Podcasts about Pennsylvania State University

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Public university with multiple campuses in Pennsylvania, United States

  • 600PODCASTS
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  • Nov 23, 2021LATEST
Pennsylvania State University

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Best podcasts about Pennsylvania State University

Latest podcast episodes about Pennsylvania State University

Mother's Quest Podcast
Embracing Neurodiversity and Being an Adult with Julie Lythcott-Haims and Ryan Neale

Mother's Quest Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 61:31


I'm excited to welcome you to a special episode of the Mother's Quest Podcast that I am extremely grateful for, just in time for Thanksgiving, featuring the amazing Julie Lythcott-Haims and my 17-year-old son Ryan Neale. Julie is an incredible mother to two, a former Stanford Dean and New York Times bestselling author of the anti-helicopter parenting manifesto How to Raise an Adult, which gave rise to a TED Talk that has more than 5 million views. Her second book is the critically-acclaimed and award-winning prose poetry memoir Real American, which illustrates her experience as a Black and biracial person in white spaces. I'm so fortunate to have had the opportunity to interview Julie for the podcast several years ago when that book was first released. When I heard about Julie's new book Your Turn: How to Be an Adult, I knew I wanted to invite her back to the podcast again. And, I hoped that my son Ryan, on the threshold of adulthood himself, would join us in the conversation. The stars aligned and Ryan was available the day of the interview, enabling Julie, Ryan, and I to explore the concepts of her book, about navigating adulthood and embracing our differences, especially our neurodiversity, in deeply personal and relevant ways.  In this episode, I'm also excited to share a dedication from Deborah Reber, former podcast guest, fellow mother on a quest, and host of the TiLT Parenting Podcast.Deborah's heart-felt dedication honors Julie and other mothers raising neurodivergent children. I could not agree more with Deborah's assessment about what an exceptional human Julie is, about the power of Julie's commitment to put the stories of a diverse group of young people with different identities on the pages of her book, and about the impact of Julie's work for normalizing and honoring differences.  As you hear our conversation unfold, I know you'll be as struck as I was by Julie's wisdom and humility as she talks with Ryan, helping him to understand that he deserves to be cherished for who he is, that he can approach things like writing in ways that work for his differently-wired mind, and that he can seek out environments, like college, that enables him to play to his strengths and allow him to thrive. Since our conversation, Ryan was able to take Julie's advice to heart, using voice to text without shame to write his personal statement for college applications and sharing his personal insights on a panel at the recent Stanford Neurodiversity Summit. You can follow the link in the show notes to listen.Finally, this conversation is a demonstration that there is no destination to becoming an adult, but an ongoing journey of learning and discovery, that parents and their children can support one another in reciprocity with curiosity, and that we can all benefit from asking ourselves the question from Mary Oliver's famous poem, that Julie gives us as our challenge, “What is it that we want to do with our one wild and precious life?”As we approach Thanksgiving, the five-year birthday of the launch of Mother's Quest, and my 50th birthday, I can say there is nothing I'd rather do than hold space for a conversation like this one and share it with you.   About Julie: Julie Lythcott-Haims believes in humans and is deeply interested in what gets in our way. She is the New York Times bestselling author of the anti-helicopter parenting manifesto How to Raise an Adult which gave rise to a TED Talk that has more than 5 million views. Her second book is the critically-acclaimed and award-winning prose poetry memoir Real American, which illustrates her experience as a Black and biracial person in white spaces. A third book, Your Turn: How to Be an Adult, is out now. Julie is a former corporate lawyer and Stanford dean, and she holds a BA from Stanford, a JD from Harvard, and an MFA in Writing from California College of the Arts. She serves on the board of Common Sense Media, and on the advisory board of LeanIn.Org, and she is a former board member at Foundation for a College Education, Global Citizen Year, The Writers Grotto, and Challenge Success. She volunteers with the hospital program No One Dies Alone. She lives in the San Francisco Bay Area with her partner of over thirty years, their itinerant young adults, and her mother.    Connect with Julie:  Website  Twitter Instagram LinkedIn   About RyanRyan Neale is a neurodivergent 12th Grader from San Mateo, California. His parents discovered he was differently wired when he was 18 months old but he has been in fully mainstream education for his academic career, with most people around him not knowing about some of the struggles that he faces. His experiences publicly masking his neuro differences have given him a unique perspective on many of the struggles neurodiverse people face, such as public stigma, ableism, and the ever-present desire to fit in. As he has begun advocating more for his needs, he has high hopes to use his perspective and communication skills to increase public understanding of neurodiversity, and hopefully create a more inclusive society for everyone. In his free time, he enjoys playing varsity basketball for his high school team, coaching youth sports, roughhousing with his little brother, and diving headfirst into his many fantasy special interests. He is thrilled to have participated in this fall's Stanford Neurodiversity Summit on a K-12 student panel. You can listen to the panel here. Connect with Ryan:  Instagram   Topics Discussed in this Episode: How Julie's experience listening to students as a Stanford Dean and raising her own children led her to write a book about young adults The painful admission Julie shared about overlooking her own son Sawyer's challenges with ADHD and anxiety and the poignant moment when her son acknowledged Julie's shift in understanding him  The ways that Ryan identifies as neurodivergent, how he has adapted, and the pain he has experienced trying to fit in a neurotypical world  Julie's advice to Ryan about embracing who he is Her recommendation of the book Normal Sucks by Jonathan Mooney  The revelations parents can take from Julie's book How to help young adults figure out what next steps to take on their path to becoming an adult  The lessons Julie has personally gained from writing her books Julie's words of wisdom for Ryan on how to move through his resistance of writing by trying methods that might work better for his differences and strengths  The biggest takeaway that Julie learned in her research and in her own journey writing the book about how to be vulnerable and connected and open to the support of others so that you don't have to feel alone Julie's challenge for all of us that can help us live our best lives as adults   Resources and Topics Mentioned: Ep 52: Third Chapters, Raising Adults, and Loving Ourselves with Julie Lythcott-Haims  Normal Sucks by Jonathan Mooney  Julie's books Julie's Ted talk    This Episode's Challenge: Ask yourself the question from Mary Oliver's famous poem, “what do I want to do with this one wild and precious life?” Explore what would you do if it was only up to you...if nobody else's opinion really mattered. Go to a quiet place, a shower, out in nature, or on a hammock and ask yourself "What is the work that brings me joy? What are the places and spaces where I feel valued and seen?" This Episode is dedicated by Deborah Reber Debbie Reber is a parenting activist, New York Times bestselling author, podcast host, and speaker who moved her career in a more personal direction in 2016 when she founded TiLT Parenting, a top resource for parents like her who are raising differently wired children. The TiLT Parenting Podcast has grown to be a top podcast in Kids & Family, with more than 3 million downloads and a slate of guests that includes high-profile thought leaders across the parenting and education space. A certified Positive Discipline trainer and a regular contributor to Psychology Today and ADDitude Magazine, Debbie's newest book is Differently Wired: Raising an Exceptional Child in a Conventional World. In November 2018, she spoke at TEDxAmsterdam, delivering a talk entitled Why the Future Will Be Differently Wired. In the summer of 2020, she co-created the Parenting in Place Masterclass series. Prior to launching TiLT, Debbie spent more than fifteen years writing inspiring books for women and teens, including Doable: The Girls' Guide to Accomplishing Just About Anything, Language of Love, Chill: Stress-Reducing Techniques for a More Balanced, Peaceful You, In Their Shoes: Extraordinary Women Describe Their Amazing Careers, and more than a dozen preschool books based on the series Blue's Clues. In 2008, she had the privilege of creating and editing the first-ever series of teen-authored memoirs, Louder Than Words. Before becoming a solopreneur, Debbie worked in TV and video production, producing documentaries and PSAs for CARE and UNICEF, working on Blue's Clues, and developing original series for Cartoon Network. She has an MA in Media Studies from the New School for Social Research and a BA in Communications from Pennsylvania State University. In 2019, her husband, and 17-year-old twice-exceptional son relocated to Brooklyn, NY after living in Amsterdam, the Netherlands for five years.    Connect with Deborah: https://tiltparenting.com https://instagram.com/tiltparenting https://facebook.com/groups/tilttogether https://twitter.com/tiltparenting   You can also check out my conversation with Debbie on the Mother's Quest Podcast about embracing differences here! Announcement:   Special Q & A Brunch with Julie Lythcott-Haims Join Mother's Quest and Happy Women Dinners for a special opportunity to receive Julie's new book, get it personally signed, and enjoy brunch and a Q & A with Julie at Julie Neale's private home in the SF Peninsula. Cost is $125 and includes brunch and a copy of the signed book. Email jill@happywomendinners.com to secure your spot ASAP. Tickets are sold out with the exception of a small number for Mother's Quest listeners and members.    Mother's Quest is Turning Five - Celebrate With Us! On December 1st, Mother's Quest will be celebrating it's 5th birthday. To honor this milestone, we are having a virtual celebration with poetry, music, toasts and more.  If you've been impacted by Mother's Quest and have wishes to share for our next chapter, I'd love for you to join us. Email hello@Mothersquest.com to get all the details and RSVP.    Mother's Quest is a podcast for moms who are ready to live a truly E.P.I.C. life. Join in for intimate conversations with a diverse group of inspiring mothers as they share how they are living an E.P.I.C. life, Engaging mindfully with their children (E), Passionately and Purposefully making a difference beyond their family (P), Investing in themselves (I), and Connecting to a strong support network (C). Join our community of mothers to light the way and sustain you on your quest at https://www.facebook.com/groups/mothersquest/

Everyday Wellness
Ep. 179 Shocking Facts About Metabolic Health: How to Lower Your Risk of Chronic Illness with Dr. Philip C. Ovadia

Everyday Wellness

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 62:40


Today, I am delighted and honored to be talking to Dr. Philip Ovadia. He is a board-certified Cardiac Thoracic Surgeon and Founder of Ovadia Heart Health. His mission is to help people stay off his operating table by optimizing their metabolic health to lower the risk of heart disease and other chronic illnesses.   In this episode, we take a deep dive into clinical medicine. We explain how it is possible to reverse conditions like high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes and become healthy without taking any medications. Dr. Ovadia defines metabolic health, talks about his journey from being morbidly obese to losing more than 100 pounds, discusses Gary Taubes's influence on his health journey, and his seven principles for health and wellness. We also get into metabolic health markers, the hyper-palatability of processed food, metabolic syndrome, and the metabolic inflexibility of most Americans.  Dr. Ovadia's approach to nutrition is all about bio-individuality and having enough protein in your diet to ensure satiety. I really enjoy connecting with other western medicine-trained health care professionals who have pivoted towards optimizing metabolic health and flexibility! Stay tuned for more!  IN THIS EPISODE YOU WILL LEARN: Problems that exist within the medical system. Dr. Ovadia shares his health journey and talks about his mission. Why much of Dr. Ovadia's current education is coming from non-physicians. Dr. Ovadia talks about metabolic health. The physical effects of eating hyper-palatable processed foods versus eating nutrient-dense whole foods. Take control of what you eat rather than letting food control you. What metabolic syndrome is all about. The benefits of using a continuous glucose monitor. Why no one diet will serve everyone. Using metabolic health as a system to guide you to good health. The benefits of pushing for nutrient density to feel satiated. Bio: Dr. Philip Ovadia is a board-certified Cardiac Surgeon and founder of Ovadia Heart Health. His mission is to optimize the public's metabolic health and help people stay off his operating table. As a heart surgeon who used to be morbidly obese, Dr. Ovadia has seen firsthand the failures of mainstream diets and medicine. He realized that what helped him lose over 100 pounds was the same solution that could have prevented most of the thousands of open-heart surgeries he has performed—metabolic health. In Stay off My Operating Table: A Heart Surgeon's Metabolic Health Guide to Lose Weight, Prevent Disease, and Feel Your Best Every Day, Dr. Ovadia shares the complete metabolic health system to prevent disease. Dr. Ovadia grew up in New York and graduated from the accelerated Pre-Med/Med program at the Pennsylvania State University and Jefferson Medical College. This was followed by a residency in General Surgery at the University of Medicine and Dentistry in New Jersey and a Fellowship in Cardiothoracic Surgery at Tufts-New England Medical School. Connect with Cynthia Thurlow Follow on Twitter, Instagram & LinkedIn Check out Cynthia's website  Connect with Dr. Philip Ovadia On his website  At The Stronger Heart Society  On Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn,   and Twitter A simple calculator for metabolic syndrome  Dr. Ovadio's book, Stay Off My Operating Table Books mentioned: The Unhealthy Truth by Robyn O'Brien     The Case for Keto by Gary Taubes Salt Sugar Fat by Michael Moss

NASFAA's Off the Cuff Podcast
OTC From the Field: Financial Aid Administrators' Post-Pandemic Office Plans

NASFAA's Off the Cuff Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 28:43


This week on "Off The Cuff," Justin is joined by three financial aid professionals who discuss how their offices plan to operate as we transition into 2022 where higher education, like many sectors, begins to approach a resumption of pre-pandemic operations. Tune in hear firsthand from our guests — Tyler Pruett, director of financial aid at Samuel Merritt University and Melissa Kunes, an assistant vice president for undergraduate education and executive director of the Office of Student Aid at The Pennsylvania State University — how financial aid offices are implementing new remote, hybrid, and in-person work policies. The three discuss their institutions' plans in the months ahead, and share their thoughts on how the sector will approach a post-pandemic landscape. Plus, Hugh has a recap of the latest higher education and financial aid news.

The Livin' La Vida Low-Carb Show With Jimmy Moore
1781: Dr. Philip Ovadia Says Heart Disease Prevention Is About Metabolic Health

The Livin' La Vida Low-Carb Show With Jimmy Moore

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 45:46


Join Jimmy today for this episode of the LLVLC Show as he welcomes Dr. Philip Ovadia to talk about how to prevent heart disease and what it has to do with metabolic health. “The American Heart Association was a struggling organization before Ancel Keys came along with his narrative about saturated fat.” - Dr. Philip Ovadia GET STARTED WITH THE KETO CHOW STARTER BUNDLE at JimmyLovesKetoChow.com In this episode, Jimmy welcomes in a cardiac surgeon and metabolic health physician named Dr. Philip Ovadia, MD (@ovadia_heart_health) who is making it his life's mission to help people prevent heart disease and chronic disease by focusing on the therapeutic effects of proper nutrition and lifestyle choices. He is the author of the new book STAY OFF MY OPERATING TABLE where he makes the case that all of the things we're being told about heart health is dead wrong–and what you can do to actually keep yourself healthy. Watch Jimmy's insightful interview with Dr. Ovadia where they get into the keto diet, cholesterol, heart healthy practices, and so much more! Dr. Philip Ovadia grew up in New York and graduated from the accelerated Pre-Med/Med program at the Pennsylvania State University and Jefferson Medical College. Dr. Ovadia started Ovadia Cardiothoracic Surgery in 2020, working as an independent contractor throughout the United States In 2021he launched Ovadia Heart Health, offering a virtual clinic to people all over the world. The focus is the prevention and treatment of heart disease by modifying diet and lifestyle.

All Horror Radio
UNSOLVED: The Disappearance of Cindy Song

All Horror Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 23:47


What would you do if your child disappeared in a different country, while you were 4000miles away? That's exactly what happened to Cindy Song's parents. Cindy disappeared late one Halloween night while attending a bar near her college, Pennsylvania State University. It was almost as if she vanished into thin air, but then the leads came. It turned into an absolute roller coaster, as potential leads involved a disgraced pharmacist, a sex trafficking ring, and a serial killer. ---------------------------------------------------A BIG "Thank you!" to this episode's sponsor, BetterHelp. As a listener, you'll get 10% offyour first month by visiting our sponsor at BetterHelp.com/wsd Join over 1 million people who have taken charge of their mental health. ---------------------------------------------------We Saw the Devil: Website: http://www.wesawthedevil.com Get Free Sh*t: http://www.wsdlove.comDiscord: https://discord.gg/hRGJwPMATwitter: http://www.twitter.com/WeSawtheDevil Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/wesawthedevilpodcastPatreon: http://www.patreon.com/wesawthedevil --------------------------------------------- We would like to thank our Executive Producers: Brittany H Denise BBren WMaureen M Emalie SAshley MYlana Dawn M Amy SShawna SIris SMeghann A

The Takeaway
Do Climate Summits Like COP26 Really Matter? 2021-11-16

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 43:58


Do Climate Summits Like COP26 Really Matter? The summit was seen as one of the most important international climate negotiations in recent history. But how effective are these kinds of summits? And do the outcomes even matter? The Takeaway talks about that and more with Dr. Michael E. Mann, Distinguished Professor of Atmospheric Science at Pennsylvania State University and author of The New Climate War: The Fight to Take Back our Planet.  Israeli Military Surveillance Program Targets And Monitors Palestinians Using Facial Recognition Technology An Israeli surveillance program, rolled out over the past two years, uses facial recognition technology to monitor and surveil the Palestinian population. To discuss the surveillance program, implications to Palestinian society and what the future of surveillance technology could look like in other parts of the world, we spoke with The Washington Post's Silicon Valley Correspondent Elizabeth Dwoskin and Yousef Munayyer, nonresident senior fellow at Arab Center in DC. Aging While Queer: Aging with HIV In this segment, we talk to Tez Anderson, a long-term survivor of HIV, activist and founder of the first and largest group in the world focused on long-term HIV survivors and older adults aging with HIV, Let's Kick ASS (Aids Survivor Syndrome). For transcripts, see individual segment pages.      

The Takeaway
Do Climate Summits Like COP26 Really Matter? 2021-11-16

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 43:58


Do Climate Summits Like COP26 Really Matter? The summit was seen as one of the most important international climate negotiations in recent history. But how effective are these kinds of summits? And do the outcomes even matter? The Takeaway talks about that and more with Dr. Michael E. Mann, Distinguished Professor of Atmospheric Science at Pennsylvania State University and author of The New Climate War: The Fight to Take Back our Planet.  Israeli Military Surveillance Program Targets And Monitors Palestinians Using Facial Recognition Technology An Israeli surveillance program, rolled out over the past two years, uses facial recognition technology to monitor and surveil the Palestinian population. To discuss the surveillance program, implications to Palestinian society and what the future of surveillance technology could look like in other parts of the world, we spoke with The Washington Post's Silicon Valley Correspondent Elizabeth Dwoskin and Yousef Munayyer, nonresident senior fellow at Arab Center in DC. Aging While Queer: Aging with HIV In this segment, we talk to Tez Anderson, a long-term survivor of HIV, activist and founder of the first and largest group in the world focused on long-term HIV survivors and older adults aging with HIV, Let's Kick ASS (Aids Survivor Syndrome). For transcripts, see individual segment pages.      

New Books Network
Naoko Wake, "American Survivors: Trans-Pacific Memories of Hiroshima and Nagasaki" (Cambridge UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 91:20


The little-known history of U.S. survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings reveals captivating trans-Pacific memories of war, illness, gender, and community. The fact that there are indeed American survivors of the American nuclear attack on Hiroshima & Nagasaki is not common knowledge. Even in Hiroshima & Nagasaki the existence of American survivors is not well known. American survivors, however, number in the thousands. This number, like that of survivors in general is dwindling fast. But they have a unique and important history. And, Naoko Wake have written this book almost at the last possible moment to capture it. Counterintuitively, American Survivors: Trans-Pacific Memories of Hiroshima and Nagasaki (Cambridge UP, 2021) argues that it the very marginality of this group that make American survivors important. As she writes, “If, indeed, it is ‘not the centre that determines the periphery, but the periphery that ... determines the center,” US survivors' history is a periphery that threatens to disassemble established meanings of the bomb that have not taken notice of it.' (2). Based on oral testimonies and extensive documentation, American Survivors trace the history of American survivors from the interwar years to the present. American Survivors argues that Hiroshima, and to a lesser extent, Nagasaki (both of which were port towns) were cities of immigrants, and as such the attack on these cities was not just an attack on supposedly homogenous Japanese cities (as it is commonly understood) but on diverse communities. Wake traces the way immigration and re-migration between Hiroshima and the US, Korea, and other locations, as well as war time dislocations created the immigrant communities in Hiroshima. These trans-pacific connections, and what she terms “strengths of weak ties” in the history of immigration in the Pacific,” had an important impact on subsequent histories, which the b ook examines with great detail and deftness. Ran Zwigenberg is an associate professor at Pennsylvania State University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Naoko Wake, "American Survivors: Trans-Pacific Memories of Hiroshima and Nagasaki" (Cambridge UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 91:20


The little-known history of U.S. survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings reveals captivating trans-Pacific memories of war, illness, gender, and community. The fact that there are indeed American survivors of the American nuclear attack on Hiroshima & Nagasaki is not common knowledge. Even in Hiroshima & Nagasaki the existence of American survivors is not well known. American survivors, however, number in the thousands. This number, like that of survivors in general is dwindling fast. But they have a unique and important history. And, Naoko Wake have written this book almost at the last possible moment to capture it. Counterintuitively, American Survivors: Trans-Pacific Memories of Hiroshima and Nagasaki (Cambridge UP, 2021) argues that it the very marginality of this group that make American survivors important. As she writes, “If, indeed, it is ‘not the centre that determines the periphery, but the periphery that ... determines the center,” US survivors' history is a periphery that threatens to disassemble established meanings of the bomb that have not taken notice of it.' (2). Based on oral testimonies and extensive documentation, American Survivors trace the history of American survivors from the interwar years to the present. American Survivors argues that Hiroshima, and to a lesser extent, Nagasaki (both of which were port towns) were cities of immigrants, and as such the attack on these cities was not just an attack on supposedly homogenous Japanese cities (as it is commonly understood) but on diverse communities. Wake traces the way immigration and re-migration between Hiroshima and the US, Korea, and other locations, as well as war time dislocations created the immigrant communities in Hiroshima. These trans-pacific connections, and what she terms “strengths of weak ties” in the history of immigration in the Pacific,” had an important impact on subsequent histories, which the b ook examines with great detail and deftness. Ran Zwigenberg is an associate professor at Pennsylvania State University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in American Studies
Naoko Wake, "American Survivors: Trans-Pacific Memories of Hiroshima and Nagasaki" (Cambridge UP, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 91:20


The little-known history of U.S. survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings reveals captivating trans-Pacific memories of war, illness, gender, and community. The fact that there are indeed American survivors of the American nuclear attack on Hiroshima & Nagasaki is not common knowledge. Even in Hiroshima & Nagasaki the existence of American survivors is not well known. American survivors, however, number in the thousands. This number, like that of survivors in general is dwindling fast. But they have a unique and important history. And, Naoko Wake have written this book almost at the last possible moment to capture it. Counterintuitively, American Survivors: Trans-Pacific Memories of Hiroshima and Nagasaki (Cambridge UP, 2021) argues that it the very marginality of this group that make American survivors important. As she writes, “If, indeed, it is ‘not the centre that determines the periphery, but the periphery that ... determines the center,” US survivors' history is a periphery that threatens to disassemble established meanings of the bomb that have not taken notice of it.' (2). Based on oral testimonies and extensive documentation, American Survivors trace the history of American survivors from the interwar years to the present. American Survivors argues that Hiroshima, and to a lesser extent, Nagasaki (both of which were port towns) were cities of immigrants, and as such the attack on these cities was not just an attack on supposedly homogenous Japanese cities (as it is commonly understood) but on diverse communities. Wake traces the way immigration and re-migration between Hiroshima and the US, Korea, and other locations, as well as war time dislocations created the immigrant communities in Hiroshima. These trans-pacific connections, and what she terms “strengths of weak ties” in the history of immigration in the Pacific,” had an important impact on subsequent histories, which the b ook examines with great detail and deftness. Ran Zwigenberg is an associate professor at Pennsylvania State University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

The Current
Cautious optimism for the future as COP26 ends

The Current

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 19:56


COP26 ends in Glasgow on Friday, and world leaders, scientists, and lobbyists have spent the last couple of weeks making deals and pledges in an attempt to keep the world from catastrophic warming. We speak to University of British Columbia political science professor Kathryn Harrison, and Michael Mann, director of the Earth System Science Center at Pennsylvania State University, about the key takeaways from COP26.

Harvard Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies
The Stone and the Wireless, with Ma Shaoling

Harvard Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 88:02


The Stone and the Wireless: Lyrical Media and Bad Models of the Feeling Women Ma Shaoling is an Assistant Professor of Humanities (Literature) at Yale-NUS College. She was born in Taiwan, grew up in Singapore, and spent ten years in the United States where she obtained her PhD (University of Southern California, Comparative Literature), and subsequently taught at Pennsylvania State University. Her research interests include literary and critical theory, media studies, and global Chinese literature, film, and art. She has published in academic journals such as Science Fiction Studies, Configurations, Mediations, and positions. Her first book manuscript, The Stone and the Wireless: Mediating China, 1861-1906 is published in June 2021 by Duke University Press as part of the ‘Sign, Storage, Transmission' series. This lecture is part of the Modern Chinese Humanities lecture series at the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University. The series is organized by Professor David Der-wei Wang and Jie Li.

Health Coach 4 Women
How to Stay off My Operating Table with Philip Ovadia

Health Coach 4 Women

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 25:21


In today's episode Marsha had the pleasure to speak with board certified Heart Surgeon owner of Ovadia Heart health and Author Dr. Philip Ovadia.  Dr. Ovadia experienced his own health journey of being overweight which led him to a massive shift. He was able to lose over 100 pounds and five years later has still managed to keep the weight off.  Everything we have learned about our health in the medical profession from traditional medicine has been wrong. Dr. Ovadia is changing the narrative of how we approach health through the metabolic health. It is our goal as medical professionals and health practitioners that we get the word out on how we view health and the truth about food as it relates to your health. Look out Dr. Ovadia's book Stay off My Operating Table: A Heart Surgeon's Metabolic Health Guide to Lose Weight, Prevent Disease, and Feel Your Best Every Day. Available November 11th 2021.   Author Bio  Dr. Philip Ovadia is a board-certified Cardiac Surgeon and founder of Ovadia Heart Health. His  mission is to optimize the public's metabolic health and help people stay off his operating  table. As a heart surgeon who used to be morbidly obese, Dr. Ovadia has seen firsthand the  failures of mainstream diets and medicine. He realized that what helped him lose over 100  pounds was the same solution that could have prevented most of the thousands of open heart  surgeries he has performed—metabolic health.  In Stay off My Operating Table: A Heart Surgeon's Metabolic Health Guide to Lose Weight,  Prevent Disease, and Feel Your Best Every Day, Dr. Ovadia shares the complete metabolic  health system to prevent disease.  Dr. Ovadia grew up in New York and graduated from the accelerated Pre-Med/Med program at  the Pennsylvania State University and Jefferson Medical College. This was followed by a  residency in General Surgery at the University of Medicine and Dentistry at New Jersey and a  Fellowship in Cardiothoracic Surgery at Tufts – New England Medical School.  Learn more about Dr. Ovadia at www.OvadiaHeartHealth.com.   

Nutrition with Judy
7 Principles for Metabolic Health from a Cardiac Surgeon - Dr. Philip Ovadia

Nutrition with Judy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 38:08


Hey guys! I had the pleasure of sitting down with Dr. Philip Ovadia for a discussion on metabolic health. Dr. Philip Ovadia is a board-certified Cardiac Surgeon and founder of Ovadia Heart Health. His mission is to optimize the public's metabolic health and help people stay off his operating table. As a heart surgeon who used to be morbidly obese, Dr. Ovadia has seen firsthand the failures of mainstream diets and medicine. He realized that what helped him lose over 100 pounds was the same solution that could have prevented most of the thousands of open heart surgeries he has performed—metabolic health.In Stay off My Operating Table: A Heart Surgeon's Metabolic Health Guide to Lose Weight, Prevent Disease, and Feel Your Best Every Day, Dr. Ovadia shares the complete metabolic health system to prevent disease.Dr. Ovadia grew up in New York and graduated from the accelerated Pre-Med/Med program at the Pennsylvania State University and Jefferson Medical College. This was followed by a residency in General Surgery at the University of Medicine and Dentistry at New Jersey and a Fellowship in Cardiothoracic Surgery at Tufts – New England Medical School.All about Dr. Philip Ovadia- 12 myths about metabolic health- 5 markers to define metabolic health- 7 principles of metabolic health- Sleep- Ideal diet for metabolic health?- Heart disease at younger ages- Where can people find Dr. Ovadia_____RESOURCES- Dr. Ovadia at www.OvadiaHeartHealth.com- Twitter: https://twitter.com/ifixhearts- Book: Stay off my Operating Table – A Heart Surgeon's Metabolic Health - Guide to Lose Weight, Prevent Disease and Feel Your Best Everyday: https://amzn.to/3AUXjFj____CHECK OUT MY BOOK, Carnivore CureSIGN UP FOR MY WEEKLY NEWSLETTER: _____ ADDITIONAL RESOURCESNutrition with Judy ArticlesNutrition with Judy ResourcesCutting Against the Grain Podcast_____ FIND ME

1988 Topps
Tom Lawless (#183)

1988 Topps

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 33:42


The bat flip heard 'round the world. Link to Card 183 on Beckett Coach Clarence "Shorty" Stoner of Penn State Behrend, a College of Pennsylvania State University, on Tom Pre-emptive correction about the use of the Pennsylvania abbreviation: "Penna." Video of the homer and The Flip Interview with Tom about The Flip

Fairygodboss Radio
Wanda Hope - Chief Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Officer, Johnson & Johnson

Fairygodboss Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 35:00


In this episode of Fairygodboss Radio, Romy is joined by Wanda Hope, Chief Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Officer at Johnson & Johnson. Wanda shares her experiences (and advice!) of her flourishing 30-year career at J&J – from being the first in many roles as a young sales professional to advancing DEI as a thought leader. Wanda Bryant Hope is an accomplished business executive with significant experience in general management, marketing, sales, commercial operations, and human resources. She currently serves as Chief Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Officer at Johnson & Johnson, and is responsible for globally advancing the company's diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) outcomes, strengthening DEI capabilities, and driving growth through innovation. Prior to this role, Wanda held a variety of leadership positions across Johnson & Johnson including Vice President, Sales & Marketing; Vice President, Commercial Analytics, Development & Operations; and Vice President, Global Performance & Development. She has been recognized for her ability to exceed business results, deliver innovative solutions to complex challenges, lead global change, develop people for optimal results and DEI global outcomes. Wanda is a sought-after speaker and thought leader on advancing DEI to drive business performance and results. Her passion and performance have been recognized with several awards including the Elite 100 of Black Women leaders by Diverse Women Media, Penn State Smeal Diversity Award, and the Most Powerful Women in Corporate Diversity by Black Enterprise Magazine. Wanda received her Bachelor of Science degree in Marketing from The Pennsylvania State University. She and her husband Bobby are the proud parents of Tyler, their 14-year-old son.

Unprofessional Engineering
Great Engineering Universities: Penn State - Episode 272

Unprofessional Engineering

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 37:41


Pennsylvania State University (otherwise known as Penn State) has a long history as a top engineering school in the United States. In our new series on great engineering universities, we decided to focus on Penn State, not only because James is an alum, but because it is actually a great school as well! Starting as a land grant school back in the 1800s, Penn State was one of the first universities to focus on engineering as a stand-alone major, and eventually became the first university with a nuclear reactor to support its nuclear engineering program. Learn all about how the school got started, how it's engineering programs rank, how much you can expect to make as a Penn State graduate, and some famous Penn State engineers that you may have heard of.

Higher Ed ReWired
SAT: Rethinking College Admission Criteria

Higher Ed ReWired

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 22:12


In a sweeping decision amid the height of the pandemic, universities across the nation decided to remove the SAT/ACT as an admission requirement and go test-optional. In the absence of this tool, institutions have been forced to rethink their approach to admissions and take a holistic look at the students who apply.Higher Ed Rewired spoke with Gary Clark, Director of Undergraduate Admission at UCLA, David Holmes, the executive director of the Character Collaborative, Kelly Rosinger, assistant professor of education at Pennsylvania State University, and Angel B. Pérez of the National Association for College Admission Counseling. They share their research and experience on how this decision has affected admission at test-optional institutions and what this may look like for the future of enrollment management for higher education.   If you haven't already, please review us on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. It will help bring new listeners in to learn more about student success efforts occurring across the country. Higher Ed ReWired  is produced by California State University. 

53/39
Meet Mandy Marquardt – Team Novo Nordisk & Team U.S.A.

53/39

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 72:07


This week we talk to Mandy Marquardt! A Little About Mandy: Mandy learned to love riding a bicycle at the age of 10 at the Brian Piccolo Velodrome near her home in south Florida. A little less than a year later, Mandy won three medals in cycling, including two gold medals (criterium and time trial) at the 2003 U.S. Junior Women's 10-12 Road National Championships. Early in high school she moved back to Germany to live with her father, continuing to compete in many endurance road and track cycling events. It was during this time she was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. After completing her senior year of high school in Florida, she balanced studies and cycling at Penn State Lehigh Valley. It was during college in 2012, at age 21, that she moved her cycling focus to the track and sprint disciplines. Mandy resides in Allentown, PA and is currently a full-time professional cyclist for Team Novo Nordisk, the world's first all-diabetes professional cycling team. As part of the USA Cycling National Team, she has raced internationally at the Pan-American Championships, UCI World Cups, and UCI World Championships. A 22-time U.S. National Champion, Mandy currently holds three U.S National Records in the Women's Standing 500m TT, 1km TT and the Team Sprint. Mandy graduated from The Pennsylvania State University in 2014, and is currently pursuing her MBA with Penn State's Smeal College of Business. She is an active ambassador for many organizations, including TrueSport, The Taylor Hooton Foundation, and the St. Luke's University Health Network in Allentown, Pennsylvania . Mandy is passionate about being a role model for children worldwide as well as for everyone affected by diabetes. The Kit Andrew was referring to: CEROTIPOLAR Kit On Amazon

I Like Your Work: Conversations with Artists, Curators & Collectors
Making Space in Painting, Virtual Reality & In a City: Arden Bendler Browning

I Like Your Work: Conversations with Artists, Curators & Collectors

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 54:49


Philadelphia based artist Arden Bendler Browning makes large abstract paintings, small works on paper and panel, and virtual reality environments.   Her work contemplates perception of landscapes affected by digital imagery, the flow of time throughout many moments and distractions, and the contemporary desire to capture many possible perspectives and directions at once.   Intense, vibrant color, sweeping gestures, and areas of finer detail always show evidence of the artist's hand – even in the digital VR spaces. Her work is a direct response to her environments – whether it is her urban home base, weeks-long family road trips, documenting urban change, or seasonal changes during family hikes.  She takes cues from a wide range of artists, but with clear ties to Abstract Expressionists, time based work, Impressionist landscape, and many contemporary artists who engage with multifaceted and immersive spaces.     Her works are included in the West Collection, the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia International Airport, Toyota collection,  Dream Hotel Nashville and more.   She is represented by Bridgette Mayer Gallery, Galleri Urbane, and Tinney Contemporary.  Exhibitions include the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Weatherspoon Art Museum, James A. Michener Museum, and Pennsylvania State University.  She holds a BFA from Carnegie Mellon University (1997), an MSA from Sydney College of the Arts (2000), and an MFA from Tyler School of Art (2003).  Upcoming shows in 2021 include a solo show at Tinney Contemporary in Nashville and a group show at the Delaware Contemporary and Katzen Art Center at American University in Washington, DC.     Arden is a mother to three daughters : 15 year old twins and a 6 year old.  Though her teens attend a small Montessori high school,  Arden has supervised a homeschool education for all three daughters since her teens were school age.  Their family follows a self-directed learning path.  Arden's husband Matt Browning is a creative tech programmer and assists the development of Arden's VR work.       LINKS:  www.instagram.com/arden2bees Ardenbendlerbrowning.com     I Like Your Work Links:   Exhibitions Studio Visit Artists I Like Your Work Podcast Instagram Submit Work Observations on Applying to Juried Shows Studio Planner  

CFR On the Record
Academic Webinar: Geopolitics in the Middle East

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021


Steven A. Cook, Eni Enrico Mattei senior fellow for Middle East and Africa studies and director of the International Affairs Fellowship for Tenured International Relations Scholars at CFR, leads a conversation on geopolitics in the Middle East.   FASKIANOS: Welcome to today's session of the CFR Fall 2021 Academic Webinar Series. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach at CFR. Today's discussion is on the record and the video and transcript will be available on our website, CFR.org/Academic, if you want to share it with your colleagues or classmates. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. Today's topic is geopolitics in the Middle East. Our speaker was supposed to be Sanam Vakil, but she had a family emergency. So we're delighted to have our very own Steven Cook here to discuss this important topic. Dr. Cook is the Eni Enrico Mattei senior fellow for Middle East and Africa studies, and director of the International Affairs Fellowship for Tenured International Relations Scholars at the Council on Foreign Relations. He is the author of several books, including False Dawn; The Struggle for Egypt, which won the 2012 Gold Medal from the Washington Institute for Near East Policy; and Ruling But Not Governing. And he's working on yet another book entitled The End of Ambition: America's Past, Present, and Future in the Middle East. So keep an eye out for that in the next year or so. He's a columnist at Foreign Policy magazine and contributor and commentator on a bunch of other outlets. Prior to coming to CFR, Dr. Cook was a research fellow at the Brookings Institution and a Soref research fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. So, Dr. Cook, thank you for being with us. I thought you could just—I'm going to give you a soft question here, to talk about the geopolitical relations among state and nonstate actors in the Middle East. And you can take that in whatever direction you would like. COOK: Well, thanks so much, Irina. It's a great pleasure to be with you. Good afternoon to everybody who's out there who's on an afternoon time zone, good morning to those who may still be in the evening, and good evening to those who may be somewhere where it's the evening. It's very nice to be with you. As Irina mentioned, and as I'm sure it's plenty evident, I am not Sanam Vakil, but I'm happy to step in for her and offer my thoughts on the geopolitics of the Middle East. It's a small topic. That question that Irina asked was something that I certainly could handle effectively in fifteen to twenty minutes. But before I get into the details of what's going on in the region, I thought I would offer some just general comments about the United States in the Middle East. Because, as it turns out, I had the opportunity last night to join a very small group of analysts with a very senior U.S. government official to talk precisely about the United States in the Middle East. And it was a very, very interesting conversation, because despite the fact that there has been numerous news reporting and analytic pieces about how the United States is deemphasizing the Middle East, this official made it very, very clear that that was practically impossible at this time. And this was, I think, a reasonable position to take. There has been a lot recently, in the last recent years, about withdrawing from the region, from retrenchment from the region, reducing from the region, realignment from the region. All those things actually mean different things. But analysts have essentially used them to mean that the United States should deprioritize the Middle East. And it seems to me that the problem in the Middle East has not necessarily been the fact that we are there and that we have goals there. It's that the goals in the region and the resources Washington uses to achieve those goals need to be realigned to address things that are actually important to the United States. In one sense that sound eminently reasonable. We have goals, we have resources to meet those goals, and we should devote them to—and if we can't, we should reassess what our goals are or go out and find new resources. That sounds eminently reasonable. But that's not the way Washington has worked over the course of the last few decades when it comes to the Middle East. In many ways, the United States has been overly ambitious. And it has led to a number of significant failures in the region. In an era when everything and anything is a vital interest, then nothing really is. And this seems to be the source of our trouble. For example, when we get into trying to fix the politics of other countries, we're headed down the wrong road. And I don't think that there's been enough real debate in Washington or, quite frankly, in the country about what's important in the Middle East, and why we're there, and what we're trying to achieve in the Middle East. In part, this new book that I'm writing called the End of Ambition, which, as Irina pointed out, will be out hopefully in either late 2022 or early 2023, tries to answer some of these questions. There is a way for the United States to be constructive in the Middle East, but what we've done over the course of the last twenty years has made that task much, much harder. And it leads us, in part, to this kind of geostrategic picture or puzzle that I'm about to lay out for you. So let me get into some of the details. And I'm obviously not going to take you from Morocco all the way to Iran, although I could if I had much, much more time because there's a lot going on in a lot of places. But not all of those places are of critical importance to the United States. So I'll start and I'll pick and choose from that very, very large piece of geography. First point: There have been some efforts to deescalate in a region that was in the middle of or on the verge of multiple conflicts. There has been a dialogue between the Saudis and the Iranians, under the auspices of the Iraqis, of all people. According to the Saudis this hasn't yielded very much, but they are continuing the conversation. One of the ways to assess the success or failure of a meeting is the fact that there's going to be another meeting. And there are going to be other meetings between senior Iranian and Saudi officials. I think that that's good. Egyptians and Turks are talking. Some of you who don't follow these issues as closely may not remember that Turkey and Egypt came close to trading blows over Libya last summer. And they pulled back as a result of concerted diplomacy on the part of the European Union, as well as the Egyptian ability to actually surge a lot of force to its western border. Those two countries are also talking, in part under the auspices of the Iraqis. Emiratis and Iranians are talking. That channel opened up in 2019 after the Iranians attacked a very significant—two very significant oil processing facilities in Saudi Arabia, sort of scaring the Emiratis, especially since the Trump administration did not respond in ways that the Emiratis or the Saudis had been expecting. The Qataris and the Egyptians have repaired their relations. The Arab world, for better or for worse, is moving to reintegrate Syria into is ranks. Not long after King Abdullah of Jordan was in the United States, he and Bashar al-Assad shared a phone call to talk about the opening of the border between Jordan and Syria and to talk about, among other things, tourism to the two countries. The hope is that this de-escalation, or hope for de-escalation coming from this dialogue, will have a salutary effect on conflicts in Yemen, in Syria, in Libya, and Iraq. Thus far, it hasn't in Yemen, in particular. It hasn't in Syria. But in Libya and Iraq, there have been some improvements to the situation. All of this remains quite fragile. These talks can be—can break off at any time under any circumstances. Broader-scale violence can return to Libya at any time. And the Iraqi government still doesn't control its own territory. Its sovereignty is compromised, not just by Iran but also by Turkey. But the fact that a region that was wound so tight and that seemed poised to even deepen existing conflicts and new ones to break out, for all of these different parties to be talking—some at the behest of the United States, some entirely of their own volition—is, I think, a relatively positive sign. You can't find anyone who's more—let's put it this way, who's darker about developments in the Middle East than me. And I see some positive signs coming from this dialogue. Iran, the second big issue on the agenda. Just a few hours ago, the Iranians indicated that they're ready to return to the negotiating table in Vienna. This is sort of a typical Iranian negotiating tactic, to push issues to the brink and then to pull back and demonstrate some pragmatism so that people will thank for them for their pragmatism. This agreement to go back to the negotiating table keeps them on decent terms with the Europeans. It builds on goodwill that they have developed as a result of their talks with Saudi Arabia. And it puts Israel somewhat on the defensive, or at least in an awkward position with the Biden administration, which has very much wanted to return to the negotiating table in Vienna. What comes out of these negotiations is extremely hard to predict. This is a new government in Iran. It is certainly a harder line than its predecessor. Some analysts believe that precisely because it is a hardline government it can do the negotiation. But we'll just have to see. All the while this has been going on, the Iranians have been proceeding with their nuclear development, and Israel is continuing its shadow campaign against the Iranians in Syria, sometimes in Iraq, in Iran itself. Although, there's no definitive proof, yesterday Iranian gas stations, of all things, were taken offline. There's some suspicion that this was the Israelis showing the Iranians just how far and deep they are into Iranian computer systems. It remains unclear how the Iranians will retaliate. Previously they have directed their efforts to Israeli-linked shipping in and around the Gulf of Oman. Its conventional responses up until this point have been largely ineffective. The Israelis have been carrying on a fairly sophisticated air campaign against the Iranians in Syria, and the Iranians have not been able to mount any kind of effective response. Of course, this is all against the backdrop of the fact that the Iranians do have the ability to hold much of the Israeli population hostage via Hezbollah and its thousands of rockets and missiles. So you can see how this is quite worrying, and an ongoing concern for everybody in the region, as the Israelis and Iranians take part in this confrontation. Let me just continue along the line of the Israelis for a moment and talk about the Arab-Israeli conflict, something that has not been high on the agenda of the Biden administration, it hasn't been high on the agenda of many countries in the region. But since the signing of the Abraham Accords in September 2020, there have been some significant developments. The normalization as a result of the Abraham Accords continues apace. Recently in the Emirates there was a meeting of ministers from Israel, the UAE, Morocco, Bahrain, and Sudan. This is the first kind of face-to-face meeting of government officials from all of these countries. Now, certainly the Israelis and the Emiratis have been meeting quite regularly, and the Israelis and the Bahrainis have been meeting quite regularly. But these were broader meetings of Cabinet officials from all of the Abraham Accords countries coming together in the United Arab Emirates for talks. Rather extraordinary. Something that thirteen months—in August 2020 was unimaginable, and today is something that doesn't really make—it doesn't really make the headlines. The Saudis are actually supportive of the normalization process, but they're not yet willing to take that step. And they're not willing to take that step because of the Palestinian issue. And it remains a sticking point. On that issue, there was a lot of discussion after the formation of a new Israeli government last June under the leadership, first, of Naftali Bennett, who will then hand the prime ministership over to his partner, Yair Lapid, who are from different parties. That this was an Israeli government that could do some good when it comes to the Palestinian arena, that it was pragmatic, that it would do things that would improve the lives of Palestinians, whether in Gaza or the West Bank, and seek greater cooperation with both the United States and the Palestinian authority toward that end. And that may in fact turn out to be the case. This government has taken a number of steps in that direction, including family reunification, so that if a Palestinian on the West Bank who is married to a Palestinian citizen of Israel, the Palestinian in the West Bank can live with the family in Israel. And a number of other things. But it should also be clear to everybody that despite a kind of change in tone from the Israeli prime ministry, there's not that much of a change in terms of policy. In fact, in many ways Prime Minister Bennett is to the right of his predecessor, Benjamin Netanyahu. And Yair Lapid, who comes from a centrist party, is really only centrist in terms of Israeli politics. He is—in any other circumstances would be a kind of right of center politician. And I'll just point out that in recent days the Israeli government has declared six Palestinian NGOs—long-time NGOs—terrorist organizations, approved three thousand new housing units in the West Bank, and worked very, very hard to prevent the United States from opening a consulate in East Jerusalem to serve the Palestinians. That consulate had been there for many, many, many years. And it was closed under the Trump administration when the U.S. Embassy was moved from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. The Biden administration would like to reopen that consulate. And the Israeli government is adamantly opposed. In the end, undoubtably Arab governments are coming to terms with Israel, even beyond the Abraham Accords countries. Egypt's flag carrier, Egyptair, announced flights to Tel Aviv. This is the first time since 1979. You could—you could fly between Cairo and Tel Aviv, something that I've done many, many times. If you were in Egypt, you'd have to go and find an office that would sell you a ticket to something called Air Sinai, that did not have regular flights. Only had flights vaguely whenever, sometimes. It was an Egyptair plane, stripped of its livery, staffed by Egyptair pilots and staff, stripped of anything that said Egyptair. Now, suddenly Egyptair is flying direct flights to Tel Aviv. And El-Al, Israel's national airline, and possibly one other, will be flying directly to Cairo. And there is—and that there is talk of economic cooperation. Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett met with Egyptian President Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi in Sharm al-Sheikh not long ago. That was the first meeting of Israeli leaders—first public meeting of Israeli leaders and Egyptian leaders in ten years. So there does seem to be an openness on the part of Arab governments to Israel. As far as populations in these countries, they don't yet seem to be ready for normalization, although there has been some traffic between Israel and the UAE, with Emiratis coming to see Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, and so on and so forth. But there are very, very few Emiratis. And there are a lot of Egyptians. So as positive as that all is, this is—this has not been a kind of broad acceptance among the population in the Arab world for Israel's legitimate existence. And the kind of issue du jour, great-power competition. This is on everybody's lips in Washington, D.C.—great-power competition, great-power competition. And certainly, the Middle East is likely to be an arena of great-power competition. It has always been an arena of great-power competition. For the first time in more than two decades, the United States has competitors in the region. And let me start with Russia, because there's been so much discussion of China, but Russia is the one that has been actively engaged militarily in the region in a number of places. Vladimir Putin has parlayed his rescue of Hafez al-Assad into influence in the region, in an arc that stretches from NATO ally Turkey, all the way down through the Levant and through Damascus, then even stretching to Jerusalem where Israeli governments and the Russian government have cooperated and coordinated in Syria, into Cairo, and then into at least the eastern portion of Libya, where the Russians have supported a Qaddafist general named Khalifa Haftar, who used to be an employee of the CIA, in his bid for power in Libya. And he has done so by providing weaponry to Haftar, as well as mercenaries to fight and support him. That episode may very well be over, although there's every reason to believe that Haftar is trying to rearm himself and carry on the conflict should the process—should the political process in Libya break down. Russia has sold more weapons to Egypt in the last few years than at any other time since the early 1970s. They have a defense agreement with Saudi Arabia. It's not clear what that actually means, but that defense agreement was signed not that long after the United States' rather chaotic withdrawal from Afghanistan, which clearly unnerved governments in the Middle East. So Russia is active, it's influential, its militarily engaged, and it is seeking to advance its interests throughout the region. I'll point out that its presence in North Africa is not necessarily so much about North Africa, but it's also about Europe. Its bid in Libya is important because its ally controls the eastern portion of Libya, where most of Libya's light, sweet crude oil is located. And that is the largest—the most significant reserves of oil in all of Africa. So it's important as an energy play for the Russians to control parts of North Africa, and right on Russia's—right on Europe's front doorstep. China. China's the largest investor and single largest trading partner with most of the region. And it's not just energy related. We know how dependent China is on oil from the Gulf, but it's made big investments in Algeria, in Egypt, the UAE, and in Iran. The agreement with Iran, a twenty-five-year agreement, coming at a time when the Iranians were under significant pressure from the United States, was regarded by many in Washington as an effort on the part of the Chinese to undercut the United States, and undercut U.S. policy in the region. I think it was, in part, that. I think it was also in part the fact that China is dependent in part on Iranian oil and did not want the regime there to collapse, posing a potential energy crisis for China and the rest of the world. It seems clear to me, at least, that the Chinese do not want to supplant the United States in the region. I don't think they look at the region in that way. And if they did, they probably learned the lesson of the United States of the last twenty-five years, which has gotten itself wrapped around the axle on a variety of issues that were unnecessary and sapped the power of the United States. So they don't want to get more deeply involved in the region. They don't want to take sides in conflicts. They don't want to take sides in the Arab-Israeli conflict. They don't take sides in the conflict between the United States and Iran, or the competition between Saudi Arabia and Iran. They want to benefit from the region, whether through investment or through extraction, and the security umbrella that the United States provides in the region. I'm not necessarily so sure that that security umbrella needs to be so expensive and so extensive for the United States to achieve its goals. But nevertheless, and for the time being at least, we will be providing that security umbrella in the region, from which the Chinese will benefit. I think, just to close on this issue of great-power competition. And because of time, I'm leaving out another big player, or emerging player in the region, which is India. I'm happy to talk about that in Q&A. But my last point is that, going back to the United States, countries in the region and leaders in the region are predisposed towards the United States. The problem is, is that they are very well-aware of the political polarization in this country. They're very well-aware of the political dysfunction in this country. They're very well-aware of the incompetence that came with the invasion of Iraq, the withdrawal from Afghanistan, or any number of disasters that have unfolded here in the United States. And it doesn't look, from where they sit in Abu Dhabi, in Cairo, in Riyadh, and in other places, that the United States has staying power, the will to lead, and the interest in remaining in the Middle East. And thus, they have turned to alternatives. Those alternatives are not the same as the United States, but they do provide something. I mean, particularly when it comes to the Chinese it is investment, it's economic advantages, without the kind of trouble that comes with the United States. Trouble from the perspective of leaders, so that they don't have to worry about human rights when they deal with the Chinese, because the Chinese aren't interested in human rights. But nevertheless, they remain disclosed toward the United States and want to work with the United States. They just don't know whether we're going to be there over the long term, given what is going on in the United States. I'll stop there. And I look forward to your questions and comments. Thank you. FASKIANOS: Steven, that was fantastic. Thank you very much. We're going to now to all of you for your questions. So the first raised hand comes from Jonas Truneh. And I don't think I pronounced that correctly, so you can correct me. Q: Yeah, no, that's right. Thank you. Thank you very much. Thank you, Dr. Cook, for your talk. I'm from UCL, University College London, in London. COOK: So it is—(off mic). Q: Indeed, it is. Yeah. That's right. COOK: Great. Q: So you touched on it there somewhat particularly with great-power competition, but so my question is related to the current energy logic in the Middle East. The Obama administration perhaps thought that the shale revolution allowed a de-prioritization, if I'm allowed to use that word, of the Middle East. And that was partly related to the pivot to Asia. So essentially does the U.S. still regard itself as the primary guarantor of energy security in the Persian Gulf? And if so, would the greatest beneficiary, as I think you indicated, would that not be China? And is that a case of perverse incentives? Is there much the U.S. can do about it? COOK: Well, it depends on who you ask, right? And it's a great question. I think that the—one of the things that—one of the ways in which the Obama administration sought to deprioritize and leave the region was through the shale revolution. I mean, the one piece of advice that he did take from one of his opponents in 2002—2008, which was to drill, baby, drill. And the United States did. I would not say that this is something that is specific to the Obama administration. If you go back to speeches of presidents way back—but I won't even go that far back. I'll go to George W. Bush in 2005 State of the Union addressed, talked all about energy independence from the Middle East. This may not actually be in much less the foreseeable future, but in really—in a longer-term perspective, it may be harder to do. But it is politically appealing. The reason why I say it depends on who you ask, I think that there are officials in the United States who say: Nothing has changed. Nothing has changed. But when the Iranians attacked those two oil processing facilities in Saudi Arabia, that temporarily took off 50 percent of supply off the markets—good thing the Saudis have a lot stored away—the United States didn't really respond. The president of the United States said: I'm waiting for a call from Riyadh. That forty years of stated American policy was, like, it did not exist. The Carter doctrine and the Reagan corollary to the Carter doctrine suddenly didn't exist. And the entirety of the American foreign policy community shrugged their shoulders and said: We're not going to war on behalf of MBS. I don't think we would have been going to war on behalf of MBS. We would have been ensuring the free flow of energy supplies out of the region, which is something that we have been committed to doing since President Carter articulated the Carter doctrine, and then President Reagan added his corollary to it. I think that there are a number of quite perverse incentives associated with this. And I think that you're right. The question is whether the competition from China outweighs our—I'm talking about “our”—the United States' compelling interest in a healthy global economy. And to the extent that our partners in Asia, whether it's India, South Korea, Japan, and our important trading partner in China, are dependent upon energy resources from the Gulf, and we don't trust anybody to ensure the free flow of energy resources from the Gulf, it's going to be on us to do it. So we are kind of hammered between that desire to have a healthy global economy as being—and being very wary of the Chinese. And the Chinese, I think, are abundantly aware of it, and have sought to take advantage of it. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question, which got an up-vote, from Charles Ammon, who is at Pennsylvania State University. And I think this goes to what you were building on with the great-power competition: What interests does India have in the Middle East? And how is it increasing its involvement in the region? COOK: So India is—imports 60 percent of its oil from the region. Fully 20 percent of it from Saudi Arabia, another 20 percent of it from Iran, and then the other 20 percent from other sources. So that's one thing. That's one reason why India is interested in the Middle East. Second, there are millions and millions of Indians who work in the Middle East. The Gulf region is a region that basically could not run without South Asian expatriate labor, most of which comes from India—on everything. Third, India has made considerable headway with countries like the United Arab Emirates, as well as Saudi Arabia, in counterextremism cooperation. This has come at the expense of Pakistan, but as relations between Pakistan and Saudi Arabia and relations between Pakistan and the UAE soured in recent years, the Indians have been able to take advantage of that. And Indian leaders have hammered away at the common interest that India and leaders in the region have in terms of countering violent extremism. And then finally, India and Israel have quite an extraordinary relationship, both in the tech field as well as in the defense area. Israel is a supplier to India. And the two of them are part of a kind of global network of high-tech powerhouse that have either, you know, a wealth of startups or very significant investment from the major tech players in the world. Israel—Microsoft just announced a huge expansion in Israel. And Israeli engineers and Indian engineers collaborate on a variety of projects for these big tech companies. So there's a kind of multifaceted Indian interest in the region, and the region's interest in India. What India lacks that the Chinese have is a lot more capacity. They don't have the kind of wherewithal to bring investment and trade in the region in the other direction. But nevertheless, it's a much more important player than it was in the past. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Curran Flynn, who has a raised hand. Q: How do you envision the future of Egypt, Sudan, and Ethiopia politics for the next thirty years? Ethiopia controls the Nile dam projects. And could this dispute lead to a war? And what is the progress with the U.S. in mediating the talks between the three countries? COOK: Thank you. FASKIANOS: And that is coming from the King Fahd University in Saudi Arabia. COOK: Fabulous. So that's more than the evening. It's actually nighttime there. I think that the question of the great Ethiopian Renaissance Dam is really an important one, and it's something that has not gotten as much attention as it should. And for those of you who are not familiar, in short the Ethiopians have been building a massive dam on the Blue Nile, which is a tributary to the Nile. And that if—when competed, threatens the water supply to Egypt, a country of 110 million people that doesn't get a lot of rainfall. Ethiopia, of course, wants to dam the Nile in order to produce hydroelectric power for its own development, something that Egypt did when it dammed the Nile River to build the Aswan High Dam, and crated Lake Nasser behind it. The Egyptians are very, very concerned. This is an existential issue for them. And there have been on and off negotiations, but the negotiations aren't really about the issues. They're talks about talks about talks. And they haven't gotten—they haven't gotten very far. Now, the Egyptians have been supported by the Sudanese government, after the Sudanese government had been somewhat aligned with the Ethiopian government. The Trump administration put itself squarely behind the Egyptian government, but Ethiopia's also an important partner of the United States in the Horn of Africa. The Egyptians have gone about signing defense cooperation agreements with a variety of countries around Ethiopia's borders. And of course, Ethiopia is engaged in essentially what's a civil war. This is a very, very difficult and complicated situation. Thus far, there doesn't seem to be an easy solution the problem. Now, here's the rub, if you talk to engineers, if you talk to people who study water, if you talk to people who know about dams and the flow of water, the resolution to the problem is actually not that hard to get to. The problem is that the politics and nationalism have been engaged on both sides of the issue, making it much, much more difficult to negotiate an equitable solution to the problem. The Egyptians have said in the past that they don't really have an intention of using force, despite the fact of this being an existential issue. But there's been somewhat of a shift in their language on the issue. Which recently they've said if red lines were crossed, they may be forced to intervene. Intervene how? What are those red lines? They haven't been willing to define them, which should make everybody nervous. The good news is that Biden administration has appointed an envoy to deal with issues in the Horn of Africa, who has been working very hard to try to resolve the conflict. I think the problem here however is that Ethiopia, now distracted by a conflict in the Tigray region, nationalism is running high there, has been—I don't want to use the word impervious—but not as interested in finding a negotiated solution to the problem than it might have otherwise been in the past. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Bob Pauly, who's a professor of international development at the University of Southern Mississippi. It got three up-votes. What would you identify as the most significant likely short and longer-term effects of Turkey's present domestic economic and political challenges on President Erdogan's strategy and policy approaches to the Middle East, and why? COOK: Oh, well, that is a very, very long answer to a very, very interesting question. Let's see what happens in 2023. President Erdogan is facing reelection. His goal all along has been to reelected on the one hundredth anniversary of the republic, and to demonstrate how much he has transformed Turkey in the image of the Justice and Development Party, and moved it away from the institutions of the republic. Erdogan may not make it to 2023. I don't want to pedal in conspiracy theories or anything like that, but he doesn't look well. There are large numbers of videos that have surfaced of him having difficulties, including one famous one from this past summer when he was offering a Ramadan greeting on Turkish television to supporters of the Justice and Development Party, and he seemed to fade out and slur his words. This is coupled with reports trickling out of Ankara about the lengths to which the inner circle has gone to shield real health concerns about Erdogan from the public. It's hard to really diagnose someone from more than six thousand miles away, but I think it's a scenario that policymakers in Washington need to think seriously about. What happens if Erdogan is incapacitated or dies before 2023? That's one piece. The second piece is, well, what if he makes it and he's reelected? And I think in any reasonable observer sitting around at the end of 2021 looking forward to 2023 would say two things: One, you really can't predict Turkish politics this far out, but if Turkish elections were held today and they were free and fair, the Justice and Development Party would get below 30 percent. Still more than everybody else. And Erdogan would have a real fight on his hands to get reelected, which he probably would be. His approaches to his domestic challenges and his approaches to the region are really based on what his current political calculations are at any given moment. So his needlessly aggressive posture in the Eastern Mediterranean was a function of the fact that he needed to shore up his nationalist base. Now that he finds himself quite isolated in the world, the Turks have made overtures to Israel, to the UAE, to Saudi Arabia. They're virtually chasing the Egyptians around the Eastern Mediterranean to repair their relationship. Because without repairing these relationships the kind of investment that is necessary to try to help revive the Turkish economy—which has been on the skids for a number of years—is going to be—is going to be more difficult. There's also another piece of this, which is the Middle East is a rather lucrative arms market. And during the AKP era, the Turks have had a significant amount of success further developing their defense industrial base, to the point that now their drones are coveted. Now one of the reasons for a Saudi-Turkish rapprochement is that the United States will not sell Saudi Arabia the drones it wants, for fear that they will use them in Yemen. And the Saudis are looking for drones elsewhere. That's either China or Turkey. And Turkey's seem to work really, really well, based on experience in Syria, Libya, and Nagorno-Karabakh. So what—Turkish foreign policy towards the region has become really dependent upon what Erdogan's particularly political needs are. There's no strategic approach to the region. There is a vision of Turkey as a leader of the region, of a great power in its own right, as a leader of the Muslim world, as a Mediterranean power as well. But that's nothing new. Turkish Islamists have been talking about these things for quite some time. I think it's important that there's been some de-escalation. I don't think that all of these countries now love each other, but they see the wisdom of pulling back from—pulling back from the brink. I don't see Turkey's position changing dramatically in terms of its kind of reintegration into the broader region before 2023, at the least. FASKIANOS: Great. Let's go next to, raised hand, to Caleb Sanner. And you need to unmute yourself. Q: Hello, my name is Caleb. I'm from the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. So, Dr. Cook, you had mentioned in passing how China has been involved economically in North Africa. And my question would be, how is the U.S. taking that? And what are we doing, in a sense, to kind of counter that? I know it's not a military advancement in terms of that, but I've seen what it has been doing to their economies—North Africa's economies. And, yeah, what's the U.S. stance on that? COOK: Well, I think the United States is somewhat detached from this question of North Africa. North Africa's long been a—with the exception of Egypt, of course. And Egypt, you know, is not really North Africa. Egypt is something in and of itself. That China is investing heavily in Egypt. And the Egyptian position is: Please don't ask us to choose between you and the Chinese, because we're not going to make that choice. We think investment from all of these places is good for—is good for Egypt. And the other places where China is investing, and that's mostly in Algeria, the United States really doesn't have close ties to Algeria. There was a tightening of the relationship after the attacks on New York and Washington in 2001, recognizing that the Algerians—extremist groups in Algerian that had been waging war against the state there over the course of the 1990s were part and parcel of this new phenomenon of global jihad. And so there has been a security relationship there. There has been some kind of big infrastructure kind of investment in that country, with big companies that build big things, like GE and others, involved in Algeria. But the United States isn't helping to develop ports or industrial parks or critical infrastructure like bridges and airports in the same way that the Chinese have been doing throughout the region. And in Algeria, as well as in Egypt, the Chinese are building a fairly significant industrial center in the Suez Canal zone, of all places. And the United States simply doesn't have an answer to it, other than to tell our traditional partners in the region, don't do it. But unless we show up with something to offer them, I'm afraid that Chinese investment is going to be too attractive for countries that are in need of this kind of investment. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go next to a written question from Kenneth Mayers, who is at St. Francis College in Brooklyn. In your opinion, what would a strategic vision based on a far-sighted understanding of both resources and U.S. goals—with regard to peace and security, prosperity and development, and institutions and norms and values such as human rights—look like in the Middle East and North Africa? COOK: Well, it's a great question. And I'm tempted to say you're going to have to read the last third of my new book in order to get the—in order to get the answer. I think but let me start with something mentioned about norms and values. I think that one of the things that has plagued American foreign policy over the course of not just the last twenty years, but in the post-World War II era all the way up through the present day, you see it very, very clearly with President Biden, is that trying to incorporate American values and norms into our approach to the region has been extraordinarily difficult. And what we have a history of doing is the thing that is strategically tenable, but morally suspect. So what I would say is, I mean, just look at what's happened recently. The president of the United States studiously avoided placing a telephone call to the Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi. The Egyptians, as many know, have a terrible record on human rights, particularly since President Sisi came to power. Arrests of tens of thousands of people in the country, the torture of many, many people, the killings of people. And the president during his campaign said that he was going to give no blank checks to dictators, including to Abdel Fattah al-Sisi. And then what happened in May? What happened in May was that fighting broke out between Israel and Hamas and others in the Gaza Strip, a brutal eleven-day conflict. And Egypt stepped up and provided a way out of the conflict through its good offices. And that prompted the United States to—the president of the United States—to have two phone calls in those eleven days with the Egyptian leader. And now the United States is talking about Egypt as a constructive partner that's helping to stabilize the region. Sure, the administration suspended $130 million of Egypt's annual—$130 million Egypt's annual allotment of $1.3 billion. But that is not a lot. Egypt got most of—most of its military aid. As I said, strategically tenable, morally suspect. I'm not quite sure how we get out of that. But what I do know, and I'll give you a little bit of a preview of the last third of the book—but I really do want you to buy it when it's done—is that the traditional interests of the United States in the Middle East are changing. And I go through a kind of quasi, long, somewhat tortured—but very, very interesting—discussion of the origins of our interests, and how they are changing, and how we can tell they are changing. And that is to say that the free flow of energy resources may not be as important to the United States in the next twenty-five years as it was over the course of the previous fifty or sixty years. That helping to ensure Israeli security, which has been axiomatic for the United States, eh, I'd say since the 1960s, really, may not be as important as Israel develops its diplomatic relations with its neighbors, that has a GDP per capita that's on par with the U.K., and France, and other partners in Europe, a country that clearly can take care of itself, that is a driver of technology and innovation around the globe. And that may no longer require America's military dominance in the region. So what is that we want to be doing? How can we be constructive? And I think the answers are in things that we hadn't really thought of too systematically in the past. What are the things that we're willing to invest in an defend going forward? Things like climate change, things like migration, things like pandemic disease. These are things that we've talked about, but that we've never been willing to invest in the kind of the resources. Now there are parts of the Middle East that during the summer months are in-habitable. That's going to produce waves of people looking for places to live that are inhabitable. What do we do about that? Does that destabilize the Indian subcontinent? Does it destabilize Europe? Does it destabilize North Africa? These are all questions that we haven't yet answered. But to the extent that we want to invest in, defend and sacrifice for things like climate, and we want to address the issue—related issue of migration, and we want to deal with the issue of disease and other of these kind of functional global issues in the Middle East is better not just for us and Middle Easterners, but also in terms of our strategic—our great-power competition in the region. These are not things that the Chinese and the Russians are terribly interested in, despite the fact that the Chinese may tell you they are. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go next to Ahmuan Williams, with a raised hand, at the University of Oklahoma. COOK: Oklahoma. Q: Hi. And thank you for being here. You kind of talked about the stabilization of northern Africa and the Middle East. And just a few days ago the Sudanese government—and they still haven't helped capture the parliamentarian there—have recycled back into a military—somewhat of military rule. And it's been since 2005 since the end of their last civil war, which claimed millions of innocent civilians through starvation and strife and, you know, the lack of being able to get humanitarian aid. There was also a huge refugee crisis there, a lot of people who evacuated Sudan. How's that going to impact the Middle East and the American take to Middle East and northern Africa policy, especially now that the Security Council is now considering this and is trying to determine what we should do? COOK: It's a great question. And I think that, first, let's be clear. There was a coup d'état in Sudan. The military overthrew a transitional government on the eve of having to hand over the government to civilians. And they didn't like it. There's been tension that's been brewing in Sudan for some time. Actually, an American envoy, our envoy to East Africa and Africa more generally, a guy named Jeff Feltman, was in Khartoum, trying to kind of calm the tension, to get the two sides together, and working to avert a coup. And the day after he left, the military moved. That's not—that doesn't reflect the fact that the United States gave a blessing for the military to overthrow this government. I think what it does, though, and it's something that I think we all need to keep in mind, it demonstrates the limits of American power in a variety of places around the world. That we don't have all the power in the world to prevent things from happening when people, like the leaders of the Sudanese military, believe that they have existential issues that are at stake. Now, what's worry about destabilization in Sudan is, as you point out, there was a civil war there, there was the creation of a new country there, potential for—if things got really out of hand—refugee flows into Egypt, from Egypt across the Sanai Peninsula into Israel. One of the things people are unaware of is the large number of Sudanese or Eritreans and other Africans who have sought refuge in Israel, which has created significant economic and social strains in that country. So it's a big deal. Thus far, it seems we don't—that the U.S. government doesn't know exactly what's happening there. There are protesters in the streets demanding democracy. It's very unclear what the military is going to do. And it's very unclear what our regional allies and how they view what's happening. What Egypt, the United Arab Emirates, what Saudi Arabia, what Israel—which Sudan is an Abraham Accords country now—what they are doing. How they view the coup as positive or negative will likely impact how effective the United States can be in trying to manage this situation. But I suspect that we're just going to have to accommodate ourselves to whatever outcome the Sudanese people and the Sudanese military come to, because I don't think we have a lot of—we don't have a lot of tools there to make everybody behave. FASKIANOS: OK. So I'm going to take the next question from Elena Murphy, who is a junior at Syracuse University's Maxwell School. And she's a diplomatic intern at the Kurdistan Regional Government's Representation in the United States. COOK: That's cool. FASKIANOS: That's very cool. So as a follow up, how much do you believe neo-Ottomanism and attempting regional hegemony has affected Erdogan's domestic and foreign policy, especially in consideration of Turkey's shift towards the MENA in their foreign policy, after a period of withdrawals and no problems with neighbors policy? COOK: Great. Can I see that? Because that's a long question. FASKIANOS: Yeah, it's a long question. It's got an up-vote. Third one down. COOK: Third one down. Elena, as a follow up, how much do you believe neo-Ottomanism—I'm sorry, I'm going to have to read it again. How much do you believe neo-Ottomanism and attempting regional has affected Erdogan's both domestic and foreign policy, especially in consideration of Turkey's shift towards the MENA in their foreign policy, after a period of withdrawals and no problems with neighbors? OK. Great. So let us set aside the term “neo-Ottomanism” for now. Because neo-Ottomanism actually—it does mean something, but people have often used the term neo-Ottomanism to describe policies of the Turkish government under President Erdogan that they don't like. And so let's just talk about the way in which the Turkish government under President Erdogan views the region and views what Turkey's rightful place should be. And I think the Ottomanism piece is important, because the kind of intellectual framework which the Justice and Development Party, which is Erdogan's party, views the world, sees Turkey as—first of all, it sees the Turkish Republic as a not-so-legitimate heir to the Ottoman Empire. That from their perspective, the natural order of things would have been the continuation of the empire in some form or another. And as a result, they believe that Turkey's natural place is a place of leadership in the region for a long time. Even before the Justice and Development Party was founded in 2001, Turkey's earlier generation of Islamists used to savage the Turkish leadership for its desire to be part of the West, by saying that this was kind of unnatural, that they were just merely aping the West, and the West was never actually going to accept Turkey. Which is probably true. But I think that the Justice and Development Party, after a period of wanting to become closer to the West, has turned its attention towards the Middle East, North Africa, and the Muslim world more generally. And in that, it sees itself, the Turks see themselves as the natural leaders in the region. They believe they have a cultural affinity to the region as a result of the legacies of the Ottoman Empire, and they very much can play this role of leader. They see themselves as one of the kind of few real countries in the region, along with Egypt and Iran and Saudi Arabia. And the rest are sort of ephemeral. Needless to say, big countries in the Arab world—like Egypt, like Saudi Arabia—don't welcome the idea of Turkey as a leader of the region. They recognize Turkey as a very big and important country, but not a leader of the region. And this is part of that friction that Turkey has experienced with its neighbors, after an earlier iteration of Turkish foreign policy, in which—one of the earliest iterations of Turkish foreign policy under the Justice and Development Party which was called no problems with neighbors. In which Turkey, regardless of the character of the regimes, wanted to have good relations with its neighbors. It could trade with those neighbors. And make everybody—in the process, Turkey could be a driver of economic development in the region, and everybody can be basically wealthy and happy. And it didn't really work out that way, for a variety of reasons that we don't have enough time for. Let's leave it at the fact that Turkey under Erdogan—and a view that is shared by many—that Turkey should be a leader of the region. And I suspect that if Erdogan were to die, if he were unable to stand for election, if the opposition were to win, that there would still be elements of this desire to be a regional leader in a new Turkish foreign policy. FASKIANOS: Steven, thank you very much. This was really terrific. We appreciate your stepping in at the eleventh hour, taking time away from your book. For all of you— COOK: I'm still not Sanam. FASKIANOS: (Laughs.) I know, but you were an awesome replacement. So you can follow Steven Cook on Twitter at @stevenacook. As I said at the beginning too, he is a columnist for Foreign Policy magazine. So you can read his work there, as well as, of course, on CFR.org, all of the commentary, analysis, op-eds, congressional testimony are there for free. So I hope you will follow him and look after his next book. Our next Academic Webinar will be on Wednesday November 3, at 1:00 p.m. Eastern time on the future of U.S.-Mexico relations. In the meantime, I encourage you to follow us, @CFR_Academic, visit CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for new research and analysis on global issues. And stay well, stay safe, and thank you, again. COOK: Bye, everyone. FASKIANOS: Bye. (END)

new york japan europe russian university china chinese american mexico america future oklahoma indian south asian world war ii representation gdp west european france turkey iran council donald trump syria iraq united states vladimir putin russia washington gulf cia africa turkish pakistan african afghanistan needless egyptian indians middle east sudan barack obama struggle bush morocco cook muslims european union palestinians mediterranean tel aviv steven cook ethiopia arab ge trouble security council gold medal outreach assad joe biden nile saudi cabinet arab israeli horn pennsylvania state university jerusalem university college london foreign policy south korea foreign affairs ngos algeria united arab emirates saudi arabia foreign relations cfr ottoman empire turks academic hezbollah libya nato abu dhabi ethiopian syracuse university ambition state of the union southern mississippi fully webinars iraqi ucl oman embassy algerian intervene north africa mena bahrain gaza israelis saudis uae brookings institution sisi yemen east africa west bank iranians geopolitics arrests eastern mediterranean ramadan sudanese ankara george w bush levant benjamin netanyahu yair lapid suez canal riyadh khartoum washington institute near east policy damascus tigray hamas emiratis abdel fattah bashar akp hafez islamists broader mbs nile river eritreans east jerusalem emirates persian gulf recep tayyip erdogan turkish republic maxwell school algerians haftar blue nile false dawn egyptair sharm king abdullah nagorno karabakh gaza strip middle easterners cook it khalifa haftar national program qataris sheikhs sanam wisconsin whitewater kurdistan regional government development party naftali bennett egyptian president abdel fattah ottomanism abraham accords
The EBFC Show
Ironworker Impact with Cindy Menches, Ph.D., P.E.

The EBFC Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 58:48


Iron workers install structural and reinforcing iron and steel to form and support buildings, bridges, roads, and more. These professionals impact the built environment by performing physically demanding and dangerous work, often at great heights. Dr. Cindy Menches support the business success of union iron worker contractors and the Iron Workers International Union as the Director of Professional Development & Training for IMPACT.  She develops innovative professional education programs that aid members in growing and improving their businesses, facilitating the startup of new contractors, and career advancement. Dr. Menches manages a training program that consists of nearly 40 unique courses. Check her full bio to learn more about these offerings. Her prior work included being an assistant professor at the University of Texas at Austin and the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, including research work on the improvisational decision-making processes of construction field supervisors. Dr. Menches worked as a construction project manager in Chicago and Madison and served as an Air Force civil engineering officer, including positions as a construction project planner, environmental engineering program manager, and Deputy Chief of Engineering. Dr. Menches holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering-Building Science from the University of Southern California, a Master of Science degree in Architectural Engineering from The Pennsylvania State University, and a Doctor of Philosophy degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Wisconsin.   --- Connect with Cindy via Email at cmenches@impact-net.org LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/cindy-menches-ph-d-p-e-5146413/ Website at https://www.impact-net.org  Twitter at https://twitter.com/IW_IMPACT  Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/impactironworkers/ YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/user/IronworkersIMPACT   Connect with Felipe via Social media at https://thefelipe.bio.link  Subscribe on YouTube to never miss new videos here: https://rb.gy/q5vaht    --- Today's episode is sponsored by Bosch RefinemySite. It's a cloud-based construction platform. Bosch uses Lean principles to enable your entire team, from owners to trade contractors – to plan, communicate, document, and execute in real-time. It's the digital tool that supports the Last Planner System® process and puts it all together in one simple, collaborative ecosystem. Bosch RefinemySite empowers your team, builds trust, creates a culture of responsibility, and enhances communication. Learn more and Try for free at https://www.bosch-refinemysite.us/tryforfree    Today's episode is sponsored by Construction Accelerator. This online learning system for teams and individuals offers short, in-depth videos on numerous Lean topics for Builders and Designers to discuss and implement, just like on this podcast. This is tangible knowledge at your fingertips in the field, in the office, or at home. Support your Lean learning at your own pace. Learn more at http://trycanow.com/    Today's episode is sponsored by the Lean Construction Institute (LCI). This non-profit organization operates as a catalyst to transform the industry through Lean project delivery using an operating system centered on a common language, fundamental principles, and basic practices. Learn more at https://www.leanconstruction.org    Today's episode is sponsored by STRUXI. STRUXI is happy to help the EBFC Show fight the good fight for improving construction productivity. Built on 50+ years of construction-tech innovation, STRUXI replaces outdated-paper timesheets and production reports with software that updates you on labor productivity in real time – without disrupting how you already run your job sites. STRUXI does this by providing a simple user interface, so your foreman can accurately allocate time without being stuck behind a computer. This data is also easily connected to Power BI for rich reporting and forecasting. Learn more at https://www.struxi.com/   The EBFC Show Intro Music: –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– California by MusicbyAden https://soundcloud.com/musicbyaden  Creative Commons — Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported — CC BY-SA 3.0 Free Download / Stream: https://bit.ly/al-california  Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/oZ3vUFdPAjI  ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

PA BOOKS on PCN
“Frederick Watts and the Founding of Penn State,” with Roger Williams

PA BOOKS on PCN

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021


Frederick Watts came to prominence during the nineteenth century as a lawyer and a railroad company president, but his true interests lay in agricultural improvement and in raising the economic, social, and political standing of Pennsylvania's farmers. After being elected founding president of The Pennsylvania State Agricultural Society in 1851, he used his position to advocate vigorously for the establishment of an agricultural college that would employ science to improve farming practices. He went on to secure the charter for the Farmers' High School of Pennsylvania, which would eventually become the Pennsylvania State University. This biography explores Watts's role in founding and leading Penn State through its formative years. Watts adroitly directed the school as it was sited, built, and financed, opening for students in 1859. He hired the brilliant Evan Pugh as founding president, who, with Watts, quickly made it the first successful agricultural college in America. But for all his success in launching the institution, Watts nearly brought it to the brink of closure through a series of ruinous presidential appointments that led to an abandonment of the land-grant focus on agriculture and engineering. Roger L. Williams served as Associate Vice President and Executive Director of the Penn State Alumni Association and as Affiliate Associate Professor in Penn State's Higher Education Program.

Every Town
State College, PA - Cindy Song's Halloween Disappearance

Every Town

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 28:32


“Will it be a trick or a treat?” It's the most popular question in thousands of children's minds come Halloween season. But in the minds of State College, Pennsylvania police, and the family and friends of Korean girl Hyun-Jong Song, the question “What happened to Cindy Song?” has been eluding them since Halloween 2001. Cindy is that 21-year old Korean girl, a junior co-ed at the Pennsylvania State University. And for almost 2 decades, the answer to the question has always been, “She vanished.” As years pass and memories fade, the details of her vanishing on October 31, 2001 have become muddled. It drew national attention, but ultimately faded into a cold case. Thus, the Cindy Song disappearance remains one of the most notorious in central Pennsylvania.

Podcasts360
Jonathan Stine, MD, on the Impact of Exercise on NAFLD and Gut Dysbiosis

Podcasts360

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 12:34


In this 13-minute podcast, Jonathan Stine, MD, from the Milton S. Hershey Medical Center at Pennsylvania State University, discusses his proof-of-concept study concerning the relationship of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and gut dysbiosis and how exercise can improve outcomes.

New Books in Genocide Studies
Eliyana R. Adler, "Survival on the Margins: Polish Jewish Refugees in the Wartime Soviet Union" (Harvard UP, 2020)

New Books in Genocide Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 63:34


Between 1940 and 1946, thousands of Jewish refugees from Poland lived and toiled in the harsh Soviet interior. They endured hard labor, bitter cold, and extreme deprivation. But out of reach of the Nazis, they escaped the fate of millions of their coreligionists in the Holocaust. In Survival on the Margins: Polish Jewish Refugees in the Wartime Soviet Union (Harvard University Press, 2020), Eliyana Adler provides the first comprehensive account in English of their experiences. Eliyana Adler is Associate Professor of History and Jewish Studies at Pennsylvania State University. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/genocide-studies

New Books in Eastern European Studies
Eliyana R. Adler, "Survival on the Margins: Polish Jewish Refugees in the Wartime Soviet Union" (Harvard UP, 2020)

New Books in Eastern European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 63:34


Between 1940 and 1946, thousands of Jewish refugees from Poland lived and toiled in the harsh Soviet interior. They endured hard labor, bitter cold, and extreme deprivation. But out of reach of the Nazis, they escaped the fate of millions of their coreligionists in the Holocaust. In Survival on the Margins: Polish Jewish Refugees in the Wartime Soviet Union (Harvard University Press, 2020), Eliyana Adler provides the first comprehensive account in English of their experiences. Eliyana Adler is Associate Professor of History and Jewish Studies at Pennsylvania State University. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/eastern-european-studies

New Books in History
Eliyana R. Adler, "Survival on the Margins: Polish Jewish Refugees in the Wartime Soviet Union" (Harvard UP, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 63:34


Between 1940 and 1946, thousands of Jewish refugees from Poland lived and toiled in the harsh Soviet interior. They endured hard labor, bitter cold, and extreme deprivation. But out of reach of the Nazis, they escaped the fate of millions of their coreligionists in the Holocaust. In Survival on the Margins: Polish Jewish Refugees in the Wartime Soviet Union (Harvard University Press, 2020), Eliyana Adler provides the first comprehensive account in English of their experiences. Eliyana Adler is Associate Professor of History and Jewish Studies at Pennsylvania State University. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Jewish Studies
Eliyana R. Adler, "Survival on the Margins: Polish Jewish Refugees in the Wartime Soviet Union" (Harvard UP, 2020)

New Books in Jewish Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 63:34


Between 1940 and 1946, thousands of Jewish refugees from Poland lived and toiled in the harsh Soviet interior. They endured hard labor, bitter cold, and extreme deprivation. But out of reach of the Nazis, they escaped the fate of millions of their coreligionists in the Holocaust. In Survival on the Margins: Polish Jewish Refugees in the Wartime Soviet Union (Harvard University Press, 2020), Eliyana Adler provides the first comprehensive account in English of their experiences. Eliyana Adler is Associate Professor of History and Jewish Studies at Pennsylvania State University. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/jewish-studies

New Books Network
Eliyana R. Adler, "Survival on the Margins: Polish Jewish Refugees in the Wartime Soviet Union" (Harvard UP, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 63:34


Between 1940 and 1946, thousands of Jewish refugees from Poland lived and toiled in the harsh Soviet interior. They endured hard labor, bitter cold, and extreme deprivation. But out of reach of the Nazis, they escaped the fate of millions of their coreligionists in the Holocaust. In Survival on the Margins: Polish Jewish Refugees in the Wartime Soviet Union (Harvard University Press, 2020), Eliyana Adler provides the first comprehensive account in English of their experiences. Eliyana Adler is Associate Professor of History and Jewish Studies at Pennsylvania State University. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies
Eliyana R. Adler, "Survival on the Margins: Polish Jewish Refugees in the Wartime Soviet Union" (Harvard UP, 2020)

New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 63:34


Between 1940 and 1946, thousands of Jewish refugees from Poland lived and toiled in the harsh Soviet interior. They endured hard labor, bitter cold, and extreme deprivation. But out of reach of the Nazis, they escaped the fate of millions of their coreligionists in the Holocaust. In Survival on the Margins: Polish Jewish Refugees in the Wartime Soviet Union (Harvard University Press, 2020), Eliyana Adler provides the first comprehensive account in English of their experiences. Eliyana Adler is Associate Professor of History and Jewish Studies at Pennsylvania State University. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/russian-studies

PA BOOKS on PCN
“Made Free and Thrown Open to the Public” with Bernadette Lear

PA BOOKS on PCN

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 57:43


"Made Free and Thrown Open to the Public" charts the history of public libraries and librarianship in Pennsylvania. Based on archival research at more than fifty libraries and historical societies, it describes a long progression from private, subscription-based associations to publicly funded institutions, highlighting the dramatic period during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries when libraries were “thrown open” to women, children, and the poor. The book explains how Pennsylvania's physical and cultural geography, legal codes, and other unique features influenced the spread and development of libraries across the state. It also highlights Pennsylvania libraries' many contributions to the social fabric, especially during World War I, the Great Depression, and World War II. Bernadette Lear is the behavioral sciences and education librarian at Pennsylvania State University's Harrisburg campus. With Eric C. Novotny, she is the founding coeditor of the scholarly journal "Libraries: Culture, History, and Society." Lear's research focuses on the history of libraries, which she studies as an intersection of cultural, labor, social, and women's history.

Jewish History Matters
73: Polish Jewish Refugees in the Wartime Soviet Union with Eliyana Adler

Jewish History Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021


Eliana Adler joins us to talk about Polish Jews who fled to the Soviet Union in 1939, and who subsequently survived the Second World War and the Holocaust in Siberia and Central Asia. Listen in as we discuss her book Survival on the Margins: Polish Jewish Refugees in the Wartime Soviet Union, and the big picture issues it raises about how we understand the Holocaust, what it means to be a survivor, and the paradoxes of history: those Jews who were deported by the Soviet Union found themselves far away from the Nazi genocide. Survival on the Margins is a phenomenal book, which tells us about those Polish Jews who fled to the east when war broke out in September 1939; after the Molotov-RIppentrop treaty re-partitioned Poland between the Soviet Union and Germany, in the chaos of war about 200,000 Jews escaped from the Nazis into the Soviet Union—where they were subsequently deported further east, in many cases to Siberia and other locations in central Asia. After the war, they were allowed to return to Poland, where they discovered the full extent of the Holocaust's destruction. In the war's aftermath, they actually made up a large portion of the total group of Holocaust survivors—but in the years since, for various reasons their story has been subsumed into the main Holocaust narratives. Eliyana Adler is an Associate professor of History and Jewish Studies at Pennsylvania State University. She is an historian of the modern Jewish experience in Eastern Europe, and her most recent book, Survival on the Margins: Polish Jewish Refugees in the Wartime Soviet Union, is the basis for our conversation today.

Philosophy of Fitness
Staying Fit Over 40 & Why Women Should Be Lifting With Celebrity Fitness Trainer Holly Perkins |#61

Philosophy of Fitness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 58:17


This may be one of my favorite guests that I've had on the show thus far! Today I had the honor of chatting with celebrity fitness trainer Holly Perkins! Holly has BS in Exercise Physiology from The Pennsylvania State University and is also a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS NSCA). She's the author of the Women's Health book Lift to Get Lean, and a regular contributor to Shape, Prevention, Women's Health, SELF, BuzzFeed, and LIVESTRONG. Her clients have included Karlie Kloss, Howard Stern, Adrian Grenier, Carole Radziwill, Billy Crystal, Petra Ecclestone, NHL and NFL athletes, and even a Presidential candidate! Today we discuss the key ways women can use strength training and intentional nutrition to build the body they need to keep up with the life they love. With 30 years of experience, Holly offers incredible insight not only from the work she's done but also her personal journey. Interested in learning more about how to manifest or apply the law of attraction to your life? Make sure you hit the subscribe button so that you don't miss out on future content! All links below! Follow Holly on Instagram! Check out her free 6-week workout plan! Get her free macros guidebook! *************************** Click HERE to join the Philosophy of Fitness 21 Day Mindset Program! Use code "PHILOSOHY10" at checkout for 10% off *************************** If you want to work with me one-on-one for nutrition coaching, click HERE! *************************** Shop my Amazon Storefront! Follow me on Instagram Find me on Facebook Subscribe to my YouTube Channel Stream the podcast on your favorite platform Full Podcast Playlist *************************** I am a NASM certified personal trainer, certified nutrition coach, indoor cycling instructor, mindset mentor, and lover of all things spiritual. I am here to help you level up physically, mentally, and spiritually. *Disclaimer: For entertainment purposes only. This does not take the place of medical diagnosis or legal advice. Any major decisions should be consulted by a professional. This does not take place of that.* #fitover40 #strengthtraining #workoutsforwomen --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/philosophyoffitness/support

My Voice, Our Story Talks with Cielo
How to Handle Criticism with Rep. Adrian Tam

My Voice, Our Story Talks with Cielo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 32:34


In this episode, Rep. Adrian Tam shares with us how to handle criticism so you do not let it get the best of you. He also tell us about his fascinating political career and what he has learned from it so far.   Background: Representative Adrian Tam was born and raised in Honolulu, Hawaii. He is the proud graduate of Kalani High School, and received his bachelor's degree from Pennsylvania State University. Upon graduating, Tam became a licensed real estate agent. In 2016, he worked as a temporary hire at the Hawaii State House of Representatives before moving to the Hawaii State Senate to work for Senator Stanley Chang from 2017- 2020. In 2020, Tam launched a successful campaign for the Hawaii State House of Representatives. He became a household name after defeating conservative proud's boy leader in Hawaiian elections to become the only openly gay member of the Hawaii State Legislature. Tam is currently the representative for Hawaii State House, District 22 serving Waikiki and Ala Moana. He serves as Vice-Chair of the House Committee on Health, Human Services, and Homelessness, and Vice-Chair of the House Committee on Culture, Arts, and International Affairs, and as a member of the House Committee Finance. This episode also covers: Adrian's unique family history and upbringing The journey to becoming a politician.  Why Authenticity matters  Definition of Success Resources: Connect with Adrian on IG: instagram.com/adrianktam/ Connect with Cielo on IG: instagram.com/seaandsky45/ Adrian's Twitter: twitter.com/adrianktam Official Website of Rep. Adrian Tam: adrianforhawaii.com Services: Are you ready to take your brand to the next level? Want to increase your digital presence online so you can skyrocket your number of clients & sales? We can help you!  Visit BLENDtw Media to learn more about our digital marketing services and send us an email to outreach@blendtw.com to BOOK a F-R-E-E consultation TODAY.  For more resources to help you live your BEST life, join our community on: Facebook  Instagram Find more inspiring stories & higher wisdom at myvoiceourstory.com  

Smart City
L'odore della paura per proteggere giardini e coltivazioni dagli insetti nocivi

Smart City

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021


L'odore della paura; lo chiamano così i ricercatori, e presto potrebbe diventare una nuova arma nella lotta agli insetti nocivi per giardini e colture agricole, tra cui gli afidi. A dare l'annuncio di questa nuova strategia, che sfrutta il naturale terrore degli insetti per i loro predatori, sono stati ricercatori della Pennsylvania State University, i quali hanno presentato le loro conclusioni all'America Chemical Society.Sviluppare nuovi approcci per la lotta contro i parassiti delle piante è sempre più urgente vista la sempre maggiore resistenza degli insetti parassiti ai pesticidi, che induce ad aumentare sempre di più dosaggi, mentre bastano poche molecole che trasportano l'odore di una coccinella per tenere lontani gli afidi. Ospite Emilio Guerrieri dirigente di ricerca dell'Istituto per la protezione sostenibile delle piante del Cnr-Ipsp

The Native Plant Podcast
Jessica Walliser- Attracting Beneficial Bugs to the Garden: A Natural Approach to Pest Control

The Native Plant Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 81:28


Jessica Walliser is a former contributing editor for Organic Gardening and a regular contributor to many national gardening publications. Her two weekly gardening columns for the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review have been enjoyed by readers for over ten years. Her book, Attracting Beneficial Bugs to the Garden: A Natural Approach to Pest Control, was awarded the American Horticultural Society's Book Award. Jessica received her degree in ornamental horticulture from The Pennsylvania State University.

PA BOOKS on PCN
"Harrisburg in World War II" with Rodney Ross

PA BOOKS on PCN

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 58:43


As the nation entered into the throes of World War II, Harrisburg was prepared to answer the call of service. Prideful as a “beehive of industry,” the city was a hub for wartime manufacturing, railroads and distribution. Bond drives attracted celebrities such as Abbott and Costello as locals enjoyed “Coffee MacArthur” and “Doughnuts Doolittle” for breakfast. Market Square's Caplan's collected empty toothpaste and shaving cream containers in rationing efforts. The local Pabst Blue Ribbon plant stopped canning, and the Harrisburg Coca-Cola Bottling Works ran out of sugar as everyday products became rare luxuries. Nearly 540 area service members lost their lives in the war, leaving Harrisburg to honor their legacy for generations. Author Rodney Ross reveals the trials of life on the homefront in Harrisburg during World War II. OVERVIEWDETAILSAUTHOR Rodney J. Ross is a Harrisburg native. He attended Forney Elementary, Edison Junior High School and John Harris High. He is a 1962 Shippensburg State Teachers College graduate. He earned a master's and a doctorate at the Pennsylvania State University. Before retiring in 2017, he taught seven years in the Harrisburg School District and forty-seven at the Harrisburg Area Community College. He has authored academic articles, book reviews and encyclopedia entries. He is researching Harrisburg's experience with World War I and the flu pandemic. He and his wife reside in Lower Paxton Township with their Shih Tzu, Prince.

For the Love of Goats
Iodine Deficiency in Goats

For the Love of Goats

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 38:29


As I've received more messages from people with kids born hairless or with goiters, I've become more interested in the topic of iodine and goats because those symptoms occur in kids that are iodine deficient.You don't usually hear anyone talking about iodine and goats unless the topic of kelp comes up, and then the conversation can swing wildly between people worried about deficiency or toxicity. In today's episode, I am joined again by Dr. Robert VanSaun, Professor of Veterinary Science and Extension Veterinarian in the Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences at Pennsylvania State University.We talk about symptoms of iodine deficiency in adult goats, as well as newborn kids. We also take a deep dive into providing kelp for goats and how labels don't always give you the information you need.Full show notes here --  https://thriftyhomesteader.com/iodine-deficiency-in-goats/To see the most recent episodes, visit  ForTheLoveOfGoats.com

Get A Grip On Lighting Podcast
Episode 258: #212 - Telling Stories Through Lighting

Get A Grip On Lighting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 43:32


Angelica Santana holds a Bachelor of Architectural Engineering with a focus in Lighting/Electrical systems from The Pennsylvania State University. Angelica is a lighting designer with CM Kling in Washington DC.  Angelica describes her work as “painting with light” when she goes into a space. As a yoga instructor, she also uses light as an important aspect of meditation. Want to de-stress you or your employees?  Shoot an email to Angelica at unionyogadc@gmail.com 

Good / True / & Beautiful | with Ashton Gustafson
Episode 179: The Monastic Heart with Joan Chittister

Good / True / & Beautiful | with Ashton Gustafson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 60:54


Joan Chittister, OSB, is an internationally known writer and lecturer and the executive director of Benetvision, a resource and research center for contemporary spirituality in Erie, Pennsylvania. A Benedictine Sister of Erie, Pennsylvania, she served as president of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious and of the Conference of American Benedictine Prioresses, and was prioress of the Benedictine Sisters of Erie for twelve years. Sister Joan received her doctorate from Pennsylvania State University in speech communications theory. She has authored sixty books and received numerous awards for her work on behalf of peace, justice, and women in church and in society.Her latest book, The Monastic Heart, was released September 21, 2021. This book carries the weight and wisdom of the monastic spiritual tradition into the twenty-first century. Sister Joan leans into Saint Benedict, who, as a young man in the sixth century, sought moral integrity in the face of an empire not by conquering or overpowering the empire but by simply living an ordinary life extraordinarily well. This same monastic mindset can help us grow in wisdom, equanimity, and strength of soul as we seek restoration and renewal both at home and in the world. At a time when people around the world are bearing witness to human frailty—and, simultaneously, the endurance of the human spirit—The Monastic Heart invites readers of all walks to welcome this end of certainty and embrace a new beginning of our faith. Without stepping foot in a monastery, we can become, like those before us, a deeper, freer self, a richer soul—and, as a result, a true monastic, so “that in all things God may be glorified.”

Science in Action
New evidence for Sars-CoV-2's origin in bats

Science in Action

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 30:13


Researchers studying bats in Northern Laos have found evidence that brings us closer than ever to understanding the origin of Covid-19. Since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic scientists have tried to pin-point the exact origin of Sars-CoV-2. But recent evidence from the Institut Pasteur has identified several novel coronaviruses with similarities to the current coronavirus in bats. Professor Marc Eliot spoke to Roland Pease about how this research could give us a better idea where Covid-19 came from. Could an oral Covid-19 treatment be available soon? Daria Hazuda, responsible for infectious disease and bacteria research at MSD tells us about their clinical trials for an oral antiviral drug that could combat Covid-19: Molnupiravir. Early Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Roland Pease travels to Bath to meet scientists who may have developed a way to diagnose Alzheimer's in the earlier stages of the disease. Dr George Stothart, has led the team from Bath university in the development of this simple 2 minute test. Inducing Earthquakes Scientists are experimenting with artificially managing earthquakes by injecting fluid into fault lines. Professor Derek Elsworth at Pennsylvania State University explains his research into how these induced earthquakes can be more tightly controlled. Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz (Photo: Bats hanging in a cave. Credit: Getty Images)

Identity Talk 4 Educators LIVE
"The Evolving Education Project" (Dr. Tiffany M. Nyachae)

Identity Talk 4 Educators LIVE

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 89:03


In this episode, I had the honor of interviewing Buffalo's finest Dr. Tiffany M. Nyachae on the podcast to learn about her personal journey to education, her transition from the classroom to academia, how she manages racial battle fatigue as a Black woman in academia, the importance of incorporating 'race space' critical professional development in our school communities, and so much more! To learn more about Tiffany's work, you can visit The Evolving Education Project at evolvingeducationproject.com or you can follow her on Instagram (@tiffany.m.nyachae or @evolvingeducationproject) or Twitter (@tiffany_nyachae or @EvolvingEduProj) BIO: Tiffany M. Nyachae is Assistant Professor of Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at The Pennsylvania State University, College of Education. She is also podcaster, educational consultant, and founder of the Evolving Education Project; a fellow in the STAR (Scholars of Color Transitioning into Academic Research Institutions) Mentoring Program through the Literacy Research Association (LRA); and 2018-2020 Cultivating New Voices (CNV) Among Scholars of Color Fellow through the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE). Dr. Nyachae earned her Ph.D. in Literacy Education: Curriculum, Instruction, and the Science of Learning at the University at Buffalo (SUNY). As a native and longtime resident of the city of Buffalo, NY, at the heart of her research agenda is, has been, and will be improving the educational experiences of students of Color. This agenda is evident in her research on supporting the racial literacy, social justice ideological becoming, and classroom practice of urban teachers committed to social justice through “race space” critical professional development. Additionally, she provides educational consulting and professional development to college/university faculty, school districts, administrators, and teachers through the Evolving Education Project. As a former middle school teacher of urban Black youth, Dr. Nyachae is interested in the continuous transparent and reflective work that is required from those who claim to center social justice in their leadership, instruction, and research. Thus, she also facilitates social justice literacy workshops and programming for youth of Color broadly—and for Black girls specifically at times—interrogating the degree to which these spaces are liberatory in actuality. Dr. Nyachae finds her greatest joy in learning with (and from) young people. Her publications have appeared in journals such as Urban Education, Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, Multicultural Learning and Teaching, Gender and Education, and Qualitative Inquiry. Finally, she also volunteers her service to various community and professional organizations. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/identitytalk4educators/support

Red Beard Radio
#110: What Is Health Sovereignty and Why Is It So Important? | Dr. Philip Ovadia

Red Beard Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 21:20


After growing up in New York, Dr Ovadia graduated from the accelerated Pre-Med/Med program at the Pennsylvania State University and Jefferson Medical College (now Sidney Kimmel School of Medicine at Thomas Jefferson University). He then went on to complete a Residency on General Surgery at the University of Medicine and Dentistry in New Jersey - Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and a Fellowship in Cardiothoracic Surgery at Tufts-New England Medical School. Dr. Ovadia has practiced Cardiothoracic Surgery in Beaver, PA and Clearwater, Florida. In 2020 he established Ovadia Cardiothoracic Surgery and now works as an independent contractor Cardiothoracic Surgeon in various locations throughout the United States. In an effort to overcome his lifelong struggle with obesity, Dr. Ovadia adopted a low-carbohydrate focused way of eating in 2015. He has maintained a weight loss of approximately 100 pounds and since March, 2019, has adopted a carnivorous way of eating. He has extensively researched the health benefits of low-carb with a focus on heart health through many hours of reading the medical literature, books, and listening to podcasts, as well as personal discussions with many of the physician leaders, citizens, and scientists involved in the low-carb movement. He currently curates the research section of MeatRx.com, a leading online platform focused on the Carnivore way of eating, established by Dr. Shawn Baker. Dr. Ovadia has also established Ovadia Heart Health, a Telehealth practice that focuses on the prevention and treatment of metabolic and heart disease, utilizing lifestyle and dietary modification. He incorporates his hands-on, clinical experience with heart disease and the personal insights he has gained in his own struggle with obesity and poor metabolic health. Dr Ovadia is board certified in Cardiothoracic Surgery and General Surgery. He is a founding member of the Society of Metabolic Health Practitioners. He makes frequent podcast appearances discussing the role of metabolic health in the prevention of heart disease as well as the importance of health sovereignty. Dr. Ovadia currently lives in Florida with his wonderful wife and 2 amazing daughters. Find out more about Dr. Ovadia and what he offers here: Website: https://ovadiahearthealth.com Twitter: @ifixhearts Instagram: @Ovadia_heart_health LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/Philip-ovadia-heart-health

Rise Up For You
Episode #374 Master Growth Conversations With Rob Fazio

Rise Up For You

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 24:52


ABOUT: Dr. Rob Fazio is the Managing Partner at OnPoint Advising specializing in global leadership and organizational success. His approach to advising combines original research on power, influence, conversations, and motivation as well as over 20 years of consulting to elite performers. During the Covid 19 crisis Dr. Fazio has been advising hospitals and conducting presentations on Growth Leadership in Times of Crisis to support front line health professionals and executive leadership. His work on Flattening the Anxiety Curve has been featured on Fox News and in The Hill. Based on his experiences in sport psychology and executive development, he teaches clients how to remove barriers to function at optimal levels. He has worked with executive teams and coached executives throughout organizations including the C-Suite, surgeons, and emerging leaders. Dr.Fazio has contributed to Forbes, NBC News, NY Daily News, HER Magazine, CEO Magazine, Philadelphia Business Journal, and American Management Association. His advice on navigating turbulent times and politics has been featured in the NY Times and on CNN, Fox News Channel, MSNBC, and local networks. His book, Simple is the New Smart (foreword by Neil Cavuto), features success strategies he has gleaned from over a decade and a half of working with athletes, executives, and people driven toward excellence. Recently, he developed the Motivational Currency® Calculator. This self-assessment reveals what drives people, how well someone can read another person's motivators, and how effective someone is at using the best approach to tap into someone's motivators. He has developed significant expertise in advising Fortune 500 organizations globally develop, advise, and retain employees based on a future-oriented strategy, organizational values, culture, and person/position fit. He has worked internationally in a variety of industries including finance/banking, private equity, accounting, media, pharmaceuticals, hospitals, telecommunications, chemicals, retail, sports, public utilities, and nonprofits. Rob is often asked to be a keynote speaker or facilitator at executive offsites. Dr. Fazio has served as a performance excellence consultant to a variety of organizations and athletic teams. He participated in the development and facilitation of the life-skills portion of the NFL's Coaching Academy and the PGA's 1st Tee programs. He is the founder and President of a September 11th inspired nonprofit organization, Hold The Door For Others. The organization's mission is to empower people to grow through any type of loss and adversity and achieve their dreams, www.HOLDTHEDOOR.com. Prior to starting OnPoint Advising, he worked at Leadership Research Institute and Hay Group. Rob completed his B.A. in Psychology at The Pennsylvania State University. He earned an M.Ed. in Athletic Counseling from Springfield College and a MS in Counseling Psychology from Virginia Commonwealth University. Dr. Fazio earned his PhD in Counseling Psychology, with a subspecialty in consulting, and completed his clinical rotation at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Fazio is a Licensed Psychologist in the state of Pennsylvania. He lives just outside Philadelphia in Haddonfield NJ with his wife Keli, daughters Reese and Rae and adopted Great Dane Cannoli. SCHEDULE YOUR FREE CALL HERE calendly.com/riseupforyou/coaching

Sweet but Fearless Podcast
Podcast #51 - Private Practice: Successfully Transitioning from Employee to Entrepreneur

Sweet but Fearless Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 32:09


Often when we talk about career, being an entrepreneur can be an option.  In fact, many of the entrepreneurial choices may be a variation of what you are already doing.  For Ty McGilberry, CEO and Managing Partner of his own firm, this was the case.  Is being an entrepreneur in your future?  Hear about Ty's journey as he moved from employee to entrepreneur!  Born in Philadelphia, Ty grew up in Yeadon, and has lived in the greater Philadelphia area the majority of his life. He graduated from Monsignor Bonner High School in Drexel Hill, Pennsylvania. After high school he received both his bachelor's and master's degrees from Pennsylvania State University both in Business Administration. After receiving his bachelor's degree from Penn State University, Ty worked at the mutual fund giant Vanguard for over 10 years. During his time at Vanguard, he served and educated the individual investor, retirement plan sponsors and participants, and financial advisor markets. In his various roles, Ty focused on teaching investors how to manage and understand portfolio costs and fees as it relates to being able to reach investment goals. After leaving Vanguard, Ty launched his practice as a financial advisor. He built on his foundation of investment knowledge from Vanguard by adding in the comprehensive financial planning process that puts the client first and foremost. Ty serves a very diverse clientele by offering each client a plan uniquely crafted to meet their goals and objectives. After building his practice, in 2017 Ty created Pegasus Financial Planning.  His vision was to create a firm where advisors worked together to focus on educating and serving their client while following the fiduciary standard. Ready to invest in your career? Learn more about the Career Transformation Academy! * Access to a scientific-based assessment * A learning path specifically for your skills gap * Premiere monthly course training videos * Monthly live group coaching sessions * Access to a private community of career women like yourself * Signature worksheets, action guides, and E-Books For helpful articles and resources about change, confidence and careers, please visit www.sweetbutfearless.com. Join our Successful Women's Network Facebook Group to join other women who are on the rise and aspiring to be the most successful version of themselves! https://www.facebook.com/groups/successfulwomensnetwork

Broken Boxes Podcast
On This Site: Interview with Jeremy Dennis

Broken Boxes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021


This episode we hear from Afro-Indigenous photographer Jeremy Dennis who shares insight, concept and approach around their practice. Jeremy also describes a myriad of exciting projects they have going on including Ma's house, an old family home on the Shinnecock Indian Reservation in Southampton, NY that he and his family have been renovating. Learn about all the projects mentioned on this episode and how to support the work at www.jeremynative.com Music/Samples featured on this episode:  Zero 7- Futures (feat Jose Gonzales) Excerpt recording from James Baldwin, Why We Need Artists Jeremy Dennis is a contemporary fine art photographer and a tribal member of the Shinnecock Indian Nation in Southampton, NY. In his work, he explores indigenous identity, culture, and assimilation. Dennis holds an MFA from Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA, and a BA in Studio Art from Stony Brook University, NY. In his work, he explores indigenous identity, cultural assimilation, and the ancestral traditional practices of his community, the Shinnecock Indian Nation. Dennis' work is a means of examining his identity and the identity of his community, specifically the unique experience of living on a sovereign Indian reservation and the problems they face. He currently lives and works in Southampton, New York on the Shinnecock Indian Reservation.  Jeremy Dennis Artist Statement:  My photography explores indigenous identity, cultural assimilation, and the ancestral traditional practices of my tribe, the Shinnecock Indian Nation. Though science has solved many questions about natural phenomena, questions of identity are more abstract, the answers more nuanced. My work is a means of examining my identity and the identity of my community, specifically the unique experience of living on a sovereign Indian reservation and the problems we face. Digital photography lets me create cinematic images. Nowhere have indigenous people been more poorly misrepresented than in American movies. My images question and disrupt the post-colonial narrative that dominates in film and media and results in damaging stereotypes, such as the “noble savage” depictions in Disney's Pocahontas. As racial divisions and tensions reach a nationwide fever pitch, it's more important to me than ever to offer a complex and compelling representation of indigenous people. I like making use of the cinema's tools, the same ones directors have always turned against us (curiously familiar representations, clothing that makes a statement, pleasing lighting), to create conversations about uncomfortable aspects of post-colonialism. For example, in my 2016 project, “Nothing Happened Here,” stylized portraits of non-indigenous people impaled by arrows symbolize, in a playful way, the “white guilt” many Americans have carried through generations, and the inconvenience of co-existing with people their ancestors tried to destroy. By looking to the past, I trace issues that plague indigenous communities back to their source. For example, research for my ongoing project “On This Site” entailed studying archaeological and anthropological records, oral stories, and newspaper archives. The resulting landscape photography honors Shinnecock's 10,000-plus years' presence in Long Island, New York. Working on that collection has left me with a better understanding of how centuries of treaties, land grabs, and colonialist efforts to white-wash indigenous communities have led to our resilience, our ways of interacting with our environment, and the constant struggle to maintain our autonomy. Despite four hundred years of colonization, we remain anchored to our land by our ancient stories. The indigenous mythology that influences my photography grants me access to the minds of my ancestors, including the value they placed on our sacred lands. By outfitting and arranging models to depict those myths, I strive to continue my ancestors' tradition of storytelling and showcase the sanctity of our land, elevating its worth beyond a prize for the highest bidder.

The Opperman Report
Ray Blehar: Sandusky, Second Mile & Penn State COVERUPS!!!!

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 66:31


Ray Blehar Second Mile Sandusky Scandal "Jerry" Sandusky (born January 26, 1944) is a convicted serial child molester and retired American football coach. Sandusky served as an assistant coach for his entire career, mostly at Pennsylvania State University under Joe Paterno (from 1969 to 1999). He received Assistant Coach of the Year awards in 1986 and 1999.[Sandusky authored several books related to his football coaching experiences. In 1977, Sandusky founded The Second Mile, a non-profit charity serving Pennsylvania underprivileged and at-risk youth. After Sandusky retired as assistant coach at Penn State, he continued working with The Second Mile at Penn State, maintaining an office at Penn State until 2011. In 2011, following a two-year grand jury investigation, Sandusky was arrested and charged with 52 counts of sexual abuse of young boys over a 15-year period from 1994 to 2009. He met his molestation victims through The Second Mile; they were participating in the organization. Several of them testified against Sandusky in his sexual abuse trial. Four of the charges were subsequently dropped. On June 22, 2012, Sandusky was found guilty on 45 of the 48 remaining charges. Sandusky was sentenced on October 9, 2012 to 30 to 60 years in prison—at his age, effectively a life sentence.On October 18, 2012, Sandusky's lawyers appealed his conviction in Centre County Court in Pennsylvania. They claim that they did not have enough time to prepare for their client's case. On October 31, 2012, Sandusky was moved to Pennsylvania's SCI Greene "supermax" prison to serve his sentence. On January 30, 2013, Pennsylvania Judge John Cleland denied Sandusky's request for a new trial.

The Opperman Report
Ray Blehar Second Mile Sandusky Scandal

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 140:41


Ray Blehar Second Mile Sandusky Scandal "Jerry" Sandusky (born January 26, 1944) is a convicted serial child molester and retired American football coach. Sandusky served as an assistant coach for his entire career, mostly at Pennsylvania State University under Joe Paterno (from 1969 to 1999). He received Assistant Coach of the Year awards in 1986 and 1999.[Sandusky authored several books related to his football coaching experiences. In 1977, Sandusky founded The Second Mile, a non-profit charity serving Pennsylvania underprivileged and at-risk youth. After Sandusky retired as assistant coach at Penn State, he continued working with The Second Mile at Penn State, maintaining an office at Penn State until 2011. In 2011, following a two-year grand jury investigation, Sandusky was arrested and charged with 52 counts of sexual abuse of young boys over a 15-year period from 1994 to 2009. He met his molestation victims through The Second Mile; they were participating in the organization. Several of them testified against Sandusky in his sexual abuse trial. Four of the charges were subsequently dropped. On June 22, 2012, Sandusky was found guilty on 45 of the 48 remaining charges. Sandusky was sentenced on October 9, 2012 to 30 to 60 years in prison—at his age, effectively a life sentence.On October 18, 2012, Sandusky's lawyers appealed his conviction in Centre County Court in Pennsylvania. They claim that they did not have enough time to prepare for their client's case. On October 31, 2012, Sandusky was moved to Pennsylvania's SCI Greene "supermax" prison to serve his sentence. On January 30, 2013, Pennsylvania Judge John Cleland denied Sandusky's request for a new trial.

Axios Today
Hard Truths: What it takes to get tenure

Axios Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2021 15:27


On our latest installment of our Hard Truths series, we look at how the process to get tenure at many universities in the U.S. is shutting out academics of color. Guests: Paul Harris, associate professor of education at Pennsylvania State University, and Patricia Matthew, associate professor of English at Montclair State University and editor of Written/Unwritten: Diversity and the Hidden Truths of Tenure Credits: “Axios Today” is brought to you by Axios and Pushkin Industries. This episode was produced by Nuria Marquez Martinez and edited by Alexandra Botti. Jeanne Montalvo is our sound engineer. Dan Bobkoff is our executive producer. Special thanks to executive editor Sara Kehaulani Goo, Hard Truths editor Michele Salcedo and managing editor for business Aja Whitacker-Moore. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices