Podcast appearances and mentions of Francis Fukuyama

American political scientist, political economist, and author

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Francis Fukuyama

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Best podcasts about Francis Fukuyama

Latest podcast episodes about Francis Fukuyama

Democracy IRL
Have We Reached Peak China? Interview with Andrew G. Walder

Democracy IRL

Play Episode Play 32 sec Highlight Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 43:41


Political sociologist Andrew G. Walder, the Denise O'Leary and Kent Thiry Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences and Senior Fellow in the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, is a specialist on the sources of conflict, stability, and change in communist regimes and their successor states. Walder joins Francis Fukuyama to discuss China's economic slowdown, why it suffers from high inequality, and whether the country has peaked and is now facing long-term stagnation.Andrew G. Walder is the Denise O'Leary and Kent Thiry Professor of Sociology at Stanford University and Senior Fellow at Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies. His research has focused on the social impact of revolutions, particularly the sources of stability and change in communist regimes and their successor states, with a special emphasis on China. His book on Communist Neo-Traditionalism: Work and Authority in Chinese Industry (1986) examined the way that Communist Party organization and reward structures created patron-client forms of authority in post-revolution urban China. Professor Walder's subsequent work examined the evolution of property rights and economics organization under the impact of market reform and the consequences for social stratification, career and intergenerational mobility, and political conflict. He is the author of Fractured Rebellion: The Beijing Red Guard Movement (2009), which analyzed the origins of political factionalism during the Cultural Revolution and explored how this phenomenon altered the direction of the student movement and its social impact. At Stanford, he has served as Chair of the Department of Sociology; Director of the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center; and Director of the Division of International, Comparative and Area Studies. Professor Walder is a past recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and a former Fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. His books have received awards from the American Sociological Association and the Association for Asian Studies.

Conversations with Bill Kristol
Francis Fukuyama on the War in Ukraine, Authoritarianism, and Liberal Democracy

Conversations with Bill Kristol

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 56:43


Eleven months into the war, where do things stand in Ukraine? What does the West need to do to help Ukraine win? What lessons can we draw from the war about the ambitions of authoritarians, the resolve of liberal democracies today, and the most pressing geopolitical challenges we face? To discuss these questions, Bill Kristol is joined by Francis Fukuyama, the Olivier Nomellini Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University, who has led important efforts in education and civil society in Ukraine over the last decade. According to Fukuyama, we are in the midst of a difficult moment in the war. Nonetheless, he argues, the fundamental dynamics remain unchanged: Ukraine can win if it receives adequate military and financial support from the West. Fukuyama argues that Ukraine's impressive performance and Russia's weakness should force us to confront and reassess the fashionable narrative of pessimism about liberal democracies. The war, as well as other recent developments, has revealed the reserves of strength and resilience in liberal democracies, while the weaknesses of strong states such as Russia and China have become more apparent. This assessment is not one of complacency. Rather, Fukuyama points to the high stakes of the war—and the importance of strengthening our resolve to defend free countries against authoritarian threats.

The Podcast for Social Research
(Pop) Cultural Marxism, Episode 4: 2022 Cultural Year in Review

The Podcast for Social Research

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 194:28


In episode four of (Pop) Cultural Marxism, Ajay, Isi, and Joseph review the year 2022 in pop culture via the prism of five topics and trends: "open world" (and cinematic universe) fatigue (for example, Assassin's Creed: Vahalla, Sonic Frontiers, Legend of Zelda); the plague of remakes and cultural nostalgia (Top Gun Maverick, Wednesday, Interview with the Vampire); cultural paranoia (true crime TV and paraphernalia, including the "In Case I Go Missing Binder," Nextdoor, Tár); liberal fan fiction (Handmaid's Tale, Bridgerton); and the substitution of moralism and forensic analysis for actual aesthetic judgment (explainers, the backlash to critique, and "explains it all" prequels like Lord of the Rings: Rings of Power). Do open worlds lend gravitas to video games—or do they just create sameness? What are the pastoral impulses behind farming games? Is the mania for remakes confirmation of Francis Fukuyama's "End of History"? Is Tár a product of cancel cultural panic? What is "plastic representation"; and how does representational fantasy like Bridgerton erase the very historical knowledge that makes social critique possible? And finally, what explains the urge to explain it all? How does ambiguity provide potency to art? The podcast closes with a discussion of Ajay's, Isi's, and Joseph's favorite 2022 things (whether actually released in 2022 or just personally discovered): Elden Ring, Yellowjackets, Hades, Azor, The Banshees of Inisherin, Station 11, and Xenoblade Chronicles 3.

Take Back the Day

Sam and Simon are together in a room, for a change, and discuss the impact of artificial intelligence, existential crises, and a range of other topics. Along the way they mention: The Cope Zine (https://simon.co.za/COPE.pdf) (instructions on how to fold it below) ChatGPT (https://chat.openai.com/chat?__cf_chl_tk=B07daYor4vLq8_6t4W8A9OJEqUNGVa2ZYBN1RpViGxI-1674117777-0-gaNycGzNFn0) again. Nick Cave's The Red Hand Files on ChatGPT (https://www.theredhandfiles.com/chat-gpt-what-do-you-think/) Francis Fukuyama (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_Fukuyama) and his theories on the progress of civilisation. Irresistible (https://www.netflix.com/title/81249604) the movie (one of the many things Simon could not remember). Also Triangle of Sadness (https://www.triangleofsadness.film/). The incredible art of Fanie Buys (https://www.faniebuys.com/). Many games. Including World of Warcraft, Don't Starve Together, Mario Kart, Stardew Valley, League of Legends, and other candidates for Sam and Simon to play together. Wingspan (https://stonemaiergames.com/games/wingspan/). How to fold a zine: https://annabrones.files.wordpress.com/2020/03/make-a-one-page-zine.jpg?w=700&h=467

The Neoliberal Podcast
The Neoliberal Podcast's Best Books of 2022 (Part Two)

The Neoliberal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 69:18


Jeremiah recaps the best books from 2022. From those books covered on the podcast to the more obscure finds, from fiction to non-fiction, including biographies, academic works, humor, political science, science fiction and more, it's all here as we recap the best books of the year.   Recommended listening:   Best Books of 2022, Part One - https://open.spotify.com/episode/0ESEBmWWlyUhI7d4SgyEaw   Interview with Francis Fukuyama - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-end-of-history-ft-francis-fukuyama/id1390384827?i=1000590281758   Interview with Richard Reeves - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/whats-gone-wrong-with-boys-and-men-ft-richard-reeves/id1390384827?i=1000583029300   Interview with Brad DeLong - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/slouching-towards-utopia-ft-brad-delong/id1390384827?i=1000578720797   To make sure you hear every episode, join our Patreon at https://www.patreon.com/neoliberalpodcast. Patrons get access to exclusive bonus episodes, our sticker-of-the-month club, and our insider Slack.  Become a supporter today! Got questions for the Neoliberal Podcast?  Send them to mailbag@cnliberalism.org Follow us at: https://twitter.com/ne0liberal https://www.instagram.com/neoliberalproject/ https://www.twitch.tv/neoliberalproject   Join a local chapter at https://cnliberalism.org/become-a-member/

Democracy IRL
Ukraine's Winter War, with Steven Pifer

Democracy IRL

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 40:30


To kick off our second season, Francis Fukuyama is once again joined by former US Ambassador to Ukraine Steven Pifer. The two discuss the prospects for negotiation in Ukraine, the origins of the Russian invasion, and how the war may evolve this winter.Steven Pifer is a nonresident senior fellow in the Arms Control and Non-Proliferation Initiative, Strobe Talbott Center for Security, Strategy, and Technology, and the Center on the United States and Europe at the Brookings Institution, and an affiliate of the Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC) at Stanford University. His research focuses on nuclear arms control, Ukraine, Russia, and European security.Brookings articleVideo of this conversation

The CGAI Podcast Network
Energy Security Cubed: Energy Security Year in Review 2022

The CGAI Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 49:25


On this special episode of the Energy Security Cubed Podcast, Kelly Ogle and Joe Calnan discuss major events in global and Canadian energy security in 2022, and what to watch for into the future. Guest Bios: - Joe Calnan is a Fellow and Energy Security Forum Manager at the Canadian Global Affairs Institute Host Bio: - Kelly Ogle (host): President and CEO of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute (www.cgai.ca/staff#Ogle) Clip Guest Bios (in order of appearance) - Thierry Bros is a Professor at Sciences Po Paris, find him on Twitter at @thierry_bros - Roy Norton is a CGAI Fellow and an Adjunct Assistant Professor at the University of Waterloo - Greg Brew is a CGAI Fellow and Henry A. Kissinger Postdoctoral Fellow at International Security Studies and the Jackson School of Global Affairs at Yale University, find him on Twitter at @gbrew24 - Dale Naly is the former Associate Minister of Natural Gas and the current Minister of Service Alberta and Red Tape Reduction in the Government of Alberta - Kathryn Porter is the founder of energy research firm Watt-Logic, find Watt-Logic at watt-logic.com - Swaran Singh is a CGAI Fellow and Professor and Former Chair of the Centre for International Politics Organisation and Disarmament in the School of International Studies at Jawaharlal Nehru University What is Joe reading? 1. History of the Peloponnesian War, by Thucydides: https://www.amazon.ca/History-Peloponnesian-War-Thucydides/dp/0140440399 2. The Iliad, by Homer: https://www.amazon.ca/Iliad-Homer/dp/0140445927 3. Political Order and Political Decay: From the Industrial Revolution to the Globalization of Democracy, by Francis Fukuyama: https://www.amazon.ca/Political-Order-Decay-Industrial-Globalization/dp/1491584874 4. Capitalism, Socialism, and Democracy, by Joseph Schumpeter: https://www.amazon.ca/Capitalism-Socialism-Democracy-Joseph-Schumpeter/dp/0061561614 What is Kelly reading? 1. From Left to Right: Saskatchewan's Political and Economic Transformation, by Dale Eisler: https://www.amazon.ca/Left-Right-Saskatchewans-Political-Transformation-ebook/dp/B09XJHM6M6 2. Revival and Change: The 1957 and 1958 Diefenbaker Elections, by John C. Courtney: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Revival-Change-Diefenbaker-Elections-Turning/dp/0774866640 3. Personality and Power: Builders and Destroyers of Modern Europe, by Ian Kershaw: https://www.amazon.com/Personality-Power-Builders-Destroyers-Modern/dp/1594203458 4. Ice War Diplomat: Hockey Meets Cold War Politics at the 1972 Summit Series, by Gary J. Smith: https://www.amazon.ca/Ice-War-Diplomat-Behind-Scenes/dp/1771623179 Recording Date: January 3, 2023 Energy Security Cubed is part of the CGAI Podcast Network. Follow the Canadian Global Affairs Institute on Facebook, Twitter (@CAGlobalAffairs), or on LinkedIn. Head over to our website at www.cgai.ca for more commentary. Produced by Joseph Calnan. Music credits to Drew Phillips.

El Búho
La Biblioteca de El Búho: El origen de las ideas liberales y sus retoños extremistas (Todos oyentes)

El Búho

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 30:30


José García Domínguez, Cristina Losada y Eugenia Gayo hablan del último libro de Francis Fukuyama, "El liberalismo y sus desencantados".

In Pursuit of Development
Just copy us! Why can't the rest of the world be more like Scandinavia? — Harald Eia

In Pursuit of Development

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 51:50


Scandinavian countries are well-known for high standards of living and many people wonder about the origins of the welfare state model in Scandinavia and why it has worked so well. The features of the welfare state in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden typically include high state spending, strong universal public services, and relatively high equality in gender roles.But what explains the success of this model of development and how did these countries get to where they are today? These are some of the questions my guest – Harald Eia – tries to answer in a recent book co-authored with Ole-Martin Ihle. The book – The Mystery of Norway – discusses how Norway became one of the most prosperous countries in the world. It focuses on the relationship between wealth and happiness, and the power of civil society and trade unions in negotiating wages and a range of benefits. The book also highlights the important role played by The Norwegian Labour and Welfare Administration – popularly known in Norway by its acronym – NAV, which administers a third of the national budget through schemes such as unemployment benefit, work assessment allowance, sickness benefit, pensions, child benefit and cash-for-care benefit.Harald Eia is a sociologist and became a household name in Norway in the mid-1990s having starred in several hit comedy shows. He has since then been one of the country's most popular and well-known comedians. Key highlights Introduction - 00:52Is there a Norwegian model of development? - 03:18Origins and functions of the welfare state in Norway: 06:22Can money make you happy? 20:20Relative poverty in one of the world's wealthiest countries: 28:30Immigration: 35:13Host:Professor Dan Banik, University of Oslo, Twitter: @danbanik  @GlobalDevPodApple Google Spotify YouTubehttps://in-pursuit-of-development.simplecast.com/

KPFA - Law & Disorder w/ Cat Brooks
Anti-Imperialist Struggle Makes Us Human w/ Vijay Prashad

KPFA - Law & Disorder w/ Cat Brooks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 63:54


As the Soviet Union came crashing down, Francis Fukuyama declared what he called the end of history in 1994, imagining that capitalism had won out – socialism had failed – and that global governing formations would sit within capitalist democratic values from there on. This “end of history” theory has been challenged by many, including Fukuyama himself much more recently. Our guest today is a historian and a scholar who thinks of history – not in linear form, not in cyclical form, and certainly not in a form that has an ending. He says that history zigs and zags, where we consider failed historic movements as experiments that didn't quite go right, as opposed to failures. More important than failure or success, the point here is that the struggle itself is a learning process and a humanizing one. For that reason, the book that we'll be discussing is called Struggle Makes Us Human with historian, author, and Executive Director of the Tricontinental: Institute for Social Research, Vijay Prashad. Follow Vijay Prashad on Twitter: https://twitter.com/vijayprashad Check out the Tricontinental's website: https://thetricontinental.org/ —- Subscribe to this podcast: https://plinkhq.com/i/1637968343?to=page Get in touch: lawanddisorder@kpfa.org Follow us on socials @LawAndDis: https://twitter.com/LawAndDis; https://www.instagram.com/lawanddis/   The post Anti-Imperialist Struggle Makes Us Human w/ Vijay Prashad appeared first on KPFA.

Democracy IRL
Year-End Wrap-Up: The State of Global Democracy, with Larry Diamond

Democracy IRL

Play Episode Play 49 sec Highlight Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 62:45


As 2022 comes to a close, Francis Fukuyama sits down with his CDDRL colleague and democracy expert Larry Diamond for a wide-ranging conversation about the state of global democracy and the year's dramatic political developments in China, Iran, and the United States.Larry Diamond is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, the Mosbacher Senior Fellow in Global Democracy at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI), and a Bass University Fellow in Undergraduate Education at Stanford University. He is also a professor by courtesy of Political Science and Sociology at Stanford. His research focuses on democratic trends and conditions around the world and on policies and reforms to defend and advance democracy. His latest edited book (with Orville Schell), China's Influence and American Interests (Hoover Press, 2019), urges a posture of constructive vigilance toward China's global projection of “sharp power,” which it sees as a rising threat to democratic norms and institutions. He offers a massive open online course (MOOC) on Comparative Democratic Development through the edX platform and is now writing a textbook to accompany it.Diamond's book, Ill Winds: Saving Democracy from Russian Rage, Chinese Ambition, and American Complacency, analyzes the challenges confronting liberal democracy in the United States and around the world at this potential “hinge in history,” and offers an agenda for strengthening and defending democracy at home and abroad. A paperback edition with a new preface was released by Penguin in April 2020. His other books include: In Search of Democracy (2016), The Spirit of Democracy (2008), Developing Democracy: Toward Consolidation (1999),  Promoting Democracy in the 1990s (1995), and Class, Ethnicity, and Democracy in Nigeria (1989). He has also edited or coedited more than forty books on democratic development around the world, most recently, Dynamics of Democracy in Taiwan: The Ma Ying-jeou Years.

The Neoliberal Podcast
The End of History ft. Francis Fukuyama

The Neoliberal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 61:17


How robust is liberal democracy worldwide? Why do authoritarian countries like China, Iran and Russia seem to be struggling right now? How safe is democracy in the developed world? Francis Fukuyama joins the podcast to discuss how the ideas from his book 'The End of History' apply to what we're seeing in geopolitics today. We discuss what capital-H History is really about, whether neoliberalism is to blame for the rise of authoritarianism in recent decades, the contradictions that give strong states inherent weaknesses, and what he's watching for to see if the world might experience another wave of democratization. Recommended Reading: American Purpose - https://www.americanpurpose.com/ Persuasion - https://www.persuasion.community/ The UnPopulist - https://www.theunpopulist.net/ Frankly Fukuyama - https://www.americanpurpose.com/topics/frankly-fukuyama/   To make sure you hear every episode, join our Patreon at https://www.patreon.com/neoliberalproject. Patrons get access to exclusive bonus episodes, our sticker-of-the-month club, and our insider Slack.  Become a supporter today! Got questions for the Neoliberal Podcast?  Send them to mailbag@cnliberalism.org Follow us at: https://twitter.com/ne0liberal https://www.instagram.com/neoliberalproject/ https://www.twitch.tv/neoliberalproject   Join a local chapter at https://cnliberalism.org/become-a-member/

The Democracy Group
Best of 2022: Francis Fukuyama on the promise and peril of liberalism | Democracy Works

The Democracy Group

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 43:25


We continue our Best of 2022 episodes with an  episode from the Democracy Works podcast, hosted by Jenna Spinelle, Christopher Beem, Michael Berkman. Can liberal democracy withstand the challenges its currently facing? Francis Fukuyama is one of America's leading scholars on liberalism and joins us this week for a discussion about the threats its faces and how we might overcome them.It's no secret that liberalism didn't always live up to its own ideals. In America, many people were denied equality before the law. Who counted as full human beings worthy of universal rights was contested for centuries, and only recently has this circle expanded to include women, African Americans, LGBTQ+ people, and others. Conservatives complain that liberalism empties the common life of meaning. As the renowned political philosopher Francis Fukuyama shows in Liberalism and Its Discontents, the principles of liberalism have also, in recent decades, been pushed to new extremes by both the right and the left: neoliberals made a cult of economic freedom, and progressives focused on identity over human universality as central to their political vision. The result, Fukuyama argues, has been a fracturing of our civil society and an increasing peril to our democracy.Fukuyama isthe Olivier Nomellini Senior Fellow at Stanford University's Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and a faculty member at Stanford's Institute on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. His previous books include Identity: The Demand for Dignity and the Politics of Resentment and The End of History and the Last Man.Liberalism and its DiscontentsDemocracy Works PodcastMore shows from The Democracy Group

Democracy IRL
Exploring China's Lockdowns, Protests, and the Communist Party, with Peidong Sun

Democracy IRL

Play Episode Play 48 sec Highlight Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 44:34


Peidong Sun is a Distinguished Associate Professor of Arts and Science in China and Asia-Pacific Studies in the History Department at Cornell University. Previously, she was a professor at Fudan University in Shanghai and has written extensively on social issues in China. Professor Sun joins Francis Fukuyama to discuss the protests that have taken place across many cities in China over the past several weeks. Prompted by anger over the country's prolonged COVID lockdowns, these protests have also questioned the legitimacy of the Communist Party regime.

Know Your Enemy
TEASER: More Mail, More Bag

Know Your Enemy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 2:55


Subscribe to Know Your Enemy on Patreon to listen to this bonus episode, and all of our bonus content: https://www.patreon.com/knowyourenemyMatt and Sam pick up where they left off in their recent mailbag episode and keep answering listener questions. Topics include: KYE merchandise, the existence of Hell, Francis Fukuyama, Mormonism, gun violence, and more. Sources:David Bentley Hart, That All Shall Be Saved (Yale University Press, 2019)John G. Turner, Brigham Young: Pioneer Prophet (Harvard University Press, 2012)Francis Fukuyama, "Still the End of History," Atlantic, October 17, 2022Francis Fukuyama, The End of History and the Last Man (Free Press, 1992)W.H. Auden, "In Memory of Sigmund Freud" (1940)Christopher Isherwood, Christopher and His Kind (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1976)Sohrab Ahmari, "Urban Jeremiah: Mike Davis, 1946-2022," Compact, October 26, 2022

Macro Musings with David Beckworth
Noah Smith on the Future of the Chinese Economy and the Climate of Social Change in the US

Macro Musings with David Beckworth

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 48:16


Noah Smith is a former columnist for Bloomberg and is now a popular writer at his own Noahpinion Substack. Noah is also a returning guest to the podcast, and rejoins Macro Musings for a wide ranging discussion on some of the recent issues he's been covering on his Substack, including China, social change in the US, recent macro developments, and much more. Noah and David also discuss the façade of Xi Jinping's leadership, the elite overproduction hypothesis, how Fukuyama's *End of History* thesis can be applied today, and more.   Transcript for the episode can be found here.   Noah's Substack: Noahpinion Noah's Bloomberg archive Noah's Twitter: @Noahpinion   David's Twitter: @DavidBeckworth Follow us on Twitter: @Macro_Musings Click here for the latest Macro Musings episodes sent straight to your inbox!   Related Links:   *The Elite Overproduction Hypothesis* by Noah Smith   *Danger Zone: The Coming Conflict with China* by Hal Brands and Michael Beckley   *Book Review: “Danger Zone”* by Noah Smith   *Is China Heading Toward Another Tiananmen Square Moment?* by Lili Pike and Tom Nagorski

Plain English with Derek Thompson
Why the Bad Guys—in China, Russia, Iran, and the U.S.—Are Having a Terrible Winter

Plain English with Derek Thompson

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 51:34


One year ago, we had Anne Applebaum on the podcast to talk about her essay, "The Bad Guys Are Winning." And I think you could have made an argument that this was the most important story in geopolitics. Across the world, the rise of authoritarianism—in Russia, China, Turkey, Venezuela, India, and even right here in the U.S. authoritarianism was ascendant. Illiberalism was rising. Anti-democratic forces were assembling. But at this very moment, the opposite narrative seems like it might just be the most important story in the world. The fall of the authoritarians. Look at China, where the ruler Xi Jinping's "zero-COVID" policy is sparking a wave of protests. Look at Russia, which is losing its war against Ukraine. Look at Iran, which is rife with protests for women's rights. Today's guest is Francis Fukuyama, the author of the very famous (and very misunderstood) book, 'The End of History and the Last Man.' In this episode we take a first-class tour of what's happening in China, Russia, Iran, and the U.S., ending with some thoughts on the future of liberalism in America. If you have questions, observations, or ideas for future episodes, email us at PlainEnglish@Spotify.com. You can find us on TikTok at www.tiktok.com/@plainenglish_ Host: Derek Thompson Guest: Francis Fukuyama Producer: Devon Manze Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Democracy IRL
The Islamic Republic and Protests in Iran, with Political Scientist Saeid Golkar

Democracy IRL

Play Episode Play 30 sec Highlight Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 42:43


Saeid Golkar has been writing and teaching about Iranian politics for the last decade since he was forced to leave the country. A 2009 alumnus of CDDRL's Draper Hills Summer Fellows Program, Saeid is an expert on the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps and their Basij auxiliaries. Last month he joined Francis Fukuyama to discuss the nature and implications of the anti-regime protests that have rocked Iran since the killing of Mahsa Amini in September 2022.Saeid Golkar is an assistant professor in the Department of Political Science & Public Service at the University of Tennessee, Chattanooga. Previously an adjunct professor at Northwestern University's Middle East and North African Studies Program and a visiting scholar at the Buffett Institute for Global Studies, he was also a  postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University's Center on Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law. Golkar was a lecturer from 2004 to 2009 in the Department of Social Sciences at Azad University, Iran, where he taught undergraduate courses on the political sociology of Iran and the sociology of war and military forces.Golkar received a PhD from the Department of Political Science at Tehran University in June 2008. His recent work can be found in publications such as Middle East Journal; Armed Forces & Society; Politics, Religion & Ideology; and Middle East Policy. Captive Society, his book on the Basij paramilitary force and the securitization of Iranian society, was copublished by Columbia University Press and Woodrow Wilson Center Press in June 2015.

The Cyberlaw Podcast
The Empire Strikes Back, at Twitter

The Cyberlaw Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 39:06


The Cyberlaw Podcast leads with the legal cost of Elon Musk's anti-authoritarian takeover of Twitter. Turns out that authority figures have a lot of weapons, many grounded in law, and Twitter is at risk of being on the receiving end of those weapons. Brian Fleming explores the apparently unkillable notion that the Committee on Foreign Investment in the U.S. (CFIUS) should review Musk's Twitter deal because of a relatively small share that went to investors with Chinese and Persian Gulf ties. It appears that CFIUS may still be seeking information on what Twitter data those investors will have access to, but I am skeptical that CFIUS will be moved to act on what it learns. More dangerous for Twitter and Musk, says Charles-Albert Helleputte, is the possibility that the company will lose its one-stop-shop privacy regulator for failure to meet the elaborate compliance machinery set up by European privacy bureaucrats. At a quick calculation, that could expose Twitter to fines up to 120% of annual turnover. Finally, I reprise my skeptical take on all the people leaving Twitter for Mastodon as a protest against Musk allowing the Babylon Bee and President Trump back on the platform. If the protestors really think Mastodon's system is better, I recommend that Twitter adopt it, or at least the version that Francis Fukuyama and Roberta Katz have described. If you are looking for the far edge of the Establishment's Overton Window on China policy, you will not do better than the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission, a consistently China-skeptical but mainstream body. Brian reprises the Commission's latest report. The headline, we conclude, is about Chinese hacking, but the recommendations does not offer much hope of a solution to that problem, other than more decoupling.  Chalk up one more victory for Trump-Biden continuity, and one more loss for the State Department. Michael Ellis reminds us that the Trump administration took much of Cyber Command's cyber offense decision making out of the National Security Council and put it back in the Pentagon. This made it much harder for the State Department to stall cyber offense operations. When it turned out that this made Cyber Command more effective and no more irresponsible, the Biden Administration prepared to ratify Trump's order, with tweaks. I unpack Google's expensive (nearly $400 million) settlement with 40 States over location history. Google's promise to stop storing location history if the feature was turned off was poorly and misleadingly drafted, but I doubt there is anyone who actually wanted to keep Google from using location for most of the apps where it remained operative, so the settlement is a good deal for the states, and a reminder of how unpopular Silicon Valley has become in red and blue states. Michael tells the doubly embarrassing story of an Iranian hack of the U.S. Merit Systems Protection Board. It is embarrassing to be hacked with a log4j exploit that should have been patched. But it is worse when an Iranian government hacker gets access to a U.S. government network—and decided that the access is only good for mining cryptocurrency.  Brian tells us that the U.S. goal of reshoring chip production is making progress, with Apple planning to use TSMC chips from a new fab in Arizona.  In a few updates and quick hits: I remind listeners that a lot of tech companies are laying employees off, but that overall Silicon Valley employment is still way up over the past couple of years. I give a lick and a promise to the mess at cryptocurrency exchange FTX, which just keeps getting worse. Charles updates us on the next U.S.-E.U. adequacy negotiations, and the prospects for Schrems 3 (and 4, and 5) litigation. And I sound a note of both admiration and caution about Australia's plan to “unleash the hounds” – in the form of its own Cyber Command equivalent – on ransomware gangs. As U.S. experience reveals, it makes for a great speech, but actual impact can be hard to achieve.

In Pursuit of Development
The development bargain — Stefan Dercon

In Pursuit of Development

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 61:21


Development is a gamble because success is not guaranteed when benefits materialize in the long-term and a host of factors may undermine elite positions. Some countries are able to settle on elite bargains that favour growth and development, and others are unable to reach such settlements.While elite bargains in China, Indonesia, Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Rwanda and Ghana ended up being development bargains, the opposite was the case in Nigeria, DRC, Malawi and South Sudan. Stefan Dercon is Professor at the Blavatnik School of Government and the Economics Department at theUniversity of Oxford, where he also directs the Centre for the Study of African Economies.His latest book – Gambling on Development: Why some countries win and others lose– draws on his academic research and his policy experience across three decades. Twitter: @gamblingondevKey highlights:Introduction - 0:55Bridging the gap between research and policy – 3:09Why a general recipe for development is not very helpful – 11:22Gambling for development: Key arguments – 28:38The future of foreign aid – 45:13 Host:Professor Dan Banik, University of Oslo, Twitter: @danbanik  @GlobalDevPodInstagram: @GlobalDevPodApple Google Spotify YouTubehttps://in-pursuit-of-development.simplecast.com/E-mail: InPursuitOfDevelopment@gmail.com 

The Remnant with Jonah Goldberg
Perspicacious Punditry

The Remnant with Jonah Goldberg

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 72:17 Very Popular


Jonah finds himself unable to resist the allure of rank punditry on today's Ruminant. He begins by describing how little he cares about the upcoming midterms before diving into a lengthy rant on that very matter. Next, he tackles the state of Trump's continued influence on the Republican Party, the ills of the modern legislative process, and the undermining of confidence in elections by both parties. After a brief foray into John Dewey's “screwed up” view of democracy, Jonah finishes the show with commentary on Putin's rejection of liberal democratic capitalism, the hypocrisy of his attacks on America, and why Francis Fukuyama was right all along (again).Show Notes:- Richard Rorty's Achieving Our Country- Jonah: “Putin's Dangerous Blend of Propaganda and Hypocrisy”

Ten Thousand Posts
[PREVIEW] The Ballad of the Babadook

Ten Thousand Posts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 10:08


note: Phoebe's microphone is broken in this episode. A replacement has arrived and it will be fine going forwards, but you may notice a certain... mobile phone handset quality to the audio. I have done everything I can, and it sounds orders of magnitude better than it did in the raw file, but it's still not ideal. This is a free preview of a bonus episode! Find the whole episode, as well as our entire backlog of bonus episodes, at https://www.patreon.com/10kpostspodcast -------- On this Halloween spooktacular, we reminisce fondly about a legendary halloween post: Showing up to a party dressed as the Babadook, when the event really had more of a 'grown ups drinking wine' vibe. Previous years' halloween specials have been about posts such as Francis Fukuyama lamenting the casualised nature of skeletons as decorations. -------- Ten Thousand Posts is a show about how everything is posting. It's hosted by Hussein (@HKesvani), Phoebe (@PRHRoy) and produced by Devon (@Devon_onEarth).    

Canusa Street - Intersecting the Canada U.S. Relationship

The US and Canada have long been known for their vibrant democratic traditions. But recently, we have seen those traditions tested on both sides of the border. On the eve of Election Day in the US, Scotty and Chris bring back constitutional scholar Susan Lagon to discuss what's going wrong and whether the guardrails will hold on Canusa Street. Also check out Chris's book reference: Trust by Francis Fukuyama.

TrustTalk - It's all about Trust
Trust & the Future of Democracy

TrustTalk - It's all about Trust

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 20:12


Our guest today is Francis Fukuyama. He is the Olivier Nomellini Senior Fellow at Stanford University's Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and a faculty member of the Center on Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law, and a professor of Political Science. His interest in philosophy and inspiration for his later work came from his undergraduate teacher, Allan Bloom. He talks about interpersonal trust that enables formal institutions to establish property rights and the rule of law and a commercial code to promote economic activity, about the lack of trust that will add to transaction costs and make business dealings much more difficult. When asked about the eroding political trust he talks about the rise of populist politicians and the distrust they foster against institutions as well as media to gain power, the elite losing sight of the views of ordinary people, being unresponsive and unaccountable, which has led to a crisis of trust in political institutions. We talk about information distortion, conspiracy theories, and the imperviousness of fact-checking and evidence. He counters China and Russia's arguments that liberal democracy is an obsolete system, and talks about Putin's Ukraine war and the effects that any outcome will have on other conflicts in the world, the Biden election win denial in the US, people's disenchantment with European institutions for not delivering.

Worker and Parasite
Liberalism and Its Discontents by Francis Fukuyama

Worker and Parasite

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 55:28


In this episode we discuss Liberalism and Its Discontents by Francis Fukuyama. Next time we'll discuss Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man by Marshall McLuhan.

The Seen and the Unseen - hosted by Amit Varma
Ep 300: The Gentle Wisdom of Pratap Bhanu Mehta

The Seen and the Unseen - hosted by Amit Varma

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 258:33


Our selves are nebulous, the world is complex and the times they are a-changin'. Pratap Bhanu Mehta joins Amit Varma in episode 300 of The Seen and the Unseen for a freewheeling chat about how to make sense of all of this.  (For full linked show notes, go to SeenUnseen.in.) Also check out: 1. The Hunter Becomes the Hunted -- Episode 200 of The Seen and the Unseen, where Amit Varma answers questions from his guests. 2. Pratap Bhanu Mehta on Twitter, Amazon and the Indian Express. 3. What Have We Done With Our Independence? -- Episode 186 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Pratap Bhanu Mehta). 4. Self-Esteem (and a Puddle) — Amit Varma's post with Douglas Adams's puddle quote. 5. The End of History? — Francis Fukuyama's essay. 6. The End of History and the Last Man — Francis Fukuyama's book. 7. Francis Fukuyama on Amazon. 8. Ideas of India: The Theory of Moral Sentiments -- Pratap Bhanu Mehta discusses Adam Smith with Shruti Rajagopalan. 9. Conversation and Society -- Russ Roberts discusses Adam Smith with Amit Varma in episode 182 of The Seen and the Unseen. 10. Human — Michael S Gazzaniga. 11. The Interpreter — Amit Varma. 12. Free Will on Wikipedia, Britannica and Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. 13. Free Will — Sam Harris. 14. Immanuel Kant on Amazon, Wikipedia, Britannica and Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. 15. The Median Voter Theorem. 16. 'Thinking and Reflecting' and 'The Thinking of Thoughts': Gilbert Ryle's essays on 'thick description' and Winks vs Twitches, also found in Collected Essays. 17. Thick Description: Towards an Interpretive Theory of Culture -- Clifford Geertz. 18. Fighting Fake News -- Episode 133 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Pratik Sinha). 19. The Greater India Experiment: Hindutva and the Northeast -- Arkotong Longkumer. 20. Memories and Things -- Episode 195 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Aanchal Malhotra). 21. Remnants of a Separation — Aanchal Malhotra. 22. Don't think too much of yourself. You're an accident -- Amit Varma's column on Chris Cornell's death. 23. Alice Evans Studies the Great Gender Divergence -- Episode 297 of The Seen and the Unseen. 24. Scientism. 25. Ludwig Wittgenstein on Amazon, Wikipedia, Britannica and Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. 26. Wanting — Luke Burgis. 27. René Girard on Amazon and Wikipedia. 28. Jean-Jacques Rousseau on Amazon, Wikipedia, Britannica and Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. 29. A Meditation on Form -- Amit Varma. 30. Agarkar's Donkeys: A Meditation on God -- Amit Varma. 31. Faust, as portrayed by Christopher Marlowe and Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. 32. The Measure of a Man -- Episode 9, Season 2, Star Trek: The Next Generation (Wikipedia entry). 33. Ex Machina -- Alex Garland. 34. Reality+: Virtual Worlds and the Problems of Philosophy -- David Chalmers. 35. Yoga Vasistha. 36. On a Certain Blindness in Human Beings -- William James. 37. Capitalism and Freedom -- Milton Friedman. 38. The Experience Machine -- Robert Nozick. (Wikipedia entry.) 39. Utilitarianism: For and Against -- JJC Smart and Bernard Williams. 40. Reasons and Persons -- Derek Parfit. 41. Episode of The Seen and the Unseen with Ajay Shah: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. 42. Ethics and the Limits of Philosophy -- Bernard Williams. 43. Bernard Williams on Amazon, Wikipedia, Britannica and Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. 44. India's Greatest Civil Servant -- Episode 167 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Narayani Basu, on VP Menon). 45. A Life in Indian Politics -- Episode 149 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Jayaprakash Narayan). 46. Friedrich Hayek on Amazon, Econlib, Wikipedia, Britannica and Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. 47. The Dark Side of Democracy -- Michael Mann. 48. Jayaprakash Narayan on proportional representation. 49. Pakistan or the Partition of India — BR Ambedkar. 50. Don't Insult Pasta (2007) — Amit Varma. 51. Manish Sisodia invokes ‘Rajput' caste amidst CBI probe -- Janta Ka Reporter. 52. Caste, Capitalism and Chandra Bhan Prasad -- Episode 296 of The Seen and the Unseen. 53. Defying the Odds: The Rise of Dalit Entrepreneurs — Devesh Kapur, D Shyam Babu and Chandra Bhan Prasad. 54. Beware of Half Victories -- Pratap Bhanu Mehta. 55. Hussain Haidry, Hindustani Musalmaan -- Episode 275 of The Seen and the Unseen. 56. Carl Schmitt on Amazon, Wikipedia, Britannica and Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. 57. Raghu Sanjaylal Jaitley's Father's Scooter -- Episode 214 of The Seen and the Unseen. 58. Justin Amash on why he left the Republican Party. 59. Kashi Ka Assi — Kashinath Singh. 60. Rational Ignorance. 61. The Economics of Voting — Amit Varma on Rational Ignorance. 62. Karthik Muralidharan Examines the Indian State -- Episode 290 of The Seen and the Unseen. 63. Lessons from an Ankhon Dekhi Prime Minister -- Amit Varma on the importance of reading.   64. John Aubrey's biography of Thomas Hobbes. 65. Ludwig van Beethoven, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, George Frideric Handel and Felix Mendelssohn on Spotify. 66. Digital Concert Hall -- Berliner Philharmoniker. 67. Berliner Philharmoniker on YouTube, Twitter and their own website. 68. Nikhil Banerjee on Spotify, YouTube and Wikipedia. 69. Wolf Hall, Bring Up the Bodies and The Mirror and the Light -- The Wolf Hall Trilogy by Hilary Mantel. 70. The World of Premchand: Selected Short Stories — Munshi Premchand (translated and with an introduction by David Rubin). 71. Premchand's Kazaki And Other Marvellous Tales — Munshi Premchand (translated and with an introduction by Sara Rai). 72. Sara Rai Inhales Literature -- Episode 255 of The Seen and the Unseen. 73. Yeh Premchand Hai -- Apoorvanand. This episode is sponsored by CTQ Compounds. Check out The Daily Reader and FutureStack. Use the code UNSEEN for Rs 2500 off. Check out Amit's online course, The Art of Clear Writing. And subscribe to The India Uncut Newsletter. It's free! Episode art: ‘Radiant Knowledge' by Simahina.

45 Graus
#131 Edalina Rodrigues Sanches - Porque tarda a democracia em África?

45 Graus

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 73:30


Edalina Rodrigues Sanches é doutorada em Ciência Política pela Universidade de Lisboa e é actualmente Investigadora Auxiliar no Instituto de Ciências Sociais da Universidade de Lisboa. Os seus interesses de investigação incluem democratização, representação, ligações partidos-cidadãos, comportamento político, e dedicação ao círculo eleitoral, com enfoque em África. A sua tese de doutoramento foi distinguida com o prémio da Associação Portuguesa de Ciência Política em 2016, e deu origem ao livro «Party Systems in Young Democracies: Varieties of institutionalization in Sub-Saharan Africa, publicado pela Routledge. -> Apoie este projecto e faça parte da comunidade de mecenas do 45 Graus em: 45grauspodcast.com _______________ Índice da conversa: (3:35) Início da conversa (6:47) O processo de descolonização do pós II GM. | O que se passou para tantos líderes promissores da independência se terem revelado ditadores? (12:21) A «3ª vaga de democratização»: O que correu mal? | Como evoluiu de lá para cá? Francis Fukuyama e o Fim da História. | O que há de especial nos países africanos mais democráticos?  (26:57) Os desafios da democracia em África. Diversidade étnica e comunitarismo. | É preciso “africanizar a democracia”. O caso de sucesso do Botswana  (38:13) O tipo de colonização de cada país impactou o sucesso da democratização? A «maldição dos recursos naturais». É possível prever o sucesso da democratização com base em diferentes realidades pré-coloniais? (48:34) Casos de sucesso de democratização no século XXI? Seicheles, Zâmbia, Malawi (acção do Tribunal Constitucional). Mo Ibrahim Index of African Governance (IIAG). | O caso do Rwanda.  (57:10) Casos de INsucesso de democratização no século XXI? Guiné Equatorial, Eswatini, Chade, Camarões, Djibuti. | O mundo lusófono: Angola e Moçambique.  (1:04:22) Que podemos esperar no futuro da democracia em África? O crescimento dos protestos populares em vários países.  Livro recomendado: Marcher, une philosophie, de Frédéric Gros _______________ África é um continente gigante, com 54 países, étnica e culturalmente diverso e com um enorme potencial ainda por desenvolver. Mas é também vítima de uma História… complicada (para usar um eufemismo), com séculos de exploração europeia, primeiro, e colonialismo, depois.  O pós II Guerra Mundial trouxe uma nova esperança ao continente, com 30 países a tornarem-se independentes entre 1945 e 1960.  As promessas de democracia e liberdade saíram, porém, esfumadas, com muitos países a acabarem dominados por regimes autoritários. No final dos anos 1980, começou uma nova era de optimismo, com a chamada “3ª onda de democratização mundial” (cujo início se convencionou ser o nosso 25 de abril) a ganhar em África um ímpeto especialmente grande, combinando uma conjuntura internacional favorável (com a queda da URSS) com importantes protestos políticos a nível doméstico. Neste período, diversos países conseguiram iniciar processos de liberalização política para sistemas mais democráticos. No entanto, desde então, a verdade é que tem havido poucos ou nenhuns progressos ao nível da democracia em África (sobretudo se excluirmos a Primavera Árabe, no caso dos países acima do Sahara, cujo sucesso, de resto, acabou por ser reduzido). Hoje, menos de 10 de entre os 54 países que compõem o continente, são considerados democracias “liberais”. Se excluirmos países-ilhas, falamos essencialmente do Gana e dos três países mais a sul: África do Sul, Botswana e Namíbia. Ao olhar para o estado da democracia em África há, por isso, várias perguntas a que é preciso responder.  O que correu mal no processo de independência, em particular naqueles países que tinham, na altura, líderes independentistas tão promissores?  No sentido inverso, o que permitiu os avanços da democracia nos anos 1990? E o que explica os parcos progressos desde então?  Por outro lado, que factores comuns podemos identificar num continente tão grande e tão diverso?  E, finalmente, o que podemos esperar no futuro da democracia no continente nas próximas décadas?  Para responder a estas questões, dificilmente poderia pedir melhor pessoa do que a convidada deste episódio. Foi uma conversa muito elucidativa, sobre uma realidade muito complexa e à qual não damos, porventura, a devida atenção.  _______________ Obrigado aos mecenas do podcast: Julie Piccini, Ana Raquel Guimarães Galaró family, José Luís Malaquias, Francisco Hermenegildo, Nuno Costa, Abílio Silva, Salvador Cunha, Bruno Heleno, António llms, Helena Monteiro, BFDC, Pedro Lima Ferreira, Miguel van Uden, João Ribeiro, Nuno e Ana, João Baltazar, Miguel Marques, Corto Lemos, Carlos Martins, Tiago Leite Tomás Costa, Rita Sá Marques, Geoffrey Marcelino, Luis, Maria Pimentel, Rui Amorim, RB, Pedro Frois Costa, Gabriel Sousa, Mário Lourenço, Filipe Bento Caires, Diogo Sampaio Viana, Tiago Taveira, Ricardo Leitão, Pedro B. Ribeiro, João Teixeira, Miguel Bastos, Isabel Moital, Arune Bhuralal, Isabel Oliveira, Ana Teresa Mota, Luís Costa, Francisco Fonseca, João Nelas, Tiago Queiroz, António Padilha, Rita Mateus, Daniel Correia, João Saro João Pereira Amorim, Sérgio Nunes, Telmo Gomes, André Morais, Antonio Loureiro, Beatriz Bagulho, Tiago Stock, Joaquim Manuel Jorge Borges, Gabriel Candal, Joaquim Ribeiro, Fábio Monteiro, João Barbosa, Tiago M Machado, Rita Sousa Pereira, Henrique Pedro, Cloé Leal de Magalhães, Francisco Moura, Rui Antunes7, Joel, Pedro L, João Diamantino, Nuno Lages, João Farinha, Henrique Vieira, André Abrantes, Hélder Moreira, José Losa, João Ferreira, Rui Vilao, Jorge Amorim, João Pereira, Goncalo Murteira Machado Monteiro, Luis Miguel da Silva Barbosa, Bruno Lamas, Carlos Silveira, Maria Francisca Couto, Alexandre Freitas, Afonso Martins, José Proença, Jose Pedroso, Telmo , Francisco Vasconcelos, Duarte , Luis Marques, Joana Margarida Alves Martins, Tiago Parente, Ana Moreira, António Queimadela, David Gil, Daniel Pais, Miguel Jacinto, Luís Santos, Bernardo Pimentel, Gonçalo de Paiva e Pona , Tiago Pedroso, Gonçalo Castro, Inês Inocêncio, Hugo Ramos, Pedro Bravo, António Mendes Silva, paulo matos, Luís Brandão, Tomás Saraiva, Ana Vitória Soares, Mestre88 , Nuno Malvar, Ana Rita Laureano, Manuel Botelho da Silva, Pedro Brito, Wedge, Bruno Amorim Inácio, Manuel Martins, Ana Sousa Amorim, Robertt, Miguel Palhas, Maria Oliveira, Cheila Bhuralal, Filipe Melo, Gil Batista Marinho, Cesar Correia, Salomé Afonso, Diogo Silva, Patrícia Esquível , Inês Patrão, Daniel Almeida, Paulo Ferreira, Macaco Quitado, Pedro Correia, Francisco Santos, Antonio Albuquerque, Renato Mendes, João Barbosa, Margarida Gonçalves, Andrea Grosso, João Pinho , João Crispim, Francisco Aguiar , João Diogo, João Diogo Silva, José Oliveira Pratas, João Moreira, Vasco Lima, Tomás Félix, Pedro Rebelo, Nuno Gonçalves, Pedro , Marta Baptista Coelho, Mariana Barosa, Francisco Arantes, João Raimundo, Mafalda Pratas, Tiago Pires, Luis Quelhas Valente, Vasco Sá Pinto, Jorge Soares, Pedro Miguel Pereira Vieira, Pedro F. Finisterra, Ricardo Santos _______________ Esta conversa foi editada por: Hugo Oliveira _______________ Bio: Edalina Rodrigues Sanches é doutorada em Ciência Política (Universidade de Lisboa) e Investigadora Auxiliar no Instituto de Ciências Sociais da Universidade de Lisboa. Os seus interesses de investigação incluem democratização, protesto popular, desenvolvimento dos partidos e sistemas partidários e representação política, com enfoque em África. A sua investigação tem sido publicada em revistas como Party Politics, African Affairs, Journal of Contemporary African Studies, Parliamentary Affairs, Electoral Studies, entre outras. Publicou recentemente o livro  Party Systems in Young Democracies: Varieties of institutionalization in Sub-Saharan Africa (Routledge, 2018) e organizou o livro  Popular Protest, Political Opportunities, and Change in Africa (Routledge, 2022). Integra a comissão editorial das revistas Caderno de Estudos Africanos e Análise Social.

Democracy Works
Francis Fukuyama on the promise and peril of liberalism

Democracy Works

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 42:49


It's no secret that liberalism didn't always live up to its own ideals. In America, many people were denied equality before the law. Who counted as full human beings worthy of universal rights was contested for centuries, and only recently has this circle expanded to include women, African Americans, LGBTQ+ people, and others. Conservatives complain that liberalism empties the common life of meaning. As the renowned political philosopher Francis Fukuyama shows in Liberalism and Its Discontents, the principles of liberalism have also, in recent decades, been pushed to new extremes by both the right and the left: neoliberals made a cult of economic freedom, and progressives focused on identity over human universality as central to their political vision. The result, Fukuyama argues, has been a fracturing of our civil society and an increasing peril to our democracy.Fukuyama isthe Olivier Nomellini Senior Fellow at Stanford University's Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and a faculty member at Stanford's Institute on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. His previous books include Identity: The Demand for Dignity and the Politics of Resentment and The End of History and the Last Man.Liberalism and its Discontents

New Ideal, from the Ayn Rand Institute
What ‘Liberalism and Its Discontents’ Gets So Wrong

New Ideal, from the Ayn Rand Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 56:14


Amid a rising tide of populism and tribalism Francis Fukuyama, a prominent public intellectual, has come to the defense of America's political-economic system. Fukuyama views it as rooted in “classical liberalism,” and he seeks to vindicated it in his book, “Liberalism and Its Discontents.” Why is this system losing? What would a defense of it require? Does Fukuyama rise to the occasion? This week's episode of New Ideal Live, with Elan Journo and Nikos Sotirakopoulos, will explore these questions and their philosophic implications.

Yang Speaks
Liberalism and Its Discontents

Yang Speaks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 56:24


Francis Fukuyama, political scientist and senior fellow at Stanford, discusses the failure of classical liberalism to live up to its ideals, the resulting challenges to liberalism from left and right, and how liberalism can be modernized for the 21st century. Watch this episode on YouTube: https://youtu.be/xmtDwNqo5QU Liberalism and Its Discontents - https://us.macmillan.com/books/9780374606718/liberalismanditsdiscontents Follow Francis Fukuyama: https://twitter.com/fukuyamafrancis | https://francisfukuyama.com Follow Andrew Yang: https://andrewyang.com | https://forwardparty.com To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Buitenhof
#206 - Nieuwe fase oorlogsvoering, Tuur Elzinga, Francis Fukuyama

Buitenhof

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 54:37


https://www.vpro.nl/speel~WO_VPRO_20009209~.html WO_VPRO_20009209 Fri, 30 Sep 2022 15:09:24 +0200 full 206 https://podcast.npo.nl/file/buitenhof/75598/nieuwe-fase-oorlogsvoering-tuur-elzinga-francis-fukuyama.mp3

Buitenhof
#205 - Over de houdbaarheid van het liberalisme

Buitenhof

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 14:06


Aan tafel de wereldberoemde politicoloog Francis Fukuyama over zijn nieuwe boek 'Het Liberalisme en zijn schaduwzijden'. Presentatie: Pieter Jan Hagens Wil je meer weten over de gasten in Buitenhof? Op onze website vind je meer informatie. Daar kan je deze aflevering ook terugkijken en je vindt er natuurlijk nog veel meer gesprekken: https://bit.ly/buitenhof-2-okt-22

The Eastern Front
Moldova's Nearing Energy Crisis (with Dr. Francis Fukuyama)

The Eastern Front

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 32:29


Following his recent trip to Moldova, Giselle Donnelly and Iulia Joja sat down with Dr. Francis Fukuyama, Senior Fellow at Stanford University's Freeman Spogli Institute, to discuss the implications Russia's invasion of Ukraine may have for greater Europe. According to Dr. Fukuyama, since Moldova is 100% dependent on Russia for energy and gas—and Transnistria is 100% dependent on Moldova for its own energy—a potential decision by Russia to cut off gas supplies to Moldova would put two countries on the precipice of an energy crisis. Accordingly, Dr. Fukuyama argued that Europe must rethink its energy policy and help secure gas flows from other parts of the continent to reduce overall dependence on Russian energy supplies. On the topic of Russian President Vladimir Putin's recent threat to use nuclear weapons on Ukraine, Fukuyama believes it is unlikely. Although Putin has been an “unpredictable risk taker” in the past, resorting to nuclear warfare would be self-destructive; not only would it have international consequences, but it would run the risk of “scaring” Russian citizens and isolating Putin from his own population. For the sake of his own survival, Fukuyama said, nuclear weapons should be out of the question.

FAIR Perspectives
Liberty, Individualism, and Identity with Nick Gillespie - Ep. 26

FAIR Perspectives

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 97:59


Our guest this week is Nick Gillespie. Nick is an editor at large at Reason, the Libertarian magazine of free minds and free markets and host of The reason Interview with Nick Gillespie. He serves on the board for Ideas Beyond Borders, and is the co author with Matt Welch of 'The Declaration of Independents: How Libertarian Politics Can Fix What's Wrong with America' We discuss what Libertarianism is and is not, the relationship to anarchism, the role of the state in an ideal society, the lack of a unifying social or political narrative, libertarianism successes in the West, the rise of China's willpower, social media and the tensions between libertarian views on private companies versus free expression, Francis Fukuyama and our crisis of identity and more.  Nick emailed us shortly after the recording to make one correction: At one point Nick refers to there being currently 100,000 school districts in the United States, a reduction from previous numbers, but there are actually currently 13,500 school districts, also a reduction from previous numbers of 100,000 in 1940. Follow Nick GIllespie on: https://twitter.com/nickgillespie

American Exception
UNLOCKED Episode 73: Deep Scholasticism

American Exception

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 69:08


  Aaron and Ben Norton of Multipolarista discuss Establishment scholar Francis Fukuyama and his strange intervention into deep state discourse. I am hoping that Fukuyama is just building up to addressing the deep state construct in future installments because he does mention some important aspects of the emergence of the state, even as he leaves out many other angles: Valuing the Deep State, Part I Valuing the Deep State Part II: The Origin of States Special thanks Dana Chavarria for the sound engineering! Music: “Nine Times” by Mock Orange Aaron and Ben Norton of Multipolarista discuss Establishment scholar Francis Fukuyama and his strange intervention into deep state discourse. I am hoping that Fukuyama is just building up to addressing the deep state construct in future installments because he does mention some important aspects of the emergence of the state, even as he leaves out many other angles: Valuing the Deep State, Part I Valuing the Deep State Part II: The Origin of States Special thanks Dana Chavarria for the sound engineering! Music: “Nine Times” by Mock Orange

American Exception
Episode 73: Deep Scholasticism [TRAILER]

American Exception

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 10:02


  Aaron and Ben Norton of Multipolarista discuss Establishment scholar Francis Fukuyama and his strange intervention into deep state discourse. I am hoping that Fukuyama is just building up to addressing the deep state construct in future installments because he does mention some important aspects of the emergence of the state, even as he leaves out many other angles: Valuing the Deep State, Part I Valuing the Deep State Part II: The Origin of States Special thanks Dana Chavarria for the sound engineering! Music: “Nine Times” by Mock Orange Aaron and Ben Norton of Multipolarista discuss Establishment scholar Francis Fukuyama and his strange intervention into deep state discourse. I am hoping that Fukuyama is just building up to addressing the deep state construct in future installments because he does mention some important aspects of the emergence of the state, even as he leaves out many other angles: Valuing the Deep State, Part I Valuing the Deep State Part II: The Origin of States Special thanks Dana Chavarria for the sound engineering! Music: “Nine Times” by Mock Orange

Multipolarista
US imperial theorist Fukuyama praises the deep state (with historian Aaron Good)

Multipolarista

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 61:10


US imperial court philosopher Francis Fukuyama once declared liberal capitalist democracy was the "end of history." Now he is openly praising the deep state. Ben Norton is joined by political scientist Aaron Good of the American Exception podcast to analyze his fallacious arguments. VIDEO: https://youtube.com/watch?v=Rr1a4BshPo8 You can support Aaron's show American Exception at https://patreon.com/americanexception

Democracy IRL
The Inheritors: A Conversation with Eve Fairbanks

Democracy IRL

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 45:19


Eve Fairbanks is a brilliant journalist who has lived in South Africa for the past decade. Francis Fukuyama speaks to her about her new book, The Inheritors, in which she provides a fascinating account of the way that both blacks and whites in that country have adjusted—or not—to democracy over the past generation. South Africa has undergone a transformation much like that of the US since the Civil War, only compressed into a much shorter time period, and Fairbanks points to the enduring difficulties of racial reconciliation and historical memory with implications for the United States.

Plus
Interview Plus: Fukuyama: Liberální demokracie dokáže napravovat své chyby a právě takovým obdobím nyní procházíme

Plus

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 27:21


Je to 30 let, co světoznámý americký politolog, spisovatel a filozof Francis Fukuyama přišel se svou tezí o konci dějin a vítězství liberální demokracie. V poslední době to ale tak optimisticky nevypadá. „Lidé začali brát liberální demokracii za samozřejmost, protože byla v období po 2. světové válce velmi silným systémem. Předpokládali, že to je přirozený stav věcí a že nemusí přinášet oběti, aby demokratický řád zůstal zachován,“ vysvětluje v Interview Plus.

Spectator Books
Francis Fukuyama: Liberalism and its Discontents

Spectator Books

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 37:09


This week we spotlight our most popular episode of the last year, Sam's conversation with Francis Fukuyama about his book Liberalism and its Discontents. He tells Sam how a system that has built peace and prosperity since the Enlightenment has come under attack from the neoliberal right and the identitarian left; and how Vladimir Putin may end up being the unwitting founding father of a new Ukraine.

Spectator Radio
The Book Club: Francis Fukuyama

Spectator Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 37:09


This week we spotlight our most popular episode of the last year, Sam's conversation with Francis Fukuyama about his book Liberalism and its Discontents. He tells Sam how a system that has built peace and prosperity since the Enlightenment has come under attack from the neoliberal right and the identitarian left; and how Vladimir Putin may end up being the unwitting founding father of a new Ukraine.

Wisdom of Crowds
Episode 111: Does Liberalism Have a Future? A Conversation with Francis Fukuyama.

Wisdom of Crowds

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 60:05


The Politics Lab
Debating History

The Politics Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 63:03


Bill and Phil consider the contentious role of history in our current political environment, discuss whether the Ukraine war means the end of Francis Fukuyama's end of history thesis, and explore some recent scholarship on the question of whether Trump supporters are capable of changing their minds

Boa Noite Internet
Vetocracia

Boa Noite Internet

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 29:37


Vetocracia é o termo cunhado pelo cientista político Francis Fukuyama para descrever as sociedades que acabam sendo paralizadas pelo sentimento de "pelo sim, pelo não, melhor deixar como está". Ela surge por conta de medos, vieses e falácias de argumentação as quais todos estamos sujeitos e afeta não só sociedade e governos, mas também as empresas.

The Dishcast with Andrew Sullivan
Larry Summers On Inflation And Mistakes

The Dishcast with Andrew Sullivan

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 85:05 Very Popular


He’s in the news again this week — after persuading Joe Manchin that the climate and healthcare bill he’s pushing isn’t inflationary. Larry Summers has had a storied career, as the chief economist of the World Bank, the treasury secretary under Clinton, and the director of the National Economic Council under Obama. He also was the president of Harvard University from 2001 to 2006 and remains there as the Charles W. Eliot University Professor. You can listen to the episode right away in the audio player above (or on the right side of the player, click “Listen On” to add the Dishcast feed to your favorite podcast app). For two clips of our convo — on how the US government spent way too little during the Great Recession and way too much during the pandemic, and how we can help the working class cope — pop over to our YouTube page.The episode has a lot of thematic overlap with our recent discussion with David Goodhart, author of Head, Hand, Heart: Why Intelligence Is Over-Rewarded, Manual Workers Matter, and Caregivers Deserve More Respect. Here’s a new transcript. And below is a clip from that episode on how our economy overvalues white-collar brain power:Back to inflation talk, here’s a dissent:I’ve been reading your blog for a little over a year now, and listening to Dishcast, which is great. I’ve noticed a few things, however, that I would like you to perhaps respond to, or at least consider. First, what you refer to as “wokeness” on the left is, I agree, an obnoxious problem that has been exacerbated by social media. But I think your recent guest Francis Fukuyama has it mostly correct in his new book, Liberalism and Its Discontents, when he identifies illiberal trends on the political left as being more of an annoyance, or at the very least, far less of a threat to the republic than illiberal trends on the right. Second, I completely disagree with this rather lazy salvo from you: “Biden’s legacy — an abandonment of his mandate for moderation, soaring inflation, an imminent recession, yet another new war, and woker-than-woke extremism — has only deepened it.” It simply is not the case that Biden has not, especially when forced to, hewed towards moderation. Yes, he is attempting to respond to a leftward shift in the Democratic Party by trying to govern more from the left, but this is simply a reflection of political reality. In addition, much of his agenda has been batted down, but more on that in a moment. Next, inflation and an imminent recession have a lot more to do with what the Fed has done over the last four decades — and definitely since the financial crisis of 2008 — than with Joe Biden. On this theme of a highly financialized economy nearing the end of the neoliberal era, I recommend Rana Foroohar on Ezra Klein’s latest podcast, where she talks about the popping of the “Everything Bubble.” Asset-value inflation, deindustrialization, a perverse focus on shareholder value rather than investing in Main Street or even R&D, and an utter lack of policy solutions, have caused this. In addition, as Foroohar herself says, the changes we need to make in our economy are going to be, in the short-to-medium term, inflationary. This means policymakers have to start making policy that actually helps both people and infrastructure, which means spending money. Unfortunately, the garden has gone untended for so long that we’re teetering on the brink of becoming a really shitty country if we don’t take more aggressive action. In addition, with regard to an upcoming recession, Noah Smith wrote on his Substack recently that Keynesian economics would suggest that a quick recession now in order to stomp out inflation would be better in the long run than milquetoast attempts to curb it by raising interest rates too slowly. The idea is that recessions — especially fast and somewhat shallow ones — can be weathered, but inflation that goes on for too long leaves lasting scars on the economy. (Smith identifies the Volker recessions as probably permanently damaging the Rust Belt.) Personally, what I worry about more on the left is not “woke-ism,” but the trendy socialist/ironic/weird outlets like Jacobin or Chapo Trap House, which seem to be doing their damndest to convince younger, more impressionable and less educated people that the whole country is fucked; it’s designed to be fucked because capitalism is fucked; and only its imminent collapse will allow for problems to be solved through revolution/redistribution. Believe me, that sentiment is becoming a real problem, and the people who buy into it are every bit as ideologically rigid, illiberal, and closed to inquiry as those on the rabid right.Next up, listeners sound off on last week’s episode with Fraser Nelson, the British journalist who sized up the prime minister race. The first comment comes from “a long-time libertarian in Massachusetts”:I’ve been reading the Dish for about a year and finally subscribed thanks to your fascinating interview with Fraser Nelson. I was particularly glad to be alerted to Kemi Badenoch.It’s taken awhile to pull the trigger on subscribing to the Dish because of your Trump bashing, since you sound more like Hillary Clinton than William Buckley. I’m perfectly fine with bashing Trump, but I prefer to see it paired with an acknowledgment of the forces that created him, i.e. the abandonment of the middle class by the two major parties, particularly the Democrats. I do think half the country would lose its mind if Trump runs again, so in that sense I sympathize with your sentiments. But the larger context is essential.Some episodes our listener might appreciate — ones sympathetic to the concerns of middle-class Trump voters — include Michael Anton, Mickey Kaus, Ann Coulter and David French. More on the Fraser Nelson pod:Thank you for an outstanding episode. Nelson has almost persuaded me to take out a Spectator subscription! I thought he summed up eloquently and fairly the state of the Conservative Party, Johnson, Sunak and Truss, and the challenges that lie ahead.Like many Brexiteers — and Nelson half-acknowledges this — the Tories have not grappled with the realities of Brexit. The most obvious lacuna in your discussion was the economy. You cannot leave the EU and not increase the size of the state. You have to have more customs arrangements (as we have recently seen at Dover), more vets, more checks and so on, ad nauseam. It’s all very well for conservatives to argue for a smaller state, but they haven’t defined what that will look like and how the services people use now (education, transport, local government, the legal system etc) will be improved, i.e. funded to a better extent than now. Underfunding is obvious and no amount of arguing “we can do it more efficiently” will cut it — the Tories have had 12 years to fix this.Moreover, picking fights with the EU has meant less investment, reduced business confidence and increased uncertainty — except of course in Northern Ireland, which has access to the single market and where business is booming. Listen to NFU President Minette Batters talk about the issues surrounding Truss’s free trade deals with Australia and New Zealand, or fishermen now dealing with the consequences of Brexit. They were once fans. Not so much now.James Carville once said, “It’s the economy, stupid.” Promising tax cuts now when much of the Western world is likely to enter a recession is ridiculously irresponsible, but hey ho, it’s a political campaign and reality will bite once we have a new prime minister, whoever she is.Also, I look forward to hearing Marina Hyde on the Dishcast!This next listener takes issue with some of my phrasing:I enjoyed the Nelson episode overall! But I have to take issue with a rare faux pas from you, where you said that Rishi Sunak is “himself obviously a globalist, just by his very career and nature.” I can’t really understand how you came to this conclusion. Is anyone who worked overseas for some time a “globalist”? Are you a “globalist” because your moved to America? What about Sunak’s “nature” makes him so?Back in 2016, Sunak supported Brexit, which was seen as the losing bet, despite much pressure from David Cameron. And he has set out very clearly in his leadership campaign that he thinks, for example, we need to be tougher on border control. Neither of these things strike me as globalist, nor a return to the Cameron era.On the other hand, I agree with your characterisation of Truss — who voted Remain before undergoing a miraculous and instantaneous change of heart the day after her side lost — as a “dime-store Thatcher.”Speaking of border control, here’s David Goodhart — also from a British perspective — on why elites favor open borders:One more listener on Fraser pod:As a Spectator subscriber (and Glasgow Uni man), I very much enjoyed Fraser Nelson. Mishearing (I think) at around the 37 minute mark when he seemed to refer to Boris getting a first at Oxford, I was reminded of this fine b****y exchange with David Cameron in the Sunday Times back in the day:Surely Boris has been the man Cameron had to beat, ever since they were at school together. 'This is one of the great myths of politics', says the PM [Cameron]. 'These things grow up and it's so long ago no one challenges them, but I don't think we really knew each other at school, he was a couple of years ahead of me. He was very clever.'Then Cameron explodes into a beaming grin. 'But', he says exultantly. 'Boris didn't get a First! I only discovered that on the Panorama programme the other night... I didn't know that'. He is suddenly lit up, almost punching the air with joy.And in that outburst of public-schoolboy competitiveness — Cameron, of course, did get a First — he reveals everything we've always thought about him.Also, when Boris was described as believing the untrue things he said at the time he said them, I’m reminded of George Costanza’s credo that “it’s not a lie if you believe it!” (which, for a fairly left liberal Tory, you’d perhaps take over a Trump analogy).Lastly, a listener looks to a potential guest:If you wish to continue to mine the vein of the global power landscape, its recent evolution this century, and its implications: Condoleezza Rice. She has an interesting perspective from one whose expertise is Russia and is a past practitioner of American statecraft with Russia and China.Thanks, as always, for the suggestion. Get full access to The Weekly Dish at andrewsullivan.substack.com/subscribe

The Brian Lehrer Show
The End of Liberalism?

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 25:41


Francis Fukuyama, senior fellow at Stanford University's Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, former State Department official, author of The End of History and the Last Man (Free Press, 1992) and his latest, Liberalism and Its Discontents (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2022), reflects on the state of liberal democracy which he had seemed ascendant in the wake of the fall of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War and offers a critique of the current state of liberalism.

The Michael Steele Podcast
Quick Take: How Tech Platforms Undermine Liberalism

The Michael Steele Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 15:03


Political scientist Francis Fukuyama joins The Michael Steele Podcast to discuss his new book, "Liberalism and Its Discontents." Michael and Professor Fukuyama discuss current manifestations of liberalism— the ideology that government should have limited power— and how liberalism ties into today's fight for individual autonomy and the ways in which tech platforms have worked to undermine liberalism.Check out the book here:https://us.macmillan.com/books/9780374606718/liberalismanditsdiscontents

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes
'Liberalism and Its Discontents' with Francis Fukuyama

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 57:27


Freedom House's annual Freedom in the World survey notes that liberalism has rapidly declined each year for the last 16 years. And its precipitous downturn is more evident now than ever amid waning respect for individual rights, increased growth of autocracies and most recently in the seismic Russian invasion of Ukraine. Decades ago, political scientist and professor Francis Fukuyama was one of the preeminent scholars to predict the marked impending fall of liberal societies. He serves as a senior fellow at Stanford's Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and is a bestselling author of numerous books, including one published in March 2022 aptly titled, “Liberalism and Its Discontents.” He joins WITHpod to discuss why liberalism doesn't always live up to its own principles, challenges from the right and the left and why our democracy will be under continued threat without a revitalized approach to its core tenets.

The Remnant with Jonah Goldberg
Ghastly Groupishness

The Remnant with Jonah Goldberg

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 65:34 Very Popular


Yascha Mounk makes his second appearance on The Remnant, this time to discuss his new book, The Great Experiment: Why Diverse Democracies Fall Apart and How They Can Endure. In a conversation tailor-made for holders of the Remnant bingo card, Yascha and Jonah discuss the dangers of tribalism and populism, America's crisis of community, and what patriotism should look like. They also examine America's shifting demographics and take a deep dive into the nuances of liberal philosophy. Show Notes:- Yascha's web page- The Great Experiment- Yascha's previous Remnant appearance- The coalitional instinct- The cult of unity- The Remnant with Yuval Levin- The Remnant with Francis Fukuyama

The Ezra Klein Show
Rethinking the "end of history"

The Ezra Klein Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 62:19 Very Popular


Sean Illing talks with political scientist and author Francis Fukuyama, whose ideas about the "end of history" and the ideological supremacy of liberal democracy became well-known through his 1989 essay "The End of History?". They discuss Fukuyama's new book, Liberalism and Its Discontents, as well as some of the modern challenges facing liberalism today, what Fukuyama thinks of the radically redistributive politics of the Bernie Sanders campaign, and whether he thinks it's still the case that liberal democracy stands victorious in the war of ideas. Host: Sean Illing (@seanilling), Interviews Writer, Vox Guest: Francis Fukuyama (@FukuyamaFrancis), author; professor, Stanford University References:  Liberalism and Its Discontents by Francis Fukuyama (FSG; 2022) "The End of History?" by Francis Fukuyama (The National Interest, v. 16; Summer 1989) The End of History and the Last Man by Francis Fukuyama (Free Press; 1992) "Francis Fukuyama Predicted the End of History. It's Back (Again)," by Jennifer Schuessler (New York Times; May 10) Enjoyed this episode? Rate Vox Conversations ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ and leave a review on Apple Podcasts. Subscribe for free. Be the first to hear the next episode of Vox Conversations by subscribing in your favorite podcast app. Support Vox Conversations by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts This episode was made by:  Producer: Erikk Geannikis Editor: Amy Drozdowska Engineer: Patrick Boyd Deputy Editorial Director, Vox Talk: Amber Hall Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices