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  • Jan 14, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about Kaiser Permanente

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Latest podcast episodes about Kaiser Permanente

Dying to Ask
5 Ways To Fight Pandemic Brain With Dr. Hillary Van Horn-Gatlin

Dying to Ask

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 68:55


Feel like you're losing your mind? So do I. It's time to do something about a new phenomenon called pandemic brain. "Pandemic brain" isn't an official disorder. But it's a real thing, according to Dr. Hillary Van Horn-Gatlin, a Kaiser Permanente psychologist. Her office is filled with patients complaining of feeling foggy ever since the pandemic started and their work and home lives were turned upside down. An article in Glamour Magazine went viral with the headline "Pandemic Brain is Real- And it Explains Why You Can't Focus." The article predicted relief was right around the corner as vaccines were about to end the pandemic. That article was published in March of 2021 and you know what happened, or didn't happen, next. Bottom line, pandemic brain is worse. Van Horn-Gatlin said, "You know I can't tell you the number of patients I've talked to you recently that will say I will forget what I'm talking about in mid-sentence and I don't even know what I'm doing. We're seeing those behaviors and issues related to the pandemic." Harvard medical researchers are studying the impact the pandemic is having on our brains as we reach its two-year mark. It's not good. They're noticing a neural inflammation caused by stress that's likely leading to what we're calling pandemic brain. The bad news? The pandemic isn't ending soon. The good news? Van Horn-Gatlin said there are five things we can do right now that could lead to a sense of relief (however small) in as soon as a week. On this Dying to Ask: The science behind why you can't focus 5 things you can try to regain mental clarity And KCRA 3 anchor Edie Lambert joins me to talk about our shared experience of pandemic brain and what we're doing about it

The Art of Masculinity
Episode 247: Finding Emotions with Dr. John Schinnerer

The Art of Masculinity

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 57:40


On this episode, we talked about: Looking at emotions and how to deal with them Acknowledging emotions instead of hiding them Externalizing blame on others What's underneath the anger? Overfocusing on negative thoughts Interrupting the anger cycle Universal anger triggers Understanding that we are imperfect Rising in the energetic output of anger Playing around with embarrassment You can't outthink your way from emotions Denying and suppress Getting better at emotional awareness Learning how to be better in all aspects of life Men box culture Serving your needs and those around you Knowing your tools in every situation "Where is the room in this idea of success for things like happiness, or relaxation or contentment?" "One of the major things that we need to work on its self awareness and then you can work on greater self-acceptance" "Our anger, it's our business. My anger it's my business, my problem, it's nobody else's problem, I have to figure it out on my own"   About Dr. John: Dr. John Schinnerer coaches clients to perform at their peak from the boardroom to the bedroom.  Dr. John graduated from U.C.  Berkeley with a Ph.D. in educational psychology.  Dr. John was one of three experts to consult with Pixar on the Academy Award-winning movie, Inside Out. He has spoken to organizations such as Stanford Medical School, U.C. Berkeley, Kaiser Permanente, Sutter Health, Yahoo, AT&T, and the Gap. He has been featured in national media such as U.S. News and World Report, Readers Digest, and SELF Magazine. He is a nationally recognized speaker and an award-winning author. He has been on stage or on air with Lt. Governor John Garamendi, Olympic medalist Paul Kingsman, Dr. Daniel Amen, Dan Millman, Dr. Fred Luskin from Stanford, and Dr. Jonathan Haidt from the University of Virginia. He has impacted individuals at companies such as Okta, Twilio, Indeed, AskJeeves, Visa, Cisco, Starbucks, Yahoo, FedEx, Stanford, Cal, UPS, Schreiber Foods, Kaiser Permanente, and Sutter Health. He was featured in a documentary entitled, Skewed, by Paola Bossola, on the effects of violence in the media. He wrote the award-winning book, “How Can I Be Happy?” His areas of expertise range from high performance, to stress management, to positive psychology, to anger management, to creating happy, thriving relationships.  Over 10,000 people have taken his online anger management course. He recently recorded micro-courses on anger management and forgiveness for Simple Habit; they have been listened to over 60,000 times in the first 4 months. Dr. John hosts a podcast to help men evolve towards greater success, happiness, and connection, The Evolved Caveman. Visit GuideToSelf.com to learn more about Dr. John. Or follow on Instagram at TheEvolvedCaveman.    You can follow and support Dr. John at:  IG: @theevolvedcaveman Web: https://theevolvedcaveman.com/ Podcast: The Evolved Caveman   Let's connect over on Instagram: @Johnny.Elsasser

