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Extreme Health Radio
Atom Bergstrom – How All Illness & Disease Is Caused By Invisible Traumas & How To Get Rid Of Them Plus Much More!

Extreme Health Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 102:12


Atom Bergstrom just might be from another planet. The information he comes up with and researches is not going to be found in any text book or nutrition course anywhere in the world. If you are looking for a great blend of spiritual, emotional and physical information that has to do with our health and longevity, Atom Bergstrom is that man for you. I find him utterly fascinating (and Atom if you're reading this let's have another chat sometime soon!). In today's conversation we talked about how the illnesses and diseases of our culture just might be caused by some sort of invisible trauma that is spiritual and emotional in nature. Can you believe that? All disease is caused by emotional or spiritual traumas? Perhaps they energetically manifest in our bodies at the time of the trauma but they're "held in place" by poor diet and lifestyle factors. What do you think? Is there something to that? For what it's worth, my contention is exactly that. A "dis-ease" can only be held in physical form with toxins, chemicals and poisons we ingest on a daily basis. The real root of the disease is our inability to energetically detoxify these hidden and invisible traumas. Lots of people talk about how to detoxify the colon, the liver and so forth but many people don't focus on the real root which are these emotional and spiritual traumas. If you're into that sort of an idea, I suggest you look into Atom's work and his message. Please pass this show on to your friends. We rely on you to help us and we are 100% listener supported! Thank you!! I hope you enjoyed this podcast as much as we did. If you enjoyed it please share the love with your friends by clicking "like" and "share" on this page! Show Notes For This Episode: Click here to download the show notes for THIS EPISODE. Featured Products For This Episode: Featured Product #1 - Medical Biomats Featured Product #2 - Vitamix Blenders - Free Shipping! Featured Product #3- Bellicon Rebounders Featured Product #4 - Chemical Free Cookware! Find Extreme Health Radio On: [include file=showpage-itunes-soundcloud-stitcher.html] Please Subscribe: Subscribe To Our Radio Show For Updates! Other Shows: [include file=show-links.html] Listen to other shows with this guest. Show Date: Friday 7/31/2015 Show Guest: Atom Bergstrom Guest Info: Atom has been teaching workshops and seminars across the U.S.A. since 1977. With over 50 years experience in health and nutrition, Atom has been counseling people with various diseases and ailments since the 70's. His expertise is on nutrition, chronobiology, reflexology, slit-lamp iridology, meditation, Sufi, and I Ching and other holistic modalities. He graduated from Adano Ley's Texas Institute of Reflex Sciences in 1979. Show Topic: energy healing, color therapy, color recycling, body dowsing, solar nutrition, chronobiotic eating Guest Website(s): http://www.solarman111.com http://www.solartiming.com http://www.sunsyncnutrition.com Social Websites: https://twitter.com/sunsyncnutritio https://www.facebook.com/SunSyncNutrition https://www.facebook.com/pages/Atoms-School-of-Time-Conscious-Living-at-Solarman111com/182971901757492 https://www.facebook.com/atom.bergstrom Guest Product(s): Please Support Us If You Are Able: (Opens in a new window - Every bit helps us to keep delivering even better shows that help you heal & thrive!) Copy and paste the following HTML code into any web page. Or you can grab a badge! Interview with Atom Bergstrom Video Version: Full Youtube Interview (Opens in a new window) Youtube Time Share This Show Socially!: Atom Bergstrom - can you really clear past emotional traumas using color recycling? What is dextrinizing your food? http://t.co/oV1kssrOyC— Extreme Health Radio (@ehrshow) December 7, 2014 Radio Show Transcript: [spp-transcript]

I Ching Cafe
Weekly I Ching // 14 November 2022 // Hexagram 13 & 49

I Ching Cafe

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 12:41


Our dance with fellowship and collaboration continues this week as the I Ching encourages us to keep working with others. The potential for victory is at hand, so let's go for it and celebrate together. Plus some big (positive) changes are available to us. Listen to this episode for more insight into how to work with this flow this week! I Ching Resources, Links and Giveaways: https://linktr.ee/ichingcafe Timestamps 0:00 Intro 0:38 Last week's recap 2:23 Hexagram 13 Fellowship 5:31 Hexagram 13 Fellowship, Changing Line 6 7:59 Hexagram 49 Revolution Tech Specs Main or Present Hexagram - Hexagram 13 Fellowship Changing Lines - 6th Position Outcome Hexagram - Hexagram 49 Revolution

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 157: “See Emily Play” by The Pink Floyd

