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Public university in Louisiana, U.S.

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Best podcasts about louisiana state

Latest podcast episodes about louisiana state

Louisiana Considered Podcast
Louisiana Considered: Louisiana Seafood Industry Hit Hard By Hurricane Ida, Andouille Season In South Louisiana, State Correctional Facilities Mishandled Ida Evacuations

Louisiana Considered Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 24:30


Patrick Madden hosted this Monday's episode of Louisiana Considered. Gulf Seafood Foundation Board Member Jim Gossenand former chairman of the Louisiana Seafood Promotion and Marketing Board Harlon Pearceexplain how Hurricane Ida disrupted Louisiana's seafood industry and how the industry recovered from Hurricane Katrina 16 years ago. Food writer Ian McNultyreports on the heroic efforts undertaken by local meat markets in the River Parishes to produce andouille in communities hit hard by Hurricane Ida. WWNO/WRKF Criminal Justice Reporter Bobbi-Jeanne Misick reports on how juvenile detention centers, state correctional facilities and jails botched evacuations during Hurricane Ida. In one case, 36 teens were evacuated from the New Orleans Juvenile Justice Intervention Center to Elayn Hunt Correctional Center in St. Gabriel instead of Dixon Correctional Institute in Jackson, the evacuation point described in JJIC's evacuation plans. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

AP Audio Stories
Louisiana state trooper charged in pummeling of Black man

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 1:37


It's New Orleans: Out to Lunch
Can You Hear This?

It's New Orleans: Out to Lunch

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 32:26


In a free-market economy, the role of government is often debated. On the one hand, business generally prefers to be left alone by government, interpreting the word “free” in free-market as free from regulation. On the other hand, there are any number of business organizations whose principal functions are to extract as many regulatory and tax advantages as possible for their particular industry.  In response to this lobbying, the Louisiana State government, like any good investor, does its best to diversify. The state has instituted economic development initiatives to attract and grow a wide range of businesses, from film to aerospace. You might remember a few years ago, starting with the re-development period after Hurricane Katrina, there was a big push to create what was called New Orleans' Biomedical District. That economic development has, as of today, reportedly created 34,000 new jobs and had an economic impact of some $3.3 billion. The Biomedical District includes the Veterans Administration Hospital, the University Medical Center, the Louisiana Cancer Research Center, and the New Orleans BioInnovation Center.  The New Orleans BioInnovation Center provides office space, laboratories, business support, and even financial investment for biotech startups. They have a 66,000 square-foot building on Canal Street that opened in 2011, and cost $47m to build. This size investment in a “build it and they will come” strategy takes some serious financial and science skill to navigate. Similar state-funded bio innovation initiatives in Baton Rouge and Shreveport failed. To keep the New Orleans enterprise afloat, in 2021 Kris Khalil was named Executive Director of the New Orleans BioInnovation Center. In one type of best-case scenario, the object of biomedical innovation is to come up with a medical device that becomes an everyday piece of equipment that sells in the millions. For example, the FitBit and Apple Watch have turned the decidedly un-sexy concept of a heart monitor into a fashion item. In the same way, eyeglasses are technically a medical device. But somehow, Warby Parker and others have turned assisted vision into what is now a fashion accessory. What's next? Which otherwise pedestrian item that we use for medical-assisted-living could become hip and ubiquitous? With the growing number of people walking around with ear-buds blasting sound directly into their ears, could the next medical fashion item become the hearing aid? If you'll excuse the pun, that might not be as crazy as it sounds. Federal legislation called “The Over The Counter Hearing Aid Act of 2017” finally went into effect in early 2021. This legislation allows hearing aids to be sold in stores or online, without any consultation, prescription, or referral. As a result, some trend-spotters are predicting major growth in the hearing aid industry. Dina Zeevi is President of the Louisiana Society of Hearing Aid Specialists, and a Board Member and Administrative Secretary of the Louisiana Board of Hearing Aid Dealers. She's also a Hearing Instrument Specialist and the owner of a hearing aid store on the Westbank, called Hear Now. Out to Lunch is recorded over lunch at NOLA Pizza in the NOLA Brewing Taproom. You can find photos from this show by Jill Lafleur at our website.  And here's more lunchtime conversation about New Orleans' health and hearing. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

INspired INsider with Dr. Jeremy Weisz
Life After the NFL: Pressure and Facing Your Demons with Brent Novoselsky, Gemara Williams, and Wendell Davis

INspired INsider with Dr. Jeremy Weisz

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 62:06


Brent Novoselsky is a Vice President at the wealth management company, GCG Financial. GCG has been serving clients since 1989 with a particular focus on the accumulation and preservation of assets and risk management. Brent played seven seasons in the NFL, and he played with the Chicago Bears in ‘88 and Minnesota Vikings from ‘89 to ‘94. He retired after a severe neck injury. Brent is also a member of the Chicago Jewish Sports Hall of Fame and is active in many charities; he serves as the Vice President of the Retired Professional Football Players of Chicago (RPFPC).  Wendell Davis is the Co-founder of Trywen Medical, a Chicago-based healthcare products and services company. In college, Wendell was two times All American of Louisiana State. He is a former NFL wide receiver who played six seasons for the Chicago Bears and was selected in the first round in ‘88. After his career in the NFL, Wendell became the Assistant Coach for the 49ers. Wendell is currently also the President of the Retired Professional Football Players of Chicago (RPFPC) and the Manager of Minority Development at National Material L.P.  Gemara Williams is the Client Engagement Manager for RL Canning, a global provider of information technology consulting and managed services headquartered in Chicago. He is a former football player who saw action in the NFL and the CFL. The New England Patriots signed him in 2006, and he was part of the team that executed the only undefeated 16-game regular season in 2007. After his time with the New England Patriots, Gemara signed on with Canadian teams, the Montreal Alouettes and what is now known as the Edmonton Elks.  In this episode… The top-level NFL career lasts an average of three years, and many athletes suddenly realize they still have their whole life ahead of them. Unfortunately, there's not much on the field that prepares you for the entire new world outside of the NFL. You could go from signing autographs to begging for business appointments, not to mention the unquenchable thirst for NFL-esque thrill — and nothing can seem to fill that void.  How do you cope with that pressure of transitioning from NFL into business, knowing that you might not understand the first thing about business and could leave the NFL unceremoniously? And if you're already a business owner, what does the life story of an NFL player teach you about business?  Listen to this episode of the Inspired Insider Podcast with Dr. Jeremy Weisz, featuring former NFL players Brent Novoselsky, Wendell Davis, and Gemara Williams. They discuss the high and low points of their NFL careers, the tough job of transitioning to the business world, facing the demons of still playing in your sleep, and what they wished they knew when they were younger. Stay tuned. 

Multipassionaire Podcast
Tech Talk: Co-Founding a Tech Startup & Developing Web and Mobile Apps with Software Engineer, Farzad Sunavala

Multipassionaire Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 35:59


#24 | Farzad and I talk about co-founding a tech startup and developing web and mobile applications! Farzad has a Bachelor's of Science in Petroleum Engineering from Louisiana State and is pursuing his Master's of Engineering from Cornell University. Farzad is a Petroleum Engineer who transitioned from the oil and gas industry now as Software Engineer. He has co-founded a tech startup, Barstat, which provides a data analytics platform for entertainment services. We talk about logistics of co-founding a tech startup, development of web and mobile applications, and technical advice for transitioning careers into the software industry. • Farzad's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/farzad_528/ • Farzad's Website: https://fullstackfarzzy.tech/ • Farzad's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/farzadsunavala/ • Leave a review on Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/multipassionaire-podcast/id1515981004 • Stay connected! Follow our Instagram: @multipassionaire https://www.instagram.com/multipassionaire • New episodes on Monday 2x a month!

Paranormal Prowlers Podcast
118: Doing Time at Central Louisiana State Hospital

Paranormal Prowlers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 26:47


A look into the still up and running Central Louisiana State Hospital. Former resident spirits who refuse to leave still wander the state hospital grounds and halls.

William Wallis For America
Beryl Amedee, Louisiana State Rep #51

William Wallis For America

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2021 63:09


Why did this Republican vote against SB221? While most Republicans want election reform, and voted for it in the legislature. Beryl Amedee - State Representative explains why she did not vote for it and I think the reason might be shocking. We always need legislators to talk about legislation, so people can understand the details. Only then will we get more people involved. After that, she gives us a legislative wrap up about some other legislation we have been hearing about.

William Wallis For America
Charles Owen, Louisiana State Rep Charles Owen District 30

William Wallis For America

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2021 15:49


State Representative Charles "Chuck" Owen District 30 has some very interesting legislation that I think you will like. He has an approach to legislation that is refreshing. And he is a member of the new Louisiana Conservative Caucus.  To see my interviews on video, please see me on Facebook and You Tube at "William Wallis For America"    

TELL IT LIKE IT IS WITH YOUR HOST DIS504GIRL
DID LOUISIANA STATE TROOPERS COVER UP RONALD GREEN'S DEATH

TELL IT LIKE IT IS WITH YOUR HOST DIS504GIRL

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2021 12:34


An unknown source leaked the body cam footage of the death of Ronald Green. Lt. Clary of the Louisiana State Troopers was on scene of the incident lied about the body cam footage. So was this a cover up to save the State Troopers??? FINALLY the truth has been revealed after two years. Listen to the audio of Ronald Green pleading for his life. FOLLOW ME ON IG/TWITTER @DIS504GIRL CASH APP $DIS504GIRL --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/dis504girl/message

William Wallis For America
Robert Mills, Louisiana State Senator, District 36

William Wallis For America

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2021 27:41


In this interview I had the opportunity to talk with Senator Robert Mills There are a lot of popular legislators and legislators from popular areas, but sometimes the ones that are doing the bigger things aren't from either category. This interview is with another legislator that could have enjoyed retirement in a more relaxing scenario, but instead he chose to serve the public as a State Senator. For him the the return on his long hours with part time pay is a better Louisiana for everyone. To see my interviews before they become a podcast please follow me on Facebook or Subscribe to my YouTube Channel at "William Wallis For America"

Dear Adam Silver
Episode 77: Glauco Adorno and Our Letters to Senda

Dear Adam Silver

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2021 60:48


Glacuo Adorno is back on the pod today (listen to episodes 40, 25 and 3 for more)! Long time listeners will remember that we collaborated in Lithuania on a body of artwork made about women’s basketball pioneer Senda Berenson. We met while we were both in graduate school at Louisiana State university, when I was studying fine art and Glauco was studying art history and he is now a curator based in Rio de Janeiro. He is back on the pod today to read some of the letters that we wrote to Berenson while we were Lithuania, a part of this work which we have not shared before. Thank you to Glauco for coming on and being so willing to discuss this ongoing work and the hardships of the pandemic in Brazil right now. And thank you to you all for listening! Please share, subscribe, rate and review Dear Adam Silver wherever you get your podcasts. Please note that we recorded this episode on Zoom and the sound quality is a bit lower than usual.

Residential Spread
Fee'd Up

Residential Spread

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2021 54:37


This week, we are joined by Ben Bergholtz to talk student fees. Ben Bergholtz is a former Brittain Fellow who is now Assistant Professor in the School of Literature and Language at Louisiana Tech University. Ben received his PhD from Louisiana State, which has one of the highest student fees in the nation. Ben talks to us about the political climates and misplaced administrative priorities that encourage the ballooning of student fees and talks about his relationship to LSU's (in)famous lazy river, which was paid for in part with student fees! We also explain why you should never believe upper administrators when they tell you how much their institution pays their graduate student employees! "LSU Graduate Student Fees Among Highest in the Nation" -- https://www.lsureveille.com/daily/lsu-graduate-student-fees-among-highest-in-the-nation/article_02d79ca0-661f-11e9-a7ff-9f0e0cfe6ea9.html "New Fund Helps Graduates Finish Degrees" -- https://t.co/2NQUn5lu3p?amp=1 “The hidden cost of college: rising student fees” -- https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/grade-point/wp/2017/08/24/the-hidden-cost-of-college-rising-student-fees/ Transcript -- https://docs.google.com/document/d/12pecNNkuMmcMAFy-NQnWE36AVzPDqHzD1-fu7Vx3ApA/edit?usp=sharing --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/residential-spread/message

The Michigan Insider
First weekend Michigan basketball recap, Florida State preview

The Michigan Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2021 66:39


In this episode, we break down how the Michigan basketball looked in the opening weekend of the 2021 NCAA Tournament, along with a look-ahead to the Sweet Sixteen. We begin by looking at the Wolverines’ wins over Texas Southern and Louisiana State. We discuss Eli Brooks, Chaundee Brown Jr., Michigan’s perseverance, strategic decisions and other components that impressed us. We then discussed the up-and-down play of Hunter Dickinson, Mike Smith, Franz Wagner, some tight officiating and other concerning elements from Michigan’s NCAA Tournament run without Isaiah Livers. In the second half of the episode, we go big-picture and look ahead to the Sweet Sixteen. We first talk about the significance of Michigan making six Sweet Sixteen appearances in eight years and four in a row, along with the Wolverines leading the nation with 20 NCAA Tournament wins in the last eight postseasons. We next discuss what Michigan can realistically improve between now and the Sweet Sixteen, and offer an early preview of the Wolverines’ matchup against 4-seed Florida State. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Zoomer Report
More Sex After 50 Years

Zoomer Report

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 12, 2021 1:17


For many, if not most couples who have been together for a long time, things can get a little dull in the bedroom. Now a study says that after around 50 years of marriage, your sex life could pick up again thanks to a renewed sense of trust and commitment. Researchers at Louisiana State university analyzed the sex lives of over 1,600 adults from their late-50s all the way to their mid-80s. They noticed a slight "rebound" in how often long-married couples were having sex once they had surpassed 50 years of marriage.

Cliff and Puck
Let's Talk PAC-12 Hoops w/John Canzano

Cliff and Puck

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2021 18:36


John Canzano joins Puck and Slick for his weekly visit. John breaks down if the PAC-12 will put on a good showing ahead of the NCAA tournament, former LSU President F. King Alexander is now at Oregon State and the results of an investigation into sexual misconduct complaints at Louisiana State during his seven-year tenure have resurfaced, is he on the run, any news on the new commissioner, and more.

Civics 101
Right to Privacy: Griswold v Connecticut

Civics 101

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2021 22:42


Despite the fact that they were written in the late 19th century, morality laws were still on the books in the United States in 1965. In Connecticut, one such law prohibited the discussion, prescription and distribution of contraception. After years of trying to get the courts to scrub this law from the books, medical providers had to find a way to get the question before the highest court in the land. It wouldn’t be easy, but in the end the case would transform our notion of privacy and the role of the Supreme Court when it comes to public law. Renee Cramer of Drake University and Elizabeth Lane of Louisiana State are our guides.

The Jordy Culotta Show
The Jordy Culotta Show | February 19, 2021

The Jordy Culotta Show

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 19, 2021 121:39


The Jordy Culotta Show caps off your week with flab to fab, as we rank the best glow-ups from celebrities, whether it be athletes or celebrities.    Firstly, our good friend and LSU announcer John Brady explains what LSU basketball is going through, as the game vs Ole Miss is canceled. So we look ahead to the challenges Auburn provides and what a win would do for Louisiana State heading into March.  We also get you primed for first pitch out at the box with show regular, Doug Thompson. He pulls no punches when talking about wintery baseball, the constant changes to this weekend's schedule, and his expectations for the Tigers as we toe the rubber for opening weekend vs Air Force.  Then, we chat with our former son, Nathan Velasquez. He has turned into a weather snob, but goes on to discuss what we should be watching for the weekend, his life in Hollywood, and anything else that comes up. 

Let's Talk Real Estate
Let's Talk Nashville Real Estate Growth With Josh Anderson

Let's Talk Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2021 35:42


Originally from Nashville, Josh graduated from Louisiana State University in International Trade and Finance. Josh served 8 years in the U.S. Army, including a 10-month stint in Bagram, Afghanistan, during Operation Enduring Freedom. These experiences, coupled with the education he received from Louisiana State, have molded him into a focused, disciplined, and strong willed individual. Josh Anderson can best be described as a man of high energy with a passion for Nashville real estate. He is a business savvy professional with a strong desire to cater to his clients' particular needs. Client satisfaction is paramount! Josh's market expertise coupled with his superior negotiating skills set him apart from the rest. Today, Josh shares his extensive experience in real estate and within the luxury sector. We also talk with Josh about what it means to create a culture for his team that breeds success for everyone.

Duley Noted
Josh Anderson - Nashville's most trusted Realtor and owner of The Anderson Group Real Estate

Duley Noted

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2020 43:26


Mike welcomes Josh Anderson to the show. Originally from Nashville, Josh graduated from Louisiana State University in International Trade and Finance. Josh served 8 years in the U.S. Army, including a 10-month stint in Bagram, Afghanistan, during Operation Enduring Freedom. These experiences, coupled with the education he received from Louisiana State, have molded him into a focused, disciplined, and strong willed individual. Josh Anderson can best be described as a man of high energy with a passion for Nashville real estate. He is a business savvy professional with a strong desire to cater to his clients' particular needs. Client satisfaction is paramount! Josh's market expertise coupled with his superior negotiating skills set him apart from the rest.   Useful Links: https://www.theduleygroup.com/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/mike-duley-43b2054/   https://www.linkedin.com/in/nashvillesrealtor/ https://www.joshandersonrealestate.com/  

Grounded by the Farm
Sweet Potato Farmer Todd O'Neal Is Feeling the Love as

Grounded by the Farm

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2020 37:32


Todd O'Neal is a sweet potato farmer in Louisiana and his enthusiasm for the crop is electric. He talks to us about how sweet potatoes were considered something for poor people, as small farmers always had a patch to feed their family. But recently, the crop has been better understood as flavorful, nutritious and versatile. Todd talks to us for our holiday foods series about the ins and outs of growing them as well as give us his tip on the best way to enjoy sweet potatoes.  Todd is with Black Gold Farms, you can connect with them on online: On the Web: https://blackgoldfarms.com/ Like Them on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BlackGoldFarms/ Connect with Them on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/black-gold-farms/ Watch Todd talk growing sweet potatoes this season with the team at This Week in Louisiana Agriculture. Sweet Potatoes are now grown & enjoyed 12 months out of the year! It's no longer just a holiday thing! Did you know that the "regular potatoes" you think of are often called "white potatoes" or "Irish Potatoes?"   The Curing Process in Sweet potatoes: Regular/White/Irish Potatoes are brought inside to an environment to cool. Sweet potatoes on the other hand are heated up to help break down the sugars inside the sweet potato which makes it "sweet". The biggest time of the year for sweet potato farmers? Thanksgiving! Holidays are big in general. Thanksgiving, Christmas and Easter are all big times for sweet potatoes. But they have been gaining ground and are now enjoyed year round! Why are sweet potatoes so popular? At one time every farmer grew sweet potatoes but there was a steady decline as farming numbers dwindled. At one time, sweet potatoes were somehow aligned with people "being poor" and so they fell off the general chart of attention span. In just the last decade, sweet potatoes have gained attention momentum, being associated with a general focus on health, being offered as solutions to many people with a variety of dietary needs including those who are diabetic and take take on the starches that are provided in the Regular/White/Irish Potato.They are high in Vitamin A & Beta Carotene. It's in the bag, man: When COVID-19 began gripping the US, there was a swell in sales of sweet potatoes (and all general foods that could be purchased/acquired at grocery stores). Todd also noticed something strange in a photo of a grocery store's produce area - the only things left were "loose apples" which helped to craft a new plan to help the sale of sweet potatoes. It was clear that people were grabbing things in a BAG, because people were paying attention to how many surfaces were touched by how many people. There's only ONE kind of sweet potato, right? There are many varieties of sweet potatoes - The Bayou Belle: It's not the prettiest potato but makes for great sweet potato fries! The Orleans sweet potato is the pretty one for fresh market handsome go to processors and there is a lesser known type - The Beauregard - all of which were developed and named - clearly - from their development at Louisiana State's Sweet Potato Research Station. The Count Matters - Which state tops sweet potato production? Wondering who is on top of the "sweet potatoes heap? North Carolina currently grows the most. Mississippi is in the second slot. California comes in third, and Louisiana takes the number 4 slot. Lookin' Mighty Fine (For a sweet potato...): Todd is SURE, (not because he lives and has a sweet potato farm there or anything) that Louisiana Potatoes LOOK the best of all available sweet potatoes. What makes these so great? Silt loam soils! Silt is a solid, dust-like sediment that water, ice, and wind transport and deposit. Silt is made up of rock and mineral particles that are larger than clay but smaller .. Loam is a special type of soil that has been formulated to contain a mixture of sand, silt and clay. Sandy loam soil is a very desirable medium that is used by farmers, gardeners, landscapers and property owners because of its very beneficial qualities. You can learn more about the passion for soil in this conversation with Mr. Ray Young that’s mentioned. Did You Know: A sweet potato will cure in 4-5 days in general, but depends a bit on time of year, temperature and humidity. Some Like It Hot - But Not Wet: 85% humidity and nice cool temperatures (55 degrees or so) is best to put sweet potatoes "to sleep" to help prevent CO2 levels form climbing too high that would cause the sweet potatoes to rot. They also like dry environments like Shay told us onions do... Smart Buildings Help Feed People? Huh? Sweet potato farmers often use buildings that detect how much CO2 is building up to help prevent unfavorable conditions! The Root of the Matter: A sweet potato is a Root. It's part of the Morning glory family - it's a WEED! It has the same type of flowers you may have seen in a vining garden. SORRY! You're Going to Have to Listen to This Episode to Find Out... The process of growing and cultivating sweet potatoes is incredibly detailed! Be sure to listen to this episode of Grounded By The Farm to understand all of it! Thanks, Todd! Big Machines - Beautiful sweet potatoes - ACTION! Interested in seeing ALL of the sweet potato farming Machines in action? "Dig It!" ;) https://youtu.be/EGFo3bZj_SM Planting sweet potatoes takes 40-50 days! Harvesting is probably 75 days of the year! Ready to learn more about "H2A Workers"? Be sure to check out The Grounded By the Farm episode on Peppers for more details! https://groundedbythefarm.com/how-americans-love-of-spicy-food-gave-this-farm-room-to-grow/ Counting Workers to Help Make It COUNT! Did you know that the Black Gold Farm location that Todd supervises, has almost 300 employees? Feeding people requires hard work and they truly enjoy their effort knowing that it will put food on the plates of many people! You Say "Yam" But They Say "Sweet Potato" -- What's the Story? Are Yams and sweet potatoes the SAME THING? As much as we want you to read and then know the answer, you're going to have to listen to this episode of Grounded By The Farm with Todd O'Neal from Black Gold sweet potato farm to find out! Suffice it to say, Louisiana is marketing smart! Finding sweet potatoes near you! The market for sweet potatoes has grown sometimes due to food services and restaurants. Do you know what a QSR is? It's an acronym that in this case stands for Quick Serve Restaurant! Do you know what an LTO is? It's an acronym that in this case stands for Limited Time Offer! What does YOUR favorite "QSR" offer as an "LTO?" Tell us PDQ, or you'll be SOL, and end up doing KP and if you're in the we'll surely all end up DOA! Curious about ONIONS? Be sure to check out the episode of Grounded By The Farm featuring onion farmer that's so good it'll make you CRY! https://groundedbythefarm.com/growing-onions/ Black Gold offers value added & bulk sweet potatoes! There are so many innovations that go beyond individual sweet potatoes or bags, doing poly-wrapped and more. Fresh at the grocery really went up when more people stayed at home, but the company also offers them in bulk of 40 pounds at their Delhi, Louisiana locations. Todd's favorite way to eat a sweet potato? First it gets peeled. Then you warm up a seasoned cast iron skillet. Slice the sweet potato length-wise. Toss in half a stick of butter and brown it up on both sides - sprinkle a little salt on it and you're there! He’s had sweet potato biscuits, sweet potato cakes and more! What’s YOUR favorite kind of sweet potato preparation? Contact us via The Grounded By The Farm's social media and tell us what yours is! The Struggle is REAL: Sweet potatoes WITH or WITHOUT - PECANS? That’s a controversy Storing them at home — keep them in a cool, dark place. Heat is the enemy that causes it to put sprouts on and it changes the texture inside. Stick It - In The Window! Even Todd grows sweet potatoes in his window sill! Have you tried? He gives the instructions on how to do it inside this episode! Listen, Learn, Grow and EAT! We Need to Hear from You!  What did YOU find interesting about this episode of Grounded by The Farm? What would you like us to be sure we include in the second season of the podcast? Tell Janice what you thought about it now and we just may use your feedback on a future episode

Revolutionary Hoodoo New Orleans Voodoo Secrets and Recipes
Mystery in Motion @ Louisiana State Museum

Revolutionary Hoodoo New Orleans Voodoo Secrets and Recipes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2020 77:00


Monday 23rd November 2020 NOON US CST Mystery in Motion @ Louisiana State Museum @mim_lsm November 22nd 2020 African American Mardi Gras traditions are infused with spiritual elements. Moderator @vazdeville  discusses the spiritual side of Mardi Gras with Peteh Haroon, @TheDivinePrince, and Shaka Zulu @WordsandMusicNO  #spirituality #voodoo #nationofislam #orisha Voodoo is NOT witchcraft! Voodoo is stronger than witchcraft! Ancestors are more POWERFUL than witchcraft! Revolutionary Hoodoo New Orleans Voodoo Secrets and Recipes Psychics can predict But Revolutionary Hoodoo New Orleans Voodoo Secrets and Recipes gets Results! Blog Talk Radio! Host | Member since Dec 23, 2008 ATR Spirituality and Religion from a Pan African Hoodoo World Spiritualist perspective. LIVE at NOON DAILY! (Weekdays) Listen in and Call in (And ALWAYS In-Archive at Your Leisure and Convenience) https://www.blogtalkradio.com/the-divine-prince/   All is a Blessing! #RespectTheVoodoo

Cygnal Pulse Podcast
Bo Staples - Pulse Pod #13

Cygnal Pulse Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2020 21:19


This week on the Cygnal Pulse Pod (Ep. 13), Brent Buchanan and Chris Kratzer begin by discussing what issue work looks like for lobbyists as they may not be allowed in the building to meet with legislators in the same way they have before. Polling can be the key to “get in the door.” This week’s guest is Bo Staples, Director of Political Action Committees and Governmental Reform for the Louisiana Association of Business and Industry (LABI). Bo got his feet wet in politics during his time at LSU when he became a member of the student government. He found his passion and switched majors from pre-med to political science. Bo has been a part of Louisiana State politics for over 13 years and jokes that he now has 230 elected bosses.