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy

How to Understand and Treat Psychosis: An interview with Maggie Mullen, LCSW Curt and Katie interview Maggie Mullen, LCSW, a national trainer on culturally responsive, evidence-based care for psychotic spectrum disorders. We talk with Maggie about her anti-racist and disability justice framework of psychosis, understanding psychosis on a spectrum, what to do when psychosis enters the treatment picture, assessment of psychosis, and treatment using Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT). We also talk about how society defines “normal” and pathology, exploring cultural differences in these definitions. Interview with Maggie Mullen, LCSW Maggie Mullen, LCSW (they/them) is a clinical social worker, national trainer, community activist, and author of The Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills Workbook for Psychosis. Maggie specializes in culturally responsive, evidence-based care for psychotic spectrum disorders, trauma and PTSD, the LBGTQ+ community, and formerly incarcerated people. As a training director at Kaiser Permanente, they take great pride in mentoring, training, and supervising the next generation of social workers. You can find them online at www.maggiemullen.com In this podcast episode we talk about looking at psychosis differently We started the conversation on psychosis when we were looking at conspiracy theories. We know that folks who believe in conspiracy theories and those who have a diagnosis of psychosis are different, but knew that we needed a deeper dive into how to understand and treat psychosis. We dig deeply into this conversation in this week's podcast episode: Maggie Mullen's anti-racist and disability justice framework of psychosis “People with psychosis [are] being overly institutionalized… over medicated or highly focused on medication as the sole treatment. And particularly for our… black, indigenous, and folks of color experiencing psychosis, and people who are being shot and killed by police… when they're out responding to their symptoms in a public way, or being incarcerated and not receiving treatment.” Maggie came from a community organizing background Inequity and lack of resources for people who experience chronic psychosis The focus on medication rather than other forms of treatment for psychosis BIPOC individuals being shot by police when psychosis shows up in a public space “Psychotic spectrum” versus the segregation of psychosis as “other” “We are often the least prepared to deal with our most acute clients” The continued segregation of psychotic disorders Cultural considerations when determining what is psychosis or other types of experiences The lack of inclusion of psychosis in the research Psychosis is not “other” but is actually a spectrum of behaviors and are very common The symptoms of psychosis are not constant, they fluctuate for every individual The importance of following the model and voices of the disability justice movement Including education on the treatment for psychosis, rather than allowing therapists to opt out Folks with psychosis are often not included in the research, which needs to change What to do when psychosis comes into the treatment picture for our clients “The reality is there are wonderful outcomes, I think, for people with psychosis, when we look at it from a different perspective. Which is to say – what if some of the work might be on changing your symptoms themselves? But what if part of the work is actually on accepting your experiences so that you can just experience less stress with them?” We need more training on psychosis to feel confident Normalizing the experience of psychosis Helping to make peace with psychotic symptoms (i.e., making friends with the voices) to decrease distress Looking at treatments beyond medication How to identify psychosis and assess for impact and impairment The myth that all elements of psychosis are distressing and bad Why Maggie Mullen is using Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) to treat psychosis “People with psychosis deal with emotion dysregulation, actually more so than the average person…that's where we know DBT is really effective” We frequently underestimate the ability to help folks with psychosis Using DBT skills for emotion regulation concerns that frequently come up in psychosis Psychosis and PTSD oftentimes occur together and aren't always diagnosed Trauma can influence the onset of psychosis AND psychosis can be traumatic Maggie's pilot program with DBT for psychosis The concrete and straight forward nature of DBT skills make them very accessible Understanding psychosis differently, including the cultural differences of what is “normal” How to identify what is “real” and what is psychosis How do you define what is normal for someone? What do we decide what we pathologize? Breaking up the binary of normal or not normal – reframing as “experience” The importance of understanding what is negatively impacting the client and how to keep clients safe Take the lead of your client and trust that they know themselves best The tension between taking the lead of the client and mandates and requirements as a therapist The Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills Workbook for Psychosis by Maggie Mullen, LCSW Maggie wrote a book to democratize DBT skills Using DBT, but making the skills more concrete and accessible Our Generous Sponsor for this episode of the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide: Buying Time LLC Buying Time is a full team of Virtual Assistants, with a wide variety of skill sets to support your business. From basic admin support, customer service, and email management to marketing and bookkeeping. They've got you covered. Don't know where to start? Check out the systems inventory checklist which helps business owners figure out what they don't want to do anymore and get those delegated asap. You can find that checklist at http://buyingtimellc.com/systems-checklist/ Buying Time's VA's support businesses by managing email communications, CRM or automation systems, website admin and hosting, email marketing, social media, bookkeeping and much more. Their sole purpose is to create the opportunity for you to focus on supporting those you serve while ensuring that your back office runs smoothly. With a full team of VA's it gives the opportunity to hire for one role and get multiple areas of support. There's no reason to be overwhelmed with running your business with this solution available. Book a consultation to see where and how you can get started getting the support you need - https://buyingtimellc.com/book-consultation/   Resources for Modern Therapists mentioned in this Podcast Episode: We've pulled together resources mentioned in this episode and put together some handy-dandy links. Please note that some of the links below may be affiliate links, so if you purchase after clicking below, we may get a little bit of cash in our pockets. We thank you in advance! Maggie's website Maggie on Instagram The DBT Skills Workbook for Psychosis by Maggie Mullen, LCSW   Relevant Episodes of MTSG Podcast: Conspiracy Theories in Your Office Fixing Mental Healthcare in America: Serious Mental Illness and Homeless Fixing Mental Healthcare in America: Psychiatric Crises in the Emergency Room Fixing Mental Healthcare in America: Peer Support Specialists   Who we are: Curt Widhalm, LMFT Curt Widhalm is in private practice in the Los Angeles area. He is the cofounder of the Therapy Reimagined conference, an Adjunct Professor at Pepperdine University and CSUN, a former Subject Matter Expert for the California Board of Behavioral Sciences, former CFO of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists, and a loving husband and father. He is 1/2 great person, 1/2 provocateur, and 1/2 geek, in that order. He dabbles in the dark art of making "dad jokes" and usually has a half-empty cup of coffee somewhere nearby. Learn more at: www.curtwidhalm.com Katie Vernoy, LMFT Katie Vernoy is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, coach, and consultant supporting leaders, visionaries, executives, and helping professionals to create sustainable careers. Katie, with Curt, has developed workshops and a conference, Therapy Reimagined, to support therapists navigating through the modern challenges of this profession. Katie is also a former President of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists. In her spare time, Katie is secretly siphoning off Curt's youthful energy, so that she can take over the world. Learn more at: www.katievernoy.com A Quick Note: Our opinions are our own. We are only speaking for ourselves – except when we speak for each other, or over each other. We're working on it. Our guests are also only speaking for themselves and have their own opinions. We aren't trying to take their voice, and no one speaks for us either. Mostly because they don't want to, but hey. Stay in Touch with Curt, Katie, and the whole Therapy Reimagined #TherapyMovement: www.mtsgpodcast.com www.therapyreimagined.com https://www.facebook.com/therapyreimagined/ https://twitter.com/therapymovement https://www.instagram.com/therapyreimagined/ Consultation services with Curt Widhalm or Katie Vernoy: The Fifty-Minute Hour Connect with the Modern Therapist Community: Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapists Group   Modern Therapist's Survival Guide Creative Credits: Voice Over by DW McCann https://www.facebook.com/McCannDW/ Music by Crystal Grooms Mangano http://www.crystalmangano.com/   Transcript for this episode of the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide podcast (Autogenerated): Curt Widhalm  00:00 This episode of the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide is sponsored by Buying Time   Katie Vernoy  00:04 Buying Time has a full team of virtual assistants with a wide variety of skill sets to support your business. From basic admin support customer service and email management to marketing and bookkeeping, they've got you covered. Don't know where to start, check out the system's inventory checklist, which helps business owners figure out what they don't want to do anymore and get those delegated ASAP. You can find that checklist at buying time. llc.com forward slash systems stash checklist.   Curt Widhalm  00:31 Listen at the end of the episode for more information.   Announcer  00:34 You're listening to the modern therapist survival guide where therapists live, breed and practice as human beings to support you as a whole person and a therapist. Here are your hosts, Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy.   Curt Widhalm  00:49 Welcome back modern therapist. This is the modern therapist Survival Guide. I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy. And this is the podcast for therapists about all sorts of stuff and just my continued ability or inability to introduce episodes well here but   Katie Vernoy  01:06 yes, yes.   Curt Widhalm  01:07 Recently, we had an episode on conspiracy theories. We very, very briefly talked about the difference between people who are following conspiracy theories and psychosis. We did an almost barely adequate job of talking about it and decided that we needed to follow up with somebody could who could help us talk about psychosis a little bit more deeply. And so we have a guest today, Maggie Mullen LCSW w. And they are a fantastic resource when it comes to working with psychosis and very glad to have them with us here today. So thank you very much, Maggie, for joining us.   Maggie Mullen  01:49 Thanks so much for having me, Curt. And Katie.   Katie Vernoy  01:51 So glad to have you here. Like I told you before we got started, we needed somebody to talk about psychosis saw that you had sent in a little pitch to us. And we're like, oh my gosh, this is perfect. We're so excited. And I can't wait to kind of get to meet you here on the podcast. But let's, let's have everyone meet you and say what we always say to all our guests, who are you? And what are you putting out to the world.   Maggie Mullen  02:12 As Curt mentioned, Maggie Mullen, LCSW I use they them pronouns. And I am an author and trainer. And what I am working right now to put out into the world is an anti racist and disability justice approach to working with people experiencing psychosis that really focuses on centering their experiences and needs. And one of the ways that I'm really going about that right now is by offering DBT informed treatment to people who are struggling with psychotic spectrum disorders like schizophrenia, schizoaffective, disorder, bipolar disorder, etc.   Curt Widhalm  02:43 You get into this work, that a lot of therapists have their own stories that just what's your story as far as getting into working with psychosis, and really having this level of passion for it?   Maggie Mullen  02:59 So I come from a community organizing background, right, a lot of the work that I was doing before grad school was really centered around how do we bring communities together to fight for change. And I chose a path of social work, because I really wanted to have the opportunity to do both that macro kind of bigger level practice, but also help individuals because I was somebody who was able to connect with people pretty well and really enjoyed that part of the work. And as I was in grad school, learning more about mental health and kind of being in that part of the field, the thing I kept seeing over and over again, was the inequity and really lack of resources for people who are experiencing psychosis in a chronic way. And the way that, you know, that kind of shows up and at least at US, US society is, you know, seen people with psychosis being overly institutionalized, you know, really over medicated or highly focused on medication as the sole treatment. And particularly for our, you know, black indigenous and folks of color experiencing psychosis, and people who are being shot and killed by police, right when they're out of responding to their symptoms in a public way, or being incarcerated and not receiving treatment. And for me, that just felt like a call to action to say, I want to get involved in this area that really needs to be expanded. And I think one additional piece is if you look at almost any piece of literature in our field, right? So if you're like nerd like me, you want to go and do research about something. If you look into almost any psychotherapy treatment, you'll see that there's a rule out for participants who experienced psychosis. And that's really widespread across almost all therapies. And I find this odd because the same type of like what we used to call delusional beliefs we now call distressing beliefs or distorted beliefs, those same types of things happen in other diagnoses, right? We see this in eating disorders, right? People who have such distorted beliefs about their bodies to the point that they're willing to, you know, encounter significant health issues in order to engage in certain behaviors, right or even with depression, right, where we have distorted beliefs about your self worth to the point that you're willing to hurt yourself. but we don't exclude people so aggressively from treatment as we do with psychosis. And for me, that's really kind of a question that I kept coming on grad school, like, why this group? Why are we segregating them in this kind of way that's leading to, you know, high rates of suicide, high rates of incarceration, all those things that I mentioned before, that are just poor quality of life issues for these folks.   Curt Widhalm  05:20 So to ask maybe an obvious question here. Why, why what have you found out and asking this big question, what is our system have against psychosis? Is it fear from treatment professionals in the past? I'm sure that you've come up with some at least explanatory answers here.   Maggie Mullen  05:41 Yeah, there's not one right answer, I think is part of this, right. Like, if we went back really far in history, one of the things that we would see is that across cultures, right, there are really different approaches to psychosis, right? We see in a lot of indigenous cultures, the idea that people with psychosis are actually, you know, accessing other states of reality, and that scene is a strength, right? And something that's really valued, right, like people who are medicine are healers. And we don't see that particularly in white society in the US, right, where we're really have kind of more colon colonized mindset. But I think a lot of this comes from fear, right? Just the idea that I don't understand maybe what's happening to this person, they're behaving in a way that's, you know, erratic in my eyes, when it can't really get into their, you know, headspace and understand what they're experiencing. And I think that's part of how our field is responded, because if we look back at Dr. Aaron Beck, right, the creator of CBT, who just passed recently, he was doing trials of CBT, with people with psychosis back in 1950s. And for some reason, and I don't know all the reasons why his research kind of stopped around that point, right, kind of hit a dead end. And then we just kind of started offering these things to people with more like depression, anxiety, etc. I think part of this is just again, that fear that you mentioned, Curt, more than anything, unfortunately,   Katie Vernoy  05:45 when we look at this, there are folks who try to exclude psychosis from their practices, especially private practices. But we can't always exclude it. Right? Like there are times when it comes into our office, we've an established relationship with the client, and we can't always exclude and I'm not saying that we should always exclude it. I think that's part of the problem. But when we don't when we actually start working with psychosis, because it is so... I don't even know what the right word is...kind of fringe, maybe to our profession. I mean, I even think about I know you do DBT for psychosis, I've talked with DBT centers that say if they have psychosis, they shouldn't be doing DBT. I mean, like, there's, there seems like there's not really guidance, when whether you invite or exclude psychosis, when it shows up in your office, it seems like there's there's an opportunity for us to really do it wrong. And so I mean, typically, we asked what a therapist get wrong. So I guess I'm asking that question. But I, I'm trying to sort out kind of even how to get to the correct question, because it seems like part of what we get wrong as we exclude these folks from our practice. But if they show up, I imagine there's stuff that we're really getting wrong in the room and in the treatment planning.   Maggie Mullen  08:18 Yeah, I think part of this is that combination of we need clinicians to have more training across the board and treating psychosis. And again, I think with these newer wave therapies, like CBT, for psychosis, act for psychosis, more DBT skills kind of approach that are really emerging as very strong in the literature and really effective for people. And that are offered, but just not I think, in a very widespread way, again, at least in the US. And so I think part of it is we need clinicians with more training, so they feel more competent. And I think part of where we get things wrong, is that we think of psychosis as like these people over there, right? We kind of again, like you said, kind of put them in like a box segregated in some way. And the way that we really approach psychosis now in a kind of more modern or progressive sense, is that there's really a spectrum of psychosis. Right. On one end of the spectrum, we see people with less distressing less bothersome experiences of psychosis. And that for like, for me, for example, that looks like I'm on call for my work every once in a while, and I My phone has to be on 24/7 because I might be calling the emergency room to do an evaluation. And what will happen to me occasionally is I will think I hear my phone rang, and I will look down and I'll see no miss call, right? And I'll like say to my partner like hey, did you see Did you hear my phone ring? And they're like, No, that's an experience of an auditory hallucination, right. I've just had experience of psychosis. And on the other side of the spectrum, we have more of these distressing chronic life impairing experiences like psychosis that are more common for people who get diagnosed with schizoaffective sorta are psychotic spectrum disorder of some kind. And people who experienced those diagnoses fluctuate on the scale in the same way, right? That they are doing better at certain points, or their symptoms are not as distressing, etc. And part of the reason we frame it in this way now is to normalize the experience of psychosis that at some point, almost all of us will have some experience of psychosis. And I think when we look at it from that perspective, it feels less scary to approach psychosis. And I think also it can instill some hope that I think a lot of therapists don't have when they work with psychosis, right? We feel like, it feels hopeless, nothing's going to change, things are not going to get better. But we get training, I think and experience in that way. And the reality is there are wonderful outcomes, I think, for people with psychosis, when we look at it from a different perspective, which is to say, what if some of the work might be on changing your symptoms themselves? But what if part of the work is actually on acccepting your experiences so that you can just experience less stress with them? Right, so how do I make friends with my voices? So they don't bother me in the same way? Or how do I have to, like, do education with somebody's loved ones and families or societies to accommodate the fact that this person may need to, you know, do certain things to manage their psychotic symptoms, right. And that's just a normal part of their experience, rather than a pathologized experience. So I think these are ways as therapists that we have been getting things wrong historically. But we also know that there's plenty of ways that we can shift that with training with education, to make ourselves feel more confident doing this work   Curt Widhalm  11:37 The longer that we do this podcast more than I recognize that maybe my graduate training was not the greatest. And I'm trying to recall back to the way that we were educated on it. And it just seems to have been like one class in like the the psychopathology class that was just kind of, here's defining what it is. And if you ever end up working on it, then you'll get trained at your site. And it really kind of allowed for opting out of even having to learn about it. And my experience across time has been that it still shows up in my office that clients still present with this kind of stuff. Where do you see, you know, if my experience is really bad, where do you see graduate education needing to go as far as removing some of this fear or other ring of psychotic spectrum as a thing that needs to be feared?   Maggie Mullen  12:43 I think it starts with following the model and the experiences of the Disability Justice Movement, right, I think the thing that we can do first and foremost, is bring in the voices of people who experience psychosis themselves, right, have this lived experience, into our education or classroom settings. Because it's one way that we, I think, with any kind of stigma, right, that's out there is that through more dialogue and experience with people who are living with this, you know, whether we call it condition or experience or whatever, the more comfortable we get with it, the more normal it becomes to us. And so I think it's starting there and in the education and kind of classroom settings to reduce that kind of othering. And then, in addition to that piece, I think, again, it's the part of actively including, and teaching the treatments for folks with psychosis, and not acting like we can opt out of it. I think one thing I find, with therapists, not across the board, but oftentimes, is that we are often the least prepared to deal with our most acute clients, right? So we are often trained really well to work with people with, you know, garden variety, depression and anxiety adjustment issues, etc. The word Well, exactly right. And we don't get a lot of trained, I think that is very quality for people who are chronically struggling and dealing with things that are acute and very difficult for them very distressing. And I think that's part of where our education and our schools needs to change is to shift away from, you know, exclusive treatment of worried well, and really integrate the bigger spectrum of mental health and well being overall,   Curt Widhalm  14:20 to maybe even further add to this is not necessarily treating psychosis as something that just needs to be medicated away, which has been historically just kind of where well, you ship them to a psychiatrist, and that'll take care of the voices.   Maggie Mullen  14:38 Absolutely. Yeah, I hear that even for my colleagues, right, who work in my clinic have the idea that like psychosis is actually easy to work with because it's on the psychiatrist right to do that work. It's not really on us. We're just chasing them around getting them on medication. But as you've probably experienced in doing any of this work yourselves, many people with psychosis struggle with medications as an intervention, right? That can be life changing. For a lot of people, and for other folks, the side effects that come with them, you know, are so impairing that they're like, I don't want to do this right or, or I'm scared to do this or whatever it is because they can really change your life, your health outcomes, and even just the longevity of your life. So when we rely exclusively on that stuff, it really denies people the ability to build a life worth living, but isn't just, you know, kind of circled around medications as the only treatment   Katie Vernoy  15:26 Well, even in and how you're talking about psychosis, it just really puts a different flavor of it for me with this whole idea of a spectrum of psychosis. And to me, I mean, if we're really looking at auditory hallucinations, like hearing the phone ring, but it hasn't really wrong, or, or even, you know, kind of some of these really distorted thoughts that come up and these delusional beliefs that we have about ourselves that happen in, you know, even kind of garden variety, depression and anxiety, it seems like assessing psychosis would actually be much more complicated. If we're really looking at the full spectrum of the experience. What is your advice as far as identifying, you know, kind of what, what requires or what would be helped by this knowledge around psychosis?   Maggie Mullen  16:16 Can you answer a different way, Katie?   Katie Vernoy  16:19 Yeah, I guess I'm just asking, basically, how do you assess psychosis when it's not kind of this florid psychosis? How do you how do you actually assess psychosis with this idea of a spectrum of psychosis and psychotic experience?   Maggie Mullen  16:38 I think it's really dependent on the level of distress and impairment and causes in somebody's life. Right? Like with all things, when I think about if you're doing really good assessment for any mental health issue, and psychosis is no exception. It's like, how is this interfering with your goals? And the things you want to be doing with your values, your ability to do what you love? How is this in terms of the emotional side of it, right? Like, how much distress how much upset is this causing you, etc. And getting a really clear picture from clients around those pieces, I think can tell us whether we what level of intervention we need to kind of do. Because again, I think one thing that providers often do is we also kind of do the other extreme, which is to assume that if you have any experience of psychosis, it is distressing, and it's bad, right? Like we need to get rid of it. And I think a lot of people who have lived experience of psychosis will tell you, I actually find that there's some very comforting parts of my psychosis, right? Like, maybe I hear the voice of my mom talking to me who passed away or some other loved one, right, or, you know, something that can feel like it's just reassuring to them. And so when we need to when we're doing these assessments, we want to also be integrated in what's the problem and what's actually quite adaptive and works for your life instead,   Curt Widhalm  17:51 So why DBT for psychosis   Maggie Mullen  17:54 So in thinking back to the part about like, where researchers and mental health people got it wrong. So for a long time, providers assumed that people with psychosis didn't experience emotions in the same way as people who were maybe more neurotypical because they weren't expressing their emotions through their effect or their body language, right. And a lot of that has to do with negative symptoms, which are part of that spectrum of psychosis. And what we now know is that people with psychosis deal with emotion dysregulation, actually more so than the average person, right? So they're dealing with overwhelming emotions, that are sometimes triggered by their symptoms, right. So if you have a critical voice telling you, you're a bad person, that's going to cause emotion dysregulation, we're going to get emotional, sure, and kind of the cycle that can happen where then you might experience more psychosis, right? More symptoms, because of an increase in emotions, so kind of becomes a cycle. And what we know to be true is that people then cope with that emotion dysregulation the same way that somebody with, you know, BPD, who's in treatment for DBT, like do which is self harming suicide attempts, substance use, etc. And so that's where we know DBT is really effective, right, based on both the literature, the research, but people's lived experience around it. And so the idea with how we use DBT skills, and I say DBT skills, because we're taking an informed treatment approach, we're not necessarily doing a full DBT treatment program, although that is appropriate for some people with psychosis. We're thinking, let's break that cycle of again, emotions and symptoms kind of escalating each other by using something like distress tolerance skill, or an emotion regulation skill or mindfulness to help break things up and help reduce your distress.   Katie Vernoy  19:44 It seems to be completely logical that that would be the case like and my experience of working with some clients that had different different diagnoses on the spectrum of psychosis, and I also in my experience, if in any way was was aware of oftentimes trauma histories as well as is that? Is that relevant to this conversation?   Maggie Mullen  20:09 Absolutely. Yeah. Thanks for bringing it up. So one thing that I think is, or I don't think I know is very common amongst people with psychotic spectrum disorders is PTSD. So not just experiences of trauma, but experiences of trauma that are continuing to impact our life in a really significant way. And right now, we think about a third of people with schizophrenia have PTSD, which is a very high number. We actually think it's probably higher, though, because clinicians tend to not assess for PTSD very commonly. And clients don't tend to also report those symptoms very actively when they're not asked. So when we think about, again, what clinicians might be missing, it's important that we assess for that and, and part of how we think about trauma with psychosis is that it's really common for people with a psychotic spectrum disorder to have, you know, childhood trauma, so some kind of trauma from growing up. That might be one of the contributing stress factors in the development of psychosis over time. And we also know the experiences associated with experiencing psychosis are traumatic, right. So for example, we talked about the idea of like being incarcerated or being taken by the police in handcuffs to go to the hospital, right, that's a traumatizing experience for a lot of people, particularly for people of color. We also have, you know, being mistreated in hospitals kind of being warehoused there for long periods of time. And then certainly just the experience of psychosis itself, right, when you're just oriented and you're, you know, kind of separated from reality that can be really scary for people, right, we might do things that are out of character for ourselves. So trauma is a common experience, I think, for people with psychosis. And secondarily, there's really great treatment for people experiencing PTSD who also have a psychotic spectrum disorder. But it's really uncommon for providers to offer it because of fear, I think, again, to what we were talking about earlier. And we know, I think more so part of what we see the literature and research changing is that we are including more people with psychosis and studies now than we used to before. So for example, we see a lot of the new prolonged exposure, which is, you know, one of the gold standards for treatment of PTSD, that if somebody has relatively well controlled psychosis, so they might experience some active psychosis, but it may just not cause strong levels of distress. They're a great candidate for PTSD treatment. And same thing for cognitive processing therapy or CPT as well.   Curt Widhalm  22:31 Over the couple 100 episodes or so that we've done, we've had plenty of guests who come in and speak very well about their their target populations. But I don't think that we've had people like you who've actually piloted programs that back up that this is just beyond kind of the here's something that I've experienced a lot in my office and done well with, can you talk about what you saw as an opportunity with the program that you piloted?   Maggie Mullen  23:00 Sure, so I was trained as a DBT clinician, that's like my bread and butter as a therapist and working in a fully intensively trained DBT program. And I like live and breathe DBT, like, I am one of those DBT nerds that you hear about in grad school. And I think I felt like I was working, you know, as a DBT therapist, but also working a lot with people with psychosis in a in a kind of a treatment program. And there was this weird separation where we saw like, these two worlds being again, just very disparate, and not a lot offered between them necessarily, even though again, for people with borderline personality disorder who are really well treated by DBT. A lot of them actually experienced psychosis as part of their symptoms. And so what I did, essentially, with the encouragement of my colleagues was to say, why don't we just try to offer some of these skills to our clients and see how they do with them, see if they're practical enough, if they're concrete enough, which is, you know, important for people who might be experiencing chronic psychosis to be able to use them. And I really did this in conjunction with cognitive behavioral therapy for psychosis, right. CBT for psychosis has a really strong evidence base. And so I felt like, let's address this cognitive piece that CBT is really good at, but also integrated behavioral piece of DBT. And our clients loved it. Like it was actually kind of overwhelming the response that we received, as well as the outcome studies that we were doing around clients talking about how they were using those skills, and what that what that was shifting in their life, essentially, to feel like, not only do I know how to shift my thinking, but I can do something differently about it. And the thing about DBT skills that maybe no one will tell you is they're very straightforward, right? There are a lot of things people are already doing. Right? So self soothing, right? Many of us self soothe in many different ways, right? we distract ourselves, right? We use all of these skills, I think in many adaptive ways. And part of the work I think of integrating DBT skills is saying, Okay, do that intentionally now, right like don't just Do it as a background thing, but like think about what do I actually need right now that I'm feeling distressed? Because of the voices I'm hearing? You know, do we need to practice? You know, tip, right, which is a common skill in DBT when somebody is really distressed? Or do we want to practice opposite action here, because you're feeling some unjustified emotions, for example, and really just getting people to practice those in a more active way.   Katie Vernoy  25:20 I guess I keep going back to this notion that psychosis is not something that is separate, although I think there are programs where folks end up that are separate, like a day treatment program, those types of things, but oftentimes, even in those programs, it's folks that have had pretty intense emotions, intense suicidality, you know, there's, there's a reason that they're there, it's doesn't always mean that every single person in these day treatment programs have psychosis. But regardless, I think that the, the thing that I keep coming back to is this idea around looking at psychosis differently. And when we do that, it opens up all these other treatment options, because we look at as folks who have this element, and not "them", when you were talking about the way that other cultures look at psychosis, and the ways that folks who are having some of these experiences are, are seen as whether it's a medicine person, or someone that has insight in a different way. Or there's, there's different things where, you know, people are in touch with different parts of reality. I think about religion in the United States, and the similarities with that, and how people will hear God, they'll they'll, you know, they'll see signs, there's, there's a lot of things where there are pieces of things that are kind of acceptable, and culturally appropriate. And there are things that are seen as other and I'm just curious, because you talk about kind of your your background and the way that you're perceiving psychosis, and it seems like it would be very hard. And maybe this is what I was trying to get to earlier with the assessment question, but it seems like it's very hard to identify, in some cases, what is real? And what is psychosis? And so the question I have is, again, kind of like, how do we sort through that? How do we sort through? Is this a cultural experience? I mean, I think earlier, you said it was more around, you know, kind of distress. But sometimes having these things that are culturally appropriate are very distressing, you know, you get messages from God, or you get messages from other sources that are very distressing to you. And so how to how do you grapple with that when you're really trying to honor the experience of the person and sorting through whether it's psychosis or whether it's something else?   Maggie Mullen  27:48 I think one of the questions that you're kind of getting at is the question of like, how do you define what's normal for somebody?   Katie Vernoy  27:55 Yes.   Maggie Mullen  27:56 Yeah. And I, this is a question. I think that is when we like really backtrack as mental health professionals to the idea of like, what do we pathologize? And what do we consider normal? It's really hard to do our jobs to some extent, because the DSM is, right, kind of almost based on the idea that there are certain things that are not normal. But   Katie Vernoy  28:17 yeah,   Maggie Mullen  28:17 normal is really relative, right, based on culture based on history based on so many different parts of our experience. So it's, it's a little bit hard to answer that question, because it's a real philosophical one, in a way.   Katie Vernoy  28:28 Yeah.   Maggie Mullen  28:28 I think that is what informs our approaches, different providers is like, where do we come from? And our background of how we approach this type of stuff, again, of the idea of like, is there anything that's normal. And so I think when I see like this disability justice pushing around this piece, that's the part that really aims to sort of break up that binary of normal or not normal and say, like, this is all just experience. And again, the part that becomes how we assess things as clinicians is when somebody tells us this is a problem for me, or this isn't normal for me, right? Or this is scaring me, for example. And that's when we treat things with that kind of lens. It's complex. I think, in many ways, though, because for example, if I have somebody who is experiencing mania, they're not going to tell me something as a problem, oftentimes, right, you know, kind of, again, is a kind of generalization. When people experience mania, oftentimes, they feel amazing, right? They feel very on top of the world, not all the time, but for many folks. And they don't want an intervention at that point. And the thing that I'm always weighing right is the idea of, can you be safe at this point, right? Like art, what kinds of risks are you taking, for example? And what are ways that like, I need to intervene to help you just live your best life but take more of a harm reduction approach here, right like to keep you on track so that you're doing okay, the least amount of harm happens. But it's I think it's very tricky because so much of this stuff is relative and I honestly don't know if I have a great answer to Your question because of how murky things get around this piece. And so I think maybe my best advice around it is to say, take the lead of your client and know that they know themselves best and will inform you if something's an issue.   Katie Vernoy  30:12 Yeah, yeah, I think the the thought process that I've heard a number of different times and in my travels and learning about psychosis, is being able to inhabit the world where your client is, and then kind of slowly assess what is real and not real with the client from the clients perspective. And, and to me, I feel like that can be very, very challenging, because I think there's so much bias that comes into how we perceive the world that it's can be hard to truly take the lead of the client, do you have advice on how to how to do that when when it's not like, Oh, you have a different opinion for me, but it's like, Oh, your, your reality is different than mine.   Maggie Mullen  30:54 It's tough. It's really, it can be very challenging, because again, we have two different systems of training, right. So like, I have my beliefs around strengths based approach, following the lead of the client, like they are the expert on their own life that we get. And then there are things like being a mandated reporter, right, and like, needing to assess for risk and safety and things that my agency requires. And those are often at odds with each other, I think with a psychosis with the idea that I approach that really, by trying to be as transparent as possible with my clients coming into treatment around what their experience might be like, and maybe the way that I'm documenting things in my notes, right, and like trying to more educate them and say, Okay, so your doctor is going to talk about your delusions, your ideas of reference, etc. Here's what that means. Now, what's the language that you and I are going to use to describe that type of stuff that is affirming to you, and that is recognizing your experience as unique? And I try to take a bit of that perspective around all of this, because I think we can't necessarily fight the existing system. We have without I think, like working around it in that kind of way. So I don't know if that answers your question. Exactly, Katie,   Katie Vernoy  32:07 Yeah, no, that totally answers my question. Thank you.   Curt Widhalm  32:09 And I think your last couple of answers have really demonstrated why the DBT approach to psychosis fits so naturally, yeah. And I think is where your book probably just came very naturally in this whole process.   Maggie Mullen  32:27 It did it well. And I'll tell you, I didn't start out to write a book. Because I don't know, I didn't ever think of myself as somebody who's a writer, or even frankly, like training. But I got recruited to write a book because I was doing something it was a bit more innovative in this approach to working with psychosis. And the funny part is, one of the things that came up really frequently, just as kind of an aside is getting messages about people with psychosis don't read, right? There isn't a market for this. And it first of all, that's, that's very discriminatory. Yeah, for lack of a better term wrong. It's awful. And I think part of the reason people assume that A is because of stigma, and you know, wrong beliefs about people with psychosis, but also because there are literally aren't any other books written for people that are self help books for somebody with psychosis. And, you know, we have a wonderful books on the market for loved ones, or families or mental health providers working with psychosis, but almost nothing that is geared for the experience of somebody with a psychotic spectrum disorder to say, you take control of your own experience, right, you get to be educated and learn and be offered skills. And I think in particular, with psychosis, the other thing that we know is that most people with psychosis don't get mental health treatment, right, they don't either have access to it, they don't want it or they don't have providers who are, you know, competent in providing, as we talked about before. And so this book, obviously, is not a substitute for therapy. But it's a way to really, I think, democratize these skills to say, I want to get these out to you in a form of offering that's less than $20. And so I always encourage people to seek treatment as part of that book. But this is just one way to kind of get that message out there. So that's part of kind of the journey that led me to writing the book is just wanting to make sure people had access to these skills one way or the other, essentially,   Katie Vernoy  34:16 are there differences and how DBT skills are used when you are learned when you have psychosis as part of the the makeup.   Maggie Mullen  34:25 So the actual skills themselves are really identical to Marsha Linehan's work, right. And I really respect her work. And for me, I did not want to stray away from what the model is because the model is really effective. We're seeing more research now around full DBT treatment programs serving people with psychosis, but that's still kind of emerging literature. And Marsha Linehan, and her book actually even talks a bit about that. But to go back to your question, I think, part of what we do need to do when we're kind of, you know, adapting or kind of shifting. The way we teach DBT skills for these clients is to do a few things. One is to make them really concrete. so that there's just really straightforward information, there's not a lot of psychological jargon, right? Things that are just very straightforward. We also want to make sure that whatever we're offering is accessible. Because, you know, as we talked about a little bit before, you know, rates have been on, you know, for example, like SSI, so like being on a fixed income are really high amongst people with psychosis. So people don't have a lot of money. A lot of folks are marginally housed don't have stable housing or food access. And so we want to make things that are really accessible, right? You know, there's a DBT skill about going on a brief vacation, for example, we have to talk about, what does that actually practically look like in the life of somebody who has who's getting 700 ollars? a month, right? Like, what does that look like? So we want to adapt the examples to actually be a reflection of their personal experience as part of that as well. But otherwise, I think the skills really kind of match on well to the experience of psychosis.   Curt Widhalm  35:53 We've mentioned your book a couple of times, I think it's fair for us to actually name it. So dialectical behavior therapy skills, workbook for psychosis. We'll put a link to that in our show notes. But where else can people find out about you and the work that you're doing?   Maggie Mullen  36:12 So first is my website, which is Maggie mullen.com. I'm on Instagram. I'm working on building that following. It's Maggie Mullen, LCSW W there. And those are the main pieces you can contact me and reach me my direct contact information is there. I really am trying right now to put the work out again of this more progressive approach to treating psychosis into the world and doing a lot of consulting and training with agencies. So that's definitely something that I'm always excited about doing with new folks.   Curt Widhalm  36:40 And we will include links to Maggie's websites and Instagram handle over in our show notes. You can find those at MTS g podcast.com. And you can follow our social media come and let us know about your experiences and getting trained or poorly trained in working with psychosis. Come in and be a part of our Facebook community, the modern therapist group, and until next time, I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy And Maggie Mullen.   Katie Vernoy  37:10 Thanks again to our sponsor, Buying Time   Curt Widhalm  37:12 Buying Time's VAs support businesses by managing email communications, CRM or automation systems, website admin and hosting email marketing, social media, bookkeeping and much more. Their sole purpose is to create the opportunity for you to focus on supporting those you serve while ensuring that your back office runs smoothly with a full team of VAs gives the opportunity to hire for one role and get multiple areas of support. There's no reason to be overwhelmed with running your business with this solution available.   Katie Vernoy  37:41 book a consultation to see where and how you can get started getting the support you need. That's buyingtimellc.com/book-consultation once again, buying time llc.com forward slash book dash consultation.   Announcer  37:57 Thank you for listening to the modern therapist Survival Guide. Learn more about who we are and what we do at mtsgpodcast.com. You can also join us on Facebook and Twitter. And please don't forget to subscribe so you don't miss any of our episodes.