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022


Episode one hundred and fifty-seven of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “See Emily Play", the birth of the UK underground, and the career of Roger Barrett, known as Syd. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-five-minute bonus episode available, on "First Girl I Loved" by the Incredible String Band. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources No Mixcloud this time, due to the number of Pink Floyd songs. I referred to two biographies of Barrett in this episode -- A Very Irregular Head by Rob Chapman is the one I would recommend, and the one whose narrative I have largely followed. Some of the information has been superseded by newer discoveries, but Chapman is almost unique in people writing about Barrett in that he actually seems to care about the facts and try to get things right rather than make up something more interesting. Crazy Diamond by Mike Watkinson and Pete Anderson is much less reliable, but does have quite a few interview quotes that aren't duplicated by Chapman. Information about Joe Boyd comes from Boyd's book White Bicycles. In this and future episodes on Pink Floyd I'm also relying on Nick Mason's Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd and Pink Floyd: All the Songs by Jean-Michel Guesdon and Philippe Margotin. The compilation Relics contains many of the most important tracks from Barrett's time with Pink Floyd, while Piper at the Gates of Dawn is his one full album with them. Those who want a fuller history of his time with the group will want to get Piper and also the box set Cambridge St/ation 1965-1967. Barrett only released two solo albums during his career. They're available as a bundle here. Completists will also want the rarities and outtakes collection Opel.  ERRATA: I talk about “Interstellar Overdrive” as if Barrett wrote it solo. The song is credited to all four members, but it was Barrett who came up with the riff I talk about. And annoyingly, given the lengths I went to to deal correctly with Barrett's name, I repeatedly refer to "Dave" Gilmour, when Gilmour prefers David. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A note before I begin -- this episode deals with drug use and mental illness, so anyone who might be upset by those subjects might want to skip this one. But also, there's a rather unique problem in how I deal with the name of the main artist in the story today. The man everyone knows as Syd Barrett was born Roger Barrett, used that name with his family for his whole life, and in later years very strongly disliked being called "Syd", yet everyone other than his family called him that at all times until he left the music industry, and that's the name that appears on record labels, including his solo albums. I don't believe it's right to refer to people by names they choose not to go by themselves, but the name Barrett went by throughout his brief period in the public eye was different from the one he went by later, and by all accounts he was actually distressed by its use in later years. So what I'm going to do in this episode is refer to him as "Roger Barrett" when a full name is necessary for disambiguation or just "Barrett" otherwise, but I'll leave any quotes from other people referring to "Syd" as they were originally phrased. In future episodes on Pink Floyd, I'll refer to him just as Barrett, but in episodes where I discuss his influence on other artists, I will probably have to use "Syd Barrett" because otherwise people who haven't listened to this episode won't know what on Earth I'm talking about. Anyway, on with the show. “It's gone!” sighed the Rat, sinking back in his seat again. “So beautiful and strange and new. Since it was to end so soon, I almost wish I had never heard it. For it has roused a longing in me that is pain, and nothing seems worth while but just to hear that sound once more and go on listening to it for ever. No! There it is again!” he cried, alert once more. Entranced, he was silent for a long space, spellbound. “Now it passes on and I begin to lose it,” he said presently. “O Mole! the beauty of it! The merry bubble and joy, the thin, clear, happy call of the distant piping! Such music I never dreamed of, and the call in it is stronger even than the music is sweet! Row on, Mole, row! For the music and the call must be for us.” That's a quote from a chapter titled "The Piper at the Gates of Dawn" from the classic children's book The Wind in the Willows -- a book which for most of its length is a fairly straightforward story about anthropomorphic animals having jovial adventures, but which in that one chapter has Rat and Mole suddenly encounter the Great God Pan and have a hallucinatory, transcendental experience caused by his music, one so extreme it's wiped from their minds, as they simply cannot process it. The book, and the chapter, was a favourite of Roger Barrett, a young child born in Cambridge in 1946. Barrett came from an intellectual but not especially bookish family. His father, Dr. Arthur Barrett, was a pathologist -- there's a room in Addenbrooke's Hospital named after him -- but he was also an avid watercolour painter, a world-leading authority on fungi, and a member of the Cambridge Philharmonic Society who was apparently an extraordinarily good singer; while his mother Winifred was a stay-at-home mother who was nonetheless very active in the community, organising a local Girl Guide troupe. They never particularly encouraged their family to read, but young Roger did particularly enjoy the more pastoral end of the children's literature of the time. As well as the Wind in the Willows he also loved Alice in Wonderland, and the Little Grey Men books -- a series of stories about tiny gnomes and their adventures in the countryside. But his two big passions were music and painting. He got his first ukulele at age eleven, and by the time his father died, just before Roger's sixteenth birthday, he had graduated to playing a full-sized guitar. At the time his musical tastes were largely the same as those of any other British teenager -- he liked Chubby Checker, for example -- though he did have a tendency to prefer the quirkier end of things, and some of the first songs he tried to play on the guitar were those of Joe Brown: [Excerpt: Joe Brown, "I'm Henry VIII I Am"] Barrett grew up in Cambridge, and for those who don't know it, Cambridge is an incubator of a very particular kind of eccentricity. The university tends to attract rather unworldly intellectual overachievers to the city -- people who might not be able to survive in many other situations but who can thrive in that one -- and every description of Barrett's father suggests he was such a person -- Barrett's sister Rosemary has said that she believes that most of the family were autistic, though whether this is a belief based on popular media portrayals or a deeper understanding I don't know. But certainly Cambridge is full of eccentric people with remarkable achievements, and such people tend to have children with a certain type of personality, who try simultaneously to live up to and rebel against expectations of greatness that come from having parents who are regarded as great, and to do so with rather less awareness of social norms than the typical rebel has. In the case of Roger Barrett, he, like so many others of his generation, was encouraged to go into the sciences -- as indeed his father had, both in his career as a pathologist and in his avocation as a mycologist. The fifties and sixties were a time, much like today, when what we now refer to as the STEM subjects were regarded as new and exciting and modern. But rather than following in his father's professional footsteps, Roger Barrett instead followed his hobbies. Dr. Barrett was a painter and musician in his spare time, and Roger was to turn to those things to earn his living. For much of his teens, it seemed that art would be the direction he would go in. He was, everyone agrees, a hugely talented painter, and he was particularly noted for his mastery of colours. But he was also becoming more and more interested in R&B music, especially the music of Bo Diddley, who became his new biggest influence: [Excerpt: Bo Diddley, "Who Do You Love?"] He would often spend hours with his friend Dave Gilmour, a much more advanced guitarist, trying to learn blues riffs. By this point Barrett had already received the nickname "Syd". Depending on which story you believe, he either got it when he started attending a jazz club where an elderly jazzer named Sid Barrett played, and the people were amused that their youngest attendee, like one of the oldest, was called Barrett; or, more plausibly, he turned up to a Scout meeting once wearing a flat cap rather than the normal scout beret, and he got nicknamed "Sid" because it made him look working-class and "Sid" was a working-class sort of name. In 1962, by the time he was sixteen, Barrett joined a short-lived group called Geoff Mott and the Mottoes, on rhythm guitar. The group's lead singer, Geoff Mottlow, would go on to join a band called the Boston Crabs who would have a minor hit in 1965 with a version of the Coasters song "Down in Mexico": [Excerpt: The Boston Crabs, "Down in Mexico"] The bass player from the Mottoes, Tony Sainty, and the drummer Clive Welham, would go on to form another band, The Jokers Wild, with Barrett's friend Dave Gilmour. Barrett also briefly joined another band, Those Without, but his time with them was similarly brief. Some sources -- though ones I consider generally less reliable -- say that the Mottoes' bass player wasn't Tony Sainty, but was Roger Waters, the son of one of Barrett's teachers, and that one of the reasons the band split up was that Waters had moved down to London to study architecture. I don't think that's the case, but it's definitely true that Barrett knew Waters, and when he moved to London himself the next year to go to Camberwell Art College, he moved into a house where Waters was already living. Two previous tenants at the same house, Nick Mason and Richard Wright, had formed a loose band with Waters and various other amateur musicians like Keith Noble, Shelagh Noble, and Clive Metcalfe. That band was sometimes known as the Screaming Abdabs, The Megadeaths, or The Tea Set -- the latter as a sly reference to slang terms for cannabis -- but was mostly known at first as Sigma 6, named after a manifesto by the novelist Alexander Trocchi for a kind of spontaneous university. They were also sometimes known as Leonard's Lodgers, after the landlord of the home that Barrett was moving into, Mike Leonard, who would occasionally sit in on organ and would later, as the band became more of a coherent unit, act as a roadie and put on light shows behind them -- Leonard was himself very interested in avant-garde and experimental art, and it was his idea to play around with the group's lighting. By the time Barrett moved in with Waters in 1964, the group had settled on the Tea Set name, and consisted of Waters on bass, Mason on drums, Wright on keyboards, singer Chris Dennis, and guitarist Rado Klose. Of the group, Klose was the only one who was a skilled musician -- he was a very good jazz guitarist, while the other members were barely adequate. By this time Barrett's musical interests were expanding to include folk music -- his girlfriend at the time talked later about him taking her to see Bob Dylan on his first UK tour and thinking "My first reaction was seeing all these people like Syd. It was almost as if every town had sent one Syd Barrett there. It was my first time seeing people like him." But the music he was most into was the blues. And as the Tea Set were turning into a blues band, he joined them. He even had a name for the new band that would make them more bluesy. He'd read the back of a record cover which had named two extremely obscure blues musicians -- musicians he may never even have heard. Pink Anderson: [Excerpt: Pink Anderson, "Boll Weevil"] And Floyd Council: [Excerpt: Floyd Council, "Runaway Man Blues"] Barrett suggested that they put together the names of the two bluesmen, and presumably because "Anderson Council" didn't have quite the right ring, they went for The Pink Floyd -- though for a while yet they would sometimes still perform as The Tea Set, and they were sometimes also called The Pink Floyd Sound. Dennis left soon after Barrett joined, and the new five-piece Pink Floyd Sound started trying to get more gigs. They auditioned for Ready Steady Go! and were turned down, but did get some decent support slots, including for a band called the Tridents: [Excerpt: The Tridents, "Tiger in Your Tank"] The members of the group were particularly impressed by the Tridents' guitarist and the way he altered his sound using feedback -- Barrett even sent a letter to his girlfriend with a drawing of the guitarist, one Jeff Beck, raving about how good he was. At this point, the group were mostly performing cover versions, but they did have a handful of originals, and it was these they recorded in their first demo sessions in late 1964 and early 1965. They included "Walk With Me Sydney", a song written by Roger Waters as a parody of "Work With Me Annie" and "Dance With Me Henry" -- and, given the lyrics, possibly also Hank Ballard's follow-up "Henry's Got Flat Feet (Can't Dance No More) and featuring Rick Wright's then-wife Juliette Gale as Etta James to Barrett's Richard Berry: [Excerpt: The Tea Set, "Walk With Me Sydney"] And four songs by Barrett, including one called "Double-O Bo" which was a Bo Diddley rip-off, and "Butterfly", the most interesting of these early recordings: [Excerpt: The Tea Set, "Butterfly"] At this point, Barrett was very unsure of his own vocal abilities, and wrote a letter to his girlfriend saying "Emo says why don't I give up 'cos it sounds horrible, and I would but I can't get Fred to join because he's got a group (p'raps you knew!) so I still have to sing." "Fred" was a nickname for his old friend Dave Gilmour, who was playing in his own band, Joker's Wild, at this point. Summer 1965 saw two important events in the life of the group. The first was that Barrett took LSD for the first time. The rest of the group weren't interested in trying it, and would indeed generally be one of the more sober bands in the rock business, despite the reputation their music got. The other members would for the most part try acid once or twice, around late 1966, but generally steer clear of it. Barrett, by contrast, took it on a very regular basis, and it would influence all the work he did from that point on. The other event was that Rado Klose left the group. Klose was the only really proficient musician in the group, but he had very different tastes to the other members, preferring to play jazz to R&B and pop, and he was also falling behind in his university studies, and decided to put that ahead of remaining in the band. This meant that the group members had to radically rethink the way they were making music. They couldn't rely on instrumental proficiency, so they had to rely on ideas. One of the things they started to do was use echo. They got primitive echo devices and put both Barrett's guitar and Wright's keyboard through them, allowing them to create new sounds that hadn't been heard on stage before. But they were still mostly doing the same Slim Harpo and Bo Diddley numbers everyone else was doing, and weren't able to be particularly interesting while playing them. But for a while they carried on doing the normal gigs, like a birthday party they played in late 1965, where on the same bill was a young American folk singer named Paul Simon, and Joker's Wild, the band Dave Gilmour was in, who backed Simon on a version of "Johnny B. Goode". A couple of weeks after that party, Joker's Wild went into the studio to record their only privately-pressed five-song record, of them performing recent hits: [Excerpt: Joker's Wild, "Walk Like a Man"] But The Pink Floyd Sound weren't as musically tight as Joker's Wild, and they couldn't make a living as a cover band even if they wanted to. They had to do something different. Inspiration then came from a very unexpected source. I mentioned earlier that one of the names the group had been performing under had been inspired by a manifesto for a spontaneous university by the writer Alexander Trocchi. Trocchi's ideas had actually been put into practice by an organisation calling itself the London Free School, based in Notting Hill. The London Free School was an interesting mixture of people from what was then known as the New Left, but who were already rapidly aging, the people who had been the cornerstone of radical campaigning in the late fifties and early sixties, who had run the Aldermaston marches against nuclear weapons and so on, and a new breed of countercultural people who in a year or two would be defined as hippies but at the time were not so easy to pigeonhole. These people were mostly politically radical but very privileged people -- one of the founder members of the London Free School was Peter Jenner, who was the son of a vicar and the grandson of a Labour MP -- and they were trying to put their radical ideas into practice. The London Free School was meant to be a collective of people who would help each other and themselves, and who would educate each other. You'd go to the collective wanting to learn how to do something, whether that's how to improve the housing in your area or navigate some particularly difficult piece of bureaucracy, or how to play a musical instrument, and someone who had that skill would teach you how to do it, while you hopefully taught them something else of value. The London Free School, like all such utopian schemes, ended up falling apart, but it had a wider cultural impact than most such schemes. Britain's first underground newspaper, the International Times, was put together by people involved in the Free School, and the annual Notting Hill Carnival, which is now one of the biggest outdoor events in Britain every year with a million attendees, came from the merger of outdoor events organised by the Free School with older community events. A group of musicians called AMM was associated with many of the people involved in the Free School. AMM performed totally improvised music, with no structure and no normal sense of melody and harmony: [Excerpt: AMM, "What Is There In Uselesness To Cause You Distress?"] Keith Rowe, the guitarist in AMM, wanted to find his own technique uninfluenced by American jazz guitarists, and thought of that in terms that appealed very strongly to the painterly Barrett, saying "For the Americans to develop an American school of painting, they somehow had to ditch or lose European easel painting techniques. They had to make a break with the past. What did that possibly mean if you were a jazz guitar player? For me, symbolically, it was Pollock laying the canvas on the floor, which immediately abandons European easel technique. I could see that by laying the canvas down, it became inappropriate to apply easel techniques. I thought if I did that with a guitar, I would just lose all those techniques, because they would be physically impossible to do." Rowe's technique-free technique inspired Barrett to make similar noises with his guitar, and to think less in terms of melody and harmony than pure sound. AMM's first record came out in 1966. Four of the Free School people decided to put together their own record label, DNA, and they got an agreement with Elektra Records to distribute its first release -- Joe Boyd, the head of Elektra in the UK, was another London Free School member, and someone who had plenty of experience with disruptive art already, having been on the sound engineering team at the Newport Folk Festival when Dylan went electric. AMM went into the studio and recorded AMMMusic: [Excerpt: AMM, "What Is There In Uselesness To Cause You Distress?"] After that came out, though, Peter Jenner, one of the people who'd started the label, came to a realisation. He said later "We'd made this one record with AMM. Great record, very seminal, seriously avant-garde, but I'd started adding up and I'd worked out that the deal we had, we got two percent of retail, out of which we, the label, had to pay for recording costs and pay ourselves. I came to the conclusion that we were going to have to sell a hell of a lot of records just to pay the recording costs, let alone pay ourselves any money and build a label, so I realised we had to have a pop band because pop bands sold a lot of records. It was as simple as that and I was as naive as that." Jenner abandoned DNA records for the moment, and he and his friend Andrew King decided they were going to become pop managers. and they found The Pink Floyd Sound playing at an event at the Marquee, one of a series of events that were variously known as Spontaneous Underground and The Trip. Other participants in those events included Soft Machine; Mose Allison; Donovan, performing improvised songs backed by sitar players; Graham Bond; a performer who played Bach pieces while backed by African drummers; and The Poison Bellows, a poetry duo consisting of Spike Hawkins and Johnny Byrne, who may of all of these performers be the one who other than Pink Floyd themselves has had the most cultural impact in the UK -- after writing the exploitation novel Groupie and co-writing a film adaptation of Spike Milligan's war memoirs, Byrne became a TV screenwriter, writing many episodes of Space: 1999 and Doctor Who before creating the long-running TV series Heartbeat. Jenner and King decided they wanted to sign The Pink Floyd Sound and make records with them, and the group agreed -- but only after their summer holidays. They were all still students, and so they dispersed during the summer. Waters and Wright went on holiday to Greece, where they tried acid for the first of only a small number of occasions and were unimpressed, while Mason went on a trip round America by Greyhound bus. Barrett, meanwhile, stayed behind, and started writing more songs, encouraged by Jenner, who insisted that the band needed to stop relying on blues covers and come up with their own material, and who saw Barrett as the focus of the group. Jenner later described them as "Four not terribly competent musicians who managed between them to create something that was extraordinary. Syd was the main creative drive behind the band - he was the singer and lead guitarist. Roger couldn't tune his bass because he was tone deaf, it had to be tuned by Rick. Rick could write a bit of a tune and Roger could knock out a couple of words if necessary. 'Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun' was the first song Roger ever wrote, and he only did it because Syd encouraged everyone to write. Syd was very hesitant about his writing, but when he produced these great songs everyone else thought 'Well, it must be easy'" Of course, we know this isn't quite true -- Waters had written "Walk with me Sydney" -- but it is definitely the case that everyone involved thought of Barrett as the main creative force in the group, and that he was the one that Jenner was encouraging to write new material. After the summer holidays, the group reconvened, and one of their first actions was to play a benefit for the London Free School. Jenner said later "Andrew King and myself were both vicars' sons, and we knew that when you want to raise money for the parish you have to have a social. So in a very old-fashioned way we said 'let's put on a social'. Like in the Just William books, like a whist drive. We thought 'You can't have a whist drive. That's not cool. Let's have a band. That would be cool.' And the only band we knew was the band I was starting to get involved with." After a couple of these events went well, Joe Boyd suggested that they make those events a regular club night, and the UFO Club was born. Jenner and King started working on the light shows for the group, and then bringing in other people, and the light show became an integral part of the group's mystique -- rather than standing in a spotlight as other groups would, they worked in shadows, with distorted kaleidoscopic lights playing on them, distancing themselves from the audience. The highlight of their sets was a long piece called "Interstellar Overdrive", and this became one of the group's first professional recordings, when they went into the studio with Joe Boyd to record it for the soundtrack of a film titled Tonite Let's All Make Love in London. There are conflicting stories about the inspiration for the main riff for "Interstellar Overdrive". One apparent source is the riff from Love's version of the Bacharach and David song "My Little Red Book". Depending on who you ask, either Barrett was obsessed with Love's first album and copied the riff, or Peter Jenner tried to hum him the riff and Barrett copied what Jenner was humming: [Excerpt: Love, "My Little Red Book"] More prosaically, Roger Waters has always claimed that the main inspiration was from "Old Ned", Ron Grainer's theme tune for the sitcom Steptoe and Son (which for American listeners was remade over there as Sanford and Son): [Excerpt: Ron Grainer, "Old Ned"] Of course it's entirely possible, and even likely, that Barrett was inspired by both, and if so that would neatly sum up the whole range of Pink Floyd's influences at this point. "My Little Red Book" was a cover by an American garage-psych/folk-rock band of a hit by Manfred Mann, a group who were best known for pop singles but were also serious blues and jazz musicians, while Steptoe and Son was a whimsical but dark and very English sitcom about a way of life that was slowly disappearing. And you can definitely hear both influences in the main riff of the track they recorded with Boyd: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Interstellar Overdrive"] "Interstellar Overdrive" was one of two types of song that The Pink Floyd were performing at this time -- a long, extended, instrumental psychedelic excuse for freaky sounds, inspired by things like the second disc of Freak Out! by the Mothers of Invention. When they went into the studio again with Boyd later in January 1967, to record what they hoped would be their first single, they recorded two of the other kind of songs -- whimsical story songs inspired equally by the incidents of everyday life and by children's literature. What became the B-side, "Candy and a Currant Bun", was based around the riff from "Smokestack Lightnin'" by Howlin' Wolf: [Excerpt: Howlin' Wolf, "Smokestack Lightnin'"] That song had become a favourite on the British blues scene, and was thus the inspiration for many songs of the type that get called "quintessentially English". Ray Davies, who was in many ways the major songwriter at this time who was closest to Barrett stylistically, would a year later use the riff for the Kinks song "Last of the Steam-Powered Trains", but in this case Barrett had originally written a song titled "Let's Roll Another One", about sexual longing and cannabis. The lyrics were hastily rewritten in the studio to remove the controversial drug references-- and supposedly this caused some conflict between Barrett and Waters, with Waters pushing for the change, while Barrett argued against it, though like many of the stories from this period this sounds like the kind of thing that gets said by people wanting to push particular images of both men. Either way, the lyric was changed to be about sweet treats rather than drugs, though the lascivious elements remained in. And some people even argue that there was another lyric change -- where Barrett sings "walk with me", there's a slight "f" sound in his vocal. As someone who does a lot of microphone work myself, it sounds to me like just one of those things that happens while recording, but a lot of people are very insistent that Barrett is deliberately singing a different word altogether: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Candy and a Currant Bun"] The A-side, meanwhile, was inspired by real life. Both Barrett and Waters had mothers who used  to take in female lodgers, and both had regularly had their lodgers' underwear stolen from washing lines. While they didn't know anything else about the thief, he became in Barrett's imagination a man who liked to dress up in the clothing after he stole it: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Arnold Layne"] After recording the two tracks with Joe Boyd, the natural assumption was that the record would be put out on Elektra, the label which Boyd worked for in the UK, but Jac Holzman, the head of Elektra records, wasn't interested, and so a bidding war began for the single, as by this point the group were the hottest thing in London. For a while it looked like they were going to sign to Track Records, the label owned by the Who's management, but in the end EMI won out. Right as they signed, the News of the World was doing a whole series of articles about pop stars and their drug use, and the last of the articles talked about The Pink Floyd and their association with LSD, even though they hadn't released a record yet. EMI had to put out a press release saying that the group were not psychedelic, insisting"The Pink Floyd are not trying to create hallucinatory effects in their audience." It was only after getting signed that the group became full-time professionals. Waters had by this point graduated from university and was working as a trainee architect, and quit his job to become a pop star. Wright dropped out of university, but Mason and Barrett took sabbaticals. Barrett in particular seems to have seen this very much as a temporary thing, talking about how he was making so much money it would be foolish not to take the opportunity while it lasted, but how he was going to resume his studies in a year. "Arnold Layne" made the top twenty, and it would have gone higher had the pirate radio station Radio London, at the time the single most popular radio station when it came to pop music, not banned the track because of its sexual content. However, it would be the only single Joe Boyd would work on with the group. EMI insisted on only using in-house producers, and so while Joe Boyd would go on to a great career as a producer, and we'll see him again, he was replaced with Norman Smith. Smith had been the chief engineer on the Beatles records up to Rubber Soul, after which he'd been promoted to being a producer in his own right, and Geoff Emerick had taken over. He also had aspirations to pop stardom himself, and a few years later would have a transatlantic hit with "Oh Babe, What Would You Say?" under the name Hurricane Smith: [Excerpt: Hurricane Smith, "Oh Babe, What Would You Say?"] Smith's production of the group would prove controversial among some of the group's longtime fans, who thought that he did too much to curtail their more experimental side, as he would try to get the group to record songs that were more structured and more commercial, and would cut down their improvisations into a more manageable form. Others, notably Peter Jenner, thought that Smith was the perfect producer for the group. They started work on their first album, which was mostly recorded in studio three of Abbey Road, while the Beatles were just finishing off work on Sgt Pepper in studio two. The album was titled The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, after the chapter from The Wind in the Willows, and other than a few extended instrumental showcases, most of the album was made up of short, whimsical, songs by Barrett that were strongly infused with imagery from late-Victorian and Edwardian children's books. This is one of the big differences between the British and American psychedelic scenes. Both the British and American undergrounds were made up of the same type of people -- a mixture of older radical activists, often Communists, who had come up in Britain in the Ban the Bomb campaigns and in America in the Civil Rights movement; and younger people, usually middle-class students with radical politics from a privileged background, who were into experimenting with drugs and alternative lifestyles. But the  social situations were different. In America, the younger members of the underground were angry and scared, as their principal interest was in stopping the war in Vietnam in which so many of them were being killed. And the music of the older generation of the underground, the Civil Rights activists, was shot through with influence from the blues, gospel, and American folk music, with a strong Black influence. So that's what the American psychedelic groups played, for the most part, very bluesy, very angry, music, By contrast, the British younger generation of hippies were not being drafted to go to war, and mostly had little to complain about, other than a feeling of being stifled by their parents' generation's expectations. And while most of them were influenced by the blues, that wasn't the music that had been popular among the older underground people, who had either been listening to experimental European art music or had been influenced by Ewan MacColl and his associates into listening instead to traditional old English ballads, things like the story of Tam Lin or Thomas the Rhymer, where someone is spirited away to the land of the fairies: [Excerpt: Ewan MacColl, "Thomas the Rhymer"] As a result, most British musicians, when exposed to the culture of the underground over here, created music that looked back to an idealised childhood of their grandparents' generation, songs that were nostalgic for a past just before the one they could remember (as opposed to their own childhoods, which had taken place in war or the immediate aftermath of it, dominated by poverty, rationing, and bomb sites (though of course Barrett's childhood in Cambridge had been far closer to this mythic idyll than those of his contemporaries from Liverpool, Birmingham, Newcastle, or London). So almost every British musician who was making music that might be called psychedelic was writing songs that were influenced both by experimental art music and by pre-War popular song, and which conjured up images from older children's books. Most notably of course at this point the Beatles were recording songs like "Strawberry Fields Forever" and "Penny Lane" about places from their childhood, and taking lyrical inspiration from Victorian circus posters and the works of Lewis Carroll, but Barrett was similarly inspired. One of the books he loved most as a child was "The Little Grey Men" by BB, a penname for Denys Watkins-Pitchford. The book told the story of three gnomes,  Baldmoney, Sneezewort, and Dodder, and their adventures on a boat when the fourth member of their little group, Cloudberry, who's a bit of a rebellious loner and more adventurous than the other three, goes exploring on his own and they have to go off and find him. Barrett's song "The Gnome" doesn't use any precise details from the book, but its combination of whimsy about a gnome named Grimble-gromble and a reverence for nature is very much in the mould of BB's work: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "The Gnome"] Another huge influence on Barrett was Hillaire Belloc. Belloc is someone who is not read much any more, as sadly he is mostly known for the intense antisemitism in some of his writing, which stains it just as so much of early twentieth-century literature is stained, but he was one of the most influential writers of the early part of the twentieth century. Like his friend GK Chesterton he was simultaneously an author of Catholic apologia and a political campaigner -- he was a Liberal MP for a few years, and a strong advocate of an economic system known as Distributism, and had a peculiar mixture of very progressive and extremely reactionary ideas which resonated with a lot of the atmosphere in the British underground of the time, even though he would likely have profoundly disapproved of them. But Belloc wrote in a variety of styles, including poems for children, which are the works of his that have aged the best, and were a huge influence on later children's writers like Roald Dahl with their gleeful comic cruelty. Barrett's "Matilda Mother" had lyrics that were, other than the chorus where Barrett begs his mother to read him more of the story, taken verbatim from three poems from Belloc's Cautionary Tales for Children -- "Jim, Who Ran away from his Nurse, and was Eaten by a Lion", "Henry King (Who chewed bits of String, and was cut off in Dreadful Agonies)", and "Matilda (Who Told Lies and Was Burned to Death)" -- the titles of those give some idea of the kind of thing Belloc would write: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Matilda Mother (early version)"] Sadly for Barrett, Belloc's estate refused to allow permission for his poems to be used, and so he had to rework the lyrics, writing new fairy-tale lyrics for the finished version. Other sources of inspiration for lyrics came from books like the I Ching, which Barrett used for "Chapter 24", having bought a copy from the Indica Bookshop, the same place that John Lennon had bought The Psychedelic Experience, and there's been some suggestion that he was deliberately trying to copy Lennon in taking lyrical ideas from a book of ancient mystic wisdom. During the recording of Piper at the Gates of Dawn, the group continued playing live. As they'd now had a hit single, most of their performances were at Top Rank Ballrooms and other such venues around the country, on bills with other top chart groups, playing to audiences who seemed unimpressed or actively hostile. They also, though made two important appearances. The more well-known of these was at the 14-Hour Technicolor Dream, a benefit for International Times magazine with people including Yoko Ono, their future collaborator Ron Geesin, John's Children, Soft Machine, and The Move also performing. The 14-Hour Technicolor Dream is now largely regarded as *the* pivotal moment in the development of the UK counterculture, though even at the time some participants noted that there seemed to be a rift developing between the performers, who were often fairly straightforward beer-drinking ambitious young men who had latched on to kaftans and talk about enlightenment as the latest gimmick they could use to get ahead in the industry, and the audience who seemed to be true believers. Their other major performance was at an event called "Games for May -- Space Age Relaxation for the Climax of Spring", where they were able to do a full long set in a concert space with a quadrophonic sound system, rather than performing in the utterly sub-par environments most pop bands had to at this point. They came up with a new song written for the event, which became their second single, "See Emily Play". [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "See Emily Play"] Emily was apparently always a favourite name of Barrett's, and he even talked with one girlfriend about the possibility of naming their first child Emily, but the Emily of the song seems to have had a specific inspiration. One of the youngest attendees at the London Free School was an actual schoolgirl, Emily Young, who would go along to their events with her schoolfriend Anjelica Huston (who later became a well-known film star). Young is now a world-renowned artist, regarded as arguably Britain's greatest living stone sculptor, but at the time she was very like the other people at the London Free School -- she was from a very privileged background, her father was Wayland Young, 2nd Baron Kennet, a Labour Peer and minister who later joined the SDP. But being younger than the rest of the attendees, and still a little naive, she was still trying to find her own personality, and would take on attributes and attitudes of other people without fully understanding them,  hence the song's opening lines, "Emily tries, but misunderstands/She's often inclined to borrow somebody's dream til tomorrow". The song gets a little darker towards the end though, and the image in the last verse, where she puts on a gown and floats down a river forever *could* be a gentle, pastoral, image of someone going on a boat ride, but it also could be a reference to two rather darker sources. Barrett was known to pick up imagery both from classic literature and from Arthurian legend, and so the lines inevitably conjure up both the idea of Ophelia drowning herself and of the Lady of Shallot in Tennyson's Arthurian poem, who is trapped in a tower but finds a boat, and floats down the river to Camelot but dies before the boat reaches the castle: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "See Emily Play"] The song also evokes very specific memories of Barrett's childhood -- according to Roger Waters, the woods mentioned in the lyrics are meant to be woods in which they had played as children, on the road out of Cambridge towards the Gog and Magog Hills. The song was apparently seven minutes long in its earliest versions, and required a great deal of editing to get down to single length, but it was worth it, as the track made the top ten. And that was where the problems started. There are two different stories told about what happened to Roger Barrett over the next forty years, and both stories are told by people with particular agendas, who want particular versions of him to become the accepted truth. Both stories are, in the extreme versions that have been popularised, utterly incompatible with each other, but both are fairly compatible with the scanty evidence we have. Possibly the truth lies somewhere between them. In one version of the story, around this time Barrett had a total mental breakdown, brought on or exacerbated by his overuse of LSD and Mandrax (a prescription drug consisting of a mixture of the antihistamine diphenhydramine and the sedative methaqualone, which was marketed in the US under the brand-name Quaalude), and that from late summer 1967 on he was unable to lead a normal life, and spent the rest of his life as a burned-out shell. The other version of the story is that Barrett was a little fragile, and did have periods of mental illness, but for the most part was able to function fairly well. In this version of the story, he was neurodivergent, and found celebrity distressing, but more than that he found the whole process of working within commercial restrictions upsetting -- having to appear on TV pop shows and go on package tours was just not something he found himself able to do, but he was responsible for a whole apparatus of people who relied on him and his group for their living. In this telling, he was surrounded by parasites who looked on him as their combination meal-ticket-cum-guru, and was simply not suited for the role and wanted to sabotage it so he could have a private life instead. Either way, *something* seems to have changed in Barrett in a profound way in the early summer of 1967. Joe Boyd talks about meeting him after not having seen him for a few weeks, and all the light being gone from his eyes. The group appeared on Top of the Pops, Britain's top pop TV show, three times to promote "See Emily Play", but by the third time Barrett didn't even pretend to mime along with the single. Towards the end of July, they were meant to record a session for the BBC's Saturday Club radio show, but Barrett walked out of the studio before completing the first song. It's notable that Barrett's non-cooperation or inability to function was very much dependent on circumstance. He was not able to perform for Saturday Club, a mainstream pop show aimed at a mass audience, but gave perfectly good performances on several sessions for John Peel's radio show The Perfumed Garden, a show firmly aimed at Pink Floyd's own underground niche. On the thirty-first of July, three days after the Saturday Club walkout, all the group's performances for the next month were cancelled, due to "nervous exhaustion". But on the eighth of August, they went back into the studio, to record "Scream Thy Last Scream", a song Barrett wrote and which Nick Mason sang: [Excerpt: Pink Floyd, "Scream Thy Last Scream"] That was scheduled as the group's next single, but the record company vetoed it, and it wouldn't see an official release for forty-nine years. Instead they recorded another single, "Apples and Oranges": [Excerpt: Pink Floyd, "Apples and Oranges"] That was the last thing the group released while Barrett was a member. In November 1967 they went on a tour of the US, making appearances on American Bandstand and the Pat Boone Show, as well as playing several gigs. According to legend, Barrett was almost catatonic on the Pat Boone show, though no footage of that appears to be available anywhere -- and the same things were said about their performance on Bandstand, and when that turned up, it turned out Barrett seemed no more uncomfortable miming to their new single than any of the rest of the band, and was no less polite when Dick Clark asked them questions about hamburgers. But on shows on the US tour, Barrett would do things like detune his guitar so it just made clanging sounds, or just play a single note throughout the show. These are, again, things that could be taken in two different ways, and I have no way to judge which is the more correct. On one level, they could be a sign of a chaotic, disordered, mind, someone dealing with severe mental health difficulties. On the other, they're the kind of thing that Barrett was applauded and praised for in the confines of the kind of avant-garde underground audience that would pay to hear AMM or Yoko Ono, the kind of people they'd been performing for less than a year earlier, but which were absolutely not appropriate for a pop group trying to promote their latest hit single. It could be that Barrett was severely unwell, or it could just be that he wanted to be an experimental artist and his bandmates wanted to be pop stars -- and one thing absolutely everyone agrees is that the rest of the group were more ambitious than Barrett was. Whichever was the case, though, something had to give. They cut the US tour short, but immediately started another British package tour, with the Jimi Hendrix Experience, the Move, Amen Corner and the Nice. After that tour they started work on their next album, A Saucerful of Secrets. Where Barrett was the lead singer and principal songwriter on Piper at the Gates of Dawn, he only sings and writes one song on A Saucerful of Secrets, which is otherwise written by Waters and Wright, and only appears at all on two more of the tracks -- by the time it was released he was out of the group. The last song he tried to get the group to record was called "Have You Got it Yet?" and it was only after spending some time rehearsing it that the rest of the band realised that the song was a practical joke on them -- every time they played it, he would change the song around so they would mess up, and pretend they just hadn't learned the song yet. They brought in Barrett's old friend Dave Gilmour, initially to be a fifth member on stage to give the band some stability in their performances, but after five shows with the five-man lineup they decided just not to bother picking Barrett up, but didn't mention he was out of the group, to avoid awkwardness. At the time, Barrett and Rick Wright were flatmates, and Wright would actually lie to Barrett and say he was just going out to buy a packet of cigarettes, and then go and play gigs without him. After a couple of months of this, it was officially announced that Barrett was leaving the group. Jenner and King went with him, convinced that he was the real talent in the group and would have a solo career, and the group carried on with new management. We'll be looking at them more in future episodes. Barrett made a start at recording a solo album in mid-1968, but didn't get very far. Jenner produced those sessions, and later said "It seemed a good idea to go into the studio because I knew he had the songs. And he would sometimes play bits and pieces and you would think 'Oh that's great.' It was a 'he's got a bit of a cold today and it might get better' approach. It wasn't a cold -- and you knew it wasn't a cold -- but I kept thinking if he did the right things he'd come back to join us. He'd gone out and maybe he'd come back. That was always the analogy in my head. I wanted to make it feel friendly for him, and that where we were was a comfortable place and that he could come back and find himself again. I obviously didn't succeed." A handful of tracks from those sessions have since been released, including a version of “Golden Hair”, a setting by Barrett of a poem by James Joyce that he would later revisit: [Excerpt: Syd Barrett, “Golden Hair (first version)”] Eleven months later, he went back into the studio again, this time with producer Malcolm Jones, to record an album that later became The Madcap Laughs, his first solo album. The recording process for the album has been the source of some controversy, as initially Jones was producing the whole album, and they were working in a way that Barrett never worked before. Where previously he had cut backing tracks first and only later overdubbed his vocals, this time he started by recording acoustic guitar and vocals, and then overdubbed on top of that. But after several sessions, Jones was pulled off the album, and Gilmour and Waters were asked to produce the rest of the sessions. This may seem a bit of a callous decision, since Gilmour was the person who had replaced Barrett in his group, but apparently the two of them had remained friends, and indeed Gilmour thought that Barrett had only got better as a songwriter since leaving the band. Where Malcolm Jones had been trying, by his account, to put out something that sounded like a serious, professional, record, Gilmour and Waters seemed to regard what they were doing more as producing a piece of audio verite documentary, including false starts and studio chatter. Jones believed that this put Barrett in a bad light, saying the outtakes "show Syd, at best as out of tune, which he rarely was, and at worst as out of control (which, again, he never was)." Gilmour and Waters, on the other hand, thought that material was necessary to provide some context for why the album wasn't as slick and professional as some might have hoped. The eventual record was a hodge-podge of different styles from different sessions, with bits from the Jenner sessions, the Jones sessions, and the Waters and Gilmour sessions all mixed together, with some tracks just Barrett badly double-tracking himself with an acoustic guitar, while other tracks feature full backing by Soft Machine. However, despite Jones' accusations that the album was more-or-less sabotaged by Gilmour and Waters, the fact remains that the best tracks on the album are the ones Barrett's former bandmates produced, and there are some magnificent moments on there. But it's a disturbing album to listen to, in the same way other albums by people with clear talent but clear mental illness are, like Skip Spence's Oar, Roky Erickson's later work, or the Beach Boys Love You. In each case, the pleasure one gets is a real pleasure from real aesthetic appreciation of the work, but entangled with an awareness that the work would not exist in that form were the creator not suffering. The pleasure doesn't come from the suffering -- these are real artists creating real art, not the kind of outsider art that is really just a modern-day freak-show -- but it's still inextricable from it: [Excerpt: Syd Barrett, "Dark Globe"] The Madcap Laughs did well enough that Barrett got to record a follow-up, titled simply Barrett. This one was recorded over a period of only a handful of months, with Gilmour and Rick Wright producing, and a band consisting of Gilmour, Wright, and drummer Jerry Shirley. The album is generally considered both more consistent and less interesting than The Madcap Laughs, with less really interesting material, though there are some enjoyable moments on it: [Excerpt: Syd Barrett, "Effervescing Elephant"] But the album is a little aimless, and people who knew him at the time seem agreed that that was a reflection of his life. He had nothing he *needed* to be doing -- no  tour dates, no deadlines, no pressure at all, and he had a bit of money from record royalties -- so he just did nothing at all. The one solo gig he ever played, with the band who backed him on Barrett, lasted four songs, and he walked off half-way through the fourth. He moved back to Cambridge for a while in the early seventies, and he tried putting together a new band with Twink, the drummer of the Pink Fairies and Pretty Things, Fred Frith, and Jack Monck, but Frith left after one gig. The other three performed a handful of shows either as "Stars" or as "Barrett, Adler, and Monck", just in the Cambridge area, but soon Barrett got bored again. He moved back to London, and in 1974 he made one final attempt to make a record, going into the studio with Peter Jenner, where he recorded a handful of tracks that were never released. But given that the titles of those tracks were things like "Boogie #1", "Boogie #2", "Slow Boogie", "Fast Boogie", "Chooka-Chooka Chug Chug" and "John Lee Hooker", I suspect we're not missing out on a lost masterpiece. Around this time there was a general resurgence in interest in Barrett, prompted by David Bowie having recorded a version of "See Emily Play" on his covers album Pin-Ups, which came out in late 1973: [Excerpt: David Bowie, "See Emily Play"] At the same time, the journalist Nick Kent wrote a long profile of Barrett, The Cracked Ballad of Syd Barrett, which like Kent's piece on Brian Wilson a year later, managed to be a remarkable piece of writing with a sense of sympathy for its subject and understanding of his music, but also a less-than-accurate piece of journalism which led to a lot of myths and disinformation being propagated. Barrett briefly visited his old bandmates in the studio in 1975 while they were recording the album Wish You Were Here -- some say even during the recording of the song "Shine On, You Crazy Diamond", which was written specifically about Barrett, though Nick Mason claims otherwise -- and they didn't recognise him at first, because by this point he had a shaved head and had put on a great deal of weight. He seemed rather sad, and that was the last time any of them saw him, apart from Roger Waters, who saw him in Harrod's a few years later. That time, as soon as Barrett recognised Waters, he dropped his bag and ran out of the shop. For the next thirty-one years, Barrett made no public appearances. The last time he ever voluntarily spoke to a journalist, other than telling them to go away, was in 1982, just after he'd moved back to Cambridge, when someone doorstopped him and he answered a few questions and posed for a photo before saying "OK! That's enough, this is distressing for me, thank you." He had the reputation for the rest of his life of being a shut-in, a recluse, an acid casualty. His family, on the other hand, have always claimed that while he was never particularly mentally or physically healthy, he wasn't a shut-in, and would go to the pub, meet up with his mother a couple of times a week to go shopping, and chat to the women behind the counter at Sainsbury's and at the pharmacy. He was also apparently very good with children who lived in the neighbourhood. Whatever the truth of his final decades, though, however mentally well or unwell he actually was, one thing is very clear, which is that he was an extremely private man, who did not want attention, and who was greatly distressed by the constant stream of people coming and looking through his letterbox, trying to take photos of him, trying to interview him, and so on. Everyone on his street knew that when people came asking which was Syd Barrett's house, they were meant to say that no-one of that name lived there -- and they were telling the truth. By the time he moved back, he had stopped answering to "Syd" altogether, and according to his sister "He came to hate the name latterly, and what it meant." He did, in 2001, go round to his sister's house to watch a documentary about himself on the TV -- he didn't own a TV himself -- but he didn't enjoy it and his only comment was that the music was too noisy. By this point he never listened to rock music, just to jazz and classical music, usually on the radio. He was financially secure -- Dave Gilmour made sure that when compilations came out they always included some music from Barrett's period in the group so he would receive royalties, even though Gilmour had no contact with him after 1975 -- and he spent most of his time painting -- he would take photos of the paintings when they were completed, and then burn the originals. There are many stories about those last few decades, but given how much he valued his privacy, it wouldn't be right to share them. This is a history of rock music, and 1975 was the last time Roger Keith Barrett ever had anything to do with rock music voluntarily. He died of cancer in 2006, and at his funeral there was a reading from The Little Grey Men, which was also quoted in the Order of Service -- "The wonder of the world, the beauty and the power, the shapes of things, their colours lights and shades; these I saw. Look ye also while life lasts.” There was no rock music played at Barrett's funeral -- instead there were a selection of pieces by Handel, Haydn, and Bach, ending with Bach's Allemande from the Partita No. IV in D major, one of his favourite pieces: [Excerpt: Glenn Gould, "Allemande from the Partita No. IV in D major"]  As they stared blankly in dumb misery deepening as they slowly realised all they had seen and all they had lost, a capricious little breeze, dancing up from the surface of the water, tossed the aspens, shook the dewy roses and blew lightly and caressingly in their faces; and with its soft touch came instant oblivion. For this is the last best gift that the kindly demi-god is careful to bestow on those to whom he has revealed himself in their helping: the gift of forgetfulness. Lest the awful remembrance should remain and grow, and overshadow mirth and pleasure, and the great haunting memory should spoil all the after-lives of little animals helped out of difficulties, in order that they should be happy and lighthearted as before. Mole rubbed his eyes and stared at Rat, who was looking about him in a puzzled sort of way. “I beg your pardon; what did you say, Rat?” he asked. “I think I was only remarking,” said Rat slowly, “that this was the right sort of place, and that here, if anywhere, we should find him. And look! Why, there he is, the little fellow!” And with a cry of delight he ran towards the slumbering Portly. But Mole stood still a moment, held in thought. As one wakened suddenly from a beautiful dream, who struggles to recall it, and can re-capture nothing but a dim sense of the beauty of it, the beauty! Till that, too, fades away in its turn, and the dreamer bitterly accepts the hard, cold waking and all its penalties; so Mole, after struggling with his memory for a brief space, shook his head sadly and followed the Rat.

