deeply, deeply love because I get to connect with physicians and other health care providers. And, you know, it's just sort of the it is sort of naturally and organically, exactly what I feel like I was called to do you put it out, you put it out into the universe, and it happened. Yeah, I mean, but not without a lot of trial and tribulation. But I think I would just tell my younger self to trust your gut and trust your instinct and you you actually are on the right path. If you're doing something that you love, you are on the right path, even if you don't know   52:09 Excellent advice. Well, Rachel, thank you so much for coming on the podcast and chatting today. I really appreciate it and I appreciate you. So thank you so much. Thank you for having me. Absolutely. And everyone. Thank you so much for listening, have a great couple of days and stay healthy, wealthy and smart.

Podcast Notes Playlist: Latest Episodes
#067 Dr. Ashley Mason on Drug-free Approaches for Treating Depression, Insomnia, and Overeating

Podcast Notes Playlist: Latest Episodes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 109:39


Found My Fitness - Rhonda Patrick Podcast Notes Key Takeaways Whole body hyperthermia is being evaluated for potential future approval as a depression treatmentPeople with depression often have temperature dysregulation, higher nighttime body temperatures, and are not as efficient at cooling the bodySauna mimics cardiovascular exercise so could be a good onramp for people who will not otherwise exercise, are sedentary, or are disabledIn early studies, positive effects of sauna on reducing depression score persisted for six weeksNon-pharmaceutical sleep tips: (1) don't use your phone or any devices in bed; (2) sleep and wakeup at the same time every day; (3) use the bed only for sleep and sex – if your mind is racing with thoughts, get out of bed; (4) sleep restriction: limit time in bed and work on improving efficiencyMindfulness tips for overeating: (1) set up your environment to promote healthy choices; (2) act slower and get connected to how everything feels – maybe the first two bites are amazing then it fades – stop at two bitesRead the full notes @ podcastnotes.orgDr. Ashley Mason is a clinical psychologist and director of the Sleep, Eating, and Affect Laboratory at the Osher Center for Integrative Medicine at UCSF. Her research centers on nonpharmacological approaches for treating depression, insomnia, and overeating. In this episode, you'll hear Rhonda and Ashley discuss: 00:08:10 - How whole-body hyperthermia (WBH) and sauna use differ.  00:17:06 - How people with depression have thermoregulatory dysfunction – but sauna use may correct it. 00:21:12 - How WBH and sauna use may reduce symptoms of depression. 00:33:22 - How heating the body slowly may improve heat tolerance and increase WBH effectiveness.  00:39:35 - How sauna use may benefit people with depression and cardiovascular disease – which often coincide.  00:40:18 - How Dr. Mason and I are collaborating on a new research project to measure biomarkers associated with depression and WBH. 00:44:19 - How sauna bathing and similar practices often provide opportunities for people to connect socially.  00:53:12 - How insomnia differs from being a "night owl." 00:57:10 - How insomnia often arises from major changes in a person's life.  01:01:26 - How cognitive behavioral therapy, sleep hygiene, stimulus control, and sleep restriction can help treat insomnia without drugs.   and so much more!   Looking for more?  Join over 300,000 people and get the latest distilled information on sleep, depression, and fasting straight to your inbox weekly: https://www.foundmyfitness.com/newsletter Become a FoundMyFitness premium member to get access to exclusive episodes, emails, live Q+A's with Rhonda and more: https://www.foundmyfitness.com/crowdsponsor

6-8 Weeks: Perspectives on Sports Medicine
Episode 55: Diet, Exercise, and Arthritis - Learning from Dr. Leon Scott

6-8 Weeks: Perspectives on Sports Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 35:38


Join us as we have an eye-opening discussing with Dr. Leon Scott, Assistant Professor at Vanderbilt University, about diet, exercise, and arthritis.

Wedded Wellness
Overcoming Codependency, Perfectionism & People-Pleasing with Victoria Albina

Wedded Wellness

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 44:49


This week, Ashley is unpacking codependency in its many forms with expert, Certified Life Coach, UCSF-trained Family Nurse Practitioner and Breathwork Meditation Guide, Victoria Albina. Victoria has a passion for helping women realize that they are their own best healers, so they can break free from codependency, perfectionism and people-pleasing and reclaim their joy.Oftentimes we think of codependency in relationships or substances, but it can often be so much deeper - from people pleasing, to lack of boundaries, to reactivity, and more, codependency can show up in many different ways. Ashley and Victoria discuss why self-care can be so challenging for women (hello, patriarchy), why we need to accept and name our neediness, the biology and science of our nervous system and how it plays into our thought process and codependency traits, sourcing worth internally, having awareness, accepting, and taking action, and so much more. Victoria is the host of the Feminist Wellness Podcast, holds a Masters degree in Public Health from Boston University School of Public Health and a BA in Latin American Studies from Oberlin College. She has been working in health & wellness for over 20 years and lives on occupied Munsee Lenape territory in New York's Hudson Valley. Learn More:Learn more about Victoria's offerings: https://victoriaalbina.com/Follow Victoria on Instagram: @victoriaalbinawellnessListen to the Feminist Wellness PodcastAnchored: Overcoming Codependency - a 6-Month Group ProgramFollow along on Instagram: @yogamagicpodcast and @ashleysondergaard.yogaLearn more about Ashley and Yoga Magic at www.ashleysondergaard.com Sponsors:Interval | This show is sponsored by Interval. Learn more about the invite only online teaching platform that makes digital classes streamlined and easy. https://interval.com/j/yogamagic Get a FREE GUIDE to building the ideal morning routine specific to YOUR zodiac sign when you sign up for the Yoga Magic newsletter.  Upcoming Yoga Magic EventsCosmic Self-Care: Using Libra Energy | 9/22 | 4:00 PM CT | Learn it Live​Book private outdoor yoga classes and online yoga & astrology classes any time!

