Podcasts about Mahayana

Branch of Buddhism

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Best podcasts about Mahayana

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Latest podcast episodes about Mahayana

Le Vieux Sage
Comment Méditer - Méditation sur le souffle

Le Vieux Sage

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 31:03


Méditation guidée qui s'adresse aux débutants désireux de connaître les premiers principes de la méditation. Celle ci extraite de l'ouvrage de Kathleen McDonald, none bouddhiste, nous permet d'apprendre à faire le calme mental, travail préparatoire à la vision profonde. La méditation, d'une durée de 30 minutes, se construit comme suit: _ 3 bols _ Méditation guidée _ 3 bols de fin Bibliographie: "Comment méditer" de Kathleen McDonald, éditions Mahayana (https://editionsmahayana.fr/produit/comment-mediter-2/) Narration et réalisation: Bruno Léger Soutenez-nous !

Dharma Talks – Ocean Gate Zen Center – Santa Cruz, Capitola, Aptos

In this talk, Rev. Daijaku Kinst talks about Japanese Ohigon and the time of the fall equinox as an opportunity to consider how we want to enter the season of darkness, suggesting the Paramitas as a path of practice. https://www.oceangatezen.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/Jaku-Sept-17-Ohigon-Audio-COMPRESSED.mp3 https://www.oceangatezen.org/2022/09/ohigon-equinox-and-the-paramitas-2/feed/

George Carlin - Part (1 of 4) Complaints and Grievances
Alan Watts - An introduction to mahayana Buddism (Ambient Lecture)

George Carlin - Part (1 of 4) Complaints and Grievances

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 128:39


Sitt back and relax while listening to Alan Watts explaining the principles of Mahayana Buddism.

Open Question
OQ 304 - Sacred World: Where is "THE" World?

Open Question

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 20:10 Very Popular


What do you see when you think about the world? You might picture a rainforest or desert. You might envision a crowded subway terminal. You might imagine a household or a war zone. You might think: “the world is a mess,” or feel touched by the beauty and the beings that inhabit it. Where exactly is “the” world? Is it conscious or material? Does it exist within our individual mind streams or outside of us? Is it cruel, mundane or sacred? Is it one or many? Is “the” world even findable?

The Altrusian Grace Media Podcast
The Diamond Sutra - Ancient Mahāyāna Buddhism

The Altrusian Grace Media Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 46:09


The Diamond Sutra is a Mahāyāna sutra from the genre of Prajñāpāramitā sutras. Translated into a variety of languages over a broad geographic range, the Diamond Sūtra is one of the most influential Mahayana sutras in East Asia, and it is particularly prominent within the Chan tradition, along with the Heart Sutra. Please consider supporting my work and download this audio as part of the ESOTERIC AND OCCULT WISDOM - MASTER COLLECTION (an ongoing collection of Gnostic, alchemical, Hermetic, and related occult/spiritual audio projects that span dozens of hours) at https://altrusiangrace.bandcamp.com/ *JOIN MY PATREON at https://www.patreon.com/altrusiangracemedia *BECOME A YOUTUBE CHANNEL MEMBER at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMzRTOugvDLwhSwJdoSWBZA/join *JOIN THE CULT OF STARRY WISDOM at https://altrusiangrace.bandcamp.com/starry-wisdom-cult *FOLLOW THE AGM PODCAST at https://altrusiangracemedia.podbean.com *MY TSHIRTS AND DESIGNS ON AMAZON at https://amzn.to/3peS9j3 *MY NEW 2022 MERCH LINE "OCCULT NOUVEAU" at https://amzn.to/3OeUHZL *MY TSHIRTS AND DESIGNS ON TEEPUBLIC at https://teepublic.sjv.io/XxvPDX *LICENSE MY MUSIC FOR YOUR PROJECT at https://www.pond5.com/artist/altrusiangracemedia *MY BOOKS ON AMAZON at https://amzn.to/3oQGh6A As an Amazon Associate I earn a small amount from qualifying purchases and it helps to support my channel. Please consider LIKING the video, SUBSCRIBING to the channel, and SHARING the links! These simple actions go a long way in supporting AGM and is truly appreciated!  ~~Places to follow and support Altrusian Grace Media~~ Website ► https://altrusiangrace.blogspot.com/ Bandcamp ► https://altrusiangrace.bandcamp.com Teepublic Store ► https://teepublic.sjv.io/XxvPDX Twitter ► https://twitter.com/AltrusianGrace Rumble ► https://rumble.com/c/c-375437 YouTube ► https://www.youtube.com/AltrusianGraceMedia Odessy ► https://odysee.com/@altrusiangracemedia:1 Bitchute ► https://www.bitchute.com/channel/altrusiangracemedia/ To kindly donate directly to my channel: www.paypal.me/altrusiangrace For inquiries regarding voice-over work or licensing for my work (including music) please contact altrusiangracemedia ((at)) gmail.com AGM BACKUP CONTENT ► https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCO0nCG5aqB1CHyU3Xf0TUbg #Gnosticism #Alchemy #Hermeticism #Occult #Esoteric #Audiobook #Mysticism #Gnostic #Egyptian #Christianity #NagHammadi #Spirituality #Jung

Edward Reib's
Buddhist Books: TIPIṬAKA - Part 57: Suttavibhaṅga, Pācittiya XXXIII & XXXIV

Edward Reib's "Buddhist Books" Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 37:34


This is Part 57 of my recital of the "Tipiṭaka," the "Three Baskets" of pre-sectarian Buddhism, as translated into English from the original Pali Language. In this episode, we'll continue reading "Pācittiya," the fifth part of "Suttavibhaṅga," which is the first part of the "Vinaya Piṭaka," the first of the three "Piṭaka," or "Baskets." "Suttavibhaṅga" means "Rule Analysis," and "Nissaggiya" literally means "Forfeiture," referring to the rules of expiation involving forfeiture.

The Rowdy Nichiren Buddhist
The First Noble Truth of Suffering

The Rowdy Nichiren Buddhist

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 23:00


This is a podcast on the 1st of the four noble truths of Buddhism. Many times this teaching is misunderstood in a very simplistic sense. I hope to provide context as well as understanding for the Mahayana practitioner of the Lotus Sutra. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/enkyoji-network/support

Edward Reib's
Buddhist Books: TIPIṬAKA - Part 56: Suttavibhaṅga, Pācittiya XXX, XXXI & XXXII

Edward Reib's "Buddhist Books" Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 39:56


This is Part 56 of my recital of the "Tipiṭaka," the "Three Baskets" of pre-sectarian Buddhism, as translated into English from the original Pali Language. In this episode, we'll continue reading "Pācittiya," the fifth part of "Suttavibhaṅga," which is the first part of the "Vinaya Piṭaka," the first of the three "Piṭaka," or "Baskets." "Suttavibhaṅga" means "Rule Analysis," and "Nissaggiya" literally means "Forfeiture," referring to the rules of expiation involving forfeiture.

