Podcasts about Kandahar

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  • 324PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about Kandahar

Latest podcast episodes about Kandahar

British Culture: Albion Never Dies
'K' is for... 'Kings, Knights, and Knaves'

British Culture: Albion Never Dies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 45:00


This week, I'm looking at Kings, Knights, Knaves, along with a few others, including:KiplingKippers(Harry) KaneKilgourKiltsKnightsbridgeKillingworth Kingston-Upon-ThamesKensington Kingston-Upon-HullKidderminster Kent King's CollegeKina Lillet…and a tiny bit of time on Khartoum, Kandahar and Khakhi.Thank you so much to everyone who sent in their suggestions! You can contact me on Instagram, by e-mail (AlbionNeverDies@Gmail.com), or by commenting on my posts in the Facebook group "

The John Batchelor Show
S4 Ep1833: Eight Weeks after the Tragedy: #ClassicLongWarJournal: @BillRoggio and @ThomasJoscelyn #UNBOUND the complete, forty-minute interview, October 11, 2021. @LongWarJournal. @Batchelorshow

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 39:30


Photo:  The Shahzada on the march from Kandahar to Kabul. The Shahzada is the Prince, a son of Habibullah Khan, King of Afghanistan from 1901 to 1919. Eight Weeks after the Tragedy: #ClassicLongWarJournal: @BillRoggio and @ThomasJoscelyn #UNBOUND the complete, forty-minute interview, October 11, 2021. @LongWarJournal.

The John Batchelor Show
S4 Ep1833: Seven Weeks after the Tragedy: #ClassicLongWarJournal: @BillRoggio and @ThomasJoscelyn #UNBOUND the complete, forty-minute interview, October 4, 2021. @LongWarJournal. @Batchelorshow

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 39:30


Photo:  This photograph of British troops signaling is from an album of rare historical photographs depicting people and places associated with the Second Anglo-Afghan War. Signaling in the British Army at that time was performed by the Corps of the Royal Engineers. They used electric telegraphy in regions that had telegraph lines. Hand-held flags, fires for nighttime communications, and different types of non-electrical semaphores [pron.: seh-mah-for-ehz] were used for campaigns in less-developed regions, such as Afghanistan. The seated soldier who is facing right uses a telescope to view the horizon; other soldiers operate rod (Chappe) semaphores with maneuverable arms, as well as heliograph semaphores (mirrors that transmit reflected light signals in Morse code). The Second Anglo-Afghan War began in November 1878 when Great Britain, fearful of what it saw as growing Russian influence in Afghanistan, invaded the country from British India. The first phase of the war ended in May 1879 with the Treaty of Gandamak, which permitted the Afghans to maintain internal sovereignty but forced them to cede control over their foreign policy to the British. Fighting resumed in September 1879, after an anti-British uprising in Kabul, and finally concluded in September 1880 with the decisive Battle of Kandahar.   ..  ..  .. Seven Weeks after the Tragedy: #ClassicLongWarJournal: @BillRoggio and @ThomasJoscelyn #UNBOUND the complete, forty-minute interview, October 4, 2021. @LongWarJournal.

Combat Story
Combat Story (Ep 52): Travis Hall | Green Beret (18D) | Ranger | Second Chance K9 | 18 Deployments

Combat Story

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 101:18


Today we hear the Combat Story of Travis Hall, an Army Ranger and Special Forces Green Beret who survived 18 combat deployments post-9/11 to Iraq, Afghanistan, and Niger. You heard that correctly: 18 deployments. Sponsor: This episode is brought to you by Loansteady LLC. A small-by-design lender, Loansteady believes in bringing a much-needed dose of humanity to the mortgage process. They are waiving all lender fees for Veterans in 2021. Visit http://www.loansteady.com/combatstory to request a rate quote or start an application. Loansteady LLC, All rights reserved, NMLS# 1701910, (www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org/), Equal Housing Lender. For more licensing information, please visit https://www.loansteady.com/licenses-and-legal. Travis was an 18D (Special Forces Medic) and one of the first K-9 handlers deployed with the Green Berets in combat. He's been in day long firefights, run both high and low vis ops, trained thousands of partner forces, and survived some incredibly difficult operations. Travis founded Second Chance K9, which is a rescue organization that pairs working military dogs with special operations veterans suffering from PTSD. He also runs Second Chance Medical Consulting, where he provides private and semi-private training on firearms and medical aid. After 18 deployments over almost two decades, Travis' positive approach to life and his focus on making people's (and dogs') lives better is tangible. I hope you enjoy this Combat Story of someone who spent many years deep in our wars (with and without a dog at his side) as much as I did. And if you do enjoy it, I hope you'll subscribe and leave a positive review (it would mean a lot). Find Travis Online: Travis' Linktree Second Chance K9 Donate to Second Chance K9 Instagram @secondchancek9 Facebook @2CK9SD YouTube Ryan: Instagram @combatstory Show Notes/Time Stamps 0:00 - Intro 0:40 - A word from our Sponsor (LoanSteady) 2:10 - Guest introduction (Travis Hall) 3:16 - Interview begins 6:40 - Travis and a childhood WITHOUT (surprisingly) animals 10:56 - A family military history and a SEAL contract 17:46 - Why Green Berets? 20:04 - Fear of Missing the War 26:20 - Combat Story #1 - Arriving in country and immediately in a fight 30:21 - What's a Low Vis mission profile? 39:27 - Combat Story #2 - Brutal fighting in Kandahar, Afghanistan 44:15 - Combat Story #3 - Lighter/funnier side of combat and being mistaken for a local 51:37 - Combat Story #4 - Life as an 18D Special Forces Medic 56:23 - Combat Story #5 - Treating himself downrange 1:01:45 - Travis' documentary to support veterans 1:04:29 - Being one of the first SF K9 handlers 1:11:31 - Combat Story #6 - Travis and his K9 Bear in Iraq 1:25:59 - Origin of Second Chance K9 1:33:54 - What did you carry into combat? 1:36:12 - Would you do it all again? 1:39:44 - Listener comments and shout outs

Newshour
Afghanistan: 'a nation on the brink of starvation'

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 48:53


The BBC's Yalda Hakim speaks to Afghans trying to cope with the country's food crisis. A foreign ministry spokesman tells her it's not the Taliban's fault. Also in the programme: "Black Tuesday" for the Turkish currency, the lira; and the United States releases 50 million barrels of oil to try to bring down energy prices. (Photo: An Afghan child receives medical treatment at a hospital in Kandahar, Afghanistan. Credit: EPA/stringer)

Newshour
Afghans in desperate need of humanitarian aid

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 49:06


Since the Taliban took power in mid-August, the financial aid on which the country depends was frozen. Donor countries don't want to legitimise Taliban rule, but Afghan citizens are experiencing real agony on the ground. Aid agencies are demanding emergency intervention. Also in the programme: Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed vows to lead from the battle front; and dozens are killed in a bus crash in Bulgarian motorway. (A man carries a child to receive medical treatment at a hospital in Kandahar, Afghanistan, 23 November 2021. Credit: EPA).

Working Dog Radio
Episode 151: The Salute

Working Dog Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 107:48


Your Working Dog Radio hosts, Eric @vanessk9 & Ted @ted_summers, sit down with Army 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment Corporal Joshua Hargis, who is also a two-time world champion Paralympic ice hockey player, Purple Heart and Bronze Star Metal with Valor recipient. ⁣ ⁣ The gents talked about how B Company 3/75 is the best in the Ranger Regiment, and went on to discuss getting into K9 and deploying to Afghanistan. Hargis recounted an insane story from a harrowing mission that cost several guys, including Hargis' MWD Jany, their lives and changed his forever. The night raid in Kandahar on Oct. 6, 2013 included multiple suicide bombers, and a minefield of IEDs - a baited ambush. After recovering MWD Jany's remains, Hargis was recovering sensitive material from some of the Fallen, when he stepped on an IED, costing him both of his legs. Hargis was conscious for about an hour and a half as medics used tourniquets and pumped freeze-dried plasma into his veins. Soon after surgery in the hospital, Hargis was conscious enough to salute his commanding officer, despite the medical wrappings, tubes, and personnel who tried to restrain him; resulting in “the salute seen around the world”. ⁣ ⁣ Hargis then talked about becoming an elite Paralympic athlete and how it helps him forget about his disability while he competes with his team; and sadly, how all of that is being ripped away from him due to COVID-19 mandates.⁣ Follow and support him on Instagram at @josh_hargis40⁣ ⁣

The Panjwai Podcast
Bonus Episode 3 - The Fall of Panjwai

The Panjwai Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 47:49


In our 3rd Bonus episode of our between season releases, we bring you our discussion from early July 2021 just after Panjwai fell, and prior to the subsequent fall of Kandahar and Kabul. We were right about some things, and wrong about others, but this is an interesting perspective on our thoughts just after the fall of Panjwai. 

The John Batchelor Show
S4 Ep1801: Nine Weeks after the Tragedy: #ClassicLongWarJournal: @BillRoggio and @ThomasJoscelyn #UNBOUND the complete, forty-minute interview, October 11, 2021. @LongWarJournal. @Batchelorshow

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 41:00


Photo:  A young girl from the Spin Boldak District in the southern Kandahar province, Afghanistan, smiles as she waits for her mother to finish speaking at a female shura. Born after the Taliban's fall, the young girl is afforded the opportunities to go to school and chase her dreams because of the Government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan's efforts to promote gender equality, to include pushing for a more robust focus on girls' education, and having in its constitution clauses rendering women and men equal, and including women in the policy-making process — all before the tragic withdrawal. Nine Weeks after the Tragedy: #ClassicLongWarJournal: @BillRoggio and @ThomasJoscelyn #UNBOUND the complete, forty-minute interview, October 18, 2021. @LongWarJournal.

10/3: Canada Covered
The push to get a Canadian soldier the highest military honour

10/3: Canada Covered

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 24:05


A campaign is underway to honour a Canadian veteran with the country's highest military medal for his actions in Afghanistan 15 years ago. Jesse Larochelle saved a platoon of his comrades outside Kandahar but his heroics took a horrible, physical and emotional toll on him.  Senior National Post features writer Joe O'Connor joins Dave Breakenridge to discuss what happened in October 2006 when Jesse Larochelle saved his fellow soldiers and the push to see him given the Canadian Victoria Cross.  Background reading: Ghosts of Afghanistan: The story of a Canadian war hero Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

War Stories by Preston Stewart
168: Baghdad to Kandahar - Army veteran Garth Landis

War Stories by Preston Stewart

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 72:19


What better way to kick off Veteran's Day than to catch up with an old buddy. Garth Landis was in basic training on 9/11, finding out from his drill sergeants that he was now in an Army at war. He took part in the invasion of Iraq with the 3rd Infantry Division and went back to Iraq a few short years later. He then deployed twice to Kandahar, Afghanistan. Once with Sayre and I in 2010 and then a few years later to help tear down some of the facilities there.

