Podcasts about Frazier

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Latest podcast episodes about Frazier

Next Level Loan Officers
Best of the Best: The Top 5 Next Level Podcast Episodes

Next Level Loan Officers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 59:02


On this episode Frazier hosts a super episode which is a combination of Next Level's Top 5 most downloaded episodes. Below you will see the key takeaways for each episode along with a link the full length version. Actions That Matter: The secret to becoming a top producerIn Power 90 the goal is to have a strategic thought process in how you prepare for your week.If you don't understand your worth you will not know what tasks you can delegate and offload. Being a proactive loan officer will always get you farther quicker, than being a reactive loan officer. As long as you have a solid team, it doesn't matter who does your actions items.Checking in once a week as a “stress check” allows you to help with creating a great experience. If you are a one man band, your first hire shouldn't be marketing it should be someone that gets you out of non-money-making activitiesHow You Can Create a Next Level Client ExperienceA lot of loan officers like to hide from tough conversations, that is your opportunity. Create a process that allows you to use sticky points so that you can differentiate yourself.Ask for reviews when you are CTC'd as oppose to when the loan closes. Make sure you are staying in touch with your pre-approved borrowers with a weekly phone call. Every happy client is a potential sales rep for your business. Focus On Your ALL-IN Agent Relationships!You need to measure your referral partner metrics and rank them accordingly. Ask yourself what you want in a new referral partnership outside of just production. A low amount of good relationships are better than a high amount of bad relationships. Not every agent is a good fit!You don't need to focus on the “A-List” agents to build a successful business relationship. Ask yourself what the value of the relationship allows you to do in your business or personal life. Appraisers and title reps are great sources to find the RIGHT agents.Becoming a Mortgage Difference Maker w/Jason FrazierA loan officer getting to the consumer first is beneficial for everyone, including the agent.  Build a strong referral network so you can help as many people as possible, even if you are helping them to go somewhere else.  Sales, marketing, being an advisor, and education is all the SAME. The more you understand about your ideal customer, the easier your marketing is and the better your conversions will be.  Don't market to consumers that you don't have expertise in helping. Stop doing content that consumers don't care about.  Know Who You Are and Who You Aren't w/Ashley CourvilleIf you're working too much, you need to invest in your business so you can work less. If you want to grow your business without killing yourself with your time, you need to invest in a team.Double down on communication and let your clients and partners tell you when it is too much. You need to be able to define who you want to work with and the clients you want to work for. You have to say no so that you can say yes to the right people. Go after business that fits your system. Know who you are and who you are not.If you are a woman with kids, your life looks very different on a daily basis compared to most men in this industry. 

History & Factoids about today
Nov 3rd- Giant Pig Fly's over England, Ozzy Osbourne, Andy Williams, Starship, Ferlin Husky, Brendan Frazier

History & Factoids about today

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 13:52


National lets hug day. Pop culture from 2010. Pink Floyds 40 ft pig escaped, Illiniois 21st state, Alka Seltzer goes on sale, neon lights 1st shown. Todays birthday's- Ferlin Husky - Andy Williams - Ozzy Osbourne - Daryl Hannah - Mickey Thomas - Julianne Moore -Brendan Frasier - Anna Chlumsky - Andy Grammer - Amanda Seyfried. Robert louis Stevenson died.

Candidly, Caitlyn
"The Support of Community Was There" | Starting Sisters in Public Health, Mental Health Stigma & Children, Building Connections/Mentorships & more | Candidly, Caitlyn with Angela Frazier

Candidly, Caitlyn

Play Episode Play 30 sec Highlight Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 63:00


TW: Sudden Death, S*icide In today's episode, I spoke with Angela Frazier, a mental health advocate, founder of Sister's in Public Health and author of “A Kids Book About Suicide. Angela and I spoke about her motivations for starting a nonprofit, the importance of starting conversations around mental health young, finding mentorship and more. I'm so thankful to Angela for reaching out about having this conversation, and I hope y'all enjoy listening.You can keep up with Angela on her various IG pages: @angelanicole_f and @sistersinpublichealth and on her website https://angelanicolefrazier.comThank you so much to my listeners for continuing to tune in & make sure to drop a review or comment to let me know what you think when you finish. As always, you can keep up with me as well on ig @/candidlycaitlyn.mph.  

Faith 'N Fish'N
Jacob Frazier of Carson-Newman University

Faith 'N Fish'N

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 74:33


This week, Cam and Robert talk with Jacob Frazier, Assistant Coach of the Bass Fishing Team at Carson-Newman University and Head Coach of the Kayak Fishing Team at Carson-Newman University about all things college bass fishing! All Things Faith 'N Fish'N

The John Howell Show Podcast
One of the Most Chaotic Elections Chicago Has Seen in Years

The John Howell Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 12:18


John Howell is joined by Burt Odelson, Founding Partner of Odelson, Sterk, Murphey, Frazier & McGrath Ltd., and elections attorney. Odelson has been in the business for over fifty years, and he says this is one of the most surprising mayoral and City Council elections he's seen. The two discuss the multiple candidates for mayor and the City Council and give their predictions for what to expect at the polls. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

John Howell
One of the Most Chaotic Elections Chicago Has Seen in Years

John Howell

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 12:18


John Howell is joined by Burt Odelson, Founding Partner of Odelson, Sterk, Murphey, Frazier & McGrath Ltd., and elections attorney. Odelson has been in the business for over fifty years, and he says this is one of the most surprising mayoral and City Council elections he's seen. The two discuss the multiple candidates for mayor and the City Council and give their predictions for what to expect at the polls. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Lacking Fundamentals
Where'd Who Go

Lacking Fundamentals

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 32:03


Hey Lackers!In this episode the Guys introduce a new segment named after a line from one of their favorite movie. It's called, "Where'd who go?" You get some solid C- reviews on some series they are currently binging. (Walking Dead, Cobra Kai, Modern Family, Friends, and more!!!) Recap the World Series just a bit with them. Brad tells of an experience he had with a friend at a major league baseball game. It was VERY Lacking Fundamentals! They also share a few high school shenanigans they were involved in. So come on! Hit rock bottom with them!

Catch The Fire Church Myrtle Beach
Healing Flowing (Brandon Frazier)

Catch The Fire Church Myrtle Beach

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022


Brandon focuses our hearts on God's healing power flowing in the gathering.

Bills Football
11-25 Leslie Frazier

Bills Football

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 19:34


The Claudio Reilsono Show
Episode 169: Smokin' Jim Frazier & Luther Dupree (Frazier- NFL Scout/TV Host/Writer, Pittsburgh Courrier. Dupree- TV Producer, Host, “Steel City Sports World”)

The Claudio Reilsono Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 48:09


A discussion with Smokin' Jim Frazier (NFL scout and TV host on PCTV) and Luther Dupree (TV host on PCTV)  

22 Goals
16 | Lionel Messi (2014) and Cristiano Ronaldo (2018)

22 Goals

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 60:43


With the two greatest players of their generation playing in what may be their final World Cup campaigns, Brian revisits their best moments in the tournament. We'll also talk about the most riveting athlete rivalries in sports. How did Messi and Ronaldo come to be as inextricably linked as Bird and Magic, Ali and Frazier, and Federer and Nadal? And does it really matter whether they ever win a World Cup?  Host: Brian Phillips Producers: Devon Renaldo, Mike Wargon, Conor Nevins and Vikram Patel  Sound Design and Original Music: Devon Renaldo  Mixing and Mastering: Scott Somerville Match footage from FIFA  Also available in Spanish and Portuguese  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Patriot Angle
Ep 356: Holiday Blues

The Patriot Angle

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 69:52


Michael & Sos welcome David 'Preachman' Frazier from Frazier Chronicles Podcast to the show. As they get into the holiday blues we all usually face during the holidays. Spending habits, and why we must watch our wallet's especially during these times more than ever. Plus Michael mentions the latest political agenda a campaign worker he was talking with on the train in Orlando tried having him sign. Show Notes https://youtu.be/Nb7pa0-v-3w WATCH OUT FOR THE SCAMMERS AND CONS THAT TRYING TO SWING VOTES as Michael warns us on the show --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/savagedunfiltered/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/savagedunfiltered/support

The NBL Pocket Podcast
240: Dean Vickerman calls for balance, United disjointed, Hawks to fly the coop?, signings Frazier and Lee plus the allegations against Adelaide 36ers owner Grant Kelley.

The NBL Pocket Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 53:55


200+ minutes of NBL action in under 45mins. Twitter: Joseph @nblpocketpod | Andrew @andrewcanion Patreon: patreon.com/nblpocketpodcast Booktopia: https://booktopia.kh4ffx.net/c/2324741/607517/9632 Give the website a butcher's hook: https://www.nblpocketpodcast.com Join the discord: https://discord.gg/bnqSYK4C Tipping competition: https://www.footytips.com.au/comps/nbl_pocket_podcast_tipping_comp 

Bills Football
11-21 Leslie Frazier

Bills Football

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 18:34


The Black Lotus Podcast
#58- Products of our Environment, feat. Frazier White

The Black Lotus Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 128:34


In today's episode, the Black Lotus brings on Frazier White, a good friend of the podcast. Frazier has seen the vision of the Black Lotus for a long time, as he used to participate in our Instagram lives back during the early days of the podcast. Now, we finally had to the opportunity to get him in the studio with us. Frazier brought plenty of insight into this episode, as we delved into the topics of education, physical health, dating, religion, and American history through the lens of the Black Community. This was an extremely informative and motivational episode, and there were plenty of valuable insights shared. We know you guys will enjoy this one. And as we always say, as long as you show love, we'll stay consistent. 00:00 Intro 01:10 How our black catholic school created a strong family 03:20- We must push for black intellectualism within the youth 07:25- Why being prepared institutionally for college hits different 10:45- Madden and Games as Adults after 2016 13:21 Importance of Integrity 16:10 Valuing your body 21:15 Sports build Family 26:28 Getting addicted to the Grind 29:35 The only thing stopping you is you 31:19 Stop fitting trends 32:30 How to Attract the opposite sex 37:16 Don't let the Red pill get to you 42:15 Love yourself before you try to love others 46:25 1st date tips for Men 52:50 Understanding people's reality 1:01:05 You never know what the future may hold 1:07:00 Understanding perspectives 1:10:10 How Black people feel about themselves 1:18:00 Iron sharpens iron 1:20:10 Integration is not the end 1:22:00 Inferior mindset 1:24:00 history lesson 1:38:23 Intrinsic value of being black 1:43:00 Keeping up with appearances 1:50:00 Who is the Goat 2:00:30 This podcast is different 2:05:00 Closing --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/blacklotuspodcast/support

Outlier to Trailblazer with Niiamah Ashong
The Power Behind Truth Telling with April Frazier

Outlier to Trailblazer with Niiamah Ashong

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 33:20


We have a tendancy of only telling the polite truth, one that's palatable, one that doesn't unearth any bodies... ------- Is getting ahead of the game no longer challenging enough for you? It's time to change the rules of the game! Come join us in the Outlier's Edge Masterclass to experience high-flame, high-impact, and high-transformation live coaching session: http://outliersedge.com/masterclass

Private Conversations
Kavon Frazier Talks Life After The League - Private Conversations #13

Private Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 79:21


In today's episode we are joined by our good friend and former NFL Safety, Kavon Frazier. He shares his journey of going to the NFL, and leaving with his own business taking the fitness and athletic world by storm.   SUBSCRIBE TO THE PODCAST ► https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCeEbfyOye9v1zZK9eumzl7w   LISTEN ON: APPLE PODCASTS: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/private-conversations/id1641605422?ign-itscg=30200S&ign-itsct=podcast_box_promote_link SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/show/5wnDrQiUCPcUErprdaBX2b  ALL PLATFORMS: https://linktr.ee/PrivateConversations   ADD US ON INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/prvt.conversations/   ALL OF OUR SOCIALS: https://linktr.ee/PrivateConversations   _________________________________________________________________ #KavonFrazier #PrivateConversations

Dan Carlin's Hardcore History: Addendum
EP23 Boxing with Ghosts

Dan Carlin's Hardcore History: Addendum

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 66:55


Ready for an argument? Like Dan's quote voice? Waiting to hear Dan discuss boxing? Then you've hit the trifecta. Boxing expert Mike Silver and Dan discuss whether today's modern fighters could compete with those of yesteryear. 1. The Arc of Boxing: The Rise and Decline of the Sweet Science by Mike Silver 2. The Night the Referee Hit Back: Memorable Moments from the World of Boxing by Mike Silver 3. Stars in the Ring: Jewish Champions in the Golden Age of Boxing: A Photographic History by Mike Silver

Up & Adams
Philadelphia Eagles Loss Could Be a Good Thing, Jeff Saturday and Parks Frazier Leading the Indianapolis Colts to Win, and Darius Butler's Top 4 NFL MVP Candidates

Up & Adams

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 46:46


In today's episode of Up & Adams, Darius Butler makes his weekly appearance to discuss why the Philadelphia Eagles loss to the Washington Commanders is not worrisome and might be a good thing, why he is giving the Indianapolis Colts organization an A+ across the board for their win this weekend, and who his Top 4 MVP candidates are for this season. Mark Ingram also returns to discuss what the Saints can do to improve their season, what is going on with the Saints quarterback situation, and to review various NFL plays and determine whether they deserved a red card or not.

Brands And Barbed Wire
"Cash Cow" Author, Andy Frazier

Brands And Barbed Wire

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 82:33


On today's episode we record a new first for Brands and Barbed Wire as we jump across the pond as they say and speak with the author of the book Cash Cow, Andy Frazier. We learn about Andy's own history in the cattle business, how he became interested in the story of Jack Dick as well as his own podcast. I've been looking forward to today's interview and can't wait to introduce you to Andy Frazier. Andy welcome to Brands and Barbed Wire. Andy's book Cash Cow can be found on Amazon and for more information about Andy, his podcast and other books visit www.andyfrazier.co.uk Thanks to today's sponsors Cattle Baron Cigars www.cattlebaroncigars.com, Gorgeous Vodka www.gorgeousbodka.com, B.R. Cutrer Ranch www.brcutrer.com, Ranch House Designs www.ranchhousedesigns.com and JMAR Genetics www.jmargenetics.com.

Black Girl Gone: A True Crime Podcast
MURDERED: The Murder Of Latisha Frazier

Black Girl Gone: A True Crime Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 41:44


On August 2, 2010 18 year old Latisha Frazier disappeared from Washington D.C. She left work that day and told her boyfriend that she was going to meet with some friends. But the friends said she never arrived. 6 months later a witness came forward and detectives finally learned what really happened to Latisha. Find out more about HelpYouFind.me and how you can create your "If I Go Missing File" https://helpyoufind.me/go/1109/ SUPPORT OUR SHOW! And Join Us On Patreon To Unlock Exclusive Content! www.patreon.com/blackckgirlgonepodcast Show Sponsor BABBEL Visit Babbel.com/GirlGone for up to 55% off your subscription Follow Us! IG: @BlackGirlGonePodcast TikTok: @BlackGirlGonePodcast FB: Black Girl Gone Podcast Twitter: @BlkGirlGonePod Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Kevin & Query Podcast
Kevin & Query - Friday 11/11: Previewing Colts-Raiders, what to expect from Jeff Saturday and Parks Frazier + Matt Taylor, Greg Rakestraw, Ball State's Michael Lewis!

Kevin & Query Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 135:49


00:00 – 26:20 – Happy Veteran's Day, Colts-Raiders is a game that's gone completely under the radar this week, Derek Carr, Raiders have plenty of drama in their own right, Matt Ryan practices and his status going forward, Ehlinger on his third offensive coordinator in three games 26:21 – 31:58 – Morning Checkdown 31:59 – 42:11 – Parks Frazier makes his debut as offensive coordinator, what to expect, is Josh McDaniels in trouble, the Raiders have a litany of issues going on as well 42:12 – 1:07:32– ISC's Greg Rakestraw on his excitement for this time of year on the high school football slate, Mr. Football front-runner, Jeff Saturday will be a CEO coach, how will Saturday evaluate Sam Ehlinger, Morning Checkdown 1:07:33 – 1:24:08 – Ball State basketball head coach Michael Lewis on their route of Earlham to start the regular season, his recruits, the alternate jerseys, how to get the program back to where they want to be, regional opponents going forward 1:24:09 – 1:28:56 – Jake's words come back to bite him on the Wabash/Depauw debate 1:28:57 – 1:55:44 – Jake's comparison of “Mitch” and Jim Irsay not meeting with Frank Reich to fire him, Monon Bell this weekend, Pop Quiz 1:55:45 – 2:14:05 – Colts radio voice Matt Taylor on his thoughts on Frank Reich and his firing, making sense of a wild week for the franchise, what he thinks Jeff Saturday brings to the table, Colts-Raiders on Sunday, is Sunday's game the toughest QB/RB/WR combo the Colts have faced to this point, Yannick Ngakoue, what might we see that's different offensively on Sunday 2:14:06 – 2:15:49 – Our picks and predictions for Colts/Raiders, Week 10 of the NFL and CFBSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Business RadioX ® Network
LIVE from the GNFCC 2022 Women in Leadership Summit: Colette Varco and Alexis Mitchell, Frazier & Deeter

Business RadioX ® Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022


LIVE from the GNFCC 2022 Women in Leadership Summit: Colette Varco and Alexis Mitchell, Frazier & Deeter (North Fulton Business Radio, Episode 562) Colette Varco and Alexis Mitchell with Frazier and Deeter joined host John Ray from the GNFCC 2022 Women in Leadership Summit. They chatted about their roles at Frazier & Deeter, the firm’s […]

North Fulton Business Radio
LIVE from the GNFCC 2022 Women in Leadership Summit: Colette Varco and Alexis Mitchell, Frazier & Deeter

North Fulton Business Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022


LIVE from the GNFCC 2022 Women in Leadership Summit: Colette Varco and Alexis Mitchell, Frazier & Deeter (North Fulton Business Radio, Episode 562) Colette Varco and Alexis Mitchell with Frazier and Deeter joined host John Ray from the GNFCC 2022 Women in Leadership Summit. They chatted about their roles at Frazier & Deeter, the firm’s […] The post LIVE from the GNFCC 2022 Women in Leadership Summit: Colette Varco and Alexis Mitchell, Frazier & Deeter appeared first on Business RadioX ®.