america tv love american death history black world children english uk space news americans games british young war walk spring secrets european wild heart inspiration stars dna songs african trip hospitals bbc wind sun vietnam joker wolf britain catholic mothers beatles lion tiger greece liverpool stem nurses cambridge wright birmingham iv kent david bowie eleven butterflies waters depending bomb bob dylan victorian newcastle civil rights john lennon invention bach lsd pink floyd apples communists rat boyd bb chapman boogie pops handel controls string heartbeat alice in wonderland kinks adler byrne ban mole greyhound emo climax sanford roald dahl tilt paul simon sigma yoko ono emi camelot eaten gnome james joyce syd pollock jenner abbey road gog rock music elektra brian wilson cautionary tales lewis carroll relics roger waters haydn notting hill arthurian groupies jeff beck sainsbury marquee willows etta james freak out i ching opel gilmour dick clark howlin edwardian coasters john lee hooker walk like gk chesterton bo diddley labour mp wish you were here tennyson sgt pepper richard wright penny lane twink pinups pat boone syd barrett anjelica huston john peel new left manfred mann nick mason free school allemande amm sdp klose jimi hendrix experience johnny b goode shine on pretty things rubber soul girl guides liberal mps chubby checker oar notting hill carnival american bandstand psychedelic experiences ray davies harrod newport folk festival bandstand bacharach elektra records frith steptoe roky erickson tam lin strawberry fields forever spike milligan soft machine andrew king joker's wild mose allison who do you love saucerful shallots joe boyd geoff emerick rhymer lodgers radio london entranced distributism ewan maccoll rick wright crazy diamond fred frith quaalude pete anderson partita no incredible string band belloc rob chapman track records slim harpo ron grainer addenbrooke what would you say emily young mike leonard interstellar overdrive dave gilmour cloudberry grimble norman smith nick kent ufo club skip spence pink fairies chris dennis first girl i loved jac holzman malcolm jones arnold layne smokestack lightnin dodder tilt araiza
I Ching Cafe
Weekly I Ching // 7 November 2022 // Hexagram 13

I Ching Cafe

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 8:51


Collaboration and working harmoniously with others is what the I Ching is asking us to zone into this week. Let's celebrate how valuable our communities, groups and cohorts are, when we work with others to achieve something wonderful. Listen to this episode for more insight into how to work with this flow this week! I Ching Resources, Links and Giveaways: https://linktr.ee/ichingcafe Timestamps 0:00 Intro 0:50 Last week's recap 2:06 Hexagram 13 Fellowship Tech Specs Main or Present Hexagram - Hexagram 13 Fellowship Changing Lines - None Outcome Hexagram - None

I Ching Cafe
Monthly I Ching // November 2022 // Hexagram 56 & 37

I Ching Cafe

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 19:34


So much is going on in November as the I Ching focuses us on the new journeys we are on, the ones that take us into our discomfort zones. As we become a great traveler in new lands, we also should reconnect with family, the home and what it means to be a part of a tribe. Listen to this episode for more insight into how to work with this flow this month. I Ching Resources, Links and Giveaways: https://linktr.ee/ichingcafe Timestamps 0:00 Intro 0:50 Last month's recap 3:22 Hexagram 56 The Wanderer 6:56 Hexagram 56 The Wanderer, Changing Line 1 10:35 Hexagram 56 The Wanderer, Changing Line 4 14:02 Hexagram 56 The Wanderer, Changing Line 5 16:38 Hexagram 37 The Family Tech Specs Main or Present Hexagram - Hexagram 56 The Wanderer Changing Lines - 1st, 4th and 5th Positions Outcome Hexagram - Hexagram 37 The Family

Pathways Radio by Paul O'Brien
Pathways for Nov. 6, 2022: Meaningful Coincidences – Bernard Beitman