Unlocking Your World of Creativity
Ho Yin Cheung, Founder and CEO of REMO

Unlocking Your World of Creativity

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 23:32


Meet https://www.linkedin.com/in/hoyincheung/ (Ho Yin Cheung) , founder and CEO of https://www.linkedin.com/company/remo-co/ (REMO). He has 7+ years of experience building remote teams and has worked with Fortune 100 companies like Nike, Best Buy, TJ Maxx, SunGard, Cardinal Health, and Kaiser Permanente. His new venture is https://remo.co/?utm_source=quora&utm_medium=profile (Remo), the next-gen video-first virtual space for event organizers and distributed teams. Check it out if you want to grow your revenue, and connect with your audience in the most interactive way online. He says, "I am passionate about humanizing technology to create authentic conversations that drive meaningful relationships in the most human way possible." Remo is an interactive virtual event platform that humanizes the online event experience. Today, Remo has grown from 5 to over 100 members, all working globally. Whether people use Remo for work, virtual, or hybrid events, we know that meeting people online can be a daunting task. Our events bring communities together built on purpose and common interests. We provide opportunities to grow and facilitate trust, thus leading to organic relationships in the virtual space, as well as offline. These common factors create comfortable networking settings, setting the stage for real human interaction and creating deep connections that can last a lifetime. We've been honored to host virtual and hybrid events for webinars, higher education institutions, alumni associations, job fairs, and professional associations. We also provide poster sessions for students presenting their dissertations. We believe this process is the most humane way to bring people together. Our clients use Remo to come together for different ways to build communities—whether that's through interactive webinars, workshops, games, or simply getting together with friends to connect in a welcoming and human experience that feels as authentic as possible. For a free demo, please stop by Remo.co.

We Want The D
WWTD 335 - Jungle Cruise: Kaiser Permanente

We Want The D

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 69:54


It's a rollicking river adventure this week as we watch the latest Disney movie to be based on a theme park ride, JUNGLE CRUISE. It's hard not to have at least a bit of a good time with this film, given how much it begs, borrows and steals from other beloved classics in the action-adventure genre, but it's got plenty to recommend itself on it's own! Like...Paul Giamatti and Jesse Plemons doing broad accents, Jack Whitehall playing his own father, and...um...The Rock wearing a cute lil' hat? 

Speak Like a Leader
Harness Your Speaking Anxiety

Speak Like a Leader

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 59:29


Nathan Gold, also known as The Demo Coach hails from the San Francisco Bay Area where he spends his days coaching people around the world on how to prepare for high-stakes speaking opportunities and how to harness speaking anxiety. He does this through keynotes, workshops, and 1:1 sessions, both in-person and online.Nathan  has personally delivered thousands of presentations along with thousands of hours of professional coaching. He's worked in and with small and large companies, including GetAround.com, Glue Networks, Bill.com, Education.com, Ensafer, Innovation Norway, SanDisk, Kaiser Permanente, and IBM — on designing, scripting and delivering more compelling and memorable presentations and product demos, especially in situations you cannot afford to miss.Nathan  is a two-time winner of the distinguished DEMOgod Award, given to me at DEMOmobile 2000 for being “A one-man walking communications store with the ability to deliver an incredibly well-timed demonstration.” And, at DEMOfall 2005, a second DEMOgod Award at U3. He's also the co-author of Giving Memorable Product Demos, published in June 2009, available on Amazon.com.Learn more about Nathan at DemoCoach.com. Connect with him on LinkedIn and Facebook.

Aging GreatFULLy with Holley Kelley
Let Your Conscience Be Your Guide for a Stellar New Year with Leonard Perlmutter

Aging GreatFULLy with Holley Kelley

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 57:45


What if your conscience could be your guide and provide super-conscious wisdom? That's the powerful message today's guest, Leonard Perlmutter, brings for the New 2022 Year and beyond! As a globally recognized thought-leader and founder of the American Medication Institute and innovator and founder of January's National Conscience Month, Leonard shows us how to give our conscience sway in our life! Perlmutter shares how ALL of our decisions support and guide us to act in our highest good, leading to a life of joy, love, peace and both personal and professional success. As author of Your Conscience: The Key to Unlock Limitless Wisdom, Creativity and Solve All of Life's Challenges, Perlmutter articulates the powerful role of our conscience, highlighting its supreme intelligence, and helps us better understand the Four Functions of the Mind. Using his shared wisdom, we gain insight as to why perspective is everything and he helps us identify how to tune into our own conscience. He educates on this complicated topic in a simplistic way that makes sense and it's no wonder Jiminy Cricket is AMI's self-proclaimed spoke person, as he does believe we should, “Always let your conscience be your guide.” But Perlmutter asks us not to take his word for it —calling upon each listener to experiment with what he shares. It's an educational, empowering and entertaining hour from beginning to end, offering tips, tools and guidance towards unlocking our full potential of wisdom and unlimited possibilities. In this power-hour of enlightYOUment, Perlmutter addresses the importance of self-care as it may relate to many New Year's Resolutions, as well as a well-celebrated living and Aging GreatFULLy. He defines Yoga for us, and its many benefits, as well as meditation, and he invites listeners to join him for his globally-welcomed weekly guided meditations and Satsang held every Sunday morning. Leonard has presented informative workshops on the benefits of meditation and Yoga Science at the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Kaiser Permanente, the Albany Medical College, The New York Times forum on Yoga Science, the Commonwealth Club of California, the University of Wisconsin School of Nursing, the Washington University Medical School the University of Colorado Medical and the West Point Association of Graduates. Over the past twenty-five years, he has served on the faculties of the New England Institute of Ayurvedic Medicine in Boston, Massachusetts and the International Himalayan Yoga Teachers Association in Calgary, Canada. Leonard's first book, The Heart and science of Yoga: The American Meditation Institute's Empowering Self-Care Program for a Happy, Healthy, Joyful Life, is an encyclopedic guide to meditation and the Yoga Science that lies behind it. The book and its corresponding curriculum, taught by Leonard in his Foundations class, was enthusiastically endorsed by popular medical luminaries like Drs. Dean Ornish, Mehmet Oz and Larry Dossey. You can learn more about this, his books and inspiring work, workshops, guided meditations and more by visiting www.americanmeditation.org. It's a must-listen for everyone who wants to take the wheel of their life for the New Year and unlock all the possibilities that await!Thank you, amazing Aging Rebels, for listening to the Aging GreatFULLy show! We create this show for YOU the listener! If you enjoy this episode, please share it with your friends and family and leave us a positive show review on your favorite platform! We love spotlighting listener reviews on our show! To listen, stream, connect, share, download, subscribe, visit our official host page at www.CTRNetwork.com/holleykelley or www.HolleyKelley.com. Remember, you rock and you ROLE model!