Inside Indiana Sports Breakfast with Kent Sterling
Indianapolis Colts - Shaq Leonard sits; JT up! Parks Frazier talks! Ehlinger's 3rd OC! IU tonight!

Inside Indiana Sports Breakfast with Kent Sterling

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 15:50


Parks Frazier will call plays from the booth - says he is aggressive in his own way. What that means, we will find out in Vegas! Shaq Leonard sat out practice, but Jonathan Taylor was full go. Mo Alie-Cox and Jalani Woods sat too! What's the toughest part of this week for Frank Reich? I'll tell you. Indiana must play against the game and not Bethune Cookman or this is an opportunity lost! Nike dumping Kyrie Irving is a business decision, not a cancel culture move. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-kent-sterling-show/support

BariDiaries
Ep30 Kwyonnica Frazier @losi.ng2winsleeve2rny

BariDiaries

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022


Listen in on todays episode. We are beyond excited to have Kwyonnica on the podcast sharing her fight for better health and weight-loss with multiple bariatric surgeries. Kwyonnica is full of inspiration and encouragement for the weight-loss community. You can find her @losi.ng2winsleeve2rnyThe BariDIARIES podcast is a weekly show where your host, CeCe, and guests share their most intimate insecurities, bariatric stories and battle with body positivity. Join us to as we navigate through life after weight loss surgery together.

Scoop Squad Truth Squad
11/10/2022 - The Scoop Squad, Ep 28 - Adam Knauff, JB Akers, Jonathan Frazier

Scoop Squad Truth Squad

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 62:19


The Scoop Squad tackles the money trail in the Charleston election and the funny business coming from leftist group Charleston Can't WaitGuests include Adam Knauff, JB Akers,and Jonathan Frazier#theonlycharlestonpodcastthatmstters

The Blue Horseshoe
Expectations for Saturday and Frazier

The Blue Horseshoe

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 27:51


Ryan and George discuss what they expect to see out of Jeff Saturday and Parks Frazier in their new roles for the Colts. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Murderous Roots with Denise & Zelda
Episode 38: Revisiting Frazier B. Baker, Part 1

Murderous Roots with Denise & Zelda

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 51:51


All sources and notes are available at our website murderousroots.com

TNT Radio
Sandy Frazier on Joseph Arthur & his Technicolor Dreamcast - 09 November 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 55:53


GUEST OVERVIEW: Sandy Frazier is a singer/songwriter, expressionist painter, the author of The Mystic Artist and has written and produced 4 full-length albums of music, including Painting Music, Resurrection and FAUVE. Described as "ArtRock" – each song is a Pop Cantata, a kind of poem set to music, like individual paintings. Sandy's latest record, SUPERSONIC is available in online stores everywhere - and her first vinyl collection is COMING SOON! She is currently working on her fifth full-length album: "Ghosts in a Time Machine" due out later this year and is also working on a docu-series of film shorts.

Bridging The Gap
The Power of Listening with Brendan Frazier

Bridging The Gap

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 52:20


Brendan Frazier, Founder of Wired Planning, speaker, host of The Human Side of Money podcast, and former baseball player, joins me from Nashville, Tennessee, on today's episode of Bridging The Gap.Brendan shares his journey from baseball to financial advice, behavioral coaching, behavioral psychology, and research on helping clients and their actions. We also discuss understanding your clients' “why,” the significance of identifying your clients' financial journey, and the importance of drawing the line between knowing what your clients need to hear and see value in and what they don't. Guest Bio: Brendan Frazier is the founder of Wired Planning, the host of The Human Side of Money podcast, a keynote speaker, and was named one of Investopedia's Top 100 Financial Advisors. He's building a global community and training program for advisors to master the human side of advice, enhance their client's lives, and forever change the trajectory of their business.Mentioned in this episode:Benjamin

The Circuit
Mitch Frazier | AgriNovus: AgTech and Indiana's Booming Agbioscience Economy

The Circuit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 43:43 Transcription Available


In today's episode, we talk to Mitch Frazier, CEO at AgriNovus.  Part of the Central Indiana Corporate Partnership, AgriNovus is a non-profit fueling growth in Indiana's agbioscience community. Mitch talks about his career and his leadership, the intersection of tech and agbioscience, and what the future holds for the industry. 

JD Talkin Sports
JD TALKIN SPORTS #1148

JD Talkin Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 56:07


Last night NINTH straight game for #lukadoncic with 30 points in @dallasmavs win over #kevindurant @brooklynnets who fell to 4-7.  #wiltchamberlain has the record of 23 such games to start a season.  Impressive.  @unc_basketball & @umichbball both won opening games last night.  @colts have #jeffsaturday running the show & #parksfrazier will be calling plays Sunday vs @raiders in a game that looked great on paper before the @nfl season started.  Frazier is 30 and is listed as pass game specialist/assistant QB coach.  Have to start somewhere right? #jimirsay what's #coltsnation think about your recent moves?  I asked a few and they're not happy. @yankeesrecaps if he becomes available @orix_buffaloes #masatakayoshida one of #nipponprofessionalbaseball best hitters is someone the @yankees have interest in but make no mistake he's no #aaronjudge and 29 years old.   Keeping all their options open.  @ny_islanders @nyrangers tonight. #potvinsucks 

PHT in the Morning with Pastor David Miller
Interview with Ron Frazier

PHT in the Morning with Pastor David Miller

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 17:18


This week Pastor Miller is interviewing Ron Frazier. You won't want to miss this interview. 

Sweet Film Talk
Take 208 - Sweet Film Tár: Tár & Banshees of Inisherin Reviews + Most Overlooked 2022 New Releases ft Spencer Davis & Nick Frazier

Sweet Film Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 80:06


WOWOWOWOWOW EVERYONE!!! We've got a double header again! Two AMAZING movies that are playing now, mixed with some great commentary from previous guest hosts: Spencer Davis & Nick Frazier. How we been? (0:00) Fav Movie News (12:15) - Keeks: Avatar: The Way of Water Trailer (12:15) - Spencer: "Hercules is going to be inspired by Tik Tok" (15:19) - Nick: No Fantastic Beasts 4 (20:20) Fav Watches (24:55) - Spencer: Punch Drunk Love & Weird (24:55) - Nick: Over the Garden Wall (27:30) - Keeks: The Watcher (29:30) TÁR Review (32:30) Banshees of Inisherin Review (48:36) Most Overlooked 2022 Movies (1:05:40) ON THE SLATE: BLACK PANTHER: WAKANDA FOREVER REVIEW WOWOWOWOWOW WE ARE ALMOST THERE! WAKANDA FOREVER IS COMING AND WE ARE STOKED FOR MOVIE SEASON TO RAMP UP A BIT MORE

Bills Football
11-07 Leslie Frazier

Bills Football

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 13:54


Coffin Talk
#94 - A Spiritual Reverend - Celeste Frazier - "I'm Direct"

Coffin Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 26:07


Celeste is an inspirational speaker, podcaster, counselor, visioning facilitator, teacher, and writer. She has directed outreach ministries to convalescent homes, children's hospitals, hospices, and prisons, providing shut-ins with love and light. Her books are on Amazon and Kindle and her website is celestefrazier.comLike our podcast?  Please rate us on Apple and subscribe at mikeyopp.com! Get full access to The Casual Casuist at mikeyopp.substack.com/subscribe

Life Science Success
Trivia Frazier PhD, MBA - CEO Obatala Sciences

Life Science Success

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 8:11


This is my first time having a returning guest on the Life Science Success Podcast. Trivia Frazier, PhD, MBA sat down with me to give me an update on Obatala Sciences. They are currently expanding their commercial team and overall footprint. It was such a blast to sit down with someone who has been on the show previously.

The Sarah Lawrence Library Podcast
SLC - EP23 - Melissa Frazier

The Sarah Lawrence Library Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 31:25


This week Tim Kail is joined by SLC faculty Melissa Frazier. On Melissa: "AB, Harvard University. PhD, University of California–Berkeley. Special interests include the 19th-century novel and literature and the literary marketplace. Author of articles and books on topics including Pushkin, Senkovskii, Gogol, Tolstoy, and Russian Formalism. Awarded the 2007 Jean-Pierre Barricelli Prize for “Best Work in Romanticism Studies,” by the International Conference of Romanticism, for Romantic Encounters: Writers, Readers, and the “Library for Reading” (Stanford University Press, 2007). SLC, 1995–" via SLC's website. Tim & Melissa discuss language, consciousness, academia, and her plans for the future. Follow The SLC Library on Facebook and Instagram @SLCLibrary. Visit the Library's website at www.sarahlawrence.edu/library. Visit the Learning Commons website at https://www.sarahlawrence.edu/library/learningcommons/ Thank you for listening.

Patient Partner Innovation Community Podcast
60. Reimaging Health Care: Mental Health in Black & Brown Communities

Patient Partner Innovation Community Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 34:13


Dr. Chantell Frazier is the CEO and Founder of Anansi, LLC. Anansi is a boutique data and research strategy consulting firm focused on improving black mental health and mental health in other communities of color. She is a thought leader, researcher, and strategist. She loves research but believes in doing studies that make an impact and matters. She focuses on metrics, research design, data strategy and policy insights that will lead to real opportunities in mental health for black and brown communities. Interested in learning more about her organization at hello@anansiresearch.com. Here’s a glimpse of what you’ll learn: Understanding what tools and resources are needed to improve mental health outcomes for patients and families of color. Learn how story telling partnered with data can drive change in healthcare systems. Understand how COVID has exasperated mental health issues in our communities Build a more solution-based way of thinking to address the SDOH factors that affect mental wellness in black and brown communities The impact of bringing in diverse voices into the work of research and quality improvement In this episode…. This week’s podcast features Dr. Chantell Frazier. She discusses how the importance of utilizing data to drive change in the black and brown communities. She identifies the gap in data collection and research in communities of color. Dr. Frazier explains how story telling can complement data to improve health outcomes. She was empowered to create her organization Anansi, LLC. Anansi is focused on improving mental health in communities of color. She will leave you inspired into action.

BiggerPockets Daily
747 - Want to Know the Easiest Way to Buy a Million-Dollar Property? Fractional Investing by Ryan Frazier

BiggerPockets Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 7:10


https://www.biggerpockets.com/blog/buy-real-estate-with-fractional-investingSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

FrazierChronicles Podcast
David Frazier Political talk with special Guest Michael Gardner

FrazierChronicles Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 34:21


David Frazier and special guest Michael Gardner from the Savage Unfiltered podcast, comes and talks politics. Today we see inflation is at an all time high and this is bringing about a lot of changes here in America, as well as all over the world. The talk about Rent, Food, Electric Vehicles, and much much more, make sure to tune in for this discussion between the two here on the greatest podcast known to man Frazierchronicles podcast. You can follow David on social media at FrazierChronicles You can follow Michael on social media at SavageUnfiltered They both can be heard on all major podcasting platforms to include; Apple, Spotify, Iheartradio, Amazon, and others. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/david-frazier7/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/david-frazier7/support