Pathways Radio by Paul O'Brien

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 30:00


https://youtu.be/rBCzvqy3O4E Dr. Bernard Beitman is the author of the new book, Meaningful Coincidences: How and Why Synchronicity and Serendipity Happen. Bernard is founding director of The Coincidence Project which encourages people to tell each other their synchronicity and serendipity stories. He is the former chair of Psychiatry at the University of Missouri-Columbia and has a private practice in Charlottesville, Virginia. His manual Learning Psychotherapy received two national awards for its unique interactive training program for psychiatric residents. He writes a blog for Psychology Today called Connecting with Coincidence. Bernard is internationally known for research in panic disorder and chest pain and has edited several books about how to integrate pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy. More information about the guest can be found at https://coincider.com

Spencer Michaud Astrology
Full Moon Lunar Eclipse In Taurus II - 2022 Transits - w/ Special Guest: Alicia Yusuf

Spencer Michaud Astrology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 90:55


Spencer Michaud & special guest Alicia Yusuf of @aliciayusuf.astrologer discuss the Full Moon Lunar Eclipse in Taurus II, finding meaning through an exploration of Decanic Tarot, Fixed Stars, and the I-Ching. . #astrology #fullmoon #lunareclipse #taurus #scorpio #horoscope #forecast #tarot #decans #fixedstars #traditionalastrology #mythology #divination #iching #spencermichaud #aliciayusuf . Visit: Alicia: https://aliciayusuf.com/ . Visit Spencer: https://www.spencermichaud.com/ . Visit Third Coast Mojo: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ThirdCoastMojo . 20% OFF Scorpio Decans Webinar: https://www.spencermichaud.com/p/store_9.html#.Yw4aOCHMJVk . Finding value in these videos? Help Spencer keep creating content by buying him a coffee! Thank you for your support! :) . Buy me a coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/spencermichaud . Venmo: @spencermichaud . PayPal Me: http://www.paypal.me/spencermichaud . Thank you for supporting your local astrologer! : ) . Book a reading / tutoring session: https://spencermichaudastrology.as.me/ . Subscribe to the Newsletter: https://www.spencermichaud.com/p/subscribe.html#.YC2Gu157lp8 . Visit the blog: http://www.spencermichaud.com . Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/spencermichaud/ . Twitter: https://twitter.com/SpencerMichaud . Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/.../spencer.../id1498982837 . Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1BZBpFaFRUBeUVrdPtRZ5X?si=kuKimd0wSr66qCUAQ6rzNw . Soundcloud: http://www.soundcloud.com/spencermichaudastrology . Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/spencermichaudastrology . https://youtu.be/gGC88Tog7GI

How to Be Happy with Mo Abdelbaki
More About the I Ching-The Mechanics of Creating a Hexagram Simplified

How to Be Happy with Mo Abdelbaki

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 37:34


The I Ching is a wonderful tool for just about everything you can imagine, but it can be confusing to approach. Mo will teach you his simple, "Minority Rule," way of tossing 3 coins to decide whether a line is a Yin or a Yang. It's simply another way of looking at it, but it's much simpler than the standard method and it'll get you to the same place. He's been teaching this method for years with great success and you'll be casting like a pro before you know it. Of course, there's a lot more to learn, but this is a great beginning to learning more about one of the greatest oracles ever devised. The next podcast will delve into how to get the pertinent information from the I Ching, but you'll need this first. Connect with Mo Abdelbaki Tarot Master and Vedic Astrologer on Facebook Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Magic of the Spheres Podcast
Animal Totems & the I Ching with Brynja Magnusson

Magic of the Spheres Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 67:49


On episode 207, Sabrina interviews Brynja Magnusson, author of book and oracle deck Animal Totems and the I Ching.Study Astrology with me in February 2023: Dragon of the Moon: an Evolutionary Astrology Initiation✨

I Ching Cafe
Weekly I Ching // 31 October 2022 // Hexagram 4 & 59

I Ching Cafe

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 11:27


In this week, the I Ching tells us that we are not yet done with the learning journey we have been on since last week. As we keep ourselves open to new insight and recognize our lack of experience, that which was stuck can begin to shift and release. Listen to this episode for more insight into how to work with this flow this week! I Ching Resources, Links and Giveaways: https://linktr.ee/ichingcafe Timestamps 0:00 Intro 0:52 Last week's recap 2:48 Hexagram 4 Youthful Folly 6:00 Hexagram 4 Youthful Folly, Changing Line 5 7:35 Hexagram 59 Dispersing Tech Specs Main or Present Hexagram - Hexagram 4 Youthful Folly Changing Lines - 5th Position Outcome Hexagram - Hexagram 59 Dispersing

Spencer Michaud Astrology
The Astrology of November 2022

Spencer Michaud Astrology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 216:43


Spencer Michaud explores The Astrology of November 2022, finding meaning through an exploration of Decanic Tarot, Fixed Stars, and the I-Ching. . #astrology #november #november2022 #horoscope #scorpio #sagittarius #forecast #monthlyforecast #tarot #decans #fixedstars #traditionalastrology #mythology #divination #iching #youtube #livestream . Visit Spencer: https://www.spencermichaud.com . Visit Third Coast Mojo: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ThirdCoastMojo . 20% OFF Scorpio Decans Webinar: https://www.spencermichaud.com/p/store_9.html#.Yw4aOCHMJVk . Please like, subscribe, and share! . Finding value in these videos? Help Spencer keep creating content by buying him a coffee! Thank you for your support! :) . Buy me a coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/spencermichaud . Venmo: @spencermichaud . PayPal Me: http://www.paypal.me/spencermichaud . Thank you for supporting your local astrologer! :) . Book a reading / tutoring session: https://spencermichaudastrology.as.me/ . Subscribe to the Newsletter: https://www.spencermichaud.com/p/subscribe.html#.YC2Gu157lp8 . Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/spencermichaud/ . Twitter: https://twitter.com/SpencerMichaud . Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/.../spencer.../id1498982837 . Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1BZBpFaFRUBeUVrdPtRZ5X?si=kuKimd0wSr66qCUAQ6rzNw . Soundcloud: http://www.soundcloud.com/spencermichaudastrology . Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/spencermichaudastrology . https://youtu.be/38g-4BZ4WjQ

Studieaux Life- Yoga Things and Other Things

When life is too hard to handle, do you ever catch yourself asking, "why me?"“Can someone else do this hard stuff for me… pretty please?”Nope. Rewrite that script into a story in which you own your energy and direct it towards radical gratitude. Then, watch how well life unfolds.Join Conscious Collaborators, Emily, and Lisa as they continue the mindset conversation on how to shift beyond chaos and shock into grace and beauty in life.Let's shed that victim mentality and claim ownership of our energy so that we can inject more productivity, joy, and strength into our minds, bodies, and businesses.See you in 5!Lisa, Emily & MichelleConnect with us!Instagram - Conscious Collaboration PodcastEmailconsciouscollaborationpodcast@gmail.comEmilyInstagram - @emily_ironyogiInstagram - @ironyogi_fitnessInstagram - @the_studieauxwww.ironyogifitness.comwww.thestudieaux.comLisaInstagram - @cloud9fengshuiwww.cloud9fengshui.comMichelleInstagram - @visionary_business_designwww.visionarybusinessdesign.comAtapa Red Light Therapy deviceswww.myatapa.comAtapa Red Light Therapy discount code: collab15

How to Be Happy with Mo Abdelbaki
What is the I Ching and How Can it Help Your Happiness? The I Ching Part 1

How to Be Happy with Mo Abdelbaki

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 37:34


What is 5000 years old and has the ability to help you in almost any part of your life? The I Ching, that's what. Mo has been a student of this amazing work for 54 years and is still learning every time he uses it. He will introduce you to the I Ching in this podcast and in the next, he focus on the mechanics and teach you his simplified method as to how to toss coins to arrive at an I Ching Hexagram. The next podcast, the third in the series, will focus on how to figure it all out. If you've ever wondered about this magnificent system, this is the podcast you've been waiting for. Connect with Mo Abdelbaki Tarot Master and Vedic Astrologer on Facebook Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

I Ching Cafe
Weekly I Ching // 24 October 2022 // Hexagram 4

I Ching Cafe

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 8:29


So much to learn this week, says the I Ching! And the way to activate this new energy is to open ourselves up to new insights even in areas we might consider ourselves to be experts. Let's put down ego and get stuck into learning and applying what we learn. Listen to this episode for more insight into how to work with this flow this week! I Ching Resources, Links and Giveaways: https://linktr.ee/ichingcafe Timestamps 0:00 Intro 0:50 Last week's recap 1:59 Hexagram 4 Youthful Folly Tech Specs Main or Present Hexagram - Hexagram 4 Youthful Folly Changing Lines - None Outcome Hexagram - None

The Women's Vibrancy Code
41: Diving Into Human Design With Petia Kolibova

The Women's Vibrancy Code

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 57:18


In today's episode of The Women's Vibrancy Code, Maraya is once again joined by alignment women's coach, Petia Kolibova. Petia returns to the podcast to teach Maraya about Human Design; a practice centered around the division of personalities into five energy types which indicate how someone is supposed to exchange energy with the world: manifestors, generators, manifesting generators, projectors, and reflectors. In This Episode: [10:41] Maraya has the projector personality type [19:03] You are influenced by the people around you [22:06] Being both an introvert and an extrovert Key Takeaways: Human Design is a holistic self-knowledge system combining astrology, I Ching, Kabbalah, Vedic philosophy, and quantum physics. It facilitates deep access to bodily, generational, and inter-dimensional intelligence. About Petia Kolibova: Petia Kolibova is an alignment women's coach who guides women to intuitively connect with their inner vision so they can experience personal and professional magnetism and become unapologetically abundant. Her mission is to empower visionaries who are on the path to embody their fullest self-expression to soulfully expand into a quantum leap in all dimensions of their lives. Petia gives immense clarity + exact steps to unlock women's divine feminine and abundance mindset. Through subconscious work as a certified breathwork facilitator, reiki, NLP & Human Design practitioner, she leads her 6 and 7 figure clients to their next level in life and business. If she is not interviewing fellow experts on her podcast Unapologetically Abundant, traveling the world with her husband, hosting retreats, or reading, you will find her in nature disconnecting from the world, connecting even deeper to herself. Important Links From Today's Show: Maraya's appearance on Unapologetically Abundant Petia Website: Petiakolibova.com Subscribe To The Podcast Apple Podcast | YouTube | Spotify Connect With The Show Facebook Page | Linkedin | Website | Tiktok | Facebook Group Make A Connection Call With Maraya Brown Click here to book About Maraya Brown: Maraya is a Yale and Functional Medicine Trained CNM, MSN with her undergraduate degree in marketing. She helps women feel turned on by their life, their lover and themselves.  Her work online brings her 21 years of experience supporting women together in one place to co-create deep transformation, energy and passion. Maraya is the founder of this Podcast and does a great deal of work with women to expand their energy, hormones, libido, confidence and much much more.   DISCLAIMER: The podcasts available on this website have been produced for informational, educational and entertainment purposes only. Listeners should take care to avoid program content which may not be suited to them. The contents of this podcast do not constitute medical or professional advice, No person listening to and/or viewing any podcast from this website should act or refrain from acting on the basis of the content of a podcast without first seeking appropriate professional advice and/or counseling, nor shall the information be used as a substitute for professional advice and/or counseling. The Women's Vibrancy Code Podcast expressly disclaims any and all liability relating to any actions taken or not taken based on any or all contents of this site.

Spencer Michaud Astrology
New Moon Solar Eclipse In Scorpio I - 2022 Transits - w/ Special Guest - Elodie St-Onge-Aubut

Spencer Michaud Astrology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 130:16


Spencer Michaud & special guest Elodie St-Onge-Aubut of @9th_house_astrology discuss the New Moon Solar Eclipse in Scorpio I, finding meaning through an exploration of Decanic Tarot, Fixed Stars, and the I-Ching. . #astrology #newmoon #solareclipse #scorpio #horoscope #forecast #tarot #decans #fixedstars #traditionalastrology #mythology #divination #iching #spencermichaud #elodiestongeaubut . Visit: Elodie: https://9thhouseastrology.wordpress.com/ . Visit Spencer: https://www.spencermichaud.com/ . Visit Third Coast Mojo: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ThirdCoastMojo . 20% OFF Libra Decans Webinar: https://www.spencermichaud.com/p/store_9.html#.Yw4aOCHMJVk . Finding value in these videos? Help Spencer keep creating content by buying him a coffee! Thank you for your support! :) . Buy me a coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/spencermichaud . Venmo: @spencermichaud . PayPal Me: http://www.paypal.me/spencermichaud . Thank you for supporting your local astrologer! : ) . Book a reading / tutoring session: https://spencermichaudastrology.as.me/ . Subscribe to the Newsletter: https://www.spencermichaud.com/p/subscribe.html#.YC2Gu157lp8 . Visit the blog: http://www.spencermichaud.com . Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/spencermichaud/ . Twitter: https://twitter.com/SpencerMichaud . Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/.../spencer.../id1498982837 . Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1BZBpFaFRUBeUVrdPtRZ5X?si=kuKimd0wSr66qCUAQ6rzNw . Soundcloud: http://www.soundcloud.com/spencermichaudastrology . Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/spencermichaudastrology . https://youtu.be/23Fv4qhg0aI

Pathways Radio by Paul O'Brien
Pathways for Oct. 23, 2022: Travelers – Donald Altman

Pathways Radio by Paul O'Brien

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 30:00


https://youtu.be/2WBTr9ugd-g Donald Altman is the author of the forthcoming novel, Travelers—an inspiring journey about overcoming loss and grief through hope, healing and spiritual renewal. Donald is an international mindfulness expert and an award-winning author of over 20 books. Featured as an expert in The Mindfulness Movie and profiled in the Living Spiritual Teachers Project, he currently writes Psychology Today's "Practical Mindfulness Blog." He is a psychotherapist and former Buddhist monk whose work integrates ancient, timeless practices into our modern lifestyles. He has taught thousands of professionals in healthcare, mental health and business how to find resilience, wholeness, healing and joy, while reducing stress, depressions and anxiety..

Studieaux Life- Yoga Things and Other Things

Something is brewing. Are things starting to unravel around you?Are feeling that you, your friends, family and society starting to panic?Perhaps you're starting over from scratch in your business and personal life or on a simpler level your day-to-day is feeling unfamiliar and out of your control?Well, you are experiencing a healthy dose of chaos, my friend.Join collaborators Lisa and Emily as they share success hacks for navigating through the uncertainty of chaos.Learn energetic shifts that you can make in your mindset, body and surroundings.Harness the power of change and rewrite your script with us to access the Revolution of abundance that is all around you.So, bring your favorite beverage, your emotional support animal or plant and explore the topic of Chaos with us.See you in 5 minutes!Emily, Lisa & MichelleConnect with us!Instagram - Conscious Collaboration PodcastEmailconsciouscollaborationpodcast@gmail.comEmilyInstagram - @emily_ironyogiInstagram - @ironyogi_fitnessInstagram - @the_studieauxwww.ironyogifitness.comwww.thestudieaux.comLisaInstagram - @cloud9fengshuiwww.cloud9fengshui.comMichelleInstagram - @visionary_business_designwww.visionarybusinessdesign.comAtapa Red Light Therapy deviceswww.myatapa.comAtapa Red Light Therapy discount code: collab15

I Ching Cafe
Weekly I Ching // 17 October 2022 // Hexagram 18 & 53

I Ching Cafe

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 11:51


It's time to get our act together, says the I Ching for this week. We have to weed out chaos and disorder, in how feel, think and live our lives. And this supports our development this week as we step ever closer towards our goals. Listen to this episode for more insight into how to work with this flow this week! I Ching Resources, Links and Giveaways: https://linktr.ee/ichingcafe Timestamps 0:00 Intro 0:39 Last week's recap 1:41 Hexagram 18 Work On What Has Been Spoiled 5:23 Hexagram 18 Work On What Has Been Spoiled, Changing Line 2 7:21 Hexagram 18 Work On What Has Been Spoiled, Changing Line 5 9:50 Hexagram 53 Development Tech Specs Main or Present Hexagram - Hexagram 18 Work On What Has Been Spoiled Changing Lines - 2nd and 5th Positions Outcome Hexagram - Hexagram 53 Development

Curioseando Con Laura
Ep. 91 Diseño Humano: ¿qué es y por qué te puede cambiar la vida?