PodcastDX
Throwback Thursday! Travis Mills Veteran/Quad Amputee

PodcastDX

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 44:05


For our very first Throwback Thursday episode we celebrate the bravery of our men and women that have served in the United States Armed Services!   In this episode we will discuss not just continuing life after a horrific injury, but excelling and living life to it's fullest, minus two arms and two legs.  On April 10, 2012, United States Army Staff Sergeant Travis Mills of the 82nd Airborne was critically injured on his third tour of duty in Afghanistan by an IED (improvised explosive device) while on patrol, losing portions of both legs and both arms. In September 2013, Travis and his wife Kelsey founded the Travis Mills Foundation, a nonprofit organization, formed to benefit and assist post 9/11 veterans who have been injured in active duty or as a result of their service to our nation. The veteran and their families receive an all-inclusive, all-expenses paid, barrier-free vacation to Maine where they participate in adaptive activities, bond with other veteran families, and enjoy much-needed rest and relaxation in Maine's great outdoors. If you are in a giving mood this year, the Travis Mills Foundation is a great way to give back to injured Veterans!  (DONATE HERE) TRANSCRIPT PodcastDX-Quad_Amputee   Lita T  00:10 Hello and welcome to another episode of podcast dx. The show that brings you interviews with people just like you whose lives were forever changed by a medical diagnosis. I'm Lita   Ron  00:22 I'm Ron,   Jean  00:23 and I'm a pina colada.   Lita T  00:24 You're not a pina colada she's Jean Marie. Collectively we're the hosts of PodcastDX. On today's show we're speaking with Travis Mills. Travis, if you're not familiar with him by now is the quadruple amputee from an Afghanistan IED and we're going to hear more about his story in a little bit. And he also is running a foundation that provides R&R services more or less for other veterans that have been injured. Is that right Travis?   Travis  00:55 Yeah, absolutely it for physically injured and now we're moving towards all injuries.   Lita T  01:00 Great, great. Well, welcome to the show. Go ahead, Ron   Ron  01:05 Travis. Hi, this is Ron. Again. Thank you for joining us today on our show. First, I would like to start off by saying thank you for your service to our country.   Travis  01:15 Well, no, I appreciate it. Thank you so much. And I'm excited to be here. I'm looking forward to hanging out with you guys for a bit. Yeah!   Ron  01:21  I read a bit about your injuries and your recovery. I gotta say, I am amazed by your determination and your tenacity. It seems like you've overcome a lot of challenges since April of 2012. Could you tell our listeners a little bit about that day? didn't it just start off as a regular day for you.   Travis  01:41 You know, it did we were on our, you know, deployment. I was supposed to be there for nine months as my third deployment. And we had a phone call come in from the village elder that there was some IEDs we had a checkout. So we put our gear on like normal. We went on patrol and try to help them out. And we went, you know, the same routes that we always would take not the same routes, the same general direction. And I had the guy in front of me with the Minesweeper and swept the ground once again, twice like we are protocol. And it just didn't alarm that there's anything under the soil. So I happened to take my backpack off and I put it on the ground. And then the bomb went off. You know it. It shocked my world to be honest with you.   Lita T  02:19 Well that's For sure.   Jean  02:21 Yeah. I can't even imagine what you were going what was going through your mind at that time? Probably. Yeah, shock. What were the next steps after you were evacuated from the site where you were actually injured. For instance, how soon after the attack, were you transferred back stateside? And was there an intermediate location or two for immediate surgical repair?   Travis  02:40 Well, I mean, what they did was, like I hit, my arm right side was completely gone, my right leg was completely gone. They disintegrated and they're found those pieces of me my left leg was snapped to the bone actually. So if you imagine the left ankle bone touching the left thigh, and my left wrist was blown out pretty bad. I hit the ground and rolled over on my back and I saw the aftermath. And in my head, I kept seeing the movie, Saving Private Ryan. And I thought you know about the medic that gets shot stomachs and then he cries out for his mom and ultimately died. I had I said no way like that ever remember me to freaking out or complaining or crying or feeling awful, you know begging not to die basically. Because at the end of the day, it's not my choice and I'm always wanting to exude confidence never showed fear, I led from the front and you know, I just, you never do that as a leader. So I calmed myself down, my medic worked on one side of me my Platoon Sergeant worked on the other side of me, they got four tourniquets on and then I with my left hand that was still left on my body. I reached up and grabbed my microphone and I called my Lieutenant I said, Hey, 6 this is 4 I got guys injured. I need your medic with mine. two of my soldiers got hit. So I you know, I called them and they radio back they sent Doc Voyce over. And Doc Voyce came to work on me, we're working on you know, my other men, and then me. I had to kind of calm him down he was in, stuck on repeat, you know like an old CD we could skip start skipping, he was doing what his training taught him to do so I kept saying "You'll be fine Sgt Mills, you'll be Okay, You'll be fine Sgt Mills, you'll be Okay,  he kept working he just kept saying it. I had to look at Doc Voyce and say "Hey Doc Just do your job. It's fine." And they got me on the helicopter about 10 minutes after Doc Voyce got there so really about 12 to 15 minutes being injured I was on a helicopter and I was transported to Kandahar hospital where I didn't know this then and I'm happy that it's, you know, a known fact now but 99% of patients that make it to Kandahar hospital leave Kandahar hospital alive.   Jean  04:36 That's amazing   Travis  04:36 And yeah, so they started wheeling me right into surgery as 14 hours of surgery took me into and just a wonderful team of nine doctors and seven nurses working for 14 hours straight to put me back to, well not put me back together I guess. that I was laying around with prosthetics but to you know, heal up my wounds and...   Lita T  04:56 Saved your life   Jean  04:57 Stabilize   Lita T  04:58  They saved your life, yeah,   Jean  04:59 yeah.   Travis  05:00 Yeah, absolutely.   Lita T  05:01 I'm guessing that those medics at the at the frontline are really the ones that saved your life. I know this wasn't something we were going to talk about, but do you stay in contact with those guys?   Travis  05:10 Oh, I do. Yeah, actually, um, you know, I know very fast forward but my wife and I had another child fortunately. So we have two now. And my son's name is DAX. Oh, he DAX is for medics, Daniel and Alexander as those who made it possible. Somebody will like name my kid in their honor. So  that was great. My wife kind of came up with the idea of more than I was going for Travis Fieldyen Mills the second but she said no   Lita T  05:29 That's amazing  (laughter)   Travis  05:39  I name everything after myself, my my business, my foundation, you know,   Lita T  05:44 At least everybody knows where they're going.   Jean  05:45 It worked for George Foreman, so why not?   Travis  05:48 Exactly.   Lita T  05:49 According to the Department of Defense, as of January 2018, more than 1500 service members have lost limbs in the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, since all of this started in 2001, and an article back in 2018. In July, it pushed the number up to 1900 and 14. So 1914 Have you met any other amputees since you have been injured yourself?   Travis  06:21 Had I, you mean previously or since?   Lita T  06:23 no since then?   Travis  06:25 Oh, yes. At the hospital that we had a bunch of better, everybody at the hospital was an amputee   Lita T  06:30 Okay. Okay. So this is a very common wartime injury currently correct.   Travis  06:37 Oh, yeah. Yeah, but it's common to the hospital. So like, I had no idea like patient things like that. I mean, you figure you lose a leg, your life's over. Like it's gonna be the worst thing ever. And, you know, I got to the hospital and when I find it, they woke me up from a medical sedation. I was kind of like questioning why that person got hate me. What would I do wrong in life, talking to your husband and father and you know, the biggest thing I wonder is, why not just die? Like, how is this better? And in truth, I didn'twant to talk to my wife, my mom and dad at all that my parents didn't want to deal with the situation. But then I got to, you know, wake up, my brother in law was in the room, he was in the Military as well,  a friend of mine, I met his sister, my wife, and my parents, my wife, and I did. And then I didn't really have a conversation with them. It's kind of like, I don't want to talk about this, I want to deal with it. But finally, I got to meet Todd Nicely. He was a quadruple amputee, I'm actually one of five, I'm the fourth one out of five of us, and he walked into my room was like, Hey, man, you're gonna be fine. You're gonna walk again, you're gonna drive again, you're going to feed yourself, you know, you do everything you need to do by yourself. And I know doesn't sound like it, but you're gonna be independent. And I'm sorry. And that was all the, you know, the motivation I needed.   Lita T  07:48 So they kind of turn you around you think?   Travis  07:51 You know, my wife, and I thought she should leave me. Turn me like okay, let's get better. I won't be a burden on anybody. I mean, I'm very demanding husband. Unfortunately, you know that I expect a lot of help things but I'm very lucky my wife stayed. My daughter was six months old when I got hit. So she was there more with me every day. And I actually learned how to walk with my daughter kind of cool. You know, little thing me and her have   Lita T  08:15 That's so cool   Travis  08:16  so and she's eight years old. She goes, and she tells people, you know, I taught my dad how to walk.   Lita T  08:22 So cool, I love that. Yeah, it's gonna be hard to not tear up right now.   Jean  08:27 Yeah, especially after watching the movie with the two of you,   Lita T  08:30 right?   Jean  08:31  Yeah, she was right there for your physical therapy and everything and your wife was right there too. And it's, that's amazing.   Travis  08:36 Oh, absolutely.   Lita T  08:38 After that. They got you back, you know, alive and somewhat functioning. Did they give you the chance to remain in the military in any status like you know, just state side desk side or do they just tell you this is it   Travis  08:53 you know, they did actually General Odierno and the Sergeant Major of the Army at the time came in Chandler came in talking to the hospital about, Hey, you know, we'd love to have you stay in, you can go around and maybe present on behalf of the military and I teared off and I said, Look, I plan on doing 20 years, gentlemen, but not like this. And my time has come to an end. I can't be Infantry anymore. I can't, you know, be airborne anymore. And as sad as it was to come to that realization, it was just, it was time. I think I made jokes and I really don't want to get restationed anywhere. And General Odierno said, I don't think we restation Sergeant Mills. I don't think so either, sir, but I'm going to call it today. I appreciate this conversation, you know, cuz it was emotional. I planned on 20 years at whole career path lined up, but it just didn't work out for me and that's okay. Cuz like, you know, it's gonna play some curveballs and you got to keep pushing forward and do the best you can and I feel like I've taken that curveball, and that's kind of knocked out of the park with everybody that helps.    Lita T  09:53 That's super   Ron  09:55 Travis, I've seen some of your videos on YouTube. Absolutely. Amazing. And I could tell you're a pretty humorous guy. How did your humor and your personality I guess, how did it help you with the recovery process? And how long after the amputations where you fitted for the prosthetic that you wear?   Travis  10:18 Well, the humor that I have came back right to me. I met in fact, one day, I was sitting there in my hospital bed, the hallway from the nurses, and I could see them holding their like change of shift brief and I started yelling, oh, my legs, my arms and legs where did they go?  How did this happen? And I'm just joking to get their attention. And a little 10 year old walked by, and I was like, Oh, I'm just kidding. Sorry. Girls, like I'm so sorry. But, of course, you have the humor. And I think the best compliment and sometimes the worst compliment that I get is that I'm the same person that I was for the injury. So depending on who says it, you know, if you know somebody that's a friend of mine that grew up with says that's awesome, but if it's like a like a Maybe old school teacher from high school. Oh, sorry.   Ron  11:02 Yeah.   Travis  11:05  But as far as my prosthetic, I was able to get fitted after five weeks time, so a relatively short period. And then seven weeks and four days, I was able to start walking again so just shy of two months. I took my very first steps at Walter Reed. I mean, it was a short, legs a very different feel from walking, but I was starting my comeback,   Jean  11:24 right? It's amazingly fast.   Lita T  11:27 Amazing. For sure.   Travis  11:29 Well, I appreciate that. And then Believe it or not, I have no arms and legs like I do. I just made a video this morning. I was at the gym and I was actually running this morning at the gym. It's first time in two years. I took a hiatus because a no excuse, but back running now. So it's good.   Jean  11:45 That's awesone, that's absolutely awesome   Travis  11:47 Well yeah, I mean, I travel I travel the nation motivational speaker and I started every time off by saying I tell jokes disarm situation. Knee slapper if you got it, you know, don't have arms or and I also can't slap my knees. But I think it just makes people look past the injury that I sustained and more at the man that I am   Ron  11:47 . I say I'm work. I work in the disability community. I'm involved in Disabled Sports. And I tell you, it is a very interesting community with the humor so I understand exactly where you're coming from. You know who can say what?   absolutely   Travis  12:22 happy, you know, because I want to break down barriers and walls and people are just at Whole Foods to be honest with you and a little boy walked up, he's like, "what happened to your arms?"  His mom's like. "don't ask that"  like don't ask that to know, I probably have people asking like, then stare and like, kind of shy away from it. So I told him I, you know, had that day at work. And now I'm like Iron Man with, you know, the superheroes. He's all about it. He followed me around for a little bit. So I was like, Hey, man, I really gotta go.   Jean  12:49 Oh, wow. So every day, you're just   Lita T  12:52  inspiring people,   Jean  12:53  inspiring people wherever you go. That's fantastic. And Travis, my mom and I both know that, you know The army is not only a community, it's kind of like a family. But apparently that's really the case for you. As you had said your brother in law is also in that in the military. And that's actually how you met your wife.   Travis  13:12 Oh, yeah.   Jean  13:13  And what role has that played in your recovery?   Travis  13:17 As far as military Brotherhood in my recovery, how's that? Okay, yeah. So at the hospital, I answered the military in general, you have a brotherhood, right? Like I didn't go on my third deployment. I was supposed to go to Fort Hood, Texas, and help build a per day up ticket timeout from the point that so much time but I had all these young guys that came from across the nation that believed in me, I said, Nope, it's not fair to them. They believe me, I'm their leader. My wife understood the calling there at her house with five kids and she knew I had to go.  There is something ingrained in you as a servicemember. So I went overseas, and I got injured, right. So you go from the platoon size brotherhood and then you have the hospital without Todd Nicely coming to talk to me. Shortly after I was injured. I've never know the possibilities that lay the head. So I work properly as motivated when you get down to the military advanced training center, where all the injured guys are at and then we tell you something is just amazing. Because that's a tight knit group, and you're all working together and living together. going through the same thing with the with your spouse will do the same thing or children and having them to lean on. Plus, the staff at Walter Reed are just top notch physical therapists, occupational therapists, you know, in the driving of cyclists, the process everybody, it's just one well oiled machine, the doctors sorry and Walter Reed is a Brotherhood and having everybody that was injured. Like me, or you know, not like me with no arms legs, but like maybe missing the leg missing the arm, spinal cord injury, whatever. It was nice having them there because, you know, you feed off them, they still got the mentality of, you know, being in the service.   Lita T  14:54 Right. Could you please tell us a little bit about the prosthetics that you're using now. And an add on question, I guess. Do you start out like a person that has an amputation? Do they start out with one type of a prosthetic and move on to different ones as they get acclimated to the use? Are there like prosthetic training wheels of sorts?   Travis  15:16 Yeah, absolutely There are so we'll start with the hands the first one that I got called the mile electric I still use things that Dan that I have that but he only went for one hour a day and then it got progressively more and more so without I was on I want so like I've added on 20 hours or whatever, you know, up and up that long working or doing whatever. And they just, you know, it's muscle flex base. So I certain muscles blow it up into flex, but they muscle fat that rotate and download down fast. And it's pretty awesome because I mean, I could eat a sandwich, I can open the door, I could drive my truck, do everything I need to with that one hand that I wear on the left side, the right side. I'm so high up injured. I don't wear prosthetics on it. Unless I'm doing that. activities like downhill mountain biking, or kayaking, and things of that nature. Okay, snowboarding, I do all that stuff, which is pretty awesome, then. Oh yeah. And then as far as the prosthetic legs is definitely a training wheels type session where you start on short legs, so they mold your legs start on really short prosthetics and you got to rebuild everything from 250 pounds when I got injured to 140 pounds. I lost all my muscle mass. I couldn't roll right and left for sit up myself for a while there. So I had to regain all my core muscle and strength. And he started on shorter legs. So when you get stronger on those, it's basically like if you imagine where your kneecap is, there's a foot at the end of it for me it would have been difficult to deal with Sure, yeah. It and then you grow taller and taller to the point where you have straight legs that are like still so you're standing up as high as they're going to make you okay, I was six, three, almost six foot right now. I was you know, so they Currently, Sanchez Blitz offer safety and gravity and whatnot. And then they give you the legs I'm wearing now it's called x threes. And they're the top of the line. They're waterproof. They're Bluetooth, that have like a locking remote, much better angle. They have little computers in each leg. So they're microprocessors fitter. So every time I move over here and adjustments get made to keep me as upright as possible. And then the last thing is they have hydraulic brakes built in so when I go down the ramp, I can slow myself down. I find a lot of airplanes actually good motivational speaker. So when I go down on the jetway, I don't go bowling for people.   Ron  17:36 So yeah, that in the video too. Right, right. Yeah,   Jean  17:39 that's, that's incredible.   Ron  17:42 was funny. One of the other things in the video talked about your prosthetic hand and your daughter's future boyfriend. I thought that was pretty humorous.   Lita T  17:53 Yeah, tell us about that firsthand.   Travis  17:55 Yeah, I got it. Yeah, keeping a Crown Royal bag in my closet. It was 45 pressure, and then 35 pounds of pressure. And the reason I keep in the closet is because when she's 16 her mom lets her go on a date, I'm gonna bring the handout. I'll probably you know, crush his hand, when he's crying I'm going to tell him "no   fingerprints".  But don't mess with me, bro. Let him go   Lita T  18:15 (laughter)   Travis  18:15 To subdue any, you know,   Lita T  18:17 Questions that he might have had   Travis  18:18 Ideas he was thinking about trying?  My wife says I'm not gonna be able to do that. But, you know, we'll see.   Lita T  18:19  Right right That's right, that's right   Travis  18:27  And high school buddies like real good friends of mine are so excited because their kids get old enough they can't wait to  buy me into the same thing. I'm like, I'm coming let's throw a party. That boys to style like Bad Boys 2 with Martin Lawrence, and Will Smith the show that day.   Lita T  18:41 Sure, sure.   Ron  18:42 Yeah, that's too funny. You just mentioned your friends. It's actually leads me into my next question. Your friends and family, including your wife. how supportive as they put you through this little this journey.   Travis  18:58 Oh, I mean, stop that. I I definitely gain and lose friends through this and you know having my wife at my side every day was a reason I kept fighting to get better because she's not leaving me, then I gotta do my best to not be a burden. And you know a lot of places that she goes for other nonprofits maybe they bring up like, you know, the problems that have their husbands or issues they have their husbands. You know, some of the other spouses might say like, we can't do this because of that I felt like was Travis Travis Travis takes boys to gymnastics he runs around does grocery shopping when he when he can and things so I try to be everyday average normal husband, fathers, I can't be but then having you know, my friends, bear with me. And now with the foundation. I've been able to bring up a lot of really cool families that I want to help out. So we help all physically injured, sterilization spinal cord, service families and it's all free to them and it's all about Hey, get out out there be active in community and in your society, because some people aren't as open as me. And I think having support group that I had and having that I, I had  to learn things like, like walking and stuff as I'm fortunately so successful in my everyday life.   Lita T  20:17 Sure, sure.   Ron  20:18  Oh, that's fantastic. That's fantastic.   Lita T  20:20 Definitely. Travis, what do you wish people knew about amputees? I know that you say that, you know, go ahead and ask That's for you personally. But what do you wish people would know about amputees? Like the emotional changes that a person goes to you? So like, in other words, if somebody wanted to ask a question, but they were afraid to ask, you know, pretend like you're asked, answering those questions. What What did you have to go through emotionally?   Jean  20:47 And I would say like, what, what do you wish they knew?   Lita T  20:50 Right?   Jean  20:50  Yeah.   Travis  20:51 Well, I mean, honestly, for me, a lot of my buddies that I know rather than have the conversation than the looks, the stairs, and like the The awkward, you know, oh crap, they're looking at me I'm going to look back, or up at the ceiling or whatever and look back when they're not looking. So, really people they want to be delicate, which I appreciate I understand but, you know, everybody that I know is everyday, regular person, they just had some mishap at work but didn't change them, you know, into being this person that needs to be, you know, you know, babied around or, or ostracized I guess. So, you know, for me, why don't people know is like, have the conversation say Hey, how's it going? People ask me. It's a funny thing. Like, hey, Travis, you know, when I see someone like you, What do I say? I'm like, I usually say hi or hello   Lita T  21:42 Exactly, exactly right, right   Travis  21:45 And, you know, also, I'm trying to change the narrative. I say I'm recalibrate because my voice those out you want those wounded guys, it doesn't feel very good, don't have any more injuries. I have scars. So I'm trying to change the whole life. Word wounded, is that the negative to recalibrated it right?   Lita T  22:03 Okay,   Travis  22:03 based off a little bit. We're good to go. It's good. And then then also, I think that the term veteran in general has become kind of like, oh, you're one of the veterans Do you got that, you know, pts or what's wrong and I'm like, nothing I serve my country had a great time doing it, love my job, had a bad day at work. I gotta move on. So, you know, my foundation, we're actually expanding our program to help people get back on their feet. That may be something for PTS, things like that. Because I really truly feel that you know, you need to get help to get out of your own way to be successful,  I'm fortunate. We're going to talk about that I run I own part owner and two, and I run one with my wife. So three businesses plus nonprofit that's very successful.   Lita T  22:47 That's great.   Jean  22:48 Well, we weren't must be very busy.   Lita T  22:50 Yeah, I would say so. Yeah, well, yes, for sure. I'm getting back to the physical thing that you've been through. How many surgical procedures have have you had?   Travis  23:02 I think 13 they said they   23:06 Yeah, 13 surgical procedures,  maybe more, but I didn't have any. I didn't have any surgeries. Kind of weeks easily get with me What's up, let's go internal. Then I had my eardrum repaired, which was the worst surgery that I can remember. But and then besides for that, nothing too crazy. I was very fortunate and lucky there no infections or anything like that.   Lita T  23:28 Do you think they'd be in the best physical condition that you were in prior to the injuries was what helped your recovery?   Travis  23:36 I think so. I think it did. For sure. I was a weightlifter. I picked anything up that was heavy and put it down. You know, one of those meat is kind of nice. But I also I think it was on the battlefield. The reason I didn't lose my blood out and everything. I remained calm. I didn't get my heart rate up. I didn't freak out. I kept telling myself whatever happens happens. Not my call at the end of the day. So don't freak out. And I think that might have saved my life as well because instead of yelling, I don't want to die and freaking out and panicking, I just like to stay calm and ride this one out. So very fortunate that I'm kind of stuffing it in the best way possible, which are my thing. And the most worst way. Yes. All my family members, maybe.   Jean  24:22 Well, yeah, that's, that is truly amazing. And it says a lot about who you are as a person who you were before, and who you who you have always been, and your injuries were in 2012. Do you still have like phantom limb pain? And is there anything that they can do to help treat that part of the injury?   Travis  24:39 You know, it's great question and I can't reiterate the documentary and I wish I could, because I say that the academy coma I don't think I would do it again, which is I only did that. You know, the documentary was five months after my injury. In truth, the phantom limb pain I would 110% not be the person I am Today if I didn't have the ketamine colon Academy coma, they're doing a case study. And what they did was reset my brain to think that my nerves and where they were blown off and finally beat. And I, I have been absolutely pain medication free since October of 2012. I quit it cold turkey, and no pain medication. No medication whatsoever, actually, which is very unfortunate, but because of my case study they did. It's more of a common use process. And I have no phantom limb pain, no pain to speak up. And I'm very, very lucky. I know that so it's, you know, that's one thing that at the time when I said it in the documentary, I didn't know the results of it and now looking back like it was probably the best thing for me because my life is obstructed by anything, I don't live, you know, any medication and just keep pushing forward with with a pretty worryfree life.   Lita T  25:58 It's amazing.   Jean  25:59 Yeah, that's awesome.   Ron  26:01 Try to watch the video that showed you and your modified truck. Oh, you know you still drive? What about any of your other recreational pursuits? Do you need adaptations? Or how do you how do you do done?   Travis  26:15 Well, you know, luckily with the remote to my truck, and I click My legs are better your angles I can drive my truck No, no no problem and therefore a lot of us like to get into get adapted. I just kind of drove it every day and made it work with a steering wheel handle so I can drive most anything but I have a van that has ankles in it, which is awesome. And that that really helps out a lot too. So it's just a lot of fun that I get to do that and be able to drive again and stuff so I i guess i have a ranger in a golf cart. But there's no adaptions on those. I just kind of drive those.   Jean  26:48 If you're going to be running that day. Is there do you switch out your prosthetics to make running   Travis  26:54  You know what? Yeah, yeah, so I did I forgot to cover that. I went back and training was walking to look at my profit. But in truth, I have bicycle legs I've never used I'm going to set them up one day very excited about this. I'm running late. I have both. I have worked out a little short workout legs. And then I have different hands and attachment. I mean, it's I have a bowling arm. I think I'm going to use this weekend. My daughter's birthday party thing she's doing with all their friends and their, you know, whatever. And I have a pool table arms. I can't wait to get a pool table. I'm telling you what,   Ron  27:26 (laughter)    Travis  27:27 kind of exciting but yeah, there's definitely different adaption,   Lita T  27:30 okay,   Travis  27:31 there are adaptations that they have. And it's kind of like it's weird, but like, just like on Amazon, you go and set the book. You're like, oh, that activity looks fun. And see if I get one of those. I have I have a like a 10 inch butcher knife. So I can carve a turkey to be honest. I haven't covered a lot of turkeys. But it's very sharp. And you got to be very careful on the walking thing because it's like running with scissors.   Lita T  27:52 Oh, yeah.   Travis  27:54 But yeah, we have all that stuff. And I'm so grateful that there's some geniuses and bright minds out there. That put this together to make it possible for   Lita T  28:01  for sure.   Ron  28:02  Well, Travis, if you don't already, if you don't do scuba diving or you haven't done archery and you are interested, let's talk later because I'm involved in both of those activities for people with disabilities.   Travis  28:17  I appreciate that. Yeah,   Ron  28:19 for what I've seen you do a lot, but I wanted to throw that out. There is another. I don't know something else you could add to the resume.   Lita T  28:26 Right, right.   Travis  28:27 Yeah, so I've done archery, and I'm okay with that. You know, it's not something again, knock knock on the arrow part gets me kinda. So like, my biggest stubbornness I have. If I can't do it by myself, then it's like, I don't really want to do it. So I'm getting some, some rifle setup so I can go, I like to skeet shoot you right. It's target shoot. But also, my next goal is already been skydiving a few times I show my airplanes but since I've been injured I've been skydiving twice, my next goal and here's where being you can can collaborate. I'm gonna go you know, cage diving with a great white sharks. I just I'm so afraid of sharks. I face my fears and I cannot wait to jump in that cage with those with sharks all around the but I want the big ones off this, you know the Cape of you know, of South Africa I want   Ron  29:14 certainly that. That's one of my bucket list items. I just say I don't want that to be the last item on my bucket list if you know what I mean   Lita T  29:20 (laughter) okay.   Jean  29:22 Yeah, you two have fun   Travis  29:23  You've got to live a little bit   Lita T  29:25 I'll be up on the boat with the spear gun and I'll be keeping an eye out for you.   Jean  29:30 Wow.   Travis  29:31 Yeah, drinking the rum punch. I love it   Lita T  29:35 Somebody getting on shotgun.   Jean  29:36 Yep.   Travis  29:37 Oh, I get it.   Jean  29:39 That's you guys are hilarious. But yeah, you guys don't have to work that out with Dive. Heart. Travis, what is the future of prosthetics look like and what do you hope to see with future prosthetic devices?   Travis  29:53 You know, the prosthetics are quite amazing. They have prosthetics that your hands that each finger moves instead of just Like the two fingers, like, you know, like he can add a little motor I'm looking for those get more durable, which is exciting, but also then hooking to like, your nerves and all that so that they can, you know, sense what your muscles would would actually be flexing to open your hand and close it. But I think also what I'm excited about a step further than prosthetics is they're doing stuff called osteo integration where they they're hollowing out your humor bone and hooking a rod to it and a rod inside your skin like your feet do. And then you connect your feet on it, and you can take them off. And then kind of lastly is the stem cell stuff, which is so intriguing to me because they're regrowing people's like one guy like regrew his thumb, so that they're saying they're probably able to regrow people's arms and legs in the near future. Like we're talking 5/10 years.   Lita T  30:47 Wow.   Travis  30:48 We're just I mean mind blowing, right?   Lita T  30:50 oh yeah wow,   Travis  30:51 yeah, I'm gonna be the first one to do it. But I'm saying it's just it's just amazing that the progression right when the first guy made a prosthetic Civil War thing or got started, because he lost his leg to a cannon, or infection or a gunshot, something to do with civil war. But now, I mean, bionic stuff is just impressive. So sky's the limit. If I was a Vietnam era veteran on the battlefield medicine or technology that we had have today, very rarely where a guy like me ever make it, very low percentage. And now, because of the wars and because of technology and the time that we live in, I live a pretty normal life. Like, I mean, you know, I, I went down and did a federal meeting today at a building that was like a day to day and I had I went to the gym and ran to the outdoors, the laces running at the gym. Pretty cool, right?   Lita T  31:41 Absolutely.   Jean  31:42 And very inspiring   Travis  31:44 And I think i think i think the big thing is, you know, to stay to stay humble, because I don't want to ask for too much. It's just so fortunate and lucky to have what's out there on the market right now.   Jean  31:55 Sure, sure. But I guess you know, as far as the future of prosthetics, the designer Definitely want to hear from the individuals who will be using them to see what is it that you guys need?   Travis  32:05 Oh, absolutely there for dreams for sure.   Ron  32:09 Travis older veterans day name require amputations due to medical complications, like diabetes, or something like that. Have you interacted with any of these older vets to talk with them and give them an idea of what to expect after amputation?   Travis  32:27 Well, I mean, I get it. I get some conversations, right? A lot of like, one on one counseling like that. But if I go to the VA to do a checkup or something, when I see somebody and ask the questions I answer or someone at the grocery store that, you know, I, you know, have the conversation. So a big thing is people emailing my website, and they'll ask me like, Hey, you know, I got this going on. I was thinking, maybe I should just cut my leg off. What do you think I'm like, I'm not the guy. Like, that's not my Yeah, my expertise, but I'll tell you, that, you know, there's different prothestics out there make your life better if that ends up being the diagnosis or what happened. So, I'll try to get as much information but I want to make it sound like oh, it's Rick, hack that thing off. Let's call it a day. Right? But um, as far as people that are suffering you know, I know people use my use my website TravisMills.org for a lot of inspiration. And they go on my Facebook, which is all like tagged SSG Travis, because when they go to my Facebook page or my Instagram they'll see fun videos of me and my wife children or or meet my buddy or things like that and then they can you know, they can find out Hey, life goes on. That's what this whole podcast about some happen. Keep pushing forward. And that's kind of the message that we always we always project I'm always speak about resiliency and about, you know, overcoming life's obstacles. And it's just, it's a lot of fun for me, so I'll have the conversation, but it's not something I do what I want to accomplish.   Lita T  33:54 Well, speaking of resiliency, you were obviously able to draw on an incredible Internal Strength just to survive that incident. Could you tell us more about your mantra of never give up? never quit? How did you come up with that? And can that work for everyone?   Travis  34:11 Absolutely. It can work for everybody in the way that I kind of started in the hole. Never go never quit was I was working out. I looked all skinny and sickly and their staff say Do you wanna take a break? And I said, I'm never gonna give up I'm never gonna quit. And you know when I say my wife on my side, my daughter being there helped me walk again. In my driving force. My parents my in laws. My father in law, I didn't really know him that well really, right. Like, we talked about the weather, a lot sports but lived near him or was nowhere near him. When I grew up. He moved in the hospital with me, we became really close friends now. I mean, we're best friends. We travel all over the nation together. But it's just it's ingrained in my head that you just keep pushing forward. You can't just let your situation that you're living in now the outcome of your life and let me just Like the military, I always strive for more promotions and higher rank and do better and things like that and the best time of my life. So, you know, I don't want to sit stagnant. You got to keep moving. And that's kind of how I got the slogan. And now I live by it because I know that there's no not one but two children that look up to me every day. And I need to make sure they know like, hey, look, if you fall down, you got to get back up and keep going forward.   Jean  35:24 It's once again, amazing,   Lita T  35:27 Hooah!   Ron  35:30 Could you tell us a little bit more about the movie a soldier's story?   Travis  35:34 Yeah. So this documentary was created because people in Texas saw my story on I think Fox News, one of the new stations, and they thought was pretty cool. And they realized quite early in our conversations to have go room to room and meet people like me and the people that came into the hospital, and they wanted to film and we decided, you know what, let's just go ahead and do a short documentary half hour long and then it turned into an hour long documentary and became a film that that was actually that was done and about seven days, maybe nine days of filming. Yeah, there's a lot of iPhone footage of that cotton edit from Kelsey phone, which was great. But they did reenact with some of the interviews and all that just like in nine days, so.   Lita T  36:16 Oh, yeah, I was, that was a heart wrenching. A heart wrenching movie. We watched it just before we started the interview. We wanted to make sure that we were in the right frame of mind, and I don't know if that helped. Oh,   Jean  36:29 yeah, it was all it was us in a box of tissue. Yeah, but there were a lot of smiles.   Lita T  36:34 Yeah, yeah, I knew how it ended so that was the only reason I said it's got a good ending.   Jean  36:38 Yeah,   Lita T  36:39 it's gonna be a good movie.   Jean  36:40 It's gonna work out it's gonna be okay.   Lita T  36:42 Yeah,   Travis  36:43 I know it kind of sad for the first half hour.   Lita T  36:45  Yeah, it was a it was a it was a rough beginning.   Travis  36:49 And then now I actually unfortunate where we have, or I guess I have a book "AS Tough As They Come" It's a New York Times bestseller. I have a book out, and it might be made into an actual motion. picture, which is exciting, but can't count your chickens before they hatch. So we're playing it day by day and see how it goes.   Lita T  37:07 Sure, sure. Can you tell our listeners about your family now? So you've got two children and how have you adapted to life together as and does this amputee getting away? I mean, are you just a husband and a dad?   Travis  37:26 I mean there's two answers to that I guess it didn't patient or my disability or you want to call it it does give away something like my daughter's in soccer. I'd love to be in the backyard keep the ball around and running. But I did that for the first year when she was like five cheaper soccer but now I can't keep up so I kind of watch her you know, from the side but doesn't really get in my way. I get on the trampoline with my kid but I still do a backflip we get into the floor the lake and swim around so don't really hold me up and I still do daddy daughter dances and things like that    Lita T  37:59 oh that's sweet   Travis  38:00  My wife, you know, she's unsung hero of everything. She doesn't like the limelight as much. But, you know, she's one keeps us all together the glue that holds it and she's been phenomenal. You know, she's taking my side and helped me out like today before we left, I still need help put my legs on. So she had to put my legs on, she doesn't complain about that she just, It's just normal now. So like, when I wake up, you know, my legs go on in my pants or whatever. But it doesn't hold me back from being a father or a parent. You know, I'm the one that takes your gymnastics, and my son and I wrestle around. This is a lot of fun. So I guess we have the same family dynamic that we were always going to have. You know, I'm, you know, active with the kids and my wife and I still do things as a family. It's just different because I'm not able to do as much sports stuff as I'd like to because I used to be very athletic.   Lita T  38:55 But at least you've been there. You know the tips. You know, you know what to tell you kids how to do it. You can train them, you can coach them, you can guide them, because you've already done it. And   Travis  39:08 absolutely, give me excuses. I'm not sure that excuses will work with me, like, really, really fully   Ron  39:19 add here and kind of in the same boat with you a little bit too old, so I can't keep up with my kid. But I've done it before I can talk with them. I can explain to them, but I certainly can't keep up with them. They're young. You know?   Travis  39:33 You're doing better than me, Ron I mean, I fell apart at 25 you know, I got two feet in the grave now. 32 years old. There you go.    Jean  39:40 I don't know if that's quite true   Ron  39:42 I finally heard that, finally caught it. Again, I know the humor in the community can be pretty pretty intense, huh?   Jean  39:50 Yeah, you guys. Yeah. quite quite the comedian there.   Lita T  39:53 I gotta close my mouth now,   Jean  39:55 yeah. Okay.   Ron  39:56 Yeah, hopefully we'll talk afterwards. There. You   Jean  40:01 Do you have any tips hints and helpful advice for our listeners, or someone who's recently had an amputation or waiting to have one or their family members?   Travis  40:10 For you, I don't just sit here with amputations. I'll tell you what I tell all the audiences I speak to. I travel with you know, all over the nation. The two things I leave won't get off stage since the two left crap where because, you know, I went from this athletic six foot three lift weights every day, big, stocky, strong guy to, you know, have no arms and legs, and everything. So the first thing I tell people is don't dwell in the past. I sit in hospital bed and close my eyes and hope we pray that this never happened. And think how I go back in time, how do I change this? And you know, it took what two three weeks then when I finally realized that it does me no good living in the past is never going to change anything. So instead of dwelling on it, I remember this 25 years I have arms and like they're phenomenal and I've had seven amazing times and then I also take it step further and tell people that you can't control your situation. But you can always control your attitude. So for me, my situation is I wake up every morning with no arms, no legs, right then that's how I am. But my attitude, I'm fortunate, my daughter, Chloe to run down with no, if I'm not already awake, I jumped my wheelchair, I throw my arm on, right, we go downstairs, and we have our breakfast. And then I'm able to go ahead and go about my day. So instead of letting my situation dictate how I feel, I just realized that hey, I'm so lucky to be here and so fortunate because I have a lot of guys that make it back home to their families, that I might as well have a great attitude about every day I get to be here because you know, they're no longer with us and their sacrifices so much bear in mind. And I think if you get by those two life life lessons that I've been, you know, that I've learned and I live by pretty, pretty positive, upbeat, average, you know, great day. Hi, everybody. Sorry about the great day   Jean  41:59 Yeah.   Lita T  42:00  good attitude   Jean  42:01  is wonderful.   Ron  42:03 Yeah, attitude is definitely a big factor. Travis, you do have quite the following of people. You want to give a plug for your book or your podcast?   Jean  42:13 I can't believe you also have a podcast Wow.   Travis  42:16 You know, I do but we're just getting it off the ground. We did a little a couple, you know, test episodes and pilots, but now we're going to go ahead and and change out the format to be great. And, you know, I'm really excited about that. So, yeah, if anybody gets bored and want to check it out, check out Travis mills.org. For otter Travis Mills needs and we'll just kind of go from there. Okay, there you go. That's, that's great. That's, that's that's wonderful. And we hope our listeners do check that out. We cannot thank you enough for joining our show today. It's been a pleasure having you on Yes, definitely. Yeah, absolutely appreciate you guys having me. I hope you guys have won frustrated day and excited to be a part of this. You know, this episode. Your phenomenal podcast here.   Lita T  43:01 Thank you Travis for joining our show. And I hope others can find strength by listening to your story because that's the goal of our podcast.   Jean  43:10 Yeah. And it's extremely inspiring,   Lita T  43:12  very   Travis  43:14 Thanks so much, much appreciated.   Lita T  43:15 You're welcome. If our listeners have any questions or comments related to today's show, they can contact us at podcast dx@yahoo.com do our website podcast dx calm and Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest or Instagram.   Jean  43:28 And if you have a moment to spare, please give us a review wherever you get your podcast. As always, keep in mind that this podcast is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare provider with a any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment in before undertaking a new health care regime and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you've heard on this podcast   Lita T  43:49 till next week.  

