Podcasts about occupational safety

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Field concerned with the safety, health and welfare of people at work

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  • Oct 19, 2021LATEST
occupational safety

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Best podcasts about occupational safety

Show all podcasts related to occupational safety

Latest podcast episodes about occupational safety

Relaxing White Noise
Infant Sleep Sound White Noise 8 hours | Helps a Baby Fall Asleep & Stay Sleeping

Relaxing White Noise

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 480:47


Many infants respond well to white noise, quickly calming down when they hear the soothing sound. When a baby is fussy, crying, suffering from colic or not sleeping well, play this calming white noise and watch them quickly settle down. Bring peace to your infant and to your household with this relaxing baby sleep sound. Baby white noise is an effective way to soothe a crying infant and lull your newborn to sleep. White noise resembles sounds the baby heard in the womb, which has a calming effect. It also masks other distracting noises so that your baby can fall asleep and remain sleeping. While playing white noise for babies, it's important to keep tabs on the volume, because any white noise machine, smartphone, or computer can put out levels that are too loud for your child. It's recommended to play the sound at least a few feet from where your infant is sleeping and to keep the volume no louder than the sound of a soft shower. Parents can download an app to turn their smartphone into a sound level meter. One good, free, option is the sound level meter app created by the U.S. National Institutes for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) available on the app store as the NIOSH SLM app. Soothe your crying baby and enjoy a moment of calm! Check out the 10-Hour version on YouTube Contact Us for Partnership Inquiries Relaxing White Noise is the number one destination on YouTube for white noise and nature sounds to help you sleep, study or soothe a baby. With more than a billion views across YouTube and other platforms, we are excited to now share our popular ambient tracks on the Relaxing White Noise podcast. People use white noise for sleeping, focus, sound masking or relaxation. We couldn't be happier to help folks live better lives. This podcast has the sound for you whether you use white noise for studying, to soothe a colicky baby, to fall asleep or for simply enjoying a peaceful moment. No need to buy a white noise machine when you can listen to these sounds for free. Cheers to living your best life! DISCLAIMER: Remember that loud sounds can potentially damage your hearing. When playing one of our ambiences, if you cannot have a conversation over the sound without raising your voice, the sound may be too loud for your ears. Please do not place speakers right next to a baby's ears. If you have difficulty hearing or hear ringing in your ears, please immediately discontinue listening to the white noise sounds and consult an audiologist or your physician. The sounds provided by Relaxing White Noise are for entertainment purposes only and are not a treatment for sleep disorders or tinnitus. If you have significant difficulty sleeping on a regular basis, experience fitful/restless sleep, or feel tired during the day, please consult your physician. © Relaxing White Noise LLC, 2018. All rights reserved. Any reproduction or republication of all or part of this text/visual/audio is prohibited. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/relaxingwhitenoise/support

America's Work Force Union Podcast
Leonard Aguilar (Texas AFL-CIO) / Marcy Goldstein-Gelb (NCOSH)

America's Work Force Union Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 54:40


Texas AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Leonard Aguilar rejoined the AWF Union Podcast to discuss vaccination rates in Texas and how Gov. Greg Abbott is pushing back against mandates. He also discussed labor shortage and how unions can take advantage of them. National Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health Co-executive Director Marcy Goldstein-Gelb was also featured on today's episode. She spoke about holding employers accountable for committing OSHA violations and creating stricter punishments to ensure infractions are not repeated.

Daily News Brief
Daily News Brief for Wednesday, October 13, 2021

Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 21:06


Americans' trust of the media is absolutely in the gutter https://notthebee.com/article/americans-trust-of-the-media-is-completely-in-the-gutter-and-boy-you-just-hate-to-see-it And the Bee notes about the Gallup research: “when political differences are accounted for, the results diverge sharply along party lines: Just 11% of Republicans trust the media, while 68% of Democrats do. But even the Democratic numbers have declined notably in recent years, as have those of Independents.” I can't help but to insert Club plug here. This is sort of self serving, but I cannot think of a better way to fight mainstream media, than by first joining a solid bible believing church, and secondly joining our club. Our goal here, and I hope we are doing a pretty good job of this, is to proclaim the Lordship of Christ over politics, produce quality news and commentary that you can trust, and build a network that surpass unprincipled legacy media like Fox News. So, go to FightLaughFeast.com to sign up and support our efforts. Texas governor bans Covid-19 vaccine mandates by any employer in state https://apple.news/AbFpB3TM-RoeortH-jmAnHA Texas Gov. Greg Abbott on Monday issued an executive order banning all state entities, including private employers, from enforcing vaccine mandates, the latest escalation in the Republican's resistance to public health measures during the Covid-19 pandemic. The order states that "no entity in Texas" can enforce vaccination against anyone in the state who objects "for any reason of personal conscience, based on a religious belief, or for medical reasons, including prior recovery from COVID-19," according to a news release from the governor's office. "The COVID-19 vaccine is safe, effective, and our best defense against the virus, but should remain voluntary and never forced," Abbott said in a statement. Abbott also called on the Texas state Legislature to pass a law with the same effect. The executive order would be rescinded upon the passage of such legislation, the governor's office said. Southwest, American among Texas businesses defying Abbott to comply with federal vaccine mandate https://www.statesman.com/story/business/2021/10/12/southwest-american-plan-ignore-abbott-comply-vaccine-mandate/8423456002/ Now according to the Satesman, there is a battle of the gods, and it looks like the federal god won: “Two of the national's largest airlines — Southwest Airlines and American Airlines — both based in Texas, said Tuesday they plan to follow looming federal guidelines and require that their employees are vaccinated against COVID-19, despite an order from Gov. Greg Abbott that attempts to block such mandates. Dallas-based Southwest Airlines last week ordered all of its estimated 55,000 employees to be vaccinated against COVID 19 by Dec. 8. That folowed a directive from President Joe Biden, who in September said all private companies with more than 100 workers must require employees to be vaccinated or conduct weekly tests for the coronavirus. Southwest said in a written statement Tuesday that the president's executive order “supersedes any state mandate or law,” saying the company is required to adhere to it despite Abbott's action “to remain compliant as a federal contractor.”” But listen to this. In the same article: “Amber Gunst, CEO of the Austin Technology Council, said most companies in Texas are unlikely to follow the governor's mandate. Employers don't have the option to defy OSHA standards, both for legal reasons and for insurance-related concerns, she said. "When the federal government comes in with OSHA and they say, 'this is what we need to do in order to keep employees safe,' companies have to follow those rules in order to be in compliance with OSHA, so I don't really feel that most companies are going to look at the mandate that the governor created and want to adhere to that," Gunst said. "Companies don't have an option to choose to not be in compliance with OSHA. They will have a very strict, and steep price to pay if they're not in compliance with OSHA." Gunst said she thinks most companies will see Abbott's order "as a nuisance that the governor has created." The question is a nuisance to who? Who is being the nuisance? Who is forcing people to vax? The Wallstree Journal captures this gem: https://www.wsj.com/articles/covid-19-vaccine-mandate-fight-between-texas-and-biden-has-companies-caught-in-the-middle-11634073605 “The Greater Houston Partnership, which represents some 900 companies including Exxon Mobil Corp., JPMorgan Chase & Co., Chevron Corp. and Accenture PLC, said Tuesday that Mr. Abbott's order would make it more difficult for Texas businesses to operate safely. The organization has been generally supportive of Mr. Biden's efforts to require vaccines for large employers.” Texas companies are showing more loyalty to the federal government, than to their state. We be tripp'n. Joe Biden's Vaccine Mandate Doesn't Exist. It's Just A Press Release https://thefederalist.com/2021/10/07/joe-bidens-vaccine-mandate-doesnt-exist-its-just-a-press-release/?s=04#.YV9Ab7sLmEY.twitter According to Joy Pullmann over at The Federalist: “Yes, we've heard all about Joe Biden's alleged vaccine mandate for private companies employing 100 or more people. It was all over the news even before he announced it on September 9. His announcement has jeopardized the employment of millions of Americans and increased worker shortages in critical domains such as health care. There's only one problem. It's all a mirage. Biden's so-called vaccine mandate doesn't exist — at least, not yet. So far, all we have is his press conference and other such made-for-media huff-puffing. No such rule even claiming to be legally binding has been issued yet. That's why nearly two dozen Republican attorneys general who have publicly voiced their opposition to the clearly unconstitutional and illegal mandate haven't yet filed suit against it, the Office of the Indiana Attorney General confirmed for me. There is no mandate to haul into court. And that may be part of the plan. According to several sources, so far it appears no such mandate has been sent to the White House's Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs yet for approval. The White House, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and the Department of Labor haven't released any official guidance for the alleged mandate. There is no executive order. There's nothing but press statements. Despite what you may have been falsely led to believe by the media fantasy projection machine, press statements have exactly zero legal authority. To impose the public perception of a mandate, the Biden administration is following an unusual rule-making process it also employed earlier this year, called an emergency temporary standard (ETS). The spring ETS rule took nearly six months to issue. Meanwhile, companies are telling reporters their vaccine mandates will have at the latest December deadlines. (For those who can't calendar, that's four months after Biden's non-existent mandate was proclaimed. According to OSHA, an ETS takes up to six months to go into effect after the initial mandate is issued in the Federal Register — which, again, for the proclaimed 100-employee mandate hasn't happened yet.) Lawyers for big business were blunt about their love for this mandate mirage: “Everybody loves this cover,” Minneapolis employment lawyer Kate Bischoff told Bloomberg Law in September. “Many were already looking down the road at doing this, but the fact that they get to blame Biden is like manna from heaven.” Using the ETS procedure instead of normal federal rule-making processes both allows the Biden administration to push its demands faster and without any public input or requirement of responding to public input, which is normally required of even legally laughable federal rule-making like this one would be. That is part of why ETS rules have been overwhelmingly overturned in courts. Earlier this week, the Wall Street Journal published a letter from Bruce Atkinson making several excellent observations about the nonexistent mandate, including the following:” “The mandate's nonexistence shields the Biden administration from legal challenges that may ultimately restrict the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's authority. Yet the mandate is still effective at compelling industries and companies into compliance, as it leaves room for any eventual issuance to target noncompliant entities. This implied cudgel is particularly effective on industries and companies that are dependent on federal spending or the goodwill of federal regulators. The nonexistent mandate also allows so-inclined state and local governments and companies to issue their own mandates, seemingly in lockstep with Washington. The Biden White House has been well-served by presenting a nonexistent mandate as a done deal.” Guitar AD Have you always wanted to play guitar but didn't know where to start? Learning to play the guitar can be a lonely, confusing and expensive experience. But it doesn't have to be that way. Fight Laugh Feast member David Harsh has created a unique, online monthly membership, that has community, a clear success path, and it's super affordable. David has spent decades of touring, leading worship, and teaching guitar. He's helped thousands of guitar players discover their potential. You may have heard us talk about GuitarSuccess4U. Here's an update. Several of our listeners have joined this membership, and they are having a blast! Maybe it's time for you to hop on board! When you join this membership, you can learn at your own pace, from home, alongside a community of guitarists including worship leaders, hobbyists, retirees, stay-at-home moms and more. Through video lessons, worksheets, and weekly Zoom calls, David will take you step-by-step towards becoming the musician you were made to be. GuitarSuccess4U is only $29 a month – that's less than a dollar a day, and a fraction of the cost of guitar lessons. Learn more and join now at GuitarSuccess4U.com. That's “Guitar Success,” the number “4” and the letter “U,” dot com. Join today and get 5 instant bonuses to help accelerate your progress! Head on over to GuitarSuccess4U.com to start your guitar journey. That's Guitar Success, the number “4” and the letter “U,” dot com. A record 4.3 million workers quit their jobs in August, led by food and retail industries https://www.cnbc.com/2021/10/12/a-record-4point3-million-workers-quit-their-jobs-in-august-led-by-food-and-retail-industries.html According to CNBC: “Workers left their jobs at a record pace in August, with bar and restaurant employees as well as retail staff quitting in droves, the Labor Department reported Tuesday. Quits hit a new series high going back to December 2000, as 4.3 million workers left their jobs. The quits rate rose to 2.9%, an increase of 242,000 from the previous month, which saw a rate of 2.7%, according to the department's Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey. The rate, which is measured against total employment, is the highest in a data series that goes back to December 2000. Quits have been seen historically as a level of confidence from workers who feel they are secure in finding employment elsewhere, though labor dynamics have changed during Covid-19 crisis. Workers have left their jobs because of health concerns and child care issues unique to the pandemic's circumstances. A total of 892,000 workers in the food service and accommodation industries left their jobs, while 721,000 retail workers departed along with 534,000 in health care and social assistance. “As job openings and hires fell in August, the quits rate hit a new series high, surging along with the rise in Covid cases and likely growing concerns about working in the continuing pandemic,” said Elise Gould, senior economist at the Economic Policy Institute.” Now two questions for me arise out of this information. Why are these people quitting, and where are they going? I could not dig up the answer for where these quitters went, and the best answer I could dig up for why they are quitting coming from the Business, Insider where they speculate: https://www.businessinsider.com/over-4-million-workers-quit-record-labor-shortage-great-resignation-2021-10 “Workers are likely quitting over work conditions, pay, the virus, or contemplation of their lives.” Bottom line is the government has created a catawampus economy, and screws up all the incentives, this makes it hard to understand what is really going on here. Pelosi signals big spending package will shrink to $2 trillion https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/congress/pelosi-signals-2-trillion-spending-bill Facing intractable opposition from party centrists, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Democrats will have to “make tighter decisions” on a massive social welfare spending package that is stalled in Congress. Pelosi, a California Democrat, acknowledged in a press conference Tuesday that the $3.5 trillion package planned by Democrats will have to shrink to about $2 trillion, telling reporters, “The fact is there are fewer dollars to spend, there are choices to be made, and the members have said let's get the results we need, but we will not diminish the transformative nature of what it is.” Pelosi, in a memo to Democrats late Monday, told them caucus members are calling for a spending package that will “do fewer things well so that we can still have a transformative impact on families in the workplace and responsibly address the climate crisis.” Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, a New York Democrat, set an Oct. 31 deadline to advance the package. Tight race in Virginia gubernatorial showdown with three weeks until election https://www.foxnews.com/politics/virginia-gubernatorial-showdown-three-weeks-until-election Tuesday marks three weeks to go until Election Day in Virginia, and the top-of-the- ticket race remains an extremely close contest in one of just two states to hold gubernatorial elections in the year after a presidential contest. An average of the latest polls in the race indicates that former Democratic Gov. Terry McAuliffe – who's running for his old job – holds a slight, single-digit edge over Republican nominee Glenn Youngkin in a state that President Biden won by 10 points in last year's election and where Republicans haven't won a statewide contest in a dozen years. The margin-of-error race in Virginia – a one-time key battleground but still competitive state which is seen as a key bellwether ahead of the 2022 midterm elections – has national Democrats on edge as they defend their razor-thin majorities in the House of Representatives and Senate in next year's contests. "Folks, the Virginia Governor's race is a big deal not just for the Commonwealth but for our country," Biden wrote to supporters in a fundraising email. And McAuliffe asked in a fundraising email last week, "Are we blowing this?" Virginia and New Jersey's elections for governor always grab outsized attention as they're the only states to hold such contests the year after the presidency's decided. And there's a long-running trend of voters in the commonwealth defeating the gubernatorial nominee of the party that controls the White House. McAuliffe broke with that tradition in 2013 with his election as governor. McAuliffe was unable to run for reelection in 2017 because Virginia governors are barred from serving two straight terms. And the McAuliffe campaign announced on Tuesday that the biggest name of all - former President Obama - will team up with the former governor on Oct. 23. Closing This is Gabriel Rench with Crosspolitic News. Support Rowdy Christian media by joining our club at fightlaughfeast.com, downloading our App, and head to our annual Fight Laugh Feast Conference next fall. With your partnership, together we will fight outdated and compromised media, engage news and politics with the gospel, and replace lies and darkness with truth and light. Go to fightlaughfeast.com to take all these actions. Have a great day. Lord bless

Relaxing White Noise
Baby White Noise Hairdryer 8 hours | Calm a Crying Infant with Sleep Sound for Colicky Babies

Relaxing White Noise

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 480:47


Many parents have found that the sounds of a hair dryer soothe a crying baby. Here's an 8 hour high-quality hairdryer recording that's a useful tool to calm a colicky newborn. The white noise helps lull a baby to sleep. While playing white noise for babies, it's important to keep tabs on the volume, because any white noise machine, smartphone, or computer can put out levels that are too loud for your child. It's recommended to play the sound at least a few feet from where your infant is sleeping and to keep the volume no louder than the sound of a soft shower. Parents can download an app to turn their smartphone into a sound level meter. One good, free, option is the sound level meter app created by the U.S. National Institutes for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) available on the app store as the NIOSH SLM app. Soothe your crying baby and enjoy a moment of calm! Check out the 10-Hour version on YouTube Contact Us for Partnership Inquiries Relaxing White Noise is the number one destination on YouTube for white noise and nature sounds to help you sleep, study or soothe a baby. With more than a billion views across YouTube and other platforms, we are excited to now share our popular ambient tracks on the Relaxing White Noise podcast. People use white noise for sleeping, focus, sound masking or relaxation. We couldn't be happier to help folks live better lives. This podcast has the sound for you whether you use white noise for studying, to soothe a colicky baby, to fall asleep or for simply enjoying a peaceful moment. No need to buy a white noise machine when you can listen to these sounds for free. Cheers to living your best life! DISCLAIMER: Remember that loud sounds can potentially damage your hearing. When playing one of our ambiences, if you cannot have a conversation over the sound without raising your voice, the sound may be too loud for your ears. Please do not place speakers right next to a baby's ears. If you have difficulty hearing or hear ringing in your ears, please immediately discontinue listening to the white noise sounds and consult an audiologist or your physician. The sounds provided by Relaxing White Noise are for entertainment purposes only and are not a treatment for sleep disorders or tinnitus. If you have significant difficulty sleeping on a regular basis, experience fitful/restless sleep, or feel tired during the day, please consult your physician. © Relaxing White Noise LLC, 2018. All rights reserved. Any reproduction or republication of all or part of this text/visual/audio is prohibited. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/relaxingwhitenoise/support

ABA Banking Journal Podcast
How Will the Biden Vaccine and Testing Mandate Apply to Banks?