Curioseando Con Laura

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 46:41


El diseño humano es un mapa ruta y de autoconocimiento para que puedas vivir la vida espectacular que tu alma planeó.Es un manual sobre tu SER en el que conseguirás dejar de darte látigo por ser quién eres. Es un sistema que está basado en La Cábala, la Astrología, el I-Ching, Chakras y Física Cuántica.Para hablar de Diseño Humano traje a Barbara Garibay, una mujer Mexicana espectacular y apasionada de este tema. Este episodio es súper práctico y lo vas a AMAR porque vas a poder conocer MÁS DE TI. Vas a conocer qué tipo de energía eres (tu AURA), cuál es tu estrategia para navegar la vida y cuál es tu SER y NO SER. La idea es que vayas a esta página https://www.institutodisenohumano.com/ para poder acceder a tu cuadro de Diseño Humano. Esto te prometo que te va a dar mucha información y herramientas para navegar mejor tu vida.Espero que lo disfrutes muchísimo y recuerda que las inscripciones del curso Sana tu relación con la muerte hasta este Domingo 16 de Octubre: www.quebuenasalud.com/sanarlamuerte Te quiero mucho,Lau

Rooted Souls
Rooting Into Lineage For Soul Exploration - Honoring The Origins Of Human Design | Ep29

Rooted Souls

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 50:14


Cultural appropriation is very common within New Age Spiritualism. In this episode, Asha and I focus on the decolonization of Human Design by illuminating the roots of the practice, originating from indigenous wisdom. Human Design combines astrology, the I Ching, Kabbalah and Vedic philosophy, centering around five different personality types (Manifestors, Generators, Manifesting Generators, Projectors, and Reflectors). Alan Robert Krakower developed the method which holds no specific religious dogma or affiliation, but pulls from several indigenous lineages. This framework has become very popular in the west and there is a need and duty to honor the original cultures from which it was derived. Becca is Spiritual Life Coach and Astrologer who supports clients through their spiritual awakening and knowing themselves more deeply. She helps purpose driven people break free from being stuck, step into their natural gifts, & live a life true to their core. Reach Becca online at www.beccaspeert.com or connect with her via social media on instagram: @beccaspeertcoaching or Facebook: Becca Speert Coaching. To follow the podcast you can *subscribe* to get notified when a new episode is released, every Monday. You can also follow and support the podcast on Instagram @_rooted_souls and Facebook: Rooted Souls Podcast. Asha D Ramakrishna is South Indian, originally from Venezuela, and currently living in occupied Nipmuc Land (Harvard, MA). She is a Minister of Spiritual Peacemaking & founder of the Dharma School: Modern Priestess School & Sacred Commerce Program, with a background in in molecular biology and business development. She breaks esoteric teachings into practical logical approaches to living in her two books: "The Priestess Code: Awakening the Modern Woman," and her new release: "Your Soul Map: Liberation, Human Design, And The BIPOC Experience." Pre-Order Asha's newest book: https://www.humandesignstore.com/product/your-soul-map-liberation-human-design-and-the-bipoc-experience/

I Ching Cafe
Weekly I Ching // 10 October 2022 // Hexagram 33

I Ching Cafe

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 7:59


It's time this week, says the I Ching, to evaluate where we really are at and remove ourselves from situations (for now) that are not in our best interest. Or perhaps it would be wise to take some time out and withdraw, regroup and rejuvenate. Happy resting! Listen to this episode for more insight into how to work with this flow this week! I Ching Resources, Links and Giveaways: https://linktr.ee/ichingcafe Timestamps 0:00 Intro 0:29 Last week's recap 1:43 Hexagram 33 Retreat Tech Specs Main or Present Hexagram - Hexagram 33 Retreat Changing Lines - None Outcome Hexagram - None

Pathways Radio by Paul O'Brien

Tracy Dennis-Tiwary, Ph.D is the author of the new book, Future Tense: Why Anxiety is Good For You (Even Though it Feels Bad). Dr. Tracy is a professor of psychology and neuroscience, Director of the Emotion Regulation Lab, and Co-Executive Director of the Center for Health Technology at Hunter College, where the mission is to connect researchers, community stakeholders, and technology innovators to bridge the healthcare gap. As Founder and CSO of Wise Therapeutics, she translates neuroscience and cognitive therapy techniques into gamified, clinically validated digital therapeutics for mental health. She has published over 100 scientific articles and delivered over 400 presentations at academic conferences and for corporate clients. She has been featured throughout the media, including the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, ABC, CBS, CNN, NPR, The Today Show, Bloomberg Television.

Living Change I Ching podcast
Losing a habit of hardship

Living Change I Ching podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 42:31


In this episode of the I Ching with Clarity podcast, Rachel asks the Yi how she can 'lose habitual hardship' - shift her experience so not everything is about crisis management! Yi answers with Hexagram 26, Great Taming, changing at lines 1 and 6 to 46, Pushing Upward: changing to It's a very lively reading, full of encouragement, warning and the mysterious promise of 26.6: ‘Is this heaven's highway?Creating success.'Hexagram 26, line 6 I hope you enjoy listening! And if you'd like to share and explore a reading of your own on the podcast, you can still book that here.

Mindful Living with Dr Sogol
E84. Finding your TRUE authentic SELF with Dr. Stacy Cisnero

Mindful Living with Dr Sogol

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 51:03


join the waitlist for CPR of the SOUL, Revive your spiritlive virtual CEREMONY for midlife female physicianshttps://www.drsogol.com/soulEver wonder who you are?  Ever wonder how you make decisions?  Ever wonder what makes up your personality? Myers Briggs ESTJ- “supervisor”logical, take-charge kind of people, assertive and concerned with making sure that things run smoothly and according to the rules.Enneagram type 8: “challenger/boss”self-confident, sociable, and pragmatic in their behavior. They are ambitious and independent, preferring to follow their own path.Human design projector type:“manager of the future”Naturally possess qualities of true leaders, skillfully lead people, achieving success through collective labor Human Design combines astrology, the I Ching, Kabbalah and Vedic philosophy centering around the division of personalities into five energy types alleged to indicate how someone is supposed to exchange energy with the world. It indicates how you are unique as a person, and guides you in living in a manner that is in sync with who you are- your TRUE AUTHENTIC SELF. www.infinitelevelhealings.comwww.facebook.com/InfiniteLevelHealings  www.instagram.com/infinitelevelhealings/  infinitelevelhealings@gmail.com

Spencer Michaud Astrology
Full Moon In Aries II - 2022 Transits

Spencer Michaud Astrology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 108:09


Spencer Michaud dives into the Full Moon in Aries II, finding meaning through an exploration of Decanic Tarot, Fixed Stars, and the I-Ching. . #astrology #fullmoon #aries #libra #horoscope #forecast #tarot #decans #fixedstars #traditionalastrology #mythology #divination #iching #spencermichaud . Visit Spencer: https://www.spencermichaud.com/ . Visit Third Coast Mojo: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ThirdCoastMojo . 20% OFF Libra Decans Webinar: https://www.spencermichaud.com/p/store_9.html#.Yw4aOCHMJVk. Finding value in these videos? Help Spencer keep creating content by buying him a coffee! Thank you for your support! :) . Buy me a coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/spencermichaud . Venmo: @spencermichaud . PayPal Me: http://www.paypal.me/spencermichaud . Thank you for supporting your local astrologer! : ) . Book a reading / tutoring session: https://spencermichaudastrology.as.me/ . Subscribe to the Newsletter: https://www.spencermichaud.com/p/subscribe.html#.YC2Gu157lp8 . Visit the blog: http://www.spencermichaud.com . Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/spencermichaud/ . Twitter: https://twitter.com/SpencerMichaud . Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/.../spencer.../id1498982837 . Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1BZBpFaFRUBeUVrdPtRZ5X?si=kuKimd0wSr66qCUAQ6rzNw . Soundcloud: http://www.soundcloud.com/spencermichaudastrology . Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/spencermichaudastrology . https://youtu.be/LhwJ6qgLzRA

I Ching Cafe
Monthly I Ching // October 2022 // Hexagram 50 & 35

I Ching Cafe

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 16:53


Get your apron on and get cooking! In October 2022, the I Ching asks us to focus on the creative transformation taking place within us as we stay true to our value and looking after it. Plus some wonderful, natural progress to move us forward this month. Listen to this episode for more insight into how to work with this flow this week. I Ching Resources, Links and Giveaways: https://linktr.ee/ichingcafe Timestamps 0:00 Intro 0:40 Last month's recap 2:00 Hexagram 50 The Cauldron 7:09 Hexagram 50 The Cauldron, Changing Line 2 10:13 Hexagram 50 The Cauldron, Changing Line 3 12:24 Hexagram 35 Progress Tech Specs Main or Present Hexagram - Hexagram 50 The Cauldron Changing Lines - 2nd and 3rd Positions Outcome Hexagram - Hexagram 35 Progress

I Ching Cafe
Weekly I Ching // 3 October 2022 // Hexagram 40 & 64

I Ching Cafe

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 9:26


This week the I Ching wants us to finish off the last piece of deliverance we may not have completed in September. As we tackle an obstruction in our path, we should finish something of project or phase well and with care. Listen to this episode for more insight into how to work with this flow this week. I Ching Resources, Links and Giveaways: https://linktr.ee/ichingcafe Timestamps 0:00 Intro 0:32 Last week's recap 1:52 Hexagram 40 Deliverance 4:11 Hexagram 40 Deliverance, Changing Line 6 6:04 Hexagram 64 Before Completion Tech Specs Main or Present Hexagram - Hexagram 40 Deliverance Changing Lines - 6th Position Outcome Hexagram - Hexagram 64 Before Completion

Spencer Michaud Astrology
The Astrology of October 2022

Spencer Michaud Astrology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 206:24


Spencer Michaud explores The Astrology of October 2022, finding meaning through an exploration of Decanic Tarot, Fixed Stars, and the I-Ching. . #astrology #october #october2022 #horoscope #libra #scorpio #forecast #monthlyforecast #tarot #decans #fixedstars #traditionalastrology #mythology #divination #iching #youtube #livestream . Visit Spencer: https://www.spencermichaud.com . 20% OFF Libra Decans Webinar: https://www.spencermichaud.com/p/store_9.html#.Yw4aOCHMJVk . Please like, subscribe, and share! . Finding value in these videos? Help Spencer keep creating content by buying him a coffee! Thank you for your support! :) . Buy me a coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/spencermichaud . Venmo: @spencermichaud . PayPal Me: http://www.paypal.me/spencermichaud . Thank you for supporting your local astrologer! :) . Book a reading / tutoring session: https://spencermichaudastrology.as.me/ . Subscribe to the Newsletter: https://www.spencermichaud.com/p/subscribe.html#.YC2Gu157lp8 . Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/spencermichaud/ . Twitter: https://twitter.com/SpencerMichaud . Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/.../spencer.../id1498982837 . Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1BZBpFaFRUBeUVrdPtRZ5X?si=kuKimd0wSr66qCUAQ6rzNw . Soundcloud: http://www.soundcloud.com/spencermichaudastrology . Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/spencermichaudastrology . https://youtu.be/OAuWVrUXJKc

Ozark Mountain Transformation Conference
Understanding the True Meaning of Success - Albert Cheung

Ozark Mountain Transformation Conference

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 57:34


Albert Cheung is a Master of Chinese Wisdom, Chinese Astrology, I-ching Tarot, Feng Shui, Strategies & Statistics. For over 20 years, Albert has been providing inspiring answers to personal and professional inquiries. Author of the Feng Shui Handbook, The Emperor's Stargate, and the I-Ching Tarot & Pictoral Guide. He also writes on Chinese philosophy and predictions.Presentation from the 2013 Ozark Mountain Transformation Conference.FOLLOW US ON:Facebook: https://goo.gl/rwvBfwInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/ozarkmtpubTwitter: https://goo.gl/LunK5DWebsite: https://goo.gl/2d5cX4ASSOCIATED LINKS:Ozark Mountain Publishing, Inc.: https://goo.gl/xhgoAPQuantum Healing Hypnosis Academy: https://goo.gl/64G7RD

Feng Shui | Holistic Spaces Podcast with Anjie Cho
Episode 192: Feng Shui Qi Forecast, October 2022

Feng Shui | Holistic Spaces Podcast with Anjie Cho

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 21:23 Very Popular


In this episode, we're sharing a feng shui qi forecast for the month of October 2022! First, we go over what's going on in nature and what you can expect energetically this month, and then Anjie shares an I Ching reading for the Holistic Spaces Podcast listener community. We also share how you can make the most of this month's energy in your home through feng shui.We cover: - Key dates to look out for this month in the moon's cycle and the Chinese solar term calendar- What to expect energetically this month- Metal element energy and fall- Celebrating your successes- Making space for stillness and silence- Noticing the abundance around you- Embracing easeMentioned in this episode: Our feng shui certification is open for enrollment!Episode 191: Fall Equinox & The Metal ElementSign up for our newsletter for exclusive complimentary special workshops and offers for our newsletter subscribers ONLY! You'll also get notified when enrollment for the Inner Circle opens. Make sure you're following us on Instagram for feng shui tips and live Q&A's.Learn about our courses and certification on our website at: Mindful Design School.Check out our older episodes on our Holistic Spaces Podcast archive.

I Ching Cafe
Weekly I Ching // 26 September 2022 // Hexagram 48 & 9

I Ching Cafe

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 11:19


This week the I Ching encourages us to focus on the structures we use to nourish our lives and businesses, and how we can dig deeply to tap into better resources. We also confront the many small things that want to help us achieve the great things. Listen to this episode for more insight into how to work with this flow this week. I Ching Resources, Links and Giveaways: https://linktr.ee/ichingcafe Timestamps 0:00 Intro 0:50 Last week's recap 1:34 Hexagram 48 The Well 4:27 Hexagram 48 The Well, Changing Line 1 6:29 Hexagram 48 The Well, Changing Line 6 8:06 Hexagram 9 Small Accumulates Tech Specs Main or Present Hexagram - Hexagram 48 The Well Changing Lines - 1st and 6th Positions Outcome Hexagram - Hexagram 9 Small Accumulates

Spencer Michaud Astrology
New Moon In Libra I - 2022 Transits - w/ Special Guest: Acyuta-bhava Das

Spencer Michaud Astrology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 83:34


Spencer Michaud & special guest Acyuta-bhava Das of @nightlightastrology discuss the New Moon in Libra I, finding meaning through an exploration of Decanic Tarot, Fixed Stars, and the I-Ching. . #astrology #newmoon #libra #horoscope #forecast #tarot #decans #fixedstars #traditionalastrology #mythology #divination #iching #acyutabhava #acyutabhavadas #nightlightastrology . Visit Acyuta-bhava: https://nightlightastrology.com/ . Visit Spencer: https://www.spencermichaud.com/ . Register for Guided Group Study - Fall 2022: https://spencermichaudastrology.as.me/?appointmentType=36736818 . Finding value in these videos? Help Spencer keep creating content by buying him a coffee! Thank you for your support! :) . Buy me a coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/spencermichaud . Venmo: @spencermichaud . PayPal Me: http://www.paypal.me/spencermichaud . Thank you for supporting your local astrologer! : ) . Book a reading / tutoring session: https://spencermichaudastrology.as.me/ . Subscribe to the Newsletter: https://www.spencermichaud.com/p/subscribe.html#.YC2Gu157lp8 . Visit the blog: http://www.spencermichaud.com . Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/spencermichaud/ . Twitter: https://twitter.com/SpencerMichaud . Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/.../spencer.../id1498982837 . Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1BZBpFaFRUBeUVrdPtRZ5X?si=kuKimd0wSr66qCUAQ6rzNw . Soundcloud: http://www.soundcloud.com/spencermichaudastrology . Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/spencermichaudastrology . https://youtu.be/KwXs56HJvv4

Rebel Spirit Radio
Meaningful Coincidences with Bernard Beitman, M.D.

Rebel Spirit Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 60:46


Bernard Beitman M.D is my guest on this episode of Rebel Spirit Radio. Bernard joins me to discuss his book Meaningful Coincidences: How and Why Synchroneity and Serendipity Happen. Bernard discusses several different types of meaningful coincidences, how to work with them, including mantic practices like the I-Ching and tarot, synchronicity and precognition, and why meaningful coincidences are important for psychological and spiritual evolution. Support Rebel Spirit Radio https://paypal.me/rebelspiritradio Bernard Beitman https://www.coincider.com/ Meaningful Coincidences Inner Traditions https://www.innertraditions.com/books/meaningful-coincidences Bookshop.org https://bookshop.org/books/meaningful-coincidences-how-and-why-synchronicity-and-serendipity-happen/9781644115701 Connect with Rebel Spirit on Social Media Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rebelspiritradio Twitter: @RebelSpiritRad Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rebelspiritradio/ https://www.rebelspiritradio.com #rebelspiritradio #rebelspirit #synchroncity #serendipity #meaningfulcoincidence

Just Follow Joy
HD101: The profiles + 6 profile lines

Just Follow Joy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 20:08


Profile deep dive audios are out NOW! Grab yours here: https://www.justfollowjoy.com/index.php/profile-deep-dive-audio/ The profiles (and 6 profile lines) are probably what people relate to + resonate most with in their chart when they learn which they have. I'm so stoked for this, because the profiles (and 6 profile lines) are probably what people relate to + resonate most with in their chart in terms of personality. In fact, if there is any part of your chart that's the closest thing to a “personality type,” this would be it!  THE GOODS What profile really is How yours is determined What the two numbers in your profile represent The 6 lines of the I-Ching + what they mean (also, their names) Personal destiny, transpersonal karma, and fixed fate   RESOURCES: PROFILE DEEP DIVE AUDIOS! ENERGY TYPE DEEP DIVE VIDEOS! -- CONNECT WITH ME! >> GET YOUR FREE ENERGY TYPE MINI GUIDE >> HD COURSES + CLASSES >> GET A 1:1 READING   [SONG CREDIT: SCOTT HOLMES]

Mindalia.com-Salud,Espiritualidad,Conocimiento
Aprende a Conectar con tu propia Energía. Entrevista a Alejandra Delgado

Mindalia.com-Salud,Espiritualidad,Conocimiento

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 40:32


En Ivoox puedes encontrar sólo algunos de los audios de Mindalia. Para escuchar las 4 grabaciones diarias que publicamos entra en https://www.mindaliatelevision.com. Si deseas ver el vídeo perteneciente a este audio, pincha aquí: https://youtu.be/LMP0cH5eQ74 Aprender a sentir y conectar con tu propia energía, es la base para crear de manera consciente y tomar el control de nuestras vidas, sin necesidad de elementos externos o poniendo del poder en el afuera. Se realizará un ejercicio práctico, limpieza frecuencial y fortalecimiento energético en vivo. Alejandra Delgado Especialista en Metafísica China: Astrología, Feng Shui, I Ching y Lectura del Rostro. Realiza Meditación, Bioenergía, Biomagnetismo, Constelaciones Familiares, Biodescodificación, método Yuen y estudiante de Medicina Tradicional China. Su pasión es “Servir". https://www.instagram.com/astrocycles... https://www.facebook.com/AUSTFengShui/ Infórmate de todo el programa en: http://television.mindalia.com/catego... ***CON PREGUNTAS AL FINAL DE LA CONFERENCIA PARA RESOLVER TUS DUDAS **** Si te parece interesante.... ¡COMPÁRTELO!! :-) DURACIÓN: 45m Aproximadamente ------------INFORMACIÓN SOBRE MINDALIA----------DPM Mindalia.com es una ONG internacional sin ánimo de lucro. Nuestra misión es la difusión universal de contenidos para la mejora de la consciencia espiritual, mental y física. -Apóyanos con tu donación en este enlace: https://streamelements.com/mindaliapl... -Colabora con el mundo suscribiéndote a este canal, dejándonos un comentario de energía positiva en nuestros vídeos y compartiéndolos. De esta forma, este conocimiento llegará a mucha más gente. - Sitio web: https://www.mindalia.com - Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mindalia.ayuda/ - Twitter: http://twitter.com/mindaliacom - Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mindalia_com/ - Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/mindaliacom - Vaughn: https://vaughn.live/mindalia - VK: https://vk.com/mindaliacom - Odysee: https://odysee.com/@Mindalia.com *Mindalia.com no se hace responsable de las opiniones vertidas en este vídeo, ni necesariamente participa de ellas. *Mindalia.com no se responsabiliza de la fiabilidad de las informaciones de este vídeo, cualquiera sea su origen. *Este vídeo es exclusivamente informativo.

I Ching Cafe
Weekly I Ching // 19 September 2022 // Hexagram 60 & 47

I Ching Cafe

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 14:03


This week, the I Ching gives us permission to stay inside the box and to care for ourselves as we establish healthy boundaries and honour our self care. It's okay to feel exhausted, yet how we deal with feeling empty is what really counts. Listen to this episode for more insight into how to work with this flow this week. I Ching Resources, Links and Giveaways: https://linktr.ee/ichingcafe Timestamps 0:00 Intro 0:55 Last week's recap 2:15 Hexagram 60 Limitation 6:18 Hexagram 60 Limitation, Changing Line 1 7:46 Hexagram 60 Limitation, Changing Line 4 11:17 Hexagram 47 Exhaustion Tech Specs Main or Present Hexagram - Hexagram 60 Limitation Changing Lines - 3rd and 5th Positions Outcome Hexagram - Hexagram 47 Exhaustion

Pathways Radio by Paul O'Brien
Pathways for Sept. 18, 2022: Ignite the Power of Women in Your Life – Simon Bailey

Pathways Radio by Paul O'Brien

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 30:00


https://youtu.be/FziPv0UeMhg Simon Bailey is the author of the new book, Ignite the Power of WOMEN in your life: A guide for MEN. Simon has committed to a life of purpose that sparks individuals and organizations to lead countries, companies, and communities differently. This current mission caps an illustrious career as a Hall of Fame Keynote Speaker and renowned advisor to companies in diverse industries. More information about the guest can be found at www.ignitethepowerofwomen.com

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 153: “Heroes and Villains” by the Beach Boys