William Wallis For America
Bob Owen Louisiana State Representative, District 76

William Wallis For America

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2020 31:25


State Rep Bob Owen has a great idea to solve some flooding issues that would have been perfect for this Hurricane to protect every parish that shares Lake Ponchatrain. His idea is well worth listening to and he has some other great thoughts, stories, and ideas to share in this interview. Please share the video, comment, and "like" my page William Wallis For America If you would like to see more intviews please "subscribe" to my you Tube Channel "William Wallis For America." And if you prefer listening to them... you can find me at the same on your favorite podcast player. Bob Owen Louisiana State Representative, District 76

Don't Be Pressed
4.5 In The News: Louisiana State Troopers murder Ronald Greene, Fenty Fashion show was ICONIC, Trump and Melania get COVID-19

Don't Be Pressed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2020 26:18


How do police officers get away with murder? They kill a black person. How do those sworn to serve and protect cover up a murder? They murder a black person. Before you begin to tell us that you’re tired of the same message, please for a second consider how tired we are of receiving the same message that our lives don’t matter. The ladies discuss on this episode the tragic murder of Ronald Greene today, as well as Rihanna’s ability to out shine competitors like Victoria Secret through her Savage x Fenty Vol. II show, and much more. Tune in to hear more!Rest in Peace Ronald Greene, Jonathan Price, and other victims of police brutality we learned of this week. AND are you registered to vote? Use this link to REGISTER TO VOTE: https://www.vote411.org/register?gclid=Cj0KCQjw7sz6BRDYARIsAPHzrNI65-LtHKTKvVlFYQK5VtAQ-H4_3du5KDaPh-1EYGFcIiJHrIheSlsaArpcEALw_wcBThis season we are applying that PRESSure (pressure) on ourselves and for our listeners. We will be applying pressure by insinuating a challenge we ask that our listeners do to improve themselves. Here is this week's challenge: Challenge yourself to try a new piece of clothing, style or outfit this week! Step out of your comfort zone and expand your wardrobe.NEW MERCH: NOT Pressed Dad hats are now available. You can purchase them on our website at dontbepressedpodcast.com. CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE: dontbepressedpodcast.com To send us your questions, stories or anything you’re pressed about, email us at DontBePressed@gmail.com. And be sure to follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter @DontBePressedPod. Personal IG pages:@devvbee@morgan_alyeve If you'd like us to promote you during an ad break all info can be found on our website dontbepressedpodcast.com

Rico Dukes Theyfeartruth Show
Louisiana State police homicide division ready to file charges in regards to the U.S. government murder contract that was upon Rico D

Rico Dukes Theyfeartruth Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2020 5:30


The Louisiana State police homicide division contacted Rico Dukes in regards to the government murder contract that left Rico Shot nine times on November 26 2010 and claim the life of George Calvin Lee jr on August 10 2018 both incidents occurred in Shreveport Louisiana that Tavara Lee played such great roles in

William Wallis For America
Daryl Deshotel, Louisiana State Representative District 28

William Wallis For America

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2020 13:36


One of the best ways to get involved and protect our communities, improve our State, and save our Country is to get to know our elected officials, especially the good ones. Here is someone doing positive things for the State of Louisiana ....... Daryl Deshotel isn't a politician, unless you count being president of his 4-H in the sixth grade. As a fourth-generation Avoyelles native, Daryl grew up working in the sweet potato fields on his uncle's farm. he knows what it means to work hard for a living. ...... Read more about him at his Facebook Page @DarylDeshotelForStateRep

The Church Politics Podcast
CP | Whole Life Politics, An interview with Louisiana State Sen. Katrina Jackson

The Church Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2020 46:20


 In this episode, Erika Collier, member of AND Campaign's Leadership Council, talks with State Senator Katrina Jackson about her life in politics, and why she advances a whole life platform.

Biz Talks
Episode 12: Louisiana State Treasurer John Schroder talks Main Street Recovery, challenges facing Louisianians

Biz Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2020 37:11


Our guest on this week's podcast is Louisiana State Treasurer John Schroder, who talks about Main Street Recovery, a new state program that will offer grants of up to $15,000 to reimburse businesses for pandemic-related expenses. Schroder also discusses the many potential challenges facing Louisianians in the months ahead as the state tries to recover from the economic effects of the coronavirus pandemic.

William Wallis For America
Gregory A. Miller. Louisiana State Representative, district 56

William Wallis For America

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2020 12:58


Louisiana State Representative Gregory A. Miller represents District 56 which is based in Norco and St. Rose.... In this interview he discusses his thoughts and ideas for his district and Louisiana.

William Wallis For America
C Travis Johnson, Louisiana State Representative, District 21

William Wallis For America

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2020 20:52


In this interview Travis talks about an area of Louisiana that many people don't think about visiting too much.  He does a great job representing the people in his district and promoting all the great things there are about his district.  He is State Representative for the 21st Legislative District. Parishes: Concordia, Catahoula, Madison, Tensas and East Carrol.

Louisiana Anthology Podcast
372. Antoine Pierce for Senate, Part 2.

Louisiana Anthology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2020


372. Part 2 of our interview with Antoine Pierce. Antoine is a Democrat who is running for U.S. Senate in Louisiana to defeat Bill Cassidy and get to work fighting for the working poor and strengthening the middle class. Antoine is running against Bill Cassidy. He's a lifelong resident of Baton Rouge. Since his teen years, he has been a dedicated servant of his community. As one of seven children, Antoine grew up in a lower middle class home filled with love, wholesome Christian values, and an emphasis on the importance of education that as a parent he upholds today. His modest upbringing inspired him to obtain his education from Louisiana State University where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Child and Family Studies and a Master of Public Administration with a concentration in Public Policy. His entrepreneurial spirit and desire to give back to his community inspired him to establish Better Boys Initiative, Inc., a nonprofit organization that uses the arts to develop character and bolster self esteem among minority and under served young men throughout Baton Rouge. This week in Louisiana history. July 3, 1870. The riverboat Robert E. Lee defeated the Natchez in a race on the Mississippi. This week in New Orleans history. July 4, 1917. The Classical Greek-styled Popp Bandstand was dedicated in City Park, New Orleans. This week in Louisiana. Baton Rouge July 4th Celebrations 305 S River Rd Baton Rouge LA 70802 Website In Baton Rouge, the historic battleship USS KIDD is the setting for a one-of-a-kind experience on July 4th. Take a tour of the destroyer and enjoy face painting, inflatables, obstacle courses and concessions at the Fourth of July Spectacular. The downtown evening concludes with our biggest fireworks display in the state over the Mississippi River at 9 p.m. Revelers can also head south to L'Auberge Casino and Hotel Baton Rouge for a pool party and more fireworks over the Mississippi.  Learn more about Independence Day events in Baton Rouge. Postcards from Louisiana. Glen David Andrews.Listen on iTunesListen on StitcherListen on Google Play.Listen on Spotify.Listen on TuneIn.The Louisiana Anthology Home Page.Like us on Facebook.

Louisiana Anthology Podcast
371. Antoine Pierce for Senate, Part 1

Louisiana Anthology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2020


371. Part 1 of our interview with Antoine Pierce. Antoine is a Democrat who is running for U.S. Senate in Louisiana to defeat Bill Cassidy and get to work fighting for the working poor and strengthening the middle class. Antoine is running against Bill Cassidy. He's a lifelong resident of Baton Rouge. Since his teen years, he has been a dedicated servant of his community. As one of seven children, Antoine grew up in a lower middle class home filled with love, wholesome Christian values, and an emphasis on the importance of education that as a parent he upholds today. His modest upbringing inspired him to obtain his education from Louisiana State University where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Child and Family Studies and a Master of Public Administration with a concentration in Public Policy. His entrepreneurial spirit and desire to give back to his community inspired him to establish Better Boys Initiative, Inc., a nonprofit organization that uses the arts to develop character and bolster self esteem among minority and under served young men throughout Baton Rouge. This week in Louisiana history. June 29, 1763. D'Abbadie becomes governor following Kerlerec. This week in New Orleans history. New Orleans guitar player Camile Baudoin, born June 27, 1948, was a founding member of The Radiators band. This week in Louisiana. Essence Festival of Culture Various locations New Orleans July 1-5, 2020 Website Join us for the World’s Largest Cultural, Entertainment and Empowerment Experience Enjoy concerts with Janet Jackson, Bruno Mars, and others. There are also cooking demonstrations, food vendors, after hours events, conferences, and keynote speakers. Postcards from Louisiana. Songs of the Nightingale.Listen on iTunesListen on StitcherListen on Google Play.Listen on Spotify.Listen on TuneIn.The Louisiana Anthology Home Page.Like us on Facebook.

William Wallis For America
Mary DuBuisson, Louisiana State Representative, District 90

William Wallis For America

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2020 16:59


Mary DuBuisson is a former business owner, community volunteer, and longtime Legislative Assistant to Rep. Greg Cromer. With more than 35 years experience in the Slidell and Pearl River communities and nearly a decade of engagement with Legislature and state agencies, she is uniquely qualified to fill the District 90 House vacancy and begin working for us in Baton Rouge. A wife, mother and grandmother, she shares our priorities for public safety, flood protection and education, and reflects the values of our community. Ask Mary and she will tell you “ Lower taxes, less government, essential services and public safety are what I'm about.”

William Wallis For America
Pat Connick, Louisiana State Senate, 8th District

William Wallis For America

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2020 21:01


A man that cares about his community, John Patrick Connick, is an American attorney from Marrero, Louisiana. A Republican, Connick has represented the 8th district in the Louisiana State Senate since 2020. He previously represented the 84th district in the Louisiana House of Representatives from 2008 until 2020.  In this podcast, he talks about his district and his passion to help people and his community.

William Wallis For America
Blake Miguez, Louisiana State Representative District 49

William Wallis For America

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2020 26:37


Blake Miguez, Louisiana State Representative District 49.  He is a strong Conservative minded Republican that strongly supports the Second Amendment.  He graduated from Catholic High School, New Iberia in 1999. Miguez earned a degree in political science from Louisiana State University in 2004 and a law degree from the Southern University Law Center in 2008. Miguez's career experience includes working as an executive with the oil and gas industry.  

William Wallis For America
John Schroder, Louisiana State Treasurer

William Wallis For America

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2020 40:07


Just a great interview with an elected official that is doing a great job for the people of Louisiana and what the Treasurer does.

Handsome Genius Club Radio Show
Monday 20 April 2020 | The evildoings of Pastor Tony Spell, Diamond Comic Distributors monopoly is broken

Handsome Genius Club Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2020 0:28


Paster Tony Spell has been ignoring Louisiana State’s orders to end services at his Baton Rouge megachurch and now karma is starting to bite his parishioners in the butt. Plus, DC Comics has signed with two brand new comic distribution companies, effectively ending Diamond Comics stranglehold on the North American market. Will other companies follow […]

It's Baton Rouge: Out to Lunch
Covid Economy: March 31st - April 6th

It's Baton Rouge: Out to Lunch

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2020 39:00


It's the second week of Out to Lunch Baton Rouge's host Stephanie Riegel's link-up with Out to Lunch Acadiana host Christiaan Mader and New Orleans Out to Lunch host Peter Ricchiuti for a statewide look at our business and financial life in Louisiana in what has become this unprecedented Covid Economy. If you live outside of Baton Rouge, and everything you know about the city comes from what you hear or see on the news, you'd be forgiven for thinking that nothing goes on here but politics. That's far from the truth. And it's the reason the slogan of the Baton Rouge Area Chamber is, “There's more to Baton Rouge than you might think.” For starters, there are over 1,500 businesses and organizations that are members of the Chamber. The function of the Chamber is to support those member-businesses, help them grow, and to make Baton Rouge such a great place to do business that other people will be attracted to start or move companies here. But, what does a Chamber of Commerce do when there is no commerce? Stephanie puts that question to the President and CEO of the Baton Rouge Area Chamber, Adam Knapp. Covid Economy Acadiana In Acadiana, Lafayette is often referred to as “Hub City.” The reason for that is, Lafayette is the economic hub of the region. The population of Acadania residents who shop in Lafayette, or go there to do business, is about 600,000. Once you figure in the oil and gas industry that pays $800m annually in local wages alone, plus the tech sector, the medical sector, and manufacturing – including one of the biggest jewelry manufacturers in the country - the economic impact of shutting down Lafayette rivals New Orleans and Baton Rouge. Lafayette's version of a Chamber of Commerce is the Lafayette Economic Development Authority, more often referred to by its acronym, LEDA. The President and CEO of LEDA is Gregg Gothreaux. Out to Lunch Acadiana host Christiaan Mader spends a good part of his day reporting on the impacts of Covid 19 in his role as publisher of the local independent news organization The Current. As a result, this conversation between Mader and Gothreaux is particularly insightful and illuminating. New Orleans Unique Covid Economy New Orleans' last total economic collapse wasn't all that long ago. In 2005 Hurricane Katrina brought the city to a standstill. A large part of New Orleans' economic recovery from that shutdown was driven by a Louisiana State initiative, called the Katrina Small Business Recovery Program. That program was headed up by Michael Hecht. Michael is now President and CEO of an organization called Greater New Orleans Inc, a kind of super-charged Chamber of Commerce. Hecht is typically self-deprecating about his role in saving New Orleans after Katrina, but a lot of people credit him personally with saving small business in the city. Once again, we're all looking for someone to tell us what to do to save small business in Louisiana, and beyond. Hecht's advice may, once again, turn out to be invaluable. You can find further discussion about Louisiana's Covid Economy here. Find photos by Jill Lafleur from this show and more information at our website itsbatonrouge.la     See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

It's New Orleans: Out to Lunch
Covid Economy : March 31st - April 6th

It's New Orleans: Out to Lunch

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2020 39:00


It's the second week of Out to Lunch host Peter Ricchiuti linking up with Out to Lunch Acadiana host Christiaan Mader and Out to Lunch Baton Rouge host Stephanie Riegel for a statewide look at our business and financial life in Louisiana in what has become this unprecedented Covid Economy. New Orleans' last total economic collapse wasn't all that long ago. In 2005 Hurricane Katrina brought the city to a standstill. A large part of New Orleans' economic recovery from that shutdown was driven by a Louisiana State initiative, called the Katrina Small Business Recovery Program. That program was headed up by Michael Hecht. Michael is now President and CEO of an organization called Greater New Orleans Inc, a kind of super-charged Chamber of Commerce. Hecht is typically self-deprecating about his role in saving New Orleans after Katrina, but a lot of people credit him personally with saving small business in the city. Once again, we're all looking for someone to tell us what to do to save small business in Louisiana, and beyond. Hecht's advice may agin turn out to be, literally, invaluable. Baton Rouge's Unique Covid Economy If you live outside of Baton Rouge, and everything you know about the city comes from what you hear or see on the news, you'd be forgiven for thinking that nothing goes on here but politics. That's far from the truth. And it's the reason the slogan of the Baton Rouge Area Chamber is, “There's more to Baton Rouge than you might think.” For starters, there are over 1,500 businesses and organizations that are members of the Chamber. The function of the Chamber is to support those member-businesses, help them grow, and to make Baton Rouge such a great place to do business that other people will be attracted to start or move companies here. But, what does a Chamber of Commerce do when there is no commerce? Stephanie puts that question to the President and CEO of the Baton Rouge Area Chamber, Adam Knapp. Covid Economy Acadiana In Acadiana, Lafayette is often referred to as “Hub City.” The reason for that is, Lafayette is the economic hub of the region. The population of Acadania residents who shop in Lafayette, or go there to do business, is about 600,000. Once you figure in the oil and gas industry that pays $800m annually in local wages alone, plus the tech sector, the medical sector, and manufacturing – including one of the biggest jewelry manufacturers in the country - the economic impact of shutting down Lafayette rivals New Orleans and Baton Rouge. Lafayette's version of a Chamber of Commerce is the Lafayette Economic Development Authority, more often referred to by its acronym, LEDA. The President and CEO of LEDA is Gregg Gothreaux. Out to Lunch Acadiana host Christiaan Mader spends a good part of his day reporting on the impacts of Covid 19 in his role as publisher of the local independent news organization The Current. As a result, this conversation between Mader and Gothreaux is particularly insightful and illuminating. You can find further discussion about Louisiana's Covid Economy here. Find photos from this show by Jill Lafleur and more information at our website https://itsneworleans.com/show/out-to-lunch/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

It's Acadiana: Out to Lunch
The Covid Economy: March 31st - April 6th

It's Acadiana: Out to Lunch

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2020 39:00


It's the second week of Out to Lunch Acadiana's host Christiaan Mader's link-up with Out to Lunch New Olreans host Peter Ricchiuti and Out to Lunch Baton Rouge host Stephanie Riegel for a state-wide look at our business and financial life in Louisiana, in what has become this unprecedented Covid Economy. In Acadiana, Lafayette is often referred to as “Hub City.” The reason for that is, Lafayette is the economic hub of the region. The population of Acadania residents who shop in Lafayette, or come here to do business, is about 600,000. Once you figure in the oil and gas industry that pays $800m annually in local wages alone, plus the tech sector, the medical sector, and manufacturing – including one of the biggest jewelry manufacturers in the country - the economic impact of shutting down Lafayette rivals New Orleans and Baton Rouge. Lafayette's version of a Chamber of Commerce is the Lafayette Economic Development Authority, more often referred to by its acronym, LEDA. The President and CEO of LEDA is Gregg Gothreaux. Out to Lunch Acadiana host Christiaan Mader spends a good part of his day reporting on the impacts of Covid 19 in his role as publisher of the local independent news organization The Current. As a result, this conversation between Mader and Gothreaux is particularly insightful and illuminating. New Orleans Troubled Past & Current Covid Economy New Orleans' last total economic collapse wasn't all that long ago. In 2005 Hurricane Katrina brought the city to a standstill. A large part of New Orleans' economic recovery from that shutdown was driven by a Louisiana State initiative, called the Katrina Small Business Recovery Program. That program was headed up by Michael Hecht. Michael is now President and CEO of an organization called Greater New Orleans Inc, a kind of super-charged Chamber of Commerce. Hecht is typically self-deprecating about his role in saving New Orleans after Katrina, but a lot of people credit him personally with saving small business in the city. Once again, we're all looking for someone to tell us what to do to save small business in Louisiana, and beyond. Hecht's advice may agin turn out to be, literally, invaluable. Baton Rouge's Unique Covid Economy If you live outside of Baton Rouge, and everything you know about the city comes from what you hear or see on the news, you'd be forgiven for thinking that nothing goes on here but politics. That's far from the truth. And it's the reason the slogan of the Baton Rouge Area Chamber is, “There's more to Baton Rouge than you might think.” For starters, there are over 1,500 businesses and organizations that are members of the Chamber. The function of the Chamber is to support those member-businesses, help them grow, and to make Baton Rouge such a great place to do business that other people will be attracted to start or move companies here. But, what does a Chamber of Commerce do when there is no commerce? Stephanie puts that question to the President and CEO of the Baton Rouge Area Chamber, Adam Knapp. You can find further discussion about Louisiana's Covid Economy here. Find photos from this show by Jill Lafleur and more information at our website https://itsacadiana.com/show/out-to-lunch/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Tuesday Talk with Key West Lou
Tuesday Talk with Key West Lou

Tuesday Talk with Key West Lou

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 18, 2020 30:00


Tonight; the democratic primaries. I'm tired of it already! Not hitting all the issues. What is happening? Euclid, Ohio police officer exposes himself to school girl. Louisiana State trooper arrested for child ography. I could go on. Judge sentences dying women to 10 months of jail for $3.00 theft. Also, Trump's sacred wall. Taking much needed money from military. Boy Scouts file for bankruptcy, people still struggling in this "great economy", and more! Always an interesting perspective on everyday issues.

Townhall Review | Conservative Commentary On Today's News
Democrats Take Show on the Road in Senate Impeachment Trial

Townhall Review | Conservative Commentary On Today's News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2020 41:00


Townhall Review – January 25, 2020 Hugh Hewitt and Senator Mike Braun, Indiana, talk about how the impeachment effort is all about the upcoming election. Sebastian Gorka talks with Louisiana Congressman Steve Scalise about the President’s impeachment defense team. Chris Stigall and National Review columnist Andrew McCarthy talk about the history of impeachment. Hugh Hewitt and retired Admiral James Stavridis about the outbreak of the coronavirus in China and that country’s effort to contain it. Dennis Prager, cigar aficionado, lauds the Louisiana State football team for celebrating by smoking cigars in the locker room after their victory over Clemson. Mike Gallagher talks with John Lott, author of “The War on Guns,” about the State of Virginia’s efforts at gun control and the recent pro-gun rally in Richmond. Dennis Prager talks with Arizona Senator Martha McSally about her encounter with a CNN “liberal hack.”

It Never Rains: A show about the Oregon Ducks
Juniors Returning & Natty Championship Thoughts

It Never Rains: A show about the Oregon Ducks

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2020 22:53


Save 40% off your first-year subscription to The Athletic by visiting: theathletic.com/itneverrains

Georgian Bay Roots
Georgian Bay Roots Episode #171 January 12, 2020(with Dylan and Lauren))

Georgian Bay Roots

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2020 58:53


1. The Spirited Lads "Culchi Lad 2. Valdy" Turned Down Flat" 3. Junior Brown "Highway Patrol" (Excerpt) 4. Miss Emily "Hold Back the River" 5. Andrew Parkhouse Band "You Find You" 6. Jon Brooks "Standing at the Gates" 7. Saffron A: "The Road and the Radio" 8. JD Edwards" Singing All the Way Home" 9. Roddie Romero: "In a Louisiana State" 10. Justin Burgess "Sattelite" 11. Bob's Vinyl Spins: John Fayhey "Sunflower River Blues" 12. Amanda Rheaume "The Skin I'm In" 13. Our Shotgun Wedding "Hush Now My Love"

Kid Friendly Animal Fun Facts
Animal Fun Fact of the Day - Episode 291 - Louisiana State Tigers

Kid Friendly Animal Fun Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2020 2:47


Facts About Louisiana State Tigers! Credits: Executive Producer: Chris Krimitsos Voice: Jimmy Murray "Winner Winner!" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Louisiana Anthology Podcast
346. Dan Mabry, part 1

Louisiana Anthology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2020


346. Part 1 of our interview with Dan Mabry. About a year ago, Dan started his own podcast in our hometown of Ruston, the Dan Mabry Project. The Idea behind The Dan Mabry Project is "honest conversation, with interesting people". There are no rules here, everyone is welcome, and everyone has a story to tell. I put out a new episode every week!This week in Louisiana history.  January 4, 1830 Louisiana State government moved to Donaldsonville from New Orleans. Donaldsonville was designated as the Louisiana capital (1829–1831),[11] as the result of conflict between the increasing number of Anglo-Americans, who deemed New Orleans "too noisy" and wanted to move the capital closer to their centers of population farther north in the state, and French Creoles, who wanted to keep the capital in a historically-French area (Wikipedia). This week in New Orleans history. January 4, 2006. Hubig's Pie factory reopens post-Katrina. This week in Louisiana. Twelfth Night When: January 6; times of parades vary Where: French Quarter, Uptown What: The first day of the carnival season, known as Twelfth Night or the Epiphany, will kick off yet again with three parades. Phunny Phorty Phellows will ride the streetcar from Uptown to Canal Street and back starting at 7 p.m. The beloved walking Krewe of Joan of Arc parade will roll in at 7 p.m. from Jax Brewery in the French Quarter, and the Société Des Champs Elysée parade, will take place starting at 7:30 p.m. on N. Rampart Street and Esplanade, going to the CBD. Like last year, it will be following the N. Rampart/St. Claude streetcar route. Postcards from Louisiana. Stevie 'typewritergypsy' writes me the poem “Midnight Jazz on Royal Street with ET.”Listen on iTunesListen on StitcherListen on Google Play.Listen on Spotify.Listen on TuneIn.The Louisiana Anthology Home Page.Like us on Facebook. 

Bloomberg Business of Sports
Patriots Go Down as NFL Owners Ready for Playoff Push

Bloomberg Business of Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2019 14:50


Scott Soshnick and Michael Barr discuss a host of issues related to the business of sports, including the final weekend of the National Football League’s regular season. The New England Patriots loss to the Miami Dolphins means their Super Bowl title defense will begin on wild-card weekend. And San Francisco’s win over Seattle gives the 49ers home-field advantage throughout the NFC playoffs. Also discussed is the college football championship game between Clemson and Louisiana State. Surprisingly, Clemson makes far less money than the other teams that qualified for the playoff -- LSU, Ohio State and Oklahoma. There are a number of reasons for the shortfall, including ticket sales, media money and higher expenses. The title game in New Orleans features two star quarterbacks: Joe Burrow at LSU and Trevor Lawrence of Clemson. Also discussed is whether Lawrence should play next season and risk injury or sit out and prepare for the 2021 NFL draft.

15 Minute U
S4 E25: 2019 College Football Playoff Semi-final Preview

15 Minute U

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2019 22:24


Ladies and gentlemen! Welcome to the 2019 college football playoff podcast preview with the official sponsor of your morning commute. Join Evan and Matt as they deep dive the first round of the college football playoff. Each game features

American Ground Radio
Robert Mills, Candidate for Louisiana State Senate District 36

American Ground Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2019 7:58


Stephen Parr and Louis Avallone talk to Robert Mills about his candidacy for Louisiana State Senate District 36.

American Ground Radio
Robert Mills, Candidate for Louisiana State Senate District 36

American Ground Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2019 7:58


Stephen Parr and Louis Avallone talk to Robert Mills about his candidacy for Louisiana State Senate District 36.

American Ground Radio
Louisiana State Senator Ryan Gatti On the Phone

American Ground Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2019 7:38


Stephen Parr and Louis Avallone talk to Louisiana State Senator Ryan Gatti, the current State Senator District 36. This runoff race is a very dirty race between two Republicans. Louis and Stephen are giving Senator Gatti a chance to explain his positions. Tomorrow, they will have his opponent, Robert Mills, on to explain his side.

American Ground Radio
Louisiana State Senator Ryan Gatti On the Phone

American Ground Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2019 7:38


Stephen Parr and Louis Avallone talk to Louisiana State Senator Ryan Gatti, the current State Senator District 36. This runoff race is a very dirty race between two Republicans. Louis and Stephen are giving Senator Gatti a chance to explain his positions. Tomorrow, they will have his opponent, Robert Mills, on to explain his side.

Athlètes-Entrepreneurs avec Amélie Delobel
L’importance de se diversifier selon Shaquille O’Neal | E027

Athlètes-Entrepreneurs avec Amélie Delobel

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2019 7:43


Bonjour à tous! Ici votre hôtesse Amélie Delobel et je suis très heureuse de vous accueillir sur mon podcast Athlètes-Entrepreneurs pour cet épisode #027. Athlètes-Entrepreneurs est un podcast qui a pour but de motiver les athlètes ou anciens athlètes qui souhaitent se lancer en affaires.  Pour cet épisode, j’ai décidé de vous en apprendre un peu plus sur Shaquille O’Neal, non seulement un des plus imposants joueurs de basketball de l’histoire, mais aussi un homme d’affaires qui a appris de ses erreurs de jeunesse. Sans plus attendre, voici l'importance de se diversifier selon Shaquille O’Neal . Bonne écoute! L'importance de se diversifier selon Shaquille O’Neal Une carrière bien remplie Celui qui a évolué avec Louisiana State lors de son parcours universitaire a été le tout premier choix de la séance de repêchage de 1992 par le Magic d’Orlando. Le grand gaillard de 7’1’’ et 325 livres a disputé quatre saisons en Floride avant d’aboutir avec les Lakers à Los Angeles. Avec le Magic, il aura été nommé recrue de l’année en 1993 et aura aidé à amener les siens en grande finale en 1995, baissant toutefois pavillon face aux Rockets de Houston. Il se reprendra trois fois plutôt qu’une avec les Lakers, remportant trois sacres consécutifs en 2000, 2001 et 2002. Avec Kobe Bryant, ils formeront l’un des duos électrisants de la NBA. En 2000, il devient seulement le troisième joueur de l’histoire a remporté le titre de MVP (joueur le plus utile) de la saison régulière, du match des étoiles ainsi que de la finale depuis Michael Jordan en 1998. Willis Reed, avec les Knicks de New-York, est l’autre qui a réalisé l’exploit en 1970.  Plusieurs changements d'adresse Cependant, O’Neal est échangé au Heat de Miami en 2004. Avec le Heat et Dwayne Wade, Shaq remporte un quatrième et dernier titre en 2006 pour ajouter à sa collection. Il est échangé aux Suns de Phoenix en février 2009 avant d’être de nouveau échangé, cette fois, aux Cavaliers de Cleveland pour la saison 2009-2010. Le centre a conclu sa carrière au terme de la campagne 2010-2011 dans l’uniforme des Celtics de Boston. L’athlète originaire de Newark, au New Jersey, a vu son numéro 34 être retiré par les Lakers ainsi que son numéro 32 par le Heat de Miami. Il a été introduit au Temple de la renommée du basketball en 2016, lui qui a enregistré plus de 28 000 points, 13 000 rebonds et 2 700 tirs bloqués au cours de sa carrière. L’importance de gérer son argent comme athlète Shaquille O’Neal est aujourd’hui un homme d’affaires réputé, mais il n’a pas toujours eu des histoires d’amour avec l’argent. En effet, O’Neal a avoué il y a quelques années que lors de la signature de son tout contrat de commandites de cartes de basketball estimé à un million de dollars américains, qu’il avait réussi à le dépenser en 30 minutes!  Dès qu’il a apposé la signature au bas de son contrat, il a expliqué qu’il avait été s’acheter une Mercedes puisque d’où il vient, si tu te promenais en Mercedes noire, c’est que tu avais réussi dans la vie.  Voyant cela, son père lui en a demandé une exactement pareille comme lui estimée à 150 000$US. Sa mère aussi voulait sa Mercedes, alors il lui en a acheté une également. L’Américain en a profité pour acheter des bijoux et comme le repêchage arrivait à grands pas, il a également acheté des habits pour être prêt pour ce grand jour.  Dès le lendemain, il a eu une discussion avec le directeur de la banque qui lui expliquait qu’il devait apprendre à gérer son argent, car il en avait vu des professionnels qui n’avaient plus un sou à la fin de leur carrière.  Par la suite, Shaq s’est inspiré de cette citation de l’ancien président américain Dwight Eisenhower pour la suite de sa carrière qui va comme suit: «Les grands leaders sont ceux qui sont assez intelligents pour s’entourer de personnes plus intelligentes qu’eux».  L’importance de l’éducation Il était important pour Shaq d’obtenir son diplôme puisqu’il l’avait promis à sa mère,

Candidate's Corner
Candidates' Corner: Louisiana State Elections Part 4

Candidate's Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2019 25:38


In this episode Miles speaks with Carling Dinkler, candidate for Louisiana's 91st State Legislative District Representative. Elections are October 12, 2019. GEAUX VOTE!

Candidate's Corner
Candidates' Corner: Louisiana State Elections Part 3

Candidate's Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2019 32:15


In this episode Miles speaks with James Simmons, candidate for Louisiana's 83rd legislative district. Louisiana state elections are October 12, 2019. GEAUX VOTE!

Candidate's Corner
Candidates' Corner: Louisiana State Elections Part 2

Candidate's Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2019 32:25


In this episode Miles speaks with Jameel Shaheer, candidate for Louisiana's 99th Legislative District. Elections are October 12, 2019. GEAUX VOTE!

Candidate's Corner
Candidates' Corner: Louisiana State Elections Part 1

Candidate's Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2019 21:10


In this episode Miles speaks with Cammie Maturin, candidate for Louisiana's 96th District Representative in the state's legislature. Elections will take place on October 12, 2019. GEAUX VOTE!

The Actors Lounge
Jane Drake Brody- Master Teacher, Coach & Author, Talks About The Art Of Acting & The Business Of Acting

The Actors Lounge

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2019 73:17


Jane Drake Brody's achievements encompass a life of dealing with the Art, Science and Business of Acting. From directing (and costuming) Bye Bye, Birdie! at age sixteen in high school, to the recent publication of two landmark books; "The Actor's Business Plan" and "Acting, Archetype and Neuroscience", she has literally transformed the lives and careers of thousands of actors. After working as an actor, agent, director, costumer, and producer, her life's journey took a determined step forward when she studied with and served as assistant to Michael Shurtleff, author of the precedent-setting actor's bible, Audition. That relationship brought about the founding of Acting Studio Chicago (neè The Audition Centre) in 1981 and PR Casting (neè Jane Brody Casting) in 1984. Leaving those thriving enterprises in the late 90s, she earned her MFA while teaching at Illinois State University. She then headed up Undergraduate Acting at Louisiana State followed by teaching undergrads and grads at DePaul's Theatre School Conservatory. Along the way she has been an actor in film, TV and commercials, won awards for casting (Casting Society of America for Fargo) and acting (LA Weekly's Best Actress Award for Absent Friends). Now, despite her “retirement” she continues to teach workshops, classes and private coaching based on her scrutiny of existing acting theory merged with her innovative research into neuroscience and archetype. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theactorslounge/support

Tractor Talk
The One And Only

Tractor Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2019 31:21


On this episode I sat down with Louisiana State’s Vice-President representing Area II to talk about her time as a state officer.

Club Wealth TV
How to Stay in Contact with Your Database w/Josh Anderson

Club Wealth TV

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2019 47:41


After a transaction is complete, it’s often difficult to stay in touch with past clients. How can you keep fostering the relationships you’ve built? What platforms should you be using to make sure your referrals count? On this episode, US Veteran and Nashville’s most trusted Realtor, Josh Anderson shares his advice on staying in contact with your database.      Three Things We Learned From This Episode Host regular client events Once a transaction is complete, it can feel awkward for an agent to stay in contact with past clients, especially over the phone. The best way to stop this interaction from being uncomfortable, is by offering your database value. By contacting past clients to invite them to client appreciation events a few times throughout the year, you have something of value to offer.   Time block You can have the best database in the world, but if you’re not time blocking, you won’t be able to take advantage of it. Set up specific times to do each activity during the day. It doesn’t help to be out of the office with clients all morning if it means it will hinder your routine.   Ask for reviews A lot of referral sites require users to set up profiles to see client testimonials. This stops many prospective clients from seeing your reviews. Rather than relying on these sites, ask your database to leave you a Google review. Everyone has access to Google, and it’s an easy tool to use. Aim to get these reviews from around 60% of your interactions, and don’t be afraid to ask for them throughout the process.    Staying in contact with past clients is one of the best ways to build a strong database. Make sure that while you’re in contact with your database, you’re offering as much value as you can. Host client appreciation days and offer assistance when needed. Just remember to run your operations like a business, and be sure to set aside the time needed.    Guest Bio Originally from Nashville, Josh graduated from Louisiana State University in International Trade and Finance. Josh served 8 years in the U.S. Army, including a 10-month stint in Bagram, Afghanistan, during Operation Enduring Freedom. These experiences, coupled with the education he received from Louisiana State, have molded him into a focused, disciplined, and strong willed individual. Josh Anderson can best be described as a man of high energy with a passion for Nashville real estate. He is a business savvy professional with a strong desire to cater to his clients' particular needs. Client satisfaction is paramount! Josh's market expertise coupled with his superior negotiating skills set him apart from the rest.   To find out more about Josh, head to: http://www.joshandersonrealestate.com/  And https://www.linkedin.com/in/nashvillesrealtor/

The Entrepreneur Way
1203: Figuring out What People Have Done Before You with Josh Anderson Founder and Owner of The Anderson Group Real Estate Services

The Entrepreneur Way

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2019 49:36


Originally from Nashville, Josh Anderson graduated from Louisiana State University in International Trade and Finance. Josh served 8 years in the U.S. Army, including a 10-month stint in Bagram, Afghanistan, during Operation Enduring Freedom. These experiences, coupled with the education he received from Louisiana State, have molded him into a focused, disciplined, and strong willed individual. Josh Anderson can best be described as a man of high energy with a passion for Nashville real estate. He is a business savvy professional with a strong desire to cater to his clients' particular needs. Client satisfaction is paramount! Josh's market expertise coupled with his superior negotiating skills set him apart from the rest. “just show up, that's half the battle, just show up. You can't get intimidated by people that are more successful. It's just show up. The other piece that goes along with showing up is… A lot of what I do is basic things, I just do basic very consistently. So, it's kind of consistent persistence. So, I just do the same thing every day and it's worked for me for the last going on 13 years now. So, show up, stick your hand out shake hands with people, introduce yourself. Everybody puts their pants on the same way regardless of how successful or how much money they have. You put your pants on one leg it is time… Find a mentor, find and industry expert and pick their brain as much as possible. Don't worry and invent the wheel… There is no reason to reinvent the wheel. You can put your own spin on things but don't reinvent the entire wheel.”…[Listen for More] Click Here for Show Notes To Listen or to Get the Show Notes go to https://wp.me/p6Tf4b-70g

SBC This Week
Horn Elected as Louisiana State Exec.; Yeats to be Nominated for 23rd Term as Recording Secretary

SBC This Week

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2019 31:28


Louisiana has elected a new state executive director, and another nomination was announced this week for the SBC Annual Meeting.

Prep Baseball Report
The Rode Show Podcast: Bobby Witt On A Tear; Big College Talent Weekend

Prep Baseball Report

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2019 42:42


Nathan Rode and Shooter Hunt talk Bobby Witt Jr.'s stats to start the spring season, plus some pop-up names in different parts of the country. David Seifert then joins them to talk about his eventful weekend seeing Florida, Vanderbilt, Georgia and Louisiana State.

SportsTalkLine
Interview with Louisiana State Edge Jaylon Ferguson

SportsTalkLine

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2019 20:33


SportsTalkLine NFL Draft Talk NFL Draft 2019 - Edge Jaylon Ferguson Louisana Tech Edge Rusher Jaylon Ferguson took time out of his preparation for the 2019 NFL Draft to talk with Connor Livesay. Jaylon Ferguson has all the tools to be the NFL's next elite pass rusher. From his extremely developed hand technique to his upper body strength and lower body explosion, Ferguson has it all. "… I'm going to keep going till I win .. " - Edge Jaylon Ferguson Played both from a two-point and three-point stance, and rushed from both the left and right side. Production was off the charts at Louisiana Tech. Take moment and get up close with the man, Jaylon Ferguson. "I am a dynamic pass rusher." - Jaylon Ferguson on what NFL Teams will get This is a team first guy who can get after the QB and is one of the best in the nation at it. Livesay keeps it real, puts things in perspective and gives you an "up close" picture of a "top NFL Draft Prospect" for 2019. STL NFL Draft Talk with EDGE Jaylon Ferguson SportsTalkLine Podcast Connor Livesay Check back for more conversations from the SportsTalkLine.com network. #ConnorLivesay #NFL #NFLDraft #JaylonFerguson

Reality Check with Ben Swann
Reality Check Louisiana State Convention proves Liberty Movement Is A Force

Reality Check with Ben Swann

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2018 4:05


Inside the Headset with the AFCA
Joshua Eargle, Offensive Coordinator - Austin Peay State University

Inside the Headset with the AFCA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2018 35:36


On this week’s episode of Inside the Headset we speak with Joshua Eargle, Offensive Coordinator and Offensive Line Coach for Austin Peay State University. We discuss his diverse coaching background, the importance of establishing a winning program culture, the turnaround at Austin Peay, and how he balances coaching and family. Coach Eargle began his career as a graduate assistant at the University of Southern Mississippi (2003-2004) before getting his first full-time position at Ouachita Baptist as an offensive line coach and recruiting coordinator (2005). He returned to Southern Mississippi as an assistant offensive line coach (2006) before coaching the offensive line at Nicholls State (2007-2008) and Louisiana State (2009), and he was named the offensive coordinator at Arkansas-Monticello in 2010. Eargle crossed over to the other side of the ball when he accepted a defensive coordinator position at Hallsville HS (TX) in 2011 and served in the same position at Southeastern Oklahoma State in 2012. In 2013, he was named the head coach at East Texas Baptist and helped lead a turnaround that culminated with a conference championship in 2015. Eargle joined the staff at Austin Peay in 2016 as the offensive line coach and was promoted to offensive coordinator during the 2018 season. [1:24] Start of interview [1:36] Diverse coaching background [3:33] Advantages of being on both sides of the ball [6:55] Defensive success at Southeastern Oklahoma State [8:16] Establishing a winning culture [11:45] Confidence to hire Coach Scotty Walden [14:13] Snapping Austin Peay’s 29-game losing streak [18:31] The turnaround at APSU [21:29] Seniors’ roles in changing the culture of APSU [27:05] Happy wife, happy life You can follow Joshua Eargle on Twitter. A GoFundMe page was started in August 2018 to help his family with medical bills for his daughter Landrey, and you can read more about her story on Kristen Eargle’s blog. Have any questions, comments, or ideas for the show? Send us an email at podcast@afca.com. 

Military History Inside Out
WWII Holocaust history book – “You’ve Got to Tell Them” (Louisiana State Press, 2018) – Charles Potter interview

Military History Inside Out

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2018 63:07


Charles Potter studied Medieval literature, worked in radio production and has recorded many audio books. When he retired to France to teach he came across a memoir about Auschwitz which he ended up translating. We spoke about the book. 1:07 – Charles talks about how he got into translating this work. He was born during…

Prep Period: Ventura County high school sports podcast
Prep Period: Cole Tracy to the Bayou

Prep Period: Ventura County high school sports podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2018 27:37


Joe Curley speaks to Cole Tracy (Camarillo/Newbury Park High), the winner of the 2017 Fred Mitchell Award as the top college placekicker from beyond FBS, on how he moved from Division 2 Assumption College in central Massachusetts to SEC country at Louisiana State. Also, Ventura Orthopedic Athletes of the Week are announced from Newbury Park High and Oaks Christian School.

Golf's Next Wave
Ep. 16: Sam Burns on playing with Tiger Woods at The Honda Classic

Golf's Next Wave

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2018 28:42


Kevin Prise and Matt Cochran visit with Louisiana State alum Sam Burns to discuss his final-round 68 at The Honda Classic playing alongside Tiger Woods, his connection with Buffalo Bills defensive stalwart Kyle Williams, acclimating to his first full season as a professional golfer and more.

Dueling Dialogues
Dueling Dialogues Ep. 30 - Clinton Dossier and Russian Uranium One

Dueling Dialogues

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2017 24:54


On today's show: Clinton Dossier and Russian Uranium One Deal. Clinton's fund the Dossier connecting Trump to Russia along with another republican, John McCain. Comey also gave dossier to Obama and Trump as if it was truth. Lots of illegal activity involved. Mueller was assigned to dossier. John and Tony Podesta's connection to Russia and Uranium One. Paul Manafort starts the investigation but he formerly worked for Podesta. Putin controlling countries in EU by controlling energy/utilities. His past motives fit the uranium deal. FBI informant gagged previously, says he will be testifying. Maybe the Iran uranium deal connected to Russian uranium deal? Breaking news: NBC suspends Mark Halperin for sex assault accusations from five women. Alzheimer's vaccine soon to be available. GM self-driving cars available soon for before market vehicles. GM's stock is rising. Trump authorized deep vetting of refugees entering US from 11 countries. House barely passed the budget. State tax deductions being eliminated. IRS boss, John Koskinen, fired by Trump for targeting tea party and conservative groups. UN Ambassador Nikki Haley evacuated from South Sudan camp. Vegas Shooter's brother arrested for child porn. Fats Domino dead at 89. Louisiana State shooting leaves 2 dead. Trump's war on opiates, public health emergency, not a national state of emergency. Melania speaks up on opiates addiction. 01:40 On today's show: Clinton Dossier and Russian Uranium One Deal 02:20 Clinton's fund the Dossier connecting Trump to Russia along with another republican, John McCain. 03:00 Comey also gave dossier to Obama and Trump as if it was truth. Lots of illegal activity involved. 05:05 Mueller was assigned to dossier. 05:50 John and Tony Podesta's connection to Russia and Uranium One. 07:00 Paul Manafort starts the investigation but he formerly worked for Podesta. 08:10 Putin controlling countries in EU by controlling energy/utilities. His past motives fit the uranium deal. 09:05 FBI informant gagged previously, says he will be testifying. 09:40 Maybe the Iran uranium deal connected to Russian uranium deal? 11:35 Breaking news: NBC suspends Mark Halperin for sex assault accusations from five women. 12:45 Alzheimer's vaccine soon to be available. 14:00 GM self-driving cars available soon for before market vehicles. GM's stock is rising. 15:05 Trump authorized deep vetting of refugees entering US from 11 countries. 16:40 House barely passed the budget. State tax deductions being eliminated. 17:55 IRS boss, John Koskinen, fired by Trump for targeting tea party and conservative groups. 18:20 UN Ambassador Nikki Haley evacuated from South Sudan camp. 18:45 Vegas Shooter's brother arrested for child porn. 19:00 Fats Domino dead at 89. 19:10 Louisiana State shooting leaves 2 dead. 19:25 Trump's war on opiates, public health emergency, not a national state of emergency. 21:45 Melania speaks up on opiates addiction. For a list of source links, visit http://therightleftchronicles.com/podcasts/882/dueling-dialogues-podcast-ep-30/

Path to Mastery
81. Josh Anderson: How The Team Closed 88 Million Volume with 259 Sides While Being Bored!

Path to Mastery

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2017 42:15


Josh Anderson - The Anderson Group Nashville TN   259 Closed units and 88 million volume in 2016. [Interview begins at 04:01] "Many agents confuse the difference between lead generation and lead follow up." Josh  We have to learn to be OK with the boredom of success.   STEPS TO SUCCESS WITH A TEAM  Consistent time block  Show up daily  Be 1st in and last out  Master follow up  Keep in touch with your SOI Do what your passionate about  Keep a perfect schedule  Subscribe to the Podcast in iTunes About Josh: Josh Anderson can best be described as a man of high energy with a passion for real estate. He is a business savvy professional with a strong desire to cater to his clients’ particular needs. Client satisfaction is paramount! Josh’s market expertise coupled with his superior negotiating skills set. 

For his buyer clients, Josh takes a keen interest in finding not only the ideal property but, more importantly, a property that proves to be priced fairly, with minimal risk, and optimal return on investment. With the most comprehensive resources, services, and solutions available to make every transition as seamless as possible, Josh continues to provide assistance after the sale is closed. 

 Originally from Nashville, Josh graduated from Louisiana State University in International Trade and Finance. Josh served 8 years in the U.S. Army, including a 10-month stint in Bagram, Afghanistan during Operation Enduring Freedom. These experiences, coupled with the education he received from Louisiana State, have molded him into a focused, disciplined, and strong willed. 
Whether buying or selling, Josh provides you with the special attention one expects of a dedicated real estate professional whose top priority is protecting the interests of the most discerning clients. Clients praise him often for his enthusiasm, patient approach, and unwavering loyalty. http://davidihill.com/affiliates    http://thesalesplaybook.net 

Coordinators' Corner
Live from JCW's: Louisiana State Week

Coordinators' Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2017 48:47


BYU football coordinators Ty Detmer, Ilaisa Tuiaki, and Ed Lamb visit with Greg Wrubell live from JCW's in Provo, Utah.

Old Dominion Libertarian Radio Network
Joe Little For Louisiana State Treasurer

Old Dominion Libertarian Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 27, 2017 81:00


Join Joe Enroughty, Jeff Kleb, Jeffry Sanford, and Andy Craig at 7 PM Eastern on Monday, March 27th, 2017, as they welcome Joe Little to the program.  Joe is running as a Libertarian for Louisiana State Treasurer and will join us to discuss his campaign.  We'll find out what's going on down in Louisiana and we'll discuss the latest "Trump News" and more.  You won't want to miss this episode!  You can call in with questions or comments by dialing: (347)-994-2949.

Method To The Madness
Arlie Russell Hochschild

Method To The Madness

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2017 30:36


Sociologist and professor emerita at UC Berkeley, Arlie Russell Hochschild, talks about her new book Strangers in Their Own Land- Anger and Mourning on the American Right with MTTM host Lisa Kiefer.TRANSCRIPTLisa Kiefer: [00:00:00] Method to the madness is next. You're listening to Method to the Madness. A weekly public affairs show on KALX celebrating Bay Area innovators. I'm your host, Lisa Kiefer. And today, I'm interviewing award winning author and sociologist Arlie Russell Hochschild, professor emerita here at UC Berkeley. One of the most innovative and productive feminist sociologists for the last 30 years. Her latest book, Strangers in their Own Land-- Anger and Mourning on the American Right was nominated for National Book in 2016. Welcome to the program.Arlie Hochschild: [00:00:39] Thank you.Lisa Kiefer: [00:00:40] You're known or you're called the founder of the Sociology of Emotion. You draw links between private troubles and social and political issues. Since Thomas Frank wrote the book What's the Matter with Kansas, a lot of people have been examining all this, but nobody's looked at it in an emotional way like you have.Arlie Hochschild: [00:00:57] I had a feeling that underneath all the words that people say about policies and candidates was feeling grounded in their deep experience. I came to wonder it's it's really about feelings. And the only way, best way to get at those feelings is to figure out what I came to call the deep story a story that feels true to you and you take the facts out of it. You take the moral judgments out of it. It's what feels true and that determines where you feel resentful, how you feel envious, how you feel fearful, anxious. It all emanates from that deep story and I think left, right and center, we've all got a deep story.Lisa Kiefer: [00:01:41] You explore this deep story through what you call a paradox in the bayou country of Louisiana.Arlie Hochschild: [00:01:48] Yes. In 2011, I already had a feeling that we were in a period of deep political divide and the sides were getting further and further apart. There was kind of a hardening of sides. And it wasn't because the left was getting more left. It was because the right was getting more right. And I also experienced myself as in an enclave here at Berkeley, California, where I have long taught sociology. And I felt in a geographic enclave, a technological enclave and in a media enclave. And I figured I'd have to get out of that enclave and go as far as I could to a place that was as far right as Berkeley, California, is left.Lisa Kiefer: [00:02:33] What did you use to figure that out?Arlie Hochschild: [00:02:35] I looked at the 2012 results. Reelection of Barack Obama and the proportion of whites voting for that re-election in California was about half. And in the south as a whole region, it was a third. And in Louisiana, it was 14 percent of whites voted in 2012 for Barack Obama. OK, perfect. Louisiana is the super south. That's where I want to go. And who do I want to talk to there? I want to talk to people who are white, older, religious, evangelical, if possible. But mainly I'm looking for people who are enthusiastic believers in the Tea Party 2011. That's who I was talking to. I interviewed over five year period 60 people, 40 of whom were very enthusiastic Tea Party people who eventually, virtually all voted for Donald Trump. I didn't know that going in. He wasn't on the scene. But at the very end of my research in March of 2016, he came for a primary rally in New Orleans. And I had an epiphany. I realized that over five years I'd been really getting to know some quite wonderful, complex people who were deeply troubled, anxious, afraid, felt scorned, and that I'd been studying the dry kindling. And that at that primary rally when Donald Trump got up there and pumping the sky.Lisa Kiefer: [00:04:07] about making America great again?Arlie Hochschild: [00:04:09] I had met the match, the kindling, kindling.Lisa Kiefer: [00:04:13] That's a great analogy.Arlie Hochschild: [00:04:14] I talked to a Pentecostal gospel singer at lunch one day at the Republican Women of Southwest Louisiana. She said, I love Rush Limbaugh. She saw Rush Limbaugh as defending her against epithets that she felt were coming from the liberal coasts, that she was ill educated, that she was backward, that she was racist, that she was sexist, that she was homophobic and even a little fat and feeling put down. And that was a feeling I heard a lot-- of defensiveness. Oh, you think we're rednecks? You don't think we're as smart as you are? Well, we are. And they are.Lisa Kiefer: [00:04:57] There was a story about the sinkhole. I think his name is Mike Schaff.Arlie Hochschild: [00:05:00] That's right. I met Mike Schaff, at an environmental rally in Baton Rouge. And he got up to speak about what he called the Bayou Corn Sinkhole. He was weeping as he spoke of this. He was holding shoulders of a woman, also a victim of this sinkhole. He said she hasn't been in her house and 364 days. And and he was pointing to her distress. But it was he who was weeping. And I thought I should talk to this man. And I discovered that he was an ardent member of the Louisiana Tea Party. And later, he became an enthusiastic advocate for Donald Trump. And I asked, could I really see where you were born? Can we visit your old school, where are your parents buried. Where did you go to church? Can I get to know your experience and your childhood? And he opened his life to me. My research began in his red truck, going through some sugar cane fields where he's showing me what he called an old shotgun house where he and his six siblings had grown up. The children of a plumber and a homemaker, Cajuns, Catholic, a very rural life. His father had been the plumber for people on the plantation and off. So he was born in the old south. But he grew up working in the new south. The new plantation system. That would be oil.Lisa Kiefer: [00:06:34] The petrochemical plantation.Arlie Hochschild: [00:06:35] That's right. I began to understand why he would look at the world the way he did. I visited him many times. We've gone out fishing and he offered me a window into an answer to the red state paradox. How could it be that it's the poorest states, the states with the worst education, the worst health care, the most pollution and the most disrupted families? And those states which receive more financial help from the federal government than they give it in tax dollars were also those states that were suspicious of or reviled the federal government. I found out that Louisiana was an exaggerated version of that paradox because depending on the year, you can pick out a year in which was THE poorest state. And so 44 percent of the state budget came from the federal government. So it was an exaggerated version. And I found that the issue of the environment kind of exaggerated the exaggeration. And this guy, Mike Schaff seemed like the key to me, if I could really understand him, how he had suffered from an environmental disaster and yet could vote for Donald Trump, who wants to abolish the EPA. He lived on a very beautiful bayou, a modest home that overlooked a canal that led into a beautiful swamp area. He knew all his neighbors. They were his community. And he once told me, well, we need to get government down to size, you know, and have people help their neighbors and friends because the government is doing that for us. It's diminishing community. But actually, I was to discover that what really diminished his community was a terrible drilling accident that could have been prevented with stricter environmental regulation. First there were earthquakes. This was an area that there had never been earthquakes before. And then people began to notice bubbles in the lawn, water. It was raining, looked like Alka Seltzer tablets, and that was methane gas. People were evacuated because it was dangerous. If you lit a match, it could be an explosion. And it turned out to be the fault of a company called Texas Brine that drills down into the floor of the bayou to extract concentrated salt from an under lying salt dome. And that is used in fracking and in other industrial purposes. They knew there was a problem and they drilled anyway. And the state of Louisiana let them do that. So the whole place was evacuated. He wanted to stay on. He got a gas meter, put it in his garage.Lisa Kiefer: [00:09:27] It's a great story. It's unbelievable.Arlie Hochschild: [00:09:31] It is! It could've blown up. He said, well, I'm just looking after my neighbors property. And then he said, actually, I don't want to leave. It was an abandoned community. So he lost his home. He lost his community not to presence of government, but to the absence of government. And he was fully cognizant of this, very intelligent, very mannerly, kind person. I began to wonder and ask him very gently, why wouldn't the government help you? Why wouldn't you want Texas Brine to be more regulated? I think you have to peel away three kinds of answers and one is layered upon another. The first was he saw federal government as an instrument of the north, there's some history to it that the South has felt conquered by the North first and then in reconstruction, carpetbaggers came down and then civil rights workers came down. Then he wondered whether some outsider environmentalists were coming down, wagging their moral fingers. And the second is that Louisiana state government was actually doing the moral dirty work for the oil companies. Louisiana was a petro-state very heavily controlled by oil and petrochemical industry, which subsidizes the election campaigns of politicians. And some of the politicians are themselves oil owners and do the bidding. The Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act are national laws, but they're each implemented by state governments. This state government is in the hands of oil. And so what it presents to citizens like Mike Schaff is a promise to protect. There's a language of protection, but not delivery of that protection. So they're disappointed.Lisa Kiefer: [00:11:22] Disappointed in the state instead of the oil companies.Arlie Hochschild: [00:11:25] That's right. But we're trying to understand the perspective of Mike Schaff and the many others. The government was an instrument of the north, instrument of oil. It wasn't doing its job when people looked at companies and they looked at the government there. They saw the companies were offering jobs. At least that was the rhetoric I was to discover these are highly automated companies.Lisa Kiefer: [00:11:54] And more to come.Arlie Hochschild: [00:11:55] And more to come. They were actually importing Filipino pipefitters. So there were very few permanent jobs, very few. Only 15 percent of the entire Louisiana workforce. And they're also handing out favors. Governor Jindal gave one point six billion dollars to these petrochemical companies as incentive money. They took it from the public coffers to his incentive money. Please come to Louisiana. Don't don't go to Texas or anywhere else. And that incentive money, of course, gave a lot of money to the companies to give out. So there's a donation to the Audubon Society and to a bird sanctuary, football uniforms for the Louisiana State team. So those sort of PR that the company could afford to do. And so people said, oh, well, company kind of generous. And and they looked at the state. I'm paying my taxes for the salary of these officials that are not protecting me. They had allowed this drilling excellent to occur. So the second point was a instrument of oil. And that kind of is the picture of things that goes with that second thing. But I think the biggest of all was that the governments seemed to them an instrument of the line cutters and what I called the deep story. You're standing in line as in a pilgrimage facing the top of the hill where you see the American dream. You've been in that line a long time. Mike Schaff hadn't had a raise in two decades. Your feet are tired. You've worked hard in a tough and dangerous job. Then you see some line cutters, blacks who through affirmative action now have access to jobs that had formerly been reserved for whites. It would be women, who now, through formative action, have access to jobs formerly reserved for men. It would be immigrants, would be refugees. It would even be the endangered brown pelican of Louisiana with its oil soaked wings, because people would say, well, you know, a lot of the liberal environmentalists are putting animals ahead of people. In this deep story, Barack Obama, as they felt it, was waving to the line cutters, supporting them, was sponsoring them, cutting the line waiters out, not representing them. So they felt suddenly strangers in their own land. Wow. I'm here following rules. Worked hard. Can't get there. They didn't look over the brow, the hill of the engine of capitalism at outsourcing, at automation. And so they generalized from that that whatever the government did was now a little suspect. They were white men who were thought of as privileged. And in their heart of hearts, they felt wait a minute, privilege of being white, didn't trickle all the way down. To me, I'm in a tough job. I may not be able to keep it. Families falling apart. And race, the privilege of that also a little questionable. And so for those three reasons, one piled upon another.Lisa Kiefer: [00:15:07] And nobody's representing.Arlie Hochschild: [00:15:08] And nobody was representing.Lisa Kiefer: [00:15:10] And then here comes Trump.Arlie Hochschild: [00:15:11] That's right .Lisa Kiefer: [00:15:11] And then Hillary says Trump followers are deplorable.Arlie Hochschild: [00:15:15] That's right. How could it be that the Democratic Party, the party of the working man and woman, is losing its blue collar, not speaking to it and not making people feel heard or recognized. They have a genuine beef and they didn't see an alternative to Trump.Lisa Kiefer: [00:15:34] It was more of a vote against rather than for. I think I'm going to hold my nose and vote for Trump that they didn't like him. They want to disrupt.Arlie Hochschild: [00:15:44] Exactly.Lisa Kiefer: [00:15:45] You use mourning in the title of your book, and I was curious why you chose that term.Arlie Hochschild: [00:15:51] Yes. I think it's so much easier for us to see the anger often under that anger masked by that anger is a fear and mourning because their way of life honestly is declining, is going away.Lisa Kiefer: [00:16:10] And I think they know it, but they don't want handouts. They know that they're on the verge of being in a place where they're going to need them. That's it's a tricky place.Arlie Hochschild: [00:16:20] It's a very tricky place. In a way, I I want to be their messenger out to say, wait a minute, there are real issues here.Lisa Kiefer: [00:16:28] And it's not just Louisiana. Next year, half of our country. That's right.Arlie Hochschild: [00:16:33] And there has to be an alternative to the bad choices that that we've been faced with and an alternative to the one we are stuck with.Lisa Kiefer: [00:16:41] Now, what are you going to do with the results of this incredible understanding of these people?Arlie Hochschild: [00:16:47] Yes, I've been giving that a lot of thought. It has made me want to join with someone named Joan Blades, who is a co-founder of MoveOn.org and who has instituted something called living room conversations, getting left and right together to find common ground. I think that's a start.Lisa Kiefer: [00:17:09] And you did come across three or four things that you found common ground.Arlie Hochschild: [00:17:13] Yes. Out fishing one day, again with Mike Schaff. He said, you know, we ought to get money out of politics. And I said, you know what? You're Tea Party and you're pro Trump. But you have a lot of friends in Berkeley, California, who agree with you completely about that. Another thing he said was, you know, we ought to reduce prison populations. This is a waste of life and money and we need to get them back to work. You know, give them their dignity. These are nonviolent offense.Lisa Kiefer: [00:17:43] And you visited a prison there? While, during the study...Arlie Hochschild: [00:17:46] The large Angola prison, largest maximum security prison in the U.S. and the U.S. is the prison capital of the world. That was another thing that there was common ground on and even the environment. Here's the thing I'm doing next week. I'm going down to visit Mike Schaff in his new home since old home was ruined and he is again living on a bayou. He loves to fish. I'm taking my son because my son is one of the five energy commissioners for the state of California. He's in charge of renewable energy, which he is a passionate believer in. He likes Mike Schaff and Mike likes David. So my thought was to all three of us, go out in a boat, go out fishing. I'll hold the tape recorder and I'll say, OK, you guys, I would like David from Blue State, California, environmentalist. And Mike, grew up on a plantation. Grew up with oil. Tea Party Trump. I'd like the two of you to discuss how could we make sure that there's never another bayou corn sinkhole, common ground or not? Let's just go see. So that kind of thing that through churches, through schools, through labor unions, I think we ought to try.Lisa Kiefer: [00:19:10] So people to people.Arlie Hochschild: [00:19:11] People to people underneath this escalating harsh, half true, half not rhetoric at the national level. Let's just see if we can't compare views, notions of truth and do it respectfully.Lisa Kiefer: [00:19:27] I wanted to ask, speaking of your son going and talking about what he knows and he might enlighten Mike Schaff about things he may not know about. What is the impact of facts to these people after this five years?Arlie Hochschild: [00:19:41] In a lot of discussions, people said oh a lot of people work for the federal government. It's just bloated. Maybe 30, 40 percent work for the government. I would leave the interview actually not knowing how many people work for the government. So I looked it up. My research assistant and I. And we found that one point nine percent of all workers in the United States work for the federal government, if you add state public employees to that, county employees. If you add the active military a little bit more, but all together, no more than 16 percent of the entire workforce works for the government. So it seemed larger than it was.Lisa Kiefer: [00:20:28] Right.Arlie Hochschild: [00:20:28] Again, with the proportion of people who were on welfare, that didn't work. We know most people on welfare do work, in fact. And if you look at a food stamp recipients, half of them work for fast food places at pretty close to minimum wage. And of course, the new secretary of labor runs Carl's Junior and doesn't believe in the minimum wage, but they're on food stamps because they can't earn enough. This is not a living wage. In a sense, this is corporate welfare, because the federal government is chipping in to keep people out of poverty because wages are too low.Lisa Kiefer: [00:21:06] General Honoré kept talking about the psychology of the jobs that are provided by the oil industry.Arlie Hochschild: [00:21:12] That's right. The talk, the rhetoric was jobs when it came down to it. There were very few permanent jobs. In fact, Sasol, the largest petrochemical company in Lake Charles, Louisiana. It's developing it's, it's adding to itself and in its material it says two thirds of the new workers being added to Sasol are coming from outside Louisiana. And that's because to run these things, you need chemist with a PhD from M.I.T. that's on the one hand. And you have Filipino pipefitters coming in who are cheaper, actually, and you may have more trained pipefitters or workers from Texas. Only a third of the new jobs are going to anybody that's born and living in Louisiana.Lisa Kiefer: [00:22:03] That's significant.Arlie Hochschild: [00:22:04] It's a little bit more like a third world country because there's something also called leakage. If you look at the money that the companies in Louisiana make, the profits aren't going back into Louisiana. One hundred percent of profits would be going back to Louisiana if we're talking about small businesses. They are people who live there. Gas station owner. And it goes back into the state of Louisiana. But these big multinationals, the heads of them, are not living in Louisiana.Lisa Kiefer: [00:22:37] They're sometimes not even in the United States.Arlie Hochschild: [00:22:40] Absolutely. Most of them not in the United States. British Petroleum. OK. That's London. I'm talking Sasol. OK. That's Johannesburg. Magnolia. OK. That's in Australia.Lisa Kiefer: [00:22:53] The reaction when people are faced with the truth of the facts. What has been your experience?Arlie Hochschild: [00:22:59] Well, I'm not sure I can answer that. I have to go gently back to that. When people responded to the book and I sent them all copies and then invited them to a dinner after the book came out. They mainly checked how I talked about them personally.Lisa Kiefer: [00:23:17] And how important you feel that is that they understand the facts behind this.Arlie Hochschild: [00:23:23] Yes. Yes, I know. But I do think that we have to turn the same self inspection on ourselves.Lisa Kiefer: [00:23:29] Why are no conservative academicians coming in and embedding themselves in the Berkeley enclave and trying to figure out who we are and what we think? It's always the liberal progressives who try to understand everyone.Arlie Hochschild: [00:23:42] I don't think we have been trying to understand. You know, I was looking around in sociology. How much how many other studies there were? There were some, a few. Very, very good ones, but not that many and not many the other way, I think, where we're both stuck in our enclaves. I suspect there will be some right wing person. And I think that that would be a very good thing. Actually, next week in February, we're hosting a Tea Party Trump family from Louisiana where the mother, very involved in the Tea Party and she voted for Trump, but her 17 year old son is a Bernie fan. And so I said to her, why don't you come over to Berkeley and stay with us from us and we'll show him around the Berkeley campus.Lisa Kiefer: [00:24:27] You know, it's great with these living room conversations and the people to people kind of thing. But do we really have that kind of time? I worry about the time factor.[00:24:35] You are right. You are completely right. I don't mean the empathic outreach to the people the Democratic Party has lost because of its disregard of the issues. I think it's one part of a larger program that I would like to see in place. We don't have at this moment something like a loyal opposition that's coherent. Where there's a leadership,.Lisa Kiefer: [00:25:05] A respectful opposition.Arlie Hochschild: [00:25:06] A respectful opposition. We're a bunch of very different separate social movements, each with our own cause. We haven't quite cohered I think. We're going to have to learn to do that.Lisa Kiefer: [00:25:19] Do you think there are other people in these, let's call them red states that feel the same way you do about wanting to get to know what we think better? Is it equal?Arlie Hochschild: [00:25:29] No, I don't think so.Lisa Kiefer: [00:25:31] OK.Arlie Hochschild: [00:25:31] I think they they want recognition of them. I'm not sure how curious they are about us, but they have felt put upon by us. The line cutters have turned around and started to insult the people stuck. In this moment, this political moment, it's no time to sit back and just talk to yourself. I think this is the most important election, certainly in my lifetime, maybe in American history. I think the shoe is on our foot to become activists as much as people were in the 1960s. There needs to be a discussion of the fear that is felt by people who feel like they're at the at the tail end of globalization and that that has been covered over and not addressed. There should be three pillars and facing forward. There's defending the values and the institutions that are already there because they're going to soon be under attack and we should prepare for that. And the other thing is to put forward values that actually aren't on the table. What's the agenda? What what are the core beliefs? Let's let's put those forward. So first to defend that's pillar 1. Second, to assert, that's pillar 2. And third, to reach out to Trump's supporters, not to Trump himself, but to his supporters to see if we can't get common ground or I think.Lisa Kiefer: [00:27:00] and that's what you're working on.Arlie Hochschild: [00:27:01] And I think we'll be surprised at how much is possible.Lisa Kiefer: [00:27:04] Did you ever just feel like the elephant in the room was the lack of good education?Arlie Hochschild: [00:27:08] Education in respect and civility, education in respecting the people that make the world turn round?Lisa Kiefer: [00:27:19] True. But I mean, more in terms of critical thinking, like the ability to, you know, enough not to be voting against yourself to understand that the facts like your son going to visit once they understand and someone takes the time to educate, then it's a different story.Arlie Hochschild: [00:27:37] I think if our colleges and universities became supportive places, it might be easier for people to open up their minds to critical thinking.Lisa Kiefer: [00:27:50] What do you mean by that support?Arlie Hochschild: [00:27:52] Well, I think about many of the churches preach that evolution is false doctrine, but those are places that people go to for solace, their community and support. It was the one place they could be dependent and could feel their fear and despair and mourning. And that's the very place where you learned that evolution was not true. And I don't think the solution is simply to get facts out there. I think the solution is to create social support in the projects in universities and colleges where critical thinking goes on. If you understand what I mean, there is an emotional dimension to learning. There is an emotional dimension to politics and everything else. It has to be an atmosphere of respect and support when you are doing this exploration. So that could be a common ground issue. Let's get to know each other, respect each other and do some critical thinking along the way.Lisa Kiefer: [00:28:50] What is the liberal deep story? We are all arranged around a public square inside of which are institutions, a fiercely proud of, a science museum, and there are libraries and fantastic public schools. There is a nature preserve. All of this is public. People who have made it are proud of it, happy to pay taxes for it. It means we're all able to enjoy this together and that that's what the Statue of Liberty stands for. Then, some marauders come in with a steam shovel and they gouge out big chunks of concrete from this. And they take that concrete out of the public realm and they start building a McMansion just for themselves. They're the 1 percent and we're incensed. But wait a minute, you're taking from the public and you're just giving to this selfish 1 percent. There's indignation. There's bafflement and fury at that.Lisa Kiefer: [00:29:59] Arlie Russell Hochschild, sociology professor emerita at UC Berkeley. You've been listening to Method to the Madness. You can find all of our podcast on iTunes University. Tune in again next week at the same time. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Real Estate Rockstars
392: Make $1 Million Dollars in Real Estate by Following Josh Anderson's Road Map

Real Estate Rockstars

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2016 48:22


Originally from Nashville, Josh Anderson graduated from Louisiana State University in International Trade and Finance. Josh served 8 years in the U.S. Army, including a 10-month stint in Bagram, Afghanistan, during Operation Enduring Freedom. These experiences, coupled with the education he received from Louisiana State, have molded him into a focused, disciplined, and strong willed individual. Josh Anderson can best be described as a man of high energy with a passion for Nashville real estate. He is a business savvy professional with a strong desire to cater to his clients' particular needs. Client satisfaction is paramount! Josh's market expertise coupled with his superior negotiating skills set him apart from the rest. Join us as Josh shares his mindset and a glance at his journey to becoming a Real Estate Rockstar by becoming one of the most trusted names in Nashville real estate. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books Network
Marlene Trestman, “Fair Labor Lawyer: The Remarkable Life of New Deal Attorney and Supreme Court Advocate Bessie Margolin” (Louisiana State UP, 2016)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2016 83:16


As a trailblazing attorney, Bessie Margolin lived a life of exceptional achievement. At a time when the legal profession consisted almost entirely of men, she earned the esteem of her colleagues and rose to become one of the most successful Supreme Court advocates of her era. Doing so, as Marlene Trestman demonstrates in Fair Labor Lawyer: The Remarkable Life of New Deal Attorney and Supreme Court Advocate Bessie Margolin (Louisiana State University Press, 2016), required overcoming not just the ingrained assumptions that men had towards professional women during that time but also the poverty of her early childhood and the loss of her mother when Margolin was only three years old. As Trestman reveals, Margolin exploited to the full the opportunities she was given as a ward of the Jewish Orphans Home in New Orleans, which provided her with a comfortable upbringing and a good education. From Newcomb College and Tulane University, Margolin went on to a fellowship at Yale University and a career in the federal government, which she began by participating in the defense of some of the most important laws to come out of President Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal program and concluded by championing measures mandating equal pay and opposing age discrimination. And yet Trestman shows that for all of the sacrifices she made to establish a career for herself, Margolin did so on her own terms and in a way that many Americans can relate to today. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in American Studies
Marlene Trestman, “Fair Labor Lawyer: The Remarkable Life of New Deal Attorney and Supreme Court Advocate Bessie Margolin” (Louisiana State UP, 2016)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2016 82:50


As a trailblazing attorney, Bessie Margolin lived a life of exceptional achievement. At a time when the legal profession consisted almost entirely of men, she earned the esteem of her colleagues and rose to become one of the most successful Supreme Court advocates of her era. Doing so, as Marlene Trestman demonstrates in Fair Labor Lawyer: The Remarkable Life of New Deal Attorney and Supreme Court Advocate Bessie Margolin (Louisiana State University Press, 2016), required overcoming not just the ingrained assumptions that men had towards professional women during that time but also the poverty of her early childhood and the loss of her mother when Margolin was only three years old. As Trestman reveals, Margolin exploited to the full the opportunities she was given as a ward of the Jewish Orphans Home in New Orleans, which provided her with a comfortable upbringing and a good education. From Newcomb College and Tulane University, Margolin went on to a fellowship at Yale University and a career in the federal government, which she began by participating in the defense of some of the most important laws to come out of President Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal program and concluded by championing measures mandating equal pay and opposing age discrimination. And yet Trestman shows that for all of the sacrifices she made to establish a career for herself, Margolin did so on her own terms and in a way that many Americans can relate to today. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Politics
Marlene Trestman, “Fair Labor Lawyer: The Remarkable Life of New Deal Attorney and Supreme Court Advocate Bessie Margolin” (Louisiana State UP, 2016)

New Books in Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2016 82:50


As a trailblazing attorney, Bessie Margolin lived a life of exceptional achievement. At a time when the legal profession consisted almost entirely of men, she earned the esteem of her colleagues and rose to become one of the most successful Supreme Court advocates of her era. Doing so, as Marlene... Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Biography
Marlene Trestman, “Fair Labor Lawyer: The Remarkable Life of New Deal Attorney and Supreme Court Advocate Bessie Margolin” (Louisiana State UP, 2016)

New Books in Biography

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2016 82:50


As a trailblazing attorney, Bessie Margolin lived a life of exceptional achievement. At a time when the legal profession consisted almost entirely of men, she earned the esteem of her colleagues and rose to become one of the most successful Supreme Court advocates of her era. Doing so, as Marlene Trestman demonstrates in Fair Labor Lawyer: The Remarkable Life of New Deal Attorney and Supreme Court Advocate Bessie Margolin (Louisiana State University Press, 2016), required overcoming not just the ingrained assumptions that men had towards professional women during that time but also the poverty of her early childhood and the loss of her mother when Margolin was only three years old. As Trestman reveals, Margolin exploited to the full the opportunities she was given as a ward of the Jewish Orphans Home in New Orleans, which provided her with a comfortable upbringing and a good education. From Newcomb College and Tulane University, Margolin went on to a fellowship at Yale University and a career in the federal government, which she began by participating in the defense of some of the most important laws to come out of President Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal program and concluded by championing measures mandating equal pay and opposing age discrimination. And yet Trestman shows that for all of the sacrifices she made to establish a career for herself, Margolin did so on her own terms and in a way that many Americans can relate to today. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Law
Marlene Trestman, “Fair Labor Lawyer: The Remarkable Life of New Deal Attorney and Supreme Court Advocate Bessie Margolin” (Louisiana State UP, 2016)

New Books in Law

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2016 83:15


As a trailblazing attorney, Bessie Margolin lived a life of exceptional achievement. At a time when the legal profession consisted almost entirely of men, she earned the esteem of her colleagues and rose to become one of the most successful Supreme Court advocates of her era. Doing so, as Marlene Trestman demonstrates in Fair Labor Lawyer: The Remarkable Life of New Deal Attorney and Supreme Court Advocate Bessie Margolin (Louisiana State University Press, 2016), required overcoming not just the ingrained assumptions that men had towards professional women during that time but also the poverty of her early childhood and the loss of her mother when Margolin was only three years old. As Trestman reveals, Margolin exploited to the full the opportunities she was given as a ward of the Jewish Orphans Home in New Orleans, which provided her with a comfortable upbringing and a good education. From Newcomb College and Tulane University, Margolin went on to a fellowship at Yale University and a career in the federal government, which she began by participating in the defense of some of the most important laws to come out of President Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal program and concluded by championing measures mandating equal pay and opposing age discrimination. And yet Trestman shows that for all of the sacrifices she made to establish a career for herself, Margolin did so on her own terms and in a way that many Americans can relate to today. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Tiferet Talk
Martha Serpas | Tiferet Talk Interview with Melissa Studdard

Tiferet Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2014 43:00


Please join Melissa Studdard and Tiferet Journal on 10/28/14 at 7PM EST for a conversation with poet, editor, chaplain and creative writing professor Martha Serpas. Serpas is the author of two collections of poetry, Côte Blanche and The Dirty Side of the Storm. Her work has appeared in places such as The New Yorker, The Nation, and Southwest Review, as well as in a number of anthologies, including the Library of America’s American Religious Poems. She holds degrees in English and creative writing from Louisiana State, New York University, and the University of Houston, and a master of divinity from Yale Divinity School. For many years as an educational consultant and as a poet-in-residence, she facilitated the teaching of writing to children in New York City classrooms. She has taught recently at Yale Divinity School and the University of Tampa, where she served as poetry editor of Tampa Review. A native of south Louisiana, she remains active in efforts to restore Louisiana’s wetlands. Since 2006 she has worked as a trauma chaplain, first at Tampa General Hospital and now at Memorial Hermann—Texas Medical Center. She teaches in the Creative Writing Program at the University of Houston. To learn more about Martha Serpas please visit: http://www.marthaserpas.com/. And, to purchase her books: http://tinyurl.com/m9yqhuh Tiferet Journal is pleased to also offer to you our multiple award-winning The Tiferet Talk Interviews book. This book includes 12 exceptional interviews from Julia Cameron, Edward Hirsch, Jude Rittenhouse, Marc Allen, Arielle Ford, Robert Pinsky, Dr. Bernie Siegel, Robin Rice, Jeffrey Davis, Floyd Skloot, Anthony Lawlor, and Lois P. Jones. It can be purchased in both print and Kindle formats at this link on Amazon: http://tinyurl.com/bu8m2zs

SAMatters Radio
SAM 014 | Interview with Louisiana State Fire Training Director Dave Casey

SAMatters Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2014 55:13


On this episode I interview Dave Casey, Director of the Louisiana State Fire & Emergency Training Institute on the need for realistic first responder training. During the interview, Dave shared: 1.The need to turn off the PowerPoint, get out of the classroom, and into the field for hands-on training.  2.Some of the challenges associated with electronic learning. 3.The benefits of demonstrating skills during scenario-based evolutions.  4.The need to perform high fidelity training, combining all the practical skills together in complete practice scenarios. 5.The use of task books to track skill development.  6.Challenges with creating realism with gas-fired firefighting props.   Fire Engineering Magazine http://www.fireengineering.com/index.html   Fire Engineering Books and Videos http://www.pennwellbooks.com/fire.html   Dave Casey’s Consulting Business www.AscendLeadershipLLC.com http://TheRightSeat.us   Jones & Barlett Live Fire Training Book http://www.jblearning.com/catalog/9780763781880/   International Society of Fire Service Instructors (ISFSI) live fire training credentialing program http://isfsi.org/links/live-fire-credential/   Situational Awareness Matters! website www.SAMatters.com   Situational Awareness Matters On-Line Academy http://www.samatters.com/situational-awareness-matters-academy/   Upcoming Situational Awareness Matters Events Schedule http://www.samatters.com/programs-keynote/eventschedule/   Situational Awareness Books and Videos (Store) http://www.samatters.com/store/   Firefighter Near Miss Reporting System http://www.firefighternearmiss.com   To be interviewed on this show, visit:Close Call Survivor Website www.CloseCallSurvivor.com   Contact Rich Gasaway www.RichGasaway.com Support@RichGasaway.com 612-548-4424      

New Books Network
Keith Clark, “The Radical Fiction of Ann Petry” (Louisiana State UP, 2013)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2013 45:07


What do you do if you accompany a friend on her research trip to Boston University’s Gotlieb Archival Research Center and end up finding a treasure trove of letters, news articles, hand written notes, and original drafts of nonfiction by one of your favorite authors? Keith Clark wrote a book. A truly insightful and wonderful one on the known but understudied Ann Petry. The title? The Radical Fiction of Ann Petry (Louisiana State University Press, 2013). Those familiar with the work of Petry probably know her mid-century, naturalist novel The Street and probably place among the likes of Richard Wright. However, Clark expands our notion of Petry’s work, takes us on a journey that shows her work within other traditions, such as gothic, modernism and realism. He also shows her as a politically active figure, even writing letters to presidents. This book is a must read for any interested in any of the topics Clark undertakes, since he handles each with care, deft, and discernment. He’s equally loquacious and informative during our interview. Please, listen in. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Literary Studies
Keith Clark, “The Radical Fiction of Ann Petry” (Louisiana State UP, 2013)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2013 45:07


What do you do if you accompany a friend on her research trip to Boston University’s Gotlieb Archival Research Center and end up finding a treasure trove of letters, news articles, hand written notes, and original drafts of nonfiction by one of your favorite authors? Keith Clark wrote a book. A truly insightful and wonderful one on the known but understudied Ann Petry. The title? The Radical Fiction of Ann Petry (Louisiana State University Press, 2013). Those familiar with the work of Petry probably know her mid-century, naturalist novel The Street and probably place among the likes of Richard Wright. However, Clark expands our notion of Petry’s work, takes us on a journey that shows her work within other traditions, such as gothic, modernism and realism. He also shows her as a politically active figure, even writing letters to presidents. This book is a must read for any interested in any of the topics Clark undertakes, since he handles each with care, deft, and discernment. He’s equally loquacious and informative during our interview. Please, listen in. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in African American Studies
Keith Clark, “The Radical Fiction of Ann Petry” (Louisiana State UP, 2013)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2013 45:07


What do you do if you accompany a friend on her research trip to Boston University's Gotlieb Archival Research Center and end up finding a treasure trove of letters, news articles, hand written notes, and original drafts of nonfiction by one of your favorite authors? Keith Clark wrote a book. A truly insightful and wonderful one on the known but understudied Ann Petry. The title? The Radical Fiction of Ann Petry (Louisiana State University Press, 2013). Those familiar with the work of Petry probably know her mid-century, naturalist novel The Street and probably place among the likes of Richard Wright. However, Clark expands our notion of Petry's work, takes us on a journey that shows her work within other traditions, such as gothic, modernism and realism. He also shows her as a politically active figure, even writing letters to presidents. This book is a must read for any interested in any of the topics Clark undertakes, since he handles each with care, deft, and discernment. He's equally loquacious and informative during our interview. Please, listen in. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

New Books in American Studies
Keith Clark, “The Radical Fiction of Ann Petry” (Louisiana State UP, 2013)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2013 45:07


What do you do if you accompany a friend on her research trip to Boston University’s Gotlieb Archival Research Center and end up finding a treasure trove of letters, news articles, hand written notes, and original drafts of nonfiction by one of your favorite authors? Keith Clark wrote a book. A truly insightful and wonderful one on the known but understudied Ann Petry. The title? The Radical Fiction of Ann Petry (Louisiana State University Press, 2013). Those familiar with the work of Petry probably know her mid-century, naturalist novel The Street and probably place among the likes of Richard Wright. However, Clark expands our notion of Petry’s work, takes us on a journey that shows her work within other traditions, such as gothic, modernism and realism. He also shows her as a politically active figure, even writing letters to presidents. This book is a must read for any interested in any of the topics Clark undertakes, since he handles each with care, deft, and discernment. He’s equally loquacious and informative during our interview. Please, listen in. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Orleans Podcasting - Listen to the voices that are rebuilding New Orleans. Click on the link below to hear the latest int

David Kahn is the Director of the Louisiana State Museum in New Orleans. David talks about "GOLD", the exciting new exhibit that opened October 20 and runs through January 2, 2008. "The exhibit was developed by the American Museum of National History in New York City", David tells us, "...the exhibit covers all aspects of gold". David also shares the good news that visitation for the Cabildo, Louisiana State Museum's flag ship attraction, has reached 98 percent of its pre-Katrina levels.

Future Projection — A Baseball America Podcast
Episode 7: The Magnificence of Shohei Ohtani, Two-Way Prospects in the Pipeline & Draft Ramifications for Jaden Hill

Future Projection — A Baseball America Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 1970 116:22


Ben and Carlos marvel at Shohei Ohtani's early-season exploits on the mound and as a hitter, which leads to a conversation about the difficulties of being a two-way player at the pro level and the prospects who could be next in line to give it a try. The two then spend a lot of time talking about Louisiana State righthander Jaden Hill, who recently tore his UCL and who now faces an uncertain draft outlook given the injury and his limited college resume. The two talk about the decision to make the draft 20 rounds in 2021 and talk about what an ideal number of rounds is—or perhaps more importantly, what an ideal draft format would be. They wrap things up by taking listener questions, including: how the Braves have used their international scouting resources in the wake of sanctions; the differences between scouting high school and college hitters; northeast prospects to keep an eye on; and whether or not Mariners prospect Noelvi Marte can become a top 25 prospect in baseball.Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/future-projection-a-baseball-america-podcast/donations

Baseball America
Baseball America Podcast: 06/12/08

Baseball America

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 1969 33:02


Aaron Fitt and John Manuel previews the Fresno State, Rice, Louisiana State, North Carolina bracket.Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/baseball-america/donationsWant to advertise on this podcast? Go to https://redcircle.com/brands and sign up.