Combat Story
Combat Story (Ep 47): Wes ‘H' Hennessey | Australian Special Forces Commando | Fought w/ DEVGRU | Seven Horses Co | Brand Ambassador

Combat Story

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 135:34


UPCOMING EVENT on November 11th (Veterans Day): If you'd like to attend a Q&A session on November 11th with Combat Story's Ryan Fugit, please fill out this form (https://tinyurl.com/552ewmu5). Today we hear the Combat Story of Wes ‘H' Hennessey, a retired Australian Special Forces Commando and 20 year veteran who deployed on numerous occasions to Afghanistan, Iraq, East Timor, Somalia, to name just a few. He fought for years at the upper echelons of the Australian special operations community and was on joint operations with US-equivalents like DEVGRU in critical missions. He was later recognized with two US Bronze Star Medals, one with Valor, for his efforts, in addition to the coveted Australian Conspicuous Service Medal. Since leaving the military, Wes has gone on to become a sought after brand ambassador, public speaker, and, most importantly, Veteran advocate. He stands out from the crowd with a down to earth, honest, and truth-to-power personality and I hope you enjoy his combat story as much as I did. Find H Online: Instagram @seven.horses.co LinkedIN https://www.linkedin.com/in/wes-hennessey-860b1235/ Find Ryan online: Follow on Instagram @combat_stories https://www.instagram.com/combatstory Follow on Facebook @combatstoryofficial https://fb.me/combatstoryofficial Send us messages at https://m.me/combatstoryofficial Email ryan@combatstory.com Learn more about Ryan www.combatstory.com/aboutus Intro Song: Sport Rock from Audio Jungle Show Notes 0:00 - Intro 1:05 - Guest bio for Wes “H” Hennessey 1:55 - Interview begins 3:41- What US State is Queensland like? 6:24 - Aussie Commandos vs SAS 16:32 - Communication once in the elite units 30:14 - The Commando pipeline 32:46 - Kit check was a favorite 38:26 - Can you tell who will make it through selection? 47:28 - The weight of leadership 51:35 - First deployment: Somalia 56:59 - First mission outside the wire 1:03:29 - Left a boy. Returned a man. 1:12:57 - Sent to Kandahar 1:24:04 - Honing the American accent 1:27:56 - Surviving a helicopter crash 1:56:49 - When the near death experiences build up 2:01:06 - Seven Horses Co and H's next mission 2:10:55 - What did you carry into combat with you? 2:11:45 - Would you do it all again? 2:13:07 - Listener comments and shout outs!

Questionable Material with Jack & Brian

YouthSpring isn't Facebook! Vampire Hunter. Changes to your favorite superheroes. The untold story behind several Beatles songs. Jack tries to be an advice columnist: Wondering in San Diego, Unhappy Dad in Kandahar, My Crotch is an Unkempt Nightmare.

Feat. Picks
FEAR PICKS - Scary Monsters (and Nice Sprites)

Feat. Picks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 87:04


We're chatting crytpids on this episode of FEAR PICKS. Sasquatch, Godzilla, King Kong, Loch Ness, Goblins, Ghouls, and Zombies with no conscience. But mostly Sasquatch, skin walkers, and the moth man. Also the giant of Kandahar. There's a lot to unpack this episode.   New merch: https://featured-picks-2.creator-spring.com/ Thanks for listening, we love ya!

VOV - Việt Nam và Thế giới
VOV - Các vấn đề quốc tế: Động thái Taliban từ chối hợp tác với Mỹ chống lại nhánh IS tại Afganistan

VOV - Việt Nam và Thế giới

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 6:58


- Tổ chức Nhà nước Hồi giáo – Khorasan (IS-K) mới đây nhận trách nhiệm thực hiện hàng loạt vụ tấn công vào các nhà thờ Hồi giáo tại Afganistan, gần nhất là vụ đánh bom liều chết tại nhà thờ ở Kandahar làm hơn 40 người thiệt mạng. Các vụ việc xảy ra với tần suất ngày một nhiều kể từ khi Taliban giành quyền kiểm soát đất nước khiến nhiều người đặt câu hỏi về năng lực của Taliban trong việc thực hiện cam kết đảm bảo không để Afghanistan trở thành mảnh đất dung dưỡng các phần tử khủng bố. - Mặc dù vấp phải sự hoài nghi của cộng đồng quốc tế về năng lực, nhưng tại cuộc gặp gỡ trực tiếp đầu tiên giữa phái đoàn Taliban và Mỹ tại Doha, Qatar, Taliban đã từ chối hợp tác với Mỹ trong việc chống lại IS-K. Việc quyết tâm một mình đối phó với IS-K có thể đẩy Taliban vào “thế khó” như thế nào? Chủ đề : Taliban, Mỹ, Afganistan --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/vov1thegioi/support

PBS NewsHour - Segments
News Wrap: Suicide attack in Afghanistan kills 47, wounds dozens

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 4:41


In our news wrap Friday, at least 47 people were killed and 70 were wounded in Afghanistan when a suicide bomber attacked a Shiite mosque in the city of Kandahar, attorneys for Nikolas Cruz say he will plead guilty for murdering 17 people at a high school in Parkland, Florida in 2018, and the Biden administration says it will go to the U.S. Supreme Court to stop a Texas ban on abortions. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
News Wrap: Suicide attack in Afghanistan kills 47, wounds dozens

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 4:41


In our news wrap Friday, at least 47 people were killed and 70 were wounded in Afghanistan when a suicide bomber attacked a Shiite mosque in the city of Kandahar, attorneys for Nikolas Cruz say he will plead guilty for murdering 17 people at a high school in Parkland, Florida in 2018, and the Biden administration says it will go to the U.S. Supreme Court to stop a Texas ban on abortions. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Newshour
British MP murdered

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 46:20


Sir David Amess, a member of parliament for the ruling Conservative Party, has been killed in a stabbing attack in Essex, England. A 25-year-old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder. Also on the programme: a deadly suicide attack on a mosque in Kandahar, Afghanistan; and what baby frogs can teach us about the healing power of algae. (Image: A photograph of Sir David Amess in St Peter's church in Eastwood, Essex, at a Catholic mass held following the death of the Conservative MP who was stabbed multiple times at a meeting with constituents. Credit: Ansell/PA Wire)

Global News Podcast
Afghanistan: Dozens killed in suicide bombings at Kandahar mosque

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 30:16


Several blasts at Shi'a mosque where worshippers were attending Friday prayers. Eyewitnesses said three attackers detonated bombs inside the crowded building. Also, funerals held in Lebanon for victims of Thursday's street violence in Beirut, and why the world's only state-appointed wizard has been told his services are no longer required.

The Kevin Jackson Show
Ep. 21-401 - Without Restriction

The Kevin Jackson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 38:40


In this episode, could your emails pass muster? Gruden's emails from 2011 reveal he's not politically correct and the social justice warriors want to crucify him. How far back is too far back?

NZZ Akzent
In Kandahar versteht man die Taliban

NZZ Akzent

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 16:23


Kandahar, das geistige Zentrum der Taliban im Süden Afghanistans, verrät viel über ihr Selbstverständnis und über ihre Widersprüche. Unser Korrespondent ist dorthin gereist. Heutiger Gast: Andreas Babst Weitere Informationen zum Thema https://www.nzz.ch/international/afghanistan-wo-die-taliban-herkommen-reise-durch-kandahar-ld.1647462 Hörerinnen und Hörer von «NZZ Akzent» lesen die NZZ online oder in gedruckter Form drei Monate lang zum Preis von einem Monat. Zum Angebot: nzz.ch/akzentabo

War Stories by Preston Stewart
161: Remembering Todd Weaver

War Stories by Preston Stewart

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 102:42


In today's episode, I'm joined by Jacob Ivey, Bryson Shipman and Kyle Snook to talk about their friend, Todd Weaver. Jacob, Kyle, Bryson and Todd were all platoon leaders together in D/2-502IN before splitting off to different companies just ahead of a deployment to Afghanistan in 2010. They share some awesome parts of Todd's story from his writing letters to the families of his Soldiers to the deep conversations had right when they arrived in country. Early in the deployment, Todd and Jacob were sent to support 1-320FA in the Arghandab River Valley just outside Kandahar. They talk about Todd taking on the new mission and how much he enjoyed being able to mentor and lead a new group of Soldiers in this challenging environment. Todd was killed in action on September 9th, 2010, but it's clear in talking with his friends that he left quite the legacy and is still making an impact today. Jacob Ivey was a Ranger-qualified Infantry Officer and served as a platoon leader in the Arghandab River Valley with B/1/320 during the 2010-2011 deployment to Afghanistan by 2IBCT, 101st Airborne Division. Jacob ultimately served for 10 years before moving on to the civilian sector where he lives in Gainesville, FL with his wife and children. Bryson Shipman was an Company Executive Officer in Zhari District, Kandahar Province with D/2-502 Parachute Infantry Regiment during the 2010-2011 deployment to Afghanistan in support of OEF X-XI. Bryson is still serving in the United States Army. Kyle Snook served 5 years as an Infantry officer with a deployment as a platoon leader to Zhari District, Afghanistan with the 101st Airborne Division's 2nd Battalion, 502nd Infantry Regiment in 2010. He now works in healthcare entrepreneurship and lives in Denver, CO with his wife, dog and 1-year-old daughter.

Shaping Opinion
What’s Next in Afghanistan

Shaping Opinion

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 45:05


Journalist Hollie McKay joins Tim from Afghanistan where she lives and from where she files her reports as the Taliban strengthens its control over the country in the wake of the U.S. pullout. Hollie is a war crimes investigator, an author and a reporter who gives a view on what life is like for the people of Afghanistan now that the Taliban is in control. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Afghanistan_auphonic.mp3 Photo Source: Hollie McKay America just marked the 20th anniversary of the September 11th terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and four hijacked aircraft. The attacks were waged by Islamic terrorists with the backing of Osama Bin Laden and the terrorist group Al Qaeda.  At the time, Al Qaeda and the Taliban operated terrorist training camps in Afghanistan, where the 9/11 hijackers trained. On October 7, 2001, the United States and Great Britain responded to the 9/11 attacks by targeting terrorist training camps in Afghanistan with bombs and cruise missiles. That led to a war against the terrorists in that country and a 20-year war-time occupation. By August of this year, that conflict started to come to its end as the United States pulled out of the country. Over the 20 years of the Afghan war, more than 3,500 allied troops died in combat. That includes 2,448 American service members. More than 20,000 Americans suffered combat-related wounds. Many more came home with scars you can't see. According to Brown University, roughly 69,000 Afghan security forces were killed during that period, as well as 51,000 Afghan civilians and 51,000 terrorists and militants. The United States had spent $2 trillion on the conflict.  In the end, the U.S. left billions of dollars in military equipment and arms, including armored vehicles, drones and military helicopters. In 10 days in August, from August 6th through the 15th, the Taliban took control of Kandahar, Mazar-e-Sharif and then the capital city, Kabul. The incumbent Afghan government quickly fell apart with the country's president fleeing to the UAE. The U.S. evacuated its embassy, and thousands of American citizens went to the Kabul airport to flee the country. During the evacuation, two suicide bombers attacked the Kabul airport, killing more than 103 people, including 12 American Marines and one U.S. Navy medic. By the time the Taliban took control, there were still an undetermined number of Americans and Afghan allies still in the country. Hollie McKay is a war crimes investigator and has worked on the frontlines of several war zones that have included Iraq, Pakistan, Syria, Iran, and many other places, including Afghanistan. Links Afghans Dying at Border as Tensions Intensify Between Taliban, Pakistan, New York Post Driving Across What Was Once Afghanistan's Terror-Filled Highway, Knewz The Transformation of Kabul, One Month After the Taliban Takeover, New York Post Taliban Official: Strict Punishment, Executions Will Return, Associated Press Hollie McKay (website) About this Episode's Guest Hollie McKay Hollie McKay Hollie S. McKay is a foreign policy expert and war crimes investigator. She was an investigative and international affairs/war journalist for Fox News Digital for over fourteen years where she focused on warfare, terrorism, and crimes against humanity. Hollie has worked on the frontlines of several major war zones and covered humanitarian and diplomatic crises in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Syria, Iran, Turkey, Yemen, Saudi Arabia, Burma, Russia, Africa, Latin America, and other areas. Her globally-spanned coverage, in the form of thousands of print articles and essays, has included exclusive and detailed interviews with numerous captured terrorists, as well as high-ranking government, military, and intelligence officials and leaders from all sides. She has spent considerable time embedded with US and foreign troops,

In Focus with Carolyn Hutcheson
Former NPR Correspondent Sarah Chayes on Afghanistan‘s Future

In Focus with Carolyn Hutcheson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 9:50


Former NPR correspondent Sarah Chayes covered the fall of the Taliban in Afghanistan, then stayed to establish a soap factory in Kandahar as a way to employ local workers to help the economy.  She talks with In Focus host Carolyn Hutcheson about witnessing the fall of the Taliban in 2001 and reconnecting today with friends who are experiencing the Taliban takeover in Afghanistan. 