I Survived Theatre School

Intro: Nasty neighbors in the Great Unraveling, The Rest MovementLet Me Run This By You: RejectionInterview: We talk to Tina Huang about soap opera acting, LaGuardia High School, the Playwrights Horizon program at Tisch, breaking down barriers for Asian actors, Ammunition Theatre Company, Revenge Porn or the Story of a Body by Carla Ching, Bay Area Theatre, Pig Hunt, starting a fake management company,  Word for Word Performing Arts Company, Intersection for the Arts, Campo Santo, Amy Tan, 1:1 Productions, Karla Mosley, Jeanne Sakata. FULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited):1 (8s):I'm Jen Bosworth Ramirez this, and I'm Gina Pulice.2 (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it.3 (15s):20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of2 (20s):It all. We survive theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet?0 (34s):You2 (35s):Part of the building.1 (36s):Okay,2 (37s):Great. I don't know how it's gonna go.1 (41s):I mean, nobody knows how it's gonna go. It's unknowable until we know it.2 (45s):That is true. Good morning.1 (48s):Good. Margie,2 (50s):Your makeup looks amazing.1 (53s):Thank you. I'm not doing well, so I'm acting opposite. You know that skill?2 (59s):Oh, I know. Oh, that's like, I would say like 90% of adulthood. Anyway. What's happening? What, what is, if you wanna get into it, like what's the overall arching shittiness,1 (1m 10s):The overarching thing is just, Well, my neighbor I told you about.2 (1m 15s):Okay. And I just wanna put it out there and we'll get into the story, but I wanna put it out there that I, we are in, and we've said this before on the podcast in what I would call, and others like Gina would call probably similar, the great unraveling of our society. So it's like Rome is falling and I, I don't even say it, it sounds so cavalier the way I'm saying it, but I literally every day see evidence of the great unraveling of the American sweater. You know what I mean? Like it's coming out. Yes. Yeah. And we, it's okay. And I think one of those things is terrible neighbors, right? Like, people who are terrible are just getting more terrible.2 (1m 58s):So Gina has a neighbor that is very terrible.1 (2m 0s):Yeah. People just over the last several years do seem to feel way more comfortable just being extremely hor. Horrible. Horrible. So what, So this is the same neighbor that I've talked about before. And basically the deal with her is it's like she's obsessed with us. And, and like, what she doesn't understand is that we just work very hard to avoid her, you know, avoid interacting with her at any cause. I realized yesterday after she screamed at me that she has screamed at three fifths of my family members.1 (2m 40s):She only hasn't screamed at the nine year old and the, and the 14 year old. It's so insane. She's the one who Aaron was walking the dog and he had a flashlight and the dog was really young and he was trying to train him. So he kept like stopping and starting screens out. It's very disconcerting to be sitting in my living room and seeing a flashing light in front of my house, house. Like, he's like, I'm walking the dog. And the same one who when she was walking her dogs and he was walking our dog, she's like, It's not a great time to be walking your dog because her dogs are out of control. And she's yelled at my son a few times. Anyway, so what happened was, I walked the dog, I picked up the poop, I had the little baggy. If it's anybody else's house, I feel comfortable putting it in their trash2 (3m 23s):Can. Yeah. Here's the deal. Here's the deal. I hate to tell you people, but poop is trash. There's like nowhere else to put it. So if you, if you are like not okay with pooping in your trash in a bag tied up, then you don't need to live in a society where there are dogs or where there are trash. Cause that's what it1 (3m 44s):Is, Honestly. Honestly. And it's like, I feel like a big part of what's driving all this bad behavior is just like, so much entitlement. Like, I'm entitled to have only my trash in my trash can. And it's like, okay, you've never lived in New York City, right? Cause you don't understand anything about cooperative living. And anybody, whether they live in my neighborhood or not, is welcome to put their poop2 (4m 6s):Back. Yeah, dude.1 (4m 7s):So I'm walking by and I'm talking on the phone stuff, somewhat distracted, and I see this trash can, and I go, I like reach out ever So tentatively, not tentatively, but like, I had barely started to reach out, realized it was their house didn't. And within milliseconds, she is out of her house screaming at me. And I hadn't even, you know, put the poop in there. And I, I'm talking about misbehavior. I mean, I've, I don't think I've ever done this except for like having road rage in the car where the other person really can't hear me. Like I just screamed every obscenity Yes.1 (4m 48s):In the book. I, I hope nobody else, I'm sure somebody else heard, but nobody, nobody's contacted me. And, you know, I'll say this, I'm much better about taking a beat. Like, I really wanted to blast her. I really wanted to like write a horrible message to her. I really want, and I, and I don't, I'm not refined enough, well enough evolved enough to like get right to like, what's, what's the need of the matter? But I have figured out that I should probably just not say anything until, until I've thought about it. I had a good long think she messaged me on social2 (5m 22s):Media. What1 (5m 23s):She said, I'm sorry, I accused you of throwing trash in our trash can. And I just blocked her. I'm just like, you know, I, I, I wanted, what I wanted to say is like, you have no idea how much time we spend trying to avoid you. You are unwell. You have yelled at three fifths of my family, like, never speak to me or my children ever again. Forget I exist. Forget I live right across the street from you because that's what I'm trying to do about you. So2 (5m 50s):Instead you just blocked her. Well listen that, that, because when you told me this story yesterday that she, the the reach out on social media hadn't happened. So now I'm like, I think what, before you said that part, I was gonna say like, I think our only recourse is what people do, which is start videotaping the insanity. And I'm not sure that's a really a good solution. Like, I think that like, oh sure, people put it on social media and then there's a laugh, but then we're really laughing at sort of the horribleness and the, and the mental illness of others. And it's their person and who knows how that's gonna negatively affect them or their job or their family. So I don't, like, I understand the, the urge to videotape everything, but I'm not sure that's really the answer with, with non-criminal behavior.2 (6m 40s):If it's a crime, then it's something else. But if it's just to embarrass or ashamed someone I, I'm, I have second thoughts about the videotaping now, but good for you for just blocking it. It, you know, what it is, is if to say, we are done with this, we are done with this.1 (6m 57s):Yeah. Yeah. And you lie down with dogs and you get fleas. Yes. And I don't really wanna bring that energy into my life. And sometimes, you know, if you get, if you're like a person who consumes as much media as I do, you get this false sense of like, what I would do in that, you know, in a certain situation when it's theoretical, I feel very, like, not even brave, but just like aggressive and entitled. And I can get to a point where I feel like I could hear myself saying like, Oh, I would kill that person. Or I would, which of course I would never do. In fact, I don't even wanna like, say anything unkind about them in a very public way. So knowing me and knowing my values, and you could just never go wrong if you stick with your own values. Like, it's not my value to, it's not my value to tell people, You know what, here's a thing you need to know about yourself.1 (7m 43s):And it's not my val even though I do that with people, people that I know, but not strangers. And it's my value to like, keep as much peace in my life as possible. And it's not my value to engage with toxic people with whom I could only ever have a toxic Yeah. You know,2 (8m 0s):Interaction. Right. It's not gonna get better. It's like a legit never gonna get better because it's just, that's not how, that's not how it works if you engage in that. So anyway, that okay. But that, that has nothing to do with the overarching shitty No,1 (8m 14s):The overarching thing is just like, wow, parenting is so hard. People, people are really, people learn at different rates. People learn lessons at different rates. People mature at different rates. Like, and having patience for somebody who's really behind in so many ways is exhausting and overwhelming to me. So there's that piece. There's like, you know, a relative with having a health crisis, there's,2 (8m 45s):Oh,1 (8m 46s):There's just stuff going on. Yeah. And, but this is what I'm doing differently this time. Okay. I am trying to stay with myself, which is to say, yes, things are terrible, things are going wrong, but I am not gonna abandon myself in the process. Yeah. Of like, feeling my way through it. And in fact, that's another new thing, is I'm feeling my way through it and I'm really trying to apply this thing about taking a beat and like how crazy, you know, Aaron is also having, we're simultaneously having this growth moment. And, and you know, he recently made a big stride with somebody in his family who's having a health crisis, and he, he said, You know something I like, I'm not gonna go to crazy town.1 (9m 32s):Like I, he, I saw the light bulb for him. Like, I have a choice about whether or not I wanna go to crazy town on this. And actually I don't, because actually it's bad for my, because you know, I was thinking about this when I was at Costco today and I was doing some something small and I was wanting to like, do it really fast. And I thought, why do I wanna do everything so fast? Like, my shoulders are tense all the time. Like, I don't wanna do anything so fast anymore. There's no reason I'm not in any rush. Like I, there's, it's, it's just a habit from youth. I feel like just doing everything in a big rush, rush, rush. Yeah. And I think it's time to let that go.2 (10m 9s):Oh, I mean it's, so I feel like it's such an intense and like right on timing because there's this whole movement about rest. Have you heard about this? Like rest is radical, Rest is as a revolution. So there's a black woman and I believe I, I I I, I am ignorant to what her like specialty is area. And I just started hearing about it. And Miles my husband was listening to her an interview with her about how rest, not napping, not, but like r really snatching and holding dear to the idea of rest as, as radicalism, rest as a revolution opposite of hustle.2 (10m 50s):Culture is like gonna be the way that we, this is my interpretation of what she's saying. Like, the way that we sort of fight injustice and in fight racism, all the isms is by really embracing rest culture as opposed to hustle culture. So1 (11m 8s):I love that. And by the way, black women are spawn every good thing there is in the world. Like, you find a trend that's happening in society that you like and think is really positive. You can definitely trace it back to a black woman who, who, who, who started, who started it. So that's great. I'm pro rest, I'm, and I'm also trying to do less of like I'm a human being, not a human doing. And like, if I don't cross everything off of my to-do list, that doesn't, you know, it's not, it's not like I'm, it's not a wasted day if I didn't get all my little tasks done, you know, especially I was emotionally dealing with something else.2 (11m 45s):Yes, yes. That's the other thing. It's that the, the emotional, you know, I think like if it's become such sort of a, I don't know, buzzword or whatever phrase, emotional labor, but I do think that the time that I spend thinking, feeling and, and, and doing internal work, I've never counted as anything. And I think the way, and, and watching, especially having watched in white male dominated Hollywood for so long, Let me tell you something, Those motherfuckers rest okay. They rest when they, when, So don't you think for one second that the people who are on top or seemingly running shit or whatever or are running shit are not resting because they are, they can, they may set the trend for hustle culture, but they're really talking ultimately about the rest of us hustling because they have yachts and vacation homes.2 (12m 43s):They rest. I don't care what you say. You know what I mean? Yeah.1 (12m 46s):It's, it's such a, it's such a, I don't even know how to describe it. It's such, it's like a comical notion that these masters of the universe are really hustling all the time because all of their work is built on the backs of people who are oppressed in one way or another. So really everybody under them is hustling. Correct. Much, much more than they are,2 (13m 8s):Right? Yes.1 (13m 9s):And we've been able to outsource all their, you know, a domestic, everybody we've been able to out Yeah. Everything. Yeah.2 (13m 16s):And like, I think, I think the other, the other sort of weird shit is that like, you know, the older I get, and we've talked about this a lot on the podcast, is the more I realize like it's all a pyramid scheme, right? Like, so any capitalism thing that you are into, whether it's Hollywood, whether it's Wall Street, whether it's, I don't care, like anything, whether you work in tech, anything is all basically a pyramid scheme because that is what capitalism is. And so I feel like there are just more and more subtle ways in which I am seeing that the, you know, the rules are never fair and the what's behind the curtain is always the same, which is a select few who tend to be, you know, white males are really running the show.2 (14m 10s):And we shall see what if it, if it changes with, without a civil war. Like, I, I don't know.1 (14m 17s):Yeah. Yeah. And you know, I I I always think of like great ideas for memes, but then I never make them. But we should do one of like, you know, a picture of that, of the Wizard of Oz and, and when we see the curtain and you know, what the internet is what has opened the curtain really, you know, kind of exposed and reality TV to some degree has exposed and documentaries have exposed like the truth of what's going on. The great unraveling is also like the great discovery of what the actual truth is.2 (14m 48s):Sure. Yes. I mean, when you, when you unravel the sweater, it's like what is under there is is like this old decrepit white dude who's flabby and, and not in shape telling the rest of us that we're fat lards and need to get it together. And that is what's happening. So I'm not, and the other thing I'm not doing, it's really interesting. It's like I've made a conscious decision to literally stop following up with people who are not following up with me.1 (15m 22s):Yes. Yeah.2 (15m 23s):I'm not following up, I'm not circling back. I'm not, I'm not hitting you up again. I'm not waiting three months and then putting it on my calendar to circle back. I'm done, I'm done with all that. I don't, I don't have anymore resources to circle back. Like, I'm not willing. Yeah. So if we have a thing and we're supposed to meet and you can't do it, or you, you keep putting it off, it's over. Unless you wanna come out of the blue and say, Hey, I realize that like we never met. Are you interested in meeting on this day at this time? And then I am okay. Because it is just my following up is taking up too much time. I'm not, I'm not1 (15m 58s):Interested taking too much time. It's, that's emotional labor too. And also, like I've gotten to the point in life where I, if, if I reach out and somebody says, Yeah, and then we go, you know, we try to firm it up and they, they ghost me, which by the way, I have done bajillions of times me to, I just understand it as the way that you're communicating to me non-verbally that you actually don't wanna be part of this thing. Correct. Which is totally fine because a lot of us over commit and can't, you know, carry out our commitments. It's fine. But I'm less inclined even after like one interaction that because the person is telling me who they are, if not who they are, how they actually feel. You know, because you make, you make, you make time for whatever you want to make2 (16m 38s):Time for. That is absolutely true. And I also feel like I am so like, okay, so we bought this house, we bought, I don't know if you know this, but we bought the second house. We didn't buy the first house. The first house was got invested with no, Oh yeah. I forgot to tell you this because I was waiting for the podcast. But, and then, anyway, that first house, I have to send you the pictures of our real house. The first house was owned by Open Door, which is a horrible private equity company that just bought up all the houses in southern California. And anyway, they communication is horrible. They treated my realtor and us like crap. And, and so we just walked away from the deal, got our earnest money back because they would not fucking fix their fucking $8,000 termite problem.2 (17m 23s):So we were like, bye, I'm done. So then we found this other house built in 1980 that I fucking adore. And so it is so dope and I am restoring it to its 1980s glory. So it's gonna be an eighties. Like every room, every room is gonna have sort of an anchor of 1980. It's a very specific year because it's like the, the seventies are still, which is why I was like, can you make my neon sign1 (17m 48s):Pink? Yes, By the way, which I did look into and I would love to do for you, but to get what we wanna put on it is like a minimum thousand dollars.2 (17m 57s):Yeah, let's not do that. Don't do that. We'll do it. Yeah. We1 (18m 1s):Could slash I was trying to do like fa slash o you know, as a, as an acronym.2 (18m 9s):Let's just do people do it all the time. People put f fa Yeah, yeah, just do that. Don't worry about it. Okay. But so, okay, so what I'm saying is like, I'm obsessed now with picking out pieces for this new home that we, we, we close on the 7th of November and we move at the end of November. And so all this to say is like, I've realized I would much rather look at giant pink velvet sectionals that are retro refurbished from the 19, from 1980 than fucking follow up and circle back with your motherfucking whatever you're gonna help me with. Yeah. I would much rather look at, oh my God, they made what in the eighties.2 (18m 51s):That is, I I would much rather like focus it on my life and like how to bring creativity and art to this our first home that we're gonna own. You know, And then fucking track you, your ass down. Who doesn't wanna hang out with me in the first place? Bye bye.1 (19m 13s):Hey,2 (19m 14s):Let run this by1 (19m 15s):You today is about rejection.2 (19m 25s):I love it.1 (19m 26s):I'm sure we've talked about it here. Oh, I'm sure we run it by each other before here. But, you know, it's one of those perennial topics. So I, I liked truly by happenstance learned about an opportunity to direct something. Not with a theater company that I used to work with, but a different or organization. And it just so happened they were doing this play and, and the person who was producing it was like, Oh, we're looking for a director who's this and this? And I go, Oh my God, that's me. Yeah. So she says, Great, you know, and submit. And I submitted and, and I had, I submitted and four months before I got a call from anybody saying, Can you come in for an interview?1 (20m 10s):And then when they did, not a call, an email from somebody who emailed me at 2:00 PM asking me if I could come at 7:00 PM2 (20m 18s):Yeah.1 (20m 19s):Now I wanted to do this. So I, I did, I hustled, I got it together. I wrote up like my, I wrote like a thesis basically on who I am as a director. And then I went to the interview with, with eight, eight or nine people there.2 (20m 35s):Oh my god.1 (20m 37s):Yeah. And you know, there was one qualification for this job that I was missing, but it wasn't something, It wasn't, to me it wasn't a deal breaker. And I was, I was very upfront, I said it right in the beginning anyway, this theater is not necessarily that high profile, which is an understatement.2 (21m 0s):I just can't believe that's too many people in a fucking interview. No, I literally wrote eight person It's too scary in person.1 (21m 8s):Yes, in person. And honestly, like even that wasn't bad because I, you know how you can just get in there and be in the zone and turn it on. And I was charming and I was, you know, an answering questions like honestly, but in a way that I felt demonstrated my competence, et cetera. Now I didn't exactly have it in my mind, like they'd be lucky to have me, but when I got rejected, I thought they would've been lucky to have me. Like, that was a mistake. What2 (21m 32s):The fuck? Did they reject you? What the fuck? Who'd they pick? What the fuck?1 (21m 36s):They, I don't know. And I've, you know, I'm trying to be politic here cuz there's people that I like who are part of this group, but it just, it just didn't work out that way. They, they, so, I don't know, I don't know who they picked, but they, but at the end of her email she said, We'd like you to re resubmit for like, this next opportunity. And so I'm working on, you know, like, it's not that if I had to do it over again, I would've done it differently. But when I really got clear with myself about things, I, you know, I was not that excited about this opportunity because it wasn't going to do anything for my career.1 (22m 21s):It really was just gonna be like an opportunity to direct and flex my muscles, which I would've loved to do. And so I, I, you know, as an actor you have to deal with rejection all the time. I just would love to know, like, actors do seem to have amazing strategies, seasoned ones, and the thing I hear the most often people say is like, after the audition, just forget it. Don't ever think about it again. But I would love to hear what your strategy2 (22m 45s):Look are. I think that for people that are, that are working and auditioning or interviewing all the time that you, that that is a really good strategy. The Brian Cranston method, which is you, you just do it and forget it. However, for those of us who don't do that every day, all day long, where it's like the one thing is more important because it's the one thing that we go out for. Like, I, like for me, I don't audition all the time. So like, when I get an opportunity from my agent, I take it really seriously and I wanna book it. And I'm, I really put in a lot of work in time. Okay, fine.2 (23m 24s):So I, it's so easy to say one and done, like forget it. But I think that that's great if that's where people are, like Brian Cranston, Okay, does he even have to audition for things anymore? I don't know. But for me, the thing that really works is what something you just said, which is to really go through and say, did I, what, what did I want about this thing? Because did I just wanna be picked? Because of course that's really valid. Like who the fuck doesn't wanna be special and picked if you say you don't, you're a sociopath like that, I don't care. You know? So I wanna be loved and picked, so that hurts on that level.2 (24m 6s):And then if I go deeper, I'm like, okay, but what is the thing that I liked about this particular interaction? Possible collaboration. Okay, well I really wanted to get more practice on what for me would be like practice on set, working out how not to be nervous on set. Okay. So I I'm gonna miss that opportunity, but like if I look at the text, did I really connect to it? Not really. So it's not that. So I think it's just like literally like what you said before, which is giving yourself and myself the time to feel my way through and think, okay, like what is upsetting about this? What is upsetting for me? It would be, if I was in your shoes, it would be like, I spent a lot of time and energy interfacing with these people.2 (24m 50s):Even if it was like, so if you, from when you submitted, even though that you weren't like thinking about it all the time, it was still hanging in the air for four months. Right? It's a four month long. Even if it's in the back of your, of, in the ethos, it's still there. Okay. So it's still like on the table. And then you finally have an interview with all these people, lovely people, whether or not it doesn't matter, you're still give, putting out so much fucking energy. And so what it feels to me, like, I would feel like, oh, like I did my best. I put myself out there, I made a case for myself and my work in front of a lot of people and I didn't get the thing.2 (25m 31s):And that just feels shitty.1 (25m 33s):It does. It just, and there's no way around it. Like sometimes things just feel shitty. And I did definitely wanna be picked the, the idea that somebody would, you know, the, like I'm a sucker for an opportunity to be picked for something. I don't, I don't necessarily like avoid things. I don't avoid things that could, you know, possibly lead in rejection. I, I, I approach those things or I try to, but it was the thing I said earlier, like, I just wanted, I just thought, oh, it'd be so fun to, to work on this, but upon reflection there are 1 million things I could be working on and would love to work on. And that would've prevented me from do, you know, for a period of time that would've prevented me from working on those things.1 (26m 16s):So it's a blessing and I what's for you will not go by you. I totally believe in that. And it was my, in fact it was my mantra that, you know, yesterday when I found out. So,2 (26m 26s):And, and, and, and to be fair, like you just found out. So like, if it was like three months from now, like I've had friends who, and I, I mean I may have had this too, where like it lasts more than 24 hours. This feeling of why did I get rejected? Why, why, why? What could I have done? Why didn't they like me? Look, it's been less than 20, you know, you're fine. Yeah. Like, you're not, Yeah. So I, I but rejection is something that is like the, the true, the true greats that I love seem to, their take on rejection is like, it gets easier the more you get rejected.1 (27m 13s):Today on the podcast, we are talking to Tina Wong, You are in for such a treat. Tina is amazing. Not only does she star and has starred on almost all of the soap operas, you've seen her in television film, She's an actor, a writer, a director, a producer. She does film television. She's a voiceover artist too. She does theater. She truly, truly, truly does it all. We really loved talking to her and we hope you enjoy our conversation with Tina Juan,0 (27m 47s):I'm2 (27m 47s):Not totally losing, losing it. Anyway, you survived and you went, you did a lot of things. I, I mean, first we're gonna get to it all, but can I just say, and I can because this is, this is, this is the platform to say it. I love that you were on two soap operas and more people, maybe more than two. Were you on more than two or just4 (28m 7s):Yeah, yeah,2 (28m 8s):Because Yeah, go ahead.4 (28m 11s):No, most recently just two, but yes.2 (28m 13s):Okay. So here's the thing about that is that I don't care. We went to theater school and I know a lot of people think that that is, or some people talk shit about soap operas in terms of acting. Yeah. I have never seen or heard actors work as hard as my friends that have been on soap operas. And in terms of the pace and the pacing and the, the amount of work that is required of, of, of actors at soap operas a stunning. So I just love it because I think that it is like, from what my, what I know about it, it's like a gymnastics routine that people are doing on those sets. So we'll go, I just wanna say that I like give full props to that because it's not a joke soap opera work.2 (28m 55s):It is not a joke. Thank4 (28m 56s):You. Yeah, thank you. I appreciate that. Shut2 (28m 58s):Out. Yeah, thank you.1 (29m 0s):So I'll just ask then, pursuant to that, because I think you are the first person we're interviewing who was on a soap opera, and I would love to know everything about the process of your audition and how you, Cause I've heard, I, I used to, I used to, when I was in high school, my show was days and I read soap, Opera Digest and everything. But I would love to know, like I've heard some people describe it as more of a, it can sometimes have a feeling of more of a regular job since it's like daytime hours, et cetera. But I would love to hear what your experience of just the work of being on a soap opera.4 (29m 34s):Well, first of all, I love everyone that I work with. I'm, I'm on days, so, but you're2 (29m 40s):Still on it. Oh my, my gosh.4 (29m 41s):I'm still on it. I'm still on it. So in fact, I'm like shooting six episodes next week. So I'm, I'm on a little break in Canada, just like here having a little vacation before we go.2 (29m 54s):Good for you. Oh my gosh. Six in a week. It's like Saturday Night Live. What's happening? Okay. How did you get on these? What was your first one that you were on, first of all? Was4 (30m 2s):It the first one? The first one I was on was I think days. And then when I first came to LA and then I did General Hospital and then I did Young and the Restless, and then I did, then I was on Bold and the Beautiful and Days at the same time during the Pandemic. And then now I'm on days Doing days.2 (30m 24s):Oh my Tina, Tina Bow Tina. This is, this is, this is incredible because what this tells me is that you are extremely obviously talented, but we know that because I've seen you on Rezo and aisles, all the things, but it's also, you are, it must be really wonderful to work with because people keep bringing you back and back and back. So you must be like a real sort of team player, which I bet is part of your theater tra like you are an ensemble. Yes. Right?4 (30m 53s):Yes. I think the best part about doing any of this is the collaboration part. You know, when people don't want, it's funny when people don't like notes and don't like getting notes. I'm always like, I love notes. Like I can't just do this on my own and act in a bag. Like I need, I need you to like tell me what's going on. What do you see that I don't see, you know, all of that is, that's the best part. The collaboration. Yeah.1 (31m 14s):So I'm still eager to know a little bit more about like how you, how it started with your audition and how you experience the day to day work of being a soap opera for actor Sure. As opposed to any other type of actor.4 (31m 26s):Sure. Well, I, I got the audition to, to go in for days and I read for Marni Satya, who, I hope I'm saying her name right, who's the casting director. And it went well. And she said, you know, we have a call back. And I said, great. I can't remember if that was the next day or if that was the same day. It may have been the same day. And she told me to just wait, I can't remember. Cuz the producers were upstairs and they wanted to do producer sessions right away and, or it may have been the next day and she, they sent sides, you know, again, but I just assumed they were the same audition and it was like 14 pages. It was like a lot of pages. But just so you know, soap scripts are, you know, one and a half spacing.4 (32m 9s):Oh yeah. So it's not single spacing, but2 (32m 11s):Still, still it's a dialogue. Listen, I, I'm like an under 10. I like always do an under 10 because that's my jam. I have trouble with that. I don't, Oh my, you must be, you're okay. So you get all these pages and you assumed it was the same, but I'm guessing it wasn't the same.4 (32m 27s):So I show up and she wanted just read all of us ladies that came back in to, to for the producer session and just like talk to us and all that kind of stuff. And she said, So you got the new scenes? And I said, New scenes, No. And then she said, Oh well we gotta go, we gotta go up to the producers right now. So we all walked up and she goes, Don't worry, I'll put you last, you know, don't hear the new scripts.2 (32m 51s):Oh my god. The new scripts. I'm peeing my pants right here. Okay, go ahead. And I4 (32m 56s):Don't remember how different it was, but I, I think it was quite different.2 (32m 60s):Like,4 (33m 1s):And she said, just take, you know, whatever time we'll put you last. And there was like maybe four, four women that, excuse me, my nose is running, but four women ahead of me and I just studied. Oh2 (33m 12s):My God. You were like, okay, nyu. Okay, tons of Shakespeare, memorization don't fail me now. Right. So, okay, so you go, were you nervous? Which it's4 (33m 23s):Harder when you get older.2 (33m 25s):No shit. Okay. Right. So you go in the room and there's producers there, obviously it's a producer's session. And is the casting lady still in the room with you?4 (33m 34s):She, she's still in the room and it was only one producer, the executive producer, so it's just him. But it was a big conference room. Anyway, when I was waiting to go in, one of the actresses, like, I guess they overheard what had happened and this, this another actor said, You didn't get the sides? And I said, No, you didn't get the new scenes. I said, No. And she said, That's sucks. That's terrible. I'm like, Yeah, I'm just gonna study. Yeah, I'm2 (34m 3s):Just studying like, be quiet. Like leave me alone. Right,4 (34m 7s):Right.2 (34m 7s):Not helpful. Not helpful. Not helpful.4 (34m 10s):I'm, I'm not that person. I don't compete with anybody in the audition room. I compete with myself and I think maybe that's part of my success. I just, I'm hard enough on myself. I don't need to add like everyone else has a distraction. But it was really interesting. So, so then he, they called me in and it went really well. I mean, it was just this huge conference room with a giant table in between us. So it was like, not like a theater setup or an audition room, A normal audition room. And it went really well. I mean, I think I sobbed, I think I was shaking, I think like all of those things. And maybe it was from the, that cold read sort of nerves that just let me just go with my, just go with my intuition, you know?4 (34m 53s):Yeah,1 (34m 54s):Right. No time to think and obsess and, and worry about it. Right. Do you get to, like, considering how much dialogue you have to memorize every single day for the next day's work, is there any room for improvisation or do you, are you supposed to say it word for word?4 (35m 9s):Supposed to say it word for word? I think there's a little bit of leeway. You know, the longer you've been on the show, they, they don't, you can't improv for sure. It's all written, but, you know, if you get a the instead of and or you know, those little things, the pace is so quick that they're not gonna redo the, and we usually get one to two takes. Right. We don't get multiple takes.2 (35m 30s):Oh my, my God.4 (35m 32s):It moves at an incredible speed. So when you said what you said about soap acting and soap actors, I really have a tremendous respect. I think a lot of people like to put judgment on high art and low art. And I, I don't really get the point of that, but, but they, people love it. People watch it, it gives them a sense of comfort. And the actors that I've met are so hardworking and so talented, like very good actors. They're just in the job that they're in. You know what I mean? And a lot of it's a lot of this soap acting is soap work has gotten better. So1 (36m 5s):Absolutely. I would go so far as to say that's probably a sexist thing that soap, soap operas have whatever reputation that they do because you know, anything that a lot of women like people tend to denigrate. Right. Okay. So did you always want to be an actor? Did you always want to go to theater school? What was your journey when you were picking colleges?4 (36m 33s):Wow. You know, I, being a Asian American woman, I didn't really see that it would be a possible career path for me. I was like a secret artist, you know, like inside I really wanted to be on the stage and I really wanted to act and all of that. But I didn't have examples really. I think growing up I had like for a short stint Margaret Show and, and Lucy Lou and you know, very few and then like Chinese actresses that I knew of. But it was a tough journey. So I secretly auditioned for LaGuardia music and art and performing arts in New York City. You know, the fame high school? Oh2 (37m 12s):Yeah. Oh yeah. I know that you went there and I'm wondering, like you seek, what does it mean to secretly audition where you didn't tell your folks and you were like, I'm out.4 (37m 20s):Didn't tell my folks. Yeah, I mean, how old are you when you start high school? I mean, I was probably, Oh yeah, what are we, 12? No, 13. 