FoundMyFitness
Ashley Mason, Ph.D., on Drug-free Approaches for Treating Depression, Insomnia, and Overeating

FoundMyFitness

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 109:39


Dr. Ashley Mason is a clinical psychologist and director of the Sleep, Eating, and Affect Laboratory at the Osher Center for Integrative Medicine at UCSF. Her research centers on nonpharmacological approaches for treating depression, insomnia, and overeating.   In this episode, you'll hear Rhonda and Ashley discuss: How whole-body hyperthermia (WBH) and sauna use differ.  How people with depression have thermoregulatory dysfunction – but sauna use may correct it. How WBH and sauna use may reduce symptoms of depression. How heating the body slowly may improve heat tolerance and increase WBH effectiveness.  How sauna use may benefit people with depression and cardiovascular disease – which often coincide.  How Dr. Mason and I are collaborating on a new research project to measure biomarkers associated with depression and WBH. How sauna bathing and similar practices often provide opportunities for people to connect socially.  How insomnia differs from being a "night owl." How insomnia often arises from major changes in a person's life.  How cognitive behavioral therapy, sleep hygiene, stimulus control, and sleep restriction can help treat insomnia without drugs.   and so much more!   Looking for more?  Join over 300,000 people and get the latest distilled information on sleep, depression, and fasting straight to your inbox weekly: https://www.foundmyfitness.com/newsletter Become a FoundMyFitness premium member to get access to exclusive episodes, emails, live Q+A's with Rhonda and more: https://www.foundmyfitness.com/crowdsponsor

Plenary Session
4.18 Dementia Interventions, Skills for Epidemiologists, & Aducanumab with Dr. Maria Glymour

Plenary Session

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 78:23


Today we're joined by social epidemiologist, Dr. Maria Glymour of UCSF. We talk about her work in studying public health interventions for dementia and how her experience in academia has led to her conviction in the necessity of rigorous, quantitative technical skills training for epidemiology PhD students. We touch on how to have a good idea, her advice for PhD applicants, and working in a soft money (grants) vs hard money environment. Finally, we discuss her idea for a stepped-wedge trial approach to evaluate the new Alzheimer's drug, aducanumab. Aducanumab: https://sites.bu.edu/melodem/files/2021/07/Pragmatic-Study-Designs-to-Accelerate-Aducanumab-Evidence_Glymour.pdf Back us on Patreon! www.patreon.com/plenarysession Check out our YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/channel/UCUibd0E2kdF9N9e-EmIbUew

The Resetter Podcast
Training Your Nervous System To Release Anxiety – With Victoria Albina

The Resetter Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 72:40


// R E A D Y • S E T • R E S E T This episode is all about codependency, perfectionism, and anxiety. Plus, we talk about moving ourselves out of fight or flight and the differences between venting and complaining. Victoria Albina (she/her) is a Certified Life Coach, UCSF-trained Family Nurse Practitioner, and Breathwork Meditation Guide with a passion for helping women realize that they are their own best healers to break free from codependency, perfectionism, people-pleasing, and reclaim their joy. She is the host of the Feminist Wellness Podcast, holds a master's degree in public health from Boston University School of Public Health and a BA in Latin American Studies from Oberlin College. Victoria has been working in health & wellness for over 20 years and lives on occupied Lenape territory in New York's Hudson Valley. In this podcast, we cover: The power of collective thinking Why social connection is the best path to happiness Intelligence is in the flesh: how we can tune into the body Simple ways to relieve stress and anxiety How to determine the difference between venting and complaining // R E S O U R C E S  M E N T I O N E D Feel the impact of Organifi - use code PELZ for a discount on all products!  15-Day Fat-Burning Experience Victoria's 6-MONTH SELF-LOVE PROGRAM Victoria Albina Free Mediations  Book: Into the wreck Book: Rushing Women's Syndrome // M O R E  O N  V I C T O R I A  A L B I N A Instagram Podcast Facebook LinkedIn // F O L L O W Instagram | @dr.mindypelz & @theresetterpodcast Facebook | /drmindypelz & /theresetterpodcast Youtube | /drmindypelz Please note the following medical disclaimer: By listening to this podcast you understand that this video is for educational purposes only. It is not intended to substitute for professional medical advice and should not be relied on as health or personal advice. Always seek the guidance of your doctor with any questions you may have regarding your health or medical condition.  

Plenary Session
4.16 Treating Lymphoma, Histiocytic Disorders, Learning by Teaching, & More! with Dr. Bita Fakhri

Plenary Session

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2021 65:00


Today we interview Dr. Bita Fakhri of UCSF on the current research behind treatments for lymphoma. We touch on CAR-T, ABVD, DA-EPOCH-R, and more. We also talk about histiocytic disorders, Dr. Fakhri's career in academia, and learning through teaching. Back us on Patreon! www.patreon.com/plenarysession Check out our YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/channel/UCUibd0E2kdF9N9e-EmIbUew