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022


Episode one hundred and fifty-three of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “Heroes and Villains” by the Beach Boys, and the collapse of the Smile album. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a sixteen-minute bonus episode available, on "I Had Too Much to Dream Last Night" by the Electric Prunes. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources There is no Mixcloud this week, because there were too many Beach Boys songs in the episode. I used many resources for this episode. As well as the books I referred to in all the Beach Boys episodes, listed below, I used Domenic Priore's book Smile: The Story of Brian Wilson's Lost Masterpiece and Richard Henderson's 33 1/3 book on Van Dyke Parks' Song Cycle. Stephen McParland has published many, many books on the California surf and hot-rod music scenes, including several on both the Beach Boys and Gary Usher.  His books can be found at https://payhip.com/CMusicBooks Andrew Doe's Bellagio 10452 site is an invaluable resource. Jon Stebbins' The Beach Boys FAQ is a good balance between accuracy and readability. And Philip Lambert's Inside the Music of Brian Wilson is an excellent, though sadly out of print, musicological analysis of Wilson's music from 1962 through 67. Catch a Wave: The Rise, Fall, and Redemption of the Beach Boys' Brian Wilson by Peter Ames Carlin is the best biography of Wilson. I have also referred to Brian Wilson's autobiography, I Am Brian Wilson, and to Mike Love's, Good Vibrations: My Life as a Beach Boy. As a good starting point for the Beach Boys' music in general, I would recommend this budget-priced three-CD set, which has a surprisingly good selection of their material on it, including the single version of “Heroes and Villains”. The box set The Smile Sessions  contains an attempt to create a finished album from the unfinished sessions, plus several CDs of outtakes and session material. Transcript [Opening -- "intro to the album" studio chatter into "Our Prayer"] Before I start, I'd just like to note that this episode contains some discussion of mental illness, including historical negative attitudes towards it, so you may want to check the transcript or skip this one if that might be upsetting. In November and December 1966, the filmmaker David Oppenheim and the conductor and composer Leonard Bernstein collaborated on a TV film called "Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution".  The film was an early attempt at some of the kinds of things this podcast is doing, looking at how music and social events interact and evolve, though it was dealing with its present rather than the past. The film tried to cast as wide a net as possible in its fifty-one minutes. It looked at two bands from Manchester -- the Hollies and Herman's Hermits -- and how the people identified as their leaders, "Herman" (or Peter Noone) and Graham Nash, differed on the issue of preventing war: [Excerpt: Inside Pop, the Rock Revolution] And it made a star of East Coast teenage singer-songwriter Janis Ian with her song about interracial relationships, "Society's Child": [Excerpt: Janis Ian, "Society's Child"] And Bernstein spends a significant time, as one would expect, analysing the music of the Beatles and to a lesser extent the Stones, though they don't appear in the show. Bernstein does a lot to legitimise the music just by taking it seriously as a subject for analysis, at a time when most wouldn't: [Excerpt: Leonard Bernstein talking about "She Said She Said"] You can't see it, obviously, but in the clip that's from, as the Beatles recording is playing, Bernstein is conducting along with the music, as he would a symphony orchestra, showing where the beats are falling. But of course, given that this was filmed in the last two months of 1966, the vast majority of the episode is taken up with musicians from the centre of the music world at that time, LA. The film starts with Bernstein interviewing Tandyn Almer,  a jazz-influenced songwriter who had recently written the big hit "Along Comes Mary" for The Association: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] It featured interviews with Roger McGuinn, and with the protestors at the Sunset Strip riots which were happening contemporaneously with the filming: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] Along with Frank Zappa's rather acerbic assessment of the potential of the youth revolutionaries: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] And ended (other than a brief post-commercial performance over the credits by the Hollies) with a performance by Tim Buckley, whose debut album, as we heard in the last episode, had featured Van Dyke Parks and future members of the Mothers of Invention and Buffalo Springfield: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] But for many people the highlight of the film was the performance that came right before Buckley's, film of Brian Wilson playing a new song from the album he was working on. One thing I should note -- many sources say that the voiceover here is Bernstein. My understanding is that Bernstein wrote and narrated the parts of the film he was himself in, and Oppenheim did all the other voiceover writing and narration, but that Oppenheim's voice is similar enough to Bernstein's that people got confused about this: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] That particular piece of footage was filmed in December 1966, but it wasn't broadcast until April the twenty-fifth, 1967, an eternity in mid-sixties popular music. When it was broadcast, that album still hadn't come out. Precisely one week later, the Beach Boys' publicist Derek Taylor announced that it never would: [Excerpt: Brian Wilson, "Surf's Up"] One name who has showed up in a handful of episodes recently, but who we've not talked that much about, is Van Dyke Parks. And in a story with many, many, remarkable figures, Van Dyke Parks may be one of the most remarkable of all. Long before he did anything that impinges on the story of rock music, Parks had lived the kind of life that would be considered unbelievable were it to be told as fiction. Parks came from a family that mixed musical skill, political progressiveness, and achievement. His mother was a scholar of Hebrew, while his father was a neurologist, the first doctor to admit Black patients to a white Southern hospital, and had paid his way through college leading a dance band. Parks' father was also, according to the 33 1/3 book on Song Cycle, a member of "John Philip Sousa's Sixty Silver Trumpets", but literally every reference I can find to Sousa leading a band of that name goes back to that book, so I've no idea what he was actually a member of, but we can presume he was a reasonable musician. Young Van Dyke started playing the clarinet at four, and was also a singer from a very early age, as well as playing several other instruments. He went to the American Boychoir School in Princeton, to study singing, and while there he sang with Toscaninni, Thomas Beecham, and other immensely important conductors of the era. He also had a very special accompanist for one Christmas carolling session. The choir school was based in Princeton, and one of the doors he knocked on while carolling was that of Princeton's most famous resident, Albert Einstein, who heard the young boy singing "Silent Night", and came out with his violin and played along. Young Van Dyke was only interested in music, but he was also paying the bills for his music tuition himself -- he had a job. He was a TV star. From the age of ten, he started getting roles in TV shows -- he played the youngest son in the 1953 sitcom Bonino, about an opera singer, which flopped because it aired opposite the extremely popular Jackie Gleason Show. He would later also appear in that show, as one of several child actors who played the character of Little Tommy Manicotti, and he made a number of other TV appearances, as well as having a small role in Grace Kelly's last film, The Swan, with Alec Guinness and Louis Jourdain. But he never liked acting, and just did it to pay for his education. He gave it up when he moved on to the Carnegie Institute, where he majored in composition and performance. But then in his second year, his big brother Carson asked him to drop out and move to California. Carson Parks had been part of the folk scene in California for a few years at this point. He and a friend had formed a duo called the Steeltown Two, but then both of them had joined the folk group the Easy Riders, a group led by Terry Gilkyson. Before Carson Parks joined, the Easy Riders had had a big hit with their version of "Marianne", a calypso originally by the great calypsonian Roaring Lion: [Excerpt: The Easy Riders, "Marianne"] They hadn't had many other hits, but their songs became hits for other people -- Gilkyson wrote several big hits for Frankie Laine, and the Easy Riders were the backing vocalists on Dean Martin's recording of a song they wrote, "Memories are Made of This": [Excerpt: Dean Martin and the Easy Riders, "Memories are Made of This"] Carson Parks hadn't been in the group at that point -- he only joined after they'd stopped having success -- and eventually the group had split up. He wanted to revive his old duo, the Steeltown Two, and persuaded his family to let his little brother Van Dyke drop out of university and move to California to be the other half of the duo. He wanted Van Dyke to play guitar, while he played banjo. Van Dyke had never actually played guitar before, but as Carson Parks later said "in 90 days, he knew more than most folks know after many years!" Van Dyke moved into an apartment adjoining his brother's, owned by Norm Botnick, who had until recently been the principal viola player in a film studio orchestra, before the film studios all simultaneously dumped their in-house orchestras in the late fifties, so was a more understanding landlord than most when it came to the lifestyles of musicians. Botnick's sons, Doug and Bruce, later went into sound engineering -- we've already encountered Bruce Botnick in the episode on the Doors, and he will be coming up again in the future. The new Steeltown Two didn't make any records, but they developed a bit of a following in the coffeehouses, and they also got a fair bit of session work, mostly through Terry Gilkyson, who was by that point writing songs for Disney and would hire them to play on sessions for his songs. And it was Gilkyson who both brought Van Dyke Parks the worst news of his life to that point, and in doing so also had him make his first major mark on music. Gilkyson was the one who informed Van Dyke that another of his brothers, Benjamin Riley Parks, had died in what was apparently a car accident. I say it was apparently an accident because Benjamin Riley Parks was at the time working for the US State Department, and there is apparently also some evidence that he was assassinated in a Cold War plot. Gilkyson also knew that neither Van Dyke nor Carson Parks had much money, so in order to help them afford black suits and plane tickets to and from the funeral, Gilkyson hired Van Dyke to write the arrangement for a song he had written for an upcoming Disney film: [Excerpt: Jungle Book soundtrack, "The Bare Necessities"] The Steeltown Two continued performing, and soon became known as the Steeltown Three, with the addition of a singer named Pat Peyton. The Steeltown Three recorded two singles, "Rock Mountain", under that group name: [Excerpt: The Steeltown Three, "Rock Mountain"] And a version of "San Francisco Bay" under the name The South Coasters, which I've been unable to track down. Then the three of them, with the help of Terry Gilkyson, formed a larger group in the style of the New Christy Minstrels -- the Greenwood County Singers. Indeed, Carson Parks would later claim that  Gilkyson had had the idea first -- that he'd mentioned that he'd wanted to put together a group like that to Randy Sparks, and Sparks had taken the idea and done it first. The Greenwood County Singers had two minor hot one hundred hits, only one of them while Van Dyke was in the band -- "The New 'Frankie and Johnny' Song", a rewrite by Bob Gibson and Shel Silverstein of the old traditional song "Frankie and Johnny": [Excerpt: The Greenwood County Singers, "The New Frankie and Johnny Song"] They also recorded several albums together, which gave Van Dyke the opportunity to practice his arrangement skills, as on this version of  "Vera Cruz" which he arranged: [Excerpt: The Greenwood County Singers, "Vera Cruz"] Some time before their last album, in 1965, Van Dyke left the Greenwood County Singers, and was replaced by Rick Jarrard, who we'll also be hearing more about in future episodes. After that album, the group split up, but Carson Parks would go on to write two big hits in the next few years. The first and biggest was a song he originally wrote for a side project. His future wife Gaile Foote was also a Greenwood County Singer, and the two of them thought they might become folk's answer to Sonny and Cher or Nino Tempo and April Stevens: [Excerpt: Carson and Gaile, "Somethin' Stupid"] That obviously became a standard after it was covered by Frank and Nancy Sinatra. Carson Parks also wrote "Cab Driver", which in 1968 became the last top thirty hit for the Mills Brothers, the 1930s vocal group we talked about way way back in episode six: [Excerpt: The Mills Brothers, "Cab Driver"] Meanwhile Van Dyke Parks was becoming part of the Sunset Strip rock and roll world. Now, until we get to 1967, Parks has something of a tangled timeline. He worked with almost every band around LA in a short period, often working with multiple people simultaneously, and nobody was very interested in keeping detailed notes. So I'm going to tell this as a linear story, but be aware it's very much not -- things I say in five minutes might happen after, or in the same week as, things I say in half an hour. At some point in either 1965 or 1966 he joined the Mothers of Invention for a brief while. Nobody is entirely sure when this was, and whether it was before or after their first album. Some say it was in late 1965, others in August 1966, and even the kind of fans who put together detailed timelines are none the wiser, because no recordings have so far surfaced of Parks with the band. Either is plausible, and the Mothers went through a variety of keyboard players at this time -- Zappa had turned to his jazz friend Don Preston, but found Preston was too much of a jazzer and told him to come back when he could play "Louie Louie" convincingly, asked Mac Rebennack to be in the band but sacked him pretty much straight away for drug use, and eventually turned to Preston again once Preston had learned to rock and roll. Some time in that period, Van Dyke Parks was a Mother, playing electric harpsichord. He may even have had more than one stint in the group -- Zappa said "Van Dyke Parks played electric harpsichord in and out." It seems likely, though, that it was in summer of 1966, because in an interview published in Teen Beat Magazine in December 66, but presumably conducted a few months prior, Zappa was asked to describe the band members in one word each and replied: "Ray—Mahogany Roy—Asbestos Jim—Mucilage Del—Acetate Van Dyke—Pinocchio Billy—Boom I don't know about the rest of the group—I don't even know about these guys." Sources differ as to why Parks didn't remain in the band -- Parks has said that he quit after a short time because he didn't like being shouted at, while Zappa said "Van Dyke was not a reliable player. He didn't make it to rehearsal on time and things like that." Both may be true of course, though I've not heard anyone else ever criticise Parks for his reliability. But then also Zappa had much more disciplinarian standards than most rock band leaders. It's possibly either through Zappa that he met Tom Wilson, or through Tom Wilson that he met Frank Zappa, but either way Parks, like the Mothers of Invention, was signed to MGM records in 1966, where he released two solo singles co-produced by Wilson and an otherwise obscure figure named Tim Alvorado. The first was "Number Nine", which we heard last week, backed with "Do What You Wanta": [Excerpt: Van Dyke Parks, "Do What You Wanta"] At least one source I've read says that the lyrics to "Do What You Wanta" were written not by Parks but by his friend Danny Hutton, but it's credited as a Parks solo composition on the label. It was after that that the Van Dyke Parks band -- or as they were sometimes billed, just The Van Dyke Parks formed, as we discussed last episode, based around Parks, Steve Stills, and Steve Young, and they performed a handful of shows with bass player Bobby Rae and drummer Walt Sparman, playing a mix of original material, primarily Parks' songs, and covers of things like "Dancing in the Street". The one contemporaneous review of a live show I've seen talks about  the girls in the audience screaming and how "When rhythm guitarist Steve Stillman imitated the Barry McGuire emotional scene, they almost went wiggy". But The Van Dyke Parks soon split up, and Parks the individual recorded his second single, "Come to the Sunshine": [Excerpt: Van Dyke Parks, "Come to the Sunshine"] Around the time he left the Greenwood County Singers, Van Dyke Parks also met Brian Wilson for the first time, when David Crosby took him up to Wilson's house to hear an acetate of the as-yet-unreleased track "Sloop John B". Parks was impressed by Wilson's arrangement techniques, and in particular the way he was orchestrating instrumental combinations that you couldn't do with a standard live room setup, that required overdubbing and close-micing. He said later "The first stuff I heard indicated this kind of curiosity for the recording experience, and when I went up to see him in '65 I don't even think he had the voices on yet, but I heard that long rotational breathing, that long flute ostinato at the beginning... I knew this man was a great musician." [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Sloop John B (instrumental)"] In most of 1966, though, Parks was making his living as a session keyboard player and arranger, and much of the work he was getting was through Lenny Waronker. Waronker was a second-generation music industry professional. His father, Si Waronker, had been a violinist in the Twentieth Century Fox studio orchestra before founding Liberty Records (the label which indirectly led to him becoming immortalised in children's entertainment, when Liberty Records star David Seville named his Chipmunk characters after three Liberty executives, with Simon being Si Waronker's full forename). The first release on Liberty Records had been a version of "The Girl Upstairs", an instrumental piece from the Fox film The Seven-Year Itch. The original recording of that track, for the film, had been done by the Twentieth Century Fox Orchestra, written and conducted by Alfred Newman, the musical director for Fox: [Excerpt: Alfred Newman, "The Girl Upstairs"] Liberty's soundalike version was conducted by Newman's brother Lionel, a pianist at the studio who later became Fox's musical director for TV, just as his brother was for film, but who also wrote many film scores himself. Another Newman brother, Emil, was also a film composer, but the fourth brother, Irving, had gone into medicine instead. However, Irving's son Randy wanted to follow in the family business, and he and Lenny Waronker, who was similarly following his own father by working for Liberty Records' publishing subsidiary Metric Music, had been very close friends ever since High School. Waronker got Newman signed to Metric Music, where he wrote "They Tell Me It's Summer" for the Fleetwoods: [Excerpt: The Fleetwoods, "They Tell Me It's Summer"] Newman also wrote and recorded a single of his own in 1962, co-produced by Pat Boone: [Excerpt: Randy Newman, "Golden Gridiron Boy"] Before deciding he wasn't going to make it as a singer and had better just be a professional songwriter. But by 1966 Waronker had moved on from Metric to Warner Brothers, and become a junior A&R man. And he was put in charge of developing the artists that Warners had acquired when they had bought up a small label, Autumn Records. Autumn Records was a San Francisco-based label whose main producer, Sly Stone, had now moved on to other things after producing the hit record "Laugh Laugh" for the Beau Brummels: [Excerpt: The Beau Brummels, "Laugh Laugh"] The Beau Brummels  had had another hit after that and were the main reason that Warners had bought the label, but their star was fading a little. Stone had also been mentoring several other groups, including the Tikis and the Mojo Men, who all had potential. Waronker gathered around himself a sort of brains trust of musicians who he trusted as songwriters, arrangers, and pianists -- Randy Newman, the session pianist Leon Russell, and Van Dyke Parks. Their job was to revitalise the career of the Beau Brummels, and to make both the Tikis and the Mojo Men into successes. The tactic they chose was, in Waronker's words, “Go in with a good song and weird it out.” The first good song they tried weirding out was in late 1966, when Leon Russell came up with a clarinet-led arrangement of Paul Simon's "59th Street Bridge Song (Feeling Groovy)" for the Tikis, who performed it but who thought that their existing fanbase wouldn't accept something so different, so it was put out under another name, suggested by Parks, Harpers Bizarre: [Excerpt: Harpers Bizarre, "Feeling Groovy"] Waronker said of Parks and Newman “They weren't old school guys. They were modern characters but they had old school values regarding certain records that needed to be made, certain artists who needed to be heard regardless. So there was still that going on. The fact that ‘Feeling Groovy' was a number 10 hit nationwide and ‘Sit Down, I Think I Love You'  made the Top 30 on Western regional radio, that gave us credibility within the company. One hit will do wonders, two allows you to take chances.” We heard "Sit Down, I Think I Love You" last episode -- that's the song by Parks' old friend Stephen Stills that Parks arranged for the Mojo Men: [Excerpt: The Mojo Men, "Sit Down, I Think I Love You"] During 1966 Parks also played on Tim Buckley's first album, as we also heard last episode: [Excerpt: Tim Buckley, "Aren't You the Girl?"] And he also bumped into Brian Wilson on occasion, as they were working a lot in the same studios and had mutual friends like Loren Daro and Danny Hutton, and he suggested the cello part on "Good Vibrations". Parks also played keyboards on "5D" by the Byrds: [Excerpt: The Byrds, "5D (Fifth Dimension)"] And on the Spirit of '67 album for Paul Revere and the Raiders, produced by the Byrds' old producer Terry Melcher. Parks played keyboards on much of the album, including the top five hit "Good Thing": [Excerpt: Paul Revere and the Raiders, "Good Thing"] But while all this was going on, Parks was also working on what would become the work for which he was best known. As I've said, he'd met Brian Wilson on a few occasions, but it wasn't until summer 1966 that the two were formally introduced by Terry Melcher, who knew that Wilson needed a new songwriting collaborator, now Tony Asher's sabbatical from his advertising job was coming to an end, and that Wilson wanted someone who could do work that was a bit more abstract than the emotional material that he had been writing with Asher. Melcher invited both of them to a party at his house on Cielo Drive -- a house which would a few years later become notorious -- which was also attended by many of the young Hollywood set of the time. Nobody can remember exactly who was at the party, but Parks thinks it was people like Jack Nicholson and Peter and Jane Fonda. Parks and Wilson hit it off, with Wilson saying later "He seemed like a really articulate guy, like he could write some good lyrics". Parks on the other hand was delighted to find that Wilson "liked Les Paul, Spike Jones, all of these sounds that I liked, and he was doing it in a proactive way." Brian suggested Parks write the finished lyrics for "Good Vibrations", which was still being recorded at this time, and still only had Tony Asher's dummy lyrics,  but Parks was uninterested. He said that it would be best if he and Brian collaborate together on something new from scratch, and Brian agreed. The first time Parks came to visit Brian at Brian's home, other than the visit accompanying Crosby the year before, he was riding a motorbike -- he couldn't afford a car -- and forgot to bring his driver's license with him. He was stopped by a police officer who thought he looked too poor to be in the area, but Parks persuaded the police officer that if he came to the door, Brian Wilson would vouch for him. Brian got Van Dyke out of any trouble because the cop's sister was a Beach Boys fan, so he autographed an album for her. Brian and Van Dyke talked for a while. Brian asked if Van Dyke needed anything to help his work go smoothly, and Van Dyke said he needed a car. Brian asked what kind. Van Dyke said that Volvos were supposed to be pretty safe. Brian asked how much they cost. Van Dyke said he thought they were about five thousand dollars. Brian called up his office and told them to get a cheque delivered to Van Dyke for five thousand dollars the next day, instantly earning Van Dyke's loyalty. After that, they got on with work. To start with, Brian played Van Dyke a melody he'd been working on, a melody based on a descending scale starting on the fourth: [Plays "Heroes and Villains" melody] Parks told Wilson that the melody reminded him vaguely of Marty Robbins' country hit "El Paso" from 1959, a song about a gunfighter, a cantina, and a dancing woman: [Excerpt: Marty Robbins, "El Paso"] Wilson said that he had been thinking along the same lines, a sort of old west story, and thought maybe it should be called "Heroes and Villains". Parks started writing, matching syllables to Wilson's pre-conceived melody -- "I've been in this town so long that back in the city I've been taken for lost and gone and unknown for a long, long time" [Excerpt: Brian Wilson and Van Dyke Parks, "Heroes and Villains demo"] As Parks put it "The engine had started. It was very much ad hoc. Seat of the pants. Extemporaneous values were enforced. Not too much precommitment to ideas. Or, if so, equally pursuing propinquity." Slowly, over the next several months, while the five other Beach Boys were touring, Brian and Van Dyke refined their ideas about what the album they were writing, initially called Dumb Angel but soon retitled Smile, should be. For Van Dyke Parks it was an attempt to make music about America and American mythology. He was disgusted, as a patriot, with the Anglophilia that had swept the music industry since the arrival of the Beatles in America two and a half years earlier, particularly since that had happened so soon after the deaths both of President Kennedy and of Parks' own brother who was working for the government at the time he died. So for him, the album was about America, about Plymouth Rock, the Old West, California, and Hawaii. It would be a generally positive version of the country's myth, though it would of course also acknowledge the bloodshed on which the country had been built: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Bicycle Rider" section] As he put it later "I was dead set on centering my life on the patriotic ideal. I was a son of the American revolution, and there was blood on the tracks. Recent blood, and it was still drying. The whole record seemed like a real effort toward figuring out what Manifest Destiny was all about. We'd come as far as we could, as far as Horace Greeley told us to go. And so we looked back and tried to make sense of that great odyssey." Brian had some other ideas -- he had been studying the I Ching, and Subud, and he wanted to do something about the four classical elements, and something religious -- his ideas were generally rather unfocused at the time, and he had far more ideas than he knew what to usefully do with. But he was also happy with the idea of a piece about America, which fit in with his own interest in "Rhapsody in Blue", a piece that was about America in much the same way. "Rhapsody in Blue" was an inspiration for Brian primarily in how it weaved together variations on themes. And there are two themes that between them Brian was finding endless variations on. The first theme was a shuffling between two chords a fourth away from each other. [demonstrates G to C on guitar] Where these chords are both major, that's the sequence for "Fire": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Mrs. O'Leary's Cow/Fire"] For the "Who ran the Iron Horse?" section of "Cabin Essence": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Cabinessence"] For "Vegetables": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Vegetables"] And more. Sometimes this would be the minor supertonic and dominant seventh of the key, so in C that would be Dm to G7: [Plays Dm to G7 fingerpicked] That's the "bicycle rider" chorus we heard earlier, which was part of a song known as "Roll Plymouth Rock" or "Do You Like Worms": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Bicycle Rider"] But which later became a chorus for "Heroes and Villains": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains"] But that same sequence is also the beginning of "Wind Chimes": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Wind Chimes"] The "wahalla loo lay" section of "Roll Plymouth Rock": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Roll Plymouth Rock"] And others, but most interestingly, the minor-key rearrangement of "You Are My Sunshine" as "You Were My Sunshine": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "You Were My Sunshine"] I say that's most interesting, because that provides a link to another of the major themes which Brian was wringing every drop out of, a phrase known as "How Dry I Am", because of its use under those words in an Irving Berlin song, which was a popular barbershop quartet song but is now best known as a signifier of drunkenness in Looney Tunes cartoons: [Excerpt: Daffy Duck singing "How Dry I Am" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ap4MMn7LpzA ] The phrase is a common one in early twentieth century music, especially folk and country, as it's made up of notes in the pentatonic scale -- it's the fifth, first, second, and third of the scale, in that order: [demonstrates "How Dry I Am"] And so it's in the melody to "This Land is Your Land", for example, a song which is very much in the same spirit of progressive Americana in which Van Dyke Parks was thinking: [Excerpt: Woody Guthrie, "This Land is Your Land"] It's also the start of the original melody of "You Are My Sunshine": [Excerpt: Jimmie Davis, "You Are My Sunshine" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yYvgNEU4Am8] Brian rearranged that melody when he stuck it into a minor key, so it's no longer "How Dry I Am" in the Beach Boys version, but if you play the "How Dry I Am" notes in a different rhythm, you get this: [Plays "He Gives Speeches" melody] Which is the start of the melody to "He Gives Speeches": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "He Gives Speeches"] Play those notes backwards, you get: [Plays "He Gives Speeches" melody backwards] Do that and add onto the end a passing sixth and then the tonic, and then you get: [Plays that] Which is the vocal *countermelody* in "He Gives Speeches": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "He Gives Speeches"] And also turns up in some versions of "Heroes and Villains": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains (alternate version)"] And so on. Smile was an intricate web of themes and variations, and it incorporated motifs from many sources, both the great American songbook and the R&B of Brian's youth spent listening to Johnny Otis' radio show. There were bits of "Gee" by the Crows, of "Twelfth Street Rag", and of course, given that this was Brian Wilson, bits of Phil Spector. The backing track to the verse of "Heroes and Villains": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains"] Owed more than a little to a version of "Save the Last Dance For Me" that Spector had produced for Ike and Tina Turner: [Excerpt: Ike and Tina Turner, "Save the Last Dance For Me"] While one version of the song “Wonderful” contained a rather out-of-place homage to Etta James and “The Wallflower”: [Excerpt: “Wonderful (Rock With Me Henry)”] As the recording continued, it became more and more obvious that the combination of these themes and variations was becoming a little too much for Brian.  