13.1 (37m 28s):13. I, No, 13. Really young, really4 (37m 30s):Young.1 (37m 31s):13. Do that on your own.4 (37m 32s):So I, you know, I grew up in New York City, so I took the subway up. I I applied to audition and, well first I was in the, the fine arts program, so, which they also didn't like. And I had an amazing art teacher in junior high school who mentored me to make, make a portfolio and all this kind of stuff. So I'd gone up and did the art test without telling my parents. And I, and I got into the art program. Wait a minute2 (37m 55s):Differently. You didn't get into the, you went for fine art. For, for and you, what do you mean the art test? What the hell is that? That sounds horrifying. What do you mean an art test?4 (38m 7s):So, well I didn't, I didn't audition yet for theater cause I think it was too scary at that moment for me. So first I did the art program because I was encouraged by a grown up teacher who was like, thought she saw talent in me, which was very amazing to have a teacher like that. And the art test was, you had to have a full portfolio, like at least 10 or 15 pieces in a portfolio. So you carry that big old thing. Like imagine a 12 year old kid carrying a portfolio uptown. I mean it's just, it's, it's crazy when I think about it. And then you get there and there's like a still life setup and there's all the, everybody sits around on desks and you have to draw, you have to draw the still life,2 (38m 48s):My god, all the pressure. And4 (38m 49s):Then they bring in, and then they bring in a model and then you have to draw the model2 (38m 55s):A. This is like my nightmare of like any kind of that where you're like, it's a test. Anxiety, high pressure, pressure, creativity, high pressure on the spot, creativity. I would've been passed out. I would've passed out.4 (39m 10s):I don't think so. I mean, look, we we're all, it's a good prep for like auditioning and callbacks and just we're al you're always under pressure. We're under pressure right now doing the podcast. But, but yeah, I mean I think growing up in New York you're constantly under pressure. So I, I maybe I was used to it for that reason. But2 (39m 30s):I do have to say Tina, Tina, there is something about you. Yes, ma'am. That is like super badass, tough, even just the way you present and your voice in the best possible way. So like, and I wonder if that is a mix of, you know, New Yorker, Asian American parents. My, my guess is I'm the par a daughter of an immigrant. Your daughter of an immigrants. Right. Of immigrants. Yeah. Okay. So there's like a toughness about you and like all I could, like you're a badassery. Do you think it is New York? What is it? Where does that come from? Because you should play, you, you should play an assassin and a like a, like an action hero in, in like huge films.2 (40m 13s):Why isn't that? We gotta make that happen today anyway,4 (40m 16s):So let's just call Kevin Fig and just let him know like, I'm available. Well, I, I think you touched on it. I think it's all those things that make up who I am. I, I, I am tough. I am tough but I like, I I, but I don't see myself necessarily that way. I'm like, you know, I think we've, I think I spent actually a lot of years trying to counteract that tough expectation by being like smiley and sweet and doing the things that I think women tend to do. Women identifying women tend to do, like by softening themselves and being smaller in the room. And I think over the years as you get older you hit 40 and you're like, fuck that.4 (40m 56s):Oh, am I allowed to curse on this? Okay. You just kinda like, absolutely, you know, I'm, I'm, I'm fucking over this. But I think it's all those things. I think definitely New York and always having your defenses up and always having an awareness around you and having parents that worked extremely hard and sacrificed a lot and knowing that I could sacrifice more. I think that's also part of like surviving as an artist. Like do I need to eat that fancy thing today? Do I need to have that new outfit? Like no, I, if I want to succeed then those are the things I need to let go of in order to invest in my career.4 (41m 36s):So yeah, I think a lot of it is identifying as an Asian American female, I think having immigrant parents for sure that work really hard. I think New York City and all of its dangerous that I survived. So I survived theater school and New York City and now I'm trying to survive LA1 (41m 56s):Yeah, yeah. Right, right. Lot of surviving happening. So at what point did you, well obviously you told your parents that you applied and that you got in for the fine arts program. Yeah. They obviously had to get on board with that at some point, cuz you're still doing it. But then tell us about the switch into acting.4 (42m 17s):So it was my first year as a, as the, you know, a drawing, painting, sculptor. And I just found it really lonesome. Like I, I I was like a little emo kid, you know what I mean? Like all this angst I had just had so much angst cause I grew, I had a rough childhood and I, I just found, found myself in a little bit of a depression as a freshman in high school, which is I guess not that rare, but I just kept looking at the theater department and seeing these kids getting to like fully express themselves and be around others like them. You know, painting is a solitary thing I think like writing, I don't know if you have that experience, the two of you. Cause I read that you're both writers and I write as well and it's a very different world you're in.4 (43m 3s):So I decided to just do it apply to the theater department and that process first it's like two monologues, right? Contemporary and a classic.2 (43m 14s):Do you remember what you did? Do you remember what you did? Oh, it's okay.4 (43m 18s):Oh boy.2 (43m 19s):I bet was great. Whatever it was.4 (43m 22s):The modern piece, I don't remember the name of it or, or where it was from, but it was, it was a girl witnessing her parents', her parents' divorce and, but going through her house and talking about how the home represented the family, you know, and, and like where things belonged in the house and how those things are gonna be moved and that means their family no longer existed, exists. So it was a really beautiful piece. I can't remember where it was from. And then the other one was Shakespeare and I'm sure I did a terrible job. It may have been1 (44m 2s):Saying4 (44m 2s):I don't remember the Shakespeare. Yeah, I don't remember the Shakespeare. That's funny.2 (44m 6s):Yeah. But I bet you know, you go, you know, you know4 (44m 10s):It was Porsche, the quality and mercy is not strange.2 (44m 14s):Oh yeah, that's1 (44m 15s):Exactly what I did. Terrible.2 (44m 20s):Wait a minute. So we have, wait a minute, wait a minute, wait a minute. I'm just picturing both you two for Gina. I'm wondering, I'm thinking it was to get into DePaul's theater school, right? Okay. And Tina, yours was even younger cuz you were, you were like 15, 14 playing Porsche. Yes. Oh that's fantastic. 14 year old Porsche's all around. Okay, so you must have, okay, so then what did you did, did it go on from there? Like you did your monologues? Oh,4 (44m 46s):So yeah, so then you do that and then there's a call back. So you go to another room with a different auditor and I'm trying to make sure I don't blend my high school audition to my college audition. But then we went from that callback to a screen test. So you to do a screen test and then wait,2 (45m 4s):Wait, A screen test for LaGuardia? Yeah. Like4 (45m 8s):At, at the time. At the time, Yeah. I remember that because I remember they said you have to go to good screen, so there's like a camera and you whatever on camera audition. And then from there, oh I, I remember there was five steps. I can't remember what the, I remember we may have had to go into the theater and do like a, like the theater exercises and movement stuff and then we had to do a interview one-on-one interview with the head of the department. So it was, you know, a lot of steps to,1 (45m 39s):This is so far tougher than it was for our, the audition. Like we had to do those other things you're describing. But we did not, I don't think we did a one-on-one interview.2 (45m 48s):No. Was1 (45m 49s):It nerve wracking?4 (45m 51s):Yeah, I mean as a kid I, I guess I didn't really like, I didn't, maybe didn't sink in that I was, that that's what was happening. But I just, you know, followed the line. I, whatever they told me where I needed to go, I just went and did it. So. Yeah. Yeah, I think it was a lot more steps than my college audition as well as well.2 (46m 9s):So, So you got in, did they just tell you I'm the spot Tina or were you, how did it work? And then were you, did you tell, did your parents know you were switching?4 (46m 20s):No, they didn't know. No, they didn't know. No, I think I, I think I just got a letter. I don't, I don't know if, I don't think they, I think they gave me the sense that it was a good fit, but I don't think I knew until later. Cause it's like thousands of kids in New York City, you know what I mean? Right, right. Yeah. Auditioning. So,2 (46m 39s):So1 (46m 40s):I'm curious about whether the, like what, what the pipeline situation was from LaGuardia to conservatories. Cuz a lot of kids who get training young or get working young don't go for theater school because they figure like, well I already know what I'm doing. So like what, what, how was it at LaGuardia? Did mostly kids go and pursue performing arts in college or what?4 (47m 5s):You know, I think a handful of us did. But honestly I, I think a lot of people didn't continue on. So it was kind of a weeding out process. You know, a lot of people went into who poli political science. A lot of people went into, you know, a lot of different things. I mean a lot of people I, I remember I went to high school with are doing amazing things currently. I mean, one of, one of the girls I was friends with, she's like a pundit on cnn, like, like one of the leading, she went into politics and then became like a on camera. So those two worlds sort of merged. But yeah, no, I, I think I ended up applying to four schools.4 (47m 45s):Four conservatories. So SUNY purchase Rutgers, I don't remember nyu. And what was,2 (47m 55s):I'm gonna just throw out Carnegie Mellon.4 (47m 57s):Carnegie Mellon. I think it was Carnegie. I, no, no, it was Boston University. I actually, it was interesting. I didn't, I didn't, I was so, I don't know. I just, I didn't do Julliard and I didn't do Carnegie Mellon. I don't know why. Oh, I know why Pittsburgh. I didn't wanna go to Pittsburgh. Sorry if, if either of you have a fondness for Pittsburgh, but I didn't wanna be there.2 (48m 23s):Never been. And also, I have a friend that went to the Carnegie Mellon program in NI started in 1993 and they weighed them at the, in their acting classes, they weighed them. So I'm glad we didn't go. I mean, you know, whatever. We missing, not missing out. Forget, forget Pittsburgh. Also the weighing, Fuck you. So, okay, so you, you auditioned, Did you do like the urda, like all of them at once, Tina? Or did you go, how did it work for your colleges? And then tell us how, how you made your choice.4 (48m 57s):So yeah, I think I did do them. You know, they, they set up the appointments to the different places. I remember that I really wanted to go to SUNY purchase. I do remember that because Israel Hicks was the head of the department then. And I remember thinking, oh he's an amazing teacher to study under. And it was such a small conservatory program. So I went up there that, that, by that point I did tell my parents I was gonna theater school and they were not happy about it. I mean, imagine they're immigrants, right? They came across the world not speaking the language, giving up everything, working very, very hard to make a better life for their children. And then their one child that didn't go to CO that is going to college wants to be an artist.4 (49m 38s):I mean that's like pretty brutal for them to absorb. But yeah, I, You were saying when you leave high school, like why, why go into the theater school? I, because I, both my brothers had not gone to college. My older brothers and my parents were, you know, had immigrated here. And like, I just, I felt like college was really important. I felt like getting an education was really important. And maybe, I remember thinking at the time, imagine being 17 and thinking I'm ruining my career. Cuz I thought it was gonna slow down my career because I did have one. We have an industry night at the end of high school and I got a manager, a New York City manager and I was freelancing with all these different agents and for like, the few months that I was not gonna leave New York.4 (50m 25s):And wait2 (50m 26s):A minute, wait a minute, wait. A I gotta go back here cuz I'm in awe. Gina, are you in awe? Cause I'm in awe that you, you had an industry night in high school and you got a manager from that. You're how old it did? 17.4 (50m 41s):17, Yeah.2 (50m 42s):You have a manager and you're freelancing. What did that feel like? I mean I'm like that. I'm like in awe. Were you like I am the shit? Are you like, this is just what I do. You're like a young, like a 17 year old professional actor. What in the hell?4 (50m 57s):I think, I think I was kind of like feeling like my dreams were coming true in a lot of ways, but I don't think I was secure in it. I definitely for sure was like, this could go away tomorrow. Am I doing the right things? You know, that manager at the time, she was lovely, but it, she did say to me like, you should move to Los Angeles. And at that point I just wanted to go to college and it, and most of the options were on the east coast that I wanted to, to, you know, except for Boston University. Well, Boston's east coast too. But she just said like, Well I just feel like if you move to the west to LA like later you're gonna be over the hill. I was 17, oh my god I was 17. God.4 (51m 36s):And2 (51m 37s):That's, that's such projection. It's such projection. It's all, I mean they mean even if they mean well, it's still projection. So you had this manager, but you were, and you were auditioning, I'm assuming in New York City. Yeah, Yeah. But then, but you really wanted to go to college and so4 (51m 55s):I really wanted to go2 (51m 56s):To college. Okay, so you wanted to go to suny. What happened there? Why, how did you end up at nyu?4 (52m 2s):Oh, so I got in to purchase, which was, which was a tough choice because SUNY purchases, like at the time was so cheap for in-state, like residents. And then, but I, I can't explain this to you at all, but I went, when I went and auditioned for nyu, I fell asleep at the audition. I remember in the waiting room. I just like, kind of not at often, I just think I just needed to be relaxed, you know? So cuz there was2 (52m 31s):All these like, what a power move.4 (52m 35s):I don't know if I was just like, you know, overwhelmed or, I don't think it was overwhelming, but I just felt like I just needed to relax. And there was like, you know, a bunch of young act New York City actors. And at the time NYU was a top conservatory. And I think I, there was like all these young actors that were like, like doing all the warmups, which I believe in a hundred percent. I do it before shows, but like, but it intimidated me in some way cuz I was like, well I didn't start acting until I was much older. I mean, I was young, but you know, in New York it felt like everybody's a kid actor that was enacting. So, I don't know, I, I fell asleep and then they woke me up and said, it's your turn.4 (53m 18s):I was like, Oh, okay. And I went in and I remember in all my auditions I did this weird thing, which, which I don't know if it's an an i, I took my shoes off in every audition. Like I, I felt like I needed to be grounded. Oh my2 (53m 31s):God. It's a power move. It's a power move. Listen to me, anyone, this is how I feel now watching youngsters. I mean, I don't hold auditions, but when, when someone has a specific bold take on, on how they're going to enter a room, they, they're yards ahead of everybody else. You made a bold move, Tina and I, I support it. I support it. You, it's like you, you had a take. Good for you.4 (54m 1s):I, I think I just needed to take care of myself. And I, I think at the time I didn't really have a lot of protection and people taking care of me in that way as a young artist. So I think I just had my own process, but part of that was being weird and saying, I need to take my shoes off and taking off my shoes. I've never told anyone that before. So Yeah, I did all my, It's1 (54m 23s):So related. This is some related to you being tough and a badass, because I think kind of what I'm hearing is however, the, I mean, I don't know necessarily the right way to say this, but you haven't waited for permission. Like you didn't wait for permission from your parents to audition for this school and you didn't, you know, ask them. Is it okay if I take you, You just did a lot, You've done a lot of things and maybe it's because you have felt like you've had to do it this vein on your own since you didn't have any family members who, who, who pursued this career. But I wanna know, Oh, sorry. You were actually, I interrupted you, you were in the middle of finishing your audition story.4 (55m 3s):No, I, I don't Where were we? I don't off.2 (55m 6s):Okay, so you That's ok. That's ok. We, I'm, I'm clocking. So you are there, you, you, you did all your auditions and you said you don't know how to explain it, but when you got into nyu, when you did your NYU audition?4 (55m 20s):Well, when I was waiting in the waiting room, when I fell asleep, that's where I was going. I just felt like I belong there. I just felt like I belonged there. I was just like, this is where I need to be. Even though purchase was my first choice and purchase at the time was very competitive. They took like 10 people in that year. And I, and it would've been cheap. Really ch that's one thing, NYU's not cheap, but I for sure, I just had this overwhelming sense that this is where I needed to be. And yeah, I, I did the audition for Beth Turner, who was amazing, amazing, I think she was a dean at the time, but auditor. And then she asked me what studio I wanted to be in and I told her Playwrights Horizons, or I think Adler is what I chose.4 (56m 11s):And she asked me why playwrights cuz she thought I should be placed in experi what was then called experimental theater wing, which is very physical. So I understand it now. She saw in me that I'm a very physical person and I told her, this is the hilarious part, I told her playwrights was my number one choice because you can study, directing, acting and design, which is what I ended up doing. And I said, I need a fallback plan, which is2 (56m 38s):Like4 (56m 39s):Directing and design, like great fallback. But2 (56m 43s):Here's, here's the thing, here's the thing, The other thing that I'm seeing is that you knew fallback plan or not, you wanted to study more than one thing. And most people go in there saying, Oh, I just wanna be a movie star so I have to go into Atlantic cuz David Mammo will cast me in. Like, you wanted a more broad sense of Yeah. You, you were like, we have several actors on the show like this where it's, they're like more renaissance people in terms of writing, acting, directing, and they're, and they're true. Like for me what it is, is a true artist instead of an actor. It's a, it's more of a collaborator and doing, making art in a collaborative setting.2 (57m 23s):And it happens to be for you right now, acting and maybe writing and maybe directing if you have or something. So I, I love that. And also my NYU audition, I went without having picked a, a studio. So they asked me where you wanna go? And I said, I have no idea. Well, they didn't let my ass in, nor should they have.4 (57m 45s):Oh, no, I, you know, I appreciate you saying that. I mean, I think when I say fallback plan, I don't really think that is what it is. Cause I didn't think, obviously, you know, it's all a risk that we're taking. It really is true that I was very, I'm very interested in all aspects of storytelling. And I did tell her that, She asked me why directing, and I said, I am, I am incredibly stimulated in a different way when thinking about directing and how a story can be told and how it's structured and, and all of that. And, and I said, but it's not necessarily my heart. My heart is acting, but my mind is very connected to directing when she asked me that question.4 (58m 29s):So yeah. So cool.1 (58m 31s):Yeah. So you mentioned earlier your manager and saying you're gonna be over the hill and so forth. So we spent a lot of time talking about the whack messages that we got, especially being, you know, nineties, mid nineties, late nineties about like what you can and can't do and who you are and who you aren't and how you come across. And, and sometimes those opinions are wildly off base and sometimes there's smack Right on. What, what about you? Where did you fall on that with terms of like the, the feedback people was were giving you?4 (59m 3s):You know, it's, I think I'm still dealing with that today. I mean, I I, the feedback was people couldn't tell if I was a leading lady or if I was a character actor. And I will say they probably thought I was a character actor just because I was a woman of color. You know what I mean? Like, you're gonna be the best friend,2 (59m 27s):Right? It's because they couldn't see beyond their own biases and the biases of the industry. And look, I think some of that is a product of the environment those people are in, but also nobody challenged. And that's what I'm ask. I feel like people are at least starting to do now challenged why someone couldn't do something. So Yeah, sure. So they told you, Oh, we think you're gonna be like, you know, Sandra Bullock's best friend or like, whatever, what the sidekick, because probably because you, you were an Asian American woman, you know? Yeah.4 (1h 0m 2s):Nice. Or you're the nerd or you know, put on some glasses and now you're like, network nerdy, you know? So it's, it's, it's, How did you ask me? How did I deal with it? Is that the question?1 (1h 0m 15s):I'm just curious. Like, people usually have an anecdote or two about like, you know, I just told it on the podcast last week that, you know, I went to this thing when I was in high school, like how to get in the business. And the only thing I remember the guy saying is, thin is in, and you're either gonna get thin or you're not gonna be in, Like, it was just very binary. And by the way, that was true. Like he wasn't, he wasn't saying anything that wasn't true, but it doesn't matter because I internalized that message and then I never wanted to be in film. Then I was like, I'll, okay, that means I can never be in film and tv. Yeah. And I never even thought twice about it until like two weeks ago. That's when I remembered that.4 (1h 0m 55s):That's so heartbreaking. That's so heartbreaking. Yeah. I mean, my parents even honestly said, you can't be an actor. You're, you're Asian, you know, there's nobody like you. There's no, there's not many women like you, you're not gonna be successful. You're gonna be hungry all the time. You're never gonna, you know, and you know, they weren't totally wrong. They weren't trying to hurt me. They, you know, they, I think they were trying to protect me, but ultimately it hurt me. Do you know what I mean? It hurt my confidence, it hurt, you know? So a lot of my defense mechanism is to have confidence, if that makes any sense.2 (1h 1m 28s):Well that's, that's what I'm getting is that in response to the binary, you were able to go, Well, no, I'm gonna actually take care of my own self and take my own shoes off if I want to. Actually, I'm still gonna move forward and be like, I just love the idea of a woman of color being on a soap opera as one of the, like a recurring main characters. Because soap operas to me, in terms of casting, have not in the past been known to really embrace all kinds of things. But here you are on like Americana, which is soaps to me. And I mean, you have telenovelas and whatever, but the, but American soap operas are a thing and you're on one.2 (1h 2m 10s):So I know the word trailblazer is so overused, but I feel like you're a trailblazer. And what people fail to remember about trailblazers is, is that it's dirty, sweaty, hard work because you're literally in the dirt forging a path for yourself and perhaps those that come after you. Do you feel like that when you're working, that you're, and it's not fair to put it on people like women of color or women or othered people, but do you feel like in some way you're blazing a trail for other folks? Or do you just are just like, No, I just, I wanna work fuck the rest.4 (1h 2m 46s):No, I'm, I appreciate that question. I, I feel hopeful that that's what's happening. Do I think about it consciously when I'm working? Not necessarily, but I do intend to, if I can give other people opportunities, like if I don't suit a role, if they're like, Well this person's Vietnamese, will you audition? I pass. And I usually, you know, I've played other Asian races before because there are limited amount of roles. But I also believe like you have to get to a certain level and have a certain level of accomplishments in order to open the door for other people. So I will, I have, like I said, I'm passing on this, but this is this actress that you should look at. And I've sent names and you know, things, little things like that within my power.4 (1h 3m 30s):And I'm not trying to say like I'm a trailblazer or anything like that. I'm just trying to do the work, like you said, and take the opportunities when I can and try to do my best at it. And then hopefully set as some kind of example. I don't know what, but it is a lot.2 (1h 3m 45s):And I think that like trailblazing is, is is done primarily because there is something doesn't exist, which we want to see existing. And so then we have to do it on our own. Like, I agree that like I never woke up and thought, Oh, one day I'm gonna be like, do doing all this work. I just thought, no, like why doesn't this exist? Why can't plus size or Latinas do this? And then I went ahead and tried to make that space. But yeah, I feel like most trailblazers I know and iconic class or whatever don't like have that intention, right?2 (1h 4m 25s):We're not like, Oh, I'm gonna change. It's more like, No, this shit is wrong. It should exist and I'm gonna participate in change, right? Like a change maker.4 (1h 4m 34s):I'm gonna take, I'm gonna take space basically and not be apologetic for it. And, and that's a very hard thing to, to come to, you know, It's like, it's still, I wanna apologize all the time, you know what I mean? But that's my instinct. But because I wanna be a fair person. But I think ultimately it's like, no, I, I should claim the space and not be apologetic for it. I mean, I had a teacher in theater school and you're saying, What did people put on you who said to me, Tina, he said something very complimentary about a project I had just finished and something like, you know, good marks or something and said like, you're, you're very talented or whatever. And then he said, What I love about you is that you shatter stereotypes and on the, the face of it, you would think that's a positive thing, but I think it put a heavy weight on me.4 (1h 5m 24s):I think I felt this sort of, that's not what I'm, you're you're putting, that means you're putting so much on me when you even look at me, there's a, there's an expectation of you have to be excellent all the time. You have to be so good all the time. And if you not, if you're not excellent, people are gonna go, Oh, Asian women can't act, or Asian women shouldn't be doing this. And so there was a pressure, like I felt, wow. Like I guess he was trying to say something nice, but ultimately it just put this sort of,2 (1h 5m 51s):No, it puts more work. It's more work,4 (1h 5m 54s):More work. And it also puts like, you see me as a certain lens. You can't just see my work. You're seeing something else. Yeah. You know what I mean

Don't Make It Weird
The One With Sean R. Frazier

Don't Make It Weird

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 102:01


In this week's episode of Don't Make It Weird, we are joined in the studio by fantasy author Sean R. Frazier! We answer some fun Star Wars-themed WOULD YOU RATHER questions! Sean tells us about the time his wife beat him at his own Halloween decorations game in STORYTIME! We chat with him about his FORGOTTEN YEARS series, and he reads us an excerpt from book one! Then, Meatwad from Aqua Teen Hunger Force treats us to a very sensual reading from A Doubters Almanac by Ethan Canin in this week's CRINGEY COPULATION! #WritingCommunity #BookTube #BookishGuest Links:Follow Sean R. Frazier on Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheCleftonTwainSean's LinkTree: https://linktr.ee/seanrfrazierDonate to Sean's EXTRA LIFE campaign and help his local Children's Miracle Network Hospital at this link!: https://www.extra-life.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=donorDrive.participant&participantID=485207Check out the WHAT THE BOOK? Podcast on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1OoU6GvvWBPVJpOMCVeKW9?si=anZ_ZXicTcCpjpWmjS-Kyg&utm_source=copy-link&nd=1Check out Daniel's new website here: https://dumps4danq.comYou can find the video presentation of this show on our YouTube channel, and the audio only version on any of your favorite podcast apps!Want to support the show? Check out our merch store here!: https://dmiwpodcast.com/storeLiterally every cent goes back into producing content for the show!Give us a call on the Don't Make It Weird Hotline and leave us a voicemail message! We just might use your message on a future episode of the show! 347-69-WEIRDDon't Make It Weird Podcast on Twitter: http://twitter.com/dmiwpodcastDaniel on Twitter: http://twitter.com/danqwritesthingDina on Twitter: http://twitter.com/dinasaurusdProducer Sean on Twitter: http://twitter.com/shaceholdu--------------------------Music Credit:Swing Rabbit ! Swing ! by Amarià https://soundcloud.com/amariamusiqueCreative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported — CC BY 3.0Free Download / Stream: https://bit.ly/al-swing-rabbit-swingMusic promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/lt7fn1NVxQMSupport the show

Next Wave Leadership Podcast
Keli Frazier-Cox, Former Chief Commercial Officer at MindGym and the Founder of Promote Leaders, On: Leading as an Introvert, Educating Yourself in a Mid-Size Company, and Why Taking Action Doesn't Require Perfection

Next Wave Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 37:23


Keli Frazier-Cox is an experienced executive and is the Chief Commercial Officer of the Americas for MindGym, a company that uses scientific principles to create a unique set of experiences, products, and tools to promote company-wide behavior changes. She is also the Founder of Promote Leaders, Inc., an organization that equips emerging leaders through coaching, speaking, and consulting. Keli specializes in building and scaling high-performing teams and helping entrepreneurs navigate the corporate world. For 15 years, she climbed through the ranks of Euromonitor International, developing her expertise during her time there. In this episode… Growing in leadership requires action and purpose. Time alone doesn't sharpen leaders, but it's the effort, intentionality, and learning they put in that ultimately make the difference. It doesn't have to be a perfect path, but pushing forward is the only way to improve yourself and your company. Few people know this better than Keli Frazier-Cox. Keli is the CCO of the Americas for MindGym and a well-known leadership coach. She has pushed for true diversity and acceptance within the workplace. During the George Floyd tragedy, she was further motivated to make a change within her company. Keli knows the importance of striving for a more inclusive environment, and now she explains what that looks like in practice. In this episode of Next Wave Leadership, Dov Pollack talks with Keli Frazier-Cox, the COO of the Americas for MindGym, to discuss leadership in action and how to promote diversity. They talk about Keli's career and how she lives out her personal motto. They also touch on the difference between diversity and belonging, taking responsibility, and even how to lead as an introvert. Stay tuned to hear all of this and more!

Health Babes Podcast
#074 Managing Multiple Sclerosis with Diet, Stress Reduction & More with Alissa Frazier

Health Babes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 41:15


In this episode Dr. Campbell and Dr. Hohn chat with health coach Alissa Frazier. She specializes in mental health, body & nutritional wellness. Despite living with chronic MS, she experiences very few symptoms today thanks to her holistic approach and health journey. Throughout the episode, Alissa explains the specific drivers of MS symptoms and why managing stress and regulating the nervous system is crucial to treating the disease. We also talk about how diet and nutrition play a major role in health, but are often neglected by conventional medicine.    TOPICS: Alissa's journey with MS ( 00:43 ) Diet & nutrition for MS (11:47) Lesions (17:11) AI disease & the microbiome (20:43) Your environment as a driver (22:22) Freeze mode (24:30)  Managing pain and symptoms through movement (29:46) Struggling with MS diagnosis (35:10) Resources from Alissa (41:30) MORE FROM THE HEALTH BABES:   Did you know? You have a chance to win 1 of 2 prizes, with a giveaway in every episode! Leave a review to win, and don't forget to subscribe for future episodes!   Follow Alissa on Instagram @liss.ms Visit her website liss-ms.com Work with Alissa HERE 5 Best Foods for MS Cheat Sheet   Find more from Dr. Becky Campbell and Dr. Krystal Hohn at DrBeckyCampbell.com Consult with us one on one HERE   Follow Dr. Becky and Dr. Krystal on Instagram @drbeckycampbell and @drkrystalhohn, follow the Health Babes Podcast @healthbabespodcast Find us on Facebook, on Pinterest, and on YouTube   Get resources on how best to support your thyroid HERE Wondering if you have histamine intolerance? Take THIS QUIZ and receive a free histamine guide Get answers to your health questions HERE

Claude VonStroke presents The Birdhouse
Dirtybird Radio 363 - Monsieur Frazier

Claude VonStroke presents The Birdhouse

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 60:04


Being no stranger to what it is that gets the whole room moving, Monsieur Frazier joins Dirtybird Radio to play a wild set that joyously breaks genre barriers and magnifies his passion for dance music through the lens of his West Coast upbringing. He has planted deep roots in the underground scene, helping to bring many local talents to greater exposure with the Los Angeles-based record label and creative collective Understated. Now, as his own production catalog grows, Monsieur Frazier has been getting on bigger stages and gaining support around the world -- definitely one to watch! VR warm-up setPlastic Robots - "Armada" [Dirtybird Records]Spiro Catalano feat. Cha$e Bank$ - "On The 405" [Farris Wheel Recordings]manolo. - "Don't Deny Me" [IN / ROTATION]Riva Starr x Todd Terry - "This Is The Sound" [Hot Creations]Monsieur Frazier guest setRod Lee - Dance My Pain AwayDJ Spen & Barbara Tucker - Think (About It) (Spen & Thommy's Summer of Dub Mix)Hardrive - Deep Inside (The Dub)Joss Moog - Drummin itLubelski - VowelsDance System - All I Wanna DoDaphni - ManiaKush Jones - Sunshine BThomas Bangalter - What To Do (Mark Broom Edit)LSDXOXO - Rockstar69Professor X - Professor X (Saga)Fred - Do It From The Back (Electro Mix)Danny Goliger - Need U 2Hiver - VapourCoco & Clair Clair ft. Paul Maxwell - Crushcrushcrush

3 Men And A Mystery
Tanya Marie Frazier

3 Men And A Mystery

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 83:43


Episode 9 Tanya Marie FrazierOn July 18th, 1994, 14 year-old Tanya Marie Frazier of Seattle, Washington, left school. She was scheduled to work at a local thrift shop, but never showed up, and she disappeared. Five days later, a dog walker found her partially nude body in an upscale neighborhood, about 10 blocks away from where she was last seen. Her throat had been cut. Weeks later in another location, some of Tanya's belongings turned up. Police did not have many leads to work with early on, and focused on Tanya's mother, and her mother's boyfriend, but DNA eventually seemed to clear them. Other names and shady people popped up in the case over the years, but police were never able to tie the crime to anyone.For some reason, whether it's lack of funding, or a misunderstanding of new investigative techniques, the evidence in Tanya's case has not been re-tested recently using the newest technology and tools.The team is joined in this episode by Rose Winquist and Kathy Decker, two investigators who have not given up on trying to solve the mystery of who murdered Tanya, and why.Anyone with any information about Tanya's case to come forward. Tips may be submitted anonymously to the Crime Stoppers TipLine: 1-800-222-TIPS.You may also contact the Seattle PoliceDepartment Cold Case Unit: 1-206-684-5550 or the homicide tip line at 1-206-233-5000.Rose Winquist urges people with information to contact her via the Find Tanya Frazier's Killer Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/justicefortanyafrazieror by email at winquistinvestigations.comTo find out how to join us live as we record each new episode of Citizen Detective, follow us on Social Media.Twitter- https://twitter.com/CitizenDPodFacebook Home Page- https://www.facebook.com/CitizenDetectivePodcastFacebook Discussion group- https://www.facebook.com/groups/233261280919915Instagram- https://www.instagram.com/citizendpod/?hl=enYoutube- https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSgvqIuf4-sEF2aDdNGip2wTo support this podcast on Patreon and gain access to ad-free episodes, bonus content, and our after-show 'The Scrum' visit Patreon.com/CitizenDetective Continue the conversation about this case with fellow Citizen Detectives over at Websleuths: https://www.websleuths.com/forums/forums/citizen-detective-true-crime-podcast.719/The Citizen Detective team includes:Co-Hosts- Mike Morford, Alex Ralph, and Dr. Lee MellorWriting and Research- Alex RalphTechnical Producer- Andrew GrayProduction Assistant- Ashley Monroe

Red Pill Revolution
Kanye West Cancelled for Exposing Truth | Sued by George Floyd's Family | Cut Off By Chase Bank | Buying Parler |

Red Pill Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 74:40


In this week's episode, we discuss the recent cancellation of Kanye West (now known as Ye) for speaking out about the elite of our country who control the media, politics, entertainment companies, and contracts of those in high celebrity positions. We watch all the controversial clips and hear what he said firsthand, then discuss where I think he was correct and where I believe he may have crossed the line. He has since lost his access to banking with Chase, has been sued by George Floyd's family for 250 million dollars, and had the podcast where he spoke out on this topic completely pulled from all platforms.   Subscribe and leave a 5-star review! ----more---- Donate to support the show by going to https://givesendgo.com/redpillrevolution   Our website https://redpillrevolution.co/    Protect your family and support the Red Pill Revolution Podcast with Affordable Life Insurance. This is attached to my license and not a third-party ad!   Go to https://agents.ethoslife.com/invite/3504a now!   Currently available in AZ, MI, MO, LA, NC, OH, IN, TN, WV. Email austin@redpillrevolution.co if you would like to sign up in a different state   ----more----   Full Transcription    Welcome to the Revolution. Hello and welcome to Red Pill Revolution. My name is Austin Adams and thank you so much for listening. Today we have quite the episode. If you have not heard the former re the rapper, formerly known as Kanye West is in a whole lot of trouble. Now, I tend to disagree on a lot of the reasons why. Um, we're gonna dive into that. If you don't care about Kanye West, that doesn't matter in this podcast. If you don't like rap music, you don't like Kanye in general, or yay as he likes to be called now, um, we'll talk about why in a little bit, cuz he talks about that with Chris Commo. Um, but he is in a world of trouble in the mainstream media, mainstream entertainment. He's been canceled off of basically all of the social media platforms and I. He's speaking out on something that we here have been talking about for quite some time in many different ways. So we will discuss, basically I listen to this three and a half hour podcast with him. I listen to all the interviews. I waited a day or two to see what else came out. Um, but some of the things that we're gonna discuss here is he had his bank account canceled by JP Morgan Chase. He had, uh, is now, uh, had a lawsuit filed against him for 250 million by George Floyd's. Uh, he did say a couple questional little things, which we will also address. Um, and then he went on Chris Cuomo's, uh, new show. I didn't even know he had one until recently. Um, but we will break that down too. He talks about, you know, basically the systemic racism behind basically putting the whole black vote as he called it, into a, a, uh, you know, a term that is used to describe, there's no white vote. He talks about. I mean, there's really some really interesting stuff, some really deep layers of the, you know, conspiracy world, which he kind of peels back here and just sheds enough light on it so that it really starts to illuminate some of these questions that you can bring up in yourself and start to dive deeper into. So we will get. All of that today. But first, thank you so much for listening. I appreciate you from the bottom of my heart, what you already know, but I would appreciate it even more if you could go ahead and hit that five star review button. And if you're not already subscribed, go ahead and subscribe Every single week we have conversations just like this. Um, talking about what's relevant, what's current, what are some of the, you know, crazier things that are going on in the world. Um, and we will get to all of it, but only if you subscribe will you be able to follow along. So go ahead and do that. Head over to red pill revolution.co.com is for losers, and you'll be able to sign up for the sub stack. You'll be able to get all of the articles, uh, documents, uh, videos, all of the stuff that we discuss here today. Um, and I will have that one out for you by the time, uh, basically this podcast is out tomorrow. Um, so make sure yet you're there. Uh, again, I appreciate you. Thank you so much from the bottom of my heart, and welcome to the Revolut. Welcome to Red Pill Revolution. My name is Austin Adams. Red Pill Revolution started out with me, realizing everything that I knew, everything that I believed, everything I interpret about my life is through the lens of the information I was spoonfed as a child. Religion, politics, history, conspiracies, Hollywood medicine, money, food, all of it. Everything we know was tactfully written to influence your decisions and your view on reality by those in power. Now I'm on a mission, a mission to retrain and reeducate myself to find the true reality of what is behind that curtain. And I'm taking your ass with me. Welcome to the Revolution. All right, let's jump into it. The very first topic that we're gonna discuss today is, again, this is all gonna be on the rapper, formerly known as Kanye West, who currently goes by the name, yay. Um, probably gonna mess it up a bunch of times, but he got pretty upset at, I believe it was Chris Cuomo. Um, I think the other one was a sexual assaulting weirdo. I'm not too sure that the other one isn't. Um, but, uh, Chris Cuomo, he got, got a earful from Ye, um, about that. Um, but I'll probably just call him Kanye because that's how everybody knows him as. So, um, Kanye West basically went onto Tucker Carlson. So we'll start from the very beginning of this story. Kanye West went on to Tucker Carlson and talked about the election, talked about, you know, um, a lot of different subjects and some of which got pulled out of the interview. Now when those clips that got pulled out of the interview got released, a lot of people were starting to call Kanye West an anti-Semite for saying things, more generalizations about the Jewish community, but more so specifically referring to the entertainment industry, um, being owned by singular families and those who are in high positions of power in the entertainment industry that own some of the largest news media corporations in the world, uh, that own the contracts of the music artists. All of those he was pointing to saying that they've screwed over the, the black community, the entertainment community for far too long. And he's sick and tired of it, that they've been calling him crazy. They had his kids ripped away from him based on that narrative, which they started through the news cycle. And you'll actually see how hard, uh, Commo goes after him on that same thing, you know, just that immediate point, uh, which was pretty interesting to see after him already calling it out right now. Now, what I find to be interesting is that since doing the interview, The interview where he was talking about how they were censoring him for calling out the truth. The interview has since been pulled within literally 12 hours of that three and a half hour podcast, which was from the, uh, what, what was the name of the podcast? The Drink something. Um, let me look up the name of it for you here, and you can still find it. They, they had it on YouTube. But let me go ahead and see the actual name of it. You can still find it, but it's from random little mirrors. It's called Drink Champs. So if you go to YouTube and you type in drink champs and then filter with Kanye, then filter your, uh, times based on, you know, filter your results based on time and then do it over 20 minutes. There's a bunch of people, and then go by upload date even. And you'll probably bill be your best way of listening to the full three and a half O power, uh, hour interview. But I pulled all of, I think his strongest points into this here. So on almost all of. I don't believe that Kanye is wrong. I don't, I don't, I think some of his generalizations were a poor choice of words, and I, I think there was one or two things that he said that were questionably, uh, maybe not very tactful. Uh, but I, I don't think in general the hi, the sentiment of what he was saying was racist. I don't think it was antisemitism. I don't think that at all. Um, now we'll discuss the ones that I do think were a, a bit controversial in the way that he approached the conversation, um, and, and, and create your own thoughts about. Uh, but the very, the first thing I I wanna show you is that this got pulled within hours. Now if you go to the YouTube comments, go to any clips talking about this, I mean, at least majority of them, depending on which platform, but almost every single one of the YouTube clips that are posted to discussing this conversation and talking about it in a negative light are getting ripped apart. The YouTube community, the community at large, the public voice is on Kanye's side on this. It seems like, according to all of the common sections that I looked into, everybody, almost every single comment was on Kanye's side, right? People are almost insulted at this point that you think that your audience, that you think the general public are so stupid that you won't even allow them to listen to the words coming out of Kanye's mouth. Right? And why is. , Are you afraid of the words or is he just crazy? And we, it, it's, it's the same thing about covid misinformation, right? It's the same exact thing. We don't think you're smart enough to decipher what's true and what's not true. So we're just not even gonna give you the other side of the argument. Well, I think that generally means that your argument is fairly weak, and I think that's what the public is generally sick of, right? The American population is far more educated than most populations in the history of humanity. Yet you think Kanye West's opinion in a three hour interview where they're drinking the entire time is going to persuade somebody one way or another and, and convince them. That's how scary Kanye is, that they're, they're gonna convince somebody of wrong, think false information, um, based on his words, even if they wouldn't have otherwise come to that same. Right. You don't think people are able to sift through information? Personally, I think you should be able to listen to anything, right? You, you should be able to go read mind comp from Adolph Hitler and decide whether his, his words were correct or not. Obviously, you're gonna come to the same conclusion as basically everybody ever, which was, Yeah, everything he did was terrible and horrible and he a bad, the worst person ever and everything he did and his sentiment, you know, I could go on. Obviously we know that we don't need to go into that, but you should still be able to read that book and you can, and you can, right. There's a couple quotes that we'll talk about, but let's go ahead and listen to Nori, uh, who is one of the hosts of this podcast. And him basically on his knees apologizing for how much hurt he caused the world by allowing you to listen to the words. And, and now go listen to that full episode. And you'll see he did not feel this way at all throughout the entirety of the interview. He was laughing, he was joking, he was having a great time. And what you're gonna see is those, the sentiment of Kanye West Yay. Uh, between his interviews is vastly different when he's approaching. And in the conversation with Cuomo, he is in a vastly different tone of voice, a vastly different, uh, uh, personality than, than he is in otherwise. And in the other interview, he's much more loose and he's talking from his heart in the other interview, and he's talk on the defensive so much in the Chris Cuomo interview that it makes it, you know, kind of crazy to see the variations from one to the next. Um, Let's go ahead and talk about this first. Let's listen to The Apology by Nori. I think that's how you pronounce his name. Um, and then we'll, we'll talk a little bit about some, some of that, the, the cancellation, because I think, you know, and I, I posted this yesterday, um, and, and I'll just kind of quote it verbatim for you because I, I, I truly think that this is, uh, telling, right? I think and, and, and this is what I said on Instagram at Red Pill Revolt, Kanye being canceled for calling out the entertainment industry after pandering to the black community for profit simply proves his point. Right? So, Kanye being canceled for calling out the entertainment industry elites for pandering to the black community for profit simply proves this point. You are useless to them once you stop playing. And what I mean by that is literally by canceling Kanye's episode, by showing him that, that, you know, you cannot speak on this topic. Even, you can't even talk about this. You can't even bring this up or you're gonna get canceled because that's what Kanye was talking about. He was getting canceled for bringing up things that you weren't supposed to talking about. Talk about the mainstream media, talking about supporting Trump, talking about, uh, you know, 20, 24 elections. All of those things led to him getting, you know, called crazy, him losing his children. Um, all of this stuff. So let's go ahead and listen to this apology and see what you think. I just, I'm here to say I apologize to anybody who felt like I let let them down, cuz I did feel like I, I did let them down to a certain extent because like I said, I did check him later, but by the time I checked him, it was like, it was already kind of like too late. So I can't. I can't be mad at Baller alert for, you know, posting the footage, uh, that I don't want them to post. Cause I, I'm not mad at them when I post the, they post the footage that I do want them to post. So, yeah, I do feel, I do feel let down. I do feel like I didn't do the right job, but this is a learning experience. I am not, I did not go to school for journalism, but that's not excuse. You know what I'm saying? So there you have it immediately within a day ripping down the YouTube. Because why, why do you think, how many threats do you think he got from the same people that Kanye is saying are threatening his life? Right. How many, how many, uh, industry leaders came to him and told him, If you don't take down this episode, we are going to tear you apart. You're gonna lose your brand. We're gonna come after you for lawsuits. All of this. Right? And immediately, the only way he's do, they're taking that down. They had a gr like those guys were laughing. They were drinking together, They were having a great time, and all of a sudden he's on his knees begging and apologizing. For even hosting a conversation with somebody and letting them have a conversation about it and releasing it to the general public. If you're not afraid of what you said, why are you afraid of what somebody else said? Why would you be afraid of the things that came out of somebody else's mouth? You should let them listen to them. And if they're an idiot and they're wrong, and what they're saying is a horrible thing, let people decipher that for themselves. Because if you are a terrible person, the the best thing that can happen to you is people can find out about it. You can make it public. People will hear the words coming from your mouth, especially in these long form con, long form conversations, right? If you thought I was a sociopathic idiot by now, you probably wouldn't listen to me. And so in this case with Kanye, let them listen to it. Let them hear it, let people decide. And if they think he's a racist jerk, and if they think that the things that he's saying is wrong, then you shouldn't take that away from the people being able to decide that on their own. And the only reason that you're pulling people or pulling that episode is because you're afraid of the real things that he said that called out the industry elites. That is truthful, right? If you look at some of the quotes that come out of this, you know, George R. R Martin said this, When you tear out a man's tongue, you are not proving him a liar. You are telling the world that you fear what he might say. Hmm. When you tear out a man's tongue, you are not proving him a liar. You are telling the world that you fear what he might say. When you are censoring somebody, you are not concerned about the world, realizing that that person's an idiot. You're afraid that they're going to agree with them, and that agreement's going to start movements right? And Kanye had a great quote, I didn't pull it, but it was a good one. Um, where in this, where he said, You know, if I throw on short shorts in a tank top and I just start running, and people look at me from, from a afar, they're gonna think I'm crazy. Right? If I'm sweating, if I'm dripping, I have blisters on my feet and I'm just running by myself in, in short shorts in a tank top people are gonna think I'm, I'm weird if I'm running just for 25 miles, 26 miles, right? People are gonna think I'm a weirdo, right? Until my feet bleed and you know, they're gonna think I'm crazy. But the second you throw a number on me and you put a hundred people beside me also running, and you call it a marathon, then nobody thinks you're crazy. There's power in numbers and they know that, So they wanna rip this off of the platform. They are afraid of the movement that might happen against these elitist communities at the top of the entertainment industry. That talking about Disney, talking about the music industry, talking about several of the largest mainstream news corporations, you know, this is a quote from Kanye, from the Cuomo interview. He said 50% at least, of the people that own the contracts of rappers NBA stars, you know, he is talking about the black community specifically and saying that the, you know, the people that are making the most money that are black are, are completely owned by contracts of people who are at least 50% of the time of Jewish ja descent. And, and so that's where the whole antisemitism conversation came up of immediately calling him an antisemite for saying that the entertainment industry and the people primarily that are putting him in bad positions and other people that are owning the black community through contract agreements are doing so. And he said it's a modern form of slavery. Which I find to be very interesting. So let's look at this next. So the one we're gonna look at here is that the George Floyd situation after this one. But the first one we're gonna look at is JP Morgan Chase. Okay. JP Morgan Chase. Immediately following the, uh, con or the Tucker Carlson interview, uh, basically made it, They, they pulled, they, uh, went after Kanye for, they basically told him he could not bank with them anymore. Let me see if I can pull this up and talk about it. Okay. So here's the exact letter. Now, Candace Owens speaks on this and says, Earlier today I learned that Kanye West was officially kicked out of JP Morgan Chase Bank. I was told there was no official reason given, but they sent this letter as well to confirm that he has till late November to find another place for the Yeezy Empire. And here's what Kanye had to say. Say about that. And then we will read the letter. You know what I'm saying? JP Morgan, I put 140 million into JP Morgan and they treated me like shit. So if JP Morgan Chase is treating me like that, how they treating the rest of of y'all? No, that's outrageous. Yeah. And this is murder arrest with Chase account. If they're treating him like shit, putting $160 million through their bank, if they're censoring him, if they're getting rid of him off of their platform, what do they think of the rest of you? What are they gonna do to you? When you start speaking up on social media platforms and you have a social credit system, the exact same thing that happened to Kanye West here. This is a preemptive strike of censorship. You, they literally allowed Jeffrey Epstein to bank at JP Morgan Chase. They've allowed terrorist organizations from what? From articles that I've read. To bank through him, allegedly. Okay. Through JP Morgan Chase, but they're not allowing Kanye West while Jeffrey Epstein could bank at Chase Bank. That is telling after he was a convicted pedophile, after he was a convicted sex trafficker. But you say one thing about a community, and all of a sudden you get your entire banking platform stripped from you. We talked about this before, the banks are the linchpin to freedom. Now. They can pull you out of their banking platform at any moment if they don't like the things that you say. We saw this with PayPal. PayPal, literally saying that they're going to charge you $2,500 if you say something that they don't like, and then immediately retracted it because of the backlash that they got. Those were literally documents that were leaked from PayPal. They never said it was wrong. They just said, we didn't intend on doing that, which is just saying, Oh shit, we messed up and we're, we know now that you guys wouldn't have liked that Right. And how much money did they lose as a result? I think PayPal dropped like 10% or something crazy as a result of that. So here's the letter of what actually happened. Is that dear? We are sending the letter to confirm our recent discussion that JP Morris Morgan Chase Bank has decided to end the banking relationship with Yeezy LLC and its affiliated entities to provide the company with sufficient time to transition to another financial institution. We will continue to maintain the accounts, including all related products and services until November 21st, 2022. To avoid any transaction delays, we suggest that you stop processing company transactions and or using any products associated with the accounts five business days before the schedule closure date set forth above. After that date, the bank will close any open accounts and after deduction of any permissible service charges and pending transactions, remit all remaining funds in the form of a check delivered to the company. At the address of record. We ask that you promptly transfer your business to another financial institution before November 21st, 2022. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to call your usual banking contact. Thank you for your attention to this matter. Sincerely, JP Morgan Chase Bank. It's the same exact people that he's critiquing own JP Morgan Chase. It's the same exact exact people that he's critiquing, you know, the same elitist community that so happened to fall under this specific name, that own basically all of the. Interesting. Um, so let's go ahead and talk about the next thing here, which is the George Floyd situation. George Floyd's mother is suing Kanye West for $250 million for saying something that may very well be accurate, as you will find out in the very next clip, allegedly. So let's go ahead and pull it up. George Floyd's mom suing for 250 million. Now, what Kanye West said is that he does not believe after watching a documentary, it's funny that they're not suing the documentary Cuz documentary comes with receipts, but $250 million for saying that he does not believe that George Floyd. From a neck on or a knee on his neck. Now we've heard people like Joe Rogan say that we've heard people all over have that, that idea in mind, and especially thinking from like a jujitsu perspective, if you don't know, I trained jujitsu, you know, literally choke people for fun. Um, when you understand where, where the, the blood comes from in the neck, right? And, and the way that you have to, how long you have to sit on top of somebody to make them die after they pass out, after they're unconscious. And how you, how you, how difficult it is to stop the flow of blood with a pretty. Choke, pretty good blood choke or strangle on somebody. It takes quite a bit of effort. It takes a little bit of time and it takes a lot of technique, right? You have to understand what you're doing. You have to understand how to approach that. I would be very hard pressed to figure out how to stop the blood flow from both, uh, both of the, uh, arteries on both sides of your neck with one knee, with the concrete on the other side, cuz your chin and your jaw would basically protect this other artery and it would remain allowing blood flow to your brain. I, I, I just don't understand how that would work. Now, I'm not saying that this wasn't false. Right. Um, but you can make that decision by yourself after we watch the clip from the documentary just released by Canice Owens. Um, but I think this is wild. I think it's crazy, and I think that this could raise a conversation that's really, really makes a community wake up to what happened through the Black Lives Matter protests, right? If you don't know, but Candace Owens just released a documentary about Black Lives Matter, talking about where all of the money basically was funding their own lavish lifestyles and mansions paying off bodyguards who were actually her husband's business. And like a million dollars or $2 million for bodyguards, um, paying, you know, uh, what is it like sexting companies and, and phone companies and prostitutes allegedly through the, the corporation and the entity, um, for doing so. It, it's so crazy. So let's go ahead and watch this video and then we will discuss it. Here is what Kanye West or Yay. Had to say about George Floyd, and then we will see what we think and if it was accurate. Here we go. I, I watched the George Floyd documentary that Candace Owen put up. One of the things that his two roommates said was, They want a tall guy like me. They want a tall guy like me. And the day when he died, he said a prayer for, you know, eight minutes. Mm-hmm. , He said a prayer for eight minutes. They hit him with the fentanyl. If you look, the, the guy's knee wasn't even on his neck like that when he said, Mama, Mama, his, it's his girlfriend. They said he screamed for his mama. Mama was his girlfriend. It's in the documentary. But something that hit me, that fucked me up when I was watching the documentary and it said they want a tall guy like me. When I looked at that image of him, this tall black dude with the bald head, he reminded me of somebody else who you think he reminded me of, Virgil, he reminded me of Virg. So let's go ahead and look at this here. Here's the do, uh, the article that talks about his mom suing him for $250. Uh, so it says, George Floyd's Family Preps $250 million lawsuit against Kanye West for overdose comments. It goes on to say, and this is from the New York Post. The mother of George Floyd's daughter, uh, says that she plans to file a 250 million defamation lawsuit against Kanye West for suggesting that Floyd died of a fentanyl overdose. Lawyers announced Tuesday. What you'll find out when we watch this next video, that it was in the trial for this, that he had basically three times the lethal dose amount of Fentanyl in this system. Um, so we'll see how the lawyer and, and the expert there tries to wiggle his way out of that with words. But this is not gonna, there's nothing that will happen to yay as a result of. There. This is gonna get thrown out just like everything else because there's so much documented proof, So much documented proof from the actual medical records from the autopsy, which shows that he did have fentanyls in the system on top of having meth in his system at three times. Three times the lethal dose amount for a regular individual. So we'll watch that in a minute, but it goes on to say that Roxy, Washington plans to file a suit on behalf of her and Floyd's minor daughter, Georgia, or I'm sorry, Gianna Floyd accusing West of making comments to promote his brands and increase marketing value and revenue for himself. His business partners and associate, which that had nothing to do with and obviously hurt him, didn't help him. The 45 year old rapper who now goes by ye made the comments during an hour long interview, three hour long interview Sunday on the drink Champs podcast, Floyd 46 died in May, 2020 in a caught on video arrest by Minnesota Police, in which he since fired the Sense fired Officer Derek Chauvin, who was later convicted of murder could be seen kneeling on Floyd's Neck. Now to say this was tragic that, you know, I was outraged by watching that video. There's no reason that officers should have been doing that. Again, coming from a jujitsu perspective, there's, that was untactful that was unnecessary. You should absolutely, if you're professionally retaining people physically for a living, you should absolutely know how to do it without causing harm to them. And you know, even in jujitsu, if you put your knee on some dude's d neck while he's laying on the ground, you're a dick and, and you're in a professional position here, he shouldn't have done that. It's wrong. You know, could that have caused death? I'm not a a a doctor, I'm not a autopsy specialist, so take it with a grain of salt. I have a little bit of knowledge coming from a world where we literally make people choke unconscious with strangle holds for the purpose, you know, of simulating this type of. But he absolutely shouldn't have done that. It was wrong. It was a little bit too violent compared to what you should be able to do to retain somebody like that. You should. He already had his back. He could have taken back control. He could have, you know, easily put cuffs on his hands. They should have absolutely. If guys bunch of fentanyl, he should be able to take control of this individual. Um, especially while he is sitting there pleading for his life. It was wrong. It was terrible. Nothing I will say here will go against that. Um, but now here's one thing that I kind of think is weird is that they said they, he ye said they hit him with the fentanyl. I don't know if that's accurate. How could you even have three times lethal dose within minutes if they did it? I don't see how that makes sense. I don't think that the cops did that. Um, I think, you know, What I remember, he had some sort of drug history. You know, he was in, you know, some other type of, you know, porn and things like that. So he wasn't, you know, the most above the law person. Um, but I, I think saying that they hit him with the fentanyl may be a little bit of a stretch. Um, I don't know if I agree with that. Um, I, I have no reason to agree with that. Okay. Um, if you look the, this is what Ye said. If you look, the guy's knee wasn't even on his neck like that. And we'll see that in the documentary footage that I pulled, is that it was according to the portion at least of what they showed, it'll show the whole thing. I don't even wanna watch the whole thing. I didn't wanna want to watch it when it happened. Um, you know, it's just terrible. But, uh, according to the, the video that we're gonna watch here, it shows that it was on his collarb. , I'm sorry, on, on his, uh, his shoulder blade, not his collarbone. Um, now it says that we will take all appropriate and necessary legal action. A few of your attorneys at, uh, employees, agents, partners, associates, and representatives fail to comply with this demand. Um, it said that the letter demanded that he inter the interview be taken down from all over the internet and demanded that Wes not make any further statements about Floyd's death. Interesting. Now they show a picture where his knee was absolutely on Derek Chauvin's neck. Okay, now, Your arteries are here, putting your, the knee on the back of somebody's neck right here. I I, again, the only way to kill somebody that's gonna make you uncomfortable, it's gonna make you pissed off later when you go home. And you gotta rub, rub out your neck with a, a foam roller, but that's not gonna kill you having a knee right here, right? That's not gonna do it. You, the veins and your arteries run the front of your neck right here. And so if you have a knee back here, it's not start stopping either of those main arteries. And that's just, again, just this part of the picture. Um, you, you basically have to stop both arteries to stop the blood moving through the brain, um, and, and actually kill somebody with a strangle. Um, it says that a, uh, show them also claim that drugs found in Floyd's system are responsible for. Uh, but a medical examiner determined that a lacks of lack of oxygen and compression of Floyd's neck were the cause of death. Chauvin also pleaded guilty to a federal charge of de depriving Floyd of his right to be free for the use of unreasonable force by a police officer. Okay, let's go ahead and watch the documentary because I think this fairly well refutes this claims. And none of this is like hearsay. This is all coming from the actual trial of Derek Chauvin's death, or I'm sorry, of Floyd, of Mr. Floyd's death of, uh, so let's go hot. Derek Chauvin was the one that was convicted of murder to correct myself, . Um, but George Floyd here. This is from the trial Derek Chauvin's trial, and we'll see what they have to say right here. This is the medical examiners. This is the, um, the autopsy specialist, and here it is from the perspective of Ms. Frazier's camera. It appears that Officer Chauvin's knee is on the neck of Mr. Floyd. Yes. Would you agree that from the perspective of Officer King's Body Camera, it appears that Officer Chauvin's knee was more on Mr. Floyd's shoulder blade? Um, yes. They had to have the jury believe that it was a neck restraint. It was the knee on the neck. It was asphyxiation that killed George. However, there was a ton of evidence that George Floyd consumed a toxic lethal cocktail of fentanyl and methamphetamine. Did it appear that Mr. Floyd said, I ate too many drugs? Yes, it did. Let's put it in perspective. Three grains of fentanyl on the head of a lead pencil. Enough to kill you. Enough to kill me. And so they had to continuously inculcate the public to believe that Derek Chauvin intentionally premeditatedly murdered George Floyd and drugs had absolutely nothing to do with it. As, as Lindsay and the toxicologist presented that awful testimony. And you have to think with the, the what was going on in our nation at that time. Could you imagine if he got off Derek, Derek Chauvin got off during that situation, Could you imagine what the public outrage would have been had he not been convicted of murder? There was already riots in the streets, There was already businesses being burned. If you don't remember that, that was so crazy during the lockdown that this happened, and literally our politicians allowed it to happen. So could you just imagine what would've happened if he got off during that? So, to his point, you know, they could not, and, and they, meaning, you know, the, the prosecution, the, the specialist, the judge, I mean, just the, all of their careers would have been ended immediately. Their names would've been, you know, written in blood on the streets. Metaphorically, it's, you just, it would be so difficult to even imagine the. Right. And then you go look at who is funding blats. Black Lives Matter is some of the very organizations that are being discussed by YAY or Kanye West in his remarks, and we'll look at that in a little bit. So let's continue this clip here. Do you recall describing the level of fentanyl as a fatal level of fentanyl? I recall describing it in other circumstances. It would be a fatal level. Yes. In other circumstances, had Mr. Floyd been home alone in his locked residence with no evidence of trauma and the only autopsy finding was that fentanyl level, then yes, I would certify his death as due to fentanyl toxicity. And they show a graph there. Fentanyl, toxicity of three, whatever. The, the way that they, uh, measured that, I think it might have, might have been like micrograms, um, three micrograms or whatever the measurement was there. It's not big enough on my screen. Um, but, and, and he had 11 and three was basically the average amount that it takes to kill somebody. So he had 11. And you, I like how he says there, you know, if he was at home and sitting there by himself and had he, you know, not been outside, then he would've died of fentanyl. 100%. I would've said that. And he didn't say a hundred percent, but he said, you know, that's, that's what I would've said is that he died of fentanyl overdose, but he didn't die inside of his home. Right? As if being in your home or out of your home has anything to do with your cause of death from a drug overdose. Now this goes on to say, and I will zoom in here, the police body cam footage. Uh, let's look. The police body cam footage also reveals George Floyd's claimed that he could not breathe prior to being put on the ground. And then I believe it. I know how to breathe, can't breathe. I can't breathe. Take a, I can't breathe here. Come on out. And then here it will say, and I'll just give credit where credit is due. This says the greatest lie ever sold, and this is on the daily. Plus. So if you want to go find that breakdown, and this is the second time that I'm talking about the Daily Wire Plus here in their documentaries because they've been killing it between Matt Walsh's, what is a woman, and Candace Owens now doing the Greatest Lie about Black Lives Matter. Um, I for one will go and watch that over the next few days and report back to you guys on it, um, because I'm very interested. Okay. Um, so let's go ahead, uh, and pull up the next situation. Although, let's touch on this for a little bit. I think that's interesting. I I, it's wild to me that he's now being sued. It's not gonna go anywhere, especially once you understand what we just heard and, and how within the actual case itself, this was discussed and talked about, and that he would have, according to that medical examiner, he would have died if it wasn't already from Fentanyl. That would've been their, their, what they would've said would've happened. So, you know, maybe being under stress and also having a lethal amount of fentanyl in your system has something to do with it. For sure, definitely could be a possibility. I'm not saying it's fentanyl alone, but having that e extra amount of stress on your body, or, you know, stress, anxiety, fear, all of that happening while also having three times the lethal dose at the exact same time. Yeah. It's probably, if you had to say which came first, the Fentanyl overdose or the knee on the neck being a part of that, it would probably be the Fentanyl had a, a major portion to do with it, which is actually pretty crazy that, that guy's, you know, I assume in prison today. Um, now let's go ahead and look at some of the, the other things that he said here. One of the things that I'd like to discuss is one of the more questionable things that Kanye said, or yay . I only correct myself because, uh, Kanye or Ye says that that was his, you know, West was a slave name. Uh, so he decided to change his name as a result. So, yay had some questionable things to say that that talked. And specifically, you know, a little bit about the Jewish community at large. Now, there is something to be said here, you know, that, that kind of preempt this. Uh, I, I have several Jewish friends. Uh, you know, I, I know several people. I grew up in a very Jewish predominant community. Um, so. You know, that's not like, you know, I have a black fund, so I'm not racist. No, not that, but I, I do understand the Jewish com community a little bit. The Jewish community is a very tight knit community, more than any other community that you or I really know of or understand. They, they generally do business only with each other if possible. Um, they're, the ways that they are, are together during, you know, worship their actual community centers. The where they live are all very specifically focused on their religious beliefs and, and their community at large. And if you understand, the way that Orthodox Judaism works is you are only considered, It's funny, I I get asked almost every time I walk past, there's always these younger, uh, boys out there probably doing something for their church where they're handing out pamphlets and I always get asked, you know, are, are you Jewish, Sir Apparently I look Jewish. Um, but, uh, but basically what you're only considered Jewish to like Orthodox Judaism, if your mother's. And the reason for that is because it's literally pa the passing from my understanding of it, the passing of your, uh, your genes and blood directly from Jewish descent. If your father's Jewish and your mother's not Jewish, you cannot be considered Jewish according to like Orthodox Judaism. Um, which is a more extreme type of Judaism compared to, you know, there's different levels, I guess, of this . Uh, but your mom has to be Jewish and it comes down to bloodline. Uh, so in this particular situation, you know, you have to understand where he's coming from. That is a very, very, more so than any other community, very tight knit in the way that they do business, the way that, you know, all of these things. So he talks about even being jealous of the way that their community is, how they only do business together, how they build these empires together. You know, how, you know, they, uh, one thing I was reading into is a lot of the, the Jewish community made their money off of, uh, you know, again, I don't know how correct this is off of, uh, the movement of, uh, having. Basically being lawyers that were doing divorce settlements to begin with when the, the predominant Christian legal teams weren't doing them. Um, which made them a lots of money, which made them a, a very, uh, powerful financial force in the communities that they were in. So, very interesting stuff. But again, I, I, I think the way that he approaches this conversation is very untact. I think the way that he frivolously throws out the Jewish community, and not specifically just calling out the families, the, the, the elitist families, like the Rockefellers, like the George Soros, like the JP Morgan Chase families, like all of these very predominantly elite families. Uh, and, and blood. That own almost everything that are very much so a part of the Black Rocks and the Vanguards of the world, and that own the entertainment industry, that own Disney, that owned msnbc, that owned cnn, that own all of these corporations from the shareholder standpoint, right? It's not like the CEO of every one of these companies is Jewish, but the shareholders, the one that make the final decisions and say the one that need to be appeased by the CEO or by the president of the company that will get removed if they don't, is had by the balls of these companies like BlackRock and Vanguard, which is very much so intertwined with these elite families like the Rockefeller family. And one thing Interesting. Yeah. We won't even go there. Let's, let's go ahead and pull this up and we'll listen to this and then we'll talk about that. Here we go. Here's the questionable things that Kanye West said that I don't agree with, right. I think that you have to separate it from the everyday Jewish individual and family and you know, even religion in general from. The way that he's talking about these things in some aspects, but majority of what he talked about was not that majority of what he talked about was about the people who owned the contracts, the Black Rocks, the Vanguards, the JP Morgan Chase's, the Rockefellers, all of that. But let's, let's go ahead and listen to this here, But, um, um, but it can't, it can't be narrowed down to, like you're saying, there's, you're saying Jewish media, but it's the media. There's, there's, there's people obviously in, in, I'm not narrowing down. I want Jewish children to look at they daddy and say, Why is Jay mad at. Hm. I want all the kids that love my shoes and love my songs to say, Why is ye mad? What have you done to his people? To the darker juice to our brothers, right? That has Jay speaking up, that had Nick Cannon speak up. Ice Q speaking up. What'd you say? Would you say Blacks is Jews? Blacks are Jews. Also, we gotta say we love Jewish people then we love Jewish people. We love, dude, we got great, we, I love Jews. People, okay, so I'm gonna be like my homie's a Nicaragua Jew. His dad came from Poland, escaped the Holocaust. Holocaust. His mom is Nicaragua. All right, so I'm gonna stop that before we get to this next point, because the next thing he says is quite interesting. But it, you know, the thing that he says there is, I want Jewish children to go to their dad and go, Why is ye mad at us? Why is Kanye West mad at our community for these things? And the reason, and he says it, and he points it out at specific times of the conversation that he's generally not speaking about them. But this was a very untact way to talk about this. And yeah, it's wrong. Don't do that. That's, it's not the way to approach this conversation. If you want to call out the elite communities, if you want to call out the entertainment industry, if you want to call out Disney, you want to call out the, the owners of your contracts. It's not the local guy down the street wearing a yamaka, doing all of the right things and being a good father and being a good husband. It's not who it is there. There's far more people in the Jewish community who are unbelievably great people that have the best of intentions that are, you know, very nice and pleasant to be around and, and not screwing over Kanye in contract agreements. . I think that's very, very easy to say. Right. So yeah, don't say that that's wrong, but the PR prime predominant point of what YE was making here in not that point was what I was talking about before. Now the next point that he makes here, and, and again, that's probably one of the only things that he said that I found to be questionable about the Jewish community. Literally probably one of the only things that he said, and the point remains the same. He believes that the Jewish community at large is so glued together, is so strong as a community that later on he says, I'm so jealous of them. I wish the black community was as strong as the, the Jewish community. I wish that we just did business with each other when we could. I wish that we raised up and, and helped to, you know, helped each other in need. He wishes that his community was more like them because it's an amazing community who's very glued together. Some would say if it was the Christian White community that was doing those same things, it might be considered, I don't know, maybe not. Maybe if it was just white people in general that stuck together, only did business with each other, you know, only propped up their communities, didn't give money elsewhere, didn't do those things that he's alleging that they do and screwed over other communities on contracts as he alleged. Yeah, maybe that would be considered not okay if it was just the white community. So when he says, you know, I wish our black community would do the same thing, does he wish that all white communities would act in that way if white people in general only did business with each other, only supported white businesses, only helped white people because of the color of their skin? I think that's inherent. Not. Okay. And I think that's the point of what he's making here, is that if it was just white people doing that to each other, maybe not what he's making, but what I'm making is that if it was just white people doing the same thing where they only helped people in their communities as he's alleging where they only did business with each other, where they only gave loans to each other, where they, where they, you know, in the ways that they interacted with other communities, utilize them and as a tool to profit, um, then maybe we would be having a different discussion here. Maybe . So let's go ahead and listen to this next point that he makes, because again, while a little, uh, exaggerated and a little, a lot exaggerated, the point remains the same in what he says here. Um, and we'll, we'll listen to that. You'll be like, I don't know what's going on. And by the way, we haven't escaped the Holocaust. We still in it Plan B, Planned Parenthood. We are still in the Holocaust. Even the, even the information put in our music, the toxicity put in our music. Mm-hmm.  is nothing promoting the idea of a king, taking care of a queen, and then taking care of the future kings and the future queens. It's just us talking about killing each other and Jewish people getting paid off of it. Okay. So there's a couple points there that I wanna talk about. The first one being he says that we're not out of the Holocaust. Now the Holocaust is a term that's specifically used for this timeframe. Jewish people were unbelievably eradicated at, at very high rates over sentiments that their culture was, you know, as age as a whole was to be eradicated based off of their belief systems, not based off of the way that they developed and used contracts. Um, so  a little bit different in the sentiment, and that's what I think you have to differentiate here, is is this antisemitic in the way that he's approaching their religion? No, he's, he's talking about the way that the, the community, the, the highest up of the community interact at large in these contract negotiations. Um, so let's, let's make that differentiation now when he uses the word Holocaust and relates it to plan B and relates it to Planned Parenthood, he has a very, very good point. Okay. When Kanye West calls, Plan B and Planned Parenthood, he makes an a very good point. Now, using the word holocaust for that is very, again, maybe a little untact, but the point remains the same, you know? And, and I don't know, may, let me look that up. Let's, let's see the definition of that, because I, I wonder if it's, let's, let's see. I, I don't know specifically if that's used to describe the event in general. Yeah. It's used to describe the event in general. So maybe don't, don't do that. And don't compare it to that, because there are two horrific things. Oh, wait, no, it's not. No, it's not. The very first definition of Holocaust is great destruction resulting in the extensive loss of life, especially by fire, which, ugh, that's horrible. So that's the definition, The very first definition, the secondary definition, uh, is the genocide of European Jews. The third definition is a massive slaughter. So used correctly ye used holocaust correctly in describing Plan B and describing Planned Parenthood, We have talked about this before. You go back to where Planned Parenthood comes from. Was Margaret Singer. She was the, the predominant force in pushing it across the country, and she was a Nazi loving or Nazi or KKK loving racist. Okay. She was for the eradication of the, the very weeds of our community. If you can go listen to the quotes of what she said about it, it was a racist move that she was trying to eradicate specific races in lower income communities. And black people are predominantly, predominantly at much higher rates affected by Prime Parenthood, affected by abortion, affected by Plan B, unfortunately. And so what his point is there, a massive slaughter. As the definition of Holocaust is correct, there, there is a massive slaughter of black children potential, uh, potentially being eradicated as a result of not, potentially is absolutely not being brought to this earth as a result of plan's. Parenthood, abortion is absolutely a massive slaughter on the black community, and it is predominantly affecting minority communities, and that's what he's speaking to. Again, this is what I'm talking about, the trickles of truth through the ways that he's saying these things, in these explosive manners. There's merit to a lot of it. Not all of it, but a lot of it. And this is one of those things, you know, he, he calls it the Holocaust, right? A Holocaust, Not the Holocaust. The Holocaust is how it's used when you're talking about, um, the Nazis during World War ii. But he makes a great point here, and this is something that should be talked about in the black community that they, they shouldn't be at the highest rates of abortion shouldn't be minority. Because what is that doing that's furthering, furthering you being the literal word minority? Who knows, If you go back and look at the statistics, they may not be considered a statistical minority if abortion wasn't a thing. And that keeps the, the, the white communities that keeps the, you know, all of these, you know, whatever you want to call it, against. On the opposite side of that, that are the lower affected communities, including white communities that are not as affected at higher rates as the majority, the majority community that's out there. And, and, and there are people in power who potentially and what we've seen here do not want that to be. And so he makes a great point here. Now, another great point that he makes is when we go on to talk about the black vote, talking about Candace Owens talking about some of these other things here. So let's go ahead and listen to that and we will discuss that as well. Cause if they're, once they cancel four SoFi stadiums because of what's classified as wrong, think right? Because you have group think, right? It is very important.  to have the black vote be in group think and to not separate from the thought and be in completely in line with the agenda of the left. The Jewish media and the Chinese, that's a lot of Chinese things got something to do with it. They got something to do with everything. This is my issue with Jared Kushner say, Okay, now we made a couple of really deep points there as well. He talks about the black vote. Do you remember what Joe Biden. If you don't vote for Joe, Joe Biden, if you don't, Jo . Wow. Why is that hard to say? If you don't vote for Joe Biden, then you ain't black. That's what he said. He literally called this out to a t. Joe Biden specifically said that you're not even black if you don't vote for me, because we have a black vote. There is a community that we need to persuade and, and, and predominantly within the black community, if you are a Republican or a conservative black individual, yeah. You're gonna have a, a, be criticized at a much higher rate than others. Just look at Candice Owens, right? You see that all of the time. And look at the way that Kanye had to deal with these things when he was a supporting Trump. There's absolutely that deeper point that, that he just made. That's very, very deep that the black community could definitely profit, you know, socially from understanding that they shouldn't be manipulated in this way. They shouldn't be manipulated in a way that makes them feel like they have to vote for a specific party. Or else you ain't black according to Joe Biden. And then he even says that, you know, 96% of the black women voted for Joe Biden because of Kamala Harris, 96%. Can you find that in any other community that they're split in that way specifically just because somebody of, of their, you know, skin color ran? I don't think so. It's crazy how much that that group think has been, been pushed and, and, and weaponized by the liberal agenda that you have to think this way. And Joe Biden called it out to them specifically in a very racist way. If you don't vote for me, then you ain't. Because you have to vote for me because we have structured it in a way socially that doing so is social suicide. And that's why they started to call Kanye crazy is because he started moving people over to the Republican party and conservatives over to the Republican party. And I think that's an amazing point about what's about to happen right before the midterms is Kanye is building a movement. A movement around the idea that this does not have to be the way. You do not have to vote liberal, you don't have to vote left, you don't have to vote for Joe Biden. And even if you don't, you're still black, you still have the same skin color, you still belong to the same communities and it has nothing to do with the fact that you voted for one way or another. And you actually are supposed to have your own individual thoughts, not based on your skin color, social beliefs, or whatever. You can own your own ideas regardless of what your skin color is and who you wanna vote for and what you believe about these social topic. Right, but that's not, that's not easy or that's not good for their party, right? That they will have such a difficult time winning anything if the black party, the black vote as they called it here, understands that you don't have to be 96% to the liberal party. If you're black, you can, you can vote for whoever you want. It's okay. You don't have to make those decisions based off of your skin color or just because, you know, And I get it, you know, there's never been a black woman as vice president. That's awesome. There was Barack Obama, um, you know, two presidencies ago. Uh, but. You know that, that, that should be propagated, but in the right way for the right reasons, right? Because that's an intelligent individual who represents your belief systems, not just specifically as, as he said here, only, you know, in that portion of the interview that said 96% of them voted for her. You know, what did he say? He, he said, You would've thought Beyonce was running . You would've thought Beyonce was running based off the statistics. Um, it's pretty crazy. So he makes a very good point there. Now the next one that I wanna look at here is the next portion of that. Let's go ahead and re-listen to it cuz it's such a quick little clip. Um, and we'll talk about the secondary point that he made. Cause if. The black vote, be in group think and to not separate from the thought and be in completely in line with the agenda of the left, the Jewish media and the Chinese. Now he calls out the Chinese specifically there, which is interesting. You know, a lot of people say, you know, even Donald Trump said China Joe. You look at all the business deals that were done through the energy companies that Hunter Biden was a part of, right? Saying that this is intertwined. And something even more interesting, maybe not more interesting, but we'll talk about in a second, is that Kanye West calls out the fact that the Clinton party, the Clinton family was on a Zoom call with Kim Kardashian, Chrisy, Teagan, all of these famous celebrities, literally pushing the fact that you need to push the vaccine, which we'll look at in that Chris Cuomo interview. Uh, but the other thing that he says here is that we're being told, you know, we're being pushed out in these social, these entertainment ways that push us towards believing that we should, you know, make it. , our communities at large, you know, from our music industry, from whatever it is, a part of the entertainment that you would think that we shouldn't be pushing for, you know, the, the, the cohesive family unit that, you know, he, So let's, let's just see what he says about it. So I'm not wrong because if they, once they cancel four SoFi stadiums of the left, the Jewish media and the Chinese, that's, a lot of Chinese things got something to do with it. They got something to do with everything. This is my issue with Jared Kushner say, Okay, so we didn't say there. Maybe I'm confusing that with another one. Uh, I think maybe it was this one. Let. But, um, um, but it can't, it can't be narrowed down to, like you're saying, there's, you're saying Jewish because if they're, once they cancel four SoFi stadiums because of what's classified as wrong think. But, um, um, but it can't, it can't be narrowed down to, like you're saying, toxicity, putting our music. Mm-hmm. , it's nothing promoting the idea of a king, taking care of a queen and then taking care of the future kings and a future queens. It's just us talking about killing each other and Jewish people getting paid off of it. Hmm. So there you go. Talking about how the entertainment that's pushed towards this, this community at large is stuff that's generally toxic to the family, generally toxic to the culture. Um, and is being propped up, you know, by the people who are writing the contract. The 50% maybe that he's alluding to, According to him, 50% haven't done all the research there, which is probably important research to do. So do that and get back to me. Uh, but let's go ahead and see here where he says, and you say you can't be mad at them cuz you wanna do the same. You know, I, you know what, That's, that's an important thing to say. I can't be, but I am cuz I'm jealous cuz I'm a human being and you want the same, And I'm a competitor. I want my people to rise up like the Jewish people. I'm a competitor. I feel that if I am not the leader, I'm one of the strongest, most vocal leaders and I feel Lauren is the leader. I feel like this. Multiple people that are leaders in this community, right? And I'm jealous of the Jewish community. I'm jealous of how the fact that they do not abort their people. I'm jealous of how the fact, So they say that opposed to saying, coming, Lemme it bro, this is coming now. It's coming out. Lemme say you have to get to it. I'm jealous. I'm jealous of the fact of how they don't abort their babies. I'm jealous of the fact of how they stay with their wives. I'm jealous of the fact of how they do business together. I'm jealous of the fact of how they read their contracts and understand their contracts. I'm jealous of the fact, I'm jealous of the way. Uh, Jewish people do business, and I'm jealous, not just for me, but for our entire culture. And I believe that once we rise up, that we will have a position to be able to serve God. Because it's not about taking over the world. God runs the world. We need to be in service to God and we all need to be in service to God. So I'm jealous. And you know what? Because when I would speak on the, the call and Drake record, why I speak on that outta jealousy when I was speaking on Drake, Why I speak on that outta jealousy while I'm speaking on the Jewish culture, While I'm speaking on that outta jealousy, I'm jealous of the Jewish culture. No, I said, I just thought of that right now. Shit. But it had to happen. . That's a breakthrough. That's a breakthrough, but that's why it's gonna win a. So a little bit more insight. You're not gonna see that clip anywhere, are you? The fact that Kanye West is saying that he's jealous of the Jewish community and not, and, and that's where his, you know, the things that he's saying are coming from. Now, obviously he's not saying positive things about the way that they deal with the contracts that he's interacted with, some of the people within the entertainment industry, but there you go. All right, Now let's go ahead and watch the, uh, Cuomo interview and then we will wrap it up. Chris Cuomo had him on his show, and you will see a completely different tonality, a completely different body language, everything compared to what we saw originally. So let's go watch this here and then we'll wrap it up. Here we go, right to vote. You realize when I wore a red hat that I, my life was threatened, I know by my Jewish managers, by my, by my Jewish. By my Jewish accountant. Your lawyer, your friends threatened your life in the streets, like by No. You said not, Not specifically the accountant, but there were many people who threatened my life. Also, my family was torn apart, off of my political opinion because of my ex-wife's attachment to the Clinton, uh, administration. I mean, they were getting my ex-wife to push the vaccination. I didn't realize how attached they were to the left agenda when I was there. Vaccinations, they were not a left agenda. Yeah. Okay. I understand. Okay. Not specifically the, the vaccinations. Vaccinations are a left agenda, Chris. Absolutely. Look at the statistics, look at the amount of people from left to right. It's absolutely a political divide in the way that people view vaccinations. It's absolutely a politically charged conversation. It's absolutely go look at Fox compared to cnn, although that's not a great example of it, but go look at that because Fox was compromised too, as we found out. But go look at that. It's absolutely a political conversation. It is absolutely a part of the liberal agenda. It's absolutely, you know, the, the liberal, uh, politicians who are sitting there eating their, oh, their cheeseburgers and mm french fries. Oh man, this is so delicious. Go, go en gorge yourself with food and get a free vaccination. At the same time, these disgusting people who are pushing these things that now we understand at a 4% rate, people are getting boosted, boosted boosters, booster shots, and even booster shots. Wrong additional shots of these mRNA, you know, things. So anyways, It's absolutely a political conversation. And the fact that he just said that Kim Kardashian, and at other points, Chrissy Teagan and all of these other very elite actors were on Zoom calls being told to push the vaccination by somebody who is not even in office. Hmm. I wonder why the Clinton Foundation or the Clinton family would be pushing that even when they're not in office. And why would you, even if you are in office, go to celebrities and have 'em on Zoom calls and tell them to go push medical pharmaceutical products onto their followers and utilize their influence to profit pharmaceutical companies who have, Oh, by the way, no backlash, no legal recourse if these things go

A Voice and Beyond
#85. My Career as a Rebel Traditionalist with Cate Frazier-Neely

A Voice and Beyond

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 72:42 Transcription Available


This week's guest is Cate Frazier-Neely.  Cate Frazier-Neely is a Singing Voice Specialist, a voice teacher with specialisation across many styles, a musician, an author, a visual artist and Somatic Educator. She is also involved in the Arts for Physical and Emotional Health. Cate candidly calls herself a traditionalist who is a rebel and in this episode, she reveals why. Cate explains that her own voice training was based on a traditional Western European Classical model, but has since stepped out to explore, perform and teach across other styles. Cate explains that as voice teachers, we need to step out of our own paradigms and we must continue to find opportunities to learn and adapt in our ever-evolving field. Cate also offers her views on different topics around singing voice pedagogy, the limitations of methodologies, the benefits of teachers having had a performance career and so much more. She shares many of her own personal and professional experiences within the singing voice industry, including those significant moments in time when she was silenced as a woman and as someone who trying to instigate change within the teaching community. There is so much to unpack in this interview with Cate Frazier-Neely and I am sure you're going to enjoy listening and learning with Cate as much as I did.https://www.Catefnstudios.comhttps://www.instagram.com/catefnstudios/https://singingthroughchange.comhttps://www.facebook.com/groups/singingthroughchange/"Where to Learn from Me for Free in 2022"https://www.catefnstudios.com/writings//better-answers-to-some-post-presentation-questionsIn this episode05:57 — Humble Beginnings10:31 — The New Thing in Music Education the You Never Knew13:31 — What is Classical Singing?20:37 — The Territories Where You Think You Should Teach24:29 — The Stains of Superiority and the Wisdom From Age 29:37 — Lessons for the Big Wigs35:54 — Knowing the Heart, Not Just Technique41:54 — Inspirations of the Great Teachings46:18 — Do You Have the Right Motive to Teach?49:28 — Putting the Muzzle on You56:18 — Making a Stand and Using Your Voice01:02:14 — Perspective as a Singing Voice Specialist01:04:16 —Kate's Mission01:06:55 — It's Okay Not to Know ThingsFor more go to https://drmarisaleenaismith.com/85Like this episode? Please leave a review here - even one sentence helps!Follow me on Instagram.