Admissions Straight Talk
Encore: How to Get into Kaiser Permanente Medical School – Warning It's Tough!

Admissions Straight Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 47:35


I am swamped now with clients facing early January deadlines so I decided to end 2021 with one of our most popular shows of the year, my interview with Kaiser Permanente Bernard J. Tyson School of Medicine's Senior Associate Dean for Admissions and Equity, Inclusion, and Diversity, Dr. Lindia Wllies-Jacobo.The Kaiser Permanente School has not yet graduated its first class, but with its tuition-free approach, dedication to social equity, and emphasis on small-group learning, it has an acceptance rate of roughly 1% and is third on Accepted's medical school selectivity index. It is very hard to get into. However, in this excellent and very popular interview, Dr. Willies-Jacobo lays out clearly what Kaiser Permanente is looking for. As we put away or throw out our calendars from 2021 and turn to 2022, I also want to share a few thoughts. When New Years Day comes and goes, some of us ignore the milestone, but many look back - and look forward. Whether your 2021 was a good one or bad one, I hope that AST's listeners will muster their courage and determination, their positivity and ability, to plan to create a better year, a better future for themselves and the world. To paraphrase Stanford GSB's motto “Improve lives. Improve organizations. Improve the world.” Again, thank you for listening to the podcast. I wish you much success in this brand new, exciting year ahead. Now the interview with Dr. Lindia Willies-Jacobo of Kaiser Permanente Tyson School of Medicine. For the complete show notes, check out the original blog post. Related links: Kaiser Permanente's Tyson School of Medicine's websiteThe Medical School Selectivity IndexMatching Your Values to the Medical School Mission StatementAccepted's Medical Admissions Consulting Related shows: Are You Rushing to Attend Rush Medical College?How to Get Accepted to Chicago Medical School at Rosalind FranklinHow To Get Accepted to University of Illinois College of MedicineAll About BU School of Medicine, a Social Justice-Minded Med SchoolWhat Med School Applicants Must Know About Johns HopkinsEverything Applicants Need to Know About the Dell Medical School Experience hbspt.cta.load(58291, '4b94e05c-2998-43ea-bc96-efd39d1c268c', {});

Girrrl... Can I Ask You Something?
Meditation Techniques for Everyone ~ Replay

Girrrl... Can I Ask You Something?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 34:53


Do you struggle with managing stress? Sis we got you! In this episode Hosts, Rhumel and Twanda interview meditation guru, Althea Lawton-Thompson. You'll learn what meditation is, why it's an effective tool for combating stress and how to get started. We learned a lot in this episode. We believe you will too. Lean in. This is good stuff. Don't forget to rate/review and subscribe!! Have a question or topic you want us to talk about? We want to hear from you!!Twitter: @girrrlpodcastInstagram: @girrrlpodcastFacebook: @girrrlpodcastEmail us: Talk2Us@girrrlpodcast.com Althea Lawton-Thompson Spiritual Healing GuideA former corporate executive, Althea left the boardroom for a career in wellness twenty- three years ago. As a certified fitness professional, she was the on-air wellness reporter for WBAL Channel 11 News in Baltimore, the creator of the youth obesity program for Johns Hopkins Hospital's pediatric department, the creator of the post-natal wellness program for Sinai Hospital, and the coordinator of the Healthy Living program for 13 Kaiser Permanente centers in Atlanta. Having trained extensively in spiritual and natural healing, Althea is a Reiki Master, a NOLS-certified outdoor leader, and a seasoned Yoga instructor and meditation guide. She has led 15 wellness retreats to Bali, Costa Rica, South Africa, Puerto Rico, Turks & Caicos, Dominican Republic, Bahamas, Grand Canyon, and the Georgia mountains. Her corporate wellness company - Aerobics, Yoga & MoreTM - provides certified and insured instructors in yoga, meditation, Pilates, and fitness to companies, schools, and government agencies in the Atlanta metro area. Althea has been highlighted in magazines including Mantra Yoga + Health, Essence, Upscale, Oxygen, and Best Body and was voted one of “Atlanta's Best Yoga Instructors” by Best Self magazine. Her album, Guided Meditations with Althea, ranked #1 and #3 on two of Amazon's bestsellers list for New Age music. She's the producer of the AltheatizedTM fitness video series and the author of the bestselling novel, Losing Control, and the entrepreneur how-to book, Twenty. Althea has been married for twenty-three years and is the proud mother of two sons. Website: AltheaLawtonThompson.com Instagram: @althealawtonthompson Facebook Group: Althea's Retreats Facebook Page: Facebook.com/AltheaLawtonThompson YouTube: Living Life Limitlessly with Althea 

Business Breakthrough
136: Leading Your Prospect Through Storytelling With Ginger Zumaeta (Part 2)

Business Breakthrough

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 30:50


In today's market everyone considers themselves an expert, and so many people have been burnt either because the expert they hired was not the expert they needed, or was not quite the expert they thought they were. In this episode Ginger shares with us how story guides people to that place of comfort certainty and trust. My Guest: Ginger Zumaeta Ginger Zumaeta, advises companies on positioning and communicating big ideas. She's the Founder and CEO of Zumaeta Group, a positioning and messaging strategy firm, and author of the forthcoming book Deckonomics: Design Presentations that Spread Ideas, Drive Decisions and Close Deals. Ginger has worked with some of the world's largest brands, such as Coca Cola, Verizon, Union Bank, Amgen, Anthem, Infinity Insurance and many others. Her insights have been featured in publications such as Business Insider, TheNextWeb, Better Marketing, Storius, and Marketing Profs, among others and she's spoken about marketing and messaging on numerous stages including Verizon's Hispanic Marketing series, the Latina Style National Conference, Union Bank's Personal Branding series, Kaiser Permanente's Annual Brand Conference, and the Promax National Conference. She's the winner of 3 Emmy Awards, 12 Muse awards and a Gracie Award for her work in television, and has held positions as an adjunct professor at UCLA and Cal Lutheran in marketing and research. After going from an award-winning career at NBC to launching a strategic consulting firm, Ginger uses her experience in storytelling and persuasion to train corporate teams in telling better business stories to move high-stakes work forward with clear and succinct presentations grounded in story structure and backed by brain science. Pivotal Moments ·       Ginger began in TV in research and found herself struggling to tell the stories of what the research was telling her. ·       She was responsible for analysing all of the ratings understanding how audience was flowing in and out of shows and so on. ·       The reason Ginger moved to storytelling was because she had dense technical information. ·       During the 2008/9 recession Ginger had to lay off her entire team as well as get her pink slip. ·       She took the opportunity to think about changing, and have not looked back since. ·       She now works with companies who are having a hard time expressing their unique and defensible difference. ·       When you are trying to attract a client base or audience you need to think about what makes every story interesting. ·       Ginger focuses on what the problem story is. ·       When you begin with the problem then you can invite people in and then you can go back to your genesis story. ·       We are in a learning economy. Advice In your story you need to talk about the following: ·       Who you are? ·       What you have done professional that you have lead the path successfully? ·       Cost of the journey ·       Benefits of the journey Quote Proximity is power Links & Resources www.gingerzumaeta.com Show: http://www.estierand.com/breakthrough (www.estierand.com/breakthrough) Part 1 of this episode where you hear more go to https://www.estierand.com/captivate-podcast/leading-your-prospect-through-storytelling-with-ginger-zumaeta-1 (estierand.com/136-1) Did you enjoy this episode? Then https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/estie-rand/id1358797306?mt=2&ls=1 (subscribe to my podcast on iTunes), so you can get automatic...

What is UX?
S4E8 An Interview with Jesse Gaskin, HCD and Patient Experience Lead, Kaiser Permanente Northern California

What is UX?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 43:46


Jesse Gaskin serves as a Co-Program Director for the Design Leaders Council of The Conference Board. In addition to his work with The Conference Board, Jesse is a patient experience and human-centered design lead at Kaiser Permanente who specializes in using human-centered design to develop and launch new care experiences. His hybrid background in design thinking and business enables him to develop products and services that solve real customer needs while balancing organizational capabilities. He has worked with start-ups and Fortune 500 companies primarily in health care and financial services. Over the last 12 years, he has been involved in nearly every aspect of the design process, from pixel to platform, from designing mobile apps to identifying new product opportunities to launching new businesses. In his current role, he leads interdisciplinary teams in defining, designing, and delivering products and services that are desirable, feasible, and viable. He holds an MBA from the Stuart School of Business and a Master of Design from the Institute of Design at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, as well as a BFA in Graphic Design from San José State University in California.In this episode, we talked about:Jesse's role in Kaiser PermanenteStrategic thinking for designersHow Jesse started in designJesse's consulting businessHow did Jesse get into the healthcare industry?Jesse explains why designers are ideal to work in healthcareJesse as the Program Director at Design Leaders CouncilAnd MUCH MORE!Links and ResourcesDiscovery Design: Design Thinking for Healthcare Improvementhttps://healthy.kaiserpermanente.org/front-doorhttps://www.conference-board.org/us/Connect with Jesse

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human
#1463 People Are Waking Back Up To The Need For Labor Unions

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 75:20


Air Date 12/22/2021 Today we take a look at some of the history of labor struggles in America and the current wave of strikes that is giving renewed energy to the labor union movement and the struggle for better working conditions for all. Be part of the show! Leave us a message at 202-999-3991 or email Jay@BestOfTheLeft.com  Transcript BestOfTheLeft.com/Support (Get AD FREE Shows & Bonus Content) Check out Coffee from the Unf*cking the Republic podcast! BestOfTheLeft.com/Store BotL MERCHANDISE! BestOfTheLeft.com/Advertise Sponsor the show! SHOW NOTES Ch. 1: Lessons from the Luddites - On the Media - Air Date 12-10-21 Gavin Mueller [@gavinmuellerphd], assistant professor of New Media and Digital Culture at the University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands, on what modern lessons can be learned from the Luddite workers of 19th century England. Ch. 2: Victory at Starbucks, Struggle at Kellogg's Part 1 - Jacobin Radio - Air Date 12-13-21 Suzi talks with John Logan about the unionization victory at Starbucks in Buffalo, and the continuing Kellogg Co. strike. Ch. 3: Strike Wave Workers Flex Their Muscle in Tight Labor Market Part 1 - Intercepted - Air Date 11-10-21 We hear from Kaiser Permanente workers, and then Labor Notes' Jonah Furman joins The Intercept's Washington Editor Nausicaa Renner to discuss this year's strike wave. Ch. 4: Labor Unions From Pullman to Kelloggs. Labors long, hard road. - Unf*cking The Republic (UNFTR) - Air Date 12-18-21 The episode includes a blow-by-blow analysis of a recent interview with the CEO of Kellogg's to translate Wall Street speak for “how to fuck workers and influence inflation.” Ch. 5: Victory at Starbucks, Struggle at Kellogg's Part 2 - Jacobin Radio - Air Date 12-13-21 Suzi talks with John Logan about the unionization victory at Starbucks in Buffalo, and the continuing Kellogg Co. strike. Ch. 6: Class Struggles in the US Today - Economic Update with Richard D. Wolff - Air Date 12-2-21 The "labor shortage" isn't, "Build Back Better" does not begin to approach what Europe already has. Ch. 7: Can Child Labor Solve Labor Shortage The GOP Thinks So... - Thom Hartmann Program - Air Date 12-2-21 Republican-controlled legislatures in several states have come up with a novel way to stem the effects of an ongoing labor shortage: loosen child labor laws governing the number of hours and times that teenagers are allowed to work. Ch. 8: Strike Wave Workers Flex Their Muscle in Tight Labor Market Part 2 - Intercepted - Air Date 11-10-21 We hear from Kaiser Permanente workers, and then Labor Notes' Jonah Furman joins The Intercept's Washington Editor Nausicaa Renner to discuss this year's strike wave. MEMBERS-ONLY BONUS CLIP(S) Ch. 9: Lessons from the Luddites Part 2 - On the Media - Air Date 12-10-21 Gavin Mueller [@gavinmuellerphd], assistant professor of New Media and Digital Culture at the University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands, on what modern lessons can be learned from the Luddite workers of 19th century England. Ch. 10: Labor Unions From Pullman to Kelloggs. Labors long, hard road. Part 2 - Unf*cking The Republic (UNFTR) - Air Date 12-18-21 VOICEMAILS Ch. 11: Fear that Democrats will lose the House - Alan from Connecticut Ch. 12: Thoughts on multiple tiers of humans - Nick From California FINAL COMMENTS Ch. 13: Final comments on how progressive thinking embraces equality while conservative thinking often requires division MUSIC (Blue Dot Sessions): Opening Theme: Loving Acoustic Instrumental by John Douglas Orr  Voicemail Music: Low Key Lost Feeling Electro by Alex Stinnent Closing Music: Upbeat Laid Back Indie Rock by Alex Stinnent   Produced by Jay! Tomlinson Visit us at BestOfTheLeft.com

KHON 2GO
DEC. 22: Honolulu Police are still investigating Kaimuki apartment fire; New visitor guidelines at Kaiser Permanente hospital

KHON 2GO

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 7:30


Listen to your daily news with KHON 2GO podcast from Monday to Friday at 8 a.m.

Business Breakthrough
136: Leading Your Prospect Through Storytelling With Ginger Zumaeta (Part 1)

Business Breakthrough

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 30:54


In today's market everyone considers themselves an expert, and so many people have been burnt either because the expert they hired was not the expert they needed, or was not quite the expert they thought they were. In this episode Ginger shares with us how story guides people to that place of comfort certainty and trust. My Guest: Ginger Zumaeta Ginger Zumaeta, advises companies on positioning and communicating big ideas. She's the Founder and CEO of Zumaeta Group, a positioning and messaging strategy firm, and author of the forthcoming book Deckonomics: Design Presentations that Spread Ideas, Drive Decisions and Close Deals. Ginger has worked with some of the world's largest brands, such as Coca Cola, Verizon, Union Bank, Amgen, Anthem, Infinity Insurance and many others. Her insights have been featured in publications such as Business Insider, TheNextWeb, Better Marketing, Storius, and Marketing Profs, among others and she's spoken about marketing and messaging on numerous stages including Verizon's Hispanic Marketing series, the Latina Style National Conference, Union Bank's Personal Branding series, Kaiser Permanente's Annual Brand Conference, and the Promax National Conference. She's the winner of 3 Emmy Awards, 12 Muse awards and a Gracie Award for her work in television, and has held positions as an adjunct professor at UCLA and Cal Lutheran in marketing and research. After going from an award-winning career at NBC to launching a strategic consulting firm, Ginger uses her experience in storytelling and persuasion to train corporate teams in telling better business stories to move high-stakes work forward with clear and succinct presentations grounded in story structure and backed by brain science. Pivotal Moments ·       Ginger began in TV in research and found herself struggling to tell the stories of what the research was telling her. ·       She was responsible for analysing all of the ratings understanding how audience was flowing in and out of shows and so on. ·       The reason Ginger moved to storytelling was because she had dense technical information. ·       During the 2008/9 recession Ginger had to lay off her entire team as well as get her pink slip. ·       She took the opportunity to think about changing, and have not looked back since. ·       She now works with companies who are having a hard time expressing their unique and defensible difference. ·       When you are trying to attract a client base or audience you need to think about what makes every story interesting. ·       Ginger focuses on what the problem story is. ·       When you begin with the problem then you can invite people in and then you can go back to your genesis story. ·       We are in a learning economy. Advice In your story you need to talk about the following: ·       Who you are? ·       What you have done professional that you have lead the path successfully? ·       Cost of the journey ·       Benefits of the journey Quote Proximity is power Links & Resources www.gingerzumaeta.com Show: http://www.estierand.com/breakthrough (www.estierand.com/breakthrough) Part 2 of this episode where you hear more go to estierand.com/136-2 Did you enjoy this episode? Then https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/estie-rand/id1358797306?mt=2&ls=1 (subscribe to my podcast on iTunes), so you can get automatic updates whenever another episode goes live (and you will be helping me get to #1 on iTunes, making us all cooler...

PopHealth Podcast
Kaiser Permanente's Angel Vargas, Vice President, Care at Home, Southern CA & Hawaii

PopHealth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 28:10


Angel shares his story of going from "unemployed dad" to becoming an executive leader that oversees the delivery of care in the home for one of Kaiesr Permanente's largest regions.  In our episode, Angel reveals how earlier chapters in his life, including time in the military and owning a computer business, helped him become the leader he is today.

Success Unscrambled | Blog Traffic Tips | Business Success Stories
7 Best Refillable Journals [That’ll Help You Get to 6-Figures]

Success Unscrambled | Blog Traffic Tips | Business Success Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 27:55


Susie has been running an online business for about 3 years and she's looking for the best refillable journal. While watching a show on entrepreneurship, Susie learned about the power of journaling. Finding the perfect journal that will suit her daily routine is important to developing a new habit. Let me know if you can relate to these points. You've always heard that journaling is a great habit to developUnderstanding why journaling is important will help you pick up this habitYou are not quite sure if you're a paper journal person or if digital is betterKnowing what to write has been a huge obstacle for you If only there was a way to get your head around the importance of journaling as well as when to do it. In this post, you'll learn how journaling can help you achieve your revenue and life goals quickly and easily. You'll also learn about over 10 different journaling techniques and when to apply them. Disclosure: Please note that this post may contain affiliate links which means that if you buy one of my recommended products I get paid a commission for sharing the link at no additional cost to you.  I only recommend products that I have tried myself and have experienced success. Why Journal If you're like me you've probably been thinking of journaling for a few years. However, you've never got into it because it didn't seem to be a necessity until now. Did you know that there is scientific evidence that shows the health benefits of journaling? According to PsychCentral, here are 5 health benefits of journaling. Solve problems more efficientlyKnow yourself betterReduce stressResolve disagreement with othersClarify your thoughts and feelings The two that jump out at me from this list are problem-solving and clarifying my thoughts and feelings. If there isn't anything on that list from PsychCentral that you find motivating, here are 6 more benefits of journaling from Kaiser Permanente. Gain self-confidenceFind inspirationAchieve goalsStrengthen memoryTrack progress and growthImprove writing and communication. You have to admit that these 11 benefits of journaling are mind-blowing. A lack of goal achievement is something that you might have encountered at different stages in your life. It is also something that you hear friends and family experience regularly. Looking back, do you think that you might have experienced more successes if you were journaling? Types of Journaling Techniques Did you know that there are several different types of journaling? Depending on the technique you would like to use will dictate the best refillable journal that will suit your needs. Let's spend some time looking at a list of journaling techniques. Art journalDream journalingReflection journalMorning pagesGratitudeUnsent letterFree writingListsWorst case scenarioOne line a dayPlan your dayReading journalBullet journaling At this point, you're probably surprised by the big list of journaling techniques available for you. In order to understand the best one to use for your needs, let's take a closer look. Art Journal As the name suggests, having an art journal will allow you to express yourself better using visual pieces. These pieces can include sketches, collages, scrapbooking, doodles, experiments and inspiration. So, if you're more inclined to express yourself visually then art would be a great option for you. Dream journaling This would be one that will rarely ever work for me because I forget my dreams all the time. Actually, it is advised that with dream journaling you write down whatever you can remember and over time your memory will improve. The challenge I find with this journaling technique is that my dreams are too weird and I prefer not to remember them. Lol!! The best refillable journal for this technique would be the one with many pages. Reflection Journaling As you can imagine,

Labor Radio-Podcast Weekly
Work Stoppage; Working People; The Rick Smith Show; Solidarity Works; Solidarity Center Podcast; Working Class History; Your Rights At Work

Labor Radio-Podcast Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 51:18


The year may be coming to an end but worker's struggles continue and those fights are reflected in many of this week's shows. On the Work Stoppage podcast, the crew are joined by Charlie, a striking PhD student from Columbia University who talks about what their union's demands are and recounts a walkout involving the president of the university and his class on free speech. Then, Alex Bazeley and Bobby Wagner discuss the Major League Baseball lockout on the Working People podcast. On The Rick Smith Show, David Pepper reports on the slow death of democracy in the states, while we hear about the fight for healthcare heroes at Kaiser Permanente on the Solidarity Works podcast. During the lockdown, millions of migrant workers were sent home unpaid, and many were forced to pay their own way back after already being in debt to get a job in their destination country. But wage theft started long before the pandemic. This week's episode of The Solidarity Center Podcast highlights the struggles of migrant workers for decent working conditions and comes a few days before International Migrants Day today, December 18. Then, on Working Class History, we learn about the forces and events leading up to the Bread Intifada in Egypt in 1977. We wrap up this week's show with some of last Sunday's Evening of Favorite and Sacred Songs concert by the DC Labor Chorus, which aired on the Your Rights At Work radio show. Highlights from labor radio and podcast shows around the country, part of the national Labor Radio Podcast Network of shows focusing on working people's issues and concerns. #LaborRadioPod @empathymedialab @duesunion @SolidarityCntr @AFLCIO @WorkStoppagePod @WorkingPod @RickSmithShow @steelworkers @SolidarityCntr @wrkclasshistory @DCLabor Edited by Patrick Dixon and Mel Smith; produced by Chris Garlock; social media guru Harold Phillips.

Discussions of Truth
Tori Jensen RN RD

Discussions of Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 44:44


Tori joins with her lawyer Dan Watkins to discuss Kaiser Permanente decline of religious exemption. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/iantrottier/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/iantrottier/support

Solidarity Works
The Fight for Health Care Heroes at Kaiser Permanente

Solidarity Works

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 24:45


In the early morning hours of Saturday, November 13, United Steelworkers Local 7600 reached a tentative agreement with health care giant Kaiser Permanente, preventing an impending strike. More than 40,000 health care workers across the West Coast would have, if necessary, walked off the job that following Monday in their fight for safe staffing and wage justice in the Inland Empire. Today, we're sitting down to talk with Local 7600 President Micheal Barnett and Vice President Norberto Gomez about this monumental fight that brought thousands of health care workers together to win this contract and what the local's plans are for the future.

Licensed to Lead
032 - A Voice for Physician Leadership: Essential, Courageous and Magical

Licensed to Lead

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 60:16


My guest this week is national healthcare leader Dr. Jack Cochran. As CEO of the Permanente Federation, he was the top national leader for over 20,000 physicians who cared for more than 10 million people in their Kaiser Permanente medical practices. In this animated conversation, the inspiring and articulate Dr. Cochran describes his non-linear and unexpected path to executive leadership and international activism on behalf of excellent and accessible healthcare.In his early days as a practicing plastic surgeon, Jack encountered the healthcare system in a different way when his parents became ill. As he says, “four years of medical school, six years of surgery residency, five years of practicing surgery, did nothing to prepare me to be the son of dying parents.” This pivotal time changed him. Jack's appreciation for all caregivers, especially nurses, led to the creation of nursing programs and a nursing scholarship that has endured for 33 years. We worked together when he was selected for his first CEO role which prompts Jack to recall both his trepidation and his gratitude during this initiation into leadership. Encouragement from well-respected leaders who had “courage, values and substance” inspired Jack to take on a role which he says he was not prepared for.Quick to call himself naïve at the time, Jack began his executive role with a listening tour, speaking personally with 500 physicians, 4-5 at a time throughout the region. What Jack heard, was shaped into the 3 constants: •Preserve and enhance the physician career•Streamline the care process•Optimize the care experienceDetermined to change a failing culture, Jack thoughtfully selected his executive team. This diverse group was made up of passionate, respected clinicians who were determined to keep the patient at the center of their decisions. The “Colorado turnaround” resulted in transformation of the organization's reputation, finances, quality, service—and at the root of it all—remarkably ramped-up physician engagement. When asked how important physician leadership in the C-Suite is he pauses before he responds:“I'm trying to find a way to be thoughtfully objective and I'm having trouble. I think it's essential. Essential.”Quotable Jack:•Physicians are not more important, but we are disproportionately impactful.•Medical education and the resulting MD and DO degrees are a “pluripotent professional preparation” for leadership.•Difference has to be a differentiator.•When you are offered a leadership role: Don't lean your ladder against the wrong wall.•Complexity has made specialty care more primary and primary care more special.•Be very, very careful when people tell you what cannot be done. Be very suspect of advice that tells you exactly why things can't get done or won't get done… or are impossible.Meet Jack Cochran, MD Dr. Jack Cochran is an innovative leader who has inspired countless physicians and healthcare workers, and driven health care transformation on a national level. He is a plastic surgeon, acclaimed leader, author, consultant, and international speaker.He led the Permanente Federation which represents the national interests of the regional Permanente Medical Groups, which employ 20,000 physicians caring for more than 10 million Kaiser Permanente members. During his tenure as CEO, Kaiser Permanente was recognized as a national leader in clinical quality by the Medicare Star program and the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA). Prior to his national role, Dr. Cochran served as Executive Medical Director, President, and Chairman of the Board of the Colorado Permanente Medical Group (CPMG). He led physicians through the transformation of a culture faced with financial challenges as well as declining membership, and poor physician and patient satisfaction. Philanthropy has long been a part of Dr. Cochran's life. He has volunteered his reconstructive surgery and consulting services in Third World countries, aiding underserved populations in Nicaragua, the Philippines, Ecuador, Tanzania, and Nepal. He is also a past president of the Consortium for Community Centered Comprehensive Child Care (C6), a foundation that has built hospitals in East Africa. He is a vocal advocate for nurses and oversees the Lois and John Cochran Education Award, an annual scholarship given to oncology nurses at the Lutheran Medical Center in Denver, Colorado.Dr. Cochran earned his medical degree from the University of Colorado and served residencies at Stanford University Medical Center and the University of Wisconsin Hospital. He is board certified in otolaryngology (head and neck surgery) and in plastic and reconstructive surgery.Links:Website: https://jackcochranmd.com/Books: https://jackcochranmd.com/books/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jackcochranmd/Twitter: https://twitter.com/JackHCochran

Transformative Principal
Improv and Psychological Safety with Michael Vargas Transformative Principal 459

Transformative Principal

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 23:57


Michael Vargas is an international facilitator with nearly 10 years of experience.  Utilizing his Master in Clinical Psychology, improv and design thinking background Michael facilitates workshops and speaks to organizations on developing collaborative and productive team cultures.  Supporting teams to develop psychological safety, building trust, and effective communication.  He has worked with a variety of organizations like Dropbox, Salesforce, Kaiser Permanente, ACLU, Evergreen Middle School, the County of San Diego and many more. How a history of improv, substance abuse hospitals, and College got him to where he is. Psychological safety is when we can challenge each other without divisiveness. Toxic positivity Internal resilience. Find others who feel the same way. How to lead to more productivity. How to not get caught in the gripe session. Yes, And How to be a transformative principal? Be vulnerable recognizing how the space is not safe. Ask for their thoughts in a way that feels safe. Sponsors John Catt Today's Transformative Principal sponsor, John Catt Educational, amplifies world-class voices on timeless topics, with a list of authors recognized globally for their fresh perspectives and proven strategies to drive success in modern schools and classrooms. John Catt's mission is to support high-quality teaching and learning by ensuring every educator has access to professional development materials that are research-based, practical, and focused on the key topics proven essential in today's and tomorrow's schools. Learn more about professional development publications that are easy to implement for your entire faculty, and are both quickly digestible and rigorous, by visiting https://us.johncattbookshop.com/. Learn more about some of the newest titles: - The Coach's Guide to Teaching by Doug Lemov The Feedback Pendulum: A manifesto for enhancing feedback in education by Michael Chiles Putting Staff First: A blueprint for revitalising our schools by John Tomsett and Jonny Uttley 10 Things Schools Get Wrong (And How We Can Get Them Right) by Jared Cooney Horvath and David Bott Let's Talk About Flex: Flipping the flexible working narrative for education by Emma Turner A Parent's Guide to Powerful Teaching by Patrice Bain John Catt is also proud publisher of the new book from Transformative Principal host Jethro Jones: SchoolX: How principals can design a transformative school experience for students, teachers, parents – and themselves Visit this page to learn more about bulk orders and how to bring John Catt's research-based materials to your school: https://us.johncattbookshop.com/pages/agents-and-distributors

The Sports Medicine Podcast
Huffines Podcast 284 - Dr. Bob Sallis on Exercise preventing COVID morbidity and mortality!

The Sports Medicine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 22:48


It's Podcast Friday!  Join us today for our discussion of a large new study that has shown that regular moderate exercise is the second best way to prevent COVID hospitalization and death.  Dr. Bob Sallis from Kaiser Permanente and former President of the American College of Sports Medicine joins us to discuss their recent huge study about the effect of regular exercise on COVID responses.  This study was unique in that it had almost 49,000 subjects with at least 6 months of exercise data before the pandemic, and then what happened to these subjects when they got COVID.  This was truly one-of-a-kind study and join us to find out how it was done and the ramifications of the results! (click here for the original study and the New York Times piece on the study).  

The Business Elevation Show with Chris Cooper - Be More. Achieve More

It is a part of human and business life that we will experience resistance to our ideas and initiatives and the more we put ourselves out there the more resistance we may encounter. So have you considered that there are effective strategies to understand resistance and avoid it before it even occurs? According to my guest Rick Maurer understanding how to break through resistance is key to turning skepticism and opposition into support for new initiatives. Rick works closely with clients to develop change strategies that will work in their unique organizations. Some of the organizations he has worked with include Lockheed Martin, Deloitte, National GeoSpatial Intelligence Agency, Verizon, Charles Schwab, The Washington Post, NASA, Tulane University Hospital, Kaiser Permanente, and many government agencies in the US, Canada, the UK, Europe, and Russia. Join us we learn how to become highly effective at dealing with resistance whilst discussing Rick's latest book, Seizing Moments of Possibility: Ways to Trigger Energy and Forward Momentum on Your Ideas and Plans.

Jake Blanchard Podcast
Episode #84 - Modern Medicine, leadership, and making your own path.

Jake Blanchard Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 43:00


Dan Meltzer, MD is a board-certified emergency physician, the former chief and chairman of the Department of Emergency Medicine at Kaiser Permanente in San Diego, and has had executive leadership roles as CMO for several organizations, and is currently the Chief Medical Officer of Clinical Solutions for Matrix Medical Network. Dan is a wealth of knowledge, and shares great perspectives from a life filled with rich experiences. https://www.linkedin.com/in/daniel-meltzer-md-mph-facep-b789a2b6/# https://matrixmedicalnetwork.com/ SPECIAL THANKS: https://www.Fewwillhunt.com - Everyone wants to Eat... Few Will Hunt. "JBP" = 15% Off https://www.fellowshipbrand.com - Premium Men's Grooming Products "JBP" = 10% Off https://www.Stream2sea.com - All Natural Care Products and Sunscreen "JBP" = 10% Off

Labor Express Radio
Show: Labor Express for 12-5-2021 - Jonah Furman, Labor Notes on new John Deere contract and sympathy strikes at Kaiser

Labor Express Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 56:09


This is the full 12-5-2021 episode of the Labor Express Radio program. On the latest episode of Labor Express Radio, Jonah Furman of Labor Notes discusses the victory of striking workers at John Deere and what they won in their new contract. Jonah also talks about the new contracts or TAs for IATSE members and workers for Kaiser, as well as the overall state of labor struggle in this unique period. Later in the program, voices from the picket lines of striking workers for Kaiser Permanente in the Bay Area of California. Labor Express Radio is Chicago's only English language labor news and current affairs radio program. News for working people, by working people. Labor Express Radio airs every Sunday at 8:00 PM on WLPN in Chicago, 105.5 FM. For more information, see our Facebook page... laborexpress.org and our homepage on Archive.org at: http://www.archive.org/details/LaborExpressRadio Labor Express is a member of the Labor Radio / Podcast Network, Working People's Voices – Broadcasting Worldwide 24 Hours A Day. laborradionetwork.org #laborradionetwork #LaborRadioPod #1u #UnionStrong

Moving Forward Leadership: Inspire | Mentor | Lead
UNLOCKING YOUR SUBORDINATES POTENTIAL | LISA KOSS

Moving Forward Leadership: Inspire | Mentor | Lead

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 44:51


Crafting a clear agenda and attending to people's states of mind can lead to far more effective meetings and build a sense of resilience and trust.Most team members aren't fully present at meetings — they're still processing thoughts and feelings from the meetings before. Creating an agenda that gives employees room to reflect and close is a powerful way to ensure employees are more present.  Lisa J. Koss is the co-founder and a partner at Ontos Global. She has 25 years' experience in global leadership, team development, talent management, executive coaching and design and organizational change initiatives. Her proprietary coaching model has been taught in 9 different languages across the globe. Her clients include Kaiser Permanente, ITT, Xylem, British Petroleum, Honeywell, Hewlett Packard, General Electric, Ernst & Young, and many more.   Topics During this interview Lisa and I discuss the following topics: How she got into developmental coachingHow to start becoming a manager-coachThe difference between mentoring and coachingHow to be a more empathetic leaderHow to get your subordinates more interested in being coached For the complete show notes be sure to check out our website: https://movingforwardleadership.com/195

BYOB: The Healthcare Podcast
Episode 8 - ChenMed and Value-Based Care with Josh Dumas

BYOB: The Healthcare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 33:27


In the eighth episode of BYOB: The Healthcare Podcast, the team speaks to Josh Dumas who is a Center Director for ChenMed in Jacksonville, FL. The crew discusses how the Medicare Advantage market has exploded in recent years and how organizations like ChenMed among others, are leading the way in a new high-touch setting for Medicare beneficiaries. The guys deepdive with Josh on what it's like to lead a site that takes care of thousands of lives, what events early in his life inspired him to join the healthcare field and what it was like to leave a prominent administrative fellowship to pursue an opportunity across the country. Josh Dumas – ChenMed Josh Dumas serves as a Center Director at ChenMed, a value-based primary care provider for Medicare lives, where he is responsible for the day-to-day operations, profitability, and membership growth of a 1500+ patient clinic in Jacksonville, Florida. Josh served as an operations manager prior to his current role and is an alumna of ChenMed's Leadership Academy. Before ChenMed, Josh worked with Sutter Health and Kaiser Permanente in the Bay Area. Josh received his MHA from Cornell University in 2020, and his Bachelors in Biology and Psychology from Central Connecticut State University in 2018. With a passion for serving and improving the lives of those in need, Josh hopes to use healthcare as a tool to create socially equitable and thriving communities. Josh firmly believes that every human deserves an equal opportunity to be their happiest and healthiest self, regardless of the race, gender, income, or social class they are born into. Josh believes that healthcare can and should be used as a catalyst to drive change and empower underserved communities. The crew asked Josh the following questions: For our listeners who may not be aware, can you speak to the great work that ChenMed does and who they are? What does value-based care mean to you? Can you talk to us about the Medicare Advantage market and why has that exploded so much in recent years with entrants like ChenMed and Oak Street Health? How did you carve a path to be at ChenMed today? How do you find balance outside of work and how do you inspire others? What are you still looking forward to in your career? In this week's ‘Talking with Nakin' segment, Nakin speaks to the CVS announcement that indicates that they would be closing 900 stores over the next three years. The crew discusses the impacts that these closings have in areas that are already seen as health and pharmacy desserts. CVS has a larger footprint in the United States (as it relates to the number of physical locations) than Walmart, Target, Kroger and Costco combined, even after closing 250 stores in recent years. Listen to this episode as the crew discusses this and more and welcome listeners into the last bit of 2021! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/byob-health/message

Keep Leading!™
KL130: The Respectful Leader

Keep Leading!™

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 35:31


KL130 Gregg Ward Founder, Center for Respectful Leadership The Respectful Leader Episode Summary RESPECT! This simple word was turned into an anthem by the legendary Aretha Franklin! We could use more “respect” in our world today.  For this reason, on Episode 130 of the Keep Leading!® podcast, I discuss respectful leadership with Gregg Ward, the Center for Respectful Leadership founder. Bio Gregg Ward is the Center for Respectful Leadership executive director and a best-selling, award-winning author, speaker, facilitator, and executive coach. Gregg is on a mission to transform lives and organizations by focusing on Respectful Leadership, Emotional, Social and Cultural Intelligence. The Respectful Leader (Wiley, 2016), Gregg's latest book, was awarded “Best Book of the Month” by Amazon and instantly became a best-seller. In 2018, the book won the Gold Medal in the prestigious Axiom Business Book Awards competition. Gregg began his career in 1986 as a specialist trainer for The New York City Police Department. Since then, he has developed and delivered over 2,500 keynote presentations and talks, training programs, seminars, webinars, and workshops for global organizations such as Booz Allen Hamilton, Kaiser Permanente, Ford, Qualcomm, the US Navy, and Warner Bros Studios. Gregg also served for five years as a freelance journalist on assignment throughout Europe for BBC Radio and other UK media. He is incredibly proud to have covered the fall of the Berlin Wall. Gregg holds a BFA from Boston University, is a Board-Certified Coach (BCC), a Master Corporate Executive Coach (MCEC), and is an Executive Coach with The Center for Creative Leadership. He is based in San Diego, CA. Website https://centerforrespectfulleadership.org/ Other Website https://greggwardgroup.com/ LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/greggward/ Twitter https://twitter.com/greggwardgroup   Facebook https://www.facebook.com/CenterForRespectfulLeadership   Leadership Quote "You respect yourself, you respect other people, and you'll do okay." Muhammad Ali said this to me when he was visiting my home outside of NYC when I was five years old (my dad was a sportswriter who was interviewing him at the time).  Get Your Copy of Gregg's Book! https://greggwardgroup.com/bookstore/ Subscribe, share and review on Apple Podcasts! https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/keep-leading/id1461490512 Full Episode Transcripts and Detailed Guest Information www.KeepLeadingPodcast.com   Keep Leading LIVE (Live Recordings of the Keep Leading!® Podcast) www.KeepLeadingLive.com The Keep Leading!® podcast is for people passionate about leadership. It is dedicated to leadership development and insights. Join your host Eddie Turner, The Leadership Excelerator® as he speaks with accomplished leaders and people of influence across the globe as they share their journey to leadership excellence. Listen as they share leadership strategies, techniques, and insights. For more information visit https://eddieturnerllc.com or follow Eddie Turner on Twitter and Instagram at @eddieturnerjr. Like Eddie Turner LLC on Facebook. Connect with Eddie Turner on LinkedIn. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Law Offices Of Quibble, Squabble & Bicker
S3: Client 24 - Gift Horses Eat Too Much

Law Offices Of Quibble, Squabble & Bicker

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 53:41


With the gift giving holidays on the horizon, the Law Offices Of Quibble, Squabble & Bicker address a long standing situation with their new client, Gift Horses Eat Too Much. They talk about Indie Pods United Summit, Sal Vagina, Kaiser Permanente, trichinosis, chlamydia, man slut, sexually abused pizza dough, lukewarm pockets, jizzy glaze, dark horse, Cthulhu, Ayn Rand, Atlas Sharted, behind the beaded curtain, nature's car, Monty Python, Great Bribbin, bolognese, pea gravel, taxi nuns, Agnes of Goop, sweater jokes, rich and jewey, a man who works the docks, collar stays, a bunch of pigs, Joan Collins, stinky cheeses, Katrina and the Waves and a baking suit. For other episodes, go to www.qsblaw.org. They are also internettable on: Instagram - @lawofficesofquibble; Twitter - @qsblaw; TikTok - @qsblaw; Uhive - https://www.uhive.com/web/shares/z/QTTCLFU; Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/quiblle.bicker.3; Tumblr - quibblesquabblebicker; Reddit - https://www.reddit.com/user/QuibbleSquabble or watch them on YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/c/LawOfficesofQuibbleSquabbleBicker --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/qsb/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/qsb/support

Empowered Nutrition
Examining Dated Eating Disorder Views with Dr. Marcella Raimondo

Empowered Nutrition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 47:53


I find, in my practice, that I encounter clients with eating disorders or disordered eating regularly. As nutrition professionals, it is important for us to be able to work cohesively with the mental health professionals that are treating these clients and stay updated on current treatment plans.  Are you a nutritionist that sees these types of patients? Do you want to know more about what metal health professionals want from us, to best aid their patients' recoveries? Marcella Raimondo, PhD, MPH is a passionate and spirited clinical trainer speaking from her heart on social justice and eating disorders since 1995. Marcella received her B.A. from UC Berkeley, and Master's Degree in Public Health from the University of Michigan. Marcella's desire to address eating disorders drove her to pursue her doctorate in clinical psychology, receiving her PhD in 2012. She completed her post- doc internships at an eating disorder outpatient program and an eating disorder residential program for adolescents. Marcella currently serves as a Licensed Clinical Psychologist (PSY # 27037) in Kaiser Permanente's eating disorder clinic in Oakland and runs a private practice. Marcella herself recovered from anorexia nervosa over 20 years ago. In this episode we talk about:  Marcella's journey to become a specialist in eating disorders How to strike a balance between eating disorders and therapeutic medical diets Whether and how modern foods and diet culture perpetuate eating disorders How nutrition professionals can support mental health professionals  with meal plans, liberating from restrictive food mentality, support with health needs such as IBS and diabetes, education on metabolic processes, explanation of physiology of dieting and its effects on metabolism and how it leads to malnutrition Marcella's process with eating disorder patients dealing with their behaviors, exercise,  body image, diet recall, goals, mental health and family history, risk, and their personal stories and how the disorders may serve to fill a need, and addressing those needs in a healthy manner How she helps practitioners improve their expertise with eating disorders Connect with Dr. Raimondo at marcella@marcellaedtraining.com or 510 214-2865. Visit Dr. Raimondo's training Website: https://marcellaedtraining.com/speaking/  Facebook and Instagram: Dr.Marcella Raimondo Check out the full episode at: https://erinskinner.com/empowerednutrition/MarcellaRaimondo   Please review the Empowered Nutrition Podcast on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen! Then, send me a screenshot of your positive review to erin@erinskinner.com as a DM on Instagram (erinskinner_rd) .  Include a brief description of what you're working on with your health and/or nutrition and I'll send you a free custom meal plan! 

KMJ's Afternoon Drive
Monday 11/29 - Hour 3

KMJ's Afternoon Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 38:49


If you're buying a Christmas tree this year, expect to pay 5-10% more for a live tree and 10-30% more for artificial trees. With more dense morning fog in the valley, parents are concerned that local school districts are not calling foggy day schedules as frequently as they should be. The 430-foot asteroid named 1994 WR12 has passed by earth with about 3.8 million miles to spare. Following the hit and run death of a 23-year-old Fresno State student on 180 early Saturday morning, CHP has recovered a Lexus believed to be involved and have identified two persons of interest, ages 16 and 17. 57-year-old, Sidney Carpenter, a pathologist at Kaiser Permanente known as the "Dancing Doctor" to folks in Clovis, was struck and killed on Saturday while crossing the street after dark.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy
270: Losing Weight vs Gaining New Habits

Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 69:26


Today's podcast features an esteemed colleague and beloved friend, Dr. Angela Krumm, who will describe her personal victory over a recent weight gain. We will illuminate the TEAM-CBT techniques she used so that you can use them yourself if you'd like to lose some weight. But I have to warn you that you have to do these techniques using paper and pencil. If you try to learn and use them just from listening, they will not be effective. As an aside, if you go to my website, www.feelinggood.com, you'll find a free chapter offer at the very bottom of my home page. If you click on it, you'll receive two unpublished chapters from my most recent book, Feeling Great, with crystal clear instructions on the methods you'll learn about in today's podcast. Angela's biosketch goes next, including how she joined David's Tuesday training group when she was a post-doctoral fellow in clinical psychology and how she ultimately developed the TEAM-CBT certification program at the FeelingGoodInstitute.com. Hopefully Angela can help with this paragraph! As the podcast begins, Angela explains how she's always viewed herself as a very fit, health-conscious woman who actually completed some marathons in the past. But during 2021, her life has been complicated by a number of tragedies and traumas, including: Angela's father was sadly diagnosed with terminal cancer and died within four months. Angela had many personal injuries that impacted her capacity to exercise, including a laceration of her retina and a fractured toe. In addition, she fell backwards over a ledge in her backyard and plunged eight feet. She sustained a concussion and experienced many lingering symptoms for 6 to 8 weeks including dizziness, brain fog, and sensitivity to light. She described what happened next like this: All this time my weight kept creeping up. I stopped caring about exercise, and during the COVID crisis, food become a joy and an escape. Then, I had a wake-up call, an ah-ha moment when everything suddenly changed. Angela described attending a wedding, and her husband was the photographer. When she saw herself in the photos, she was shocked that she no longer recognized herself because of the weight she'd gained. She also noticed that the day of the wedding, she'd eaten six huge but delicious chocolate chip cookies that her niece had baked. She says, It hit me, and I didn't have to think twice. There's a history of diabetes in my family, and I didn't want to keep gaining weight and struggle with all the medical complications of type 2 diabetes. I want to be healthy and fit so I can live to an old age and enjoy my children and grandchildren! She used behavioral and TEAM-CBT skills to tackle the problem, starting with setting specific goals for herself. She said that lots of her patients who are overweight have vague goals, like “I want to lose some weight” or “I want to get in shape,” but general goals won't be effective. In TEAM, you always focus on something specific. Angela explained the critical difference between Outcome Goals and Process Goals. An example of an Outcome Goal would be telling yourself that you want to lose ten pounds or whatever your goal might be. There's a big problem with Outcome Goals. You might go on an extreme, like fasting or eating very little, so you can lose weight fairly quickly. Then you will feel happy and tell yourself that you're done when you've achieved your goal. The big problem is that you haven't modified your eating habits, and that's exactly why you will quickly gain back all that weight you temporarily lost. Process Goals are different. Instead, you focus on the number of calories you can eat each day in order to lose weight, and then you make wise food choices within your calorie limit. In addition, you start out with a gentle but consistent exercise regimen, and then you slowly build up to more exercise. Angela started with two workouts per week and built up to four weekly workouts over time. She also set modest and realistic goals for weight loss, setting a calorie limit that would allow her two lose weight slowly, at the rate of just ½ pound per week. This plan has allowed her to lose 21 pounds, and she was looking terrific today! She has been using a free app called Lose It which provides her with all the information she needs for tracking calories bd weight, along with her BMI (Body Mass Index). She's now on a maintenance diet of 1800 calories per day and she's really pleased with it. We also illustrated several powerful motivational TEAM-CBT techniques, including: The Triple Paradox. You divide a piece of paper into three vertical columns where you list Advantages of your habit / addiction: First, you list all the GOOD reasons to continue with the status quo of unlimited eating and little or no exercise. Disadvantages off change: Next, you list all the negatives and hassles associated with dieting and exercise. Core values: Finally, you list what your overeating and slacking on exercise shows about you and your core values that's positive and awesome. As you can see, instead of pushing yourself, or your patient, to change, you go in the opposite direction. You take the role of the subconscious resistance to change, and list all the really powerful reasons to continue with your habit or addiction. In other words, you try to convince yourself NOT to change! Oddly, this usually triggers tremendous motivation to CHANGE. This paradox is one of the key features in all of TEAM-CBT. You can see Angela's Triple Paradox workshop if you click here. The Habit / Addiction Log. Here you record your tempting thoughts, such as: One more treat today won't hurt. I deserve it/ I've had a tough day! That brownie looks SO GOOD! I'm an active person so I deserve to eat whatever I want. The Devil's Advocate Technique. This is a powerful role-playing technique where you challenge and crush the tempting thoughts. We illustrate this technique with role-playing on today's podcast. Angela plays the role of her Self-Control thoughts and Rhonda and I play the role of the Devil, tempting Angela to give in to her tempting thoughts. The Problem / Solution list. You divide a piece of paper into two columns by drawing a line down the middle. In the left column (Problems), you list all the things that will sabotage your efforts to diet. In the right column (Solutions), you list solutions for all of those problems. You can see Angela's Problem / Solution list if you click here. We also discussed the issue of therapist resistance to these rather unconventional techniques. The problem is that therapists and counselors are trained to help. This paradoxically triggers patient resistance. TEAM-CBT requires one of the four “Great Deaths” of the therapist's ego—the death of the co-dependent self that feels the compulsion to save, rescue or help the patient. David gave a personal example of the extremely adverse effects of “helping” when he was the patient in an interaction with a health professional at Kaiser Permanente in California. The physician's zeal for helping actually had the opposite effect of driving David away, and he did not go to the doctor for the next ten years. So now you have a feel for the TEAM-CBT approach to habits and addictions. These methods can be surprisingly powerful but remember. You'll have to do them on paper, as Angela did, if you want success. Rhonda and I will probably offer a free, two-hour workshop on habits and addictions in late January, and if you attend, you'll have the chance to try some of these techniques on for size. We hope you can join us! Thanks for listening! And thank you, Angela, for sharing your personal example and for your awesome teaching. Rhonda, Angela, and David PS, I thought you might enjoy this "selfie," showing the amazing results that are possible after just a few weeks with TEAM-CBT!. Keep in mind that I'm 79. Just imagine what a few weeks of TEAM could do for you!

The Mindful Coping Podcast
A Deep Conversation With Leonard Perlmutter

The Mindful Coping Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 57:34


To learn more about Leonard and his work, visithttps://americanmeditation.orghttps://www.facebook.com/AmericanMeditationInstitutehttps://www.instagram.com/american_meditation_institutehttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbjgf9zM53NRo80FnMzbV9gTo learn more about Leonard's new book, YOUR CONSCIENCE: The Key to Unlock Limitless Wisdom and Creativity and Solve All of Life's Challenges  visit https://americanmeditation.org/your-conscienceEach of us knows how it feels to make the right choice. The true choice. When our outer actions reflect our inner wisdom, we feel positive, energized, creative, loving, and fulfilled. So why do we sometimes ignore that wisdom and make bad decisions? The problem lies in our mind…and the solution lies there too.Your Conscience, a new book by AMI Founder Leonard Perlmutter, helps us understand how to train the mind to make choices that lead to the kind of life we want to live. This short, powerful handbook teaches that we already have everything we need to live a happy, healthy, and fulfilling life. We must simply learn a few tools to access our own unlimited wisdom and creativity.LEONARD PERLMUTTER (Ram Lev) is the founder and director of the American Meditation Institute in Averill Park, NY and is the originator of National Conscience Month. He studied in Rishikesh, India under Swami Rama of the Himalayas whose lab studies at the Menninger Institute demonstrated that blood pressure, heart rate and the autonomic nervous system can be voluntarily controlled. Leonard has presented informative Yoga Science and meditation workshops at the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Kaiser Permanente, The New York Times Forum on Yoga, the Commonwealth Club of California, the University of Connecticut School of Medicine, the Washington University Medical School, the University of Colorado Medical School, the University of Wisconsin School of Nursing, the U.S. Military Academy at West Point Association of Graduates, the Albany Medical College, and Berkshire Medical Center and has served on the faculties of the New England Institute of Ayurvedic Medicine and the International Himalayan Yoga Teachers Association. He is the author and editor of Transformation: The Journal of Yoga Science as Holistic Mind/Body Medicine and his Heart and Science of Yoga® course curriculum has been certified by the Albany Medical College, the American Medical Association, and the American Nurses Association for continuing medical education credit.

Four Layered Takes
Love You... Maybe? Our Review, ”Insecure” S5 episode 5

Four Layered Takes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 45:09


In today's show, we review episode 5 of "Insecure", season 5. Our takes... First, RIP Young Dolph; Summer Walker is a paradox; gotta allow men to be chivalrous; Black mamas be invasive; if a man tells you he loves you first, he may be trying to keep you; Kaiser Permanente facilities need more floors. Please visit us at @4layeredtakes and don't forget to subscribe, rate and review us on iTunes, Google Play and now Spotify.

The LA Report
Experts advise boosters now; L.A. redistricting open to public comments; Hunger continues for many Angelenos – The P.M. Edition

The LA Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 5:14


What's happening today: Health experts advise getting boosters before winter gatherings; Details on new Kaiser Permanente worker contract; L.A. redistricting open Tuesday to public comments; Many Angelenos still don't have enough to eat; Winds expected to return on Thanksgiving Day. This program is made possible in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a private corporation funded by the American people.   Support the show: https://support.laist.com/laistnav

The LA Report
Kaiser Permanente boosters available for all; High winds cause power cuts for some; Supply chain woes affect small restaurants; Drive-thru pantry for families in need – The A.M. Edition

The LA Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 4:15


Here's your morning news: Kaiser Permanente now offering boosters to all adult members; SoCal Edison cuts power for some customers due to high winds; Supply chain crisis affecting small restaurants; L.A. City Council holding drive-thru pantry for families in need. This program is made possible in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a private corporation funded by the American people. Support the show: https://support.laist.com/laistnav

WorkforceRx with Futuro Health
Katie Nielson, Founder of EnGen: Tapping into the Hidden Workforce

WorkforceRx with Futuro Health

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 20:44


As U.S. employers continue to struggle to find workers, they may want to turn their attention to populations who have the skills they need but lack proficiency in English. This describes many people in immigrant and refugee populations who are currently overlooked by employers and make up part of what is called the "hidden workforce." On this episode of WorkforceRx, Katie Nielson, PhD, joins Futuro Health CEO Van Ton Quinlivan to describe how she works with employers to tap the potential of this talent pool. Nielson has a growing sense of urgency on this issue due to the fact that by 2030, every baby boomer will have reached retirement age and 97% of net workforce growth will be immigrants and their children. “The biggest barrier to integration in general and, definitely to promotion and advancement in the workforce, is English skills,” she says. “If we think about English as something that we can do to help upskill our workforce, then we'll be able to get those learners not just the English skills but also the workforce skills that they need to succeed.” Tune in to learn about Nielson's blend of tech-enabled study and interaction, the wisdom of taking a “backwards design” approach, and how workplace-based language programs can help employers achieve goals around diversity, equity and inclusion.

Master Leadership
ML243: Ginger Zumaeta (Leader & Author)

Master Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 24:00


3X Emmy Award-winning writer and producer, Ginger Zumaeta, advises companies on positioning and communicating big ideas. She's the Founder and CEO of Zumaeta Group, a positioning and messaging strategy firm, and author of the forthcoming book Deckonomics: Design Presentations that Spread Ideas, Drive Decisions and Close Deals.Ginger has worked with some of the world's largest brands, such as Coca Cola, Verizon, Union Bank, Amgen, Anthem, Infinity Insurance and many others. Her insights have been featured in publications such as Business Insider, TheNextWeb, Better Marketing, Storius, and Marketing Profs, among others and she's spoken about marketing and messaging on numerous stages including Verizon's Hispanic Marketings series, the Latina Style National Conference, Union Bank's Personal Branding series, Kaiser Permanente's Annual Brand Conference, and the Promax National Conference. She's the winner of 3 Emmy Awards, 12 Muse awards and a Gracie Award for her work in television, and has held positions as an adjunct professor at UCLA and Cal Lutheran in marketing and research.After going from an award-winning career at NBC to launching a strategic consulting firm, Ginger uses her experience in storytelling and persuasion to train corporate teams in telling better business stories to move high-stakes work forward with clear and succinct presentations grounded in story structure and backed by brain science.More Info: www.gingerzumaeta.comSponsors:Weather The Storm: 831b.comFree Coaching Session: Masterleadership.orgSupport Our Show: Click HereSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/masterleadership. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Work Stoppage
Ep 77 - HelloUnion

Work Stoppage

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 91:59


There are new contracts all over the place on this week's episode of Work Stoppage.  We start with Kaiser Permanente, where a tentative agreement has been reached to prevent the planned implementation of a two tiered contract.  Then we discuss the end of the month long John Deere strike, after workers ratified a new deal which contains hard fought gains but maintains their two tiered system.  Also this week, IATSE has ratified a new contract against the wishes of a majority of union members due to the use of an undemocratic delegate system.  HelloFresh workers have faced sub-poverty wages, racist abuse from management, dangerous working conditions, and now a vicious union busting campaign as they fight for their right to collectively bargain.  Finally, Burgerville workers have fought hard for three years, making admirable gains for workers across the company, and now finally have a historic tentative contract agreement to become the first recognized fast food union in the country. Subscribe for additional Overtime episodes at patreon.com/workstoppage Join the discord: discord.gg/tDvmNzX Follow the pod @WorkStoppagePod on Twitter, John @facebookvillain, and Lina @solidaritybee.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.18.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 59:15


Videos for Today: 1. DR Peter C. Gøtzsche Comments – 3 mins   2. PARENTS IN NY TAKE TO THE STREETS TO WARN IGNORANT PARENTS INJECTING THEIR CHILDREN WITH PFIZER SHOT   3, DANIEL NAGASE – EFFECTS OF CV VX ON THE IMMUNE SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT IN CHILDREN   4.The Great Narrative: A call to action speaker Freeke Heijman (start 3 min mark)    5. COMMERCIAL PILOT CODY FLINT: “I DON'T KNOW IF I WILL EVER BE ABLE TO FLY A PLANE AGAIN.”   6. Study, Experts: Vaccinated Are Spreading COVID-19 start 23 seconds in    7. RFK CLIP Start 50 seconds in    Everyone missed this one… vaccinated people are up to 9X more likely to be hospitalized than unvaccinated people Australian War Propaganda Keeps Getting Crazier Are we seeing some new form of Covid-19 Vaccine induced Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome? – Official Government data suggests the Fully Vaccinated are on the precipice of disaster as their Immune Systems are being decimated $285 Billion Tax Cut for the Rich Is Now 2nd Most Expensive Piece of Build Back Better Wall Street's Takeover of Nature Advances with Launch of New Asset Class  Court Deals New Blow to ‘Fatally Flawed' Biden Vaccine Mandates, But What Does That Mean?     Study: Sustainable eating is cheaper and healthier Oxford University, November 11, 2021 Oxford University research has today revealed that, in countries such as the US, the UK, Australia and across Western Europe, adopting a vegan, vegetarian, or flexitarian diet could slash your food bill by up to one-third. The study, which compared the cost of seven sustainable diets to the current typical diet in 150 countries, using food prices from the World Bank's International Comparison Program, was published in The Lancet Planetary Health. It found that in high-income countries: Vegan diets were the most affordable and reduced food costs by up to one third. Vegetarian diets were a close second. Flexitarian diets with low amounts of meat and dairy reduced costs by 14%. By contrast, pescatarian diets increased costs by up to 2%. “We think the fact that vegan, vegetarian and flexitarian diets can save you a lot of money is going to surprise people,” says Dr. Marco Springmann, researcher on the Oxford Martin Programme on the Future of Food. “When scientists like me advocate for healthy and environmentally-friendly eating, it's often said we're sitting in our ivory towers promoting something financially out of reach for most people. This study shows it's quite the opposite. These diets could be better for your bank balance as well as for your health and…the planet.” Miguel Barclay, author of the bestselling “One Pound Meals” series of cookbooks, says, “I definitely agree that cutting down your meat, or cutting it out completely, will save you money. I've written seven budget cookbooks and have costed up hundreds of recipes, and without doubt vegan and vegetarian meals consistently come in at a much lower price than recipes with meat.” The study focused on whole foods and did not include highly-processed meat replacements or eating at restaurants or takeaways. The study also found that in lower income countries, such as on the Indian subcontinent and in sub-Saharan Africa, eating a healthy and sustainable diet would be up to a quarter cheaper than a typical Western diet, but at least a third more expensive than current diets. To analyze what options could improve affordability and reduce diet costs, the study looked at several policy options. It found that making healthy and sustainable diets affordable everywhere is possible within the next 10 years when economic development, especially in lower income countries, is paired with reductions in food waste and a climate and health-friendly pricing of foods. “Affording to eat a healthy and sustainable diet is possible everywhere, but requires political will,” according to Dr. Springmann. “Current low-income diets tend to contain large amounts of starchy foods and not enough of the foods we know are healthy. And the western-style diets, often seen as aspirational, are not only unhealthy, but also vastly unsustainable and unaffordable in low-income countries. Any of the healthy and sustainable dietary patterns we looked at are a better option for health, the environment, and financially, but development support and progressive food policies are needed to make them both affordable and desirable everywhere.” The study, “The global and regional costs of healthy and sustainable dietary patterns: a modeling study,” is published in The Lancet Planetary Health on 10 November 2021. Country-level results are available here. Green One Pound Meals by Miguel Barclay is published on 30 December. It features planet-friendly recipes and includes tips and ideas for shopping smart and avoiding food waste. Meta-analysis concludes resveratrol beneficially modulates glycemic control in diabetics Zagazig University and Suez Canal University (Egypt), October 29 2021.  Findings from a meta-analysis of clinical trials published on October 16, 2021 in Medicina Clinica (Barcelona) revealed an association between supplementing with resveratrol and improvements in glycemic control. “Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a progressive meta-inflammatory disorder, which induces micro and macrovascular complications,” Ibrahim A. Abdelhaleem and colleagues wrote. “Resveratrol is a nutraceutical known to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.” “This systematic review and meta-analysis is the first to consider resveratrol's efficacy on glycemic and cardiometabolic parameters in patients with T2DM.” Sixteen randomized trials that included a total of 871 diabetic men and women were selected for the meta-analysis. The trials compared resveratrol to a placebo with or without concurrent antidiabetic medications or other drug treatment. Resveratrol doses of 500 milligrams or more were associated with lower fasting blood glucose, fasting serum insulin, insulin resistance, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and diastolic blood pressure in comparison with a placebo. Resveratrol was associated with a greater reduction in hemoglobin A1c (a marker of long-term glucose control) compared to a placebo in trials of three months duration. When HDL cholesterol levels were analyzed, resveratrol was superior to a placebo in trials of less than two months duration. Resveratrol was also associated with a reduction in systolic blood pressure compared to measurements obtained in the placebo group. Furthermore, triglycerides were lower in association with resveratrol in trials that lasted six to twelve months. “We concluded that resveratrol appropriately improved insulin sensitivity by decreasing insulin resistance, fasting blood glucose, fasting serum insulin, and hemoglobin A1c,” the authors concluded. “In addition, it improved other cardiometabolic parameters, including triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure. The most appropriate glycemic control effect was fulfilled when consumed for at least one month with doses of 500 mg or more.” Exercise linked to better mental health Kaiser Permanente Research, November 11, 2021 Kaiser Permanente research published on November 11 in Preventive Medicine showed people who exercised more during the initial lockdown period of the COVID-19 pandemic experienced less anxiety and depression than those who didn't exercise. It also showed that people who spent more time outdoors typically experienced lower levels of anxiety and depression than those who stayed inside. More than 20,000 people participated in the survey-based study from 6 regions served by Kaiser Permanente across the United States, which included Hawaii, Colorado, Georgia, and the mid-Atlantic states, as well as Southern and Northern California. “What these study findings tell us is that even during an active pandemic or other public health crisis, people should be encouraged to be physically active to help maintain their physical and mental health,” said the study's lead author Deborah Rohm Young, PhD, the director of the Division of Behavioral Research for the Kaiser Permanente Southern California Department of Research & Evaluation. “Parks and other nature areas should remain open during public health emergencies to encourage outdoor physical activity.” In March 2020, COVID-19 developed into a worldwide pandemic. With no known treatment, public health officials attempted to reduce its spread by limiting human interactions through stay-at-home policies. Businesses temporarily closed or changed their practices to prevent the spread of the virus, affecting the economy and many people's jobs. These stressful factors, along with fewer opportunities to socialize with friends and family, increased symptoms of depression and anxiety for many people. Since it is known that physical activity and time spent in nature are associated with improved mental health, researchers at Kaiser Permanente in Southern California sought to determine how exercise and time outdoors was associated with people's mental health during the height of the pandemic. In April 2020, researchers sent a series of COVID-19 surveys to more than 250,000 participants in the Kaiser Permanente Research Bank — a collection of lifestyle surveys, electronic health record data, and biospecimens, which Kaiser Permanente members volunteered. People who reported COVID-19 symptoms were not included in this analysis, resulting in 20,012 respondents. They each completed at least 4 surveys between April and July 2020. White women older than 50 accounted for a high proportion of the respondents. Most respondents said they were retired and generally adhered to the “safer-at-home” orders during the period of the survey. The study found that: Reports of anxiety and depression decreased over time Anxiety and depression scores were higher for females and younger people, and lower for Asian and Black people compared with white respondents Participants who reported no physical activity reported the highest depression and anxiety compared to people who had exercised Spending less time outdoors was associated with higher depression and anxiety scores People who had increased their time outdoors the most reported the highest anxiety scores, but the research could not explain the finding “What we learned from these findings is that during future emergencies it will be important to carefully weigh the decisions to close parks and outdoor areas against the negative impact those closures may have on people's mental health,” said Dr. Young. Bedtime linked with heart health University of Exeter (UK), November 9, 2021 Going to sleep between 10:00 and 11:00 pm is associated with a lower risk of developing heart disease compared to earlier or later bedtimes, according to a study published today in European Heart Journal—Digital Health, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). “The body has a 24-hour internal clock, called circadian rhythm, that helps regulate physical and mental functioning,” said study author Dr. David Plans of the University of Exeter, UK. “While we cannot conclude causation from our study, the results suggest that early or late bedtimes may be more likely to disrupt the body clock, with adverse consequences for cardiovascular health.” While numerous analyses have investigated the link between sleep duration and cardiovascular disease, the relationship between sleep timing and heart disease is underexplored. This study examined the association between objectively measured, rather than self-reported, sleep onset in a large sample of adults. The study included 88,026 individuals in the UK Biobank recruited between 2006 and 2010. The average age was 61 years (range 43 to 79 years) and 58% were women. Data on sleep onset and waking up time were collected over seven days using a wrist-worn accelerometer. Participants completed demographic, lifestyle, health and physical assessments and questionnaires. They were then followed up for a new diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, which was defined as a heart attack, heart failure, chronic ischaemic heart disease, stroke, and transient ischaemic attack. During an average follow-up of 5.7 years, 3,172 participants (3.6%) developed cardiovascular disease. Incidence was highest in those with sleep times at midnight or later and lowest in those with sleep onset from 10:00 to 10:59 pm. The researchers analyzed the association between sleep onset and cardiovascular events after adjusting for age, sex, sleep duration, sleep irregularity (defined as varied times of going to sleep and waking up), self-reported chronotype (early bird or night owl), smoking status, body mass index, diabetes, blood pressure, blood cholesterol and socioeconomic status. Compared to sleep onset from 10:00 to 10:59 pm, there was a 25% higher risk of cardiovascular disease with a sleep onset at midnight or later, a 12% greater risk for 11:00 to 11:59 pm, and a 24% raised risk for falling asleep before 10:00 pm. In a further analysis by sex, the association with increased cardiovascular risk was stronger in women, with only sleep onset before 10:00 pm remaining significant for men. Dr. Plans said: “Our study indicates that the optimum time to go to sleep is at a specific point in the body's 24-hour cycle and deviations may be detrimental to health. The riskiest time was after midnight, potentially because it may reduce the likelihood of seeing morning light, which resets the body clock.” Dr. Plans noted that the reasons for the observed stronger association between sleep onset and cardiovascular disease in women is unclear. He said: “It may be that there is a sex difference in how the endocrine system responds to a disruption in circadian rhythm. Alternatively, the older age of study participants could be a confounding factor since women's cardiovascular risk increases post-menopause—meaning there may be no difference in the strength of the association between women and men.” He concluded: “While the findings do not show causality, sleep timing has emerged as a potential cardiac risk factor—independent of other risk factors and sleep characteristics. If our findings are confirmed in other studies, sleep timing and basic sleep hygiene could be a low-cost public health target for lowering risk of heart disease.” Garlic compounds may boost cardio health indirectly via gut microbiota National Taiwan University, November 6 2021 Allicin from garlic may prevent the metabolism of unabsorbed L-carnitine or choline into TMAO, a compound linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, says a new study from the National Taiwan University. TMAO – or trimethylamine N-oxide – has been known to be generated from dietary carnitine through metabolism of gut microbiota, and was recently reported to be an “important gut microbiota-dependent metabolite to cause cardiovascular diseases,” explained Taiwanese researchers in the Journal of Functional Foods . While antibiotics have been found to inhibit TMAO production, concerns over side effects and resistance have limited their use. This has led researchers to examine the potential of natural alternatives. New data indicated that carnitine-fed lab mice showed a “remarkable increase in plasma TMAO levels”, compared with lab mice fed a control (no carnitine). However, when allicin supplements were provided with the carnitine diet, TMAO levels were significantly reduced. “Surprisingly, the plasma TMAO levels in the mice of ‘carnitine diet + allicin' treatment group were as low as that of chow diet [control] group,” wrote the researchers. “This result indicated that the metabolic capacity of mice gut microbiota to produce TMAO was completely inhibited by allicin supplement even though provided with carnitine-rich environment in the gut. “It means the functional alteration of gut microbiota induced by carnitine diet can be prevented by addition of another substance with antimicrobial potential derived from food, such as allicin.” Garlic and heart health The study adds to the body of scientific literature supporting the potential heart health benefits of garlic and the compounds it contains. Consumer awareness of the health benefits of garlic, mostly in terms of cardiovascular and immune system health, has benefited the supplements industry, particularly since consumers seek the benefits of garlic without the odors that accompany the fresh bulb. The benefits have been linked to the compound allicin, which is not found in fresh garlic: It is only formed when garlic is crushed, which breaks down a compound called diallyl sulphide. Study details “This may offer an opportunity to take advantage of plants' delicately designed defense system against microorganisms, to protect ourselves by modulating gut microbiota to a healthier status,” wrote the researchers The Taiwanese researchers divided male C57BL/6(B6) mice into four groups: One group received only the control chow diet; the second group received the carnitine diet (carnitine added to drinking water at a level of 0.02%); the third group received the carnitine diet with supplemental allicin; and the final group received the control diet plus the allicin supplement for six weeks. Results showed that the second group (carnitine diet) had TMAO levels 4–22 times greater than those observed in the control group. However, these increases were attenuated in the carnitine + allicin group, said the researchers. “Our study suggests that antimicrobial phytochemicals such as allicin effectively neutralize the metabolic ability of TMAO production of gut microbiota induced by daily intake of L-carnitine,” wrote the researchers. “It may offer an opportunity for us to take advantage of plants' delicately designed defense system against microorganisms, to protect ourselves by modulating gut microbiota to a healthier status. “Our research also suggested that allicin and dietary fresh garlic containing allicin might be used as functional foods for the prevention of atherosclerosis,” they concluded. Drug used to prevent miscarriage increases risk of cancer in offspring University of Texas Health Science Center, November 9, 2021 Exposure in utero to a drug used to prevent miscarriage can lead to an increased risk of developing cancer, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth Houston). The study was published today in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. The drug, 17α-hydroxyprogesterone caproate (17-OHPC), is a synthetic progestogen that was frequently used by women in the 1950s and 1960s, and is still prescribed to women today to help prevent preterm birth. Progesterone helps the womb grow during pregnancy and prevents a woman from having early contractions that may lead to miscarriage. “Children who were born to women who received the drug during pregnancy have double the rate of cancer across their lifetime compared to children born to women who did not take this drug,” said Caitlin C. Murphy, PhD, MPH, lead author on the study and associate professor in the Department of Health Promotion and Behavioral Sciences at UTHealth School of Public Health in Houston. “We have seen cancers like colorectal cancer, pancreatic cancer, thyroid cancer, and many others increasing in people born in and after the 1960s, and no one really knows why.” Researchers reviewed data from the Kaiser Foundation Health Plan on women who received prenatal care between June 1959 and June 1967, and the California Cancer Registry, which traced cancer in offspring through 2019. Out of more than 18,751 live births, researchers discovered 1,008 cancer diagnoses were made in offspring ages 0 to 58 years. Additionally, a total of 234 offspring were exposed to 17-OHPC during pregnancy. Offspring exposed in the womb had cancer detected in adulthood more than twice as often as offspring not exposed to the drug – 65% of cancers occurred in adults younger than 50. “Our findings suggest taking this drug during pregnancy can disrupt early development, which may increase risk of cancer decades later,” Murphy said “With this drug, we are seeing the effects of a synthetic hormone. Things that happened to us in the womb, or exposures in utero, are important risk factors for developing cancer many decades after we're born.” A new randomized trial shows there is no benefit of taking 17-OHPC, and that it does not reduce the risk of preterm birth, according to Murphy. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration proposed in October 2020 that this particular drug be withdrawn from the market.

Psychic Dolphin Garage
Episode 125: The immortal Artemis

Psychic Dolphin Garage

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 69:38


Artemis joins us in a triumphant return! Well, she stayed on for the main after we recorded a fun Patreon. This week we discuss:

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand
Hour 2 | Dean Sharp and Kaiser Permanente Strike @ConwayShow

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 30:39


Dean Sharp- Aldik Christmas Tree //Kaiser Nurses avoids strike / Two-tiered systems being tested//Southwest – Passenger punches flight attendant / United airlines serving liquor//Escondido pop warner team//

Growing in God’s Word
Brave Nurse, Tori Jensen Escorted Out of Kaiser Permanente Hospital

Growing in God’s Word

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 28:12


We're blessed to speak with my new friend, Tori, a brave woman who has been a nurse since the beginning of Covid-19. California's vaccination of healthcare workers took effect on Sept. 30,2021, which allowed for religious or medical exemptions. However, Tori's religious beliefs were denied at Kaiser Permanente San Diego Medical Center in Kearny Mesa. In this episode, we discuss religious exemption, medical freedom, and perseverance under trial. Don't miss this opportunity to listen in, friends. I know you will be encouraged! Links to resources Tune in to watch Pastor Rick Brown live Saturdays at 6pm: pastorrickbrown.com Seek First with Rick Brown podcast: https://open.spotify.com/show/6ryzHPLzLRxeUJqNNhGTOP Rumble: https://rumble.com/user/pastorRickBrown Bible Messages: https://pastorrickbrown.com/teachings/ Anchored in the Word Bible Reading Plan: https://pastorrickbrown.com/reading-plan/ Check out Tammy Brown's book here: https://tammybrown.org

The LA Report
Kaiser Permanente strike averted; Soaring gas prices; L.A.'s unhoused engagement strategy; UCLA crowd control – The A.M. Edition

The LA Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 4:23


Here's your morning news: Kaiser Permanente strike averted; Gas prices near record high; L.A.'s unhoused street engagement strategy; UCLA to step up crowd control efforts. This program is made possible in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a private corporation funded by the American people. Support the show: https://support.laist.com/laistnav

The LA Report
Kaiser Permanente union talks break down; Updated indoor vaccine guidelines; Boosters urged for all adults – The P.M. Edition

The LA Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 5:19


What's happening today: Talks break down between Kaiser Permanente and unions; Updated guidelines for indoor vaccine mandate; Health officials urge boosters for all adults; Social spending bill could reshape pre-school for L.A. kids; This program is made possible in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a private corporation funded by the American people. Support the show: https://support.laist.com/laistnav

World Socialist Web Site Daily Podcast

The refugee crisis on the Polish-Belarusian border and the danger of war / Tens of thousands of Kaiser Permanente workers prepare to strike as global struggles by healthcare workers continue

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand
Hour 2 | Kaiser Permanente Strike and Callers @ConwayShow

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 31:36


Kaiser Callers and strike update/ Tim & Kelly High School//

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill
Strike Wave: Workers Flex Their Muscle in Tight Labor Market

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 44:54


Since January, there have been nearly 300 strikes throughout the U.S. This week on Intercepted: a look at the labor movement in 2021. Last week, tens of thousands of Kaiser Permanente health care workers announced that they will go on strike on November 15 if a collective bargaining agreement is not reached. If they take to the picket line, they will join hundreds of thousands of other workers nationwide who have used their labor power to demand better wages and working conditions in the aftermath of the Covid-19 pandemic. We hear from Kaiser Permanente workers, and then Labor Notes' Jonah Furman joins The Intercept's Washington Editor Nausicaa Renner to discuss this year's strike wave, the continued strike at John Deere, and the political implications of 2021's rise in labor activism. join.theintercept.com/donate/now See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The News with Shepard Smith
Astroworld Investigation, Drunk Driving Crackdown & America on Strike

The News with Shepard Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 49:35


CNBC's Shep Smith reports the House committee investigating the January 6th insurrection has issued 10 more subpoenas, after issuing 6 yesterday. Capitol riot suspect Evan Newman also fled the country in March and is now hiding in Belarus, saying he's seeking political asylum. CNBC's Phil LeBeau reports on Congress's efforts to detect and stop drunk drivers by requiring carmakers to install technology in new cars. NBC's Gabe Gutierrez reports on day seven of the Kyle Rittenhouse trial, as the prosecution rests its case. NBC's Ron Allen gives details on the trial in the death of Ahmaud Arbery, as courtroom arguments continue. The FBI is joining the criminal investigation into the deadly crowd surge that killed 8 people at the Astroworld festival. Plus, roughly 32 thousand healthcare workers at Kaiser Permanente say they're ready to strike which could affect hundreds of hospitals and pharmacies across 4 states.

The Real News Podcast
35,000 Kaiser Permanente workers are set to strike, and the future of US healthcare is at stake

The Real News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 57:29


35,000 members of the Alliance of Health Care Unions, a coalition of 21 local unions representing over 52,000 workers at the healthcare giant Kaiser Permanente in states around the country, have set a strike date. Unless the company addresses the serious issues that workers have raised at the bargaining table, Kaiser workers will walk off the job on Nov. 15, and thousands more may join in what could become one of the largest strikes ever in the healthcare sector. The core issues that led to the potential strike not only involve adequate compensation for union workers, but also the dire concerns about healthcare workers being grossly overworked and under-resourced, as well as two-tier employment and the struggle to draw in and retain trained staff. On top of the essential concerns that directly impact the jobs and livelihoods of healthcare workers, the outcome of this high-stakes labor struggle will have huge implications for the future of healthcare in the US as we know it.In this special edition of Working People, TRNN Editor-in-Chief Maximillian Alvarez speaks with two Kaiser workers, Hannah Winchester, DPT, and Nicholas Eng, RNFA, about the work that they do, the changes they've experienced in the healthcare system, and the dire conditions that have led to a potential strike. Hannah Winchester is a home health physical therapist by trade; she is also her department's Labor Partner, a shop steward, and a member of the bargaining team for the Oregon Federation of Nurses and Health Professionals (OFNHP) Professional Bargaining Unit. Nicholas Eng has been a nurse for nearly 10 years; he is also an OFNHP shop steward and is currently on release for OFNHP to be present for contract bargaining and to help with organizing union members and actions, including strike planning.Post-Production: Adam ColeyRead the transcript of this interview: https://therealnews.com/35000-kaiser-permanente-workers-are-set-to-strike-and-the-future-of-us-healthcare-is-at-stakeAdditional links/info below…The Alliance of Health Care Unions website, Facebook page, and Twitter page:https://www.ahcunions.org/https://www.facebook.com/AHCUnions/https://twitter.com/AHCunionsOregon Federation of Nurses and Health Professionals website, Facebook page, Twitter page, and Instagram:http://ofnhp.aft.org/https://www.facebook.com/ofnhp/https://twitter.com/ofnhphttps://www.instagram.com/ofnhp/?hl=enOFNHP Cares - Member Hardship Relief Fund: https://www.gofundme.com/f/y3h5p-ofnhp-cares-member-hardship-relief-fund?qid=b651426291f2babae96217e9a9d1d90eNoah Lanard, Mother Jones, ““You Are Worth More”: Kaiser Permanente Workers Are on the Verge of a Historic Strike”: https://www.motherjones.com/politics/2021/10/kaiser-permanente-strike-health-care-nurses-decades/Dave Muoio, Fierce Healthcare, “Nearly 32,000 Kaiser Permanente Workers Set to Strike Nov. 15. Tens of Thousands More Mulling Their Own Demonstrations”: https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/hospitals/nearly-32-000-kaiser-permanente-workers-set-to-strike-nov-15Working People, The Real News Network, “A Small-Town Hospital Goes After Its Union Nurses”: https://therealnews.com/a-small-town-hospital-goes-after-its-union-nurses