Edward Reib's
Buddhist Books: TIPIṬAKA - Part 55: Suttavibhaṅga, Pācittiya XXVII, XXVIII & XXIX

Edward Reib's "Buddhist Books" Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 45:56


This is Part 55 of my recital of the "Tipiṭaka," the "Three Baskets" of pre-sectarian Buddhism, as translated into English from the original Pali Language. In this episode, we'll continue reading "Pācittiya," the fifth part of "Suttavibhaṅga," which is the first part of the "Vinaya Piṭaka," the first of the three "Piṭaka," or "Baskets." "Suttavibhaṅga" means "Rule Analysis," and "Nissaggiya" literally means "Forfeiture," referring to the rules of expiation involving forfeiture.

Dharma Talks – Ocean Gate Zen Center – Santa Cruz, Capitola, Aptos

Rev. Shinshu Roberts discusses Dōgen's fascicle “Immo” (Suchness) encouraging us to fully engage with each moment of our lives, including our suffering… reality as it is (Nyoze). https://www.oceangatezen.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/Shinshu-Sept-3-Immo-COMPRESSED-Audio.mp3 https://www.oceangatezen.org/2022/09/immo-suchness-2/feed/ 0

Edward Reib's
Buddhist Books: TIPIṬAKA - Part 54: Suttavibhaṅga, Pācittiya XXIII, XXIV, XXV & XXVI

Edward Reib's "Buddhist Books" Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 43:54


This is Part 54 of my recital of the "Tipiṭaka," the "Three Baskets" of pre-sectarian Buddhism, as translated into English from the original Pali Language. In this episode, we'll continue reading "Pācittiya," the fifth part of "Suttavibhaṅga," which is the first part of the "Vinaya Piṭaka," the first of the three "Piṭaka," or "Baskets." "Suttavibhaṅga" means "Rule Analysis," and "Nissaggiya" literally means "Forfeiture," referring to the rules of expiation involving forfeiture.

Edward Reib's
Buddhist Books: TIPIṬAKA - Part 53: Suttavibhaṅga, Pācittiya XXI & XXII

Edward Reib's "Buddhist Books" Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 49:21


This is Part 53 of my recital of the "Tipiṭaka," the "Three Baskets" of pre-sectarian Buddhism, as translated into English from the original Pali Language. In this episode, we'll continue reading "Pācittiya," the fifth part of "Suttavibhaṅga," which is the first part of the "Vinaya Piṭaka," the first of the three "Piṭaka," or "Baskets." "Suttavibhaṅga" means "Rule Analysis," and "Nissaggiya" literally means "Forfeiture," referring to the rules of expiation involving forfeiture.

The Zen Mountain Monastery Podcast
The Sangha Treasure

The Zen Mountain Monastery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 47:56 Very Popular


Geoffrey Shugen Arnold, Roshi - Zen Mountain Monastery, New York, Sunday 08/28/2022 - From the Mahayana teaching The Uttaratantra Shastra - The Sangha Treasure - Shugen Roshi speaks about the Sangha Treasure.

Edward Reib's
Buddhist Books: TIPIṬAKA - Part 52: Suttavibhaṅga, Pācittiya XIX & XX

Edward Reib's "Buddhist Books" Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 26:25


This is Part 52 of my recital of the "Tipiṭaka," the "Three Baskets" of pre-sectarian Buddhism, as translated into English from the original Pali Language. In this episode, we'll continue reading "Pācittiya," the fifth part of "Suttavibhaṅga," which is the first part of the "Vinaya Piṭaka," the first of the three "Piṭaka," or "Baskets." "Suttavibhaṅga" means "Rule Analysis," and "Nissaggiya" literally means "Forfeiture," referring to the rules of expiation involving forfeiture.

The Zen Mountain Monastery Podcast
The Dharma Treasure

The Zen Mountain Monastery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 44:15 Very Popular


Geoffrey Shugen Arnold, Roshi - Zen Mountain Monastery, New York, Saturday 08/27/2022 - From the Mahayana teaching The Uttaratantra Shastra - The Dharma Treasure - Shugen Roshi speaks about what it means to truly encounter the Dharma.

Edward Reib's
Buddhist Books: TIPIṬAKA - Part 51: Suttavibhaṅga, Pācittiya XVI, XVII & XVIII

Edward Reib's "Buddhist Books" Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 33:54


This is Part 51 of my recital of the "Tipiṭaka," the "Three Baskets" of pre-sectarian Buddhism, as translated into English from the original Pali Language. In this episode, we'll continue reading "Pācittiya," the fifth part of "Suttavibhaṅga," which is the first part of the "Vinaya Piṭaka," the first of the three "Piṭaka," or "Baskets." "Suttavibhaṅga" means "Rule Analysis," and "Nissaggiya" literally means "Forfeiture," referring to the rules of expiation involving forfeiture.

Buddha-Blog - Le bouddhisme au quotidien - Le podcast bouddhiste - des bouddhistes Chan (Zen)

La renaissance La réincarnation est un thème qui fascine les personnes extérieures et les bouddhistes dans le bouddhisme. La réincarnation était également une constante dans le christianisme, jusqu'à ce que cette doctrine soit bannie comme "inacceptable" lors du concile de Constantinople en 553. Toutefois, la doctrine chrétienne affirme que Jésus-Christ est ressuscité d'entre les morts. Tout d'abord, une chose très importante : tous les bouddhistes ne croient pas à la réincarnation ! Dans l'enseignement du prince indien, il existe également différentes écoles (comme dans le christianisme) qui suivent d'autres points de vue. Ainsi, le courant "Mahayana" (japonais : Zen ou chinois : Chan) n'exige pas de croire en la réincarnation, tandis que l'école "Theravada" (et ici en particulier la philosophie "Vajrayana") défend des points de vue en partie opposés. De nombreuses voies spirituelles se sont développées dans le bouddhisme au cours des siècles, mais la réincarnation n'est pas un contenu obligatoire de l'enseignement Chan (zen). Dans la "voie de la réalité", il ne s'agit pas de la voie en soi, mais de ce à quoi la voie mène, à savoir le nirvana. L'enseignement de la réincarnation montre que ceux qui n'ont pas pu atteindre le nirvana dans cette vie ont alors une autre possibilité dans la prochaine incarnation. Personnellement, je ne crois pas seulement à la réincarnation, j'en suis convaincu, car je peux me souvenir (en partie) de mes vies antérieures. Je crois que la réincarnation est la transcendance de l'identité de l'ego vers la connaissance, qui se déroule sur de nombreuses vies, car la nature de bouddha est très difficile à trouver, recouverte par les débris des événements. Nous devons comprendre qu'il n'y a pas d'endroit où nous cacher, pas d'endroit qui puisse surmonter l'éphémère. C'est seulement en nous que nous trouvons le vide qui correspond à une incroyable plénitude. Notre palais de la pensée vit dans des modèles, "bon" ou "mauvais", "juste" ou "faux", "en bas" ou "en haut", "noir" ou "blanc", chaque pensée contient son contraire dès sa naissance, sinon elle ne pourrait même pas naître. Il en va de même pour la naissance et la mort, qui trouvent ensuite leur cycle dans la renaissance, mais au nirvana, tout est effacé, car le nirvana n'est qu'un état d'esprit. Ainsi, même l'éveillé entré au nirvana peut renaître s'il n'a pas encore accompli toutes ses tâches. Au nirvana, tout est équilibré, rien n'est important, ni la naissance ni la mort, de sorte que la nouvelle incarnation n'a pas non plus d'importance, tout perd sa valeur lorsque le temps et l'espace se fondent en une grande cohérence. Toutes les personnes qui ont déjà vécu et toutes celles qui vivront sont liées entre elles, dans le présent et ici. Pouvez-vous vous souvenir de vos vies ? Le chemin est le but ! La purification passe par le cycle des renaissances - Bouddha - nom d'honneur de Siddharta Gautama - 560 à 480 avant l'an zéro L'entraînement fait partie des habitudes saines auxquelles on pardonne une certaine obstination Copyright : https://shaolin-rainer.de (Veuillez également télécharger mon application „Shaolin-Rainer" depuis les magasins Apple et Android) --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/buddha-blog-francais/message