RedHanded
216: Episode 215 - Robert Bales: The Kandahar Massacre

RedHanded

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 83:09


In Panjwai, a district in the Kandahar Province of Afghanistan, on the 11th of March 2012, U.S Army Staff Sergeant Robert Bales committed what is considered to be the deadliest war crime blamed on a single member of the U.S Armed Forces since the Vietnam War. During this brutal massacre, Robert Bales took the lives of 16 innocent Afghan civilians – 9 of them were children. In this week's episode, Hannah and Suruthi explore the various and disturbing factors that led to this unbelievable atrocity. UK TOUR 2021 - new dates added! Get your tickets here: https://linktr.ee/RedHandedthepod Book: https://linktr.ee/RedHanded_Book Subscribe to our new YouTube Channel: YouTube - Subscribe Pre-order a copy of the book here (US & Canada): Signed copies - US & Canada Pre-order on Wellesley Books Pre-order on Amazon.com Pre-order a copy of the book here (UK, Ireland, Europe, NZ, Aus): Signed copies - UK, Ireland, Europe, NZ, Aus Pre-order on Amazon.co.uk Pre-order on Foyles Follow us on social media: Instagram Twitter Facebook Visit our website: Website Contact us: Contact

Global Security
Former adviser Sarah Chayes: The US failed to understand how Afghans wage war

Global Security

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021


A logistical success, but a strategic failure.That's how top US generals described the US withdrawal from Afghanistan, in the second day of hearings on Wednesday on Capitol Hill, this time before the House Armed Services Committee.A lot of the most intense questioning dealt with intelligence failures and how the US could have missed signs pointing to the rapid collapse of the Afghan government. Related: Gen. David Petraeus: The US has a 'moral obligation' to help those left behind in AfghanistanUS Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin tried to answer for these failures in his opening statement: "We need to consider some uncomfortable truths; that we did not fully comprehend the depth of corruption and poor leadership in their senior ranks; that we did not grasp the damaging effect of frequent and unexplained rotations by President [Ashraf] Ghani of his commanders; that we did not anticipate the snowball effect caused by the deals that the Taliban commanders struck with local leaders in the wake of the Doha agreement." Related: Afghan UN employees worry about their safetyAuthor Sarah Chayes, who served as a special adviser to the US military in Afghanistan and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff after a decade on the ground in Kandahar, has been watching the hearings closely. Her most recent book is called "On Corruption in America and What is at Stake." Chayes joined The World's host Marco Werman to share her reaction to these military testimonies and to fill in the blanks on who else may need to testify on US failures in Afghanistan. Marco Werman: What do you make of that explanation for the lack of military intelligence?Sarah Chayes: It's just stunning to me, but in a way, not surprising. So much US intelligence was focused on who we should kill instead of being focused on the degree of corruption, not just in the ranks of the Afghan military, but throughout the government, and the effect that that would have on the willingness of Afghan citizens to take mortal risks for their own government, you know? I mean, that information was being hammered on successive US administrations for years. I was one of the hammerers and not at all alone. And so, I find that very distressing. And then — this snowball effect of the local deals. I think this is another really significant failing on the intelligence and military side — is misunderstanding how Afghans wage war. Afghans rarely fight as units to the death. Fighting is much more a kind of psychological exercise. That's why it's often quite violent. So, you have the combination of the Taliban, who were making battlefield victories, a Doha agreement that essentially conferred sovereignty on them, and then they went to work on the ground, as you said. How could the United States government have missed that context?Joint Chiefs Chair Gen. Mark Milley tried to provide an answer for how the US failed to predict the Afghan government's collapse: "We can count the trucks and the guns and the units and all that. We can watch that from different techniques, but we can't measure a human heart from a machine. You've got to be there to do that. And I think that was probably one of the most significant contributing factors to missing the deterioration in the morale of the Afghan army." What do you make of Gen. Milley's comments? We were there for 20 years. We were on the ground for 20 years, and we still missed that type of psychological and social intelligence. We never got close enough to ordinary people.Related: How the Taliban might finance their new Afghan government Well, you spoke earlier about the lack of understanding of how Afghans wage war. I mean, Gen. Milley at one point questioned why the US had tried to build an Afghan army in our own image. What was he getting at? He put his finger on what you really can hang around the military's neck, is why would you create, in an environment of very difficult terrain, where wars are constantly being won by ill-armed, ill-equipped insurgents, why would you create a conventional army that looks like ours, that requires highly technical equipment that people need to maintain, that seems to require air support (although the Taliban never seem to need air support). And that, again, was going on for 20 years. And I think we really have to ask ourselves as a country, why? What was the incentive structure behind building that type of top-heavy, equipment-heavy military? And were economic interests not involved here? I mean, is this not the type of equipment and contractor support that is delivered by very high-end military contractors whose executives have been building fancy mansions around Washington, DC, for the last decade?So, the starting point for the hearings this week seems to be that the problems with the US project in Afghanistan were fundamentally military. And that's why generals were brought before lawmakers today and called to task. But weren't a lot of the fundamental problems also civilian?Well, exactly. Thank you, Marco. And I hope that civilian officials will be called soon. And first and foremost, for me, it would be Zal Khalilzad, [special envoy for Afghanistan], who is responsible for the actual terms of the Doha agreement. ... He's an Afghan American who conducted these negotiations at President [Donald] Trump's behest in Doha. Those negotiations, as far as I know, were conducted in Pashto without any member of the US government who spoke the language present — other than the ambassador — and they essentially conferred sovereignty on the Taliban. How would we expect an Afghan government not to be demoralized under those conditions?This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity. 

Best of Today
Life in Afghanistan

Best of Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 12:51


The heartland of the Taliban is in southern Afghanistan. It was the scene of some of the fiercest fighting during the twenty year war. British troops were deployed to Helmand Province in the south, where they took most of their casualties. Most people in the south are Pashtuns, one of Afghanistan's main ethnic groups and increasingly dominant since the Taliban victory. It's the place where the Taliban is most established and has the strongest support. That means it's a good place to go to see how the Taliban are once again putting their stamp on what they have renamed the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan. The BBC's Jeremy Bowen, travelled from Kandahar to Lashgar Gah, the capital of Helmand, through areas that have been devastated by so many years of war and sent a report. As secondary schools in Afghanistan reopened for boys, but not for girls, a Taliban spokeman said Afghan girls will return to their classrooms as soon as possible. The delay has created more uncertainty about the prospects for girls and women in Afghanistan's new Islamic Emirate including the future of their education. The Taliban say they need more time to prepare what they call a safe learning environment for girls in classes. The BBC's Chief International Correspondent Lyse Doucet reports from a girls' school in Kabul. (Image: School classroom in Kabul, Credit: BBC / Bhasker Solanki)

The Panjwai Podcast
Episode 34 - Death From Above

The Panjwai Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 117:49


This week on the podcast we are joined by CW3(R) Keith Knicely. Keith is a former Infantryman turned Apache pilot, just like Curtis, except Keith did his transition much earlier. After the invasion of Iraq and a time as a Drill Sergeant Keith made the transition to the Apache in time to fly overhead in Kandahar in 2012. Part of Task Force 2-6, Keith flew over Panjwai, Zharey, and Kandahar as a whole. Keith talks about his time in Kandahar, his time flying with the OH-58D Kiowa community, and the impact that deployment had on him as an Attack Pilot. Keith would later go on to become an instructor pilot at Flight School in Fort Rucker, and guess who was in his very first class? That's right. Your 2nd favorite co-host - Curtis Grace.   ---------------------------------   The views expressed by the guests and hosts of this podcast do not represent the views of the Department of Defense or United States Government.   ——————————————— Also Available on:   Apple: https://buff.ly/3gTXet9 Spotify: https://buff.ly/2Kx6cjR Google: https://buff.ly/3b29R4z Podbean: https://buff.ly/2WoN0aF iHeartRadio: https://buff.ly/3nc5Wo1   Check out the video version of the podcast at : https://www.youtube.com/thepanjwaipodcast   For maps, photos and more information about Panjwai go to : https://www.thepanjwaipodcast.com/about-panjwai   You can donate and support the podcast on Patreon for as little as $3.00 a month. visit www.patreon.com/thepanjwaipodcast to learn more.   Direct donations can also be sent via venmo @thepanjwaipodcast Be sure to like, follow, and/or subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, iHeartRadio, Youtube, TuneIn, Amazon Music and many more. visit www.thepanjwaipodcast.com/listen for more information.    Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thepanjwaipodcast Instagram: @thepanjwaipodcast Twitter: @panjwaipodcast --------------------------------

Nick Koumalatsos
001 SPECIAL AMPHIBIOUS RECONNAISSANCE CORPSMAN SARC WILLIAM FAIRALL | Nick Koumalatsos

Nick Koumalatsos

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 143:51


10:00min - What did you need to do? 15:00 - Hazing in the pool 16:00 pool screening 24:00 dropped at dive 25:00 finning 1000km 32:00 min prostate exam 41:00 trauma situations 46:00 Kandahar 50:00 grooming standards/helmets/bonuses 59:00 Q&A 1:07 SARC the term is gone 1:11 what are you doing now? 1:32 Did Biden win!? 2:07 Voting / Civil War Follow William Fairall: https://www.instagram.com/williamfairall/ Follow Nick Koumalatsos on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nickkoumalatsos/ Follow The Harbor Site on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theharborsitepodcast/ SPONSORS AND DISCOUNTS Johnny Slicks https://johnnyslicks.com/ Core Medical Group (Hormone Replacement Therapy) https://coremedicalgrp.com/nick/ Bare Performance Nutrition CODE- RAIDER for discount https://www.bareperformancenutrition.com/discount/raider Gatorz Eyewear: https://www.gatorz.com/ Raider Project discount use CODE- WITHYOU] for discount https://www.raiderproject.org/ Agoge Personal Coaching https://agogetraining.com The Agoge Training Plans https://www.theagoge.com Agoge Challenge: https://www.agogechallenge.fit/join-now My Book Excommunicated Warrior: https://www.nickkoumalatsos.com/excommunicated-warrior/ Follow Nick: Youtube https://www.youtube.com/user/MrNicksmith82 Facebook https://goo.gl/yRT4c4 Instagram https://goo.gl/Pj86BM Twitter https://goo.gl/yvsRfw Website https://goo.gl/JEfUBd FOLLOW: Alison Capra https://goo.gl/iVqWXB https://goo.gl/tULVqU SEND STUFF TO: Alexander Industries 624 US HWY 17S Suite 1 Holly Ridge NC 28445 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/nick-koumalatsos/support

The Documentary Podcast
Afghanistan and me

The Documentary Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 51:08


As Afghanistan reaches a turning point with American troops leaving the country, BBC Pashto presenter Sana Safi tells the story of how her own life has been intertwined with the fate of her country. She tells the story of what it was like for a child to survive in a country caught between the crosshairs of geopolitical conflict, of surviving religious fundamentalism, of growing up in a country without music or books. She describes how violence and conflict forced her family to move from Kandahar to Helmand, only to find themselves caught in the crossfire of a gun battle. How under Taliban rule she effectively became a prisoner in her own home. How the continuing decades of conflict brought tragedy to her own family – and how she could only find security by moving to the UK, where she suffered the pain of separation from her family and homeland.

Tagesschau (Audio-Podcast)
14.09.2021 - tagesschau 20:00 Uhr

Tagesschau (Audio-Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 15:14


Themen der Sendung: TV-"Vierkampf" der kleineren Parteien mit Blick auf mögliche Koalitionen, Laut AOK-Fehlzeiten-Report ist der Krankenstand in Betrieben gesunken, Afghanistan: Tausende Menschen protestieren in Kandahar gegen die Taliban, Arbeiterpartei gewinnt Parlamentswahl in Norwegen, Papst Franziskus besucht Roma-Siedlung Lunik IX in der Slowakei, Zwickau legt Beschwerde zu Urteil gegen Grünen-Schmähplakate ein, Zentralarchiv zur Geschichte der Juden in Heidelberg neu eröffnet, Ahrtal: Winzer kämpfen kurz vor der Weinlese um Existenz nach der Flutkatastrophe, Das Wetter

Tagesschau (320x240)
14.09.2021 - tagesschau 20:00 Uhr

Tagesschau (320x240)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 15:14


Themen der Sendung: TV-"Vierkampf" der kleineren Parteien mit Blick auf mögliche Koalitionen, Laut AOK-Fehlzeiten-Report ist der Krankenstand in Betrieben gesunken, Afghanistan: Tausende Menschen protestieren in Kandahar gegen die Taliban, Arbeiterpartei gewinnt Parlamentswahl in Norwegen, Papst Franziskus besucht Roma-Siedlung Lunik IX in der Slowakei, Zwickau legt Beschwerde zu Urteil gegen Grünen-Schmähplakate ein, Zentralarchiv zur Geschichte der Juden in Heidelberg neu eröffnet, Ahrtal: Winzer kämpfen kurz vor der Weinlese um Existenz nach der Flutkatastrophe, Das Wetter

The John Batchelor Show
1683: Five foreign policy lessons not learned in Afghanistan debacle. Peter Berkowitz, @HooverInst HFN

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 12:36


Photo: This photograph of a pile of military "trophies" after the Battle of Peiwar Kotal in November 1878 is from an album of rare historical photographs depicting people and places associated with the Second Anglo-Afghan War. Peiwar Kotal was the site of a battle in late 1878, between British forces under Sir Frederick Roberts (1832–1914), who outmaneuvered Afghan forces under an unknown commander.* CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Five foreign policy lessons not learned in Afghanistan debacle. Peter Berkowitz, @HooverInst HFN https://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2021/09/05/lessons_of_freedom_from_20_years_of_war_against_jihadism_146358.html?utm_source=Hoover+Daily+Report&utm_campaign=00fd9ba5d2-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2019_09_05_04_36_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_21b1edff3c-00fd9ba5d2-72527561.. * The result was a British victory and seizure of the Peiwar Kotal Pass. A young boy is perched atop the pile; he leans against a huge bass drum and sits on a fur-lined sheepskin coat, called a poostin in Dari. He is surrounded by an assortment of military items that were abandoned during the battle or removed from the bodies of slain soldiers. They include swords and scimitars of both British and Afghan design, scabbards, rifles, and a helmet in the center. The Second Anglo-Afghan War began in November 1878 when Great Britain, fearful of what it saw as growing Russian influence in Afghanistan, invaded the country from British India. The first phase of the war ended in May 1879 with the Treaty of Gandamak, which permitted the Afghans to maintain internal sovereignty but forced them to cede control over their foreign policy to the British. Fighting resumed in September 1879, after an anti-British uprising in Kabul, and finally concluded in September 1880 with the decisive Battle of Kandahar. The album includes portraits of British and Afghan leaders and military personnel, portraits of ordinary Afghan people, and depictions of British military camps and activities, structures, landscapes, and cities and towns. The sites shown are all located within the borders of present-day Afghanistan or Pakistan (a part of British India at the time). About a third of the photographs were taken by John Burke (circa 1843–1900), another third by Sir Benjamin Simpson (1831–1923), and the remainder by several other photographers. Some of the photographs are unattributed. The album possibly was compiled by a member of the British Indian government, but this has not been confirmed. How it came to the Library of Congress is not known..

Congressional Dish
CD238: Losing Afghanistan

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 97:18


The war in Afghanistan is over. In this episode, we document how and why the Biden administration finally admitted defeat in our 20 year attempt to create a new government in Afghanistan and we take a hard look at the lessons we need to learn. Afghanistan is a country in a far away land, but there are disturbing similarities between the Afghanistan government that just collapsed and our own. We'd be wise not to ignore them. Executive Producer: Rachel Passer Executive Producer: Anonymous  Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Background Sources Recommended Congressional Dish Episodes CD236: January 6: The Capitol Riot CD218: Minerals are the New Oil CD210: The Afghanistan War CD124: The Costs of For-Profit War How We Got Here Craig Whitlock. The Afghanistan Papers: A Secret History of the War. Simon and Schuster, 2021. Patrick Tucker. August 18, 2021. “Trump's Pledge to Exit Afghanistan Was a Ruse, His Final SecDef Says.” Defense One. Eugene Kiely and Robert Farley. August 17, 2021. “Timeline of U.S. Withdrawal from Afghanistan.” FactCheck.org. Eric Schmitt and Jennifer Steinhauer. July 30, 2021. “Afghan Visa Applicants Arrive in U.S. After Years of Waiting.” The New York Times. Craig Whitlock, Leslie Shapiro and Armand Emamdjomeh. December 9, 2019. “The Afghanistan Papers: A secret history of the war.” The Washington Post. Mark Landler and James Risen. July 25, 2017. “Trump Finds Reason for the U.S. to Remain in Afghanistan: Minerals.” The New York Times. John F. Harris. October 15, 2001. “Bush Rejects Taliban Offer On Bin Laden ” Washington Post. The Evacuation: Those Left Behind William Mauldin. September 2, 2021. “Afghanistan Voice of America, Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty Staff Left Behind.” Wall Street Journal. Zolan Kanno-Youngs and Annie Karni. August 29, 2021. “Series of U.S. Actions Left Afghan Allies Frantic, Stranded and Eager to Get Out.” The York Times. Sami Sadat. August 25, 2021. “I Commanded Afghan Troops This Year. We Were Betrayed.” The New York Times. Marjorie Censer. August 18, 2021. “US contractors rush to get former employees out of Afghanistan.” Defense News. Siobhan Hughes. August 18, 2021. “Afghanistan Veterans in Congress Trying to Prevent ‘a Death Warrant' for Helping America.” Wall Street Journal. Alex Sanz and Tammy Webber. August 18, 2021. “US friends try to rescue brother in arms in Afghanistan.” AP News. Seth Moulton. June 04, 2021. "Moulton, Bipartisan Honoring Our Promises Working Group to White House: Evacuate our Afghan Partners.” Contractors in Afghanistan Matt Taibbi. August 18, 2021. “We Failed Afghanistan, Not the Other Way Around.” TK News by Matt Taibbi on Substack. Jack Detsch. August 16, 2021. “Departure of Private Contractors Was a Turning Point in Afghan Military's Collapse.” Foreign Policy. Matt Stoller. July 15, 2021. “‘A Real S*** Show': Soldiers Angrily Speak Out about Being Blocked from Repairing Equipment by Contractors.” BIG by Matt Stoller. Lynzy Billing. May 12, 2021. “The U.S. Is Leaving Afghanistan? Tell That to the Contractors.” New York Magazine. Oren Liebermann. March 29, 2021. “Pentagon could open itself to costly litigation from contractors if US pulls out of Afghanistan this year.” CNN. Lucas Kunce and Elle Ekman. September 15, 2019. “Comment Submitted by Major Lucas Kunce and Captain Elle Ekman.” [Regulations.gov(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regulations.gov). Aaron Mehta. Oct 25, 2016. “30 Years: William Perry — Reshaping the Industry.” Defense News. Jared Serbu. August 22, 2016. “DoD now awarding more than half its contract spending without competitive bids.” Federal News Network. 41 U.S. Code § 3307 - Preference for commercial products and commercial services. Money: Lost and Gained David Moore. August 23, 2021. “Lawmakers Benefit From Booming Defense Stocks.” Sludge. Lee Fang. August 20, 2021. “Congressman Seeking to Relaunch Afghan War Made Millions in Defense Contracting.” The Intercept. Anna Massoglia and Julia Forrest. August 20, 2021. “Defense contractors spent big in Afghanistan before the U.S. left and the Taliban took control.” OpenSecrets.org. Stephen Losey. April 16, 2021. “The Bill for the Afghanistan War Is $2.26 Trillion, and Still Rising.” Military.com. Eli Clifton. February 16, 2021. “Weapons Biz Bankrolls Experts Pushing to Keep U.S. Troops in Afghanistan.” Daily Beast. Open Secrets. 2021. Defense: Lobbying, 2021. Open Secrets. 2021. Defense: Money to Congress. Laws S.1790 - National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 Sponsor: Senator Jim Inhofe (R-OK) Status: Became Public Law No: 116-92 on December 20, 2019 H.R. 3237: Emergency Security Supplemental Appropriations Act of 2021 Sponsor: Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) Status: Signed into law, 2021 May 20 House Vote Breakdown Congressional Budget Office Score Law Outline TITLE IV: BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS EXTENSION AND MODIFICATION OF THE AFGHAN SPECIAL IMMIGRANT VISA PROGRAM Sec. 401: Amends the Afghan Allies Protection Act of 2009 to expand eligibility to include Afghans who worked not only for the US Government for more than 1 year but also our allies as an off-base interpreter or if they performed "activities for United States military stationed at International Security Assistance Force (or any successor name for such Force). Increases the number of Special Immigrant Visas (SIV) to Afghan partners by 8,000, for a total of 34,500 allocated since December 19, 2014. Sec. 402: Authorizes the Secretary of Homeland Security and Secretary of state to jointly waive for 1 year (maximum 2 years with an extension) the requirement that Afghan partners eligible for SIVs get a medical exam before they can receive their visa. The Secretary of Homeland Security has to create a process to make sure Afghan SIV holders get a medical exam within 30 days of entry into the United States. Sec. 403: Allows the surviving spouse or child or employee of the United States Government abroad to be eligible for immigration into the United States if the employee worked for our government for at least 15 years or was killed in the line of duty. It also expands entry permissions for Afghan SIV applicants in addition to those who have already been approved. This is retroactive to June 30, 2021. Policies for Visa Processing: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. Policy Manual, Chapter 9: Certain Afghan Nationals U.S Department of State -- Bureau of Consular Affairs. “Special Immigrant Visas for Afghans - Who Were Employed by/on Behalf of the U.S. Government.” Audio Sources Gen. Mark Milley: "There was nothing that I or anyone else saw that indicated a collapse of this army and this government in 11 days." August 18, 2021 General Mark Milley: The time frame of rapid collapse that was widely estimated and ranged from weeks to months, and even years following our departure, there was nothing that I or anyone else saw that indicated a collapse of this army and this government in 11 days. Central Command submitted a variety of plans that were briefed and approved by the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Secretary of Defense and the President. These plans were coordinated, synchronized and rehearsed to deal with these various scenarios. One of those contingencies is what we are executing right now. As I said before, there's plenty of time to do AARs(After Action Reviews) and key lessons learned and to delve into these questions with great detail. But right now is not that time. Right now, we have to focus on this mission, because we have soldiers at risk. And we also have American citizens and Afghans who supported us for 20 years also at risk. This is personal and we're going to get them out. President Biden on Afghanistan Withdrawal Transcript July 8, 2021 Sound Clips 01:30 President Biden: When I announced our drawdown in April, I said we would be out by September, and we're on track to meet that target. Our military mission in Afghanistan will conclude on August 31. The drawdown is proceeding in a secure and orderly way, prioritizing the safety of our troops as they depart 3:40 President Biden: Together with our NATO allies and partners, we have trained and equipped nearly 300,000 current serving members of the military, the Afghan national security force, and many beyond that are no longer serving. Add to that hundreds of thousands more Afghan national defense and security forces trained over the last two decades. 04:04 President Biden: We provided our Afghan partners with all the tools, let me emphasize, all the tools -- training, equipment -- of any modern military. We provided advanced weaponry, and we're going to continue to provide funding and equipment and we'll ensure they have the capacity to maintain their Air Force. 5:54 President Biden: We're also going to continue to make sure that we take on Afghan nationals who worked side by side with US forces, including interpreters and translators. Since we're no longer going to have military there after this, we're not going to need them and they'll have no jobs. We're [sic] also going to be vital to our efforts. they've been very vital, and so their families are not exposed to danger as well. We've already dramatically accelerated the procedure time for Special Immigrant Visas to bring them to the United States. Since I was inaugurated on January 20, we've already approved 2,500 Special Immigrant Visas to come to the United States. Up to now, fewer than half have exercised the right to do that. Half have gotten on aircraft and come commercial flights and come and other half believe they want to stay, at least thus far. We're working closely with Congress to change the authorization legislation so that we can streamline the process of approving those visas. And those who have stood up for the operation to physically relocate 1000s of Afghans and their families before the US military mission concludes so that, if they choose, they can wait safely outside of Afghanistan, while their US visas are being processed. 8:13 President Biden: For those who have argued that we should stay just six more months, or just one more year, I asked them to consider the lessons of recent history. In 2011, the NATO allies and partners agreed that we would end our combat mission in 2014. In 2014, some argued one more year. So we kept fighting. We kept taking casualties. In 2015, the same, and on and on. Nearly 20 years of experience has shown us that the current security situation only confirms that just one more year of fighting in Afghanistan is not a solution, but a recipe for being there indefinitely. It's up to the Afghans to make the decision about the future of their country. Others are more direct. Their argument is that we should stay with the Afghans and Afghanistan indefinitely. In doing so they point to the fact that we we have not taken losses in this last year. So they claim that the cost of just maintaining the status quo is minimal. 9:19 President Biden: But that ignores the reality, and the facts that already presented on the ground in Afghanistan when I took office. The Taliban is at its strongest militarily since 2001. The number of US forces in Afghanistan had been reduced to a bare minimum. And the United States and the last administration made an agreement that they have to with the Taliban remove all our forces by May 1 of this year. That's what I inherited. That agreement was the reason the Taliban had ceased major attacks against US forces. 9:55 President Biden: If in April, I had instead announced that the United States was going to go back on that agreement, made by the last administration, the United States and allied forces will remain in Afghanistan for the foreseeable future, the Taliban would have again begun to target our forces. The status quo was not an option. Staying would have meant US troops taking casualties, American men and women back in the middle of a civil war, and we would run the risk of having to send more troops back in Afghanistan to defend our remaining troops. Once that agreement with the Taliban had been made, staying with a bare minimum force was no longer possible. 10:34 President Biden: So let me ask those who want us to stay: how many more? How many 1000s more Americans' daughters and sons are you willing to risk? How long would you have them stay? Already we have members of our military whose parents fought in Afghanistan 20 years ago. Would you send their children and their grandchildren as well? Would you send your own son or daughter? After 20 years, a trillion dollars spent training and equipping hundreds of 1000s of Afghan National Security and Defence Forces. 2,448 Americans killed, 20,722 more wounded, and untold 1000s coming home with unseen trauma to their mental health. I will not send another generation of Americans to war in Afghanistan with no reasonable expectation of achieving a different outcome. 11:51 President Biden: Today the terrorist threat has metastasized beyond Afghanistan. So, we are repositioning our resources and adapting our counterterrorism posture to meet the threats where they are now: significantly higher in South Asia, the Middle East and Africa. 12:07 President Biden: But make no mistake, our military and intelligence leaders are confident they have the capabilities to protect the homeland and our interests from any resurgent terrorist challenge emerging or emanating from Afghanistan. We're developing a counterterrorism over-the-horizon capability that will allow us to keep our eyes firmly fixed at any direct threat to the United States in the region and act quickly and decisively if needed. 12:38 President Biden: We also need to focus on shoring up America's core strengths to meet the strategic competition competition with China and other nations that is really going to determine our future. 14:58 Reporter: Is the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan now inevitable? President Biden: No. It is not. Because you have the Afghan troops, 300,000. Well equipped, as well equipped as any army in the world, and an air force against something like 75,000 Taliban. It is not inevitable. 15:45 President Biden: Do I trust the Taliban? No, but I trust the capacity of the Afghan military who is better trained, better equipped, and more competent in terms of conducting war. 18:07 Reporter: Your own intelligence community has assessed that the Afghan government will likely collapse President Biden: That is not true 18:53 President Biden: And I want to make clear what I made clear to Ghani, that we are not going to walk away and not sustain their ability to maintain that force. We are. We're going to also work to make sure we help them in terms of everything from food necessities and other things in the region. But there is not a conclusion that in fact, they cannot defeat the Taliban. I believe the only way there's going to be -- this is now Joe Biden, not the intelligence community -- the only way there's only going to be peace and secure in Afghanistan, is that they work out a modus vivendi with the Taliban, and they make a judgement as to how they can make peace. And the likelihood there's going to be one unified government in Afghanistan, controlling the whole country is highly unlikely. 21:30 Reporter: Mr. President, how serious was the corruption among the Afghanistan government to this mission failing there? President Biden: First of all, the mission hasn't failed yet. 22:00 President Biden: There were going to be negotiations between the Taliban and the Afghan national security forces, and the Afghan government that didn't come to fruition. So the question now is where do they go from here? The jury is still out, but the likelihood there's going to be the Taliban overrunning everything and owning the whole country is highly unlikely. 23:20 Reporter: Mr. President, "speed is safety," as you just said in your remarks. Are you satisfied with the timeline of relocating Afghan nationals? Is it happening quickly enough to your satisfaction if it may not happen until next month at the end? President Biden: It has already happened, there have already been people, about 1000 people have gotten on aircraft and come to the United States already on commercial aircraft. So as I said, there's over 2500 people, that as from January to now, have have gotten those visas and only half decided that they wanted to leave. The point is that I think the whole process has to be speeded up -- period -- in terms of being able to get these visas. Reporter: Why can't the US evacuate these Afghan translators to the United States to await their visa processing as some immigrants of the southern border have been allowed to? President Biden: Because the law doesn't allow that to happen. And that's why we're asking the Congress to consider changing the law. President Biden Remarks on Afghanistan Strategy Transcript April 14, 2021 Sound Clips 00:38 President Biden: I'm speaking to you today from the Roosevelt -- the Treaty room in the White House -- the same spot where in October of 2001, President George W. Bush informed our nation that the United States military had begun strikes on terrorist training camps in Afghanistan. It was just weeks, just weeks after the terrorist attack on our nation that killed 2,977 innocent souls, that turned Lower Manhattan into a disaster area, destroyed parts of the Pentagon and made hallowed ground in a field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, and sparked an American promise that we would never forget. We went to Afghanistan in 2001, to root out al Qaeda to prevent future terrorist attacks against the United States planned from Afghanistan. Our objective was clear, the cause was just, our NATO allies and partners rallied beside us. And I supported that military action along with the overwhelming majority of the members of Congress. More than seven years later, in 2008 weeks before we swore the oath of office -- President Obama and I were about to swear -- President Obama asked me to travel to Afghanistan and report back on the state of the war in Afghanistan. I flew to Afghanistan to the Kunar Valley, a rugged, mountainous region on the border of Pakistan. What I saw on that trip reinforced my conviction that only the Afghans have the right and responsibility to lead their country. And that more and endless American military force could not create or sustain a durable Afghan Government. I believed that our presence in Afghanistan should be focused on the reason we went in the first place: to ensure Afghanistan would not be used as a base from which to attack our homeland again. We did that, we accomplished that objective. I said, along with others, we would follow Osama bin Laden to the gates of hell if need be. That's exactly what we did. And we got him. It took us close to 10 years to put President Obama's commitment into form. And that's exactly what happened Osama bin Laden was gone. That was 10 years ago. Think about that. We delivered justice to Bin Laden a decade ago. And we've stayed in Afghanistan for a decade since. Since then, our reasons for remaining in Afghanistan have become increasingly unclear, even as the terrorist threat that we went to fight evolved. Over the past 20 years, the threat has become more dispersed, metastasizing around the globe. Al Shabaab in Somalia, Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, on Al Nusra in Syria, ISIS attempting to create a caliphate in Syria and Iraq and establishing affiliates in multiple countries in Africa and Asia. With the terror threat now in many places, keeping 1000s of troops grounded and concentrated in just one country at a cost of billions each year makes little sense to me and our leaders. We cannot continue the cycle of extending or expanding our military presence in Afghanistan, hoping to create ideal conditions for the withdraw and expecting a different result. I'm now the fourth United States President to preside over American troop presence in Afghanistan: two Republicans, two Democrats. I will not pass this responsibility on to a fifth. After consulting closely with our allies and partners, with our military leaders and intelligence personnel, with our diplomats and our development experts, with the Congress and the Vice President, as well as with Mr. Ghani and many others around the world. I concluded that it's time to end America's longest war. It's time for American troops to come home. 5:01 President Biden: When I came to office, I inherited a diplomatic agreement, duly negotiated between the government of the United States and the Taliban, that all US forces would be out of Afghanistan by May 1 2021, just three months after my inauguration. That's what we inherited. That commitment is perhaps not what I would have negotiated myself, but it was an agreement made by the United States government. And that means something. So in keeping with that agreement, and with our national interest, the United States will begin our final withdrawal beginning on May 1 of this year. 8:11 President Biden: You all know that less than 1% of Americans serve in our Armed Forces. The remaining 99%, we owe them. We owe them. They've never backed down from a single mission that we've asked of them. I've witnessed their bravery firsthand during my visits to Afghanistan. They've never wavered in their resolve. They paid a tremendous price on our behalf and they have the thanks of a grateful nation. The Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) High-Risk List Center for Strategic and International Studies Transcript March 10, 2021 Speaker: John Sopko - Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction Sound Clips 7:40 John Sopko: But right now, that state is under threat. In the wake of the February 2020 withdrawal agreement, all is not well. Compromise appears in short supply on either side. Taliban attacks have actually increased since the agreement was signed. Assassination of prominent officials, activists, journalists, aid workers and others have also increased, including an unsuccessful attack on one of the female members of the peace negotiating team. And the Taliban offensive on Kandahar city last October, as peace negotiations were ongoing, may well have succeeded, were it not for U.S. air support. Peace talks between the Afghan government and the Taliban have achieved little for Afghanistan so far, and only time will tell as to whether the new Biden administration initiative will bear fruit. And the Afghan people's fears for its own government survival are exacerbated by the knowledge of how dependent their country is on foreign military and financial support. 12:56 John Sopko: Another equally serious threat to Afghanistan's stability has also largely been ignored as we focus on the boots on the ground in Afghanistan. And that is the provision of last year's U.S.-Taliban agreement that stipulates that in addition to the departure of U.S. and coalition troops, or non-diplomatic civilian personnel: private security contractors, trainers, advisors, and supporting service personnel also must leave the country by May 1. Should this come to passSIGAR and many others believe this may be more devastating to the effectiveness of the Afghan security forces than the withdrawal of our remaining troops. Why is that? Because the Afghan government relies heavily on these foreign contractors and trainers to function. In the first quarter of fiscal year 2021 there are over 18,000 Defense Department contractors in Afghanistan, including 6000 Americans, and 7,000 3rd country nationals, 40% of whom are responsible for logistics, maintenance, or training tasks. Now, it is well known that the Afghan security forces need these contractors to maintain their equipment, manage supply chains, and train their military and police to operate the advanced equipment that we have purchased for them. For example, as of December, the Afghan National Army was completing just under 20% of its own maintenance work orders, well below the goal of 80% that was set and the 51% that they did in 2018. So that's actually going down. The Afghan National Police were just as bad if not worse, undertaking only 12% of their own maintenance work against a target of 35% and less than the 16% that we reported in our 2019 high risk list. Additionally, and more troubling. The Department of Defense does train, advise and assist command air, or commonly called TAC air recently reported that since late 2019, they have reduced their personnel in Afghanistan by 94%, and that the military drawdown now requires near total use of contract support to maintain the Afghan Air fleet. They assess that quote “further drawdown in the associated closure basis will effectively end all in country aviation training contracts in Afghanistan.” Again, why is this significant? Why do we view this as a high risk? Namely because contractors currently provide 100% of the maintenance for the Afghan Air Force, UAE 60 helicopters and CE 130 cargo aircraft and a significant portion of Afghans Light Combat Support aircraft. TAC air this January gave a bleak assessment, namely, that no Afghan airframe can be sustained as combat effective for more than a few months in the absence of contractor support. 17:51 John Sopko: Continued funding for U.S. reconstruction programs aimed at promoting economic development, rule of law, respect for human rights, good governance and security for the Afghan people may be more significant, because it may be the primary lever left for the US and other donors to influence that country. It appears that even the Taliban understand Afghanistan's dire need for foreign assistance. Because, as one of the few commitments that the US had to make last year was, “to seek economic cooperation for reconstruction, with the new post settlement, Afghan Islamic government.” Now how much the donor community wishes to stay involved will of course depend on what that government looks like and how it behaves. Numerous officials, including then Secretary of State Pompeo and Ambassador Halley, have stated that the US will be able to advance its human rights goals, including the rights of women and girls with the Taliban by leveraging or conditioning this much needed financial assistance. But unfortunately, as SIGAR has long reported, even when conditionality involved only dealing with the Afghan government, donors do not have a stellar record of successfully utilizing that conditionality to influence Afghan behavior. 27:19 John Sopko: Today our report suggests the donor community should realize the Afghan government is focused on a single goal, its survival. Afghanistan is more dependent on international support than ever before. It may not be an overstatement that if foreign assistance is withdrawn and peace negotiations fail, Taliban forces could be at the gates of Kabul in short order. Hearing: A PATHWAY FOR PEACE IN AFGHANISTAN: EXAMINING THE FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE AFGHANISTAN STUDY GROUP House Committee on Oversight and Reform: Subcommittee on National Security February 19, 2021 Testimony was heard from the following Afghanistan Study Group officials: Kelly A. Ayotte, Co-Chair; News Corp Board of Directors since April 2017 BAE Systems Board of Directors since June 2017 Blackstone Board of Directors Boston Properties Board of Directors Caterpillar Board of Directors Board of Advisors at Cirtronics General Joseph F. Dunford, Jr. (Retired), Co-Chair Former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff during the Obama and Trump presidencies. Lockheed Martin Board of Directors since February 2020 Nancy Lindborg, Co-Chair President and CEO of the David Lucile Packard Foundation Former President and CEO of the US Institute for Peace Former Assistant Administrator for the bureau for democracy conflict and humanitarian assistance at USAID During the mid-Obama years. Sound Clips 3:13 Rep. Stephen Lynch (MA): I'd also like to take a moment to thank the nonpartisan US Institute of Peace for the support and expertise they provided to the study group during the course of its work. 3:23 Rep. Stephen Lynch (MA): In the fiscal year 2020 omnibus bill Congress led by Senator Graham Senator Patrick Leahy and the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee of state foreign ops and related programs. They tasked the independent and bipartisan Afghanistan study group to quote, consider the implications of a peace settlement or the failure to reach a settlement on US policy, resources and commitments in Afghanistan. After nearly nine months of review and consultation with current and former US and Afghan government officials, allies and partners and other key stakeholders, the Afghanistan study group issued its final report earlier this month. 15:12 Kelly Ayotte: We recommend that US troops remain beyond may 1. We believe a precipitous withdrawal of US and international troops in May, would be catastrophic for Afghanistan, leading to civil war, and allow the reconstitution of terror groups which threaten the United States within an 18 to 36 month period. 15:41 Kelly Ayotte: Let me be clear, although we recommend that our troops remain beyond may 1, we propose a new approach toward Afghanistan, which aligns our policies, practices and messaging across the United States government to support the Afghan peace process, rather than prosecute a war. Our troops would remain not to fight a forever war, but to guarantee the conditions for a successful peace process and to protect our national security interests to ensure that Afghanistan does not become a haven again, for terrorists who threaten the United States of America. 37:15 General Joseph F. Dunford: Do we need to increase forces if the Taliban don't accept an extension past the first of May, and if they then would re initiate attacks against US forces? and Chairman, we heard exactly what you heard. In the fall. What we were told by commanders on the ground in the department of fence was that 4500 US forces, in addition to the NATO forces that are there was the minimum level to address both the mission as well as protection of our forces in the context of the conditions that existed in the fall in as you've highlighted, those conditions have only gotten worse since the fall so in in our judgment 2500 would not be adequate. Should the Taliban re initiate attacks against the United States Hearing: Examining the Trump Administration's Afghanistan Strategy House Committee on Oversight and Reform, Subcommittee on National Security January 28, 2020 Witness: John Sopko - Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) Sound Clips 48:54 John Sopko: We've almost created a system that forces people in the government to give happy talk success stories because they're over there on very short rotations. They want to show success. The whole system is almost geared to give you, and it goes up the chain of command, all the way to the President sometimes. He gets bad information from people out in the field because somebody on a nine month rotation, he has to show success, and that goes up. 54:24 John Sopko: Maybe incentivize honesty. And one of the proposals I gave at that time,be cause I was asked by the staff to come up with proposals, is put the same requirement on the government that we impose on publicly traded corporations. Publicly traded corporations have to tell the truth. Otherwise the SEC will indict the people involved. They have to report when there's a significant event. So put that onus, call it The Truth in Government Act if you want, that you in the administration are duty bound by statute to alert Congress to significant events that could directly negatively impact a program or process. So incentivize honesty. 1:10:25 John Sopko: Over 70% of the Afghan budget comes from the United States and the donors. If that money ended, I have said before and I will stand by it, then the Afghan government will probably collapse. Wartime Contracting Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs September 21, 2011 Witnesses: Charles Tiefer: Commissioner on the Commission on Wartime Contracting Clark Kent Ervin: Commissioner on the Commission on Wartime Contracting Sound Clips 1:11:30 Charles Tiefer: Our private security in Afghanistan appears to be a major source of payoffs to the Taliban. Our report has the first official statement that it's the second-largest source of money for the Taliban. Sen. Carl Levin: After drugs. Charles Tiefer: After drugs, that's right. 1:25:18 Clark Kent Ervin: It's critical that the government have a choice, and that means that there needs to be at least a small and expandable, organic capacity on the part of these three agencies to perform missions themselves, so the next time there's a contingency, the government has a choice between going with contractors and going in-house and the determination can be made whether it's more effective to do it either way, whether it's cheaper to do it either way. As we said at the inception, right now the government doesn't have an option. Contractors are the default option because they're the only option. President George W. Bush announces U.S. Military Strikes on Afghanistan October 7, 2001 President George W. Bush: Good afternoon. On my orders, the United States military has begun strikes against Al-Qaeda terrorist training camps and military installations of the Taliban regime in Afghanistan. These carefully targeted actions are designed to disrupt the use of Afghanistan as a terrorist base of operations and to attack the military capability of the Taliban regime. More than two weeks ago, I gave Taliban leaders a series of clear and specific demands: close terrorist training camps, hand over leaders of the Al-Qaeda network, and return all foreign nationals including American citizens unjustly detained in your country. None of these demands were met and now the Taliban will pay a price by destroying camps and disrupting communications. We will make it more difficult for the terror network to train new recruits and coordinate their evil plans. ** International Campaign Against Terrorism Senate Foreign Relations Committee October 25, 2001 Witness: Colin Powell: Secretary of State Sound Clip 27:00 Colin Powell: Our work in Afghanistan though, is not just of a military nature. We recognize that when the Al Qaeda organization has been destroyed in Afghanistan, and as we continue to try to destroy it in all the nations in which it exists around the world, and when the Taliban regime has gone to its final reward, we need to put in place a new government in Afghanistan, one that represents all the people of Afghanistan and one that is not dominated by any single powerful neighbor, but instead is dominated by the will of the people of Afghanistan. Executive Producer Recommendations Elect Stephanie Gallardo 2022 Krystal Kyle and Friends. August 21, 2021. “Episode 35 Audio with Matthew Hoh.” Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)

china truth ceo staying american america americans north director war numerous audio friends democrats military losing republicans congress new york times president series donald trump peace stranded syria iraq united states white house cnn trump administration government force pennsylvania africa pakistan afghanistan harris seeking code secretary washington post middle east vice president defense barack obama osama assassination bush roosevelt waiting donations laden lower manhattan new york magazine schuster get out collapse air force tac sen prevent remain south asia commission wall street journal troops joe biden pentagon joint chiefs somalia pledge intercept testimony reform departure citizenship timeline foreign policy afghan retired compromise al qaeda nato kabul sec armed forces taliban hwy daily beast patrick tucker co chair strategic increases music alley treaty uae regulations advisors osama bin laden united states presidents afghans moulton dod contractors us government subcommittee policies publicly sludge dunford homeland security jennifer steinhauer trillion george w bush ruse qaeda behalf arabian peninsula amends preference withdrawal james risen eager al shabaab kandahar united states government fiscal year open secrets oversight turning point john f ap news afghan national police national defense authorization act matt stoller special inspector general defense department congressional dish substack immigration services matt taibbi defense news us institute defense one nancy lindborg death warrant state pompeo ghani afghanistan veterans sivs fact check york times federal news network international security assistance force sound clips lee fang seth moulton cover art design central command authorizes afghan government matthew hoh state bureau david ippolito craig whitlock afghan air force sigar jared serbu defense contracting afghan national army oren liebermann defence forces annie karni mark landler zolan kanno youngs al nusra eli clifton eric schmitt crestview government act s department january 6th
On The Issues With Michele Goodwin
Afghanistan: What Happens Next? (with Karen J. Greenberg, Gayle Tzemach Lemmon, Renee Montagne and Gaisu Yari)

On The Issues With Michele Goodwin

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 55:49


It's 20 years after 9/11—what have we learned? In May, when U.S. and international troops began to withdraw from Afghanistan, feminists and Afghanistan experts warned of the brutal impact that would likely be felt by women and minorities with the return of the Taliban and in the vacuum of leadership. They were right.  The Taliban have announced their provisional government, which does not include a single woman. What does this mean for national security? The safety of women and girls? What are the geo-political dynamics yet to be sorted?     Helping us sort out these questions and set the record straight are special guests: Karen Joy Greenberg, expert on national security, terrorism and civil liberties and the director of the Center on National Security. Her latest book is Subtle Tools: The Dismantling of American Democracy from the War on Terror to Donald Trump. Greenberg's work has been featured in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times, The San Francisco Chronicle, The Nation, The National Interest and Mother Jones, among others.  Gayle Tzemach Lemmon, award-winning author and adjunct senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. She is the author of The Daughters of Kobani and Ashley's War, and writes regularly on Afghanistan's politics and economy, entrepreneurship in fragile states, the fight to end child marriage, and issues affecting women and girls for publications including the New York Times, Financial Times, Fast Company, Christian Science Monitor and CNN.com.  Renee Montagne, NPR correspondent and host. From 2004 to 2016, Montagne co-hosted NPR's "Morning Edition," the most widely heard radio news program in the United States. Since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, Montagne has made 10 extended reporting trips to Afghanistan, where she has traveled to every major city, from Kabul to Kandahar. She has profiled Afghanistan's presidents and power brokers, while also focusing on the stories of Afghans at the heart of their complex country: schoolgirls, farmers, mullahs, poll workers, midwives and warlords.Gaisu Yari, a human rights defender from Afghanistan and survivor of child marriage who holds a master's degree in human rights from Columbia University and a bachelor's in Middle Eastern and gender studies from the University of Virginia. Yari is a writer and active speaker on women's issues in Afghanistan and worked with the government of Afghanistan as a commissioner to the Civil Service Commission of Afghanistan, as well as with national and international organizations. The focus of her expertise is in human rights and gender justice. She has extensive knowledge and professional experience working in both the U.S. and Afghanistan.   Rate and review “On the Issues with Michele Goodwin" to let us know what you think of the show! Let's show the power of independent feminist media. Check out this episode's landing page at MsMagazine.com for a full transcript, links to articles referenced in this episode, further reading and ways to take action.Tips, suggestions, pitches? Get in touch with us at ontheissues@msmagazine.com. Support the show (http://msmagazine.com)Support the show (http://msmagazine.com)

The John Batchelor Show
1672: Has the Taliban learned a lesson from 2001? Anatol Lieven, Georgetown University @LievenAnatol @QuincyInst

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 7:50


Photo:  An Afghan and coalition security force arrested a Talibat in Panjwa'i district, Kandahar province, Dec. 24, 2012. The detained Taliban senior leader was responsible for the acquisition, coordination, emplacement and distribution of lethal aid for use in attacks targeting Afghan and coalition forces. (Photo by U.S. Army Pfc. Travis S. Jones) Has the Taliban learned a lesson from 2001?  Anatol Lieven, Georgetown University @LievenAnatol @QuincyInst https://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/HL2109/S00022/what-next-after-20-years-of-war-in-afghanistan.htm

Witness History
America attacks Afghanistan

Witness History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 9:57


In October 2001, just a month after the 9/11 attacks, the first airstrikes against Afghanistan began in what the US and its allies called Operation Enduring Freedom. The country was being targeted because it had provided a haven for al-Qaeda. In 2011 Louise Hidalgo spoke to two Afghans who were in Kabul the night the bombing started. (Photo: The aftermath of a US airstrike on Kandahar. Credit: Getty Images)

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast
With Robert Spencer and Susan Katz Keating

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 52:57


ROBERT SPENCER, Director, Jihad Watch, Weekly columnist, PJ Media and FrontPage Magazine, Author, "Mass Migration in Europe: A Model for the U.S.?," and forthcoming, "Islamophobia and the Threat to Free Speech," @jihadwatchRS  Robert Spencer: The “willful ignorance” on the part of the U.S. authorities towards Sharia is why America failed in Afghanistan - Sharia is more than a religious doctrine Spencer talks about the Obama administration's decision to trade five Guantanamo inmates for Bowe Bergdahl, four of whom are back enforcing a Sharia government in Afghanistan Germany: Afghan Muslim migrant who stabbed two tried to convert his neighbors to Islam SUSAN KATZ KEATING, Chief National Security Correspondent, JustTheNews.com, Security and Terrorism Correspondent, American Media Institute, Military Correspondent, People Magazine, @SKatzKeating Ahmad Massoud, leader of the resistance in Panjshir, Afghanistan, told Just the News' Susan Katz Keating that, “I will never surrender to the Taliban…I will fight them” Leaders of the resistance in Afghanistan view the Taliban as invaders What is the current state of the resistance in and around the Panjshir Valley? Is the Taliban looting valuables from Kabul and relocating them to Kandahar?