Many of the songs he was working on were made up of individual modules that he was planning to splice together the way he had with "Good Vibrations", and some modules were getting moved between tracks, as he tried to structure the songs in the edit. He'd managed it with "Good Vibrations", but this was an entire album, not just a single, and it was becoming more and more difficult. David Anderle, who was heading up the record label the group were looking at starting, would talk about Brian playing him acetates with sections edited together one way, and thinking it was perfect, and obviously the correct way to put them together, the only possible way, and then hearing the same sections edited together in a different way, and thinking *that* was perfect, and obviously the correct way to put them together. But while a lot of the album was modular, there were also several complete songs with beginnings, middles, ends, and structures, even if they were in several movements. And those songs showed that if Brian could just get the other stuff right, the album could be very, very, special. There was "Heroes and Villains" itself, of course, which kept changing its structure but was still based around the same basic melody and story that Brian and Van Dyke had come up with on their first day working together. There was also "Wonderful", a beautiful, allusive, song about innocence lost and regained: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Wonderful"] And there was CabinEssence, a song which referenced yet another classic song, this time "Home on the Range", to tell a story of idyllic rural life and of the industrialisation which came with westward expansion: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "CabinEssence"] The arrangement for that song inspired Van Dyke Parks to make a very astute assessment of Brian Wilson. He said later "He knew that he had to adhere to the counter-culture, and I knew that I had to. I think that he was about as estranged from it as I was.... At the same time, he didn't want to lose that kind of gauche sensibility that he had. He was doing stuff that nobody would dream of doing. You would never, for example, use one string on a banjo when you had five; it just wasn't done. But when I asked him to bring a banjo in, that's what he did. This old-style plectrum thing. One string. That's gauche." Both Parks and Wilson were both drawn to and alienated from the counterculture, but in very different ways, and their different ways of relating to the counterculture created the creative tension that makes the Smile project so interesting. Parks is fundamentally a New Deal Liberal, and was excited by the progresssive nature of the counterculture, but also rather worried about its tendency to throw the baby out with the bathwater, and to ignore the old in pursuit of the new. He was an erudite, cultured, sophisticated man who thought that there was value to be found in the works and attitudes of the past, even as one must look to the future. He was influenced by the beat poets and the avant garde art of the time, but also said of his folk music period "A harpist would bring his harp with him and he would play and recite a story which had been passed down the generations. This particular legacy continued through Arthurian legend, and then through the Middle Ages, and even into the nineteenth century. With all these songs, half of the story was the lyrics, and the folk songs were very interesting. They were tremendously thought-driven songs; there was nothing confusing about that. Even when the Kingston Trio came out -- and Brian has already admitted his debt to the Kingston Trio -- 'Tom Dooley', the story of a murder most foul 'MTA' an urban nightmare -- all of this thought-driven music was perfectly acceptable.  It was more than a teenage romantic crisis." Brian Wilson, on the other hand, was anything *but* sophisticated. He is a simple man in the best sense of the term -- he likes what he likes, doesn't like what he doesn't like, and has no pretensions whatsoever about it. He is, at heart, a middle-class middle-American brought up in suburbia, with a taste for steaks and hamburgers, broad physical comedy, baseball, and easy listening music. Where Van Dyke Parks was talking about "thought-driven music", Wilson's music, while thoughtful, has always been driven by feelings first and foremost. Where Parks is influenced by Romantic composers like Gottschalk but is fundamentally a craftsman, a traditionalist, a mason adding his work to a cathedral whose construction started before his birth and will continue after his death, Wilson's music has none of the stylistic hallmarks of Romantic music, but in its inspiration it is absolutely Romantic -- it is the immediate emotional expression of the individual, completely unfiltered. When writing his own lyrics in later years Wilson would come up with everything from almost haiku-like lyrics like "I'm a leaf on a windy day/pretty soon I'll be blown away/How long with the wind blow?/Until I die" to "He sits behind his microphone/Johnny Carson/He speaks in such a manly tone/Johnny Carson", depending on whether at the time his prime concern was existential meaninglessness or what was on the TV. Wilson found the new counterculture exciting, but was also very aware he didn't fit in. He was developing a new group of friends, the hippest of the hip in LA counterculture circles -- the singer Danny Hutton, Mark Volman of the Turtles, the writers Michael Vosse and Jules Siegel, scenester and record executive David Anderle -- but there was always the underlying implication that at least some of these people regarded him as, to use an ableist term but one which they would probably have used, an idiot savant. That they thought of him, as his former collaborator Tony Asher would later uncharitably put it, as "a genius musician but an amateur human being". So for example when Siegel brought the great postmodern novelist Thomas Pynchon to visit Brian, both men largely sat in silence, unable to speak to each other; Pynchon because he tended to be a reactive person in conversation and would wait for the other person to initiate topics of discussion, Brian because he was so intimidated by Pynchon's reputation as a great East Coast intellectual that he was largely silent for fear of making a fool of himself. It was this gaucheness, as Parks eventually put it, and Parks' understanding that this was actually a quality to be cherished and the key to Wilson's art, that eventually gave the title to the most ambitious of the complete songs the duo were working on. They had most of the song -- a song about the power of music, the concept of enlightenment, and the rise and fall of civilisations: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Surf's Up"] But Parks hadn't yet quite finished the lyric. The Beach Boys had been off on tour for much of Brian and Van Dyke's collaboration, and had just got back from their first real tour of the UK, where Pet Sounds had been a smash hit, rather than the middling success it had been in the US, and "Good Vibrations" had just become their first number one single. Brian and Van Dyke played the song for Brian's brother Dennis, the Beach Boys' drummer, and the band member most in tune with Brian's musical ambitions at this time. Dennis started crying, and started talking about how the British audiences had loved their music, but had laughed at their on-stage striped-shirt uniforms. Parks couldn't tell if he was crying because of the beauty of the unfinished song, the humiliation he had suffered in Britain, or both. Dennis then asked what the name of the song was, and as Parks later put it "Although it was the most gauche factor, and although maybe Brian thought it was the most dispensable thing, I thought it was very important to continue to use the name and keep the elephant in the room -- to keep the surfing image but to sensitise it to new opportunities. One of these would be an eco-consciousness; it would be speaking about the greening of the Earth, aboriginal people, how we had treated the Indians, taking on those things and putting them into the thoughts that come with the music. That was a solution to the relevance of the group, and I wanted the group to be relevant." Van Dyke had decided on a title: "Surf's Up": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Surf's Up"] As the group were now back from their tour, the focus for recording shifted from the instrumental sessions to vocal ones. Parks had often attended the instrumental sessions, as he was an accomplished musician and arranger himself, and would play on the sessions, but also wanted to learn from what Brian was doing -- he's stated later that some of his use of tuned percussion in the decades since, for example, has come from watching Brian's work. But while he was also a good singer, he was not a singer in the same style as the Beach Boys, and they certainly didn't need his presence at those sessions, so he continued to work on his lyrics, and to do his arrangement and session work for other artists, while they worked in the studio. He was also, though, starting to distance himself from Brian for other reasons. At the start of the summer, Brian's eccentricity and whimsy had seemed harmless -- indeed, the kind of thing he was doing, such as putting his piano in a sandbox so he could feel the sand with his feet while he wrote, seems very much on a par with Maureen Cleave's descriptions of John Lennon in the same period. They were two newly-rich, easily bored, young men with low attention spans and high intelligence who could become deeply depressed when understimulated and so would get new ideas into their heads, spend money on their new fads, and then quickly discard them. But as the summer wore on into autumn and winter, Brian's behaviour became more bizarre, and to Parks' eyes more distasteful. We now know that Brian was suffering a period of increasing mental ill-health, something that was probably not helped by the copious intake of cannabis and amphetamines he was using to spur his creativity, but at the time most people around him didn't realise this, and general knowledge of mental illness was even less than it is today. Brian was starting to do things like insist on holding business meetings in his swimming pool, partly because people wouldn't be able to spy on him, and partly because he thought people would be more honest if they were in the water. There were also events like the recording session where Wilson paid for several session musicians, not to play their instruments, but to be recorded while they sat in a pitch-black room and played the party game Lifeboat with Jules Siegel and several of Wilson's friends, most of whom were stoned and not really understanding what they were doing, while they got angrier and more frustrated. Alan Jardine -- who unlike the Wilson brothers, and even Mike Love to an extent, never indulged in illegal drugs -- has talked about not understanding why, in some vocal sessions, Brian would make the group crawl on their hands and knees while making noises like animals: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains Part 3 (Animals)"] As Parks delicately put it "I sensed all that was destructive, so I withdrew from those related social encounters." What this meant though was that he was unaware that not all the Beach Boys took the same attitude of complete support for the work he and Brian had been doing that Dennis Wilson -- the only other group member he'd met at this point -- took. In particular, Mike Love was not a fan of Parks' lyrics. As he said later "I called it acid alliteration. The [lyrics are] far out. But do they relate like 'Surfin' USA,' like 'Fun Fun Fun,' like 'California Girls,' like 'I Get Around'? Perhaps not! So that's the distinction. See, I'm into success. These words equal successful hit records; those words don't" Now, Love has taken a lot of heat for this over the years, and on an artistic level that's completely understandable. Parks' lyrics were, to my mind at least, the best the Beach Boys ever had -- thoughtful, intelligent, moving, at times profound, often funny, often beautiful. But, while I profoundly disagree with Love, I have a certain amount of sympathy for his position. From Love's perspective, first and foremost, this is his source of income. He was the only one of the Beach Boys to ever have had a day job -- he'd worked at his father's sheet metal company -- and didn't particularly relish the idea of going back to manual labour if the rock star gig dried up. It wasn't that he was *opposed* to art, of course -- he'd written the lyrics to "Good Vibrations", possibly the most arty rock single released to that point, hadn't he? -- but that had been *commercial* art. It had sold. Was this stuff going to sell? Was he still going to be able to feed his wife and kids? Also, up until a few months earlier he had been Brian's principal songwriting collaborator. He was *still* the most commercially successful collaborator Brian had had. From his perspective, this was a partnership, and it was being turned into a dictatorship without him having been consulted. Before, it had been "Mike, can you write some lyrics for this song about cars?", now it was "Mike, you're going to sing these lyrics about a crow uncovering a cornfield". And not only that, but Mike had not met Brian's new collaborator, but knew he was hanging round with Brian's new druggie friends. And Brian was behaving increasingly weirdly, which Mike put down to the influence of the drugs and these new friends. It can't have helped that at the same time the group's publicist, Derek Taylor, was heavily pushing the line "Brian Wilson is a genius". This was causing Brian some distress -- he didn't think of himself as a genius, and he saw the label as a burden, something it was impossible to live up to -- but was also causing friction in the group, as it seemed that their contributions were being dismissed. Again, I don't agree with Mike's position on any of this, but it is understandable. It's also the case that Mike Love is, by nature, a very assertive and gregarious person, while Brian Wilson, for all that he took control in the studio, is incredibly conflict-avoidant and sensitive. From what I know of the two men's personalities, and from things they've said, and from the session recordings that have leaked over the years, it seems entirely likely that Love will have seen himself as having reasonable criticisms, and putting them to Brian clearly with a bit of teasing to take the sting out of them; while Brian will have seen Love as mercilessly attacking and ridiculing the work that meant so much to him in a cruel and hurtful manner, and that neither will have understood at the time that that was how the other was seeing things. Love's criticisms intensified. Not of everything -- he's several times expressed admiration for "Heroes and Villains" and "Wonderful" -- but in general he was not a fan of Parks' lyrics. And his criticisms seemed to start to affect Brian. It's difficult to say what Brian thinks about Parks' lyrics, because he has a habit in interviews of saying what he thinks the interviewer wants to hear, and the whole subject of Smile became a touchy one for him for a long time, so in some interviews he has talked about how dazzlingly brilliant they are, while at other times he's seemed to agree with Love, saying they were "Van Dyke Parks lyrics", not "Beach Boys lyrics". He may well sincerely think both at the same time, or have thought both at different times. This came to a head with a session for the tag of "Cabinessence": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Cabinessence"] Love insisted on having the line "over and over the crow flies uncover the cornfield" explained to him, and Brian eventually decided to call Van Dyke Parks and have him come to the studio. Up to this point, Parks had no idea that there was anything controversial, so when Brian phoned him up and very casually said that Mike had a few questions about the lyrics, could he come down to the studio? He went without a second thought. He later said "The only person I had had any interchange with before that was Dennis, who had responded very favorably to 'Heroes and Villains' and 'Surf's Up'. Based on that, I gathered that the work would be approved. But then, with no warning whatsoever, I got that phone call from Brian. And that's when the whole house of cards came tumbling down." Parks got to the studio, where he was confronted by an angry Mike Love, insisting he explain the lyrics. Now, as will be, I hope, clear from everything I've said, Parks and Love are very, very, *very* different people. Having met both men -- albeit only in formal fan-meeting situations where they're presenting their public face -- I actually find both men very likeable, but in very different ways. Love is gregarious, a charmer, the kind of man who would make a good salesman and who people use terms like "alpha male" about. He's tall, and has a casual confidence that can easily read as arrogance, and a straightforward sense of humour that can sometimes veer into the cruel. Parks, on the other hand, is small, meticulously well-mannered and well-spoken, has a high, precise, speaking voice which probably reads as effeminate to the kind of people who use terms like "alpha male", and the kind of devastating intelligence and Southern US attention to propriety which means that if he *wanted* to say something cruel about someone, the victim would believe themselves to have been complimented until a horrific realisation two days after the event. In every way, from their politics to their attitudes to art versus commerce to their mannerisms to their appearance, Mike Love and Van Dyke Parks are utterly different people, and were never going to mix well. And Brian Wilson, who was supposed to be the collaborator for both of them, was not mediating between them, not even expressing an opinion -- his own mental problems had reached the stage where he simply couldn't deal with the conflict. Parks felt ambushed and hurt, Love felt angry, especially when Parks could not explain the literal meaning of his lyrics. Eventually Parks just said "I have no excuse, sir", and left. Parks later said "That's when I lost interest. Because basically I was taught not to be where I wasn't wanted, and I could feel I wasn't wanted. It was like I had someone else's job, which was abhorrent to me, because I don't even want my own job. It was sad, so I decided to get away quick." Parks continued collaborating with Wilson, and continued attending instrumental sessions, but it was all wheelspinning -- no significant progress was made on any songs after that point, in early December. It was becoming clear that the album wasn't going to be ready for its planned Christmas release, and it was pushed back to January, but Brian's mental health was becoming worse and worse. One example that's often cited as giving an insight into Brian's mental state at the time is his reaction to going to the cinema to see John Frankenheimer's classic science fiction horror film Seconds. Brian came in late, and the way the story is always told, when he was sat down the screen was black and a voice said from the darkness, "Hello Mr. Wilson". That moment does not seem to correspond with anything in the actual film, but he probably came in around the twenty-four minute mark, where the main character walks down a corridor, filmed in a distorted, hallucinatory manner, to be greeted: [Excerpt: Seconds, 24:00] But as Brian watched the film, primed by this, he became distressed by a number of apparent similarities to his life. The main character was going through death and rebirth, just as he felt he was. Right after the moment I just excerpted, Mr. Wilson is shown a film, and of course Brian was himself watching a film. The character goes to the beach in California, just like Brian. The character has a breakdown on a plane, just like Brian, and has to take pills to cope, and the breakdown happens right after this: [Excerpt: Seconds, from about 44:22] A studio in California? Just like where Brian spent his working days? That kind of weird coincidence can be affecting enough in a work of art when one is relatively mentally stable, but Brian was not at all stable. By this point he was profoundly paranoid -- and he may have had good reason to be. Some of Brian's friends from this time period have insisted that Brian's semi-estranged abusive father and former manager, Murry, was having private detectives watch him and his brothers to find evidence that they were using drugs. If you're in the early stages of a severe mental illness *and* you're self-medicating with illegal drugs, *and* people are actually spying on you, then that kind of coincidence becomes a lot more distressing. Brian became convinced that the film was the work of mind gangsters, probably in the pay of Phil Spector, who were trying to drive him mad and were using telepathy to spy on him. He started to bar people who had until recently been his friends from coming to sessions -- he decided that Jules Siegel's girlfriend was a witch and so Siegel was no longer welcome -- and what had been a creative process in the studio degenerated into noodling and second-guessing himself. He also, with January having come and the album still not delivered, started doing side projects,  some of which, like his production of tracks for photographer Jasper Daily, seem evidence either of his bizarre sense of humour, or of his detachment from reality, or both: [Excerpt: Jasper Daily, "Teeter Totter Love"] As 1967 drew on, things got worse and worse. Brian was by this point concentrating on just one or two tracks, but endlessly reworking elements of them. He became convinced that the track "Fire" had caused some actual fires to break out in LA, and needed to be scrapped. The January deadline came and went with no sign of the album. To add to that, the group discovered that they were owed vast amounts of unpaid royalties by Capitol records, and legal action started which meant that even were the record to be finished it might become a pawn in the legal wrangling. Parks eventually became exasperated by Brian -- he said later "I was victimised by Brian Wilson's buffoonery" -- and he quit the project altogether in February after a row with Brian. He returned a couple of weeks later out of a sense of loyalty, but quit again in April. By April, he'd been working enough with Lenny Waronker that Waronker offered him a contract with Warner Brothers as a solo artist -- partly because Warners wanted some insight into Brian Wilson's techniques as a hit-making producer. To start with, Parks released a single, to dip a toe in the water, under the pseudonym "George Washington Brown". It was a largely-instrumental cover version of Donovan's song "Colours", which Parks chose because after seeing the film Don't Look Back, a documentary of Bob Dylan's 1965 British tour, he felt saddened at the way Dylan had treated Donovan: [Excerpt: George Washington Brown, "Donovan's Colours"] That was not a hit, but it got enough positive coverage, including an ecstatic review from Richard Goldstein in the Village Voice, that Parks was given carte blanche to create the album he wanted to create, with one of the largest budgets of any album released to that date. The result was a masterpiece, and very similar to the vision of Smile that Parks had had -- an album of clever, thoroughly American music which had more to do with Charles Ives than the British Invasion: [Excerpt: Van Dyke Parks, "The All Golden"] But Parks realised the album, titled Song Cycle, was doomed to failure when at a playback session, the head of Warner Brothers records said "Song Cycle? So where are the songs?" According to Parks, the album was only released because Jac Holzman of Elektra Records was also there, and took out his chequebook and said he'd release the album if Warners wouldn't, but it had little push, apart from some rather experimental magazine adverts which were, if anything, counterproductive. But Waronker recognised Parks' talent, and had even written into Parks' contract that Parks would be employed as a session player at scale on every session Waronker produced -- something that didn't actually happen, because Parks didn't insist on it, but which did mean Parks had a certain amount of job security. Over the next couple of years Parks and Waronker co-produced the first albums by two of their colleagues from Waronker's brains trust, with Parks arranging -- Randy Newman: [Excerpt: Randy Newman, "I Think It's Going to Rain Today"] And Ry Cooder: [Excerpt: Ry Cooder, "One Meat Ball"] Waronker would refer to himself, Parks, Cooder, and Newman as "the arts and crafts division" of Warners, and while these initial records weren't very successful, all of them would go on to bigger things. Parks would be a pioneer of music video, heading up Warners' music video department in the early seventies, and would also have a staggeringly varied career over the years, doing everything from teaming up again with the Beach Boys to play accordion on "Kokomo" to doing the string arrangements on Joanna Newsom's album Ys, collaborating with everyone from U2 to Skrillex,  discovering Rufus Wainwright, and even acting again, appearing in Twin Peaks. He also continued to make massively inventive solo albums, releasing roughly one every decade, each unique and yet all bearing the hallmarks of his idiosyncratic style. As you can imagine, he is very likely to come up again in future episodes, though we're leaving him for now. Meanwhile, the Beach Boys were floundering, and still had no album -- and now Parks was no longer working with Brian, the whole idea of Smile was scrapped. The priority was now to get a single done, and so work started on a new, finished, version of "Heroes and Villains", structured in a fairly conventional manner using elements of the Smile recordings. The group were suffering from numerous interlocking problems at this point, and everyone was stressed -- they were suing their record label, Dennis' wife had filed for divorce, Brian was having mental health problems, and Carl had been arrested for draft dodging -- though he was later able to mount a successful defence that he was a conscientious objector. Also, at some point around this time, Bruce Johnston seems to have temporarily quit the group, though this was never announced -- he doesn't seem to have been at any sessions from late May or early June through mid-September, and didn't attend the two shows they performed in that time. They were meant to have performed three shows, but even though Brian was on the board of the Monterey Pop Festival, they pulled out at the last minute, saying that they needed to deal with getting the new single finished and with Carl's draft problems. Some or all of these other issues almost certainly fed into that, but the end result was that the Beach Boys were seen to have admitted defeat, to have handed the crown of relevance off to the San Francisco groups. And even if Smile had been released, there were other releases stealing its thunder. If it had come out in December it would have been massively ahead of its time, but after the Beatles released Sgt Pepper it would have seemed like it was a cheap copy -- though Parks has always said he believes the Beatles heard some of the Smile tapes and copied elements of the recordings, though I don't hear much similarity myself. But I do hear a strong similarity in "My World Fell Down" by Sagittarius, which came out in June, and which was largely made by erstwhile collaborators of Brian -- Gary Usher produced, Glen Campbell sang lead, and Bruce Johnston sang backing vocals: [Excerpt: Sagittarius, "My World Fell Down"] Brian was very concerned after hearing that that someone *had* heard the Smile tapes, and one can understand why. When "Heroes and Villains" finally came out, it was a great single, but only made number twelve in the charts. It was fantastic, but out of step with the times, and nothing could have lived up to the hype that had built up around it: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains"] Instead of Smile, the group released an album called Smiley Smile, recorded in a couple of months in Brian's home studio, with no studio musicians and no involvement from Bruce, other than the previously released singles, and with the production credited to "the Beach Boys" rather than Brian. Smiley Smile has been unfairly dismissed over the years, but it's actually an album that was ahead of its time. It's a collection of stripped down versions of Smile songs and new fragments using some of the same motifs, recorded with minimal instrumentation. Some of it is on a par with the Smile material it's based on: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Wonderful"] Some is, to my ears, far more beautiful than the Smile versions: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Wind Chimes"] And some has a fun goofiness which relates back to one of Brian's discarded ideas for Smile, that it be a humour album: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "She's Going Bald"] The album was a commercial flop, by far the least successful thing the group had released to that point in the US, not even making the top forty when it came out in September, though it made the top ten in the UK, but interestingly it *wasn't* a critical flop, at least at first. While the scrapping of Smile had been mentioned, it still wasn't widely known, and so for example Richard Goldstein, the journalist whose glowing review of "Donovan's Colours" in the Village Voice had secured Van Dyke Parks the opportunity to make Song Cycle, gave it a review in the New York Times which is written as if Goldstein at least believes it *is* the album that had been promised all along, and he speaks of it very perceptively -- and here I'm going to quote quite extensively, because the narrative about this album has always been that it was panned from the start and made the group a laughing stock: "Smiley Smile hardly reads like a rock cantata. But there are moments in songs such as 'With Me Tonight' and 'Wonderful' that soar like sacred music. Even the songs that seem irrelevant to a rock-hymn are infused with stained-glass melodies. Wilson is a sound sculptor and his songs are all harmonious litanies to the gentle holiness of love — post-Christian, perhaps but still believing. 'Wind Chimes', the most important piece on the album, is a fine example of Brian Wilson's organic pop structure. It contains three movements. First, Wilson sets a lyric and melodic mood ("In the late afternoon, you're hung up on wind chimes"). Then he introduces a totally different scene, utilizing passages of pure, wordless harmony. His two-and-a-half minute hymn ends with a third movement in which the voices join together in an exquisite round, singing the words, "Whisperin' winds set my wind chimes a-tinklin'." The voices fade out slowly, like the bittersweet afternoon in question. The technique of montage is an important aspect of Wilson's rock cantata, since the entire album tends to flow as a single composition. Songs like 'Heroes and Villains', are fragmented by speeding up or slowing down their verses and refrains. The effect is like viewing the song through a spinning prism. Sometimes, as in 'Fall Breaks and Back to Winter' (subtitled "W. Woodpecker Symphony"), the music is tiered into contrapuntal variations on a sliver of melody. The listener is thrown into a vast musical machine of countless working gears, each spinning in its own orbit." That's a discussion of the album that I hear when I listen to Smiley Smile, and the group seem to have been artistically happy with it, at least at first. They travelled to Hawaii to record a live album (with Brian, as Bruce was still out of the picture), taking the Baldwin organ that Brian used all over Smiley Smile with them, and performed rearranged versions of their old hits in the Smiley Smile style. When the recordings proved unusable, they recreated them in the studio, with Bruce returning to the group, where he would remain, with the intention of overdubbing audience noise and releasing a faked live album: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "California Girls [Lei'd studio version]"] The idea of the live album, to be called Lei'd in Hawaii, was scrapped, but that's not the kind of radical reimagining of your sound that you do if you think you've made an artistic failure. Indeed, the group's next albu

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