ABA Banking Journal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 18:43


On the latest episode of the ABA Banking Journal Podcast — sponsored by NICE Actimize Xceed — ABA VP Jonathan Thessin covers what banks need to know about the Biden administration's COVID-19 action plan, which includes new employer-level vaccination mandates and testing requirements for employees not vaccinated against COVID. Among other topics, Thessin discusses: The scope of the “emergency temporary standard” to be issued by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration that would require employers with 100 or more employees to mandate vaccination or weekly testing for their employees. The potential for legal challenges that may prevent the ETS from being implemented. Under which conditions banks may be classified as federal contractors subject to a separate employee-vaccination mandate. Steps banks can take now to make implementation easier once the ETS is officially issued. This episode is sponsored by NICE Actimize Xceed.Additional resources: Staff analysis of Biden administration COVID action plan (updated Oct. 5, 2021) FAQ on bank-related impacts of COVID action plan (updated Oct. 5, 2021)

Free Zone Frontier
Protecting Yourself As A Successful Entrepreneur, with Paul Abel

Free Zone Frontier

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 28:00


Paul Abel was a successful franchise owner, but going up against government regulations, he always lost. Fifteen years ago, inspired by an experience he had with a workplace injury, Paul decided to start his own business informing employers how to avoid fines and lawsuits. Dan Sullivan, Steve Krein, and Paul cover the responsibilities of employers as they relate to government regulations.HIGHLIGHTS One characteristic of entrepreneurs is that they always want to change things.A lot of people might not know that they are entrepreneurs at heart.Businesses have to deal with four levels of government at a minimum.The complexity of regulations is only going to get worse over the next ten years.When it comes to administrative regulations, most entrepreneurs assume that someone else is taking care of it.It's the government's job to release new laws and regulations and the employer's job to know about it. IN THIS EPISODEThe Impact Filter™: https://resources.strategiccoach.com/home/the-impact-filter Occupational Safety & Health Administration: https://www.osha.gov/ Process Street: https://www.process.st/Paul Abel is the President of Osha4Less - https://osha4less.com/

Ogletree Deakins Podcasts
Oregon Employment Law, Episode 1: COVID-19 Vaccine Mandates—What Oregon Employers Need to Know

Ogletree Deakins Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021


In the first episode of our new Oregon Employment Law podcast series, Paul Cirner and Florence Mao discuss recent changes to the Oregon Health Authority's temporary rule mandating COVID-19 vaccinations for employees in healthcare settings. The rule now includes an updated effective date and documentation requirements for medical or religious exceptions. The speakers also address the interplay between the pending emergency temporary standard from the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Division.

Relaxing White Noise
Fan Sound Brown Noise for Sleep 8 hours | Also for Studying, Focus

Relaxing White Noise

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 480:47


This fan makes a cool breeze and soothing brown noise. Great for relaxation, sleep, studying, focus or soothing a crying baby. Use the fan noise as a virtual sound machine. The deep white noise masks distracting sounds and creates a peaceful environment. Parents can use fan sounds to help soothe a crying, colicky infant. Students use fan sounds to help them concentrate while studying. Insomniacs use fans to create an ideal environment for falling asleep. Use this virtual fan anytime to create a calming ambience. While playing white noise for babies, it's important to keep tabs on the volume, because any white noise machine, smartphone, or computer can put out levels that are too loud for your child. It's recommended to play the sound at least a few feet from where your infant is sleeping and to keep the volume no louder than the sound of a soft shower. Parents can download an app to turn their smartphone into a sound level meter. One good, free, option is the sound level meter app created by the U.S. National Institutes for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) available on the app store as the NIOSH SLM app. Soothe your crying baby and enjoy a moment of calm! Check out the 10-Hour version on YouTube Contact Us for Partnership Inquiries Relaxing White Noise is the number one destination on YouTube for white noise and nature sounds to help you sleep, study or soothe a baby. With more than a billion views across YouTube and other platforms, we are excited to now share our popular ambient tracks on the Relaxing White Noise podcast. People use white noise for sleeping, focus, sound masking or relaxation. We couldn't be happier to help folks live better lives. This podcast has the sound for you whether you use white noise for studying, to soothe a colicky baby, to fall asleep or for simply enjoying a peaceful moment. No need to buy a white noise machine when you can listen to these sounds for free. Cheers to living your best life! DISCLAIMER: Remember that loud sounds can potentially damage your hearing. When playing one of our ambiences, if you cannot have a conversation over the sound without raising your voice, the sound may be too loud for your ears. Please do not place speakers right next to a baby's ears. If you have difficulty hearing or hear ringing in your ears, please immediately discontinue listening to the white noise sounds and consult an audiologist or your physician. The sounds provided by Relaxing White Noise are for entertainment purposes only and are not a treatment for sleep disorders or tinnitus. If you have significant difficulty sleeping on a regular basis, experience fitful/restless sleep, or feel tired during the day, please consult your physician. © Relaxing White Noise LLC, 2018. All rights reserved. Any reproduction or republication of all or part of this text/visual/audio is prohibited. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/relaxingwhitenoise/support

Daily News Brief
Daily News Brief for Monday, September 20, 2021

Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 14:28


Democrats Fundraising at Record-Breaking Pace Ahead of Midterms https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-09-20/democrats-fundraising-at-record-breaking-pace-ahead-of-midterms Picking Embryos With Best Health Odds Sparks New DNA Debate https://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/picking-embryos-with-best-health-odds-sparks-new-dna-debate-1.1653639 Ad: Darkness resides not only in the heart of man, but physical darkness is a daily reality. Recently an off duty officer shot someone he thought was an intruder -- it was actually his adult son. Most mistaken shootings happen in the dark; we are legally and morally required to identify our targets. This is why Shan and his team at Werkz specialize in concealed carry holsters for pistols with lights. They believe every defensive pistol should have a light and a holster. They currently offer holsters for 1,274 pistol and light combinations, plus can help outfit your pistol with a light. Use their holster finder at Werkz.com/CrossPolitic and be prepared to defend day and night. Study: COVID recovery gave Israelis longer-lasting Delta defense than vaccines The variant was 27 times more likely to break through Pfizer protection from January-February and cause symptoms than it was to penetrate natural immunity from the same period https://www.timesofisrael.com/study-covid-recovery-gave-israelis-longer-lasting-delta-defense-than-vaccines/ Biden Pursues New Regulation To Protect Workers From Extreme Heat Employers would be obligated to follow the rule from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration under the threat of fine. https://www.huffpost.com/entry/white-house-pursues-new-regulation-to-protect-workers-from-extreme-heat_n_61489c70e4b0efa77f83203b Classy Artist Box: "Next, I want to tell our homeschool listeners about Classy Artist Box. It is a company created by a Christian art teacher who sends you everything you need to create four art projects each month. You can use their written instructions and video lessons to help guide you through each project. In addition to the four new projects each month, you'll also have access to two and a half years worth of video lessons to enjoy as a member. Each type of subscription will cover a range of art media throughout the year, which means you have your art curricular needs covered. For 30% off of your first subscription order, use code CROSS30. To see more, check out www.ClassyArtistBox.com . Your credit score may soon depend on your web history https://www.yahoo.com/now/credit-score-may-soon-depend-130000431.html

Relaxing White Noise
Rain Sleep Sounds 8 hours | White Noise for Relaxation, Studying or Soothing a Baby

Relaxing White Noise

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 480:46


Troubles sleeping? Play this soothing rain sound to help you fall asleep fast! The gentle rainstorm creates a calming ambience. This white noise masks distracting sounds so that your sleep is not disturbed. You may also find the rain noise useful for helping you study, concentrate or relax. Some parents find that the sound of rain can soothe a crying, colicky baby. If you choose to play white noise for your baby, it's important to keep tabs on the volume, because any white noise machine, smartphone, or computer can put out levels that are too loud for your child. It's recommended to play the sound at least a few feet from where your infant is sleeping and to keep the volume no louder than the sound of a soft shower. Parents can download an app to turn their smartphone into a sound level meter. One good, free, option is the sound level meter app created by the U.S. National Institutes for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) available on the app store as the NIOSH SLM app. Soothe your crying baby and enjoy a moment of calm! Check out the 10-Hour version on YouTube Contact Us for Partnership Inquiries Rain noise is one of nature's most relaxing ambiences. From rain on a tin roof to rainforest sounds, Relaxing White Noise has a wide variety of rain podcasts. Choose the rain sound that's best for you! Rainstorms are a natural form of white noise, helping you block out distractions and relax. You can also use the rain storms for sleeping, studying or to help with stress relief. Enjoy a rainy day! Relaxing White Noise is the number one destination on YouTube for white noise and nature sounds to help you sleep, study or soothe a baby. With more than a billion views across YouTube and other platforms, we are excited to now share our popular ambient tracks on the Relaxing White Noise podcast. People use white noise for sleeping, focus, sound masking or relaxation. We couldn't be happier to help folks live better lives. This podcast has the sound for you whether you use white noise for studying, to soothe a colicky baby, to fall asleep or for simply enjoying a peaceful moment. No need to buy a white noise machine when you can listen to these sounds for free. Cheers to living your best life! DISCLAIMER: Remember that loud sounds can potentially damage your hearing. When playing one of our ambiences, if you cannot have a conversation over the sound without raising your voice, the sound may be too loud for your ears. Please do not place speakers right next to a baby's ears. If you have difficulty hearing or hear ringing in your ears, please immediately discontinue listening to the white noise sounds and consult an audiologist or your physician. The sounds provided by Relaxing White Noise are for entertainment purposes only and are not a treatment for sleep disorders or tinnitus. If you have significant difficulty sleeping on a regular basis, experience fitful/restless sleep, or feel tired during the day, please consult your physician. © Relaxing White Noise LLC, 2018. All rights reserved. Any reproduction or republication of all or part of this text/visual/audio is prohibited. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/relaxingwhitenoise/support

Ogletree Deakins Podcasts
In The Breakroom With Bill, Episode 3: What to Expect From OSHA's Emergency Temporary Standard on Mandatory Vaccinations

Ogletree Deakins Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021


In this episode of In the Breakroom, a podcast series on hot topics related to employment law, Bill Grob and Phillip Russell discuss President Joe Biden's September 9, 2021, announcement of a strategy for combating the COVID-19 pandemic that calls on the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to develop and implement a new emergency temporary standard (ETS). The speakers discuss the features that employers might expect from the anticipated ETS, including a requirement that employers with 100 or more employees mandate full vaccination or weekly COVID-19 testing of their employees, as well as who will pay for weekly testing. The speakers also address the “grave danger” standard required for OSHA to issue an ETS.

Employment Law This Week Podcast
#WorkforceWednesday: Biden Announces Employer Vaccine Mandates

Employment Law This Week Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 4:56


On September 9, President Biden announced that all federal agencies and contractors and employers with 100 or more employees in the private sector must mandate COVID-19 vaccination through a new Occupational Safety and Health Administration-enforced emergency temporary standard. The plan is estimated to impact two-thirds of the country's workforce. Attorneys Kate Rigby and Adam Tomiak discuss how employers should prepare for compliance. To read more about the President's plan, click here. Visit our site for this week's Other Highlights and links: https://www.ebglaw.com/eltw225. Subscribe to #WorkforceWednesday - https://www.ebglaw.com/subscribe/. Visit http://www.EmploymentLawThisWeek.com. The EMPLOYMENT LAW THIS WEEK® and DIAGNOSING HEALTH CARE podcasts are presented by Epstein Becker & Green, P.C. All rights are reserved. This audio recording includes information about legal issues and legal developments.  Such materials are for informational purposes only and may not reflect the most current legal developments.  These informational materials are not intended, and should not be taken, as legal advice on any particular set of facts or circumstances, and these materials are not a substitute for the advice of competent counsel. The content reflects the personal views and opinions of the participants. No attorney-client relationship has been created by this audio recording. This audio recording may be considered attorney advertising in some jurisdictions under the applicable law and ethical rules. The determination of the need for legal services and the choice of a lawyer are extremely important decisions and should not be based solely upon advertisements or self-proclaimed expertise. No representation is made that the quality of the legal services to be performed is greater than the quality of legal services performed by other lawyers.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Daily Signal Podcast: Is Biden's Vaccine Mandate Legal? Constitutional Expert Explains

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021


After President Joe Biden finished his speech last Thursday evening announcing new COVID-19 vaccine mandates, a reporter called out, “Is this constitutional?” Biden, leaving the room, did not stop to answer.   The president's new vaccine mandate directs the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, part of the Labor Department, to require all organizations with 100 […]

Daily Signal News
Is Biden's Vaccine Mandate Legal? Constitutional Expert Explains

Daily Signal News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 28:50


After President Joe Biden finished his speech last Thursday evening announcing new COVID-19 vaccine mandates, a reporter called out, “Is this constitutional?” Biden, leaving the room, did not stop to answer. The president's new vaccine mandate directs the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, part of the Labor Department, to require all organizations with 100 employees or more either to test their employees weekly for COVID-19 or ensure they are vaccinated. Biden also signed an executive order requiring that all federal employees and contract workers be vaccinated. One of the most important questions to ask is whether OSHA "has the statutory authority ... to issue a rule of this type,” Heritage Foundation legal scholar John Malcolm says. Biden's requirements likely will affect between 80 and 100 million Americans, some of whom now face the choice of taking a COVID-19 vaccine or losing their job. Malcolm, who is a senior legal fellow at Heritage and directs its Meese Center for Legal and Judicial Studies, joins “The Daily Signal Podcast” to explain the constitutionality of vaccine mandates and the likelihood that litigation over a new OSHA rule will rise to the Supreme Court. (The Heritage Foundation is the parent organization of The Daily Signal.)We also cover these stories:Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich announces the filing of a lawsuit against the Biden administration in response to proposed vaccine mandates.Secretary of State Antony Blinken appears before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee to face questions about the hasty U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan.Senate Democrats unveil legislation to change federal election law in response to new Republican-led election reforms in Texas and Florida.Enjoy the show! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Advisory Opinions
Future of Biden's Vaccine Mandate

Advisory Opinions

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 73:17


In today's episode, Sarah and David give you everything you need to combat half-baked hot takes about the Biden administration's vaccine mandate as they discuss whether the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has the statutory authority to issue its rule. They then indulge in an exploration of the Commerce Clause. Lastly, our hosts discuss new legal updates to the abortion heartbeat law, as well as some potpourri.    Show Notes: -President Biden's executive order requiring COVID-19 vaccination for federal employees -Explanation of Biden's EO in The Morning Dispatch -Jacobson v. Massachusetts establishing the government's right to compulsory vaccination -United States of America v. Texas on Texas' abortion statute -The opinion from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit on Tennessee's heartbeat abortion ban -Asbestos Information Ass'n v. OSHA case -Congressional Research service paper on OSHA -Justice Breyer interview transcript with Chris Wallace See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Turley Talks
Ep. 639 Americans REVOLT against Biden's Vaccine TYRANNY!!!

Turley Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 13:53


Highlights:     “In what appears to be a rather obvious wag the dog moment for Biden trying to distract Americans from his embarrassing crisis of competency at Kabul,     his announcement yesterday involves audaciously unprecedented dictates that require mandated vaccines for all federal employees and contractors, invokes the Department of Labor via the Occupational Safety and Health Administration that's now ordering businesses with more than a hundred employees to not merely vaccinate employees but actually fire the ones that don't get vaccinated.”“Biden made it clear yesterday; you are the problem. It's not him. It's not his competence or lack of capability. No, the problem is you.”“Almost immediately #DictatorBiden began trending on Twitter and Republican governors across the nation have announced that they will not be complying with this utterly ridiculous executive overreach.”“Mandates are a substitute for trust and have the effect of exacerbating the whole situation that in the absence of trust, the greater the force the greater the backlash against that force.”“Risk society believes that we are most free, we are most secure from threats and hazards when we allow technocrats to have the most control over our lives. That's how we got here. For decades, whether we knew it or not, our secular globalist society became a risk society and risk society by definition manages risks by technological control which always involves submitting the masses to the control of technocrats.” Timestamps:       [02:46] Biden announcing new vaccine mandates for 100 million Americans[04:57] Why illegal immigrants are exempted from Biden's new vaccine mandates[05:42] The backlash against Biden's vax mandate and how the Republican National Committee will be suing the Biden administration over it[08:11] A number of unions have opposed vaccine mandates and how Blacks are least likely to be vaccinated [09:07] How did we end up hereResources: Ep. 638 LEFTISTS Admit BIDEN Will Be IMPEACHED!!!Get Your Brand-New PATRIOT T-Shirts and Merch Here:https://store.turleytalks.com/Become a Turley Talks Insiders Club Member: https://insidersclub.turleytalks.com/welcomeThank you for taking the time to listen to this episode.  If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe and/or leave a review.Do you want to be a part of the podcast and be our sponsor? Click here to partner with us and defy liberal culture!If you would like to get lots of articles on conservative trends make sure to sign-up for the 'New Conservative Age Rising' Email Alerts. 

Marketplace All-in-One
We can neither confirm nor deny exactly how much the US spends on counterterrorism

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 7:22


The federal government grew following the Sept. 11 attacks, and a lot of money has been put toward the prevention of another attack. How much, you ask? It depends on where you look, and it gets a little murky when you do. President Biden’s decree that businesses with more than 100 employees must require workers to be vaccinated puts the Occupational Safety and Health Administration in the logistical spotlight. We speak with a former OSHA leader about it. Supermarket chain Kroger is hoping to keep growing by enlisting ghost kitchens, which are restaurants that only do delivery and takeout.

Marketplace Morning Report
We can neither confirm nor deny exactly how much the US spends on counterterrorism

Marketplace Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 7:22


The federal government grew following the Sept. 11 attacks, and a lot of money has been put toward the prevention of another attack. How much, you ask? It depends on where you look, and it gets a little murky when you do. President Biden’s decree that businesses with more than 100 employees must require workers to be vaccinated puts the Occupational Safety and Health Administration in the logistical spotlight. We speak with a former OSHA leader about it. Supermarket chain Kroger is hoping to keep growing by enlisting ghost kitchens, which are restaurants that only do delivery and takeout.

Relaxing White Noise
Soothe a Colicky Baby with White Noise 8 hours | Sleep Sound for Infants

Relaxing White Noise

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 480:46


Soothe a colicky baby with this relaxing white noise sound. Millions of parents have used our white noise sounds to calm a crying infant fast. This white noise for babies is eight hours long so you can play it all night. Baby white noise is an effective way to soothe a crying infant and lull your newborn to sleep. White noise resembles sounds the baby heard in the womb, which has a calming effect. It also masks other distracting noises so that your baby can fall asleep and remain sleeping. While playing white noise for babies, it's important to keep tabs on the volume, because any white noise machine, smartphone, or computer can put out levels that are too loud for your child. It's recommended to play the sound at least a few feet from where your infant is sleeping and to keep the volume no louder than the sound of a soft shower. Parents can download an app to turn their smartphone into a sound level meter. One good, free, option is the sound level meter app created by the U.S. National Institutes for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) available on the app store as the NIOSH SLM app. Soothe your crying baby and enjoy a moment of calm! Check out the 10-Hour version on YouTube Contact Us for Partnership Inquiries Relaxing White Noise is the number one destination on YouTube for white noise and nature sounds to help you sleep, study or soothe a baby. With more than a billion views across YouTube and other platforms, we are excited to now share our popular ambient tracks on the Relaxing White Noise podcast. People use white noise for sleeping, focus, sound masking or relaxation. We couldn't be happier to help folks live better lives. This podcast has the sound for you whether you use white noise for studying, to soothe a colicky baby, to fall asleep or for simply enjoying a peaceful moment. No need to buy a white noise machine when you can listen to these sounds for free. Cheers to living your best life! DISCLAIMER: Remember that loud sounds can potentially damage your hearing. When playing one of our ambiences, if you cannot have a conversation over the sound without raising your voice, the sound may be too loud for your ears. Please do not place speakers right next to a baby's ears. If you have difficulty hearing or hear ringing in your ears, please immediately discontinue listening to the white noise sounds and consult an audiologist or your physician. The sounds provided by Relaxing White Noise are for entertainment purposes only and are not a treatment for sleep disorders or tinnitus. If you have significant difficulty sleeping on a regular basis, experience fitful/restless sleep, or feel tired during the day, please consult your physician. © Relaxing White Noise LLC, 2018. All rights reserved. Any reproduction or republication of all or part of this text/visual/audio is prohibited. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/relaxingwhitenoise/support

20-Minute Health Talk
9/11 first responders reflect on 20th anniversary, Part I

20-Minute Health Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 20:41


Retired NYPD officers Scott Strauss and Eddie Reyes spent nine months working on and in "the pile" after the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001. Now 20 years later, both suffer from health issues related to those heroic efforts, which include a remarkable rescue famously portrayed in the Oliver Stone-directed film, "World Trade Center." Both also have found treatment -- and hope -- at Northwell Health's Queens World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program. Administered by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, the program tracks medical research into physical and mental health conditions related to 9/11 exposures. Jacqueline Moline, MD, MSc, senior vice president of Northwell's Occupational Medicine, Epidemiology and Prevention department, directs the WTC Health Program. She joins Eddie and Scott to reflect on the 20th anniversary of 9/11, as well as her experiences caring for those first responders. More from the experts Hear more from Scott Strauss and Eddie Reyes from Northwell's 2021 Side-by-Side NBC special. Watch episodes of 20-Minute Health Talk on YouTube. 

Relaxing White Noise
Baby White Noise Stream Sounds | Soothe Crying Baby, Colic Relief

Relaxing White Noise

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 180:46


White noise can calm a baby fast and help them fall asleep. This soothing stream sound is a natural white noise ambience that will soothe a colicky infant. Create a calming atmosphere for your infant and watch as they settle down fast. While playing white noise for babies, it's important to keep tabs on the volume, because any white noise machine, smartphone, or computer can put out levels that are too loud for your child. It's recommended to play the sound at least a few feet from where your infant is sleeping and to keep the volume no louder than the sound of a soft shower. Parents can download an app to turn their smartphone into a sound level meter. One good, free, option is the sound level meter app created by the U.S. National Institutes for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) available on the app store as the NIOSH SLM app. Soothe your crying baby and enjoy a moment of calm! Check out the 10-Hour version on YouTube Contact Us for Partnership Inquiries Relaxing White Noise is the number one destination on YouTube for white noise and nature sounds to help you sleep, study or soothe a baby. With more than a billion views across YouTube and other platforms, we are excited to now share our popular ambient tracks on the Relaxing White Noise podcast. People use white noise for sleeping, focus, sound masking or relaxation. We couldn't be happier to help folks live better lives. This podcast has the sound for you whether you use white noise for studying, to soothe a colicky baby, to fall asleep or for simply enjoying a peaceful moment. No need to buy a white noise machine when you can listen to these sounds for free. Cheers to living your best life! DISCLAIMER: Remember that loud sounds can potentially damage your hearing. When playing one of our ambiences, if you cannot have a conversation over the sound without raising your voice, the sound may be too loud for your ears. Please do not place speakers right next to a baby's ears. If you have difficulty hearing or hear ringing in your ears, please immediately discontinue listening to the white noise sounds and consult an audiologist or your physician. The sounds provided by Relaxing White Noise are for entertainment purposes only and are not a treatment for sleep disorders or tinnitus. If you have significant difficulty sleeping on a regular basis, experience fitful/restless sleep, or feel tired during the day, please consult your physician. © Relaxing White Noise LLC, 2017. All rights reserved. Any reproduction or republication of all or part of this text/visual/audio is prohibited. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/relaxingwhitenoise/support

Flyover Conservatives
Do Masks Actually Work? | Flyover Conservatives

Flyover Conservatives

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 65:21


#Masks #Science #FlyoverConservativesWelcome to the Flyover Conservatives podcast with David and Stacy Whited. Breaking down current events and examining culture through the lens of conservative Christian values. Feel led to donate and support the Flyover message? https://www.flyoverconservatives.com/donateGet Flyover Conservatives Merch @https://flyoverconservatives.com/merch(Discount Code "Flyover" for 10% off)Support Mike Lindell's Fight Against Election Fraud and Censorship and Save Up to 66% off of Your My Pillow Products Today by Using Promo Code “Flyover” When Checking Out At www.MyPillow.comDiscover the 100% Effective and Affordable COVID-19 Treatments and Therapies Today At: www.Sherwood.TV/flyoverLearn How to Fight Back Against the Wealth Destroying Inflation: www.BH-PM.com Text Flyover's Gold and Silver Buyer Choice (Andrew Sorchini) Today At: 866-346-5325 or Text 310-433-3524Follow us @Twitter: https://twitter.com/davidmwhitedTelegram: https://t.me/FlyoverConservativesFacebook Community: https://www.facebook.com/groups/flyoverconservativesFacebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/flyoverconservativesInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/flyoverconservatives/Website: https://flyoverconservatives.comALL LINKS: https://sociatap.com/FlyoverConservatives---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------For 18 months we have been berated with opposing and flip flopping view points on the “SCIENCE” behind the population wearing masks. Well today we have two REAL experts on to actually talk about the masks! Kristen Meghan is a Senior Industrial Hygienist and Media Corespondent with Real Deal Media. Tammy Clark is an Occupational Safety and Health Professional and the Executive Director of Stand Up Michigan---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Tammy's Site:https://standupmichigan.com/Kristen's Site:https://realdealmedia.tvSupport the show (https://flyoverconservatives.com/donate)

KQED’s Forum
Investigation Looks Into Heat-Related Deaths of California Workers

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 24:20


In the last 10 years, nearly four dozen California workers have died from heat related-illnesses, according to an investigation by Columbia Journalism Investigations, NPR, KPCC and The California Newsroom. Public health experts say heat-related deaths are 100% preventable. But the investigation finds they still occur because of the chronic underfunding and understaffing of California's Division of Occupational Safety and Health — Cal/OSHA, which is charged with enforcing heat standards and protocols. Without proper inspections, employers can skirt regulations, placing farmworkers, construction workers, landscapers and others who work outdoors at a higher risk for heat-related deaths. With climate change only making California's temperatures hotter, we'll talk to the story's reporters about the breadth of the issue and what's being done to address it.

HR Rescue: Human Resource Solutions for Small Business
S08E10 - HR Rescue: OSHA Updates Workplace Coronavirus Guidance

HR Rescue: Human Resource Solutions for Small Business

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 2:57


The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has updated its workplace coronavirus guidance to, among other things, reflect recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on masks and testing for fully vaccinated workers. In this episode, HR expert Jenni Stone shares what the CDC and OSHA now recommend in regard to fully vaccinated employees. Thank you for listening to this podcast. We will continue to keep you updated on the changing landscape of Human Resources and address any topic area you wish to learn more about regarding HR and HR Compliance.  Please leave a comment below as we value your feedback or if you have an HR question ask and we just might make your question our next episode! Follow HR Shield Online Here: YouTube: https://youtube.com/TheHRShield (https://youtube.com/TheHRShield) Instagram: https://instagram.com/HRShield (https://instagram.com/HRShield) Facebook: https://facebook.com/HRShield (https://facebook.com/HRShield) Twitter: https://twitter.com/HR_Shield (https://twitter.com/HR_Shield) Podcast: https://hr-rescue-human-resour.captivate.fm/ (https://hr-rescue-human-resour.captivate.fm) Website: https://hr-shield.com/ (https://HR-Shield.com) Store:  https://hr-rescue.com/ (https://HR-Rescue.com) Enable our Alexa Skill!!! About HR Shield Do you own a small business?  Are you considering starting a business? Does hiring an HR professional not fit your budget and current cash flow? Whether you are a newly certified HR professional, business owner, office manager, student or a general curious person HR Shield are certified HR specialists that provide quick, accurate and simple answers to common HR and business questions.  Our mission at HR Shield is to impact those small and midsize companies that don't yet understand the value or can't yet afford to hire a full-time certified HR professional.  Our goal is to educate the small business owner and help them understand the importance and impact an HR professional can have on their company and one day hire a full time certified professional. In addition to working with the small to mid-size business owner we provide a full white label HR portal and HR hotline for payroll companies, PEOs and staffing companies and support their small business owner clients.

MEMIC Safety Experts
How Workplace Safety Influenced Labor Day - Celebrating the American Worker with Randy Klatt

MEMIC Safety Experts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 55:37


Back in 1892, President Grover Cleveland signed a law making the first Monday in September of each year the Labor Day holiday.  Do you know the history and the struggle of the American worker that pre-dates this historic day?  On this podcast, Randy Klatt, Director or Region 2 Loss Control here at MEMIC helps me explore what it was like to be a worker in the late eighteen and early nineteen hundreds and workplace injuries, fatalities, child labor, and deplorable conditions were the catalysts for fair wages, the 8 hour workday, and workplace safety. Wage Trends, 1800-1900 (nber.org)   Age of workers Lewis Hine - Photographer These Appalling Images Exposed Child Labor in America - HISTORY The Photographs of Lewis Hine: The Industrial Revolution and Child Laborers [Photo Gallery] | EHS Today Teaching With Documents: Photographs of Lewis Hine: Documentation of Child Labor | National Archives Search Results: "Hine, Lewis Wickes, 1874-1940" - Prints & Photographs Online Catalog (Library of Congress) (loc.gov) Search Results: "" - Prints & Photographs Online Catalog (Library of Congress) (loc.gov)   Achievements in Public Health, 1900-1999: Improvements in Workplace Safety -- United States, 1900-1999 (cdc.gov) History of Workplace Safety — SafetyLine Lone Worker Deadliest Workplace Accidents | American Experience | Official Site | PBS Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire - HISTORY Child Workers and Workplace Accidents: What was the Price Paid for Industrializing America? – Our Great American Heritage (1857) Frederick Douglass, "If There Is No Struggle, There Is No Progress" • (blackpast.org) Haymarket Riot - HISTORY https://www.dol.gov/general/laborday/history Labor Day 2021: Facts, Meaning & Founding - HISTORY History of Labor Day | U.S. Department of Labor (dol.gov) Deadliest Workplace Accidents | American Experience | Official Site | PBS History of the Holidays: Labor Day | History #82 - Comparative wages, prices, and cost of living : (from the Sixteenth ... - Full View | HathiTrust Digital Library History of The US Minimum Wage - From The Very First Minimum Wage (bebusinessed.com) Profile of work injuries incurred by young workers (bls.gov) History of Workplace Safety in the United States, 1880-1970 (eh.net) Peter Koch: [00:00:04] Hello, listeners, and welcome to the MEMIC Safety Experts podcast. I'm your host, Peter Koch, as we're about to celebrate Labor Day. I expect that you're getting up and gearing up for family and friends around the pool, the barbecue, the yard, getting people together, trying to enjoy that day off. Well, while you're doing that? Have you ever thought about where we get the Labor Day holiday from, where did it hey come from? Why do we have it? Why was it even started in the first place? So for today's episode, how workplace safety influenced Labor Day and vice versa. Celebrating the American worker. I'm speaking with Randy Klatt, CSP director of Region two, lost control here at MEMIC. Randy leads a team of consultants serving the central and southern Maine area. So, Randy, welcome back to the podcast. I'm excited to have you on to talk about Labor Day today. Randy Klatt: [00:00:55] Thank you, Peter. It's always great to talk to you. Happy holiday. Peter Koch: [00:00:59] Yeah, it's coming [00:01:00] right up here. And, you know, I was thinking about, well, the podcast and MEMIC and what our mission is to get out there and to work with companies to help keep workers safe. And I was thinking about the Labor Day holiday. And I'm like, you know what? I've enjoyed the Labor Day holiday now. I've enjoyed time off or on the Labor Day holiday. But what is it? Where to come from? And that got me to thinking having a conversation with you actually around. Well, what was it like to be a worker? Well, before our time being a worker, before our parents, and probably before our grandparents, maybe around the time of our great grandparents, because prior to, you know, the early nineteen hundreds. Labor Day didn't exist. And I think we kind of take it for granted. So let's talk about that. What was it like to be a worker in, say, the late eighteen hundreds and what were the conditions? What was going on? And I know [00:02:00] you've been doing a little bit of reading. I've been doing some reading, too. We certainly don't have any firsthand experience, even though we're both a little grayer than we were last year. We're not that gray yet. But there are some fascinating history about work in the late eighteen hundreds. What do you think it was like out there? Randy Klatt: [00:02:18] Oh, I think it was pretty horrible, quite frankly. And there is plenty of gray. In fact, I am all gray now. So thanks for the plug. But that's the way it is. Yeah, it we when we think of the industrial revolution, we sometimes think about progress and automation and heavy machinery and, you know, the wonderful products and everything that we developed and could put out there. What we don't really think about often enough is the workers who actually made all that happen. And often the horrendous conditions that they had to work under and for what we would really call minimal pay and no benefits whatsoever. [00:03:00] Peter Koch: [00:03:01] So some of the benefits you got to go home maybe at the end of the day. Randy Klatt: [00:03:06] Yeah, that was your benefit. Maybe one day off a week and maybe enough money to put a little food on the table and keep a roof over your head, if you were lucky. It was really quite horrendous. If you look at some of the statistics regarding how much people were paid in your average manufacturing facility and, you know, the textile mills or the steel mills. It's an eye opener, even in today's standards, if you adjust these things for inflation and when you're when you're making 55 cents an hour in 1860, I'm sorry, per day. That's easy to confuse, isn't it? Fifty five cents a day. Not per hour. You know, bring that to today's standards. It's still poultry. It's just amazing. [00:04:00] Peter Koch: [00:04:00] Yeah. It's really hard to think that you could live on that. And I think that's why you had multiple people in the same family, from dad to mom many times, all the way down to the kids going out and getting a job instead of going to school or maybe after school if they had the opportunity to go to school, because, you know, you add 55 cents a day up and it doesn't go very far when you've got to purchase food and pay for rent and mend clothes and all of the things that come with just the daily burden of life. Randy Klatt: [00:04:39] Right. And you add to that the strenuous physical labor that was involved in most cases, and then the hazardous conditions. We go into manufacturing facilities today and we see some things that are well in our world. They're pretty scary. Oh, my gosh. You really need a guard on that in [00:05:00] running nip point. Well, take that back a hundred and twenty years ago, and there were things spinning and turning and pulling every which way all over the building, and no one gave it a second thought. And you sent people in there to work in close proximity to all of that every day and just accept it, because if you don't want this job for fifty five cents a day, then someone else will. Yeah. So you're almost a commodity to me is if you're not going to work, then we'll find someone else who will. Because these are good jobs. Fifty five cents a day. Oh, my goodness. Peter Koch: [00:05:38] And really, some of the only jobs, you know, when we started to see the advent of us moving from that agrarian society to the advent of the industrial revolution and people moving into cities and towns to be closer to where the work is, because they couldn't find jobs or the jobs were too taxing in the agrarian culture, [00:06:00] in agriculture and farming, getting those better jobs in manufacturing and textiles and steel and construction and carpentry, just kind of looking more at some of those wages. You know, the difference in that that textile manufacturing, daily wage of 55 cents in 1860, you could make a whole dollar, 40 a day as a skilled carpenter. Just a few years later, in in the later eighteen hundreds. So depending on what job you had, I mean, you could you could earn some decent wages rather than just being a farmhand for a while or again, dealing with all the hazards that we knew about within the agricultural society and working on a farm, getting kicked by a cow or getting caught up in some of the horse or ox driven equipment to plow the fields and the hours that were there moving into the or moving into the cities. Sometimes, [00:07:00] you know, you're trading maybe one evil for another, but you're getting paid more for it. Randy Klatt: [00:07:08] Yeah. And if not more, you're actually being paid if you work a full day in most cases. Anyway, you were actually paid for that day. When you're on the farm, any farmer out there today understands this. Clearly, it's still the case. Mother Nature rules the day. And you just might not have the crop this fall or to harvest. And you don't have enough to feed your family, much less to sell to actually make a living. So seeing these jobs was an attraction for people. Nevertheless, it was still not what we would call desirable in the way of a job today. I was interested how Andrew Carnegie got his start. Most people know who Andrew Carnegie was. And, you know, the forerunner to U.S. Steel Corporation, my gosh, in [00:08:00] the railroads and all kinds of industry. And at one point was the richest man in America. He actually started his first job in this country in 1848 at the ripe old age of 12. And he was a bobbin boy, changing the spools of thread in a cotton mill. And he had to work 12 hours a day, six days a week. So he did have one day off. And for that, what, 72 hours of labor for a 12 year old boys starting wage was a dollar twenty per week. So even adjusted to it by inflation or with inflation over the years, that equal that's equivalent to about thirty six dollars in today's numbers. Can you imagine telling a 12 year old today that I'd like you to work 72 hours this week and I'm going to pay you thirty six dollars to do it? Peter Koch: [00:08:59] I think the conversation [00:09:00] would have stopped at work. Randy Klatt: [00:09:04] Well, quite possibly. Peter Koch: [00:09:06] Good. And then you get into all the rest of the reasons you don't want to work is the limited wage. And how come I don't have a day off and. Well, you have one day off but it's not enough days off. And yeah, there's a lot of challenges out there. Randy Klatt: [00:09:20] Yeah, you probably have to pay your babysitter thirty six dollars to watch your kids for a couple, two or three hours when you go out for an evening. Peter Koch: [00:09:27] For sure. Randy Klatt: [00:09:28] Can you imagine that Peter Koch: [00:09:31] You had mentioned this just a bit ago, too, about the conditions that you'd work in. And I doing some research for this looking or you can find so many different really amazing images of workers from this time frame. And one of the most prolific photographers that were out there is Louis Hine. And some of the most famous pictures that he has are from like the steelworkers having lunch [00:10:00] on the suspended beam. Therefore, I'm not sure what they were building, you remember what they were building in that particular picture, I can't recall. Randy Klatt: [00:10:08] I don't remember which building it was. I believe it was New York City. Peter Koch: [00:10:11] Yeah, I think it was to regardless. But that's the picture that people think of when they think of Louis Hines. However, when you start to look at other photos that he took, it's really representative of the American worker in the late. Eighteen hundreds, early nineteen hundreds. And there are thousands of photos which depict kids, really young kids, women, children, men all working together in some very dangerous occupations, whether it be textiles or in the fishing industry or in some of the other manufacturing industries where, you know, those in running nip points, you're surrounded by in running nip points. There's one of those photos we were talking about earlier [00:11:00] where there's a couple of kids standing on a mechanical loom right next to all the bobbins. And the caption is, they had to stand on the loom because they weren't tall enough to reach the bobbins that they had to change out. Randy Klatt: [00:11:17] Yeah, exactly. So eight year olds, nine year olds working these 60, 70 hour weeks around this equipment with absolutely no regard to their safety, simply get the job done. And we see that mentality some today. You know, we've got to get the job done. So we bypassed some things, but certainly not to the scale that we were doing back then, and not just with adults, but with children full time employed as fish cutters. And yeah, they cut their hands a lot. But, you know, that's part of the job. We're going to just overlook that piece because we're paying them by box. [00:12:00] So, you know, piecework was also something that was fairly prevalent, too. So it simply encouraged people to do things quicker, faster, which, of course, is often less safe. But as long as they got the job done, then they were happy to go home with their twenty five cents because they were able to get four boxes of fish cut for the day and they were paid five cents a box. So woohoo. Yeah. And you just Peter Koch: [00:12:26] Bring that extra money home to help the family get by for the week. And in those photos, you know, you often see adults with bandages or with a missing limb or a digit. And kids as well. There's a couple of images that I saw where, you know, it's captioned. You know, they're talking about the kid who has a big bandage on his hand, one of those fish cutters. And there's another photo there of all of the fish cutters, all the kids that were probably in one particular factory. And they all had knives [00:13:00] and some of the knives were as big as a kid's forearm, for crying out loud as long as the kids for he's holding this enormous knife out there. And you would be scared and today to hand a kid a knife like that. But if the kid came to work and he was part of the workforce, here you go. And the kids were proud of what they did. I mean, you can't take that away from the kids those days. I mean, they were working for their family. They were working for the wage. They were trying to do the best they can in some fairly deplorable conditions. Really challenging conditions. Randy Klatt: [00:13:35] Absolutely. And it wasn't just the manufacturing facilities either. There some great photos of the newsies. You know, there was one of the most enjoyable musicals I've seen in the theater was newsies about a young boy selling newspapers. But the reality is you have seven and eight year olds out running around the streets before dawn trying to sell newspapers, and they're getting [00:14:00] paid pennies to do so. So industry during these this time and we're talking anywhere from eighteen fifties or sixties up through the turn of the century into 1920s, it was pretty darn brutal for most people in most occupations. Not to say that it was everyone, but a lot of people made some money. Mm hmm. Including Mr. Andrew Carnegie. There is a reason he became a multimillionaire and the richest man in America. Peter Koch: [00:14:39] Certainly. And I think that's part of what we're celebrating today is we are celebrating. You know, the labor that the American worker, that through the courage and determination in some of those really challenging places allowed our country to be where it is today. And granted, we [00:15:00] are not in. The best place all the time, but we can certainly look at, especially around work, the work that we do and the innovations that have come out of the American worker and the labor force that's there. There's a lot that they've done and a lot that they've allowed us to do. And that we take for granted today. A lot of those things that we take for granted today, whether it be a day off or equal wage or a living wage, are things that came out of the labor force and is part of what Labor Day really is. And we'll talk about more of that kind of later on as we go, because we certainly didn't end with a photographer taking pictures of kids with bandages on their hands. That got us to Labor Day because there were you know, there were injuries and there are definitely fatalities that occurred. And individual fatalities happened probably more frequently than we thought. They're doing a little research. Again, there's [00:16:00] the death calendar. If you if you want to look it up and talking about an article about from achievements in public health. Nineteen hundred through 1999 and improvements in workplace safety. So there's a death calendar in industry. So all industries for Allegheny County. And it has the months of July through June in that order. And they have little red x's in each of the boxes where somebody has died. And sometimes there's one, sometimes there's multiple. And this is just one county where it occurred. And there are very few days that are blank or that do not have a red X in that calendar. It's a fairly stunning graphic to think about that back in that back in that time frame, Randy Klatt: [00:16:49] I was really impressed with the impact that that calendar has. Well, first of all, how many times have we ever seen a death calendar? [00:17:00] I mean, that's just the topic. The title itself is pretty indicative of disaster. But nineteen O' six July through nineteen O' seven and June five hundred and twenty six workers. And you're right, it's hard to find a date there where there's no red X and many of them have multiple. That's just inconceivable. And that's, like you said, one county, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. Oh, my goodness. Peter Koch: [00:17:31] There's one week, August 19. Oh six where? Twenty one through twenty four. Those three days in there. Four days in there. There's an average, I think of probably four X's in each of those days, if I can peer through some of the blurriness of the reproduced image. So like one week you're talking close to 20 people, 20 people, different days, probably different occupations passed. [00:18:00] And never came back home from work. So there's that part again, where, you know, you have that that vision of leaving for work, kissing the family goodbye, saying goodbye to your girlfriend, your wife, kissing the kids, whatever, with the intent that you're going to be able to come back home and enjoy something of your labors for that day and your family to for you to come back home to. And you never do. Five hundred and twenty six people in that year in that county didn't come back in 1906, 1907. Randy Klatt: [00:18:36] Yeah. When we look at the Bureau of Labor Statistics, as you alluded to earlier, statistics weren't well, they certainly weren't to the point where they are today. So much of it was manual and so much of this was undocumented. So who knows really how many people died. Those, I guess, are the ones that were identified. It could have been a whole lot more. But [00:19:00] we're talking twenty three thousand people a year, in some cases, working out through an equivalent of somewhere around sixty one deaths per 100000 workers. Today's rate is somewhere just over three. So we have certainly come a long, long way since those days. Peter Koch: [00:19:24] Yeah, I think so. And you bring up a really good point around, you know, injuries, statistics being important because, you know, individual injuries and even individual fatalities will have you know, people will get focused on that and then you'll move off to the next thing. It was one person who got injured. It was one person who didn't come home. And it is a tragedy. But we don't tend to look at those individual incidences as critical. But only when you start to pull all of those statistics [00:20:00] together and you look at it as a whole. Did they become really powerful like the image that we were just talking about? So if you get a chance, go up and Google, search that death calendar for an industry for Allegheny County, and it'll pop up and you'll take a look at. And that's a really powerful image when you see all of those red Xs, because we live in an age where information is plentiful and it's easy to pull that trend together. It wasn't always that easy like you talked about before. And sometimes it really took like a mass casualty incident for workplace injuries or fatalities to get noticed beyond the immediate family and friends and the workers that it truly affected. Peter Koch: [00:20:38] And our history of work is really riddled with those issues. And again, we didn't start keeping good records probably until the eighteen hundreds and into the nineteen hundreds. But you get back you know, there are some statistics back there from a website [00:21:00] called The Deadliest Workplace Accidents in the American Experience. So back in the late 60s in Lawrence, Massachusetts, the Pemberton mill, large cotton goods factory collapsed without warning and it killed one hundred and forty five workers and injuring another one hundred and sixty six. And again, an injury back in 1860 is not like an injury. It is today in two thousand twenty one. We're going to go to the doctor, going to get good treatment. Chances that you're going to make it out of the hospital whole and return to the workforce is pretty high. Back then, you had an injury. There's a good chance you never return to the workforce. And then instead of being part of the family growing, you became a burden because they needed to support you and you could no longer go back to work. Randy Klatt: [00:21:49] Yeah. At that point, you became a real liability for everyone else, right? Yeah. We weren't talking about days of health insurance and disability insurance [00:22:00] and EMS coverage for your community. So you have emergency responders and fully manned fire departments. And we just that wasn't there. You get hurt. What are the odds that that's going to become infected or you're not going to get the right care? It could have been treated properly and you might get back to work, but there was no way to access the care. So you ended up with a disability for the rest of your life and no way to be compensated for that. It really is a sad part of this industrial revolution that we don't often think about. What did it really take and what are those mass casualty incidents that we really should know about? And then on Labor Day, look back and appreciate what people went through to get to where we are today. Peter Koch: [00:22:53] Yeah, because even after Labor Day was thought about and initially [00:23:00] celebrated, Labor Day, initially was celebrated in the late eighteen hundreds, so 1882 was that first Labor Day celebration in New York. And there's a couple of myths out there, not myths, but stories out there about competing people who suggested that you gather the laborers together to celebrate labor and to hear people talk about labor and organized labor and what you could do as a as a community of laborers. Well, yeah, that's the first the first celebration, 1882. And they talk about Peter J. Maguire being from the Carpenters Union and then Matthew Maguire from the Machinists Union were the two guys that are credited with first bringing Labor Day into the forefront here in the Americas. Randy Klatt: [00:23:50] Which obviously came from labor. And this wasn't recognized by anyone else, by the federal government or state government [00:24:00] or any other organization. It was the laborers who actually took the day off in 1882 unpaid to parade, to celebrate their accomplishments or to at least try to make people aware of the significant contribution they have. Peter Koch: [00:24:16] Yeah, so and the power that you have together that the power that you have as a group to recognize that there are some challenges out there and to really fight for the rights of the American worker back then. And there was a lot to fight for back then. And still even after they celebrated Labor Day. And again, you alluded to it took the day off, not were given the day paid to have off and celebrate Labor Day with your family. The first labor days were people didn't go to work. It was almost like a protest. They didn't show up that day. They went to New York and they marched the Labor Day parade to go to Union Square in New York City and march, [00:25:00] almost in protest. So, yeah, it's an interesting piece. We celebrate Labor Day today as a holiday or as an opportunity. And they celebrated Labor Day really as a chance back then, which is pretty interesting. Randy Klatt: [00:25:15] Indeed it is. And we're talking 1882. But if you look up some of the worst disasters in history and you started to read some of those, at least one of those on that list, there are all many years after those first Labor Day celebrations and even after it was actually a recognized federal holiday. So there were still a lot of struggles to be had down the road by workers to reach that equitable pay and equitable treatment and safer workplaces and all those things of the livable wage you mentioned earlier. Peter Koch: [00:25:54] Yeah, Randy Klatt: [00:25:54] It was still worth fighting for. And you still [00:26:00] had a pretty good chance of not coming home after going to work, especially if you were in heavy industry is still working in mining in particular. Oh, my gosh. Imagine being underground in a mine with the conditions they were in around the turn of the century. Peter Koch: [00:26:18] Oh, my gosh. No, I can't. And some of those pictures from Lewis Hine were showed groups of boys, young boys who were working in the mines. And you read some of those descriptions and what they did and they were they were the ones that went places in the mines that are grown adult couldn't go. So not only were they exposed to all of the same exposures that are hazards that an adult would be in a mine, which back then was a myriad of things that weren't controlled, everything from air quality issues to explosives to all sorts of things that never really came into play until labor [00:27:00] started to look into it and say, we need to do something about this. But the boys were then, for like I guess lack of a better term, allowed to go wiggle their way in the places and place charges and find different passages where a full grown adult couldn't go. Being a little claustrophobic myself, I'm not sure that I could do that. Randy Klatt: [00:27:22] Yeah, that wouldn't be on my list of to dos, that's for sure. And the worst mining disaster in American history occurred in nineteen O' seven. So just a few years after the turn of the century. And the wording just kind of gets to me when it describes this, the underground explosion. This was in West Virginia that kills three hundred and sixty two out of the three hundred and eighty men and boys working that day.  Oh, my goodness. Peter Koch: [00:27:55] That's it's almost a whole a whole community of people that were wiped out. You [00:28:00] know, it's three hundred men and boys, three hundred men and boys that, you know, had families to go back to. You've just cut out half of the population of probably a mining town, you know, within that one particular event that occurred. Randy Klatt: [00:28:16] Exactly. Peter Koch: [00:28:17] And it didn't stop there. And it wasn't just in the mines where things were really challenging. And we found a lot of a lot of people getting injured or killed. We talk about this often, especially if we're talking about the history of OSHA and where OSHA came out of and safety in America. One of the watershed moments, I think, in workplace safety came out of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire disaster that happened back in or on March 25th in 1911, which the history of that particular fire. Not even looking at pictures, just reading a [00:29:00] description of it can almost cause nightmares. It's pretty can be pretty scary. Randy Klatt: [00:29:04] It sure can. And a well known incident that we've learned a lot about being in the worker's comp industry and knowing that this was one of the key moments that brought forth the need for some sort of compensation for injured and fatally injured workers. But I agree. You read the read the description of what happened when this factory started to burn and where the people attempted to evacuate when there are 600 workers in this building. And of course, the fire hoses weren't working because they were rotted and the bowels were rusted shut. And so their panic ensued as they tried to get out and only a few people could fit into the elevator at a time. So, of course, eventually that broke down with many people still trapped in the building. So many fell to [00:30:00] their deaths in the elevator shafts, trying to somehow escape the floor that was on fire. And so many died in the building. But then just to learn that there were 58 people who died jumping to the sidewalks from the building, it's just that is horrifying to think about the loss, a total of a hundred and forty six people. Peter Koch: [00:30:22] Yeah, and in those the conditions in in how this all came about is the tragedy. I mean, I think I know when I've described part of this in a class before, people immediately think about 9/11 and those iconic images of people plummeting from the Twin Towers. And, you know, that's that is a horrible image to have fixed in your mind. And it is a horrible reason for those things to happen, to have a plane, a terrorist attack happen on our home soil [00:31:00] for that to occur. But in the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, we did this to ourselves. Right. So the doors the exit doors were chained closed because management didn't want people taking breaks when they shouldn't be taking breaks. You know, I guess having someone work 12 hours a day, six days a week just isn't enough. Right. So. Got to make sure that they're not taking a break when they shouldn't. You know, the fire started in a rag bin. Right. So we look at this often. We go different places and we see a bin full of used oily rags in a maintenance facility. And we talk to people about, hey, this is going to combust at some point in time, like, yeah, we'll take care of it. We'll take care of it at the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, something that we take for granted, the exit routes. Right. So your fire escapes were too narrow. There wasn't enough room on the fire escape to handle the occupancy [00:32:00] of the floor of the building. So when people went out to the fire escape, the fire escape collapsed. So consider that like oh fire. Right. So I'm going to go out and I'm going to go out. What I know is the fire escape, and I'm going to walk onto that. And I'm assuming that fire escape is going to hold me and it doesn't. And it collapses and prevents everyone else from escaping. And then considering the response and you said this early on, like we didn't we had some organized EMS, we had some especially in the cities, there was fire response. A lot of it was volunteer, some of it was professional. But the fire occurred on the eighth floor. The hoses only reached to the seventh floor like. So that math just doesn't add up. Right. So there's lots of things that we take for granted today that came out of these. Disasters. [00:33:00] One of those is workplace safety. In a in a focus on workplace safety, another one is building code and making sure that the building is able to support the number of people and what they're doing in there and how do they get out in the in the event of an emergency. And we tend to forget that these rules aren't there just so that our jobs can be more annoying. But they're there because there has been substantial issues. And they talk about this in the history of Triangle Shirtwaist, too, with like 18 minutes from the time of the fire to the time that was all done and all. One hundred and forty six people died. Eighteen minutes. That's crazy to think that that many people would die almost in an instant. Peter Koch: [00:33:47] Let's take a quick break. Maybe you didn't know, but MEMIC is committed to making workers' comp work better for everyone. It's been our hallmark since day one. And through compassion, partnerships and a relentless commitment to workplace [00:34:00] safety, we make an impact, whether it's our claim specialist, connecting injured workers with the best medical care and helping them understand the worker's comp system or our safety specialist conducting training for frontline staff and workplace assessments with your supervisors. We understand your industry and how a robust safety program is a pillar of any successful company. Already a MEMIC policyholder. Then reach out to your MEMIC safety management consultant for more information about resources that can help. And if not, and you're interested in how MEMIC can partner with you for workplace safety. Contact your independent insurance agent. Now, let's get back to today's episode. Randy Klatt: [00:34:45] It is crazy. And as you said, self-induced. And we see that to some degree in business today when we do mention something about the regs or the exit was partially blocked or you can't get to the fire [00:35:00] extinguisher. And, you know, those sorts of things that we always point out. And it's the overriding philosophy of, yeah, we'll get to it, but really, we have to do business first and it's not going to happen. What are the odds? Right. What are the odds that this building is going to catch on fire, that we're going to have a problem and that's not the right way to look at workplace safety. And we should have learned from these incidents. Every manager, every supervisor, every business owner should have a real good appreciation of history. So we don't repeat it. Peter Koch: [00:35:39] It's that's a very good point. There's a phrase out there for those who don't know their history are destined to step in it again. Right. Or fall into it again, or however you want to finish that particular phrase. And there's an author out. There was this quote came out of another website that we're looking through, the [00:36:00] article called Child Workers and Workplace Accidents. What's the price paid for Industrializing America? They talk about how between the years of 1830 to 1880, there's this overworks generation of Americans that reached adulthood with hunchbacked weakness, both legs, damaged pelvises, missing limbs from working in those conditions for so long. And you have a generation that has human damage that doesn't allow them to interact in the same way with everyone else that we take for granted today. And I thought it was an interesting connection, because if we just take the example of how industrial technology back in the eighteen hundreds changed a generation and moved that same phrase to today and how technology take the industrial out of it, technology has changed a generation. What kind of injuries [00:37:00] are we seeing in a lot of young people today? And it might not always be work related. It might be just someone going to the doctor because they've got aches and pains, but it's neck injuries, it's wrist injuries, it's overexertion injuries. And most of it's coming from the phone posture. The technology posture of the hunched back, the rounded shoulders, the hands together, typing with their thumbs, staring at a small screen for hours a day. And you're seeing injuries or challenges to people that are really we saw similar things from introduction of technology back in the eighteen hundreds to. So, again, that whole concept of we need to understand our history to be able to see our current day and possibly even the effect of the current day on the future accurately, too. So there's a lot in this history that we can really take forward. [00:38:00] Randy Klatt: [00:38:00] Right. That's those are great points. It's all about those musculoskeletal disorders that take place over time and know. One hundred and fifty years ago, it was manual labor in horrible conditions and long hours and no days off. That resulted in these injuries and these long term problems that people had today. We still have a lot of people working in industry and construction and such. But you're right, there are a lot more people using the computer or using a phone or a tablet. And we actually have young people who are starting to grow spines out of their cervical spine. So like bone spurs that are developing, which is not that uncommon with elderly people because you do have to hold your head up. Right. The human head weighs 12 pounds, 15 pounds, give or take. And [00:39:00] that takes some effort to hold up. We don't really think about it until we put our head down looking at the phone. Then after a few hours, our neck really starts to hurt and we ignore it. And over time, we forget the pain and we just deal with it. And we're actually starting to grow these things out of our spine that are being found in teenagers when normally they wouldn't be found until you're in your 70s. So there are workplace challenges today that we really need to face that are, you know, from different causal factors. But again, looking at history, we should be able to learn from them and find a better way. And let's listen to your safety consultant when they make recommendations. Gosh darn it, Peter Koch: [00:39:50] Every once in a while. Don't delete the email. Read it through. Think about it before you delete it, possibly, right? Randy Klatt: [00:39:55] That's right. We know what we're talking about. So interesting [00:40:00] that that even in 1911, we see this disaster and it did spur a lot of work in building codes and, you know, the sort of standards for the workplace. But it was still another 60 years before OSHA was founded. The Occupational Safety and Health Act was founded. So it took a long time even to get to that point where we actually had federal regulations about workplace safety. Peter Koch: [00:40:35] Yeah. And even beyond or even before that. So OSHA, from a workplace safety standpoint, which is near and dear to our hearts, but just from a fair labor part, like what's fair, what's fair work, what constitutes fair work that even get passed until 1938, the Fair Labor Standards Act, where they addressed child labor and they addressed [00:41:00] the workday and they addressed fair wages and living wages, all which kind of come together to help the American worker be a more valuable component of the success of America. Randy Klatt: [00:41:13] It did take a long time, way too long. Peter Koch: [00:41:17] Way too long. And, you know, like we said it before, our current workplaces aren't free from problems. They're not free from hazards or free from people getting injured. We have come, like you said, we've come a long way. But the way there was really hard won. And whenever you've got struggle, there's going to be some progress. And to flip that around, Frederick Douglas, it's a quote that comes out of the, uh, around 1857. If there is no struggle, there is no progress. So you look at all the challenges that occurred back there and that started the labor union. It started to pull organized the different factions, not [00:42:00] factions, but the different groups from the different industries to come together and start to advocate for better conditions in the workplace. And those unions came forward and they fought for better hours, equal pay and safer working conditions. And actually, you know, Randy, when you think about it, that's somewhat on how MEMIC was actually formed and not on that, you know, not out of that particular quote. But really, there was a struggle in Maine in the early 1980s through the early nineteen nineties and through those struggles MEMIC was actually formed. It was it didn't come out of it wasn't somebody's brainchild because they thought it would be an awesome idea. It was a response to a crisis like a lot of this. Right. So the [00:43:00] the Labor Standards Act and the building codes and OSHA you hear many times that OSHA standards were written in blood because they were there's every standard in that OSHA standards book is because there's somebody or some body part that's attached to that, that didn't make it home or didn't make it home with the person after the incident occurred. Randy Klatt: [00:43:27] Yeah. And then early 1990s, Maine had one of the worst, if not the worst, workplace injury records. Our injury rate was really high and worker's compensation insurance was extremely expensive. And insurers were, in fact, withdrawing from the state. And we got to a real crisis point with the businesses in Maine and something had to be done. So thank goodness MEMIC was founded. An initial [00:44:00] mission statement really did talk about not only providing great insurance and great safety services, but we wanted to promote fair and equitable treatment for all workers. And that's still true today. We've updated the mission statement and our vision and values and all that along the way. But that's still at the core of what we do is taking care of people. And ideally, we take care of people before there's an injury. That's our role as a safety consultant, is to get out there and find those issues, find those emergency exits that are blocked and make sure that they're taken care of. So in the event of a disaster, we actually get people out of the building instead of trapping them inside. But when injuries do occur, MEMIC is also there to provide the insurance benefits and medical care so that people can get back to work healthy and happy as soon as possible. So it is an important mission. I never conceived of myself [00:45:00] working for an insurance company. I know I don't like to pay insurance premiums any more than anybody else does. But this is an important piece of every worker's life, and it is important. Peter Koch: [00:45:14] Yeah. And we're not saying that, you know, MEMIC was formed so that you could celebrate Labor Day, but I think it fits within the whole the whole thought of, you know, Labor Day came out of a struggle. And there's good things that come out of a struggle. And we have a long history of struggling for things and to things in America. You know, after those first two celebrations in New York in 1882, it still wasn't a national holiday like you didn't once. They all met together and had the parade in New York and they figured out which McGuire was the one to recognize as the person who suggested Labor Day still wasn't a national thing. I mean, that was [00:46:00] just New York City. And it took five more years for the first state in the Union to actually recognize Labor Day as an official holiday. And I don't have a lot of information about that. But Oregon was the first state back in 1887 to make Labor Day an official holiday. So I'd be curious if we can go back in time and kind of look at that first Labor Day. And was it just the day off or was it like our current Labor Day and certain companies you get that benefit of having a paid day off. So I'm not sure all of the labor in Oregon were paid for that first Labor Day holiday, but that was the first state to declare Labor Day a holiday. Oregon in 1887. Randy Klatt: [00:46:50] Oh, go Oregon. Peter Koch: [00:46:51] There you go. Randy Klatt: [00:46:52] Go Ducks! Peter Koch: [00:46:52] And even after that, it still didn't catch on. It's still a number of years, another five or six years [00:47:00] for more states to sign things into law. There again, seven more years. Grover Cleveland, are the president at the time finally signed the Labor Day holiday into law. So then it was a national holiday. And prior to that, in between 1887 and 94, 23 other states had adopted the holiday. And then Grover Cleveland signed it into law because it was becoming a trend, I guess, across the nation. Randy Klatt: [00:47:32] Ya he saw the inevitable, huh? Yeah. Yeah. Looked at it, decided to do the right the right thing for a change. Peter Koch: [00:47:38] And that's even that's an interesting history, because there, you know, prior to that, in that same year was the Pullman strike where the railroad workers were on went on strike for two, almost three months. And it was pretty nasty. There was a lot of violence and [00:48:00] some deaths, both on the strikers side and on the government side that tried to break it up. But ultimately, the labor won it out, but it was still, you know, still a violent part of our history. So, you know, again, 1894, a watershed time in our history to signing Labor Day as a holiday into law. But there is still a lot of struggle around that just to make it happen. Randy Klatt: [00:48:30] Yeah. Can you imagine having to riot and to get into gunfights on the streets and calling in the Pinkerton agents to protect your facility and all those kinds of things just because you're not willing to pay a fair wage or workers are complaining of unsafe working conditions? Peter Koch: [00:48:54] Sure, I don't think I can. I don't think I can. And I think it [00:49:00] highlights, you know, as we think about Labor Day and we think about the roots of Labor Day, it highlights, again, the need for both parties to come to the table rationally to talk about what's right and not what's just good for the one, but what's good for more than just the one. How are we going to be successful as a company as well as be successful as the individual? Because, you know, there are many cases where when you just focus on the company being successful and not the workers being successful, you're not going to end up being successful as a company. And we've talked about a lot of challenges, there's hundreds, if not thousands of companies out there that have not been able to be successful for one reason or the other, and sometimes it is because they didn't have the right priorities in mind when they started looking at labor. Randy Klatt: [00:49:59] After [00:50:00] all, who is the company? We want to make the company successful. And I don't know of any company that will be successful if their workforce isn't successful. They're the ones that make it happen. So protecting those workers is not only the right thing to do from an ethical standpoint, but certainly the right thing to do from an economic standpoint. We all know just the small part of that whole pie being the worker's compensation insurance premium and how much that costs of business. And just like any insurance, the more you use it, the more it costs. So you can drive those direct costs of an injury through the roof pretty darn quickly. And it would be far less expensive to get ahead of the game and take care of those workers in the first place so that that doesn't happen. Safety is always a pay me now or pay me later proposal and [00:51:00] now is going to be a lot less expensive than later. It's just that's the way it always works. Peter Koch: [00:51:06] It always does. And we can be really short sighted. And think about the not putting out a little bit now, but it's like you said, it's going to come around later. Back to you. Well, so we've been talking about Labor Day here for almost an hour. And I think it's good for us to recognize. Right. So back before 1994 or excuse me, back before 1894, even farther than 1994, right back before 1894, Labor Day didn't exist. We didn't recognize the success of and the input of the American worker, that construction worker, the textile worker, the manufacturing person, the firefighter, the police officer, the nurse, the doctor, the whoever it is, the [00:52:00] American labor, the person that's out there doing things and making things for to make America successful and then to try to be successful on their own. That symbiotic relationship between the work that needs to be done and the worker that's going to do it. And the history of Labor Day is just filled with struggle, courage, defiance, injuries. And as we've talked about, even death out there today, we celebrate Labor Day on the first Monday of September. And most of us will enjoy a day off from work sharing time and maybe a meal with friends and family. Peter Koch: [00:52:34] And it's become the last hurrah before summer ends and the school year starts in earnest. So people are celebrating a lot of things. And when we do it, it's easy to forget the history of our modern workplace and how we got the eight hour workday overtime pay holidays or even machine guards, air quality monitoring respirators, lock out tag out, fall protection, all of the tools and standards [00:53:00] that give us the opportunity to come home after work and see those friends and family. So when you're celebrating, don't forget the thousands of workers out there in retail, hospitality, food service, emergency services and health care that are going to celebrate Labor Day by working for us or in some cases with one of our loved ones. So this Labor Day, remember that it's not just a holiday from work, but it's a holiday about work. And without the lives and the limbs of the workers that came before us and the unions and officials that spoke out, we would not have the day to celebrate. There's a good chance more of us would be spending this first Monday of September in the hospital or worse yet, in the morgue. Peter Koch: [00:53:49] Thanks again to everyone for joining us. And today on the MEMIC Safety Experts podcast. We've been speaking about the history of Labor Day and how it has influenced safety with Randy Klatt, director of Region two here at MEMIC. If you have any suggestions for a safety related podcast [00:54:00] topic or we'd like to hear more about a topic we've touched on. Email me at podcast@MEMIC.com Also, check out our show notes for today's podcast at MEMIC.com/podcast where you can find links to the articles and resources we used for today and our entire podcast archive. And while you're there, sign up for our safety net blog so you never miss any of our articles and safety news updates. And if you haven't done so already, I'd appreciate it if you took a few minutes to review us on Stitcher, iTunes or whichever podcast service that you found us on. If you've already done that. Thanks. Hope you've subscribed because it really helps us spread the word. Please consider sharing this show. With a business associate friend or a family member who you think will get something out of it. And as always, thank you for the continued support. And until next time, this is Peter Koch reminding you that listening to the MEMIC Safety Experts podcast is good, but using what you learned here is even [00:55:00] better.  

Employment Law This Week Podcast
#WorkforceWednesday: OSHA Updates COVID-19 Mask, Vaccination Guidance

Employment Law This Week Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 6:09


The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recently updated its COVID-19 guidance, now recommending that all employees wear masks in the workplace, even if they're vaccinated. Meanwhile, employers with unionized workforces face unique considerations with regard to vaccination polices. Attorneys Bob O'Hara and Neresa De Biasi tell us more.    Visit our site for this week's Other Highlights and links: https://www.ebglaw.com/eltw223. Subscribe to #WorkforceWednesday - https://www.ebglaw.com/subscribe/. Visit http://www.EmploymentLawThisWeek.com. The EMPLOYMENT LAW THIS WEEK® and DIAGNOSING HEALTH CARE podcasts are presented by Epstein Becker & Green, P.C. All rights are reserved. This audio recording includes information about legal issues and legal developments.  Such materials are for informational purposes only and may not reflect the most current legal developments.  These informational materials are not intended, and should not be taken, as legal advice on any particular set of facts or circumstances, and these materials are not a substitute for the advice of competent counsel. The content reflects the personal views and opinions of the participants. No attorney-client relationship has been created by this audio recording. This audio recording may be considered attorney advertising in some jurisdictions under the applicable law and ethical rules. The determination of the need for legal services and the choice of a lawyer are extremely important decisions and should not be based solely upon advertisements or self-proclaimed expertise. No representation is made that the quality of the legal services to be performed is greater than the quality of legal services performed by other lawyers.

Apolonia Rockwell Show
The Power of Safety Leading Indicators w/ ​​Ed Foulke of Fisher Phillips Safety Solutions

Apolonia Rockwell Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 45:34


In this episode, Apolonia talks with Ed Foulke, president of Fisher Phillips Safety Solutions and former assistant secretary of OSHA. Topics that Ed and Apolonia discuss in this episode: * What it was for Ed to get a call out of the blue from the White House, inviting him to work for the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). * Fatalities in the workplace, including falling off ladders. * How fatality rates in the US have plateaued. * How safety and health have become increasingly more visible to the C-suite (CEOs, CFOs, CTOs, etc.). * Linking sustainability to employee safety. * The safety profession must learn how to sell safety and how to be more articulate when talking about risk. * Leading indicators of safety versus lagging indicators of safety. Thanks so much to Ed Foulke for being a guest! Connect with Ed Foulke: https://www.linkedin.com/in/edfoulke. Learn more about Fisher Phillips Safety Solutions: https://www.fisherphillips.com. Apolonia Rockwell is the Founder and CEO of True Safety Services and True Safety University. Learn more about “The True Safety Podcast with Apolonia Rockwell”: https://www.truesafetyservices.com/podcast. Subscribe to Apolonia Rockwell's YouTube channel (where we also post her podcasts): http://bit.ly/subscribe-Apolonia-Rockwell-YouTube. True Safety Services is Colorado's #1 provider in safety training and safety management services. Learn more about True Safety Services: https://www.truesafetyservices.com. True Safety University is a world class virtual training platform for individuals and companies: https://www.truesafetyuniversity.com. Connect with True Safety Services: * LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/true-safety-services. * Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/truesafetyservices. * Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/truesafetyservices. * Twitter: https://twitter.com/true_safety. Subscribe to the podcast: * Apple Podcasts: http://bit.ly/True-Safety-Apple-Podcasts. * Google Podcasts: http://bit.ly/True-Safety-Google-Podcasts. * Spotify: http://bit.ly/True-Safety-Spotify. * Stitcher: http://bit.ly/True-Safety-Stitcher. * Podfollow: http://bit.ly/True-Safety-PodFollow. This episode was produced by Story On Media & Marketing: https://www.successwithstories.com.

AgriSafe Network
Using Naloxone to Reverse Opioid Overdose in the Agricultural Workplace: Information for Employers and Workers

AgriSafe Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 45:26


In 2018, the U.S. Surgeon General called for increased awareness and availability of naloxone, the opioid antagonist, to reverse the effects of opioid overdose. Despite the rise in the dispensing of naloxone, there is a significant gap in our response across all sectors of society. In the rural parts of our country, where emergency response times can be dangerously long, developing a workplace naloxone availability and use program could ultimately save lives. This webinar will share information from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to help employers and workers understand the risk of opioid overdose and the role of naloxone. By the end of the webinar, participants will be able to: Discuss what medications are prescription and illicit opioids and what is OUD (Opioid Use Disorder) Describe the dangers of opioids in the workplace and OUD for safety-sensitive occupations Discuss the role of naloxone in opioid overdose Discuss the implementation of workplace naloxone use programs Understand the administration of the dosage forms available for naloxone used in an emergency

AgriSafe Network
Tools and Training to Aid in Selection of PPE in Agriculture

AgriSafe Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 45:44


Summary: Workers in the agricultural industry experience multiple hazardous respiratory exposures. It is important to understand these risks and to know the appropriate protective equipment to purchase and use. The female workforce often experiences a challenge finding the right protection with a proper fit. This 30-minute program will address both the risks and the right protective gear. Intended Audience: The primary audience for this program will agricultural production workers, including female workers, and agricultural business managers Objectives: At the conclusion of this program, participants will be able to: Identify common respiratory exposures that put workers at risk for respiratory illness Recognize appropriate respiratory protection for workers, co-workers, or family members Understand the difference between a respirator and a fabric or paper mask – sorting out the language Access evidence-based information related to respiratory protection This material was produced under grant #SH-05172-SH9 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does the mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government

Ogletree Deakins Podcasts
Dirty Steel-Toe Boots, Episode 3: Why Is OSHA Here?

Ogletree Deakins Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 27:01


Welcome to Dirty Steel-Toe Boots, a podcast for employers about OSHA enforcement. In this episode, Phillip Russell and Dee Anna Hays discuss the various reasons, including employee complaints and reportable events, for the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to come knocking on your door. The speakers address the likelihood of OSHA releasing COVID-19–related guidance on public indoor spaces and the agency's renewed focus on heat stress.

MEMIC Safety Experts
Revoked EUAs with Stephen Badger

MEMIC Safety Experts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 41:39


In June 2021, the FDA revoked its Emergency Use Authorization for Filtering Facepiece Respirators.  Learn what an EUA is and how it affects the use of non-NIOSH approved N-95 respirator in healthcare.     Peter Koch: [00:00:04] Hello, listeners, and welcome to the MEMIC Safety Experts podcast, I'm your host, Peter Koch, and the topic today is revoked EUAs. Often I need to hear or read something a second time to understand what's going on. And it's not for lack of education or interest. It's just sometimes a sentence tries to do way too much with too few words or letters or using abbreviations to try to help with understanding. So try to wrap your brain around this. Early on in the sars-cov-2 pandemic, the FDA as a department of the DHHS, created the FRREUAs for HCP in conjunction with NIOSH and the CDC to help combat the spread of covid-19 now due to the increase in availability of NIOSH approved and n-95 FRRs, the FDA has revoked the FRREUA for [00:01:00] HCP. Got it. Yeah, I don't. I didn't either. Every one of those, TLAs adds meeting to the message. And a TLA is a three letter abbreviation, by the way, so that's way too many TLAs packed into two sentences to be functional and I expect that if it was in print you would have to read it again and maybe again and maybe google some of those to figure out what all the pieces are. But just listening, I expect it was almost as confusing as it was to read. And if I were to pull a number of us who heard that headline for the first time, everyone would have a different opinion on its meaning. And unfortunately, many times when I'm in the field talking with clients about new regulations or safety standards, there's often confusion and most often a different opinion on the meaning or applicability. And the FDA's recent revocation of the FRREUA is no exception. So to help clear the air on the [00:02:00] podcast with me today is Steve Badger, CSP, OHST and safety management consultant with MEMIC. Steve has more than 35 years of experience working in the paper, medical sterilization and construction industries. He's an authorized training instructor for the OSHA Training Institute in Manchester, New Hampshire, and is a member of the American Industrial Hygiene Association. Steve uses his experience in different industries and formal training in industrial hygiene practices and indoor air quality testing to help the companies he works with manage their respiratory protections, challenges and others today. Steve is going to help us shed some light on the recent FRREUA revocation. So, Steve, welcome back to the podcast. Steve Badger: [00:02:45] Thank you very much, Peter. Glad to be here. Peter Koch: [00:02:47] That's fantastic. It's been a little while since we've had a conversation here. So I was really happy to I actually read some information that you sent out about the revaccinated EUAs and [00:03:00] it sparked the conversation for us about what they are and why they got revoked. And I thought it would be an interesting conversation to have on the podcast and try to get the word out about some of this. So I'd like to start by jumping right in and define some of those TLAs or three letter abbreviation. Let's start right with an EUA. What isn't EUA in the first place and why are they issued? Steve Badger: [00:03:26] Sure. And an EUA stands for emergency use authorization is really a mechanism to facilitate the availability and the use of medical countermeasures such as vaccines and other medical equipment during public health emergencies. And you see this happen rarely they're not done frequently. But as it says in their own definitions, that the public health emergencies, we don't have a lot of them, but when we have them, we need to be able to use our resources and things that are available to try to help us get [00:04:00] beyond that. And obviously, the covid-19 pandemic has proved to be that in more than one area, including the vaccines, as well as the filtering Facebook's respirators. Now, under this particular EAU, the FDA meeting, the Food and Drug Administration is the one that issued this particular set of EUAs and they can do, as I mentioned earlier, medical products, vaccines to diagnose or treat or even prevent serious life threatening diseases and conditions when there's no approved or adequate available alternatives. In this case here, you know, we're talking about filtering face piece respirators. And as we know that has been a contentious issue from the beginning as to the availability of NIOSH approved respirators. Peter Koch: [00:04:52] Why don't we help people understand? Because there's lots of different terminology about respirators and some people just think a mask is [00:05:00] a respirator or a respirator is a mask. We see we see people in a doctor's office wearing a mask. We see people on a construction site wearing a mask. We see firefighters wearing a mask. So when we talk about an n-95 respirator, what are we talking about and what's the difference between, say that and like a half face respirator and maybe that surgical mask that you might find in your doctor's office? Steve Badger: [00:05:27] Great question. The really the difference comes down to what is doing the filtering and filtering face piece respirator. The ones that we're talking about here, the mask itself is the filter. It's filtering out everything that you're breathing in. The whole entire thing acts as a filter and you know it. The same with a surgical mask is designed to filter out throughout your whole breathing zone everything that's there as opposed to say, you know, elastomeric like a half face or a full face, negative pressure [00:06:00] respirator that is fit tested. They've got it. It's got a seal that has to seal. And then the ear that's getting to you is being filtered through actual filters, cartridges that are designed to filter out different types of contaminants. So there's a big difference between those and the filtering face piece in its function and its ability and its protective qualities. Because if you think about a filtering face piece, it's filtering in both directions, whereas the elastomeric respirators, the cartridges you're breathing in, when you exhale, you're breathing out through an exhalation valve that's not filtered. So this was one of the reasons why these this particular type of respirator wasn't the first and best choice when it came to the health care professionals, Peter Koch: [00:06:51] Because it's filtering the filtering face piece or like a paper mask. Respirator would filter both ways, both in the inhalation and the [00:07:00] exhalation, as I hear you correctly. Steve Badger: [00:07:02] Correct. Peter Koch: [00:07:02] Now, with the filtering face piece and especially the n-95 respirators, some of the similarities beyond the filtering on the inhalation, they do have to be fit tested, is that correct, the n-95 respirators? Steve Badger: [00:07:18] Yes, that is correct. They do have to be fit tested. And the initial people that are first using these things, it was absolutely mandated that everyone had to be fit tested before they could wear them and they had to get a medical approval before they could even do the fit testing to make sure that they were physically capable of wearing these respirators with the people that had already been fit tested. And maybe they've been beyond that year from the initial time that they had been tested. They were given a, I will say, a waiver, but an extension so that they did not have to get that additional fit test within that year, that they as long as they were using the same type and brand of filtering [00:08:00] face piece respirator, that they could extend that fit test beyond that year deadline. Peter Koch: [00:08:07] Oh, good. So that that actually took some pressure off the numbers of people that would have to be tested for an n-95 or one of the respirators that would have been covered under the EUA originally. Now what's the biggest difference between that filtering face piece and say like the surgical mask that you might see in the doctor's office or the dentist office? Steve Badger: [00:08:34] The largest difference really comes down to the pore size. And when we talk about pore size, we're talking about what is the maximum, you know, filtration of that particular respirator or in this case, surgical mask. Now, with the filtering face piece, we know that it will filter out 95 percent of the particles at a certain size and which is which is a very good filter, a very good filter, 95 percent, [00:09:00] as opposed to a surgical mask, which really doesn't have the small enough pores to prevent the viruses from actually getting through that. And they're not fitted as well so that people, if they don't have them appropriately put across their nose or across their face, there's still gaps in them that can allow the escape of the of the virus. Peter Koch: [00:09:24] Good. So that makes sense then why someone who would be required to say treat or come into contact with someone who might have covid-19 needing to wear that n-95 mask instead of just the surgical mask? But, you know, there again, that's the requirement, higher level of protection, especially when there's a significant exposure. And then for everyone else, when there's other options for us to go out there. That's why that cloth face mask or even a surgical type mask would be functional for someone of the public [00:10:00] who maybe isn't required to come into contact with someone who has covid-19, I remember early on masks, you couldn't find them, you couldn't find n-95 mask's anywhere. And I know just outside of the covid-19 pandemic, I mean, respirators are used in industry all the time for particulate respiratory protection, chemical respiratory protection. There's many reasons why you might use an a 95 respirator and you couldn't find them. You just couldn't find them anywhere. So I guess this is a good time to maybe talk a little bit about the history here and to get a better understanding of why the EUAs were issued in the first place. So we did talk about the FDA, the federal Food and Drug Administration, and they are in charge of approving medical products and vaccines for use, and especially when it comes to the medical industry themselves to be approved for [00:11:00] medical use. It's not just, say, NIOSH. Correct. So if I'm going to use a respirator, an approved respirator for medical use, NIOSH isn't the only organization that will approve that respirator for use, is that correct? That needs to be the FDA. Steve Badger: [00:11:17] Well, it is the NIOSH does the approval and how to look at this is that they do the testing, they do the approval. And then the FDA says, OK, based on the NIOSH testing and approval, we will accept these particular respirators. Peter Koch: [00:11:35] Gotcha, I think that's a that's a good point for qualification there. So NIOSH still doing the testing. And then the FDA is saying that these are the group of respirators that are going to be functional for a health care setting. Awesome. All right. So let's look more about the historical context. And if we all remember back to the start of the covid-19 pandemic, which seems like forever [00:12:00] ago, but it wasn't all that long ago, actually, that the virus was determined to be transmitted through the air and into the respiratory system via the droplets expelled when an infected person coughed, sneezed or they spoke. What wasn't really well understood then was how a mask could protect you and why someone in a health care settings should wear an approved n-95 mask and someone not in health care could wear a mask that wasn't approved. So let's talk a little bit about what an n-95 is and then what makes it approved and then we'll get into the timeline. So Steve, take us through what an n-95 respirator n-95 mask is and what makes it approved versus a mask that might not be approved. Steve Badger: [00:12:41] You know, certainly the n-95 respirator is exactly what it sounds. It's designed to filter out 95 percent of the particles within its range, what it's approved for. And so, you know, when we take a look at what's on the outside of the respirator [00:13:00] and what gets inside, it's designed to filter out 95 percent. And that approval process, as we mentioned earlier, is done by NIOSH, the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health. And they do a lot of testing on these respirators and they put them through their paces to make sure that they really are what the manufacturer tells us they are and that they're going to, you know, meet those standards. Now, to take that one step further, these n-95 respirators, which were, you know, being approved obviously very quickly, the supplies of these got used up. And so they started looking at these different alternatives as to, OK, maybe these aren't approved yet, but there are respirators out there that have been through other trials, through other organizations throughout the world that may be good enough to be able to provide some protection for the health care professionals. Peter Koch: [00:13:58] Oh, all right, I [00:14:00] think I understand so NIOSH is going to approve an n-95 respirator based on their testing and it has to meet a minimum qualification for the for filtering out 95 percent of a certain size particle or particles above a certain size. But there are other organizations I know Canada has their own organization and other countries have their own certification organizations for different types of personal protective equipment. So but it might not be the same testing method or it might not be they might not have the same standard possibly that NIOSH does so when the supply got short. Am I correct that businesses started to look for other supply chains that might not be approved by NIOSH? Am I correct in that? Steve Badger: [00:14:50] Absolutely, that is correct. They started looking outside of the U.S. because of the fact that the U.S. supplies fell [00:15:00] behind very quickly. And so they started looking at countries that everywhere from, you know, Vietnam to New Zealand to places Europe, Italy, that that had companies that were creating respirators that met their standard for it would be an n-95. But they had not yet approved them for use in the United States. Peter Koch: [00:15:24] Very good. So that that sets up kind of sets up a challenge. Right. So as your safety person at the hospital or OSHA or the FDA are going to say, these are the things that you have to use, the companies might not have enough of those things. So they go look someplace else, find other respirators that meet a certain standard, but not the NIOSH standard. So now there's a challenge there. There are companies that are trying to protect their workers, but there aren't enough of the NIOSH approved [00:16:00] n-95 filtering face pieces to go around. So the FDA takes the next step. And I'm expecting that's the emergency use authorization, correct? Steve Badger: [00:16:12] Correct. You know, any time that there is an emergency use authorization, there has to be some reasoning behind it. And for this case here, you know, they gave three main reasons as to why they wanted to implement this. And, you know, first of all, it was the sars-cov-2 virus that causes covid-19 causes serious life threatening disease. There was no question about that at this point, including severe respiratory illness. The second reason was that based on scientific evidence available to the FDA, that there was some benefit of using these filtering face piece respirators, even though they were not NIOSH approved. And third of all is that, you know, there just wasn't any other available alternatives. There was just nothing else out there that was in the pipeline that could possibly [00:17:00] take the place of that or help supplement that. So this is why the FDA decided that this was a good time to implement this particular EUA. Peter Koch: [00:17:13] That's great. And as I understand it, too, there were multiple or at least there were two EUAs that were issued. So talk to us about the first EUA that was issued and then we can talk about the second one. Steve Badger: [00:17:26] Sure. The first EUA was the imported NIOSH Non-NIOSH approved disposable filtering face piece respirators, and that one really covered respirators that were made outside of the United States everywhere but China. And we'll talk about a little bit about that in the second one as to why they separated those. But this particular one this first one was for every other country, the Italy, the Australia, the New Zealand that were making respirators that had not been previously [00:18:00] NIOSH approved. And within that EUA, they had what's called exhibit one. Exhibit one was the list of approved filtering face piece respirators that could be used by health care professionals under this EUA. Peter Koch: [00:18:17] Ok, so once that EUA was issued, they had a list of all the different respirators. So the health care community could go out and choose from that list. They couldn't find NIOSH approved filtering face pieces. They could then look at which ones were then being approved through the emergency use authorization. That's cool. So that list one was a pretty critical list for people to have get their hands on. And then I think it was still hard to find some of those. And then there was another EUA that was issued and you referenced that earlier. That was the one for respirators manufactured in China. So can you talk a little bit about that one? Steve Badger: [00:18:56] Yes. The first EUA approved about 50, [00:19:00] I believe it was 54 different types of respirators from different countries. And as we talked about the use and the need and far outweighed the number that were available. So the second EUA was issued in October of 2020, and that was for respirators that were constructed in the country of China. Now, that particular list was also quite extensive and they actually had about 200 approved respirators that went into Appendix A of that EUA that were approved from that point that the EUA was initiated. So now they've brought in the they had the rest of the world will say in the. First, the EUA and then China and their respirators were the second EUA. Peter Koch: [00:19:55] Right, and so through your reading, were you able to determine why they had a [00:20:00] separate EUA for the respirators made in China versus the ones that may have been made in the other parts of the world? Steve Badger: [00:20:07] There's been nothing that I've been able to find in the reading that would indicate why? You know, there's a lot of conjecture out there as far as, you know, thinking about the fact that, you know, early on they thought that maybe, you know, they wouldn't have to go to that extreme to get enough respirators available. But, yeah, there's definitely nothing in writing that I've been able to find that's indicated as why it was separate after the fact. You know, when we talk about here later on, but after the fact, it became obvious that there were a lot of knockoffs and a lot of, you know, fake respirators that were being sent in, ones that weren't nearly close to approval. And so, you know, after the fact, they started, you know, weeding out those pretty quickly when they started testing them. Peter Koch: [00:20:59] Yeah. [00:21:00] So I do remember some of that information coming through. There were a number of respirators that were packaged to represent themselves as being NIOSH approved or had the OSHA seal of approval, which isn't a thing. You know, she doesn't approve those. They just say you're supposed to wear a particular type of PPE. And then there were some testing information that was placed out there, too, about how the NIOSH respirators and respirators made in other parts of the world and even some of those in China did come it did come very close to meeting that NIOSH standard over the samples that they had. But there are others that didn't do it at all. And so part of the approval, as I see it, is how I've come to understand this as a safety professional is one of the reasons that you want in a third party testing and approving is because it provides you with some information about [00:22:00] the minimum amount of protection that you're going to get. So if you buy something that's going to have the stamp of approval on it, you should you should be able to feel comfortable that it will that it will protect you at this particular level. And so then if you take that protection level and then you look at what you're trying to be protected from, if they match up and you use it the way it's supposed to, you have managed the hazard or exposure to that hazard in a good way. But if it's not going to meet that base level of approval, then it may very well put you at greater risk if you're going to use something that that doesn't have that minimum level of protection. Peter Koch: [00:22:42] Let's take a quick break, integrating workplace safety into your business is a key part of the long term success of any company. And like most components of success, there is no one size fits all solution. MEMIC is committed to partnering with employers across all industries for workplace [00:23:00] safety. And we recognize the key to that partnership is understanding the unique demands of the industries that we ensure our safety experts bring experience from the industries that they serve. And this experience provides a unique perspective through a critical eye when it comes to understanding the particular exposures and challenges of an industry from construction, retail and manufacturing to hospitality and health care. Our team of experts will work with policyholders to identify opportunities to improve safety. Interested in finding more about MEMIC, check us out at MEMIC.com. Or better yet, contact your local independent insurance agent for more information. If you're already insured by MEMIC, then check out our safety resources at MEMIC.com/workplacesafety and sign up for access to our video lending library, our LMS platform or our Safety Director Resource Library. Now let's [00:24:00] get back to today's episode. Peter Koch: [00:24:04] I think as we as we start to look at the EUAs this, you know, the podcast is pretty short today. There is a pretty focused topic. There's not a ton that we need to go through. But we learned about what an EUA is, what the FRRs are, who does the approval process, who issued the emergency use authorization in the first place and why. Now, let's talk about the well, the title of the podcast is that they have been revoked or the EUAs have been revacated. So why were the EUAs revoked here? Why did the FAA pull the EUAs for those filtering face pieces? Steve Badger: [00:24:48] Yeah, looking at, you know, the beginning of this, where they were authorized, the EUAs were issued from that point on, we had a list for [00:25:00] the exhibit one and also for Appendix A for the second. And that list of respirators were really, you know, for lack of a better term, we're really unknowns. And so what NIOSH did was they started doing testing on these particular filtering face piece respirators to see if they met the n-95 standard that 95 percent filtration. And so the process that they would go through is they would take ten samples that were sent to them by the manufacturers. They would test them and come up with an average filtration. And so as they started going through and doing these testing, they found out early on that there were many that either didn't make it or that were very bad respirators that they could tell that they were bad, they tell that they were they were the fakes, that they were the fraudulent ones. And so what they did was they started [00:26:00] eliminating some of these from that list, from that approved list and a couple of different times during 2020, they took some of these out, started weeding them down to the ones that actually that they could say would filter out 95 percent. Now, it's important to note at this point that this did not give them a NIOSH approval. OK, what all this did was that NIOSH did this testing and that they were able to say that in this testing that it did reach that 95 percent. So none of these respirators were able to gain NIOSH approval numbers from this particular testing. So as time went on, the manufacturers that NIOSH had approved previously started catching up on the numbers of respirators that were being in demand as the pandemic, you know, slowly started coming down and the number of cases and the health care workers were able to better protect themselves with NIOSH respirators. [00:27:00] These lists, this Appendix A and exhibit one, they started becoming less and less important. And so in the end of June or actually towards the end of June, the FDA decided to revoke both of these EUAs, meaning that these respirators are no longer approved for use by health care professionals. Peter Koch: [00:27:25] And that's another interesting point to note, that the lists were kind of live. So the Appendix A. And the list one, as NIOSH started testing, they actually eliminated some of the respirators from those list. Is that correct? Did I hear that correctly? Steve Badger: [00:27:43] Yes, they did, they initially they eliminated from the second EUA, the ones from China there was about I want to say it was about 75 respirators that did not meet the first cut right out of the gate. And there was a there was several from [00:28:00] the first the UK from the European and other nations that were creating them. And so they were slowly, you know, they would get several of these on that list and they would eliminate them. And so they would, you know, say, OK, from this point on, from this date on, these are no longer part of this EUA and therefore the health care providers should not be using these. Peter Koch: [00:28:23] Yeah, and I think that's a good point, because if this ever does happen again and another EUA is issued for non-NIOSH approved filtering face pieces that. The purchasing groups for these health care organizations need to understand that, unfortunately, we can only work as fast as we can work and that those lists could be live. So are the lists will be live. And as more testing gets done, those lists might change. So it's important to go back to those lists on a regular basis, work with your suppliers to make sure that you have [00:29:00] you're working off the most accurate list and you're getting the equipment that's best suited for your for your workers. So we come to the end and the EUAs are revoked and what I'm hearing, Steve, is that you're saying because manufacturing picked up enough with the NIOSH approved n-95 respirators, that that there are enough now to go around to outfit the needs of our health care professionals. So that's really the reason why they were revoked, because there wasn't a need for emergency use anymore. We were able to use the approved respirators in most cases. Is that correct? Steve Badger: [00:29:43] Yes, it is correct and you know, and obviously there's a couple of reasons for that. I mean, one, we don't have the certainly have not had the number of cases that we had initially early on, you know, and also, you know, we have to think about respirators as they are. They're the last [00:30:00] line of defense. And so when we think about, you know, you know, hazards and controls that, you know, the controls that have been put into place have also helped eliminate a lot of these potential exposures to the point where maybe not as many respirators are needed to be used because they are that last line of defense. And therefore, you know, if something happens to them, the respirator fails, that person could still be exposed. So we want to try, you know, to eliminate those hazards initially before you get to that respirator point. Peter Koch: [00:30:32] Very good now. All right. So the EUAs are revoked the non NIOSH approved respirators are no longer approved for use in a health care setting. What do I do, I've got maybe a stockpile of respirators that were once approved by the EUA and they're no longer functional or at least no longer proved to be used in a health care setting. So does the FDA have [00:31:00] any recommendations going forward? Steve Badger: [00:31:03] Yes, they do. They have several recommendations for the stockpiles of these things that  they're assuming that are out there for the health care professionals. And just because these respirators are no longer a part of this EUA, doesn't mean that they can't be used for other purposes outside of the health care organizations that you could, you know, actually, you know, redistribute these through, you know, into non health care settings, such as, you know, construction or even general industry? You might be able to you know, they offer the suggestion that maybe you could donate them to other countries or other places where approved respirators are still in very short, you know, short quantities as they're very much in demand. They also, you know, tell us that we may even consider, you know, holding on to them to [00:32:00] be used for other purposes so that's where they've kind of left it with us, that we don't want to just, you know, we just don't want to throw these things away, that there are other uses for them. And I think that's very good advice. Peter Koch: [00:32:12] Yeah, I think it's great advice as well. So just because you have a resource, make sure you're using the resource appropriately just for that health care setting of if I'm a health care professional and I'm going to be exposed to someone who potentially has covid-19, I want to make sure I'm protected. So you want to make sure you're using that NIOSH respirator. And since you should be able to have sourced enough of those for the exposure potential that that is out there now. But like you said at the end, there again, it's a good idea. As we you know, we look at where we are currently and there's starting to be an uptick in cases, an uptick with the Delta variant and maybe some other variants that are coming down the road. It's [00:33:00] always good to be prepared. So we don't want to be in a place again where we're scrambling to find respirators. We want to make sure that we have things in stock. So, you know, good advice, use it or do with those stockpiled respirators, what you, as your company feels is going to be the best use for them. And if that is a donation grade, if that's moving them to a different industry, fine, too. If that is holding on to them just in case, that's not a bad idea either. So, Steve, why don't we try? So we learned a lot today in a very short time. And I think most of it is kind of clearing up some of those three letter abbreviations like EUA and FRR and even some larger abbreviations like NIOSH or CDC. So why don't we take that sentence those two sentences we had in the intro and let's try to add the actual words that come up and see if it makes any more sense to us. So here we go. Early [00:34:00] on in the sars-cov-2 or Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus two pandemic the Food and Drug Administration as a Department of the Department of Health and Human Services created the filtering face piece respirator emergency use authorization for health care providers. They did this in conjunction with the National Institute for Occupational safety and Health, or NIOSH and the Centers for Disease Control, or CDC, to help combat the spread of covid-19. Now, due to the increase in availability of the NIOSH approved n-95 filtering face piece respirators, the Food and Drug Administration has revoked the filtering face piece respirator emergency use authorization for health care providers. Makes a little more sense. Still a mouthful to say, but there seems to make more sense to that. So I [00:35:00] guess at the end here, Steve, as you were going through the emergency use authorization, the process and how they were revoked, is there anything else that you want to add to that or maybe something that you found really interesting as you were going through that? Steve Badger: [00:35:17] Yeah, you know, I would say that I probably one of them the most interesting things that I found going through this was, you know, the ability of the government organizations to be able to work together to get to that point where these EUAs were being issued. Because, you know, it wasn't just the FDA. They had to rely on the NIOSH group for their testing and approval. And, you know, and that all, you know, in conjunction with the CDC, the Centers for Disease Control, that they had to all work together to make this work. And I think that that's the part that really drove home to me. The point that, you know, when we're in a crisis and these things happen, that these people can work together, that they can, you [00:36:00] know, do you know the right thing and get these things out to people and in a big hurry. I mean, this was these are not something that typically happens overnight. And in this case, here it did. These were given this temporary approval and this emergency approval. And so they were they were able to help that health care professionals out of a very tough position. Peter Koch: [00:36:26] Yeah, I think that's a really good point. The working across departments at the federal level can be challenging at times. And they definitely collaborated well together and came up with a with good response for a very, very challenging situation for sure. So, Steve, if someone had more questions about the FDA or and or the emergency use authorizations, something happens in the future. They see something over the Internet that there was a new EUA or they want to learn more about these [00:37:00] EUAs in particular, where would they go for more information? Steve Badger: [00:37:05] Certainly the Food and Drug Administration, the FDA has a website that you can go on and, you know, you can look and search for EUAs under that website and it will bring up all of them. And they're, quite frankly, right now there's quite a few of them out there for different types of medical processes and procedures. And also the vaccines, the very vaccines that we're taking to prevent covid fall under these EUAs. So you kind of have to do a little bit of searching through there. And the other place that I would look in regards to the filtering face piece respirators is whether or not the respirator that you've chosen that you have in your hand, is it NIOSH approved or not? Easy enough to go on to the NIOSH website and actually determine that you can do a search and look to see which respirators are really approved? You know, it's not just stamped [00:38:00] on the box from, you know, someplace, you know, out of nowhere that you can actually make sure that that thing is actually what it says that it is so that you're getting that protection factor that you're expecting. Peter Koch: [00:38:12] That's a great point. And to not all, you know, don't always trust the packaging. So if you're looking to purchase n-95 respirators, a  good idea is to double check them against the list there for the NIOSH approved respirators. And you'd find that you said right on the NIOSH site or is that the FDA site, Steve? Steve Badger: [00:38:33] You would find it on the NIOSH site for which respirators are approved and they will be given approval number. And you can determine that, you know, from that list is whether or not that one you have in your hand, if it's NIOSH approved, it's going to have a number associated with it that matches up with that NIOSH site. Peter Koch: [00:38:53] Very good. And most of your reputable distributors are going to be familiar with that and be able to help [00:39:00] you if you're purchasing PPE for your organization, whether your health care or not, they should be able to work with you and then know what's approved and what's not approved. And if you ask them questions, is it on it? What's the number they should be able to give you that. So if you're wanting to double check, you can always ask those questions of your supplier. All right. Very good. Steve, thanks so much for coming on and sharing your expertise with us today. Steve Badger: [00:39:27] You're very welcome, Peter. Thank you for having me. Peter Koch: [00:39:29] Excellent. We'll have to bring you on again and talk some more about respirators. I, I know we've been chatting back and forth about a podcast, around respiratory Protection, and it's a pretty enormous topic. And we've got to kind of whittle it down so we can fit it in within our podcast format here. So we'll have you back on again. And I'm looking forward to speaking with you. Steve Badger: [00:39:50] Thank you. Peter Koch: [00:39:50] Perfect. So thanks again for joining us. And to all of our listeners out there today on the MEMIC Safety Experts podcast, we've been speaking with Steve Badger, safety management [00:40:00] consultant, with a MEMIC about the Food and Drug Administration's revoked emergency use authorizations for filtering face piece respirators. If you have any questions or would like to hear more about a particular topic on our podcast, e-mail me at podcast@MEMIC.com. Also, check out our show notes at MEMIC.com/podcast, where you can find additional resources and our entire podcast archive. Did you know we've had more than 50 episodes so far and we're still going strong and hope to do another 50. And while you're there on the website, sign up for our safety net blog so you never miss any of our articles or safety news updates. And if you haven't done so, I'd appreciate it if you took a minute or two to review us on Stitcher, iTunes or whichever podcast service that you found us on. And if you've already done that, thanks, because it really helps us spread the word. Please consider sharing this show with a business associate friend or family member who you think will get something out of [00:41:00] it. And as always, thank you for the continued support. And until next time, this is Peter Koch reminding you that listening to the MEMIC Safety Experts podcast is good, but using what you learned here is even better.  

WBBM Newsradio's 4:30PM News To Go
Financial adviser gets 3 1/2 years in prison for stealing from clients

WBBM Newsradio's 4:30PM News To Go

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 3:07


Also happening today, state regulators want to find out if ComEd improperly made you pay fine it was ordered to pay for in a bribery-for-favors scandal; a report by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health finds a Chicago Fire Department diver who drowned in 2018 might have survived with the use of technology; and much more. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Relaxing White Noise
Kids Sleep Sound (Tool for Parents) Soothing Ocean Waves White Noise

Relaxing White Noise

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 180:46


Parents, try playing the sound of lapping waves to provide a calming ambience for your child as they fall asleep. The ocean white noise creates sound masking that helps cover up distractions coming from outside the bedroom. Adults enjoy the soothing ocean sounds too, so this is a great relaxation ambience for the whole family. While playing white noise it's important to keep tabs on the volume, because any white noise machine, smartphone, or computer can put out levels that are too loud for your child. It's recommended to play the sound at least a few feet from where your child is sleeping and to keep the volume no louder than the sound of a soft shower. Parents can download an app to turn their smartphone into a sound level meter. One good, free, option is the sound level meter app created by the U.S. National Institutes for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) available on the app store as the NIOSH SLM app. Check out the 10-Hour version on YouTube Contact Us for Partnership Inquiries Water creates a natural white noise. Infused with the relaxing quality of nature and the sound masking traits of white noise, listening to flowing water is an ideal way to block out the world and de-stress. Some of our popular water tracks include the sound of a river, running creek, babbling brook, gentle waves on a lake and a bamboo water fountain. Enjoy these white noise water sounds any time to help you relax! Relaxing White Noise is the number one destination on YouTube for white noise and nature sounds to help you sleep, study or soothe a baby. With more than a billion views across YouTube and other platforms, we are excited to now share our popular ambient tracks on the Relaxing White Noise podcast. People use white noise for sleeping, focus, sound masking or relaxation. We couldn't be happier to help folks live better lives. This podcast has the sound for you whether you use white noise for studying, to soothe a colicky baby, to fall asleep or for simply enjoying a peaceful moment. No need to buy a white noise machine when you can listen to these sounds for free. Cheers to living your best life! DISCLAIMER: Remember that loud sounds can potentially damage your hearing. When playing one of our ambiences, if you cannot have a conversation over the sound without raising your voice, the sound may be too loud for your ears. Please do not place speakers right next to a baby's ears. If you have difficulty hearing or hear ringing in your ears, please immediately discontinue listening to the white noise sounds and consult an audiologist or your physician. The sounds provided by Relaxing White Noise are for entertainment purposes only and are not a treatment for sleep disorders or tinnitus. If you have significant difficulty sleeping on a regular basis, experience fitful/restless sleep, or feel tired during the day, please consult your physician. © Relaxing White Noise LLC, 2017. All rights reserved. Any reproduction or republication of all or part of this text/visual/audio is prohibited. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/relaxingwhitenoise/support

Embracing Differences
Women in Occupational Safety and Health: Identifying and Removing Barriers

Embracing Differences

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 57:31


With Pam Walaski. Despite a decades-long increase in the participation of women in the general workforce, women in the occupational safety and health (OSH) field lags behind. In addition, women in overall leadership roles and in the OSH profession remain stagnant. Further, this lack of diversity extends to other under-represented groups. Many organizations profess to want to change, but barriers remain. This podcast will explore some reasons for the stagnation, how it can be changed and what the future looks like for women and other groups in OSH and OSH leadership?

Ogletree Deakins Podcasts
Dirty Steel-Toe Boots, Episode #2: Who Is OSHA?

Ogletree Deakins Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 26:02


Welcome to Dirty Steel-Toe Boots, a podcast for employers about OSHA enforcement. In this episode, Phillip Russell and Eric Hobbs discuss the structure of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the agency's new leadership, including in Washington, D.C., and the regional and area offices. The speakers emphasize the importance of building relationships with OSHA leadership and area offices and address the impact of the Biden administration's new enforcement priorities.

Safety Consultant with Sheldon Primus

In this episode, Sheldon goes over the International outreach from OSHA called Safe and Sound week. It is international because some participants will be outside of OSHA's jurisdiction. Sheldon gives a walk through the OSHA site through the eyes of a consultant or safety officer.

All Things Chemical
Occupational Exposure Limits for Nanomaterials — A Conversation with Carla Hutton

All Things Chemical

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 26:55


This week I sat down with Carla N. Hutton, Regulatory Analyst at B&C. Carla is also co-editor of the Nano Blog that B&C has prepared for years. Carla is uniquely well suited to discuss a report the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recently issued on developing occupational exposure limits or “bands” for engineered nanomaterials. There are thousands of chemicals in use in the workplace, but far fewer government-issued, authoritative, peer-reviewed occupational exposure limits for workplace chemicals. The recent NIOSH report discusses an approach to evaluate scientific information to derive occupational exposure limits or bands for engineered nanomaterials. ALL MATERIALS IN THIS PODCAST ARE PROVIDED SOLELY FOR INFORMATIONAL  AND ENTERTAINMENT PURPOSES. THE MATERIALS ARE NOT INTENDED TO CONSTITUTE LEGAL ADVICE OR THE PROVISION OF LEGAL SERVICES. ALL LEGAL QUESTIONS SHOULD BE ANSWERED DIRECTLY BY A LICENSED ATTORNEY PRACTICING IN THE APPLICABLE AREA OF LAW. ©2021 Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.  All Rights Reserved

Relaxing White Noise
Baby White Noise Sleep Sound | Soothe a Crying, Colicky Infant

Relaxing White Noise

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 180:46


For parents, this baby white noise can be an effective tool to quickly calm a crying, colicky infant. When a baby is fussy, suffering from colic or not sleeping well, play this soothing white noise and watch them quickly settle down. Bring peace to your infant and to your household with this relaxing baby sleep sound. White noise resembles sounds the baby heard in the womb, which has a calming effect. It also masks other distracting noises so that your baby can fall asleep and remain sleeping. While playing white noise for babies, it's important to keep tabs on the volume, because any white noise machine, smartphone, or computer can put out levels that are too loud for your child. It's recommended to play the sound at least a few feet from where your infant is sleeping and to keep the volume no louder than the sound of a soft shower. Parents can download an app to turn their smartphone into a sound level meter. One good, free, option is the sound level meter app created by the U.S. National Institutes for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) available on the app store as the NIOSH SLM app. Soothe your crying baby and enjoy a moment of calm! Check out the 10-Hour version on YouTube Contact Us for Partnership Inquiries Relaxing White Noise is the number one destination on YouTube for white noise and nature sounds to help you sleep, study or soothe a baby. With more than a billion views across YouTube and other platforms, we are excited to now share our popular ambient tracks on the Relaxing White Noise podcast. People use white noise for sleeping, focus, sound masking or relaxation. We couldn't be happier to help folks live better lives. This podcast has the sound for you whether you use white noise for studying, to soothe a colicky baby, to fall asleep or for simply enjoying a peaceful moment. No need to buy a white noise machine when you can listen to these sounds for free. Cheers to living your best life! DISCLAIMER: Remember that loud sounds can potentially damage your hearing. When playing one of our ambiences, if you cannot have a conversation over the sound without raising your voice, the sound may be too loud for your ears. Please do not place speakers right next to a baby's ears. If you have difficulty hearing or hear ringing in your ears, please immediately discontinue listening to the white noise sounds and consult an audiologist or your physician. The sounds provided by Relaxing White Noise are for entertainment purposes only and are not a treatment for sleep disorders or tinnitus. If you have significant difficulty sleeping on a regular basis, experience fitful/restless sleep, or feel tired during the day, please consult your physician. © Relaxing White Noise LLC, 2018. All rights reserved. Any reproduction or republication of all or part of this text/visual/audio is prohibited. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/relaxingwhitenoise/support

Ogletree Deakins Podcasts
Dirty Steel-Toe Boots: A Podcast for Employers about OSHA Enforcement—#1, Podcast Launch and 4 Starter Tips

Ogletree Deakins Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 22:41


In the inaugural edition of our Dirty Steel-Toe Boots podcast series, Phillip Russell explains what listeners can expect from this workplace safety and health podcast. The speaker also provides an update on developments at the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and four considerations for employers in light of OSHA's increased enforcement efforts.

The Interesting Health & Safety Podcast
Two Years Just Passed Me By

The Interesting Health & Safety Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 12:10


Colin is in a reflective mood today, as he marks the two year anniversary of the Interesting Health And Safety podcast - the insights gained, the connections made, and the success enjoyed by the show. KEY TAKEAWAYS A podcast, or any endeavour like it, is nothing without its audience, and no audience has been more helpful or inspiring than the Interesting Health And Safety's audience. Little matters more than the connections you make. Two years ago, Colin and the show were small, but grew. Now the reach is huge, and the safety message is being heard by many more people than he could possibly have imagined. BEST MOMENTS 'I'd like to thank the people who've joined the show' 'We are nearing 100,000 downloads!' 'This is a legacy that is going to run and run and run' VALUABLE RESOURCES The Interesting Health & Safety Podcast - https://podcasts.apple.com/vn/podcast/the-interesting-health-safety-podcast/id1467771449       ABOUT THE HOST Colin Nottage ‘Making health and safety as important as everything else we do.' This is the belief that Colin is passionate about and through his consultancy Influential Management Group (IMG) is able to spread into industry. Colin works at a strategic level with company owners and board members. He helps business leaders establish and achieve their health and safety ambitions. He has developed a number of leading competency improvement programmes that are delivered across industry and his strengths are his ability to take a practical approach to problem-solving and being able to liaise at all levels within an organisation. Colin also runs a company that vets contractors online and a network that develops and support H&S consultancies to become better businesses. Colin chairs the Construction Dust Partnership, an industry collaboration directly involving many organisations, including the Health and Safety Executive. He is a Post Graduate Tutor at Strathclyde University and a highly sought-after health and safety speaker and trainer. He has a Post Graduate Certificate in Safety and Risk management, an engineering degree and is a Chartered Member of the Institution of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH). See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Relaxing White Noise
Sleep Sounds Dishwasher White Noise

Relaxing White Noise

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 180:46


In the quiet moments after everyone has gone to bed, the dishwasher hums along, creating a soothing white noise sound. Babies in particular may sleep well to this white noise as the rinse cycle is reminiscent of womb sounds. For babies, white noise creates a peaceful environment that mimics the sounds of the womb and reduces their stress. It helps them cry less while lulling them to sleep. The relaxing ambience created by the white noise sound also blocks out distracting noises so that one's peace is not disturbed while trying to fall asleep or during sleep itself. And, with your child peacefully sleeping, the sound will help YOU get some rest. It's a handy tool for any new mother or father. While playing white noise for babies, it's important to keep tabs on the volume, because any white noise machine, smartphone, or computer can put out levels that are too loud for your child. It's recommended to play the sound at least a few feet from where your infant is sleeping and to keep the volume no louder than the sound of a soft shower. Parents can download an app to turn their smartphone into a sound level meter. One good, free, option is the sound level meter app created by the U.S. National Institutes for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) available on the app store as the NIOSH SLM app. Soothe your crying baby and enjoy a moment of calm! Check out the 10-Hour version on YouTube Contact Us for Partnership Inquiries Relaxing White Noise is the number one destination on YouTube for white noise and nature sounds to help you sleep, study or soothe a baby. With more than a billion views across YouTube and other platforms, we are excited to now share our popular ambient tracks on the Relaxing White Noise podcast. People use white noise for sleeping, focus, sound masking or relaxation. We couldn't be happier to help folks live better lives. This podcast has the sound for you whether you use white noise for studying, to soothe a colicky baby, to fall asleep or for simply enjoying a peaceful moment. No need to buy a white noise machine when you can listen to these sounds for free. Cheers to living your best life! DISCLAIMER: Remember that loud sounds can potentially damage your hearing. When playing one of our ambiences, if you cannot have a conversation over the sound without raising your voice, the sound may be too loud for your ears. Please do not place speakers right next to a baby's ears. If you have difficulty hearing or hear ringing in your ears, please immediately discontinue listening to the white noise sounds and consult an audiologist or your physician. The sounds provided by Relaxing White Noise are for entertainment purposes only and are not a treatment for sleep disorders or tinnitus. If you have significant difficulty sleeping on a regular basis, experience fitful/restless sleep, or feel tired during the day, please consult your physician. © Relaxing White Noise LLC, 2018. All rights reserved. Any reproduction or republication of all or part of this text/visual/audio is prohibited. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/relaxingwhitenoise/support

The Interesting Health & Safety Podcast
The Guiding Principles Of Safety - with Kessie Stevens

The Interesting Health & Safety Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2021 51:14


This week, Colin is joined by international guest, Kessie Stevens, founder of Artis Solutions in Alberta, Canada, who discusses her journey through the world of safety in the workplace, why a more flexible approach is the future, and why awards do not necessarily reflect the real face of an organisation. KEY TAKEAWAYS Learning about safety is an ongoing pursuit. It begins with a spark of interest that grows and develops, driving us to want to know more and do better. In the new world of work, it's important to provide our people with a more flexible environment. We have spent so long in shaping a new way of working, it's unfair to expect that the world can simply go back to the less efficient methods it used to employ. Companies seem to want to be the best through awards and certification. But often, these forms of recognition do not tally with the actual way they operate and do not reflect the inner culture. BEST MOMENTS 'It's so important to have that flexibility' 'People are scrambling to find good safety people' 'Good health and safety is just good business' VALUABLE RESOURCES The Interesting Health & Safety Podcast - https://podcasts.apple.com/vn/podcast/the-interesting-health-safety-podcast/id1467771449       Kessie Stevens Twitter - https://twitter.com/kessiestevens?lang=en-gb Artis Solutions - https://artissolutions.ca/our-team/ ABOUT THE HOST Colin Nottage ‘Making health and safety as important as everything else we do.' This is the belief that Colin is passionate about and through his consultancy Influential Management Group (IMG) is able to spread into industry. Colin works at a strategic level with company owners and board members. He helps business leaders establish and achieve their health and safety ambitions. He has developed a number of leading competency improvement programmes that are delivered across industry and his strengths are his ability to take a practical approach to problem-solving and being able to liaise at all levels within an organisation. Colin also runs a company that vets contractors online and a network that develops and support H&S consultancies to become better businesses. Colin chairs the Construction Dust Partnership, an industry collaboration directly involving many organisations, including the Health and Safety Executive. He is a Post Graduate Tutor at Strathclyde University and a highly sought-after health and safety speaker and trainer. He has a Post Graduate Certificate in Safety and Risk management, an engineering degree and is a Chartered Member of the Institution of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH). See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

All Things Chemical
An explosive conversation about GHS and combustible dust — with Karin Baron

All Things Chemical

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 34:14


This week I sat down with Karin F. Baron, Senior Regulatory Consultant at B&C and our consulting affiliate, The Acta Group. We tackle the daunting topic of combustible dust, a common workplace hazard that is more pervasive perhaps than people think. Combustible dust poses an explosion hazard in a wide variety of industries, including food, plastic, wood, and textiles, among many others. Karin helps us understand what combustible dust includes and then walks us through the somewhat complicated governance frameworks that have emerged among the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), private standard-setting organizations, and the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS). The space is crowded and remarkably unclear, especially given the severity of the incidents that have occurred over the years. ALL MATERIALS IN THIS PODCAST ARE PROVIDED SOLELY FOR INFORMATIONAL  AND ENTERTAINMENT PURPOSES. THE MATERIALS ARE NOT INTENDED TO CONSTITUTE LEGAL ADVICE OR THE PROVISION OF LEGAL SERVICES. ALL LEGAL QUESTIONS SHOULD BE ANSWERED DIRECTLY BY A LICENSED ATTORNEY PRACTICING IN THE APPLICABLE AREA OF LAW. ©2021 Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.  All Rights Reserved

Relaxing White Noise
Baby White Noise Fan Sleep Sound | Soothe Colicky, Crying Infant

Relaxing White Noise

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 180:46


Play this gentle fan sound to calm a crying baby. The white noise helps soothe a colicky infant, allowing them to fall asleep and stay sleeping. Millions of parents have used our baby sleep sounds with their fussy newborns. White noise is recommended by pediatricians including Dr. Harvey Karp, author of The Happiest Baby On The Block. The relaxing fan sound blocks out extraneous noise and simulates being in the womb. Not only does it soothe a baby - adults also relax to the calming sound. Your whole family will sleep better by playing this white noise track. While playing white noise for babies, it's important to keep tabs on the volume, because any white noise machine, smartphone, or computer can put out levels that are too loud for your child. It's recommended to play the sound at least a few feet from where your infant is sleeping and to keep the volume no louder than the sound of a soft shower. Parents can download an app to turn their smartphone into a sound level meter. One good, free, option is the sound level meter app created by the U.S. National Institutes for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) available on the app store as the NIOSH SLM app. Soothe your crying baby and enjoy a moment of calm! Check out the 10-Hour version on YouTube Contact Us for Partnership Inquiries Relaxing White Noise is the number one destination on YouTube for white noise and nature sounds to help you sleep, study or soothe a baby. With more than a billion views across YouTube and other platforms, we are excited to now share our popular ambient tracks on the Relaxing White Noise podcast. People use white noise for sleeping, focus, sound masking or relaxation. We couldn't be happier to help folks live better lives. This podcast has the sound for you whether you use white noise for studying, to soothe a colicky baby, to fall asleep or for simply enjoying a peaceful moment. No need to buy a white noise machine when you can listen to these sounds for free. Cheers to living your best life! DISCLAIMER: Remember that loud sounds can potentially damage your hearing. When playing one of our ambiences, if you cannot have a conversation over the sound without raising your voice, the sound may be too loud for your ears. Please do not place speakers right next to a baby's ears. If you have difficulty hearing or hear ringing in your ears, please immediately discontinue listening to the white noise sounds and consult an audiologist or your physician. The sounds provided by Relaxing White Noise are for entertainment purposes only and are not a treatment for sleep disorders or tinnitus. If you have significant difficulty sleeping on a regular basis, experience fitful/restless sleep, or feel tired during the day, please consult your physician. © Relaxing White Noise LLC, 2017. All rights reserved. Any reproduction or republication of all or part of this text/visual/audio is prohibited. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/relaxingwhitenoise/support

Gooder
Jenna Arkin - Soap Science and the Chemistry of Green Cleaning

Gooder

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 36:28


“You can get a real clean without bringing in toxic cleaning products to your home.” – Jenna Arkin This week on the Gooder Podcast, I had the pleasure of talking with Jenna Arkin, the Vice President of Innovation at ECOS®. We discuss all things ECOS: the natural cleaning trends, innovation, leadership, and science. We also learn about some myths behind bleaching when it comes to cleaning and creating a healthy living environment. Along the way, we get to hear the amazing story of a dedicated and creative leader who continuously spreads the awareness of environmental protection and chemical safety legislation. In this episode we learn: - The history, the story of ECOS and what differentiates ECOS from other competitors in the cleaning category - Jenna's path in her career and her journey to ECOS - About green cleaning product innovation and it's evolution - How the pandemic impacted the disinfecting, cleaning products industry and customers' increasing adoption of green products - Lessons that Jenna has learned professionally and personally during the pandemic and opportunities that came along with it - Trends in the green products industry and the potential of this industry in the next 5 years About Jenna Arkin: Jenna Arkin is Vice President of Innovation at ECOS®, the maker of environmentally friendly cleaning products. Jenna uses her unique background in both chemistry and design to innovate safer, more effective formulations and compelling packaging designs for the ECOS®, Baby ECOS®, ECOS® Pets, and ECOS® Pro product lines. Jenna leads the ECOS® partnership with the U.S. EPA's Safer Choice program, a third-party certification that helps consumers choose products made with safer chemical ingredients without sacrificing quality or performance. She also directs the company's educational outreach program, including ECOScience, in which she partners with local museums to bring hands-on green science education to thousands of elementary school children each year. Jenna brings a novel combination of passionate scientist and creative professional to solve modern green chemistry problems. Her sharp eye for trends has inspired out-of-the-box thinking, connecting seemingly disparate concepts to move the cleaning industry toward a more sustainable future. Jenna joined ECOS® in 2010 as the Northwest Division's senior chemist, overseeing both R&D and quality control. She most recently served as Director of Product Development at ECOS®. She earned a Bachelor of Arts in Integrative Biology from the University of California, Berkeley, and she earned a graduate degree in Fashion Design from the Fashion Institute of Design and Technology. Before joining ECOS®, she designed and directed a contemporary fashion line. Jenna holds six U.S. patents for innovations in green chemistry and packaging design. She received the GenNext Award by Progressive Grocer in 2018 for industry standouts under the age of 40. Jenna is a member of the American Chemical Society and has served as an advocate for ingredient transparency and toxic substance reform with the American Sustainable Business Council. She actively supports environmental protection and chemical safety legislation at both the state and federal levels. Guests Social Media Links: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jenna-arkin-30202514/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lifeaccordingtojenna/?hl=en  Website: https://www.ecos.com/  Show Resources: National Public Radio, NPR, full name National Public Radio, is a privately and publicly funded non-profit membership media organization that serves as a national syndicator to 797 public radio stations in the United States of America. The University of California, Berkeley is a public land-grant research university in Berkeley, California. Established in 1868 as the University of California, it is the state's first land-grant university and the first campus of the University of California system. Biochemistry or biological chemistry, is the study of chemical processes within and relating to living organisms. A sub-discipline of both chemistry and biology, biochemistry may be divided into three fields: structural biology, enzymology and metabolism.  The Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising is a private for-profit college with multiple campuses in California. It offers degree programs in a majors including fashion, entertainment, beauty, interior design, and graphic design. Green brands are those brands that consumers associate with  environmental conservation and sustainable business practices. Such brands appeal to consumers who are becoming more aware of the need to protect the environment. A green brand can add a unique selling point to a product and can boost corporate image. Family owned and operated since 1967, Earth Friendly Products® is the maker of ECOS™ Laundry Detergent and over 200 other environmentally friendly products that are safer for people, pets and the planet. Made with plant-powered ingredients, ECOS™ cleaners are thoughtfully sourced, pH balanced, readily biodegradable, easily recyclable, and never tested on animals. The LA Derby Dolls is Los Angeles' original women's quad-skate banked track roller derby league. It was founded in October 2003 by Rebecca Ninburg and Wendy Templeton. The league is composed of more than 120 women divided into five teams who skate on a banked track. The Environmental Protection Agency is an independent executive agency of the United States federal government tasked with environmental protection matters. President Richard Nixon proposed the establishment of EPA on July 9, 1970; it began operation on December 2, 1970, after Nixon signed an executive order. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration is a large regulatory agency of the United States Department of Labor that originally had federal visitorial powers to inspect and examine workplaces. Adam Ruins Everything is an American educational comedy television series starring Adam Conover that debuted on September 29, 2015, with a 12-episode. The United States Food and Drug Administration is a federal agency of the Department of Health and Human Services. Episode Sponsor - Retail Voodoo: A creative marketing firm specializing in growing, fixing and reinventing brands in the food, beverage, wellness and fitness industry. If your natural brand is in need of positioning, package design or marketing activation, we're here to help. You can find more information at www.retail-voodoo.com

The Oncology Nursing Podcast
Episode 164: Administer Ifosfamide Infusions With Confidence

The Oncology Nursing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 29:51


ONS member Rebekah Flynn, DNP, APRN, AGCNS-BC, AOCNS®, CNE, OCN®, associate director of quality improvement and education at the Washington University Siteman Cancer Center in St. Louis, MO, and board president of the St. Louis ONS Chapter, joins Stephanie Jardine, BSN, RN, oncology clinical specialist at ONS, to discuss how to safely administer ifosfamide chemotherapy infusions. This episode is part of an ongoing series about outpatient oncology drug infusion. The others are linked in the episode notes. Music Credit: "Fireflies and Stardust" by Kevin MacLeod Licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 3.0 Earn 0.5 contact hours of nursing continuing professional development (NCPD) by listening to the full recording and completing an evaluation at myoutcomes.ons.org by July 16, 2023. The planners and faculty for this episode have no relevant financial relationships with ineligible companies to disclose. ONS is accredited as a provider of NCPD by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. Episode Notes Check out these resources from today's episode: Complete this evaluation for free NCPD. Previous Oncology Nursing Podcast episodes on outpatient oncology drug infusion ONS Voice article: Nurses Advocate for Palliative Care, Drug Parity by Sharing Patient Experiences ONS Voice article: Manage Cancer Treatment-Related Skin Toxicities With ONS Guidelines™ ONS Voice article: Infection Prevention for Oncology Nurses ONS book: Chemotherapy and Immunotherapy Guidelines and Recommendations for Practice ONS Communities thread on ifosfamide toxicity ONS course: Fundamentals of Chemotherapy Immunotherapy Administration ONS course: Safe Handling Basics ONS/ONCC Chemotherapy Immunotherapy Certificate Course American Cancer Society information on approved and off-label indications for ifosfamide Chemocare information on ifosfamide Ifosfamide package insert National Comprehensive Cancer Network chemotherapy order templates National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health: Hazardous Drugs in Healthcare Settings To discuss the information in this episode with other oncology nurses, visit the ONS Communities. To provide feedback or otherwise reach ONS about the podcast, email pubONSVoice@ons.org.

Ag State of Mind with Jason Medows
ASOM - Ep 94 - Shelbie Powell/Brittney Schrick - Southwest Ag Center

Ag State of Mind with Jason Medows

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2021


Today I speak with Shelbie Powell and Brittney Schrick about the Southwest Ag Center. The Southwest Center for Agricultural Health, Injury Prevention and Education (Southwest Ag Center or SW Ag Center) was created in late 1995 at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler to serve Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas as part of a program initiative of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The initiative established a network of centers, funded on a competitive basis, to conduct programs of research, prevention, intervention, education and outreach designed to reduce occupational injuries and diseases among agricultural workers and their families. We talk today about how mental health is being worked in to these initiatives on health and safety. To find more about SWAG Center go to https://www.uthct.edu/southwest-center-for-agricultural-health-injury-prevention-and-education-2/

Ag State of Mind with Jason Medows
ASOM - Ep 94 - Shelbie Powell/Brittney Schrick - Southwest Ag Center

Ag State of Mind with Jason Medows

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2021


Today I speak with Shelbie Powell and Brittney Schrick about the Southwest Ag Center. The Southwest Center for Agricultural Health, Injury Prevention and Education (Southwest Ag Center or SW Ag Center) was created in late 1995 at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler to serve Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas as part of a program initiative of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The initiative established a network of centers, funded on a competitive basis, to conduct programs of research, prevention, intervention, education and outreach designed to reduce occupational injuries and diseases among agricultural workers and their families. We talk today about how mental health is being worked in to these initiatives on health and safety. To find more about SWAG Center go to https://www.uthct.edu/southwest-center-for-agricultural-health-injury-prevention-and-education-2/

Relaxing White Noise
Happy Baby White Noise | Colicky, Crying Baby Calms Down Fast! | Infant Sleep Sound

Relaxing White Noise

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2021 180:46


Happy babies love white noise, because it can help them calm down fast. When a baby is fussy, crying, suffering from colic or not sleeping well, play this soothing white noise and watch them quickly settle down. Bring peace to your infant and to your household with this relaxing baby sleep sound. Baby white noise is an effective way to soothe a crying infant and lull your newborn to sleep. White noise resembles sounds the baby heard in the womb, which has a calming effect. It also masks other distracting noises so that your baby can fall asleep and remain sleeping. While playing white noise for babies, it's important to keep tabs on the volume, because any white noise machine, smartphone, or computer can put out levels that are too loud for your child. It's recommended to play the sound at least a few feet from where your infant is sleeping and to keep the volume no louder than the sound of a soft shower. Parents can download an app to turn their smartphone into a sound level meter. One good, free, option is the sound level meter app created by the U.S. National Institutes for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) available on the app store as the NIOSH SLM app. Soothe your crying baby and enjoy a moment of calm! Check out the 10-Hour version on YouTube Contact Us for Partnership Inquiries Relaxing White Noise is the number one destination on YouTube for white noise and nature sounds to help you sleep, study or soothe a baby. With more than a billion views across YouTube and other platforms, we are excited to now share our popular ambient tracks on the Relaxing White Noise podcast. People use white noise for sleeping, focus, sound masking or relaxation. We couldn't be happier to help folks live better lives. This podcast has the sound for you whether you use white noise for studying, to soothe a colicky baby, to fall asleep or for simply enjoying a peaceful moment. No need to buy a white noise machine when you can listen to these sounds for free. Cheers to living your best life! DISCLAIMER: Remember that loud sounds can potentially damage your hearing. When playing one of our ambiences, if you cannot have a conversation over the sound without raising your voice, the sound may be too loud for your ears. Please do not place speakers right next to a baby's ears. If you have difficulty hearing or hear ringing in your ears, please immediately discontinue listening to the white noise sounds and consult an audiologist or your physician. The sounds provided by Relaxing White Noise are for entertainment purposes only and are not a treatment for sleep disorders or tinnitus. If you have significant difficulty sleeping on a regular basis, experience fitful/restless sleep, or feel tired during the day, please consult your physician. © Relaxing White Noise LLC, 2017. All rights reserved. Any reproduction or republication of all or part of this text/visual/audio is prohibited. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/relaxingwhitenoise/support

Marketplace All-in-One
The new, limited OSHA rules for workplace safety

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2021 8:11


More than a year into the pandemic, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration has released emergency standards for the workplace, but they’re only for health care workers. Also, ahead of the G-7 summit, there were reports that President Joe Biden was going to raise concerns about tensions in Northern Ireland in his talks with U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson yesterday. Johnson, speaking with the BBC, said that did not happen. And, new guidelines this week call for banks to take extra care in case cryptocurrency investments go bad.