Langsam gesprochene Nachrichten | Deutsch lernen | Deutsche Welle
03.09.2021 – Langsam gesprochene Nachrichten

Langsam gesprochene Nachrichten | Deutsch lernen | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 8:17


Trainiere dein Hörverstehen mit den Nachrichten der Deutschen Welle von Freitag – als Text und als verständlich gesprochene Audio-Datei.Sechs Menschen bei Anschlag in Neuseeland verletzt Bei einem offenbar islamistisch motivierten Anschlag in Neuseeland sind sechs Menschen verletzt worden. Der Angreifer attackierte in einem Supermarkt in einem Vorort von Auckland wahllos Menschen mit einem Messer, wie die Polizei mitteilte. Beamte erschossen den Mann. Die neuseeländische Premierministerin Jacinda Ardern sprach von einem "Terroranschlag". Demnach war der aus Sri Lanka stammende Täter von der Ideologie der Dschihadistenmiliz "Islamischer Staat" (IS) inspiriert. Er habe seit 2016 unter behördlicher Überwachung gestanden, hieß es weiter. Japans Ministerpräsident tritt nicht wieder an Japans Regierungschef Yoshihide Suga will sein Amt in Kürze aufgeben. Bei einer Krisensitzung der Liberaldemokratischen Partei teilte Suga in Tokio mit, dass er am 29. September nicht zur Wiederwahl als LDP-Chef antrete. Damit beendet der 72-Jährige de facto auch seine Zeit als Ministerpräsident nach nur einem Jahr. Sugas Ankündigung kam unerwartet. Bisher hatte er als Favorit bei der Wahl zum LDP-Vorsitzenden gegolten, obwohl die japanische Regierung wegen ihres Umgangs mit der Corona-Pandemie derzeit historisch schlechte Umfragewerte erzielt. UN nehmen Hilfsflüge für Afghanistan wieder auf Nach der Machtübernahme der Taliban haben die Vereinten Nationen ihren humanitären Flugdienst in Afghanistan wieder aufgenommen. Wie ein Sprecher mitteilte, könnten so 160 humanitäre Organisationen ihre Arbeit in den afghanischen Provinzen wieder fortsetzen. Durch den Passagierflugdienst seien derzeit die pakistanische Hauptstadt Islamabad mit Mazar-i-Sharif im Norden und Kandahar im Süden Afghanistans verbunden. Außerdem werde eine Luftfrachtbrücke eingerichtet, um beispielsweise medizinische Hilfsgüter dorthin zu transportieren, wo sie am dringendsten benötigt würden. US-Luftfahrtbehörde verbietet bis auf weiteres Starts von Virgin Galactic Wegen eines Fehlers beim ersten touristischen Weltraumtestflug im Juli darf das Unternehmen Virgin Galactic des Milliardärs Richard Branson vorerst keine Starts mehr durchführen. Die US-Luftfahrtbehörde FAA untersucht, ob die Abweichung vom festgelegten Kurs eine Gefahr für die öffentliche Sicherheit war. Virgin Galactic teilte mit, man arbeite eng mit der FAA zusammen, um eine gründliche Untersuchung zu ermöglichen und eine schnelle Lösung zu finden. Eigentlich sollten dieses Jahr noch zwei Testflüge erfolgen, ehe im kommenden Jahr das Geschäft mit zahlenden Passagieren beginnen sollte. 44 Hurrikan-Tote im Großraum New York Im Großraum New York sind durch den Hurrikan "Ida" nach offiziellen Angaben mindestens 44 Menschen ums Leben gekommen. Allein im Bundesstaat New Jersey, der an New York grenzt, seien 23 Tote zu beklagen, sagte Gouverneur Phil Murphy. In der Millionenmetropole starben mindestens 13 Menschen. Durch den Hurrikan hatten sich mehrere Tornados gebildet, die mit Windgeschwindigkeiten von bis zu 200 Stundenkilometern weite Teile der Region verwüsteten. US-Präsident Joe Biden wird an diesem Freitag den ebenfalls schwer getroffenen Bundesstaat Louisiana besuchen. Deutsche Fußballnationalmannschaft gewinnt mühsam gegen Liechtenstein In der Qualifikation für die Fußballweltmeisterschaft hat sich die deutsche Nationalmannschaft mit 2 zu 0 gegen Liechtenstein durchgesetzt. Im ersten Spiel unter dem neuen Bundestrainer Hansi Flick konnten die deutschen Spieler nicht überzeugen. Nur Timo Werner und Leroy Sané trafen gegen die überwiegend aus Amateuren bestehende liechtensteiner Nationalelf. Die nächsten Gegner in der Qualifikationsgruppe J sind am Sonntag Armenien und am kommenden Mittwoch Island. Deutschland liegt mit neun Punkten aus vier Spielen auf Platz zwei der Tabelle hinter Armenien.

Chewing the Fat with Jeff Fisher
Ep 696 | Fat Pile Friday: Go F-CK Yourselves

Chewing the Fat with Jeff Fisher

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 49:10


Sober money… Atheist is new chaplain… Iowa Pledge law voicemail… Meghan tweets F you… Kandahar and Jalalabad old bit… Kanye wants to change name… Subscribe to the YouTube Channel… Email to Chewingthefat@theblaze.com Subscribe www.blazetv.com/jeffy Promo code jeffy… Change my name / Kris Cruz… Al Capone stuff up for auction… Hot News Natalie on Prather… Email following the rules… Rundown of health events… Elon trolls Bezos… Roof death penalty… Landlord bidness… Quiet rooms… ‘Destined to Die Young' Elvis / Interview tomorrow… Krispy Kreme free doughnuts for vaxxed…  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Fresh Air
CNN's Clarissa Ward On The Taliban & Afghan Women

Fresh Air

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 46:34


Clarissa Ward, CNN's chief international correspondent, spent 3 weeks in Afghanistan, first with the Afghan military in Kandahar, just before it fell; then in Ghazni province, in territory that was taken over by the Taliban, and in Kabul, where the Taliban were celebrating their victory. After reporting on the chaos and danger at the airport, as thousands of people tried to escape on U.S. military flights, she got on an Air Force C-17 to Doha, Qatar, along with hundreds of evacuees. We'll talk about what she learned and what she experienced.

The John Batchelor Show
1622: #KabulDiary: Kandahar siege was the broken arrow. @BillRoggio @ThomasJoscelyn @LongWarJournal GLXXG

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 7:51


Photo: An 1881 photo showing the ruined Old Kandahar citadel of Shah Hussain Hotak that was destroyed by the Afsharid forces of Nader Shah Afshar in 1738. This destroyed fortress is still standing today.. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow #KabulDiary:  Kandahar siege was the broken arrow. @BillRoggio @ThomasJoscelyn @LongWarJournal GLXXG

The Sean Hannity Show
Captain Sam Brown's Inspiring Story - August 23rd, Hour 3

The Sean Hannity Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 36:35


Army Captain Sam Brown is now a Senate candidate in the state of Nevada. He was deployed to Kandahar, Afghanistan in 2008. A few months into this deployment, Sam's vehicle was struck by an IED blast that severely wounded him. Upon immediate evacuation from the battle field, he began a long three year journey of rehabilitation and recovery. Sam was medically retired from the US Army as a Captain in September 2011, after more than five years of active duty service. Joining him is Tyler Merritt, CEO and Founder of Nine Line Apparel, Nine Line Foundation was founded in 2013 by CPT Tyler Merritt, USA, a member of the Army's elite 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment. In early 2013, after Tyler's West Point classmate, then CPT Edward “Flip” Klein, lost three limbs fighting in Afghanistan, Tyler decided to do the same thing he did as a soldier: proactively look for solutions. In addition to personal support, Tyler got permission from the NLA Board, determining that a portion of all apparel purchases be donated to help defray the tremendous rehabilitation costs of CPT Klein and, in the process, began a journey to help severely wounded veterans regain their lives. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Student of the Gun Radio
“You Don't Need Guns to be Safe” ~Taliban | SOTG 1082

Student of the Gun Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 50:37


Taking a page from the American left and Democrats, the Taliban is disarming the people and telling them that they no longer need guns to be safe. To reinforce that fact, the Taliban is also executing anyone who disagrees with them or is critical of their regime.  The failure of the criminal Biden regime becomes more glaring and self-evident each day as they took years of stability and threw it away overnight. For a party that claims to care so much about “women's rights”,  how can they excuse the total abandonment of those we promised to protect? Also, during our Duracoat Finished Firearm segment, Professor Paul introduces us to what he called the “Universal Key”. Just what is that? Tune in and find out.  Thanks for being a part of SOTG! We hope you find value in the message we share. If you've got any questions, here are some options to contact us: • Send an Email • Send a Text • Call Us Enjoy the show! And remember…You're a Beginner Once, a Student For Life! TOPICS COVERED THIS EPISODE • DuraCoat Finished Firearms - DuraCoat University     • TOPIC: Universal Key: Mossberg 500A 12 gauge• Huge thanks to our Partners:Brownells | CrossBreed | Duracoat | SWAT Fuel • Afghanistan: Taliban confiscating weapons from civilians because they ‘no longer need them' www.independent.co.uk • Video shows Afghans passing baby off to troops to escape Taliban www.foxnews.com/politics • Afghanistan: Mounting Taliban Revenge Killings  www.hrw.org/news/ • Taliban kill woman for not wearing burqa on same day they vow to honor women's rights nypost.com/2021 • What have the kids seen for the past 20 years? How old are the kids now? Where will they go with that motivation?• Neighborhood Watch with Rifles: Patriot Fire Team  www.studentofthegun.com/articles FEATURING: Madison Rising, Jarrad Markel, Paul Markel, SOTG University PARTNERS: SDS Imports, Brownells, Inc., CrossBreed Holsters, DuraCoat Firearm Finishes, SWAT Fuel FIND US ON: Full30, Parler, MeWe.com, iTunes, Stitcher, AppleTV, Roku, Amazon, GooglePlay, YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, tumblr SOURCES Mission Planner Giveaway - www.sotggiveaway.com From www.independent.co.uk: Afghan civilians are being stripped of their weapons because they can now "feel safe" and no longer need them, the Tablian has claimed. A Taliban spokesperson said its fighters have been confiscating arms in the capital Kabul, which fell to the extremist group on Sunday. "We understand people kept weapons for personal safety," the spokesperson said. "We are not here to harm innocent civilians". (Click Here for Full Article)   From www.hrw.org/news: Taliban forces in Afghanistan are targeting known critics for attack despite claiming that they have ordered their fighters to act with restraint, Human Rights Watch said today. In Kandahar, the Taliban have been detaining and executing suspected members of the provincial government and security forces, and in some cases their relatives. Among recent cases, the Taliban executed a popular Kandahari comedian, Nazar Mohammad, known as Khasha Zwan, who posted routines that included songs and jokes on TikTok. He had reportedly also worked with the local police. On July 22, 2021, Taliban fighters abducted Khasha Zwan from his home in southern Kandahar, beat him, and then shot him multiple times. After a video of two men slapping and abusing Khasha Zwan appeared on social media, the Taliban admitted that two of their fighters had killed him. (Click Here for Full Article)   From www.studentofthegun.com: In the early morning hours of April 19th, 1775, the members of the local neighborhood watch program formed on the North Bridge in Concord, Massachusetts. The community was in crisis. Eight of their friends lay murdered on the ground a short distance away on the Lexington town green. Hold on you say, those men were not a “neighborhood watch”. They were members of the local militia and training bands. All very common in New England at the time. I would ask you, what was a minuteman if not a member of the neighborhood watch? The minutemen and the members of the training bands and militias were not paid soldiers or policemen. They were volunteer community members. (Click Here for Full Article)

Rush Limbaugh Morning Update
Our Military: Very Special People

Rush Limbaugh Morning Update

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 6:34


RUSH: This is Merit in Dayton, Ohio, nice to have you on the program. CALLER: Hi, Rush, I actually just wanted to thank you. I am a wife and sister of two Army soldiers. My brother served through tours in Afghanistan and my husband is now in Iraq, set to do a year, and it's just nice to know that there are other people going over there and telling them that they're doing a great job and that we're all ready for them to come home and that we love 'em and we support 'em and they're doing the right thing. RUSH: Thank you. They are special people. It was an honor to be able to talk to them and convey what I think to be the majority sentiments of the people in this country. But I want to tell you, when we were at Kandahar? Kandahar is the place where there still are skirmishes going on. There was mortar fire the night we were there — nowhere near us but at the base. The base is huge. One of the things that I noticed when I had that troop event is that these people would all tell me what an “honor it was” to meet me, and I thank them, but I'm honest here, folks: I can't tell you how small I felt compared to these people, the age range was anywhere from 18 to 30 and even older. I mean, some of the command officers over there, career military, have been around for a long time, and I mean I'll be honest. https://www.rushlimbaugh.com/daily/2005/02/28/our_military_very_special_people/ Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Ben Shapiro Show
Ep. 1318 - Joe Biden Just Surrendered To The Taliban

The Ben Shapiro Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 53:19


The war in Afghanistan draws to a conclusion as the Taliban overrun Kandahar and threaten the US Embassy in Kabul; and the American Academy of Pediatrics says kids don't need to see human faces. Check out Debunked. Where Ben Shapiro exposes leftist fallacies in 15 minutes or less. Watch the full season available only on The Daily Wire: utm.io/uc9er  My new book, 'The Authoritarian Moment: How the Left Weaponized America's Institutions Against Dissent,' is now available! Secure your copy here: https://utm.io/udsnA Or get a signed copy for only $30: https://utm.io/udAtM Subscribe to Morning Wire, Daily Wire's new morning news podcast, and get the facts first on the news you need to know: https://utm.io/udyIF

Global News Podcast
Afghanistan: Panic as civilians flee Taliban onslaught

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 30:28


Thousands of refugees seek sanctuary in Kabul as the militants seize more cities. Kandahar, the second largest city, has fallen, and the World Food Programme has warned of a humanitarian catastrophe. Also, China refuses to cooperate with World Health Organisation to further investigate origins of coronavirus, and why a project in Scotland is asking people to record the sounds of their workplace.

Up First
Friday, August 13, 2021

Up First

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 13:09


The Taliban has taken control of Afghanistan's second largest city, Kandahar. Now, the Biden admin. is sending 3,000 troops back into Afghanistan to help evacuate U.S. diplomats and civilians. Also, the FDA approves a third COVID-19 vaccine shot for those with weakened immune systems. And Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas says the U.S. is seeing an "unprecedented number of migrants" at the southern border with Mexico.

The John Batchelor Show
1587: New Delhi watches Kabul closely. Sadanand @Dhume @AEI @WSJOpinion GLXXG

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 12:16


Photo:  An edict of Ashoka from Kandahar, now in the Kabul museum. . Relations between the people of Afghanistan and India traces to the Indus Valley Civilisation. Following Alexander the Great's brief occupation, the successor state of the Seleucid Empire controlled the region known today as Afghanistan. In 305 BCE, they ceded much of it to the Indian Maurya Empire as part of an alliance treaty. "Kabul has a castle celebrated for its strength, accessible only by one road. In it there are Musulmáns, and it has a town, in which are infidels from Hind." — Istahkrí, 921 CE CBS Eyes on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow New Delhi watches Kabul closely. Sadanand @Dhume @AEI @WSJOpinion GLXXG https://www.wsj.com/articles/u-s-withdrawal-afghanistan-taliban-islamist-jihadist-human-rights-violations-11628196829?mkt_tok=NDc1LVBCUS05NzEAAAF-yj2WH89VlVSD9x8JBNwqfYelSOPibdjFmMVd48wvsY45GW7TwESdU46QufiQRvxhSyPQRA1x6-ID2DVmlmU-wO2PAZ645fxwSBm1Zi_f8tk