Edward Reib's
Buddhist Books: "Xuan Zang" Reaction & Review

Edward Reib's "Buddhist Books" Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 77:01


In this Special Episode of Edward Reib's "Buddhist Books" Podcast, we'll be joining 7th-century CE Buddhist scholar-monk Xuan Zang on his epic journey from China to India where he studies at Nalanda University in Rajgir, collects over 657 Indian texts, and brings them back with him to China to translate.

The Zen Mountain Monastery Podcast
Who Is This Buddha Treasure?

The Zen Mountain Monastery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 49:45 Very Popular


Geoffrey Shugen Arnold, Roshi - Zen Mountain Monastery, New York, Wednesday 08/24/2022 - From the Mahayana teaching The Uttaratantra Shastra - What is it that makes Buddhist meditation, liturgy, teachings, practices, the precepts that we follow, the vows that we take, a path to liberation? And how is it that we can awaken to the three treasures - the Buddha, Dharma & Sangha - in our everyday lives? Shugen Roshi encourages us to see the Buddha Treasure right within ourselves.

Edward Reib's
Buddhist Books: TIPIṬAKA - Part 50: Suttavibhaṅga, Pācittiya XIV & XV

Edward Reib's "Buddhist Books" Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 46:07


This is Part 50 of my recital of the "Tipiṭaka," the "Three Baskets" of pre-sectarian Buddhism, as translated into English from the original Pali Language. In this episode, we'll continue reading "Pācittiya," the fifth part of "Suttavibhaṅga," which is the first part of the "Vinaya Piṭaka," the first of the three "Piṭaka," or "Baskets." "Suttavibhaṅga" means "Rule Analysis," and "Nissaggiya" literally means "Forfeiture," referring to the rules of expiation involving forfeiture.

Ajahn Anan Podcast
No Mahayana, No Theravada

Ajahn Anan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 12:53


'No Mahayana, No Theravada' - A Dhamma talk given by Ajahn Anan on 22 Aug 2022, translated from Thai to English. To join Ajahn Anan and the Wat Marp Jan Community online for daily chanting, meditation, and a Dhamma talk, you can email wmjdhamma@gmail.com for the link. Daily live sessions at 7.15pm - 9pm, Indochina Time (Bangkok, GMT+7).

Edward Reib's
Buddhist Books: TIPIṬAKA - Part 49: Suttavibhaṅga, Pācittiya XII & XIII

Edward Reib's "Buddhist Books" Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2022 38:55


This is Part 49 of my recital of the "Tipiṭaka," the "Three Baskets" of pre-sectarian Buddhism, as translated into English from the original Pali Language. In this episode, we'll continue reading "Pācittiya," the fifth part of "Suttavibhaṅga," which is the first part of the "Vinaya Piṭaka," the first of the three "Piṭaka," or "Baskets." "Suttavibhaṅga" means "Rule Analysis," and "Nissaggiya" literally means "Forfeiture," referring to the rules of expiation involving forfeiture.

Edward Reib's
Buddhist Books: TIPIṬAKA - Part 48: Suttavibhaṅga, Pācittiya IX, X & XI

Edward Reib's "Buddhist Books" Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 33:35


This is Part 48 of my recital of the "Tipiṭaka," the "Three Baskets" of pre-sectarian Buddhism, as translated into English from the original Pali Language. In this episode, we'll continue reading "Pācittiya," the fifth part of "Suttavibhaṅga," which is the first part of the "Vinaya Piṭaka," the first of the three "Piṭaka," or "Baskets." "Suttavibhaṅga" means "Rule Analysis," and "Nissaggiya" literally means "Forfeiture," referring to the rules of expiation involving forfeiture.

EveryBodhi Podcast
eB 121 - Fueled By Merit

EveryBodhi Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 24:52 Very Popular


Jampal Norbu explores the practice of applying Tonglen in everyday life by utilizing specific skillful means. The fifteenth verse of Lojong, “The Four Practices are the Best of Means,” outline specific methods of practice which enhance Lojong practice in general. Theme music by Matt Quentin

Edward Reib's
Buddhist Books: TIPIṬAKA - Part 47: Suttavibhaṅga, Pācittiya VI, VII & VIII

Edward Reib's "Buddhist Books" Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 73:12


This is Part 47 of my recital of the "Tipiṭaka," the "Three Baskets" of pre-sectarian Buddhism, as translated into English from the original Pali Language. In this episode, we'll continue reading "Pācittiya," the fifth part of "Suttavibhaṅga," which is the first part of the "Vinaya Piṭaka," the first of the three "Piṭaka," or "Baskets." "Suttavibhaṅga" means "Rule Analysis," and "Nissaggiya" literally means "Forfeiture," referring to the rules of expiation involving forfeiture.

Disciplinas Alternativas
DIS-003-II-08-El Kanjur Tibetano.

Disciplinas Alternativas

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 6:06


Canon Budista Tibetano Es una lista de textos sagrados reconocidos por varias escuelas del Budismo Tibetano, compuesto por: · el Kangyur o Kanjur, que se traduce como: “La Traducción de la Palabra”. · el Tengyur o Tanjur, que traducido significa, “Traducción de los Tratados”. El Canon budista tibetano, consiste principalmente en obras que fueron traducidas de idiomas indios, como principalmente el sanksrit, al tibetano entre los siglos 7 y 14, durante las últimas etapas del budismo indio. El canon también incluye obras, que fueron traducidas del chino y los idiomas de Asia Central. Además de los textos fundacionales de las escuelas budistas primitivas, como la Sarvastivada, y textos del Mahayana, el Canon Budista; incluye textos tántricos. SpeachLingua02 Esta categoría no siempre se distingue de las otras, porque incluye piezas no consideradas tántricas, por otras tradiciones como el Sutra del Corazón e incluso pasajes del Canon Pali. El Canon quedó fijado de forma definitiva en el siglo 14, por Bu Ston, quien vivio del 1290 al 1364.. Prestemos atención al informe…

Edward Reib's
Buddhist Books: TIPIṬAKA - Part 46: Suttavibhaṅga, Pācittiya IV & V

Edward Reib's "Buddhist Books" Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 25:29


This is Part 46 of my recital of the "Tipiṭaka," the "Three Baskets" of pre-sectarian Buddhism, as translated into English from the original Pali Language. In this episode, we'll continue reading "Pācittiya," the fifth part of "Suttavibhaṅga," which is the first part of the "Vinaya Piṭaka," the first of the three "Piṭaka," or "Baskets." "Suttavibhaṅga" means "Rule Analysis," and "Nissaggiya" literally means "Forfeiture," referring to the rules of expiation involving forfeiture.

Buddhism in daily life - Mindfulness in every day tasks
134-Rebirth - Buddhism in daily life

Buddhism in daily life - Mindfulness in every day tasks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 5:49


Rebirth Rebirth is a subject that fascinates outsiders and Buddhists about Buddhism. Reincarnation was also a fixture in Christianity until this doctrine was banned as "unacceptable" in the Council of Constantinople in 553. However, Christian doctrine says that Jesus Christ was resurrected from the dead. First of all something very important at the beginning: Not all Buddhists believe in rebirth! Also in the teaching of the Indian prince there are different schools (similar to Christianity), which follow other views. For example, the "Mahayana" school (Japanese:Zen or Chinese: Chan) does not require a belief in reincarnation, while the "Theravada" school (and here especially the "Vajrayana" philosophy) holds partly opposite views. Many spiritual paths have developed in Buddhism over the centuries, but rebirth is not a mandatory content of the Chan (Zen) teachings. The "path of reality" is not about the path itself, but about where the path leads, namely to nirvana. The doctrine of rebirth indicates that those who could not reach nirvana in this life then have another opportunity in the next incarnation. Personally, I not only believe in rebirth, I am convinced of it because I can remember my past lives (to some extent). I believe that reincarnation is the transcendence of ego-identity towards realization, which proceeds over many lifetimes, as Buddha-nature is very difficult to find, overlaid by the debris of events. We must understand that there is no place to hide, no place that can overcome impermanence. Only in us can we find the emptiness that corresponds to an incredible fullness. Our thought palace lives in patterns, "good" or "bad", "right" or "wrong", "below" or "above", "black" or "white", every thought contains the opposite already at its origin, otherwise it could not arise at all. So also birth and death, which then finds its cycle in the rebirth, but in the Nirvana everything is extinguished, because the Nirvana is only a state of mind. Thus, even the awakened one who has entered nirvana can be reborn if he has not yet been granted the completion of all tasks. In Nirvana everything is balanced, nothing is important, neither the birth nor the death, so that the new incarnation does not matter either, everything loses its value when time and space merge into one big context. All people who have already lived and all those who will live, they are connected, in the now and in the here. Can you remember your lives? The path is the goal! Purification comes through the cycle of rebirth - Buddha - honorary name of Siddharta Gautama - 560 to 480 before the year zero Exercise is one of the healthy habits that you forgive a certain stubbornness Copyright: https://shaolin-rainer.de (Please also download my app "Buddha-Blog English" from the Apple and Android stores)

Edward Reib's
Buddhist Books: TIPIṬAKA - Part 45: Suttavibhaṅga, Pācittiya II & III

Edward Reib's "Buddhist Books" Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 58:30


This is Part 45 of my recital of the "Tipiṭaka," the "Three Baskets" of pre-sectarian Buddhism, as translated into English from the original Pali Language. In this episode, we'll continue reading "Pācittiya," the fifth part of "Suttavibhaṅga," which is the first part of the "Vinaya Piṭaka," the first of the three "Piṭaka," or "Baskets." "Suttavibhaṅga" means "Rule Analysis," and "Nissaggiya" literally means "Forfeiture," referring to the rules of expiation involving forfeiture.

Edward Reib's
Buddhist Books: TIPIṬAKA - Part 44: Suttavibhaṅga, Pācittiya I

Edward Reib's "Buddhist Books" Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 30:45


This is Part 44 of my recital of the "Tipiṭaka," the "Three Baskets" of pre-sectarian Buddhism, as translated into English from the original Pali Language. In this episode, we'll begin reading "Pācittiya," the fifth part of "Suttavibhaṅga," which is the first part of the "Vinaya Piṭaka," the first of the three "Piṭaka," or "Baskets." "Suttavibhaṅga" means "Rule Analysis," and "Nissaggiya" literally means "Forfeiture," referring to the rules of expiation involving forfeiture.

Rebel Buddhist
Greatest Hits Vol. 7 - Psychedelics and Spiritual Practice

Rebel Buddhist

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 39:45


Hey hey, wild and whacky humans! It's my birthday week, and I'm up at the yurt relaxing and celebrating with my family and dear friends. This means I've got something else for you - and it's juicy. If you haven't seen it yet, Netflix just released a new series “How to Change Your Mind,” exploring psychedelics and their effects on the mind. For those of you who have been around for a bit (or who follow me on social), you know this subject is very important to me and my specialty. I've been talking about it for year, but especially with the release of Michael Pollan's series. So, I had to revisit this topic on the podcast with one of my greatest hits: “Psychedelics & Spiritual Practice.” To a lot of people, the words psychedelic and spiritual are paradoxical. But the use of psychoactive substances in shamanic, religious, and spiritual practices is found throughout history, with evidence from thousands of years ago. In this episode, we will be talking about psychedelics and spiritual practice and if there is a helpful role for them…and the potential harm.  Let's start with some definitions:  Psychedelics are a class of psychoactive substances that produce changes in perception, mood and cognitive processes. They affect all the senses, altering a person's thinking, sense of time and emotions.   There are also entheogens, which are typically of plant origin, that are ingested to produce a non-ordinary state of consciousness for religious or spiritual purposes. Some examples of both are psilocybin mushrooms, ayahuasca, ketamine, 5-MeO-DMT, cannabis,, LSD, MDMA… and many more.   I've used psychedelics in clinical settings and have found them to have a unique place in the treatment of mental health disorders. But I'm personally very interested in their use for spiritual purposes. Especially because, in my own clinical experience, many mental health issues have a strong root in spiritual and existential challenges.  So when we really look at the intention for spiritual practice or use of psychedelics, Buddhism and psychedelics share something in common: finding that which frees the mind. There are probably a good amount of Buddhists who would say it's a gateway to a spiritual path, which I certainly agree with (and there's also many who would disagree).  At my alma mater, Johns Hopkins University, there has been decades of research in the use of psychedelics for a variety of purposes, showing promising results in many areas. They've done studies with long-time meditators as well as those who didn't have a previous spiritual practice.   One study by Rolland Griffit's et al. in 2018 wanted to see if the changes noted after receiving psilocybin in personality and other traits were enduring for people without a previous spiritual practice…and not just the short-term result of a great trip.  The results were impressive. I got into more details about the study in the pod, but after 6 months, the groups who received high-dose psilocybin and support for spiritual practice showed large significant positive changes long–term when compared to a placebo group (low dose psilocybin) that also received spiritual practice support. The areas of improvement include interpersonal closeness, life meaning/purpose, forgiveness, daily spiritual experiences, and community observer ratings (how others rated them, not just how they saw themselves…to make sure the changes weren't just perceived by the participant but that others could tell there was a shift as well).  So this – and other studies – show that psilocybin can influence long-lasting /enduring increases in positive social attitudes/behaviors and in healthy psychological functioning.  Isn't that so fascinating?  I want to mention here that there's a big difference between recreational use of psychedelics and intentional use of psychedelics.  I had my own first experience with LSD when I was 15 years old and experimented with it a lot over the course of a few years. That first experience forever changed the way I saw the world – it helped me see that my beliefs and the way I perceived the world was through many filters and that the ideas I had about separation of myself and others were false, and there was a mystical unity to our existence.  I also had – at a later experience – a mystical near-death experience that changed the way I perceived death (and was a lot less fearful of it).   And my difficult experiences (aka “bad trips”) gave me insight into the way my brain could loop and perseverate on things…and how important my mindset was in how I experienced the world.  I had done so many psychedelics by my late teens that I went another 20 years before using them again (I spent that time integrating my insights with many life-changing experiences). When I decided to bring them back into my life again, it was with much more intention, and for entheogenic purposes.  So, while there were some enduring effects for me with recreational use, in my own experience and in my subsequent guiding of altered states experiences, intentional use is a very different experience.  There are several factors we take into account and implement when we intentionally use psychedelics. The mindset of the participant and the guide, the setting, which substance to use and the dosing, the skillset of the guide itself.. and post-experience situation/support as well.  When we skillfully put these things together, I do believe there can be a great benefit.  It's not just about having a great experience, but also support in integrating what arose during the experience and integrating that into our day-to-day lives.  There's a high risk of using psychedelics as a way to escape the challenges of life. We can see this with almost anything that helps us feel better than sitting with a difficult emotion or experience – it happens with meditation, too. I like to remind myself and others to not chase after that meditative bliss experience, because it will be elusive, and that it's a good practice to let go of the attachment and craving.  So…what are psychedelics and spiritual practice (particularly Buddhist practices) contradictory? What often comes up in this discussion are the Buddhist precepts.  These precepts are 5 ethical guidelines are considered the foundation for successful practice because they help to calm the mind and have it be in the est state for meditation and spiritual practice (not lying, not stealing, not killing, no harm from sexual misconduct). The fifth precept is often discussed here: I undertake the precept to abstain from liquor that causes intoxication and indolence.  So here it specifically says alcohol and not other substances. And some people take it literally and others say well, it's more complicated in modern times and it probably was meant to include all mind-altering substances.  Is this…wise? Compassionate?   Some people take precepts very literally, especially in early Buddhism and in many Theravedan schools. Like literally not lying under any circumstance. But other traditions – like Mahayana or Vajrayana – look at it slightly differently, with prioritizing the concept of skillful means and compassion for others as the primary intention. A common example is not lying. If you're hiding an innocent person in your house, and someone comes to kill them and asks if they're in there, is it OK to lie? The Bodhisattva vow would say you break the precept to help the person.   Thinking this way, when we are asking this question about psychedelics and spiritual practice, we can consider is it beneficial – ultimately – to our compassion and ability to help others? At this point, do we have the wisdom to inform this? How does a perspective impact our ability to show up in the world and make it a better place as we walk in it?  What is our intention?  This is why I feel strongly about the intention of spiritual growth.  And of course, we have to have wisdom along with the compassionate intention, because us silly humans can fool ourselves. We can convince ourselves something is beneficial when we don't have the wisdom to make that call yet…but we really want it to be beneficial;) So we have to tread with integrity over these waters.  You know, I used to wonder if after a psychedelic experience, people would later feel, “Oh it was just the medicine, the drug”… but what I've found – at least with guided journeys – is that it's more an affirmation of truth, and experience of truth. The veil has been lifted.  And my hope is that it does encourage more spiritual practice and more dedication to the practice. The science is supporting this.  It's like taking a helicopter ride up to summit instead of a slow climb –  to see the view to see if it's worth it, what's possible. To help one commit to the slow climb that is to come.  After the glimpse or the affirmation, we then continue with the traditional practices instead of trying to grasp at that initial insight again – striving for the meditative bliss experience or having another psychedelic journey.  So do I think there's a role for psychedelics in spiritual practice? Absolutely. AND psychedelics are not for everyone.   I believe in appropriate screening and assessment because there are medical and psychiatric contraindications and situations where they just won't be as beneficial.  AND I strongly believe in the importance of integration – with a coach or therapist who is trained specifically in psychedelic integration (there are also communities that have this support built in, like the Burner community or the Santo Daime church.  It's not just about the journey if you want a higher chance of success at enduring benefit for you and those you come into contact with.  Lastly – and this is important – you don't “need” psychedelics for spiritual growth. What you need is 100% within you. Right now. But they can be a safe, helpful tool along the way in the right context.  Until next week, rebels… Free your mind! In this episode you'll learn:// Are psychedelics and entheogens the same thing?   // The difference between recreational and intentional use  // How science support that intentional use of psychedelics can create long-term positive changes in mindset, personality, social behavior, and spiritual practice  // How psychedelics can be used to benefit spiritual practice  // How to avoid using psychedelics as an escape or a temporary high  // Whether Buddhism and psychedelics are actually contradictory in nature  // Why integration is key in seeing positive long-term effects of psychedelic use Resources:// Buddhism and Psychedelics 3-part YouTube Series: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 // Zig, Zag, Zen: Buddhism and Psychedelics edited by Alex Grey & Allan Badiner  // The Secret Drugs of Buddhism by Michael Crowley  // If you want to finally get clear about your unique Soul purpose and how to create a life that supports it during this one precious life we have, apply for the Adventure Mastermind. It's deep work. Important, necessary, and essential to what the world needs right now. Be a part of it.  Head over to AdventureMastermind.com and apply for the next cohort. We have 2 altered states retreats, weekly coaching, virtual retreats, and more. I've got you! // If you're new to the squad, grab the Rebel Buddhist Toolkit I created at RebelBuddhist.com. It has all you need to start creating a life of more freedom, adventure, and purpose. You'll also get access to the Rebel Buddhist FB group, and tune in weekly when I go live on new topics. // Want to dive into this work on a deeper level on your own time? To study it and practice it together with a group of people with the same goals of freedom, adventure and purpose? Check out Freedom School – the community for ALL things related to freedom, inside and out. 

Buddhaverse Podcast
Dogen Zenji - Space

Buddhaverse Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 67:27


Dogen Zenji is a dual patriarch of both Rinzai and Soto Zen  and his writing a Dharma activity changed Japan and the world forever .  To celebrate his life a work I'll be doing a reading of chapters of his Shobogenzo intermitently.  I do a a brief bio of his life and enlightenment story, and then read a chapter entitled Space or Koku in Japanese, and I finish with the Prayer in Praise of the 16 Arhats for the well fare of all Dharma teachers and the flourishing of the Dharma. buddhaversepodcast.comFor my updates follow me  here: instgram.com/harddrive

Dharma Talks – Ocean Gate Zen Center – Santa Cruz, Capitola, Aptos

Rev. Daijaku Kinst discusses the ordination path for a Soto Zen Priest. https://www.oceangatezen.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Jaku-July-30-Tokudo-Ordination-COMPRESSED-audio.mp3 https://www.oceangatezen.org/2022/07/tokudo-novice-priest-ordination-2/feed/ 0

Dharma Talks – Ocean Gate Zen Center – Santa Cruz, Capitola, Aptos

Rev. Daijaku Kinst speaks about the passage from Dogen's ShoboGenzo Zuimonki that the sangha studied this past week, emphasizing the teaching that our behavior tells us who we are. https://www.oceangatezen.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Jaku-July-23-Dogens-SG-Zuimonki-COMPRESSED-audio.mp3 https://www.oceangatezen.org/2022/07/dogens-zuimonki-4/feed/ 0

Central Church Port Kembla
An Eastern view of the Prodigal Son

Central Church Port Kembla

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 35:24


Jesus told the story of the prodigal son during His ministry years. However, about 200 years later, a very similar parable appeared in the Lotus Sutra as part of the teachings in the Mahayana line of Buddhism. In this podcast Oran looks at the similarities and differences between both tales, and considers how the both bring glory to God.

Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox
Episode 145 - The Nature of The Mind

Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 34:45 Very Popular


The word enlightenment is a translation of two Pali words that mean “awakened” and “freed from all fetters.” To become enlightened then means we wake to the true nature of reality, and we free our mind from all the shackles of the delusions, like ignorance, anger, and attachment. The basic nature of the mind is purity. No matter how troubled or deluded someone's mind is currently, their basic nature is purity. In this episode, we try to get an understanding and an experience of the basic nature of the mind: purity, clarity, and awareness.    “The deep, peaceful clarity of our essential mind is in the nature of love, and in this calm atmosphere the disturbances of hatred and anger have no place. While absorbed in this deep state of awareness, there is no chance for a harmful thought to agitate us. It is not a question of consciously deciding to refrain from anger and behave virtuously; this loving, benevolent feeling arises spontaneously and effortlessly, from the depths of our being.    As this feeling of spaciousness grows and as we become closer to the correct view of nonconcrete non-self-existence, a sense of unity between ourselves and everything else will arise. Instead of feeling suffocated and oppressed by our surroundings — “It's me against them” — we will feel as if there is room enough for everything in the world. There is space for everything. Within the clear space of nonduality, everything flows freely in a constant process of coming and going, growing and dying, arising and disappearing. Within this expanse of non-self-existent reality, all things function perfectly without obstructing one another. There is no conflict, no confusion, and no separation. Instead of feeling alienated from our environment, from others, or even from ourselves, we share in the experience of universal harmony.” —Lama Yeshe    Excellent are tamed mules, Thoroughbreds, horses of the Indus valley, Tusked elephants and great elephants.  But even more excellent  Are people who have tamed themselves.    Not by means of these animals could one go  To that place not gone to,  Where a self-tamed person goes  By means of a well-tamed, disciplined self. (322–323)* —Buddha, The Dhammapada    References   Buddha.The Dhammapada. Translated by Gil Fronsdale. (Kindie).Shambala, Boston and London, 2011.   Yeshe, Thupten. Introduction to Tantra. (Kindle). Wisdom Publications, Somerville, 2014. Find us at the links below:  https://www.facebook.com/Buddhismforeveryone Join our private group at: https://www.facebook.com/groups/sanghatalk/ https://www.instagram.com/buddhism.with.joann.fox  

Dharma Talks – Ocean Gate Zen Center – Santa Cruz, Capitola, Aptos

In this talk about the Four Noble Truths, the foundational teaching of the Buddha, Rev. Shinshu Roberts encourages us to look closely at our minds, our suffering and how we practice with both. https://www.oceangatezen.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Shinshu-July-16-4NTs-Compressed-audio.mp3 https://www.oceangatezen.org/2022/07/the-four-noble-truths-2/feed/ 0

Open Question
OQ 303 - Sacred World: The Shimmering Apparition

Open Question

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 23:45 Very Popular


In Open Question 303, Elizabeth explores the power of words and what it means to go beyond them in the tradition of Prajnaparamita.

Dharma Talks – Ocean Gate Zen Center – Santa Cruz, Capitola, Aptos

Listening with the sangha and discussing the lyrics of Stevie Nick's evocative 1974 song, “Landslide”, Rev Shinshu Roberts weaves in teachings from Dogen in this reflection about how we engage with transitions and transform our lives. https://www.oceangatezen.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Landslide-July-9-2022-audio-MP3-2.mp3 https://www.oceangatezen.org/2022/07/landslide-2/feed/ 0

Tibetan Buddhism: The Elegant Mind
Lao Tzu and the Mahayana Path

Tibetan Buddhism: The Elegant Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 13:08


The legendary Lao Tzu was living and teaching a harmonious way of being -- simple, modest and true -- traveling throughout China centuries before Siddhartha's birth. Upon achieving enlightenment, Siddhartha Buddha refined, deepened and shared similar ways to all who were inclined to listen. Then, after his death, these teachings were assembled and gradually morphed into what we today know as Buddhism's Mahayana curriculum. The teachings of Lao Tzu . . .  The awakened Bodhisattva path . . .  Both so ancient, yet so relevant today. (Length: 13 minutes) Written by Mark Winwood of the Chenrezig Project, with accompanying music composed and performed by the SF-bay area musician Bobby Vega.

Learn Buddhism with Alan Peto
32 - Mahayana Buddhism

Learn Buddhism with Alan Peto

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 39:40 Very Popular


Mahayana makes up the second branch of Buddhism in our world today and is practiced in the East-Asian and Central-Asian countries.  Mahayanists follow the "Bodhisattva Path" that leads to the full awakening of Buddhahood.  This Mahayana Path allows anyone, even laypersons, to achieve enlightenment without having to take a path of a monastic.  Learn more in the article: https://alanpeto.com/buddhism/understanding-mahayana-theravada/   About Buddhist scriptures:  https://alanpeto.com/buddhism/buddhist-scriptures/   Video:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Fv0N9-iDN4   Contact Alan: alanpeto.com/contact   Podcast Disclaimer: alanpeto.com/legal/podcast-disclaimer/   Get Alan's free eBook "Buddhism in 10 Steps": alanpeto.com/books/buddhism-10-steps --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/alanpeto/message

Learn Buddhism with Alan Peto
31 - Theravada Buddhism

Learn Buddhism with Alan Peto

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 24:58 Very Popular


The first in a series of episodes on the branches and traditions of Buddhism, we will explore Theravāda Buddhism. How did this school emerge? Did it ever read Mahayana sutras? What is the school of thought and guiding practice? Come explore in this episode! Learn more in the article: https://alanpeto.com/buddhism/understanding-mahayana-theravada/ About Buddhist scriptures: https://alanpeto.com/buddhism/buddhist-scriptures/ Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Fv0N9-iDN4 Contact Alan: alanpeto.com/contact Podcast Disclaimer: alanpeto.com/legal/podcast-disclaimer/ Get Alan's free eBook "Buddhism in 10 Steps": alanpeto.com/books/buddhism-10-steps --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/alanpeto/message

Rime Buddhist Center Dharma Talks
Embracing the 24 Hour Mahayana Vows

Rime Buddhist Center Dharma Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 12:03


Dharma talk given by Lama Matthew Palden Gocha, June 12, 2022. Music by Barefoot Bran Music.

The buddhahood Podcast
Gosho - Hinayana Versus Mahayana- part 2

The buddhahood Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 61:53


The instantiations of energies from Noumena to all Phenomena Form the momentum of Life/Time/Space. This process perceived in the mind as Buddha.

The buddhahood Podcast
Gosho-Hinayana Versus Mahayana - part 1

The buddhahood Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2022 55:16


Just as a "map", can be separated into sections, from beginning to end, it is only the arrival at the destination that provides the value of the map.

Dharma Talks by Gilbert Gutierrez
Dharma Talk April 4, 2022: Daoxin -- How to Meditate

Dharma Talks by Gilbert Gutierrez

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2022


 Audio link: www.riversidechan.org/lectures/Dharma_Talk_20220404.mp3    YouTube video: https://youtu.be/f0zk9rLlHZ8Thank you to An-Yi Pan for transcribing the lecture.Notes:-          Consider volunteering to transcribe a lecture. It is a great way to deepen your practice.-          This transcription is work in progress. It is transcribed as recorded and no professional editing was performed.-

Dharma Talks by Gilbert Gutierrez
Dharma Talk April 11, 2022: Early Chan

Dharma Talks by Gilbert Gutierrez

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022


 Many thanks to Paloma Sayin for transcribing this lecture.Lecture audio:  https://www.riversidechan.org/lectures/Dharma_Talk_20220411.mp3Video: https://youtu.be/3-cq5iTAmpUNotes:-   If you benefit from transcriptions, please volunteer to transcribe a lecture. It is a great way to deepen your practice.-   This transcription is work in progress. It is transcribed as recorded and no professional

UnMind: Zen Moments With Great Cloud

Dharma trumps karmabut it is not an escape —Consequences come* * *Last Sunday we performed an initiation ceremony called “Jukai Tokudo” in Japanese. We had an international visitor and a couple of other candidates who were ready and willing to receive the initial precepts of Zen, declaring themselves Soto Zen Buddhists. We will do so again in November of this year, which is our Founder's Month, honoring Matsuoka Roshi, our founding teacher.It occurred to me that in this context, with all the consternation and pontificating over Ukraine — now segueing into the dismal fatigue syndrome of becoming yesterday's news — we might revisit the fundamental question I raised for our Sunday dharma dialog a few weeks ago: “What the hell is wrong with Vladimir Putin?”You may have participated in this discussion, so apologies in advance for any redundancy, but these points bear repeating. It is an inexcusable, but seemingly inevitable scenario, that we become fatigued at the repetition of atrocities, as if the victims being killed and maimed today are somehow not as worthy of our attention, the horror not as shocking, as we registered at the beginning of the aggression. As someone once said at the screaming of lobsters being boiled alive, “They are used to it.” But in light of the aspirational aspect of the Precepts, even this tragedy takes on deeper meaning.In approaching this particular train wreck as a subject for dharma, I was careful to couch my terms, explaining that “what” is the fundamental question in Zen, rather than “why” or “how,” with “who, when and where” being pretty self-evident. “Who” the hell does Vladimir Putin think he is? would suffer from focusing on the wrong question, personalizing the issue to too great a degree. “Hell” is also carefully chosen in that, according to classic Zen philosophy, we human beings make our world into hell or heaven, and reap the karmic consequences thereof. “Wrong” is also understood to reside in the realm of “right” views and thoughts, as well as speech, action and livelihood, the social side of the Eightfold Path, with right mindfulness, effort, and meditation rounding out the inner, personal dimension of our all-too-human existence. In Zen, all opinions are not equal, and all teachings do not lead to nirvana.I thought it might be worthwhile to consider Vladimir Putin's behavior, and the attitudes that it seems to betray, in the light of the Buddhist Precepts, which many of us take up as guidelines or reminders, touchpoints to return to from time to time, as we witness our own actions as well as those of others. There is a hoary meme in Buddhism that government leaders — one of the Four Benefactors we appreciate in the Meal Chant — are in their position of power by virtue of merit accumulated in past lives. So the only set of criteria we can hold them to are those of Buddhist morality or ethics, or Shila. Which begs the question, does this mean that the millions of dollars spent campaigning are basically a waste of time and treasure? And as good Buddhists, aren't we supposed to avoid discussing the faults of others?How does the behavior of Putin, as well as President Trump and others in leadership roles, hold up in comparison to the admonitions of the Buddhist Precepts? First, we must remember that the Precepts of Zen have a history of their own. In India and China they may have been expressed and understood differently. Those we receive in modern times convey the current rendering of their meaning, sometimes translated as “morality,” but “ethical” conduct is probably more appropriate. It should also be mentioned in passing that Vladimir Putin is purportedly a Christian, so whatever precepts, lower case “p” he may be following would not necessarily resemble those of Buddhism or Zen.The quotes regarding precepts in Zen are taken from an essay by Shohaku Okumura Roshi, one of my lineage teachers, in the Soto Zen Journal, “Dharma Eye.” This is a recommended online source of information of a scholarly nature for those of us practicing Zen in the West, its masthead shown below.One of the first factoids that Okumura roshi points out is that there are variations in the precepts given to Zen practitioners over time, depending on factors such as lineage and the country. The scholars tell us that Master Dogen could not have received the sixteen precepts he handed down to us in our initiation and formal ceremonies today, as they were not done that way in China. Whether he modified those he received from his Tendai masters or cobbled together his best interpretation of the precepts he felt inclined to transmit as Bodhisattva principles, I leave to further scholarship. Quoting the journal:Dogen Zenji received only the Bodhisattva PreceptsDogen Zenji (1200-1253), the founder of Japanese Soto School, originally became a monk in the Japanese Tendai tradition in 1213. Therefore, he received only the Mahayana precepts. According to his biography, Dogen had some difficulty receiving permission to practice in a Chinese monastery. This was because he had not received the Vinaya precepts which was a requirement to be recognized as a Buddhist monk in China. However, he did not receive the Vinaya precepts. To his disciples and lay students, Dogen Zenji only gave the 16 precepts that were called Busso-shoden-bosatsu-kai (the Bodhisattva precepts that have been correctly transmitted by Buddhas and Ancestors). The nature of the Bodhisattva precepts we receive in Soto Zen tradition is quite different from that of the Vinaya precepts.Okumura Roshi quotes one of those seemingly contradictory statements that appear so often in Zen literature, this one from the Brahma Net Sutra:And in the introduction of the ten major precepts, the Sutra says, “At that time, when Shakyamuni Buddha sat beneath the bodhi tree and attained unsurpassable awakening, he first set forth the Bodhisattva pratimoksha.”Okumura goes on to make the literal case about this claim:Pratimoksha is the text of the precepts, and here, it refers to the Bonmo-kyo. This means that the Bodhisattva precepts were established as soon as the Buddha attained unsurpassable awakening and even before he began to teach. Historically, this is not true. The Buddha did not establish any precepts or regulations before people made mistakes. In the Vinaya text, the stories explaining why the different precepts were made were recorded. When we read these stories, we can see that the Buddhist Sangha was a gathering of actual human beings. People made all sorts of mistakes even though they aspired to study and practice the Dharma under the Buddha's guidance.So the Vinaya, the rules and regulations governing behavior within the original Order, obviously evolved over time, like any other organizational protocols. The main rule governing the harmonious community, or sangha, is, of course harmony. Most communities we belong to are anything but harmonious, and even Zen groups are known to become rancorous from time to time. Human nature raises its head.But the bit about Buddha establishing the pratimoksha in zazen that night I think we have to take on faith. What transpired within his experience in meditation was, and is, the essential meaning of the precepts. As Master Dogen is said to have asked, what precept is not fulfilled in zazen?If we take the precepts as primeval and natural, built-in to existence and to be discovered, not made up, we can accept that translating them into language and written form is a mere approximation of their true meaning. This is why they seem impossible at first glance. They live in the realm of being, not doing.Ceremonially, Zen precepts include and are preceded by a Repentance Verse and taking Refuge in the Three Treasures of Buddhism:RepentanceAt a precepts ceremony in the Soto Zen tradition, first we make repentance by reciting the following verse, “All the twisted karma ever created by me, since of old, / through beginningless greed, anger and ignorance, / born of my body, speech and thought. / I now make complete repentance of it all.”There is another repentance verse taken from Samanthabhadra-sutra that says, “The ocean of all karmic hindrances arises solely from delusive thoughts. / If you wish to make repentance, sit in an upright posture and be mindful of the true nature of reality. / All faults and evil deeds are like frost and dew. / The sun of wisdom enables them to melt away. This verse clearly shows that our precepts are based on awakening to reality and wisdom of such reality.Okumura is now leading us gently by the hand to the realization of the concrete reality of the Precepts.The Three RefugesWe then take refuge in the Three Treasures: Buddha, Dharma and Sangha. The Buddha is the one who awakened to reality. The Dharma is reality itself, the way things truly are. The Sangha are the people who aspire to study and living according to the teaching of the reality of all beings.We also take refuge, or return to, our original nature, which is called Buddha, or awakened. What we awaken to is the Dharma, which is ever-present, but does not depend upon our knowing it. The Sangha members are primarily vested in awakening to this same truth, or it is not truly a Zen community.The Threefold Pure PreceptsNext, we receive the threefold pure precepts: (1) the precept of embracing moral codes, (2) the precept of embracing good deeds, (3) the precept of embracing all living beings. These three points are the direction we walk on the Bodhisattva path.These are often translated as: Do no harm; Do only good; and Do good for others. And yet the truth of the Precepts is that they are beyond doing in the conventional sense. If we find what we are looking for in our practice, the Precepts become our natural intention. But we make mistakes. And resolve to try harder. Eventually our behavior may become consonant with the Precepts, by virtue of practicing zazen.The Ten Major PreceptsThe ten major precepts are: (1) do not kill, (2) do not steal, (3) do not engage in improper sexual conduct, (4) do not lie, (5) do not deal in intoxicants, (6) do not criticize others, (7) do not praise self and slander others, (8) do not be stingy with the dharma or property ,(9) do not give way to anger, (10) do not disparage the Three Treasures.If this sounds like a laundry list of do's and don't's or the 10 Commandments phrased a little differently, there is a kernel of truth in that. But we take up the way of following Zen voluntarily, not under threat of punishment by a vengeful God. They are not merely literal; in that interpretation some are impossible. We come to understand what they mean through the tried and true process of trial and error.Zen and the Precepts are OneThe Bodhisattva precepts we receive in the Soto Zen tradition are also called, Zen-kai (Zen precepts). This means that our zazen and the precepts are one. In our zazen practice, we put our entire being on the ground of true reality of all beings instead of the picture of the world that is a creation of our minds. By striving to keep the precepts in our daily lives, we strive to live being guided by our zazen.So what does all this have to do with design thinking? Design thinking starts with problem definition and proceeds to problem-solving through design-build actions. Zen starts with Buddha's definition of the central problem of existence as sentient beings and offers a method for arriving at solutions, zazen. In design, we speak of design intent, and strive to maintain its integrity through all the trials and tribulations that any existent object, program or system is subject to, including the test of time. Each of these solutions tends to have a weak link in the chain, which is where it eventually breaks down. The design approach is to take the failure as instructive, and redesign. The Zen approach is “Fall down seven times, get up eight.” Considering the Precepts in the light of design intent, we can see that they are meant to foster harmony in the social dimension, in transactions with other individuals and groups. They shine a bright light on the futility of having “designs” on conquering another country, especially in the context of impermanence and imperfection. Whatever gains are realized are only good for whatever is left of one lifetime. Which brings us back to our starting place. Is Putin evil? Or just ignorant?Zen holds that the only thing that finally accompanies you to the grave, and affects life after death, is the deeds committed in this life. Whatever crusade you mount to defend your actions may be based on a category error. To die in the service of a cause greater than yourself may indeed be considered a noble deed. To kill others in the service of a cause you consider greater than or glorifying to yourself, while cowering behind your local cronies, is a crime, in karmic as well as human terms.Putin may be surprised to discover that his reward in heaven is not what he anticipates. He may be surprised to find that that kind of heaven lasts about fifteen minutes, as an old Master once said. He may be disappointed to find that life moves on without him, as he conceives himself. And that any actual afterlife, including his potential rebirth, is not one of his choosing. He may be surprised that karma is not a respecter of persons, however powerful they may regard themselves. And that the Soviet Union, as well as Mother Russia, do not really exist, except in the fevered imagination of a limited mind.* * *Elliston Roshi is guiding teacher of the Atlanta Soto Zen Center and abbot of the Silent Thunder Order. He is also a gallery-represented fine artist expressing his Zen through visual poetry, or “music to the eyes.”UnMind is a production of the Atlanta Soto Zen Center in Atlanta, Georgia and the Silent Thunder Order. You can support these teachings by PayPal to donate@STorder.org. Gassho.Producer: Kyōsaku Jon Mitchell

Ungraduated Living & Learning
The 3 Basic Buddhist Teachings

Ungraduated Living & Learning

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 9:09


In this short daily does of ungraduation episode we peel apart the 3 basic teachings of Buddhism: 1. The Theravada 2. The Mahayana 3. The Vajrayana  My Website: https://ungraduated.com More learnings from todays daily message: https://www.amazon.com/Everyday-Buddhism-Real-Life-Teachings-Practices/dp/1734163801/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?crid=1WZNCX00X9RNT&keywords=everyday+buddhism&qid=1648411962&s=books&sprefix=everyday+Budd%2Cstripbooks%2C115&sr=1-1-spons&psc=1&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUFIMkdDMFdFOExMSUImZW5jcnlwdGVkSWQ9QTAxNjUzMDdLOFpKUDFUSzlZSk8mZW5jcnlwdGVkQWRJZD1BMDE3OTg3MzJVR1YzV1VIU01YSk4md2lkZ2V0TmFtZT1zcF9hdGYmYWN0aW9uPWNsaWNrUmVkaXJlY3QmZG9Ob3RMb2dDbGljaz10cnVl

10% Happier with Dan Harris
430: From Evangelical Pastor to Buddhist Nun | Venerable Pannavati

10% Happier with Dan Harris

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 56:13


Venerable Pannavati is a former evangelical pastor who has been ordained in three separate Buddhist traditions: Theravada, Chan, and Mahayana. She's the co-founder and co-Abbot of Embracing-Simplicity Hermitage and Meditation Center; Co-Director of Heartwood Refuge and President of the Treasure Human Life Foundation. She teaches around the world, was a 2008 recipient of the Outstanding Buddhist Women's Award, and currently serves as the Vice President of the US Chapter of the Global Buddhist Association.This episode explores:Why many meditators try to jump over important preliminary steps.Why Buddhism isn't necessarily fun or easy. The utility and impact of making vows.What Venerable Venerable Pannavati calls healthy shame.Full Shownotes: https://www.tenpercent.com/podcast-episode/venerable-pannavati-430See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.