Podcast appearances and mentions of Forrest Gump

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1994 American film directed by Robert Zemeckis

  • 1,898PODCASTS
  • 2,247EPISODES
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  • Nov 26, 2021LATEST
Forrest Gump

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Best podcasts about Forrest Gump

Latest podcast episodes about Forrest Gump

You've Got Hanks
Hanksgiving: Forrest Gump (1994) With Ruha Taslimi & Oscar Montoya

You've Got Hanks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 60:19


*Airhorn* It's officially Hanksgiving — the celebration of all things Tom Hanks — so we're trying to figure out what's the best Tom Hanks movie? You voted for your faves and we've narrowed it down to the top four. This week, we're discussing Forrest Gump with two James Cordens — Ruha Taslimi (@ruhataslimi) and Oscar Montoya (@ozzymo). How important is it that Forrest Gump has its own restaurant chain? Will any other movie top how quotable this movie is? And is it the number one answer in Family Feud? We answer these questions to get to the bottom of it all. Let me know what you think! "My mom always said life was like a box of chocolates." Theme Music by Zach Olsen (@realzacholsen) Artwork by Matt Czap (@mattczap) — SHOW INFORMATIONInstagram: Instagram Twitter: Twitter Subscribe: Apple Podcasts Subscribe: Spotify

Books with Brookes
November 2020 Book Club Discussion: Greenwood by Michael Christie

Books with Brookes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 51:50


A magnificent generational saga that charts a family's rise and fall,” Greenwood by Michael Christie is a 500+ page examination of the choices we are forced to make for, by and alongside family. This is an extremely epic book with dystopian, post-apocalyptic vibes mixed with Forrest Gump-esque historical timelines. Carrie, who suggested this book, joins the podcast to discuss.  Books with Brookes is produced by Mo Barrow with theme music by Jonathan Allen.  For sponsorship plans and more information, please email: admin@pressplaypodcasts.com | www.pressplaypodcasts.com

All Time Top Ten
Episode 488: Episode 488 - Top Ten Rock N Roll Mensches w/Fuzzbee Morse

All Time Top Ten

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 128:59


mensch/men(t)SH/noun1. a person of integrity and honor.2. Fuzzbee MorseAs Thanksgiving approaches and the first 10 years of this podcast wind down, we are most thankful for all the kind, funny and genuine people we've met in the last decade. There have been many good souls along the way but none could possibly be menschier than the one and only Fuzzbee Morse, who we hadn't seen in person in nearly 2 years. We had a wonderful time talking about our favorite mensches in music, Fuzzbee regaled us with stories of those he has encountered over the years in his Forrest Gump-like life in rock n roll, and we played some amazing tunes, highlighting the mensches that do their best to be upstanding citizens, and advocates for the need to spread good vibes. Stream this fine playlist on Spotify:https://open.spotify.com/playlist/2yi2XCjlr0IjTTkivJirxe?si=ad75c92463ee4635The Supermensch Supreme Fuzzbee Morse's MUSIC can be found at his Bandcamp:https://fuzzbee.bandcamp.comGet to the Patreon thing and more at our website:https://alltimetoptenpod.com

Everyday Jay Podcast
Episode 66 | Crack Babies

Everyday Jay Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 75:02


Jaysuttoncomedy.com Episode 66 is no different from the rest. Full of informative information delivered in a comical way. Show starts off repping for Young Dolph (RIP) then things take a turn when we discuss the latest theatrics of one Da Baby disrespecting his Baby Mom on Live which turns into an debate between Bruce & I over Dark skin ninjas & Light skin ninjas lol. Stevie J doing it for the internet cursing Faith out on live. Kanye West & Drake squash beef thanks to J Prince, Beanie Segal not taking the money from Kanye says he owes him nothing for the name Yeezy. We beg to differ and so does Allah and the brothers, two men being released from Prison for the killing of Malcolm X, another two men arrested for beating a cop but may be justified. Chris Tucker gives the reason for not doing another Friday movie, sticking to movies we discuss how selfish Tom Hanks is, is he a A list actor and Forrest Gump being a simp for Jenny and a whole lot more for your viewing pleasure. So press play and enjoy the show.

Lunker Dogs Reel Guy show
Ft Lauderdale Boat Show a Bust

Lunker Dogs Reel Guy show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 61:17


After a weak mullet run the Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show was a bust. The Lunkerdog has Captain Norm in the studio for a long conversation that can only come from this duo . Norm compares himself to Forrest Gump and prefers day drinking as he considers himself a pro drinker. Lunkerdog touts about going live 15 years ago . Hope you Enjoy! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Mike Missanelli - 97.5 The Fanatic
The Mike Missanelli Show 11-16-2021

Mike Missanelli - 97.5 The Fanatic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 170:18


Today on The Mike Missanelli Show, Mike opens the show telling people to get on the Eagles playoff train now before it is too late. While he still has major questions about this team; he believes logically (because of the schedule) that a wild card playoff berth is a real possibility. Tyrone also wants Philadelphia to boycott Adele's new album (0:00-46:37). NBCSPhilly's Dave Zangaro joins the show to discuss the Eagles' running back rotation, Jalen Hurts' growth, and all things Eagles. “What's Brewing” with Jen Scordo which includes news stories such as a fireball seen in New Jersey, a penguin traveling 2,000 miles, and an employee not allowed to eat breakfast at work (46:37-1:26:28). The Athletic's Rich Hofmann joins the show to discuss the Sixers' Covid situation and gives an update on Ben Simmons. Tyrone believes, in Forrest Gump,  Jenny lied to Forrest about the child being his (1:26:28-2:10:34). Mike takes a few more phone calls and finishes out the show with Sound Off (2:10:34-2:50:11).

2 Guys Named Chris, Daily Show Highlights
Who Was The Real Bad Guy In Forrest Gump?

2 Guys Named Chris, Daily Show Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 12:34


Who Was The Real Bad Guy In Forrest Gump? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Newt's World
Episode 330: Gary Sinise on Honoring Veterans

Newt's World

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 41:08


For nearly 40 years, actor Gary Sinise has been an advocate on behalf of America's service members. His portrayal of Lt. Dan in Forrest Gump formed an enduring connection with service members throughout the military community. Following the attacks of September 11th, 2001, Sinise's dedication to our nation's active duty defenders, veterans, first responders and their families has become his personal crusade of support, service and gratitude for all those who protect our freedom and serve our country through the garysinisefoundation.org Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Saturday Live
Evanna Lynch

Saturday Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 83:18


Richard Coles and Nikki Bedi are joined by Evanna Lynch who was a Harry Potter superfan who developed anorexia aged 11. Whilst having treatment, her beloved Harry Potter books provided an escape, particularly the dreamy, independent character of Luna Lovegood in the fifth book. When the film came around amazingly she won the role, and Evanna played Luna for the remaining four films. She joins us. A few years ago, Hamza Yassin went on holiday to a remote Scottish peninsula. He never left. He is now an acclaimed wildlife cameraman who loves to spread his enthusiasm for the natural world with a series on CBeebies and a new series on More4. Asma Elbadawi led a four-year campaign to overturn a ban on hijabs in women's basketball. Now a performance poet, she joins us. In 2016, vet Rob Pope decided to to copy Forrest Gump and run across America. During his journey Pope became the living embodiment of the Tom Hanks character: long scraggly beard, Bubba Gump's baseball hat and all. By the time he finished, 422 days later, he'd crossed the United States more than four times, covering a distance in excess of 25,000km – the equivalent of 600 marathons – and become the first person to trace the whole Gump route. Lady Anne Glenconner chooses her Inheritance Tracks: Smoke Gets In Your Eyes, The Platters and Nimrod, Edward Elgar, and we have your Thank you. Producer: Corinna Jones

OnWriting: A Podcast of the WGA East
Episode 62: Jon Spaihts and Denis Villeneuve, "Dune"

OnWriting: A Podcast of the WGA East

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 39:10


Host Geri Cole is joined by Jon Spaihts and Denis Villeneuve—two-thirds of the writing team behind DUNE—to discuss the challenges of writing a story that serves two audiences, relearning the lesson of focusing on the human element in science fiction, and just how much coffee it takes for three masters of filmmaking to collaborate on the script of DUNE (spoiler alert… it's a lot). Jon Spaihts wrote the screenplays for PROMETHEUS, THE DARKEST HOUR, and MARVEL'S DR. STRANGE. Denis Villeneuve is perhaps best known as the director of SICARIO, ARRIVAL, and BLADE RUNNER 2049. Third co-writer Eric Roth—who, unfortunately, couldn't join us because of technical difficulties—is the writer of titles like FORREST GUMP, THE CURIOUS CASE OF BENJAMIN BUTTON, and A STAR IS BORN, among many others. DUNE—co-written by Spaihts, Villeneuve, and Roth and directed by Villeneuve— is a mythic and emotionally charged hero's journey adapted from the 1965 science fiction novel by Frank Herbert. The film tells the story of Paul Atreides, a brilliant and gifted young man born into a great destiny beyond his understanding, who must travel to the most dangerous planet in the universe to ensure the future of his family and his people. As malevolent forces explode into conflict over the planet's exclusive supply of the most precious resource in existence-a commodity capable of unlocking humanity's greatest potential-only those who can conquer their fear will survive. DUNE is now playing in theaters, and can also be streamed on HBO Max. --- Before it was a podcast, OnWriting was a print publication. Check out OnWriting: The Print Archives. Read shownotes, transcripts, and other member interviews: www.onwriting.org/ Follow the Guild on social media: Twitter: @OnWritingWGAE | @WGAEast Facebook: /WGAEast Instagram: @WGAEast

Wealthy Wellthy Wise
Jerremy Newsome: Money DOES Grow On Trees

Wealthy Wellthy Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 63:03


Jerremy Newsome started his fortune by the inspiration of Forrest Gump. Yup! That was the seed of success that energized him and planted the seed of success as a young child. Today, his main mission is to enrich lives and teach others about the stock market-- and use it to create active and/or cash flow. Jerremy and I discuss the power of the mind. The position of our thought life is everything. If your mind is SET-- that is simply the standard you will be at. However, Jerremy introduces the HEART-set. He poses the statement: you can change your beliefs, your structure your thoughts, and your feelings! A few nuggest from Jerremy himself... “Money does grow on trees, you just have to exchange it.”  “You have to circulate money to grow.” Topics Mentioned:  Retiring on $3k, How to Grow a Modest Investment into a Comfortable Retirement  Day Trading 101 Take the First Step, How to Reshape your Beliefs About Money  Knowing the Difference Between Fear and Greed Buying Stock at a Lower Price Using Stock Options Links Jerremy's Twitter Jerremy's Facebook Jerremy's LinkedIn Jeremy's YouTube

The Reese Waters Show
Run Forrest, Run. Forrest Gump Stinks.

The Reese Waters Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 9:32


It's not a good movie. It has almost no redeeming qualities, except being hilarious for none of the intended reasons. Stupid is as stupid does.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Reese Waters Show
11/11/2021 - HR 2 - Chris Miles & Forrest Gump

The Reese Waters Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 43:02


Our pal!! Chris Miles of the NBA network is back on the show.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Live Inspired Podcast with John O'Leary
A Veteran's Story of Courage, Combat + Recovery (ep. 410)

Live Inspired Podcast with John O'Leary

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 58:50


One of my favorite groups to partner with each year is FOCUS Marines Foundation. FOCUS does an amazing job providing coping skills, relationship guidance, goal creation and career advancement to wounded veterans struggling with physical ailments, PTSD, traumatic brain injuries and various other challenges.   Among the remarkable servants I've met through this organization is retired Marine Gunnery Sergeant Nick Popaditch. Wounded in action, Nick was struck in the head by an enemy rocket-propelled grenade (RPG), resulting in numerous shrapnel wounds to the head and neck which left him legally blind and partially deaf in his right ear. In honor of Veteran's Day, Nick joins us to share his inspirational story of courage, combat and recovery. SHOW NOTES: Nick Popaditch earned numerous military awards including a Silver Star and Purple Heart. "If you don't quit on us, we will never quit on you." The power of inertia: The greatest difficulty always arises in the beginning. As a drill sergeant, Nick learned that everything was trained in the antithesis. Courage was trained by fear, honor by unfair treatment and commitment by failing. April 9, 2003: An AP photographer captures a striking image seen around the world of Nick smoking a victory cigar in his tank with the haunting statue of Saddam Hussein hovering in the background, immortalizing him forever as "The Cigar Marine." April 6, 2004: During the battle for Fallujah, Nick suffers grievous head wounds that leave him legally blind and partially deaf. Nick and his wife April would sign every letter during his multiple deployments with Romans 1:11: For I long to see you so that I may impart to you some spiritual gift to strengthen you that is, that you and I may be mutually encouraged by each other's faith. Learn more about FOCUS Marines Foundation here. Get a copy of Nick Popaditch's book Once a Marine here. If you enjoyed this episode, Hear from award-winning actor Gary Sinise. As one of America's favorite, heart-led leaders Gary shares lessons on gratitude, service, and how his role in Forrest Gump as Lt. Dan led him to celebrate America's defenders, veterans, and first responders. Listen to Gary Sinise on ep. 128. GYSGT NICK POPADITCH'S LIVE INSPIRED 7 Q. What is the best book you've ever read? A. It Doesn't Take a Hero by General Norman Schwarzkopf. Q. What is a characteristic or trait that you possessed as a child that you wish you still exhibited today? A. Be positively motivated just because. Q. Your house is on fire, all living things and people are out. You have the opportunity to run in and grab one item. What would it be? A. My drill instructor hat called a Campaign Cover. Q. You are sitting on a bench overlooking a gorgeous beach. You have the opportunity to have a long conversation with anyone living or dead. Who would it be?  A. Avigdor Kahalani, an Israeli battalion commander, who saved the entire country of Israel in the Valley of Tears. Q. What is the best advice you've ever received?  A. My father told me to treat people with respect and hold them accountable. Q. What advice would you give your 20-year-old self?  A. I wouldn't change a thing. Every mistake made me who I am now. Q. It's been said that all great people can have their lives summed up in one sentence. How do you want yours to read?  A. I'd like it to say, "the world was a better place because I was here."

Anything Goes with James English
Ep 222 Rob Pope, Being Forrest Gump.

Anything Goes with James English

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 66:17


Anything goes with James English Ep/222 Becoming Forrest Gump. Inspired by Forrest Gump, Rob ran across the US for 20 months and got through 33 pairs of trainers Rob Pope, a 43-year-old from Liverpool, set out to run across America a grand total of five times. He had his late mother's words ringing in his ears – “Do one thing in your life that makes a difference. The link to robs book https://www.google.co.uk/aclk?sa=L&ai=DChcSEwiX9-Kgn470AhVG6u0KHerXDEoYABAHGgJkZw&ae=2&sig=AOD64_1NWNsXMDBwNAuRl7jxj2EKVdou_w&ctype=5&q=&ved=2ahUKEwiO-dqgn470AhV0SEEAHVg5ByUQ8w56BAgBEBQ&adurl=   You can contact James English on his social media platforms ⬇️⬇️ http://instagram.com/jamesenglish2 http://twitter.com/jamesenglish0 http://Facebook.com/Jamesenglish11 You can also listen & download full Podcasts at the link below. https://jamesenglish.podbean.com/ https://itunes.apple.com

Green & Red: Podcasts for Scrappy Radicals
The Best Political Movies of All Time (Part 2). Bob & Scott talk about their favorite Lefty films. (G&R 119)

Green & Red: Podcasts for Scrappy Radicals

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 68:55


Green & Red Goes Hollywood! At Green and Red, we're big fans of popular culture and how it can politicize and radicalize people. We've already done shows on sports and activism, progressive Country music, cancel culture, Socialism and the Sopranos and other such themes. So.....in an upcoming series of episodes, we're periodically going to talk about our favorite political/radical films, television and music. Check out part 1 here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mGV962JFmiY&t=2722s In part 2, we continue our journey into the best political films by starting with movies about working-class issues and activism. Then we discuss some of our favorite foreign films with political themes, including the work of Gillo Pontecorvo and Costas-Gavras. One of our favorite themes was "political satire and dystopia," where we talked about movies that often served as warnings about the world we live in today. We discussed what we called "cultural touchstones," films that defined an era ("Hair") or served as a snapshot into a reality we never were shown ("Being There"). We also talk about important films that discuss wars, revolution, and imperialism, which are essential to any left understanding of politics. And we finished with our least favorite political films, and you get to hear an epic rant from Bob about the horrors of "Forrest Gump." If you haven't subscribed to Green & Red on YouTube yet, just click that button above. Please SHARE and please leave any COMMENTS about what we left in or what we left out. We want to know what your favorite political flicks are. And please share the word about G&R and follow us all over social media! -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Follow Green and Red// https://linktr.ee/greenandredpodcast Donate to Green and Red Podcast// Become a recurring donor at https://www.patreon.com/greenredpodcast Or make a one time donation here: https://bit.ly/DonateGandR This is a Green and Red Podcast production. Produced by Bob (@bobbuzzanco) and Scott (@sparki1969). “Green and Red Blues" by Moody. Editing by Isaac.

Gutting the Sacred Cow
Episode 107: Bill Schulz SHRINKS Big Episode 107 GTSC podcast

Gutting the Sacred Cow

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 97:04


Our chum, Bill Schulz (Mornin' with Bill and Jo on Compound Media) returns to see if he make it TWO gutting in a row.  Bill hates America's male sweetheart, Tom Hanks, and sharpens his scythe to try and cut Big down to ribbons.  You know, the one where a 13 year wakes up as a man and decides to get a 9-5 job in NYC instead of do fun adult stuff?  Do Kevin Gootee and Kevin Israel find his argument worse than the traitorous actions of Benedict Arnold?  We'd love if you subscribed to us on youtube (it really helps!) if you want to see our cute faces and great teeth.  DM us to get some sweet GTSC stickers!Don't forget, you can find us on all podcasts platforms: apple iTunes, Spotify, google, spreaker, stitcher, iheartradio, castbox. You name it and we're on it! And you can also see our handsome yet smug faces on Youtube as well. https://guttingthesacredcow.com/where-to-listen-see-us/ Hello to our new friends! We love it when you click "subscribe", like us on social media, and most importantly when you tell your friends/family about our podcast. Looking to sell your product, advertise your services, or raise brand awareness? We'd love to help you and we can be reached at guttingthesacredcow@gmail.comThank you ALL for continually shouting us out on social media, we love when you do that as well as leave us those 5 star rating and 2-3 sentence reviews. Guttingthesacredcow.com is where you find us every day giving YOU those movie quotes, movies news, THAT DOESN'T HAPPEN, and more!  Social media for the gang: @KevinGootee on Twitter, FB, IG. www.kevingootee.com @kevinisrael_NJ on twitter, FB, @Kevin_israel_comedy on IG www.kevinisrael.com @billschulz @morninbillandjo @compoundamerica www.compoundmedia.com

Go Be Wyoming
Bruce Moriarty

Go Be Wyoming

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 57:14


On Today's episode Aaron sits down with film producer, director, horse stuntman and local business owner, Bruce Moriarty. Bruce at an early age had the passion for movies getting experience as a horse stuntman in local Canadian films as a teenager. This would lead him to horse training and stunt work in the movie industry. Bruce is proud of his work on all of his films, his most notable are; Forrest Gump, Apollo 13, Black Stallion, 13th Warrior, Bad Boys, Casino Royale and many more! Aaron asks him about his love for Wyoming, how Wyoming can become more attractive for the film industry and how he spends his time on his little ranch outside Bighorn, WY. This episode is brought to you by Fly Sheridan, Operated by SkyWest Airlines. This episode is produced by the help of DYT Solutions and Go Be WYO Productions.

The Bill Simmons Podcast
Part 2: Tom Hanks on ‘Cast Away' Theories, ‘Forrest Gump' Haters, and 40 Years of Memorable Movies

The Bill Simmons Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 84:34


I'm Part 2 of a two-part podcast, The Ringer's Bill Simmons is joined by actor and filmmaker Tom Hanks to discuss his long career, his three favorite films, his new movie, ‘Finch,' baseball stories, and much more. Host: Bill Simmons Guest: Tom Hanks Producer: Kyle Crichton Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

True Stride
EP58: What Lights You Up with Ryan Cwick

True Stride

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 54:55


What if you release the idea that you had for the life that you or others expected for yourself? Doing what lights you up will conquer any expectations without even meaning to and is ultimately the best way to be kind to yourself. Ryan Cwick, our guest for EP58's Wise Walk, likes to take on the world with the intention of spreading love and kindness. He doesn't back down from a challenge, and I admire how he views the world. We both share the mindset that it's important to do what lights you up. On our Wise Walk, Ryan and I talk about how a shock in life provides freedom to explore something new. Why there is not an optimal sequence to life, and how to recreate life at any point. We discuss the balance of giving to others and giving to yourself.  We share our thoughts and create space for you to reflect on these Wise Walk questions and more: Where can you shock yourself so you can fully connect to experiences that light you up? In what ways can you offer help or give on a day-to-day basis? If you give up something (because it no longer makes your heart happy), what will you choose instead to align with what will light you up? On the True Stride podcast, we take a Wise Walk to slow down and check our reality. True Stride is that feeling you get when you're aligned in your heart with all that you do, and you feel energized and happy with each and every step that you take. I'm your host, Mary Tess Rooney, and I connect with Ryan Cwick on this episode. You definitely want to listen!! Ryan Cwick says he fulfilled lots of odd jobs in his journey and stumbled into personal development. Ryan contributes to the world through his experiences as a travel enthusiast and an industrial engineer interested in solar energy. He operates as a Travel Coach through TripsWithCwick and gives back to communities by raising money through social media challenges. He organizes his spontaneous ideas into meaningful events that inspire change. The things that light us up actually make an impact in the world, whether the impact is directly or indirectly connected to our efforts. Tune in to hear ways to: Explore the thread of our True Stride through different aspects of life Intentionally follow our heart Break the norms and habits we grew accustomed to that no longer serve us Join this inspiring community to uncover a new sense of freedom, and be sure to follow Ryan as he continues to spread his bright light and Heart Value with others.   In this episode: [00:23] - Welcome to the show! [02:05] - Mary Tess talks about her thoughts on the feedback from Striders as everyone pursues their own path. [04:04] - Ryan Cwick says that making others smile is what lights him up. [05:50] - What led to Ryan's sudden move across the country, and how did this move alter his life? [07:51] - Ryan talks about the influence a series of miscellaneous jobs had on his perspective of communication and growth. [09:53] - This social media challenge inspired Ryan to explore the intersection of work, interests, and service to others. [12:15] - Ryan thinks it's imperative for people to break the norms they are accustomed to in everyday life. [14:16] - Mary Tess and Ryan discuss how having time to pause gives people space to explore and seek new things. [16:00] - What happens when life doesn't go as planned? Mary Tess speaks on her own personal experience of life taking a turn from what she once envisioned and how she chose to recreate life. [17:44] - Enjoy the present while still challenging the next level of the future.  [19:54] - In the future, Ryan says he is looking to be more involved with the nonprofit and solar industries. [21:50] - Ryan recalls the funny reason his third give-back Venmo challenge almost didn't happen. [24:16] - This moment made Ryan realize how he could amplify his impact with intention. [27:02] - Ryan says the Venmo challenge is not about the dollar amount, but the way the challenge can be a symbol of hope. [28:57] - How many challenges did Ryan complete thus far? [31:35] - Ryan says he began to focus on providing value to others as he understood himself more and more. [33:19] - Mary Tess and Ryan discuss the balance of giving to others and giving to yourself. [36:06] - Ryan shares his favorite aspects of Heart Value by Mary Tess, such as action steps for awareness. [38:09] - Mary Tess emphasizes the change she noticed once she found ways to implement insights she learned. Ryan points out the trap of ruminating on “How to do it”. [40:46] - Listen to Ryan reminisce about his “Forrest Gump” challenge to raise money and highlight exercise. [43:24] - Where did the Forrest Gump part come into play for Ryan's challenge? [46:18] - Look around and seek those moments where you can help or give. [48:51] - Where can you shock yourself to give yourself the freedom to explore? [51:27] - Ryan says seeing others spreading love and kindness brings him joy. [53:05] - Thank you for listening!   Memorable Quotes: “When a stranger pays a kindness unexpectedly, there is something about that exchange of energy that charges you differently.” - Mary Tess “Once I turned that corner of when I was shocked, and I opened my awareness to everything that I was doing, it really focused me on doing more for others.” - Ryan “Not everything has to happen overnight. We set ourselves up for success so much more when we are kind to ourselves.” - Mary Tess “You see the stuff you do everyday without thinking about it. It's so ingrained in you, you can't see it. When you do see it, that might be a great opportunity to shock yourself and start doing something different.” - Ryan   Links and Resources: Mary Tess Rooney Email Facebook | LinkedIn | Twitter | Instagram   Ryan Cwick LinkedIn | Instagram | TikTok

HugLife Podcast - Podaholics Network
Hugflection: Episode 17 – She Gets to Kiss Ed Norton with Kane Holloway

HugLife Podcast - Podaholics Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 65:37


Monica and Mike have the wonderful Kane Holloway on this episode. They talk about the world's best beer pong team, Monica's amateur astronomy, and touch on Kane's love of movies including Forrest Gump.

RNZ: Sunday Morning
The 'Forrest Gump' of the Captain Cook story

RNZ: Sunday Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 30:39


Author and historian Hampton Sides' latest book, The Exotic: Intrigue and Cultural Ruin in the Age of Imperialism, tells the remarkable story of Mai, a central figure in the story of Captain James Cook but one who is rarely mentioned in other books on the famous explorer. 

Movie Amigos Podcast
Ep. 21 Kinda Like Acting (Anniversary)

Movie Amigos Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 96:41


In this episode, the Amigos kinda celebrate their first anniversary as Movie Amigos while they kinda converse about the art of "acting!" We like movies and we're amigos. Join us and be our movie amigos. Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/movieamigospodcast/ Find us wherever you listen to podcasts! Letterboxd profiles: Gila https://letterboxd.com/gilasantos1/ Josh https://letterboxd.com/joshman972/ Juve https://letterboxd.com/mrfalcon/ Movies mentioned this episode: Titanic (1997) Air Bud (1997) 101 Dalmatians (1996) Mulan (1998) The Night of the Hunter (1955) Inglourious Basterds (2009) Perfect Blue / パーフェクトブルー (1997) Dragonball Evolution (2009) The Last Airbender (2010) Finding Nemo (2003) Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings (2021) Black Widow (2021) Midsommar (2019) Snow White and the Huntsman (2012) Abduction (2011) The Princess Diaries (2001) The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones (2013) The Blind Side (2009) Mirror, Mirror (2012) Pretty Woman (1990) My Fair Lady (1964) The Sound of Music (1965) Notting Hill (1999) Runaway Bride (1999) Erin Brockovich (2000) Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (2001) Little Women (2019) The Suicide Squad (2021) Beauty and The Beast (2017) The Circle (2017) Toy Story (1995) Forrest Gump (1994) Lost in Translation (2003) The Terminal (2004) Twilight (2008) You've Got Mail (1998) Captain Phillips (2013) Marriage Story (2019) Les Misérables (2012) Fast Five (2011) Joker (2019) Zack Snyder's Justice League (2021) Suicide Squad (2016) Transformers (2007) Jojo Rabbit (2019) Fighting with My Family (2019) Spider-Man (2002) The Lighthouse (2019) My Left Foot (1989) There Will Be Blood (2007) Nightcrawler (2014) Phantom Thread (2017) I, Tonya (2017) Good Time (2017) Hereditary (2018) Call Me By Your Name (2017) The Shining (1980) Gone Girl (2014) Black Swan (2010) Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace (1999) Léon: The Professional / Léon (1994) The Prestige (2006) The Greatest Showman (2017) Hot Fuzz (2007) Maleficent (2014) Cinderella (2015) The Jungle Book (2016) Aladdin (2019) Lady and the Tramp (2019) Dumbo (2019) The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement (2004) The Dark Knight Rises (2012) Alice in Wonderland (2010) Interstellar (2014) Ella Enchanted (2004) Miss Congeniality (2000) Gravity (2013) The Devil Wears Prada (2006) Kramer vs. Kramer (1979) La La Land (2016) Blade Runner 2049 (2017) Blue Valentine (2010) Crazy, Stupid, Love. (2011) Finding Dory (2016) Onward (2020) The Godfather (1972) Shakespeare in Love (1998) Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness (2022) Luca (2021) The Boy (2016) The Amazing Spider-Man (2012) She's the Man (2006) Both intro and outro music: Beat provided by https://freebeats.io Produced by White Hot RELEASE CODE: 55514 For any inquiries: Email us at movieamigospodcast@gmail.com

Everyday Liminality
Forrest Gump: A Political Movie?

Everyday Liminality

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 39:03


Forrest Gump is arguably the most beloved movie of the 90s. It's nostalgic and wholesome, funny and heartbreaking. There's a reason it won best picture. And yet, not everyone is on board. Is there a problematic agenda to this movie?

Couple Of Catches
GOIN' LIKE GUMP! | MiLB MOVES & TE DAY | S3E9

Couple Of Catches

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 31:48


Oh sweet heavens, finally, finally, Minor League Baseball players are getting a little respect put on their names, and Avery J lets the world hear her *true* feelings. They've spent decades below the poverty line and are *just* now getting some financial boosts. There was even a major development in their housing ~thank u advocacy groups~. They deserve the world (in our opinion)! You know who runs the football world in our eyes? TIGHT ENDS. They do it all, block, catch, and run like Forrest Gump! We've got the best tight ends of the season *so far* listed, with maybe a surprise or two mixed in. FOLLOW US INSTA: @averyjnichols / @katelyn_sass TWITTER: @CoupleOfCatches --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/couple-of-catches/message

Jonesy & Amanda's JAMcast!

Peter Fitzsimons joined Jonesy & Amanda to chat about his brand new book, The Incredible Life Of Hubert Wilkins.

Did That Age Well?
#43 - Did Forrest Gump age well? (w/ Will Winner)

Did That Age Well?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 88:28


Will Winner is back to talk about one of his favorite movies! // Listen to The Good, The Dad and The Ugly podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-good-the-dad-and-the-ugly/id1183633705 // Follow @will.the.winner @didthatagewell @mollybirdsmith on Twitter and Instagram // Send us your ideas for Cancel Or Callback! Email didthatagewell@gmail.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/didthatagewell/support

Southern Oddities
Sorrel-Weed House - Savannah, Georgia

Southern Oddities

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 8:46


Sitting right on Madison Square is one of Savannah's most treasured historic houses, the Sorrel Weed House. It's made cameos in movies and television, from Forrest Gump to the Today Show, but the building's true claim to fame is not its size, nor its architecture, its the ghosts that inhabit its halls. The Sorrel Weed House is not only among the most haunted houses in Savannah; it's one of the most well-known haunted houses in the world. The strange haunts and horrifying history have brought quite a bit of attention to the Sorrel Weed House, As a result, the building has been the subject of several paranormal investigations.[FOLLOW ON SOCIAL MEDIA & MORE]TWITTER: www.twitter.com/SouthernOddPodINSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/SouthernOddPodJARED'S TWITTER: www.twitter.com/jared_ordisJARED'S INSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/jared.ordis[ADDITONAL INFORMATION]Questions or Business Inquiry, Email Us @ ordisstudios@gmail.comResearched was used for this episode of Southern Oddities, and we couldn't have made it possible without the journalism and dedication from these awesome sources of information: Wikipedia [Sorrel Weed House] Sorrel Weed House [Website] Country Living [Sorrel Weed House Savannah Haunted] Ghost Savannah [The Sorrel Weed House Haunted] Savannah Terrors [The Suicides at the Sorrel Weed House]"Southern Oddities" is created & produced by Jared Ordis, an Ordis Studios production. This show is part of the Ordis Studios Network Copyright © 2021 by Ordis Studioswww.ordisstudios.com

How To Love Lit Podcast
Shirley Jackson - The Haunting Of Hill House - Episode 1 - MeetThe Author And The Personal Issues That Created One Of The Best Horror Genre Books Of All Time!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 48:20


Shirley Jackson - The Haunting Of Hill House - Episode 1 - MeetThe Author And The Personal Issues That Created One Of The Best Horror Genre Books Of All Time!   `Hi, I'm Christy Shriver and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    And I'm Garry Shriver and this is the How to Love Lit Podcast.  If you are listening to this in real time, we are well into the month of October and in the United States, the month of October means Halloween.  Halloween, as we've discussed before, is not Christy's favorite holiday.  Christy, why is that?    Because it's horrifying.  It's about death.  It's about being scared.  It's about demons.  I don't understand why we're celebrating these things.      And yet, I have seen you dress up as Wilma Flintstone; answer a door bell to a slew of terrifyingly dressed children, hand out candy and enjoy every minute of it.  For those of you who live in other parts of the world- that is what we do here in the United States on October 31st.  My son, Ben, and his wife Rachel live in a part of Memphis which is particularly serious about Halloween, so we, if we can, love to go down there on Halloween and get in on the party.      That's true- and it is wild. They have a neighbor whose yard literally looks like the set of a horror movie with graves, and ghosts and witches and everything.  It spooks me, but on the other hand,  I do love dressing up, and I love seeing all the kids dress up.  That part I'm cool with.    And yet, here we are reading a classic work described as Female Gothic or horror fiction- the work of the celebrated Shirley Jackson, perhaps her most famous novel The Haunting of Hill House.      True.  But I will say that Literary Horror is slightly different than Nightmare on Elm street.  Here's a little story about myself, so I had never watched a horror movie growing up.  My mother didn't allow it in our home, and back then these movies were rated R and the people at movie theaters really policed that sort of thing- so if you were a young child, obviously you could watch a rated R movie, but they didn't make it easy for you.  Well, anyway, when I was a sophomore in high school, this little school that I attended at the time took an overnight trip out of town to hike up this mountain, Pico da Bandeira.   After the hike, somebody pulled out the VHS of this move and we were going to watch it (I'm pretty sure it was a bootleg).  Anyway, I was so excited- most everyone in Brazil loves horror movies and Nightmare on Elmstreet was one of the most populat at the time.       Well, how did that go for you?    Not well, I'm not sure I got through 15 minutes.  I spent the rest of the night under the covers and with my hands in my ears.  I didn't even want to hear it.      HA!!  Well, what I find fascinating about Literary fiction is that it's scary for all kinds of different reasons, not the idea of someone jumping out and stabbing an unsuspecting girl.      Exactly. It's not some obvious caricature of a gore covered mummy walking around with a hatchet that defines it.  It's metaphorical; it's about the cost of seduction; it's about psychological disorders and it's very much about anxiety.      Well, you know I love it when we get psychological.  One thing I found interesting, and this is coming from the perspective that we just did an entire series kind of around women's issue with A Doll's House, but I expected Shirley Jackson's work to be more feminist than it is.  Also, the book has all this mother/daughter stuff in it.  I wasn't expecting that.    Yes- it very much has everything to do with mother/daughter relationships.  That motif starts on the first page and never lets up.  I got tired of counting mother references, and I never found an article that did the math, but there are reference to mothers endlessly- and something that drew my immediate attention- especially the first time Eleanor wakes up terrified in the middle the night yelling for her mother.  But that is just one way of looking at the book- although that's a great place to start and where we will start our discussion today as we attempt to make it all the way through chapter 1 of the book.    But in a more general sense, what Jackson was looking at was this imbalance of power that can exist in relationships between any two people.  She wants to express the seduction and betrayal of the powerless by the powerful. She expresses how one person uses the power in the relationship basically to crush another person.  And unfortunately, she understood this problem so well because it was her entire life story.  She had that experience with her mother, and then she turned around and had it again with her husband, and really she had it within the community at large of the 1950s.      And, of course, being written in the 1950s, many women of her generation quickly related to it.  In fact, in some ways, it reminds me a little bit of that very famous work by Betty Friedan, The Feminine Mystique, that became so important in American history but wasn't even going to be written for another ten years.    Yeah, I've heard of that book, but honestly, I don't know much about it.  What is the premise and why does it connect, in your mind to Shirley Jackson.    Well, I'll be upfront and tell you I have never read the book, so I'm speaking from second hand knowledge.  But, what I know about it from teaching and studying history is the impact it had on American culture because of the power of the argument Friedan makes in the book.     First of all I would like to point out she's interviewing women that attended Smith College, which is a very well to do private school in Massachusetts.  survey sample was not very scientific     Friedan, at her 15th college reunion, took a survey from her fellow colleagues, about how they felt about their lives.  The basic premise of her book is that society had created a myth that women were most fulfilled if they were taking care of children, staying at home,  supporting their husbands, and staying away from politics and business.  In the book, she claims that entire worldview for women is a myth- at least for many women.  I will never assume to speak for women and I certainly won't speak for all women.  But Friedan will, and she went after the 1950s stereotypical Leave it To Beaver kind of mom that had been the socially accepted lifestyle.  She said many women were absolutely miserable.  She claimed that society's pressure on women for women to succumb to what amounted to in many cases mindnumbing non-stimulating existences was causing depression.  She famously said it was a “problem that has no name”.   And whether you want to challenge her or agree with her, you have to respect that her idea absolutely resonated across America and really the entire world.  Her book was a best seller, selling over 3 million in her lifetime and has been translated into at least a dozen major languages around the world.  Many textbooks credit Friedan for sparking the second wave of feminism that was a key feature of the 60s, the kind of thing we see portrayed in movies like Forrest Gump in the character of Jenny.  This women's rights movement was not interested in voting rights; it was moving forward to the next level.  It was pushing for workplace equality, birth control, abortion rights, breaking the glass ceiling in academia and business.  Where I see it aligning with Jackson, who came much earlier, is that this book, The Haunting of Hill House is a metaphorical expression of everything Friedan wanted to say about women in the 1960s- the house is haunted, so to speak.  The house was crushing women.  It was making women crazy.     Well, you're starting to steal a little bit of my thunder –next week we are going to spend almost the entire episode discussing the house itself, but you are dead on about what Jackson is doing in her work…pardon the pun.  But, I want to say before all the men moan and groan and say, I'm turning this off if this is going to be another one of those feminist books- the book really is much more than a political commentary- in fact that's just one way of relating to it.  The metaphor most definitely can be read exactly as you have connected to the femininist movement of the 1960s, and many many people have read it just that way, but I'm not sure Jackson herself really did, although there's no doubt she was an advocate for many of the things you just enumerated. She, like Ibsen, would say her work is art and not a piece of political propaganda.  She would also likely claim, and I know I'm being presumptuous to speak for her, but I do think she would claim, that would be a very small way to understand her body of work, if that's all you thought it was. She was writing the emotions and then the reader found themselves in them.     I was also interested to see that Jackson, very much like Elizabeth Barrett Browning struggled fighting critics over the years.  Stanley Hyman, her husband and literary critic during their lives, in the preface for a book he published of her yet unpublished work after her death famously wrote, “For all her popularity, Shirley Jackson won surprisingly little recognition.  She received no awards or prizes, grants or fellowships; her name was often omitted from lists on which it clearly belonged, or which it should have led.  She saw these honors go to inferior writers.”    True, and Hyman, although I have trouble giving him credit for anything because of his and Shirley's relationship which we'll talk about in a different episode, but he predicted that Jackson's “powerful visions of suffering and inhumanity” and would be found “increasingly significant and meaningful.”  He truly always understood that her long form or serious work was more than pop fiction, or gory horror, and yet that was not the majority view of that time.    And part of that is somewhat understandable.  One thing I didn't know about her until we started reading up on her for this podcast series was that her acclaim during her day really came from two places- one was for the short story, “The Lottery”, but the other and this is what I didn't know- was her best-selling essay collection on domestic life titled Life Among the Savages.  I haven't read much of that, to be honest, but what I did read is really truly funny stuff stuff.  She was Erma Bombeck before Erma Bombeck.    Yes- and she was funny, and she was writing about her kids, house cleaning, being a mom, a member of a local community and all the craziness of middle-class life.  It was the stuff that people were living in their world, and she made it funny.  People didn't take seriously the psychological insights into issues of emotional isolation, rage, paranoia, and the fragmentation of the human mind- from a person who was a regular contributor to magazines like Good Housekeeping, Mademoiselle, McCall's and Ladies Home Journal.    No, it was just too different, and of course, you can't discount the condescension from the serious art community- I mean here was a woman writing in a genre that nobody took seriously about female protagonists- which was often not taken seriously- and was famous for cute anecdotes about the comedy of errors which is life as a house-mom raising four children in a small town.We must remember also, as a general rule, the 1950s are not that far removed from the time period where women didn't read literature at all- there was a thing called “ladies reading material” That's what women read.  Men read literature, but women writing for women was not elevated enough to actually be called “literature”- it was simply reading material for women.       Oh- well – I guess we shall make that distinction- although I will say, as a woman writing “ladies reading material” for money she did fairly well for herself.  Shirley Jackson made serious cash off of these stories- in fact, she outearned her husband- and it was the essays that were funding their lifestyles, not her novels. Her biographer Ruth Franklin, commented in an interview that she could make  over $2000 per essay which at the time was enough to fun to fund her Morris Minor collection.    Nice- well British Sports cars are always a fun thing to keep around the house.     I'll say.  But back to her legacy for a second, Jackson is like Elizabeth Barrett Browning in that her work, well after her death, found it's way into the canon and today is very much taken seriously.  In fact, we're teaching her right now to all the 11th graders at Bartlett High School, and almost all American students will at some point read  her short story “The Lottery”, the  famous short story that triggered more public outrage  in 1948 than anything published before or since by the magazine the New Yorker.  Hundreds of people cancelled their subscriptions and even more wrote the magazine totally exasperated.      Well, it's political and psychological and really even religious as well.  But back to the 11th graders at Bartlett, do you think your kids will be able to appreciate or enjoy the depth of the psychological analysis in her novel that today is the central hallmark of her work?    Yeah, I think many of them will get it.  I look forward to how they understand what she's talking about.  You know, students today live in such a different world and the ghosts and houses that haunt them look so differently than the ghosts and houses that haunted our generation or much less Shirley Jackson's.     I look forward to discussing some of these issues with them and see what fascinates them the most.      One of the things that fascinates me the most and I'm expecting to come out is Jackson's multiple direct and indirect references to the relationship between mothers and daughters.  It's clear in this book that whatever is going wrong in Eleanor's mind has something to do with her dead mother.  I have two daughters, and I really pray, I am not the kind of mother Shirley Jackson had or that my daughters ever express any of the feelings she expresses about mother/daughter relationships- nothing that would haunt and torment my children after I'm dead.      No, I'm sure none of us want to have that kind of legacy with our children.      And yet, there are women like Geraldine Jackson, Shirley's mother.  Geraldine was truly relentless in her cruelty towards her daughter.  She was cruel to her as a child and her passive aggressive disapproval was something she perpetuated all throughout Shirley's life right to her untimely death at age 48.      Yes and I think understanding Geraldine' cruelty really helps me see some of the things in Jackson's writing that I may have overlooked before.  And I know that an author's life cannot be used uncritically to explain an artist's work; obviously art speaks for itself, but maybe more than any other writer we've read together, Jackson uses her writings to express pain in artistic ways that were personal to her, but universal to many of us.  Geraldine's ruthless subtle and sometimes not so subtle demoralizing was something Jackson could not get out of her mind.  .  Geraldine's own personality disorder took a heavy toll on Shirley.    And it was always expressed with all the best of intentions- she was always so concerned.    Let's tell a little about their story and then people will know what you're talking about.     Okay, well the story starts when  Jackson was born in 1916 (although she lied about her age and claimed to have been born in 1919- which I think is funny), but anyway, she was born into an affluent family and up until she was 16 they lived in Burlingame, California.     Let me interrupt, just for context, Burlingame, to this day is one of the most expensive cities in the United States.  The median house in Burlingame costs over 2 million dollars- and I'm not talking mansions- this is the price range for what would be an average home that would cost a tenth of that in other parts of the US.  Every review on bestplaces.com talks about how unaffordable it is for most people to live in this Burlingame.     Yep, and Geraldine, Shirley's mom and her father Leslie, cultivated that cliché'd vision of the upper class  country club lifestyle.  They were into the production of this very sophisticated appearance of success and wealth, what was important was the appearance of things.   They were into competitive living, and that,  of course, still includes having perfect children.  Shirley's brother, I might add, was beautiful and competitive and made them proud, but unfortunately for Shirley, she was not- and this was just a huge disappointment for Geraldine.  She could not nor did she want to fit the mold.  Shirley was heavier than the other girls.  She didn't enjoy the same kinds of things as the other girls.  She didn't have that “All-American” barbie doll look like the other girls.  She wasn't into the deputante thing, and if she had been wasn't cute enough.    Yes, I read a couple of articles that called Jackson morbidly obese, so I googled images of her, it was true that she was heavier , but, in my mind, she falls way short of the criteria for morbidly obese by today's definition, especially in her youth. And I want to say something else about this 1950's lifestyle we've been discussing. After WW 2 there was a huge economic boom that doubled family incomes in the decade. It was the first decade of widespread middle class wealth. And one sign of that new middle class wealth was the ability to live on one income. Wives staying at home were a sign of wealth and prestige.     Maybe not, but she certainly wasn't the daughter Geraldine wanted nor could be proud of at a deputant ball.  In fact, truth be told, Geraldine was actually disappointed when she found out she was pregnant because she didn't want a child at that time.  But Geraldine's largest problem and obsession was with Shirley's weight- and her obsession with Shirley's weight never ended.  She made comments about her weight- all of the time.  They were gratuitous, just dropped in to remind her that she was fat.   Here are some quotes from a couple of Geraldine's letters to her daughter just to show you what I'm talking about. “Glad you're dieting.” “Excess weight is hard on the heart.” “You should get down to normal weight. Try non-fat milk.”  Even after the publication of what would be Jackson's final novel, Geraldine could be relied on to bring up her weight, “Why oh why do you allow the magazines to print such awful pictures of you?...I have been so sad all morning about what you have allowed yourself to look like.”      Yes, let me read the full quote for context.     If you don't care what you look like or care about your appearance why don't you do something about it for your children's sake— and your husband's. . . . I have been so sad all morning about what you have allowed yourself to look like. . . . You were and I guess still are a very wilful child and one who insisted on her own way in everything— good or bad.    This is a straight up narcissistic rant.     There was always the subtext that was no matter what Shirley did with her life, she could never live up to her mother's expectations- even if she was famous- Jackson wanted acceptance of who she was- but she wanted it on her terms, and she and wanted to prove to her mom that the way she was was a good way, and she could be good at life just by being herself- but that was never going to happen.  In fact, at one low moment, Geraldine actually told her daughter that she was a failed abortion.      Wow.  That is just hateful.  Geraldine wanted a girl in the image of what she wanted, and she was never going to compromise.  This is classically what people call today a “toxic mother”,  And this plays a terrible toll on girls who have toxic mothers.  These behaviors can destroy women's images of themselves.   And this is what seems to have happened with Jackson and her mother.        Let me just back  up and say, it's absolutely natural and healthy for a girl to look up to her mother; a mom is the original ideal of what a woman should be.  That's how we all learn to navigate in this world, and likely a mom and a daughter will have a lot in common for obvious reasons.  There is a lot of joy in that.  There is a special bond in that.  Over the years, though, as a little girl develops into a teenager, although at first she wants to be exactly like her mom, that desire kind of separates out.  In a normal relationship, as a girl transitions into a woman, she individuates.   She becomes her own person.  Some things of her mother she will keep; others she'll discard.  And healthy moms respect and encourage their daughters individuality.  A normal mom will do whatever she can to equip her daughter, make her bolder and stronger.  But as painful as it may be from a mom's perspective, healthy mom's accept daughter's choices- even the ones they think are mistakes.  That's just what they do, and if they end up being mistakes, it's okay.  We all get to live our own lives.  But in Geraldine's life, what Shirley did was a reflection on her, so she couldn't let the fact that her daughter was overweight go.      Well, how do you think she took it when Shirley told her mom she was marrying a Jew in 1940- or I should say that she had already married a Jew, she didn't even tell them she got married until several months later because they were anti-Semitic people,  I can imagine that didn't go well?        No, I'd say it probably didn't, but I really don't know.   I do want to say one other thing, Christy, don't get me wrong, I think it's pretty well-established that motherhood is by definition a lose/lose proposition- moms just can't win.  It's impossible to raise a perfect child, just like it's impossible to be a perfect person, so of course we can't raise a person in the most perfect of emotional environments.      Mom's will unrealistically be blamed for things that may or may not be their fault- the reality is no one can be perfect, we will hurt each other and there will insecurities that spring up because of the way we are raised, and that's kind of normal too- it's normal for dads; it's normal for moms.  But, that is not the same as being a toxic mom.  Geraldine was toxic.  Nothing was ever going to be good enough for Geraldine.  She was perpetually disapproving, and Shirley was never going to meet her standards.  Geraldine was also always very controlling- I read somewhere she made Shirley wear garters and high heels as a little girl.  She was constantly guilt-tripping Shirley.  She constantly made negative comments; she manipulated her emotions, and most of the time she did it passive-aggressively.  She did it under the guise of love.      And that seems to be in one sense what Jackson expresses in her writing- it's at least what lots of people have identified with in Hill House.   There is this sense that Shirley could never get her mom out of her head, and of course, she's not the only one who struggles with these kinds of things.  In Hill House,  the main character is a 32 year old young woman named Eleanor Vance. I want to add that 32 is not a young age.  She's not telling the story of a child and the abuses of a mother on a small child.  Eleanor is a fully grown adult who should be living her own independent life for quite some time.  But she hasn't.  She hasn't even had an opportunity to do so.  Eleanor has no friends and is alone. That's what we're told at the beginning and we will see all the way through to the end of the book when she tells Theo she has never been wanted, it's been how she's felt always.  We're also told Eleanor's mother is dead right here at the beginning, and that Eleanor has been taking care of her relentlessly since she was twenty years old.   Eleanor's mom is a constant presence in Eleanor's psyche, even beyond the grave.  She even buys clothes that she knows her mother hates- pants- just because her mom is dead and can't do anything about it.   Eleanor is being haunted before she ever gets to Hill House.    True, and this lack of self-esteem and then loneliness is what has resonated with so many women and men who read Jackson's stories.  It also is what directly led to a lot of the suffering Jackson experienced in her marriage to Stanley.      Stanley Hyman, there's a character.  Before I smear him, I guess I will say right off that bat that he, in many ways, was very supportive of Shirley professionally and admired her intellectually.  My problem with him is that he degraded her sexually- and that is the cruelest and most intimate and demeaning forms of degradation that there is.    For one thing he absolutely did not respect the sexual boundaries Shirley wanted in their marriage.  Besides having so many affairs with students at the school he taught but also really just anyone—he seemed to enjoy telling Jackson all about these trysts.  I've read a few of the letters he wrote about women he was sleeping with on various business trips, and I got the feeling it's almost like he was bragging a little bit.  I'd read a few quotes, but they're vulgar.  He talked about groping girls- giving details about what he had done. It's gross never mind hurtful.  And Shirley would get upset.  Although she was a free spirit and Bohemian in some ways, this was not okay with her.  She didn't want a open marriage where everyone just slept with whoever they wanted.  There are letters where she writes him and expresses how this behavior made her feel, but she never mailed these letters.  I don't even know why.  Maybe she didn't have the nerve.  Maybe she knew it made no difference.  Maybe she wanted her family and that was a price she was willing to pay.  I'm speculating.  We only know that  she just took it.  She wouldn't confront him, at least that there isa record of.  She just forced herself to accept it and moved on with her life.      And that is an indication of low self-esteem, obviously.  Jackson wouldn't have put up with that sort of thing like she did, if she didn't think, at some level, it was her fault or that she didn't deserve to be treated any better than that.  This is the legacy of a toxic parent.  Allowing people to treat you in a way that is lesser and that is not how you treat them is a direct result of low self-esteem, but I want to add that future abusive relationships is not the only symptom of low self-esteem and it isn't the only symptom of low-esteem we see in Jackson's life.   Behaviors that provoke self-harm  like over-eating, over-drinking, and pill-popping- all things Jackson did- are also a result of low esteem and indicate high levels of anxiety.  Feelings of sadness, depression, anxiety, anger, shame and guilt- are also things we see in Jackson's life.  She seems to have truly struggled emotionally.     True, but before we get too dark, Shirley was all of that, but she wasn't ONLY that.  She had a happy side too- an apparently tremendously happy side.  I say that from interviews I read that people did with her children.  When her kids write or talk about their homelife, the reports are glowing.  Her home was a happy place.  It was chaotic and topsy turvey at times, the kind of crazy that people love.  They didn't even see any tension between their parents.  For one thing, Stanley didn't have a whole lot to do with the family- lots of men didn't in the 50s, that was the mother's domain, but from the perspective of her children, her marriage to Stanley was a happy one, as was their home.  So, we see all of that going on.  Back to her biographer, Ruth Franklin, Franklin titled her biography about Jackson, “A Rather Haunted Life” kind of to reflect that idea- that she was haunted, but not entirely, just rather haunted.      Yes, and it was that dichotomy that leads to all kinds of cognitive dissonance.  I read in another article by a different biographer that Shirley, as a mother was deeply involved but also emotionally erratic.  “Her moods and anxieties colored her children's days.  No one could be more loving; no one could be meaner.”      Which brings me back to her as a writer.  One critic observed that out of over 110 different stories that Jackson wrote in her lifetime, most of them are about imperiled, divided or anxious women- and that is including both her scary and her funny stories.  And when we get to her final three novels- they are gothic completely about anxiety, entrapment and in the case of Hill House, a deeply troubled female with an inability to differentiate well between illusion and reality.      Understanding that really makes the famous first paragraph of The Haunting of Hill House  meaningful in a deeper way, at least it does to me. And I do want to emphasize this first paragraph is one of the most famous paragraphs in all of Jackson's writings:    No live organism can continue for long to exist sanely under conditions of absolute reality; even larks and katydids are supposed, by some, to dream.  Hill House, not sane, stood by itself against its hills, holding darkness within; it had stood so for 80 years and might stand for eighty more.  Within, walls continued upright, bricks met neatly, floors were firm, and doors were sensibly shut; silence lay steadily against the wood and stone of Hill House, and whatever walked there, walked alone.”    And what do you always say, when we start these books, that great writers will give their story away in the first sentence or two.    They almost always do.  This one in particular invites us to think about so much.  First of all, it starts with a negation- “no” but there are a lot of negative words here.  It's hard to understand, but something is telling us no- and when we get to the end of the book, that prophecy is fulfilled, although I won't spoil that just yet and tell you how.  But there's so much more.      Listen to the ideas she introduces-  there is the idea of being alive- of being sane- or not sane- another negative word- of standing in the darkness-in the silence- of being alone.  Of being in a house, but yet…being alone.   The alliteration highlights and brings together her key ideas- within walls- drawing attention to the idea of claustrophobia- sensibly shut; silence lay steadily I might add brings the silence and the claustrophobia together.  Then of course- whatever walked- walked alone- the w sound kind of swoshes in her head and haunts the end of that sentence.      All of her personal demons in one sentence.    Yes- and all of her personal demons getting ready to flesh themselves out metaphorically for all of us to understand and experience with her.      This assertion that she makes about absolute reality, of course is a religious or philosophical statement.  This idea that we absolutely just cannot know what is real, and if we did know what is real we would go crazy.  She's going to say that even little bird or crickets (a katydid is a cricket if you haven't heard that word yet, it's not very common)- Not even the simpliest organisms can handle a world without illusions.  We need them to protect our own sanity.    Yes- and the subtext here suggests because reality is dark; and the reality is you are alone in this world.  You can live – but perhaps you must accept a dream, perhaps an illusion that people have your back, people love you and will support you, but in reality- you are alone.  Perhaps you have to even create an entire fairyland- something to give you an escape from what you know to be true- the betrayal which is coming.  I'm speculating, obviously because I'm fleshing out what is implied with the subtext, at least implied to me-  but there is a sense that that is the direction she's leading us, and it certainly seems to be something we find in her personal story.     It's also kind of a religious statement because it speaks to the nature of reality and that is the essence of faith and walking through life not-alone.  Christy, what was her religious background.      Well, that's a very interesting question.  She was raised by members of the the Christian Science church, but later on she developed a real fascination with the occult and was even accused of being a witch.  Garry, what makes Christian scientists different from main stream Christianity?    Christian scientists, for those who are not familiar with Christianity, adopt many tenents of traditional Christianity but they break from it in a couple of ways that are obvious.  For one,  they do not accept the diety of Jesus Christ in the way traditional versions of Christianity do.  But the second is What most people know and that is the tension is the between The teachings of the Christian science church and their complicated relationship with the medical community.  They  encourage their members to pray for divine healings often perhaps instead of going to doctors.  And this has been controversial in some cases especially for family members outside of the faith.     That was certainly true for Jackson.  One time she and her brother were horsing around and her brother broke his arm, instead of going to the doctor Geraldine and her mother stayed up all night and prayed for his broken arm.  Her grandmother was a faith healer in the church and Jackson did not approve of this. So, she had this side of her, that would seem more secular- but then Jackson had her own sense of the spiritual.  She carried around tarot cards, tried to communicate with spirits later in her life, and flirted with all kinds of spiritual practices, like I said before, many accusing her of actually practicing witchcraft, ahtough I never found anything that really verified how serious she was about that.      So I can see why she might say something about absolute reality being somewhat unknowable or even a dark and lonely thing.      True, and at least in this book what we see in the the relationships that populate the lives  of the characters is that they are contrived.  In chapter 1 of The Haunting of Hill House, Dr. Montague, a title that is somewhat meant to mislead since he's really a ghost hunter, assembles a very select group of people to live with him for three months in a house that he thinks is probably haunted.  There are only four people that will be in this house- Dr. Montague himself, Luke, who is a member of the family who will own the house, Theodora who is selected because she may have extra-sensesory perspection abilities and Eleanor who as a child appeared to bring down a shower of rocks.      We will follow what happens to them from the point of view of Eleanor.  This story is written in the third person omniscient style, but it's way more akin to the free indirect discourse we saw Jane Austen create in Emma.  Laura Miller in the introduction to the book put it this way, readers "experience the novel from within Eleanor's consciousness, and however unreliable we know her to be, we are wedded to her".  And of course the farther into the novel you get, the more you understand how true this statement really is.  Most of the first chapter is really kind of a way to introduce us to Eleanor, and what we find out about her first is that she is 32, she genuinely and for good reason hated her mother until she died and now genuinely hates her sister.  Let's read this part…    Page 3    She's clearly alone and exploited by people who are supposed to be protect her.  This is further developed through the anecdote about her sister and their car.  Apparently they bought a car together but her sister never lets her drive it.  So, when Dr. Montague invites her to come to Hill House, she just takes the car and goes.  And while she's driving to Hill House, she imagines all sorts of things.  She imagines things that could never be real, like the road being an intimate friend or living in a house with a pair of stone lions and people bowing to her on the street because of these lions.  It's gives you kind of this crazy feeling- like how you would feel if you finally had escaped.    Yes, and that crazy feeling is going to intensify as the book progresses.  She's escaped her mother only to land sleeping on a cot in the nursery of a terrible sister.  She's not escaped her sister, but to go where.  At one point on her drive to Hill House she stops to admire a quarter of a mile of Oleanders.  Oleanders are beautiful flowers but they are also poisonous flowers.  She fantasizes about them about a castle with oleanders …then she gets back in her car and drives to a diner where she's going to watch a mother try to coax her daughter into drinking a cup of milk- and let me tell you know- these very same images that she sees on her drive in come back towards the end of the book as we, as readers, feel we are losing our grasp of reality.      But here in chapter 1, when she finally gets to the mansion, the care taker, Mr. Dudley flat out tells her, “You won't like it.  You'll be sorry I ever opened that gate.”    She looks at him and asks him to get away from her car…then she proceeds forward.  At the end of the chapter, we see her looking at this house and this is what she says, “The house was vile.  She shivered and thought, the words coming freely into her mind, Hill House is vile, it is diseases, get away from here at once.”      But of course she doesn't.    No, she doesn't.  That's the thing about haunting houses- they are dangerously tantalizing.  She was invited here by Mr. Montague and for better or for worse, she wants to be here.   I don't know if the Haunting of Hill House is the best example of this, but Jackson was absolutely fascinated with this- Jackson was fascinated with man's obsession with what Poe called the “imp of the perverse.”    Oh yes,  the urge to do something awful to someone and have pleasure in it.  I've seen this in kids, a kid just trips a stranger in the hall just because he can.  Paul Salkovskis, a psychology professor, suggests that it's evolutionary to have these kinds of intrusive thoughts as part of our way of problem solving for future problems.  But this idea that people have impulses to do mean things  or at least things we know we shouldn't and get joy from them.  Jackson was very interested in this idea.  So, are you saying that Dr. Montague is deliberately doing something mean.  Or that Dudley is?  Or Eleanor is?    Not really, in other stories she really demonstrates this much more poignantly, but the reason it comes to mind, besides the fact that I've been told to look for it in her writings, is that we are setting up relationships where we really can't trust each other to be there for each other.  Hill House looks like a place where you are really going to feel alone and exposed and that's where the terror comes from, but we will also see that it's soft and motherly and the people here at the beginning seem kind of exciting- it's seductive.      And I guess it does and has for many readers.  Let me just add one thing I didn't know until we started studying this book.  Horrornovelreviews.com claims that The Haunting of Hill House is the 8th scariest novel of all time.  And Paste magazine puts it into the unsorted top 30.      And so we open the gates to this terrifying place- Hill House- next episode we will look at the house itself, we'll look at the places where biographers think she got her inspiration for the house, we'll meet the other residents, explore the history of the house and begin to experience the ghosts- if that's what they are- as they manifest themselves to us through the eyes of Eleanor.                        

Jeff & Aimee On Demand
CRINGIEST EMAIL EVER! Jeff Screwed Up.

Jeff & Aimee On Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 27:47


(October 22) He had the right intention, that's for sure, but the result wasn't great. Listen at the top of today's podcast.  “Your Idiot, Mark” is how our Friday Flowers nominator signed his letter. Throw in a Forrest Gump quote and you get today's Friday Flowers Delivery. Listen at 12:00 to hear it.  Reba is losing […] The post CRINGIEST EMAIL EVER! Jeff Screwed Up. appeared first on 102.7 Coyote Country.

PLANETA PODCAST
CineClube: FORREST GUMP com Humberto Rosso, Daniel Varella e Deco Machado | Planeta Podcast #158

PLANETA PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 83:53


O Planetinha analisa esse vencedor do Oscar buscando sentido em um filme sobre a falta de sentido. Faz que nem a peninha, voa com o vento enquanto ouve esse episódio radical.

AMDG: A Jesuit Podcast
Actress Siobhan Fallon Hogan Brings Faith to the Big Screen

AMDG: A Jesuit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 31:23


Jesuit-educated actress Siobhan Fallon Hogan has had an incredibly busy acting career over the last three decades, from appearing in Saturday Night Live and Seinfeld in the early 1990s to roles in movies like Forrest Gump, Men in Black and the Lars Von Trier musical drama Dancer in the Dark. Most recently, she made her screenwriting debut with a movie called Rushed. Siobhan also stars in the film as an Irish Catholic mother in upstate New York who has to figure out how to respond to a tragic fraternity hazing incident that strikes her family. Host Mike Jordan Laskey asked Siobhan about what it was like to try screenwriting for the first time, and how she prepares for a dramatic role versus a comedic one. They also talked about her strong Catholic faith and how her home parish pitched in to the filming of Rushed in a few awesome ways. Finally, they got into her Jesuit education at LeMoyne College in Syracuse, New York, plus how she managed raising three kids while working an extremely full schedule that took her all over the world. AMDG is a production of the Jesuit Conference of Canada and the United States. Subscribe to AMDG wherever you get podcasts.

Oh, Dear
Bret & Whitmer's Body Swap Movie, Forrest Gump 2, and Paul McCartney & Cristian Agree

Oh, Dear

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 65:37


Comedians Nick Whitmer, Cristian Duran, and Bret Raybould hang out every week and occasionally someone will say something so horrible that all the others can say is, "Oh Dear." Oh Dear is basically if your group chat was a podcasts. @Nick_Whitmer @Cristianduranduran @Bretraybould --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/ohdear/support

Hochman and Crowder
10-19-2021 - Talk About It Tuesday

Hochman and Crowder

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 21:19


Solana has topics... Hoch and Crowder have takes... forced to choose between Pulp Fiction, Jurassic Park, Forrest Gump and Shawshank Redemption.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Rumble in the Morning
Movie Trailer: Forrest Gump Fatal Obsession

Rumble in the Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 0:54


Movie Trailer: Forrest Gump Fatal Obsession

Football Cliches - A show about the unique language of football
Warnock as Forrest Gump, referees in jeans and the Football Podcast "Big Six"

Football Cliches - A show about the unique language of football

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 38:13


The Athletic's Adam Hurrey, David Walker and Nick Miller convene for a jam-packed edition of the Adjudication Panel. This week's agenda includes: Neil Warnock's Forrest Gump impression, calculating the maximum number of times two teams could theoretically play each other in a single season, 40-goal thrillers in the 16th tier of the English pyramid and some truly excellent TV-drama football small talk. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Keto Mans Club Podcast
More "Being," Less "Doing" | Keto Man's Club Podcast Episode 108

Keto Mans Club Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 69:24


Jay Campbell has a lived a varied life - he played college and professional basketball, had an appearance in "Forrest Gump" and is now an author and health expert. On the show this week Jay discusses some of the science in men's health, including therapeutic testosterone, peptides and more. Jay clearly knows his stuff as you will quickly find out... enjoy the chat!https://jayccampbell.com/ TKMC Discord: https://discord.gg/kPDn4NwPlease help us get the word out by sharing about our podcast with your friends and family. You can use the share buttons on the player on our website if you would like to send them a link directly.You can also use the Subscribe button to make sure you don't miss an episode if you're using the web player.You can reach us a number of ways:Email: KetoMansClubPodcast@gmail.comWebsite: http://www.TheKetoMansClub.comLeave a voicemail comment or question by calling 512-518-6161InstagramPodcast: @ketomansclubpodcastChris: @DuckmanketoJim: @JiminmanjrAlberto: @el.KetoCholo

The Ron Flatter Racing Pod
S4E57: My mama always said

The Ron Flatter Racing Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 104:36


This week's episode of the Ron Flatter Racing Pod features the Academy Award-winning screenwriter of “Forrest Gump” and 10-time National Horseplayers Championship competitor Eric Roth. Jockey Arnaldo Bocachica talks about the rarity of his eight-win night last Saturday at Charles Town. Racing Post's Lee Mottershead handicaps Saturday's British Champions Day at Ascot. The Ron Flatter Racing Pod is available via free subscription from iHeart, Apple, Google, Spotify and Stitcher as well as from VSiN.com/podcasts. It is sponsored by 1/ST BET. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Chapel Bell Curve
5.12 - Ruining Your Auburn Tiger Party - Auburn Review

Chapel Bell Curve

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 76:32


The difference between us and Forrest Gump is that he'd apologize for it. It's the Auburn Review. Yell at us on TwitterChapel Bell Curve Twitter - @ChapelBellCurveNathan Lawrence on Twitter - @NathanJlawrenceJustin Bray on Twitter - @TheJustinBray

Horror Struck
Night of the Living Dead (1968)

Horror Struck

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 47:04


On this weeks episode, Cecilia needs to be better at helping Riley and both discuss how Forrest Gump and Tom Savini are basically the same person, as these two friends discuss the 1968 film "Night of the Living Dead". Follow us (mostly Riley) on Twitter and Instagram @HorrorStruckPod, and @HorrorStruckPodcast on Facebook! Our intro and outro music is by the wonderful Andy Bors. Check out him out here: https://duckii.bandcamp.com/?fbclid=IwAR0IN2dxd-0QXHWAVNejLOVXqaYvj70FfPh5vw3Hot1lA-ugJNT5D2wtjsw  and   https://divorcehorse330.bandcamp.com/?fbclid=IwAR0Y5zAKowHUJ_pkJRASlKUXU6sSczKUdzT90WOvI6jXIx76CcE3PvcMYhg

The Gary DeMar Podcast
The Forrest Gump of Southern Presbyterianism

The Gary DeMar Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 26:35


This is the first part of several of an interview that Gary recorded with Rev. Mickey Schneider. Pastor Schneider has been instrumental in many of the important events that have transpired in Reformed Christianity in the last 50 years. He knows everyone and has been everywhere. In many ways, Pastor Schneider helped lead the modern resurgence of Reformed theology while never being its leader.

Hammer + Nigel Show Podcast

A Boston suburb is asking people not to put jack-o-lanterns out this year, because RATS love them.   Someone made a movie trailer that makes Forrest Gump into a horror movie about obsession and stalking.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Behind the Shot - Audio
Focus on History

Behind the Shot - Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 66:26


Periodically I get a guest on Behind the Shot that makes me nervous. This episode is one of those moments. Wish me luck... David Hume Kennerly is a legend. In fact, I would wager money that other 'legends' look to David Hume Kennerly as the standard by which they are judged. All of that is to say that there is no 'starting point' when trying to explain the photojournalist David Hume Kennerly. Still, the blog is here, and I have to start somewhere. Travel with me back to 1972... (insert way back machine sounds here) David was awarded the 1972 Pulitzer Prize in Journalism for Featured Photography, with a winning portfolio that included Ali being knocked down in the 15th round during the Ali v. Frazier “Fight of the Century,” images of the Vietnam and Cambodia wars, and refugees escaping into India from East Pakistan. David was just 25 at the time. Two years later, at just 27, he was appointed President Gerald R. Ford's Personal White House Photographer, the third person to have that job. Again, I have to stress this, by the time David was 27 he'd seen and documented more history that most of us learn in school. In the years since, David has photographed U.S. presidents from Johnson to Biden, and covered thirteen presidential campaigns. He was a Newsweek magazine contributing editor for ten years, and a contributing photographer for Time & Life and George magazines. American Photo named Kennerly “One of the 100 Most Important People in Photography.” Washingtonian Magazine called him "One of the 50 most important journalists in Washington, DC". That is David Hume Kennerly. One of the most important photographers ever, and his TedX talk has a title that really sums it up: Telling the Story in 1/60th of a Second As an author, David is just as successful. Kennerly has published several books of his work, Shooter, Photo Op, Seinoff: The Final Days of Seinfeld, Photo du Jour, Extraordinary Circumstances: The Presidency of Gerald R. Ford, and David Hume Kennerly On the iPhone. He was also a major contributor to the CNN 2016 book, Unprecedented: The Election that Changed Everything. His exclusive portrait of Trump is on the cover. He was executive producer of The Spymasters, a 2015 CBS/Showtime documentary about the directors of the CIA. He also produced The Presidents' Gatekeepers, a four-hour Discovery Channel film about White House chiefs of staff.  Kennerly was nominated for a Primetime Emmy as executive producer of NBC's, The Taking of Flight 847, and was the writer and executive producer of a two-hour NBC pilot filmed in Thailand, Shooter, starring Helen Hunt. Shooter, based on Kennerly's Vietnam experiences, won the Emmy Award for Outstanding Cinematography. In 2019 The University of Arizona Center for Creative Photography acquired the David Hume Kennerly Archive that features almost a million images, prints, objects, memorabilia, correspondence and documents. University President Dr. Robert C. Robbins appointed Kennerly as the university's first Presidential Scholar. When trying to pick an image for this show I lost over an hour browsing through David's site, specifically his 'Greatest Hits' gallery. The image of U.S. President Gerald Ford at the desk in the Oval Office, feet up is amazing. This was the day after he became president, August 10, 1974, and the bookshelves are empty because Nixon's things had been removed, but Ford's memorabilia had yet to arrive, due to the suddenness of the transition. The image of Mohammed Ali being knocked down in the 15th round at Madison Square Garden by Joe Frazier was part of Kennerly's Pulitzer Prize-winning portfolio. Then there was "The Hug", an image where Michelle Obama is hugging former president George W. Bush. Picking one image was hard, but with David's help we found the shot. There is a quote on David's website from James Earl Jones that wraps up David's career perfectly: “David Hume Kennerly is like Forrest Gump, except he was really there.”

Behind the Shot - Video

Periodically I get a guest on Behind the Shot that makes me nervous. This episode is one of those moments. Wish me luck... David Hume Kennerly is a legend. In fact, I would wager money that other 'legends' look to David Hume Kennerly as the standard by which they are judged. All of that is to say that there is no 'starting point' when trying to explain the photojournalist David Hume Kennerly. Still, the blog is here, and I have to start somewhere. Travel with me back to 1972... (insert way back machine sounds here) David was awarded the 1972 Pulitzer Prize in Journalism for Featured Photography, with a winning portfolio that included Ali being knocked down in the 15th round during the Ali v. Frazier “Fight of the Century,” images of the Vietnam and Cambodia wars, and refugees escaping into India from East Pakistan. David was just 25 at the time. Two years later, at just 27, he was appointed President Gerald R. Ford's Personal White House Photographer, the third person to have that job. Again, I have to stress this, by the time David was 27 he'd seen and documented more history that most of us learn in school. In the years since, David has photographed U.S. presidents from Johnson to Biden, and covered thirteen presidential campaigns. He was a Newsweek magazine contributing editor for ten years, and a contributing photographer for Time & Life and George magazines. American Photo named Kennerly “One of the 100 Most Important People in Photography.” Washingtonian Magazine called him "One of the 50 most important journalists in Washington, DC". That is David Hume Kennerly. One of the most important photographers ever, and his TedX talk has a title that really sums it up: Telling the Story in 1/60th of a Second As an author, David is just as successful. Kennerly has published several books of his work, Shooter, Photo Op, Seinoff: The Final Days of Seinfeld, Photo du Jour, Extraordinary Circumstances: The Presidency of Gerald R. Ford, and David Hume Kennerly On the iPhone. He was also a major contributor to the CNN 2016 book, Unprecedented: The Election that Changed Everything. His exclusive portrait of Trump is on the cover. He was executive producer of The Spymasters, a 2015 CBS/Showtime documentary about the directors of the CIA. He also produced The Presidents' Gatekeepers, a four-hour Discovery Channel film about White House chiefs of staff.  Kennerly was nominated for a Primetime Emmy as executive producer of NBC's, The Taking of Flight 847, and was the writer and executive producer of a two-hour NBC pilot filmed in Thailand, Shooter, starring Helen Hunt. Shooter, based on Kennerly's Vietnam experiences, won the Emmy Award for Outstanding Cinematography. In 2019 The University of Arizona Center for Creative Photography acquired the David Hume Kennerly Archive that features almost a million images, prints, objects, memorabilia, correspondence and documents. University President Dr. Robert C. Robbins appointed Kennerly as the university's first Presidential Scholar. When trying to pick an image for this show I lost over an hour browsing through David's site, specifically his 'Greatest Hits' gallery. The image of U.S. President Gerald Ford at the desk in the Oval Office, feet up is amazing. This was the day after he became president, August 10, 1974, and the bookshelves are empty because Nixon's things had been removed, but Ford's memorabilia had yet to arrive, due to the suddenness of the transition. The image of Mohammed Ali being knocked down in the 15th round at Madison Square Garden by Joe Frazier was part of Kennerly's Pulitzer Prize-winning portfolio. Then there was "The Hug", an image where Michelle Obama is hugging former president George W. Bush. Picking one image was hard, but with David's help we found the shot. There is a quote on David's website from James Earl Jones that wraps up David's career perfectly: “David Hume Kennerly is like Forrest Gump, except he was really there.”

Better Movie Club
#36 Return to Oz (1985) w/ Adal Rifai

Better Movie Club

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 67:35


Welcome to Scary Month!!! To start the month off, the club watched Return to Oz with Adal Rifai from Hey Riddle Riddle and Hello from the Magic Tavern! Hijinks ensue as the gang recast and remake characters on their way to the Nome King. Plus: dead moose puns, Forrest Gump impressions, and a new meaning for Halloween! Join us on Discord and follow the show on social media: Facebook | Twitter | Instagram

Juan Ep Is Life
Mic Geronimo Is The Forrest Gump of Hip Hop Part 1

Juan Ep Is Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 64:52


This week on Juan Ep Is Life we have the one and only Mic Geronimo!!! Mic tells the guys stories about working with Irv Gotti, Large Professor, and so much more! If you're digging this episode and want to hear Part 2 (a whole extra hour more) go to http://patreon.com/juanepislifeDon't forget to grab Juan Ep merch at http://Juanep.com and to follow everyone on IG/Twitter @juanepislife @rosenbergradio @ciphasounds @micgeronimo on IG and Twitter @realmicgeronimo and @billyjune88. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Anna & Raven Show
Monday October 4, 2021: Do You Believe in Curses; Nice Neighbors; How You Got A Black Eye

The Anna & Raven Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 47:03


Have you ever gotten a text from a wrong number, but still wondered if it really was meant for you?  Anna got one over the weekend and can't shake the feeling it might have been meant for her…  (:30) Are you up to date on this weekends trends?  Anna and Raven get you caught up on the top trending stories from over the weekend, including the risqué Forrest Gump moment on SNL!  (3:10) If you are a member of a wedding party, and a trained dog can do their job better than you, that's all I need to know about you!  (7:05) Do you believe in curses?  The powerball jackpot is at an all time high, but Anna heard a story last week that is making her re-think playing the lottery ever again…  (10:28) Are you the type of person who greets new people when they move into your neighborhood?  Anna isn't and she's wondering if that makes her a jerk, and Raven is shocked at how she reacted to a seemingly harmless gift from one of her neighbors!  (17:15) Are you up on the newest Gen Z lingo?  After one US Senator had an awkward exchange involving teen slang, Anna wanted to see if Raven was up to date on the trendiest new words!  (25:08) When was the last time you got a black eye?  Raven has been rocking an impressive black eye for the last few days but, despite his occasionally aggressive demeanor, he didn't get it the way you might expect…  (29:00) Andrea and Sean have a kindergartener, and their new teacher is an older woman who likes to give her students hugs.  Andrea has no problem with that, but Sean thinks that it's inappropriate!  Whose side are you one?  (36:16) Alec thinks he's got what it takes to win $200!  Can he succeed and beat Raven in pop culture trivia?  (42:49)

Trash-Blood
Forrest-Gump-Possesses-Uncle-Trash-Blood

Trash-Blood

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 94:51


On this episode we talk about Zac's horror movie themed truck “The Witching Hour ,” the movie The Ritual and we perform our script for “Halloween Spills!” Available on Spotify, Apple Podcasts and most podcast platforms. Enjoy, Trash Bloodians!

Going Off Track
#383 - Ian Perkins

Going Off Track

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 141:48


Guitarist, roadie, amazing human, Ian Perkins of The Gaslight Anthem and Horrible Crowes, came on this week to throw a LOT of laughs our way. We try hard to figure out his over-arching interest in people and hatred of social media.

Fitzdog Radio
Siobhan Fallon Hogan - Episode 924

Fitzdog Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 64:08


Great chat today with  SNL's Siobhan Fallon Hogan. You also know her from Men in Black, Fever Pitch, Daddy Day Care, Forrest Gump, Seinfeld and a million other great projects.   Follow Siobhan Fallon Hogan on Twitter @siobhandillonuk