Podcasts about Biotechnology

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Use of living systems and organisms to develop or make useful products

  • 810PODCASTS
  • 1,662EPISODES
  • 31mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 17, 2022LATEST
Biotechnology

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Best podcasts about Biotechnology

Show all podcasts related to biotechnology

Latest podcast episodes about Biotechnology

FYI - For Your Innovation
An Outlook on Biotechnology with Sam Kulkarni, CEO CRISPR Therapeutics

FYI - For Your Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 56:28


Breaking Biotech
106 - Bright Spot Among CRISPR in Caribou Biosci. 2022 Biotech Trends to Watch!

Breaking Biotech

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 42:53


CRISPR is an exciting space, with a number of companies finally sharing early clinical data in 2021. NTLA benefitted the most from this by doubling in valuation after data release, while the other CRISPR companies continue to trend lower in the XBI bear market. Caribou Biosciences is one of the smaller EV CRISPR companies with their first clinical readout coming up in 2022. In this episode, I go through a short primer on all the CRISPR companies and discuss why I think Caribou will have a great year. 2022 is on track for another exciting year in biotech - despite the early sell off in the XBI. In this episode, I cover the trends to watch including a number of targets in oncology. As well, Curis reported a data update in their two programs: CA-4948 and CI-8993. The stock sold off by 25% but I explain why I plan on continuing to hold the stock. Thank you to InfoPathways for being a sponsor on the show! Check them out for all your biotech IT needs at infopathways.com or call 410-751-9929. Help out the show (or join the discord) by becoming a patron at: https://www.patreon.com/breakingbiotech Follow me on twitter @matthewlepoire Send me an email matthewlepoire@gmail.com www.breakingbiotech.com #breakingbiotech Disclaimer: All opinions expressed by Matt (or his guests) in this podcast are solely his (their) opinions. You should not treat any opinion expressed by Matt in this podcast as a specific inducement to make a particular investment or follow a particular strategy, but only as an expression of his opinion. Matt's opinions are based upon information he considers reliable, but Matt cannot warrant its completeness or accuracy, and it should not be relied upon as such. Matt is not under any obligation to update or correct any information provided in this podcast. Past performance is not indicative of future results. Matt does not guarantee any specific outcome or profit. You should be aware of the real risk of loss in following any strategy or investment discussed in this podcast. #biotech

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research
243 - Autophagy & Proteostasis in Alzheimer's Disease: October 2021

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 34:18


New year, new papers! Join Kate for your monthly update on all things proteostasis and autophagy as they relate to both AD pathology and potential new therapeutic interventions. In today's papers, we'll journey through the endolysosomal system, say "Hi" to some new chaperone families, and even discuss the interplay between AD and other distinct neurodegenerative diseases. Enjoy!  Sections in this episode:  Autophagy & Proteostasis Pathology (4:42)  Targeting Proteostasis/Autophagy Machinery (28:48) -------------------------------------------------------------- You can find the numbered bibliography for this episode by clicking here, or the link below: https://drive.google.com/file/d/135C2fAXAPF4-_c4huLXuhj59VW1SDeN-/view?usp=sharingTo access the folder with all the bibliographies for 2021 papers so far, follow this link (it will be updated as we publish episodes and process bibliographies), or click the following link below:https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1N1zx_itPkCDNYE1yFGZzQxDDR-NiRx3p?usp=sharingYou can also join our mailing list to receive a newsletter by filling this form. --------------------------------------------------------------Follow-up on social media for more updates!Facebook:  AMiNDR  Twitter: @AMiNDR_podcastInstagram: @AMiNDR.podcastYoutube: AMiNDR PodcastLinkedIn: AMiNDR PodcastEmail: amindrpodcast@gmail.com  -------------------------------------------------------------- Please help us by spreading the word about AMiNDR to your friends, colleagues, and networks! Another way you can help us reach more listeners who would benefit from the show is by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. It helps us a lot and we thank you in advance for leaving a review! Our team of volunteers works tirelessly each month to bring you every episode of AMiNDR. This episode was scripted and hosted by Kate Van Pelt, edited by Michelle Grover, and reviewed by Marcia Jude and Anusha Kamesh. The bibliography was generated by Anjana Rajendran and the wordcloud was created by Sarah Louadi (www.wordart.com). Big thanks to the sorting team for taking on the enormous task of sorting all of the Alzheimer's Disease papers into episodes each month. For October 2021, the sorters were Jacques Ferreira, Christy Yu, Kate Van Pelt, Eden Dubchak, Kira Tosefsky, Dana Clausen, Ellen Koch and Elyn Rowe.Also, props to our management team, which includes Sarah Louadi, Ellen Koch, Naila Kuhlmann, Elyn Rowe, Anusha Kamesh, Jacques Ferreira, and Shruti Kocchar for keeping everything running smoothly.Our music is from "Journey of a Neurotransmitter" by musician and fellow neuroscientist Anusha Kamesh; you can find the original piece and her other music on soundcloud under Anusha Kamesh or on her YouTube channel, AKMusic.   https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMH7chrAdtCUZuGia16FR4w   -------------------------------------------------------------- If you are interested in joining the team, send us your CV by email. We are specifically looking for help with sorting abstracts by topic, abstract summaries and hosting, audio editing, creating bibliographies, and outreach/marketing. However, if you are interested in helping in other ways, don't hesitate to apply anyways.  --------------------------------------------------------------*About AMiNDR: *  Learn more about this project and the team behind it by listening to our first episode: "Welcome to AMiNDR!"  

Expert Dojo
E232 How Gamma Diagnostics is the Future of Biotechnology

Expert Dojo "The Art of Startup War"

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 25:17


Gamma Diagnostics specializes in developing novel diagnostics that are better quantitative indicators of the inflammatory response in infectious and chronic diseases (such as SARS-CoV-2, Dengue fever, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and others) to determine the right course of treatment, improve efficacy of care and thereby save more patient lives. For more information, visit https://www.gammadiagnostics.com/ If you have the next big idea, apply to the Expert Dojo Accelerator: www.expertdojo.com

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research
242 - New Variants & Genetic Insights Part 2: October 2021

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 27:35


Welcome to our first episode of 2022! Marcia will bring you 13 genetics papers from October 2021. We will talk about all kinds of topics - right from AD-associated loci to polygenetic risk stratification, all of which can contribute to planning effective treatment strategies. Tune in!  Sections in this episode:  Transcriptomics/Gene Expression Changes (2:33)  Genetic Variants (6:16)  Genetic Risk (13:14)  MicroRNA (20:10)  Other Topics (22:52) -------------------------------------------------------------- You can find the numbered bibliography for this episode by clicking here, or the link below: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ZmtkgGyheSdJreRmjXy6GIkSmoUdMQTP/view?usp=sharingTo access the folder with all the bibliographies for 2021 papers so far, follow this link (it will be updated as we publish episodes and process bibliographies), or click the following link below:https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1N1zx_itPkCDNYE1yFGZzQxDDR-NiRx3p?usp=sharingYou can also join our mailing list to receive a newsletter by filling this form. Or tweet at us: @AMiNDR_podcast  --------------------------------------------------------------Follow-up on social media for more updates!Facebook:  AMiNDR  Twitter: @AMiNDR_podcastInstagram: @AMiNDR.podcastYoutube: AMiNDR PodcastLinkedIn: AMiNDR PodcastEmail: amindrpodcast@gmail.com  -------------------------------------------------------------- Please help us by spreading the word about AMiNDR to your friends, colleagues, and networks! Another way you can help us reach more listeners who would benefit from the show is by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. It helps us a lot and we thank you in advance for leaving a review! Our team of volunteers works tirelessly each month to bring you every episode of AMiNDR. This episode was scripted and hosted by Marcia Jude, edited by Chihiro Abe, and reviewed by Anusha Kamesh and Ellen Koch. The bibliography was generated by Anjana Rajendran and the wordcloud was created by Sarah Louadi (www.wordart.com). Big thanks to the sorting team for taking on the enormous task of sorting all of the Alzheimer's Disease papers into episodes each month. For October 2021, the sorters were Jacques Ferreira, Christy Yu, Kate Van Pelt, Eden Dubchak, Kira Tosefsky, Dana Clausen, Ellen Koch and Elyn Rowe.Also, props to our management team, which includes Sarah Louadi, Ellen Koch, Naila Kuhlmann, Elyn Rowe, Anusha Kamesh, Jacques Ferreira, and Shruti Kocchar for keeping everything running smoothly.Our music is from "Journey of a Neurotransmitter" by musician and fellow neuroscientist Anusha Kamesh; you can find the original piece and her other music on soundcloud under Anusha Kamesh or on her YouTube channel, AKMusic.   https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMH7chrAdtCUZuGia16FR4w   -------------------------------------------------------------- If you are interested in joining the team, send us your CV by email. We are specifically looking for help with sorting abstracts by topic, abstract summaries and hosting, audio editing, creating bibliographies, and outreach/marketing. However, if you are interested in helping in other ways, don't hesitate to apply anyways.  --------------------------------------------------------------*About AMiNDR: *  Learn more about this project and the team behind it by listening to our first episode: "Welcome to AMiNDR!" 

Breaking Biotech
105 - Neurodegenerative Disease Recap! ALXO and LGVN updates plus Breaking Breaking 2021 Top Trades

Breaking Biotech

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 41:29


ALXO announces new HR-MDS data that disappoints! I talk about the comparison to Magrolimab data and why I think ALXO is still a buy. LGVN pushes data updates but is still a risk for a short squeeze! I talk about some of the stock statistics and fundaments to determine whether I'm going to place that short trade. The neurodegeneration space had an exciting 2021 and I provide an update on all the companies I covered earlier in the year. 2022 might prove to be more exciting with some big Alzheimer's Disease readouts expected. The Breaking Biotech portfolio hit -17% YTD and I cover my best and worst trades to see what kinds of lessons I'll take into 2022. Help out the show (or join the discord) by becoming a patron at: https://www.patreon.com/breakingbiotech Follow me on twitter @matthewlepoire Send me an email matthewlepoire@gmail.com www.breakingbiotech.com #breakingbiotech Disclaimer: All opinions expressed by Matt (or his guests) in this podcast are solely his (their) opinions. You should not treat any opinion expressed by Matt in this podcast as a specific inducement to make a particular investment or follow a particular strategy, but only as an expression of his opinion. Matt's opinions are based upon information he considers reliable, but Matt cannot warrant its completeness or accuracy, and it should not be relied upon as such. Matt is not under any obligation to update or correct any information provided in this podcast. Past performance is not indicative of future results. Matt does not guarantee any specific outcome or profit. You should be aware of the real risk of loss in following any strategy or investment discussed in this podcast. #biotech

Original Transplants
Ep 64: Supply Chain Resilience

Original Transplants

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 63:17


Original Transplants Episode 64: Supply Chain Resilience Original Transplants Podcast Episode 64: Supply Chain Resilience finds Satoyama Homestead stewards Will and Sarah planning for the year ahead in 2022 in the bee yard, chicken coop, and edible landscape. Will is researching spring bee package suppliers following the demise of his beehives, with one colony absconding and the other dead-out. In better news, the four pullets he raised from chicks during the summer are fully integrated into the flock and have begun egg-laying. Sarah is slowly prepping the vegetable garden beds for the off-season and plans to identify some of the weeds to see if any are useful and should be saved during clean-up. The homesteaders are enjoying the previous season's harvest, including glazing a roast ham with kiwiberry preserves and using dehydrated vegetables on veggie pizza. Will explains harvesting vermicompost and leachate from the worm farm, and the homesteaders plan new storage methods to prevent clumping in key homemade soup ingredients borax and washing soda. Sarah looks forward to enjoying bird watching with Lucy and her birdseed bell from Santa, and is browsing seed catalogs to plan next year's vegetable garden. The homesteaders review new science about the discovery of microplastics in infants at ten times the rate in adults, and discuss agricultural news about how to evaluate your supply chain vulnerabilities and make your supply chain more resilient. Notes Infants have more microplastics in their feces than adults, study finds - American Chemical Society https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/pressroom/newsreleases/2021/september/infants-have-more-microplastics-in-their-feces-than-adults-study-finds.html Microplastics revealed in the placentas of unborn babies - The Guardian https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/dec/22/microplastics-revealed-in-placentas-unborn-babies Vermicomposting for beginners - Rodale Institute https://rodaleinstitute.org/science/articles/vermicomposting-for-beginners/ Bacterial diversity in a finished compost and vermicompost: differences revealed by cultivation-independent analyses of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes - Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology via Academia.edu https://www.academia.edu/20157205/Bacterial_diversity_in_a_finished_compost_and_vermicompost_differences_revealed_by_cultivation_independent_analyses_of_PCR_amplified_16S_rRNA_genes Assessing the impact of composting and vermicomposting on bacterial community size and structure, and microbial functional diversity of an olive-mill waste - Bioresource Technology https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2008.08.014 What to do about hard clumpy borax and washing soda - The Make Your Own Zone https://www.themakeyourownzone.com/clumpy-hard-borax-washing-soda/ How vulnerable is your personal supply chain? - Charles Hugh Smith, Of Two Minds Blog https://www.oftwominds.com/blogdec21/personal-supply-chain12-21.html

Talking Biotech Podcast
325- Is Biotechnology Just New Colonialism?

Talking Biotech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 49:59


Two unusually parallel articles emerged this week, both claiming that modern ag technology (as they say, “GMO”) is just another arm of colonial control of the Developing World.  Both wordy, yet visible articles stoked remarkably [...] The post 325- Is Biotechnology Just New Colonialism? first appeared on Talking Biotech Podcast.

Profoundly Pointless
Futurist Richard Yonck

Profoundly Pointless

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 60:50


It's a New Year but how will the world change in 2022 and beyond? Futurist Richard Yonck joins us for a revealing look at the new technologies and trends that will shape the future. We talk Digital Humans, Biotechnology, the rise of Emotional Intelligence, talking to the past and manipulation by Algorithm. Then, we countdown the Top 5 Things That Should End in the New Year.Richard Yonck: 01:50ishPointless: 35:20ishTop 5: 50:55ishhttps://intelligent-future.com (Richard Yonck Website)https://www.facebook.com/IntelligentFuture (Richard Yonck Facebook)https://twitter.com/ryonck (Richard Yonck Twitter)https://www.amazon.com/Heart-Machine-Artificial-Emotional-Intelligence/dp/195069111X (Heart of the Machine - Book)https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1948924382 (Future Minds - Book)

Farm and Ranch Report
Plants That Can Tell Farmers What's Bothering Them - Part Two

Farm and Ranch Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021


InnerPlant is recoding the DNA of commodity crops so that they signal when they are under stress.

Farm and Ranch Report
Plants That Can Tell Farmers What's Bothering Them - Part One

Farm and Ranch Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021


Can biotechnology code a plant to signal when it needs help?

Voices In Validation
Integrate Risk into Change Control

Voices In Validation

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 53:10


This week, Alan Golden hosts a comprehensive discussion on the changes driven by risk and conversely risk updates that are driven by change as well as risk integration. Alan will share his expertise from over 30 years in the medical device industry. Alan Golden: Alan Golden is Principal at Design Quality Consultants, LLC where he works with clients training and advising on topics in the medical device industry including Design Control, Change Control, Risk Management, and process/test method validation. Alan has more than 30 years of experience working in the medical device industry. In addition to his expertise in Design Controls, he is also highly experienced in Good Laboratory Practice (GLP), 21 CFR 820, ISO 13485, ISO 14971, Biotechnology, and U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and risk management. He retired from Abbott Molecular in 2018. Voices in Validation brings you the best in validation and compliance topics. Voices in Validation is brought to you by IVT Network, your expert source for life science regulatory knowledge. For more information on IVT Network, check out their website at http://ivtnetwork.com.    This episode is brought to you by IVT Network's Validation Week.

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research
241 - New Variants & Genetic Insights Part 1: October 2021

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 30:35


Join Marcia for Part 1 of this genetics episode covering a total of 13 papers. In this one, she talks about papers from October 2021, related to transcriptomics, especially genes that are differentially expressed In Alzheimer's disease, and some studies with vertebrate and invertebrate AD model organisms and risk loci. Tune in to learn more! Sections in this episode:  Transcriptomics/Gene expression changes (2:45)Model organisms (17:21)  Risk alleles/variants (22:16)  Methods (27:09)  -------------------------------------------------------------- You can find the numbered bibliography for this episode by clicking here, or the link below:https://drive.google.com/file/d/1T7h0KF--qwGt31ygyXV_NMAktRDw7CWH/view?usp=sharingTo access the folder with all the bibliographies for 2021 so far, follow this link (it will be updated as we publish episodes and process bibliographies), or click the following link below:https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1N1zx_itPkCDNYE1yFGZzQxDDR-NiRx3p?usp=sharingYou can also join our mailing list to receive a newsletter by filling this form. Or tweet at us: @AMiNDR_podcast  --------------------------------------------------------------Follow-up on social media for more updates!Facebook:  AMiNDR  Twitter: @AMiNDR_podcastInstagram: @AMiNDR.podcastYoutube: AMiNDR PodcastLinkedIn: AMiNDR PodcastEmail: amindrpodcast@gmail.com  -------------------------------------------------------------- Please help us by spreading the word about AMiNDR to your friends, colleagues, and networks! Another way you can help us reach more listeners who would benefit from the show is by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. It helps us a lot and we thank you in advance for leaving a review! Our team of volunteers works tirelessly each month to bring you every episode of AMiNDR. This episode was scripted and hosted by Marcia Jude, edited by Michelle Grover, and reviewed by Kate Van Pelt and Anusha Kamesh. The bibliography was generated by Anjana Rajendran and the wordcloud was created by Sarah Louadi (www.wordart.com). Big thanks to the sorting team for taking on the enormous task of sorting all of the Alzheimer's Disease papers into episodes each month. For October 2021, the sorters were Jacques Ferreira, Christy Yu, Kate Van Pelt, Eden Dubchak, Kira Tosefsky, Dana Clausen, Ellen Koch and Elyn Rowe.Also, props to our management team, which includes Sarah Louadi, Ellen Koch, Naila Kuhlmann, Elyn Rowe, Anusha Kamesh, Jacques Ferreira, and Shruti Kocchar for keeping everything running smoothly.Our music is from "Journey of a Neurotransmitter" by musician and fellow neuroscientist Anusha Kamesh; you can find the original piece and her other music on soundcloud under Anusha Kamesh or on her YouTube channel, AKMusic.   https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMH7chrAdtCUZuGia16FR4w   -------------------------------------------------------------- If you are interested in joining the team, send us your CV by email. We are specifically looking for help with sorting abstracts by topic, abstract summaries and hosting, audio editing, creating bibliographies, and outreach/marketing. However, if you are interested in helping in other ways, don't hesitate to apply anyways.  --------------------------------------------------------------*About AMiNDR: *  Learn more about this project and the team behind it by listening to our first episode: "Welcome to AMiNDR!" 

Boiler Room
How To Leave The New Abnormal Behind - Hour 2

Boiler Room

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 68:08


Alternate Current Radio Presents: BOILER ROOMTrouble navigating the "New Normal"? Differences of opinion can now change the nature of relationships? Is the 'news media' causing issues in ability to stay informed? Biotechnology products and heavy handed "mandates" to take them hosing up your workplace, your friendships and your public interactions... Or Worse yet, ARE YOU AFRAID? On this episode the Social Rejects Club in the Boiler Room are discussing this, and so much more. Drop the fear, drop the mass media cartel and roll with Hesher, Spore, Oddman Out, Ruckus, Infidel Pharaoh, Chopper, Corey Drayton and Mindspace Art for this edition of the BOILER ROOM.

Boiler Room
How To Leave The New Abnormal Behind - Hour 1

Boiler Room

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 67:11


Alternate Current Radio Presents: BOILER ROOMTrouble navigating the "New Normal"? Differences of opinion can now change the nature of relationships? Is the 'news media' causing issues in ability to stay informed? Biotechnology products and heavy handed "mandates" to take them hosing up your workplace, your friendships and your public interactions... Or Worse yet, ARE YOU AFRAID? On this episode the Social Rejects Club in the Boiler Room are discussing this, and so much more. Drop the fear, drop the mass media cartel and roll with Hesher, Spore, Oddman Out, Ruckus, Infidel Pharaoh, Chopper, Corey Drayton and Mindspace Art for this edition of the BOILER ROOM.

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research
240 - Treatments Targeting Neuroprotection and Neurotransmission: October 2021

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 24:42


Hello there! Just in time for the holiday season we've got quite the deal lined up for you. Two episodes for the length of one! Anusha will be guiding you through the literature of October 2021 that focuses on targeting neuronal function and neurotransmission as an Alzheimer's disease treatment. If you want to find out the progress we've been making as a field towards finding better treatments, this is the episode for you!  Sections in this episode:  Targeting neuronal and synaptic protection (2.33)  Targeting neurotransmission (13.27) -------------------------------------------------------------- You can find the numbered bibliography for this episode by clicking here, or the link below: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1UK_5b07HLhanVYgDN8mbIsIBkmB24kOh/view?usp=sharingTo access the folder with all the bibliographies for 2021 so far, follow this link (it will be updated as we publish episodes and process bibliographies), or click the following link below:https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1N1zx_itPkCDNYE1yFGZzQxDDR-NiRx3p?usp=sharingYou can also join our mailing list to receive a newsletter by filling this form. Or tweet at us: @AMiNDR_podcast  --------------------------------------------------------------Follow-up on social media for more updates!Facebook:  AMiNDR  Twitter: @AMiNDR_podcastInstagram: @AMiNDR.podcastYoutube: AMiNDR PodcastLinkedIn: AMiNDR PodcastEmail: amindrpodcast@gmail.com  -------------------------------------------------------------- Please help us by spreading the word about AMiNDR to your friends, colleagues, and networks! Another way you can help us reach more listeners who would benefit from the show is by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. It helps us a lot and we thank you in advance for leaving a review! Our team of volunteers works tirelessly each month to bring you every episode of AMiNDR. This episode was scripted, hosted and edited by Anusha Kamesh, and reviewed by Christy Yu and Ellen Koch. The bibliography was generated by Lara Onbasi and the wordcloud was created by Sarah Louadi (www.wordart.com). Big thanks to the sorting team for taking on the enormous task of sorting all of the Alzheimer's Disease papers into episodes each month. For October 2021, the sorters were Jacques Ferreira, Christy Yu, Kate Van Pelt, Eden Dubchak, Kira Tosefsky, Dana Clausen, Ellen Koch and Elyn Rowe.Also, props to our management team, which includes Sarah Louadi, Ellen Koch, Naila Kuhlmann, Elyn Rowe, Anusha Kamesh, Jacques Ferreira, and Shruti Kocchar for keeping everything running smoothly.Our music is from "Journey of a Neurotransmitter" by musician and fellow neuroscientist Anusha Kamesh; you can find the original piece and her other music on soundcloud under Anusha Kamesh or on her YouTube channel, AKMusic.   https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMH7chrAdtCUZuGia16FR4w   -------------------------------------------------------------- If you are interested in joining the team, send us your CV by email. We are specifically looking for help with sorting abstracts by topic, abstract summaries and hosting, audio editing, creating bibliographies, and outreach/marketing. However, if you are interested in helping in other ways, don't hesitate to apply anyways.  --------------------------------------------------------------*About AMiNDR: *  Learn more about this project and the team behind it by listening to our first episode: "Welcome to AMiNDR!" 

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research
239 - Prevention & Intervention Strategies for Alzheimer's Disease: October 2021

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 20:26


We've got a short and sweet episode for you today, with 7 papers from October 2021 on the intervention and prevention of AD. Tune in to hear Naila ramble on about pet therapy, update you on diet and exercise research in animal models, and provide a stimulating overview of neuromodulatory techniques.  Sections in this episode:  Complimentary Therapies (2:55)  Lifestyle Interventions (9:30)  Stimulation Techniques (13:28) -------------------------------------------------------------- You can find the numbered bibliography for this episode by clicking here, or the link below:https://drive.google.com/file/d/1C7WBstTEh5Fhfr_bsOdjXhz2SwIfDMdN/view?usp=sharingTo access the folder with all the bibliographies for 2021 so far, follow this link (it will be updated as we publish episodes and process bibliographies), or click the following link below:https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1N1zx_itPkCDNYE1yFGZzQxDDR-NiRx3p?usp=sharingYou can also join our mailing list to receive a newsletter by filling this form. Or tweet at us: @AMiNDR_podcast  --------------------------------------------------------------Follow-up on social media for more updates!Facebook:  AMiNDR  Twitter: @AMiNDR_podcastInstagram: @AMiNDR.podcastYoutube: AMiNDR PodcastLinkedIn: AMiNDR PodcastEmail: amindrpodcast@gmail.com  -------------------------------------------------------------- Please help us by spreading the word about AMiNDR to your friends, colleagues, and networks! Another way you can help us reach more listeners who would benefit from the show is by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. It helps us a lot and we thank you in advance for leaving a review! Our team of volunteers works tirelessly each month to bring you every episode of AMiNDR. This episode was scripted and hosted by Naila Kuhlmann, edited by Alexandra Pavel,  and reviewed by Alexandra Pavel and Ellen Koch. The bibliography was generated by Lara Onbasi and the wordcloud was created by Sarah Louadi (www.wordart.com). Big thanks to the sorting team for taking on the enormous task of sorting all of the Alzheimer's Disease papers into episodes each month. For October 2021, the sorters were Jacques Ferreira, Christy Yu, Kate Van Pelt, Eden Dubchak, Kira Tosefsky, Dana Clausen, Ellen Koch and Elyn Rowe.Also, props to our management team, which includes Sarah Louadi, Ellen Koch, Naila Kuhlmann, Elyn Rowe, Anusha Kamesh, Jacques Ferreira, and Shruti Kocchar for keeping everything running smoothly.Our music is from "Journey of a Neurotransmitter" by musician and fellow neuroscientist Anusha Kamesh; you can find the original piece and her other music on soundcloud under Anusha Kamesh or on her YouTube channel, AKMusic.   https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMH7chrAdtCUZuGia16FR4w   -------------------------------------------------------------- If you are interested in joining the team, send us your CV by email. We are specifically looking for help with sorting abstracts by topic, abstract summaries and hosting, audio editing, creating bibliographies, and outreach/marketing. However, if you are interested in helping in other ways, don't hesitate to apply anyways.  --------------------------------------------------------------*About AMiNDR: *  Learn more about this project and the team behind it by listening to our first episode: "Welcome to AMiNDR!" 

Education On Fire - Sharing creative and inspiring learning in our schools

Ashish Fernando founded iSchoolConnect in 2017 to solve the pain point of many parents and children: getting hassle-free admission in foreign colleges. After going through the same trouble of finding a college to study that fit his needs, Ashish launched iSchoolConnect with a vision to democratize the global admissions market for graduate and undergraduate programs. Through the effective use of artificial intelligence, iSchoolConnect aims at being the most cost-effective and advanced solution for connecting students and schools worldwide. Ashish started his career as a Software Engineer with Thomson Reuters Inc., building their flagship investment research solution - Thomson One. He then went on to take multiple executive roles in Program Management and AI before managing the Data Science and Engineering business in the Insurance vertical. Ashish is a university gold medalist in Biotechnology. He graduated from Bentley University's flagship MBA in 2014 with a 100% scholarship. Website https://ischoolconnect.com (https://ischoolconnect.com) Social Media Information Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/ischoolconnect/ LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/company/ischoolconnect/ Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/ischoolconnect/ YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqFEkZLcdM6udUH_LUJGPrA Resources Mentioned https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Secret_(Byrne_book) (The Secret) https://www.vineetnayar.com/employees-first/turning-conventional-management-wisdom-upside-down (‘Employees First, Customer Second' ) Show Sponsor The National Association for Primary Education speaks for young children and all who live and work with them. Find out more about their online CPD events at https://nape.org.uk/online-events (nape.org.uk/online-events) https://frstre.com/go/?a=100059-6a3612&s=1971853-ecdb80&p_affiliate.referral_code=marktaylor12 (Listen to Mark's audio course ) https://frstre.com/go/?a=100059-6a3612&s=1971853-ecdb80&p_affiliate.referral_code=marktaylor12 (10 Pieces of Advice You'd Like to Have as a Child) Support this podcast

China In Focus
Lawmakers to NBC: cover China abuses during Olympics; US sanctioning China for biotechnology

China In Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 22:17


Lawmakers to NBC: Cover China abuses during Olympics Purdue president on Chinese student harassment Beijing revokes famous rights lawyer's license U.S. sanctioning China for biotechnology Taiwan to hold 4th-ever referendum

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research
238 - Brain Imaging of Structural Changes in Alzheimer's Disease: October 2021

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 31:21


We have 14 papers in this episode using structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) in the diagnosis or prognosis of Alzheimer's Disease. Join Christy as she walks you through some deep learning based frameworks and other automated models, as well as new findings with grey matter atrophy.  Sections in this episode:  Deep Learning (2:38)  Automated Algorithms & Models (8:24)  Grey Matter (17:20)  Others - White matter and the Retina (25:00) -------------------------------------------------------------- You can find the numbered bibliography for this episode by clicking here, or the link below:https://drive.google.com/file/d/185-JtSl-wsuty_XmNGMbGzFYXVHjzCVk/view?usp=sharingTo access the folder with all the bibliographies for 2021 so far, follow this link (it will be updated as we publish episodes and process bibliographies), or click the following link below:https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1N1zx_itPkCDNYE1yFGZzQxDDR-NiRx3p?usp=sharingYou can also join our mailing list to receive a newsletter by filling this form. Or tweet at us: @AMiNDR_podcast  --------------------------------------------------------------Follow-up on social media for more updates!Facebook:  AMiNDR  Twitter: @AMiNDR_podcastInstagram: @AMiNDR.podcastYoutube: AMiNDR PodcastLinkedIn: AMiNDR PodcastEmail: amindrpodcast@gmail.com  -------------------------------------------------------------- Please help us by spreading the word about AMiNDR to your friends, colleagues, and networks! Another way you can help us reach more listeners who would benefit from the show is by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. It helps us a lot and we thank you in advance for leaving a review! Our team of volunteers works tirelessly each month to bring you every episode of AMiNDR. This episode was scripted and hosted by Christy Yu, edited by Michelle Grover,  and reviewed by Jacques Ferreira, Sarah Louadi and Anusha Kamesh. The bibliography and wordcloud were created by Sarah Louadi (www.wordart.com). Big thanks to the sorting team for taking on the enormous task of sorting all of the Alzheimer's Disease papers into episodes each month. For October 2021, the sorters were Jacques Ferreira, Christy Yu, Kate Van Pelt, Eden Dubchak, Kira Tosefsky, Dana Clausen, Ellen Koch and Elyn Rowe.Also, props to our management team, which includes Sarah Louadi, Ellen Koch, Naila Kuhlmann, Elyn Rowe, Anusha Kamesh, Jacques Ferreira, and Shruti Kocchar for keeping everything running smoothly.Our music is from "Journey of a Neurotransmitter" by musician and fellow neuroscientist Anusha Kamesh; you can find the original piece and her other music on soundcloud under Anusha Kamesh or on her YouTube channel, AKMusic.   https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMH7chrAdtCUZuGia16FR4w   -------------------------------------------------------------- If you are interested in joining the team, send us your CV by email. We are specifically looking for help with sorting abstracts by topic, abstract summaries and hosting, audio editing, creating bibliographies, and outreach/marketing. However, if you are interested in helping in other ways, don't hesitate to apply anyways.  --------------------------------------------------------------*About AMiNDR: *  Learn more about this project and the team behind it by listening to our first episode: "Welcome to AMiNDR!" 

The Drug Discovery World Podcast
Using biotechnology to maximise drug discovery output

The Drug Discovery World Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 33:34


High-throughput screens are a recognised hit-finding process but the use of an integrated discipline approach is key to maximising the output from such a screening methodology. In the first article, Ian Linney and Scott Maidment from Charles River describe the value of integration of medicinal chemistry in this method.   Thanks to continued advances in genetic engineering, investigators often find they can obtain the most relevant mouse model for their research by commissioning the custom generation of a model that best meets their need—whether it's modelling a disease state, validating a gene target of interest, or testing a drug candidate in vivo. Caroline Horizny from Taconic Biosciences discusses this in the second article. 

Climate 21
Intelligent Decarbonisation - A Chat With Prof Markus Kraft

Climate 21

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 41:21


What is Intelligent Decarbonisation?Intelligent Decarbonisation is the combining of artificial intelligence with cyber physical assets to reduce carbon emissions. To discuss this I invited Cambridge University Prof Markus Kraft to come on the podcast because he literally wrote the book on the topic.Professor Kraft  is a Fellow of Churchill College Cambridge and Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology. He is the director of CARES, the Singapore-Cambridge CREATE Research Centre, and Principal Investigator of C4T the “Cambridge Centre for Carbon Reduction in Chemical Technology”, which is a CARES research programme. And he leads the Computational Modelling group, known as CoMO in Cambridge.We discussed key decarbonisation strategies, the World Avatar Project, and the why's and what-for of Intelligent Decarbonisation.This was a truly fascinating episode of the podcast and I learned loads as always, and I hope you do too.If you have any comments/suggestions or questions for the podcast - feel free to leave me a voice message over on my SpeakPipe page, head on over to the Climate 21 Podcast Forum, or just send it to me as a direct message on Twitter/LinkedIn. Audio messages will get played (unless you specifically ask me not to).And if you want to know more about any of SAP's Sustainability solutions, head on over to www.sap.com/sustainability, and if you liked this show, please don't forget to rate and/or review it. It makes a big difference to help new people discover the show. Thanks.And remember, stay healthy, stay safe, stay sane!Music credit - Intro and Outro music for this podcast was composed, played, and produced by my daughter Luna Juniper

FedSoc Events
Showcase Panel IV: Law, Science, and Public Policy

FedSoc Events

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 63:59


The 2021 National Lawyers Convention took place November 11-13, 2021 at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, DC. The topic of the conference was "Public and Private Power: Preserving Freedom or Preventing Harm?". The final showcase panel explored "Law, Science, and Public Policy.""Science" as a concept enjoys the trust of the public. Indeed, some make "I trust the Science" a centerpiece for their appeal to the voting public, and this evidently has had some success. By contrast, others in the scientific community stress that scientific methods explicitly exclude "trust". The noted physicist Richard Feynman remarked that "science begins with the distrust of experts". Instead, process in science relies on an "ethic" of impersonal objectivity, respect for data, self-questioning, a willingness to stand corrected, and open discourse. Its methods involve constructing models for reality that best fit objective assessments of available data, followed by a search for data that might contradict those models. Scientists are therefore (supposed to be) anti-advocates, willing to concede when their models were wrong; the most successful scientists even enjoy conceding, as it means that knowledge has advanced.However, scientists, being human, are inherently imperfect practitioners of scientific methods. Historians document many examples where scientists have advocated their own (wrong) ideas over others simply because they were their own, obstructed opposing points of view, and otherwise behaved as 'politically' as in any other field of human endeavor. However, the process and its "ethic" has historically allowed models for reality to improve, and those improvements are known by the technology that has emerged based on them. As one example without science, improvements in civilized transport advanced haltingly over millennia. With science, citizens may now buy tickets to suborbital space flight.Consequently, public policy decision-makers often rely on science (or at least they say they do) when making laws and regulations in many areas, including economics, criminal law, environmental regulations technology and bioethics. However, the law is in many ways anti-science. Scientists, practicing their methods, commit to seeking out and weighting more heavily data that oppose their theory; they are (supposed to be) anti-advocates. In contrast, clients hire lawyers expressly to be their advocates.This creates a natural tension when scientists are called upon to advise public policy. Many who call themselves "scientists" are willing to participate as advocates in public policy. This has been shown clearly in fields like anthropogenic climate change, economic stimulus packages and, most recently, in the management of the COVID-19 pandemic. How should we as lawyers assure that science is used properly in the public space, to make policy conform to reality, and not for political goals?The panel will address two areas with this as background: The FDA, CDC, and public health regulation. The COVID pandemic uncovered many problems in the way medical science is used to manage public health crises. with public policy.Should scientific presentations be paternalistic? Is it ever justified to withhold, distort, or misrepresent science for fear that the truth will do damage by being misunderstood or misused? Featuring:Dr. Steven Benner, Distinguished Fellow, The Westheimer Institute at the Foundation for Applied State Room Molecular EvolutionProf. I. Glenn Cohen, James A. Attwood and Leslie Williams Professor of Law, Deputy Dean, and Faculty Director, Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology & Bioethics, Harvard Law SchoolMs. Christina Sandefur, Executive Vice President, Goldwater InstituteModerator: Hon. Kenneth Lee, U.S. Court of Appeals, Ninth Circuit

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research
236 - Detecting Amyloid, Tau & New Markers in the Brain: October 2021

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 15:54


To kick off our series on papers published in October 2021, we'll look at 7 papers that rely on Positron Emission Tomography (or PET) imaging to detect amyloid and tau pathology in the brain, within the context of Alzheimer's disease! If you're interested in learning about tau and amyloid based detection, alternative PET tracers in AD research, or combining PET with different imaging modalities, make sure to tune into this episode.  Sections in this episode:  Amyloid Detection (2:35)  Tau Detection (7:40)  Amyloid + Tau (10:41)  Miscellaneous (12:34) -------------------------------------------------------------- To access the folder with all the bibliographies for 2021 so far, follow this link (it will be updated as we publish episodes and process bibliographies), or click the following link below:https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1N1zx_itPkCDNYE1yFGZzQxDDR-NiRx3p?usp=sharingYou can also join our mailing list to receive a newsletter by filling this form. Or tweet at us: @AMiNDR_podcast  --------------------------------------------------------------Follow-up on social media for more updates!Facebook:  AMiNDR  Twitter: @AMiNDR_podcastInstagram: @AMiNDR.podcastYoutube: AMiNDR PodcastLinkedIn: AMiNDR PodcastEmail: amindrpodcast@gmail.com  -------------------------------------------------------------- Please help us by spreading the word about AMiNDR to your friends, colleagues, and networks! Another way you can help us reach more listeners who would benefit from the show is by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. It helps us a lot and we thank you in advance for leaving a review! Our team of volunteers works tirelessly each month to bring you every episode of AMiNDR. This episode was scripted, hosted and edited by Alexandra Pavel,  and reviewed by Naila Kuhlmann and Anusha Kamesh. The bibliography and wordcloud were created by Sarah Louadi (www.wordart.com). Big thanks to the sorting team for taking on the enormous task of sorting all of the Alzheimer's Disease papers into episodes each month. For October 2021, the sorters were Jacques Ferreira, Christy Yu, Kate Van Pelt, Eden Dubchak, Kira Tosefsky, Dana Clausen, Ellen Koch and Elyn Rowe.Also, props to our management team, which includes Sarah Louadi, Ellen Koch, Naila Kuhlmann, Elyn Rowe, Anusha Kamesh, Jacques Ferreira, and Shruti Kocchar for keeping everything running smoothly.Our music is from "Journey of a Neurotransmitter" by musician and fellow neuroscientist Anusha Kamesh; you can find the original piece and her other music on soundcloud under Anusha Kamesh or on her YouTube channel, AKMusic.   https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMH7chrAdtCUZuGia16FR4w   -------------------------------------------------------------- If you are interested in joining the team, send us your CV by email. We are specifically looking for help with sorting abstracts by topic, abstract summaries and hosting, audio editing, creating bibliographies, and outreach/marketing. However, if you are interested in helping in other ways, don't hesitate to apply anyways.  --------------------------------------------------------------*About AMiNDR: *  Learn more about this project and the team behind it by listening to our first episode: "Welcome to AMiNDR!" 

Breaking Biotech
104 - Biotech Bear Market Offers SIGNIFICANT Opportunity in Oncology - CRIS! Longeveron Rises on ODD

Breaking Biotech

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 48:17


Curis is an oncology company trying to develop an inhibitor of IRAK-4. They have shown positive results in AML/MDS in spliceosome/FLT3 mutation patients as well as their non-target group. This will hopefully allow them to get accelerated approval with the FDA but they still have some hurdles to overcome. Longeveron is a cell therapy company looking to develop their Medicinal Signaling Cell therapy, Lomacel-B, in aging patients. They are focusing on Alzheimer's Disease, Aging Frailty as well as Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome, but there's something off that makes me question the therapy's potential. Help out the show (or join the discord) by becoming a patron at: https://www.patreon.com/breakingbiotech Follow me on twitter @matthewlepoire Send me an email matthewlepoire@gmail.com www.breakingbiotech.com #breakingbiotech Disclaimer: All opinions expressed by Matt (or his guests) in this podcast are solely his (their) opinions. You should not treat any opinion expressed by Matt in this podcast as a specific inducement to make a particular investment or follow a particular strategy, but only as an expression of his opinion. Matt's opinions are based upon information he considers reliable, but Matt cannot warrant its completeness or accuracy, and it should not be relied upon as such. Matt is not under any obligation to update or correct any information provided in this podcast. Past performance is not indicative of future results. Matt does not guarantee any specific outcome or profit. You should be aware of the real risk of loss in following any strategy or investment discussed in this podcast. #biotech

Simple Eats w/ Chef T
Ep 548 | Omicron Symptoms | Biotechnology Diversity | Elon's Musk Brother Using Crypto for Philanthropy & Food Inequality | Crypto IRA |Web3

Simple Eats w/ Chef T

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 36:52


Host: Tito Dudley aka Chef T BitIRA Affiliate Partner: https://bitira.go2cloud.org/aff_c?offer_id=1&aff_id=533 Live Healthy! www.SimpleEats.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/biocheft/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/officialcheft/ TikTok: https://vm.tiktok.com/ZMJrNHcMT/ Twitter: https://mobile.twitter.com/officialcheft Omicron: https://www.healthline.com/health-news/the-omicron-variant-means-its-more-important-than-ever-to-get-the-covid-19-vaccine Biotechnology: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41587-021-01110-3 Kimbal Musk Brother: https://markets.businessinsider.com/news/currencies/elon-musk-brother-kimbal-musk-big-green-dao-food-inequality-2021-11 Web3: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/12/05/business/dealbook/what-is-web3.html COVID-19 | Crypto | Blockchain | BioTech --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/vektween/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/vektween/support

BacterioFiles
466: Microbes Mining Mars Minerals

BacterioFiles

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 9:01


This episode: Bacteria are able to extract metals from rocks for industrial use, even in microgravity! Download Episode (6.2 MB, 9.0 minutes) Show notes: Microbe of the episode: Decapod ambidensovirus 1   News item   Takeaways As humanity makes progress toward becoming an interplanetary species, consideration is needed on how travelers can survive and thrive in distant places. These methods may look very different from what works well on Earth, with differences in gravity, atmosphere, and access to resources. For example, mining for materials for construction may not be feasible using methods common on Earth. An alternative may be biomining, using microbes that can selectively extract and purify specific metals from minerals.   In this study, the European Space Agency tested the ability of several microbes to extract vanadium from rocks in different gravity conditions, on the International Space Station. Two out of three microbes were able to extract twice as much vanadium as was extracted in the absence of microbes, both on a planet and up in space.   Journal Paper: Cockell CS, Santomartino R, Finster K, Waajen AC, Nicholson N, Loudon C-M, Eades LJ, Moeller R, Rettberg P, Fuchs FM, Van Houdt R, Leys N, Coninx I, Hatton J, Parmitano L, Krause J, Koehler A, Caplin N, Zuijderduijn L, Mariani A, Pellari S, Carubia F, Luciani G, Balsamo M, Zolesi V, Ochoa J, Sen P, Watt JAJ, Doswald-Winkler J, Herová M, Rattenbacher B, Wadsworth J, Everroad RC, Demets R. 2021. Microbially-Enhanced Vanadium Mining and Bioremediation Under Micro- and Mars Gravity on the International Space Station. Front Microbiol 12:663. Other interesting stories: A prokaryote with internal metabolic compartments (paper)   Email questions or comments to bacteriofiles at gmail dot com. Thanks for listening! Subscribe: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Android, or RSS. Support the show at Patreon, or check out the show at Twitter or Facebook.

Mind & Matter
Nathan Price: Metabolism, Aging, Microbiome, Blood Sugar, Diet, Digital Phenotyping & Personalized Medicine | #47

Mind & Matter

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 103:16


Nick Jikomes talks to Dr. Nathan Price, who has a PhD is in bioengineering and has been faculty at the University of Washington and the Institute of Systems Biology. He was also CEO of a health intelligence startup called Onegevity, which recently merged with Thorne HealthTech, which he is Chief Science Officer of. Nathan and Nick discussed various topics in the realm of personalized medicine, digital phenotyping and systems biology, including things like metabolism & blood sugar monitoring, the microbiome & diet, aging & longevity, and more. They talked about the basic biology of these things, as well as different emerging technologies related to health monitoring.USEFUL LINKSSign up for the weekly Mind & Matter newsletter[https://mindandmatter.substack.com/]Download the podcast & follow Nick at his website[https://www.nickjikomes.com]Buy books by M&M guests[https://linktr.ee/mindandmatter_books]Athletic Greens, comprehensive daily nutrition (Free 1-year supply Vitamin D w/ purchase)[https://athleticgreens.com/partner/d3...]Organize your digital highlights & notes w/ Readwise (2 months free w/ sub)[https://readwise.io/nickjikomes/]Follow & Support Nick's work[https://linktr.ee/trikomes]Learn more about our podcast sponsor, Dosist[https://dosist.com/]Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/nickjikomes)

Modern Healthcare’s Healthcare Insider Podcast
The promise of virtual collaboration in biotech and pharma

Modern Healthcare’s Healthcare Insider Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 12:20


The pandemic has forced healthcare teams to work together differently, spurring the widespread use of virtual communication tools including video calls, instant messaging and virtual whiteboards. But biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies have been slower to adopt virtual collaboration despite the potential to connect and innovate better and faster. In this episode of Healthcare Insider, we discussed the promise of virtual collaboration in biotech and pharma and how hybrid work is presenting new opportunities for innovation with Amelia Eudailey, healthcare industry lead at Zoom. 

MIDI Innovation Vault
The Ultimate Medical Accelerator & Incubator Lab with Center for Biotechnology, Diane Fabel

MIDI Innovation Vault

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 38:36


MIDI Medical Product Developments CEO, Gregory Montalbano is speaking with Diane Fabel who is the Director of Operations at The Center for Biotechnology located on the campus of Stony Brook University. On this podcast, Greg and Diane will discuss in detail what The Center for Biotechnology is all about. A deep dive is taken into the inner workings of the Center for Biotechnology ecosystem programs. Together they discuss the methods of mentoring and support offered to the entrepreneurial groups spanning medical, scientific, and biotechnology applications. Diane also outlines the various Center for Biotechnology corporate, university, industry as well as venture partner networks that support their members. Greg and Diane's discussions also include what the Center for Biotechnology groups looks for in a startup and how they can apply to the various programs offered. Lastly, today's podcast discussion also highlights new biotech and MedTech innovative initiatives and exciting breakthroughs that are expected on the horizon from the Center for Biotechnology member network.

Midas Letter Podcast
Can Psychedelics Cure Addiction? | Awakn Life Sciences $AWKN $AWKNF

Midas Letter Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021


Awakn Life Sciences Corp (NEO:AWKN, OTCMKTS:AWKNF) is a biotechnology company developing new psychedelic therapeutics to better treat addiction. Awakn also operates clinics delivering treatments in the UK and Europe which provides free cash flow to reinvest back into the biotech side of the business. Awakn […]

The Guiding Voice
Career options in social work | Kavya Narayanan | TGV 170

The Guiding Voice

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 22:12


Career options in social work Know the Speaker  Kavya Narayanan (Program officer, South India AIDS Action Program)  Genre: Social Work, Career Options & Emerging Fields  Social work is a rewarding career for those who are interested in working with people and wish to address social and community issues.  Many people think that social work simply involves working with NGOs as a part-time job/activity.  But in reality, social workers work with individuals, communities, and families and deal with social issues such as unemployment, education, and poverty.  Social workers contribute to the society by working for the upliftment of poor people, by working with children with special needs and promoting women empowerment. In this episode you will listen to :- Huge transition she had in her career . ( 3.55 ) Why the humanitarian sector as a career ? ( 6.18) Career options in Humanitarian sector ( 6.56) Common myths about social work ( 8.26)  How social work helps people with special needs (9.40) Solution by identifying the root cause ( 11.03) Development of newer fields in Social sector (13.30) Mental health and helps ( 14.32) Interesting rapid fire questions (17.08) Hidden talent no one knows about kavya (18.16) Advice for people who want to flourish their career (19.44) Tune in for more!  About the Speaker (Kavya Narayanan): Kavya Narayanan, a program officer at South India AIDS Action Program is  currently working on a project that focuses on the mental health of adolescents in low income communities in Chennai .  She did her Research Master in Clinical and Cognitive Neuroscience from Maastricht University. She also did her Bachelor's in  Biotechnology , Chemistry and Zoology from Christ University , Bengaluru. She has dedicated herself to exploring and researching intersectional mental health of marginalized communities .  Social work as a career is very prominent these days and the number of  people choosing social work as a career increases day by day .  This episode talks about the social service path Kavya chose and  the career options in social work . She also gives amazing advice for her younger version that can help the coming generation . Follow her on Linked in :-https://www.linkedin.com/in/kavya-narayanan-1b38a811b Connect with the hosts: Naveen Samala: https://www.linkedin.com/mwlite/in/naveensamala Sudhakar Nagandla: https://www.linkedin.com/in/nvsudhakar  #socialwork, #careeroptions, #mentalhealth, #humanitariansector, #socialsector. #tgv, #theguidingvoice, #careerguidance, #careergrowth

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.29.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 58:46


Yoga improves quality of life in men with new diagnosis of prostate cancer University of Texas at San Antonio, November 23, 2021 An estimated 1.4 million men were diagnosed with prostate cancer worldwide in 2020, according to the American Cancer Society and the International Agency for Research on Cancer. With a new diagnosis of prostate cancer, these men have approximately a 30% incidence of depression and anxiety, a fourfold higher risk of heart attack and a twofold higher risk of committing suicide. Yoga, a set of specific body postures combined with breathing techniques and mindfulness, may be an easy-to-implement answer in this stressful situation, according to a study published Nov. 23 in the journal Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases. A pilot randomized clinical trial by urology researchers at the Mays Cancer Center, home to UT Health San Antonio MD Anderson Cancer Center, enrolled 29 men who were awaiting prostatectomy. Fourteen were randomized to participate in yoga and 15 were assigned to the standard of care, which was just waiting for surgery. “We gave the active intervention group six weeks of yoga, at least twice a week, for 60 to 75 minutes,” said lead author Dharam Kaushik, MD, associate professor of urology in UT Health San Antonio's Joe R. and Teresa Lozano School of Medicine and cancer surgeon with the Mays Cancer Center. Via questionnaires, the team documented the men's perceived quality of life at the start of yoga, at the time of surgery and after surgery. Men who did not do yoga completed the same questionnaires at study enrollment and at the other two junctures. The team drew blood samples before the men began yoga and after all sessions were completed. Samples were also taken from men who did not do yoga. Sense of well-being  “What we found was very interesting,” Dr. Kaushik said. “Yoga improved quality of life in men compared to the standard of care, specifically on the fatigue scale, meaning they were less tired; on sexual function; and on their functional, physical and social well-being.” A more robust immune response and lower levels of inflammation were observed in the yoga group, he added. “This is positive data and further large-scale studies are needed, for which this pilot study can be a model,” Dr. Kaushik said. Biomarkers and yoga The primary study outcome was self-reported quality of life assessed by the questionnaires. Changes in immune cell status and inflammatory markers with yoga were secondary outcomes. The yoga group showed increased numbers of circulating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, which are important contributors to immune health. Among other markers, the yoga group also exhibited a reduction in inflammatory markers called cytokines. The median age of participants was 56 years in the yoga group and 60 years in the standard of care group. Yoga has been studied in breast cancer, but not at the level of detail of this study, matching self-reported quality of life data with markers of immune response and inflammation, Dr. Kaushik said. “If we are able to encourage patients to do a small, inexpensive and easy-to-implement intervention that can have a big impact, then why not?” he said.     Researchers Discover How Antibiotic Power of Garlic Fights Chronic Infections Washington State University, November 28, 2021   Garlic is probably nature's most potent food. It is one of the reasons people who eat the Mediterranean diet live such long healthy lives. An active sulphurous compound found in garlic can be used to fight robust bacteria in patients with chronic infections, a new study from the University of Copenhagen indicates.   A previous finding from Washington State University showed that garlic is 100 times more effective than two popular antibiotics at fighting disease causing bacteria commonly responsible for foodborne illness.  Here the researchers show that the garlic compound is able to destroy important components in the bacteria's communication systems, which involve regulatory RNA molecules. 'We really believe this method can lead to treatment of patients, who otherwise have poor prospects. Because chronic infections like cystic fibrosis can be very robust. But now we, together with a private company, have enough knowledge to further develop the garlic drug and test it on patients', says Assistant Professor Tim Holm Jakobsen from the Costerton Biofilm Center at the Department of Immunology and Microbiology. The study is the latest addition from a research group headed by Professor Michael Givskov, which since 2005 has focussed on garlic's effect on bacteria. At the time they learned that garlic extract is able to inhibit bacteria, and in 2012 they showed that the sulphurous compound ajoene found in garlic is responsible for the effect. The new study, which has been published in the scientific journal Scientific Reports, takes an even closer look and documents ajoene's ability to inhibit small regulatory RNA molecules in two types of bacteria. 'The two types of bacteria we have studied are very important. They are called Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. They actually belong to two very different bacteria families and are normally fought using different methods. But the garlic compound is able to fight both at once and therefore may prove an effective drug when used together with antibiotics', says Tim Holm Jakobsen. Previous studies have shown that garlic appears to offer the most powerful, naturally occurring resistance to bacteria. In addition to inhibiting the bacteria's RNA molecules, the active garlic compound also damages the protective slimy matrix surrounding the bacteria, the so-called biofilm. When the biofilm is destroyed or weakened, both antibiotics and the body's own immune system are able to attack the bacteria more directly and thus remove the infection. In 2012 the researchers took out a patent on the use of ajoene to fight bacterial infections. Similar patents have been taken out for compounds in allicin -- which gives garlic its aroma and flavour -- and is known as one of the world's most powerful antioxidants.     Calorie restriction cycles could help cancer patients Fondazione Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori (Italy), November 22 2021.  Findings from a trial reported on November 17, 2021 in Cancer Discovery revealed that five days of a diet that mimics fasting is safe for people with cancer and could improve factors that affect prognosis. The trial included 101 patients with different cancers treated with standard therapies. Participants were assigned to a five-day low protein, low carbohydrate, plant-based diet that provided up to 600 calories on the first day and up to 300 calories per day during the remaining days. The regimen was repeated every three or four weeks for up to eight cycles. Each period of calorie restriction was followed by a period in which patients were instructed to adhere to healthy diet and lifestyle guidelines. Blood samples were collected before and at the end of each calorie restricted period. Severe adverse events related to the diet were reported by 12.9% of the participants, which was significantly lower than the 20% figure hypothesized by the researchers prior to the study. Median plasma glucose, serum insulin and serum IGF-1 were decreased by 18.6%, 50.7% and 30.3% after each cycle. In an evaluation conducted among a subgroup of participants after the first calorie restricted cycle, a reduction in peripheral blood immunosuppressive cells and an increase of immune cells known as activated CD8+ T cells was observed. To explore the effects of the diet on immunity within cancer patients' tumors, the researchers performed an analysis of findings from an ongoing trial that administered the fasting-mimicking diet prior to tumor removal in breast cancer patients. Tumor microenvironments revealed enhanced tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells and additional favorable immune factors when compared to biopsy samples obtained before the diet was initiated.  “Cyclic fasting-mimicking diet is a safe, feasible and inexpensive dietary intervention that modulates systemic metabolism and boosts antitumor immunity in cancer patients,” the authors concluded.     Morning exposure to deep red light improves declining eyesight University College London, November 24, 2021       Just three minutes of exposure to deep red light once a week, when delivered in the morning, can significantly improve declining eyesight, finds a pioneering new study by UCL researchers. Published in Scientific Reports, the study builds on the team's previous work*, which showed daily three-minute exposure to longwave deep red light ‘switched on' energy producing mitochondria cells in the human retina, helping boost naturally declining vision.   For this latest study, scientists wanted to establish what effect a single three-minute exposure would have, while also using much lower energy levels than their previous studies. Furthermore, building on separate UCL research in flies** that found mitochondria display ‘shifting workloads' depending on the time of day, the team compared morning exposure to afternoon exposure. In summary, researchers found there was, on average, a 17% improvement in participants' colour contrast vision when exposed to three minutes of 670 nanometre (long wavelength) deep red light in the morning and the effects of this single exposure lasted for at least a week. However, when the same test was conducted in the afternoon, no improvement was seen. Scientists say the benefits of deep red light, highlighted by the findings, mark a breakthrough for eye health and should lead to affordable home-based eye therapies, helping the millions of people globally with naturally declining vision. Lead author, Professor Glen Jeffery (UCL Institute of Ophthalmology), said: “We demonstrate that one single exposure to long wave deep red light in the morning can significantly improve declining vision, which is a major health and wellbeing issue, affecting millions of people globally. “This simple intervention applied at the population level would significantly impact on quality of life as people age and would likely result in reduced social costs that arise from problems associated with reduced vision.” Naturally declining vision and mitochondria In humans around 40 years old, cells in the eye's retina begin to age, and the pace of this ageing is caused, in part, when the cell's mitochondria, whose role is to produce energy (known as ATP) and boost cell function, also start to decline. Mitochondrial density is greatest in the retina's photoreceptor cells, which have high energy demands. As a result, the retina ages faster than other organs, with a 70% ATP reduction over life, causing a significant decline in photoreceptor function as they lack the energy to perform their normal role. In studying the effects of deep red light in humans, researchers built on their previous findings in mice, bumblebees and fruit flies, which all found significant improvements in the function of the retina's photoreceptors when their eyes were exposed to 670 nanometre (long wavelength) deep red light. “Mitochondria have specific sensitivities to long wavelength light influencing their performance: longer wavelengths spanning 650 to 900nm improve mitochondrial performance to increase energy production,” said Professor Jeffery. Morning and afternoon studies The retina's photoreceptor population is formed of cones, which mediate colour vision, and rods, which adapt vision in low/dim light. This study focused on cones*** and observed colour contrast sensitivity, along the protan axis (measuring red-green contrast) and the tritan axis (blue-yellow). All the participants were aged between 34 and 70, had no ocular disease, completed a questionnaire regarding eye health prior to testing, and had normal colour vision (cone function). This was assessed using a ‘Chroma Test': identifying coloured letters that had very low contrast and appeared increasingly blurred, a process called colour contrast.    Using a provided LED device all 20 participants (13 female and 7 male) were exposed to three minutes of 670nm deep red light in the morning between 8am and 9am. Their colour vision was then tested again three hours post exposure and 10 of the participants were also tested one week post exposure.  On average there was a ‘significant' 17% improvement in colour vision, which lasted a week in tested participants; in some older participants there was a 20% improvement, also lasting a week. A few months on from the first test (ensuring any positive effects of the deep red light had been ‘washed out') six (three female, three male) of the 20 participants, carried out the same test in the afternoon, between 12pm to 1pm.  When participants then had their colour vision tested again, it showed zero improvement. Professor Jeffery said: “Using a simple LED device once a week, recharges the energy system that has declined in the retina cells, rather like re-charging a battery. “And morning exposure is absolutely key to achieving improvements in declining vision: as we have previously seen in flies, mitochondria have shifting work patterns and do not respond in the same way to light in the afternoon – this study confirms this.” For this study the light energy emitted by the LED torch was just 8mW/cm2, rather than 40mW/cm2, which they had previously used. This has the effect of dimming the light but does not affect the wavelength. While both energy levels are perfectly safe for the human eye, reducing the energy further is an additional benefit. Home-based affordable eye therapies With a paucity of affordable deep red-light eye-therapies available, Professor Jeffery has been working for no commercial gain with Planet Lighting UK, a small company in Wales and others, with the aim of producing 670nm infra-red eye ware at an affordable cost, in contrast to some other LED devices designed to improve vision available in the US for over $20,000. “The technology is simple and very safe; the energy delivered by 670nm long wave light is not that much greater than that found in natural environmental light,” Professor Jeffery said. “Given its simplicity, I am confident an easy-to-use device can be made available at an affordable cost to the general public. “In the near future, a once a week three-minute exposure to deep red light could be done while making a coffee, or on the commute listening to a podcast, and such a simple addition could transform eye care and vision around the world.” Study limitations Despite the clarity of the results, researchers say some of the data are “noisy”. While positive effects are clear for individuals following 670nm exposure, the magnitude of improvements can vary markedly between those of similar ages. Therefore, some caution is needed in interpretating the data. It is possible that there are other variables between individuals that influence the degree of improvement that the researchers have not identified so far and would require a larger sample size. This research was funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, and Sight Research UK.   Global rise in red/processed meat trade linked to sharp increase in diet-related illness Michigan State University & University of California at Merced, November 22, 2021   The global rise in the red and processed meat trade over the past 30 years is linked to a sharp increase in diet related ill health, with the impact greatest in Northern and Eastern Europe and the island nations of the Caribbean and Oceania, finds an analysis published in the open access journal BMJ Global Health. Health policies should be integrated with agricultural and trade policies among importing and exporting nations as a matter of urgency, to stave off further personal and societal costs, say the researchers. Among continuous urbanisation and income growth, the global red and processed meat trade has risen exponentially to meet demand. This trend has implications for the environment because of the impact it has on land use and biodiversity loss.  And high red and processed meat consumption is linked to a heightened risk of non-communicable diseases, particularly bowel cancer, diabetes, and coronary artery heart disease. The researchers wanted to find out what impact the red and processed meat trade might be having on diet-related non-communicable disease trends and which countries might be particularly vulnerable.  They drew on data on meat production and trade from the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) from 1993 to 2018 for 154 countries, focusing on 14 red meat items derived from beef, pork, lamb and goat, and six processed primarily beef and pork items, preserved by smoking, salting, curing, or chemicals. They then calculated the proportions of deaths and years of life lived with disability (DALYs) attributable to diet as a result of bowel cancer, type 2 diabetes, and coronary artery heart disease among those aged 25 and over in each country. The global red and processed meat trade increased by more than 148% from 10 metric tonnes in 1993–5 to nearly 25 metric tonnes in 2016–18. While the number of net exporting countries fell from 33 in 1993–5 to 26 in 2016–18, net importing countries rose from 121 to 128.  Developed countries in Europe accounted for half of total red and processed meat exports in 1993–95 and 2016–18.  But developing countries in South America, such as Brazil, Argentina, and Paraguay made up nearly 10% in 2016–18, up from around 5% in 1993–5.  Developing countries also increased their meat imports by 342.5% from 2 metric tonnes in 1993–5 to nearly 9 metric tonnes in 2016–18; developed countries doubled theirs from 8 metric tonnes to 16. Diet related attributable death and DALY rates associated with the global meat trade rose in three quarters of the 154 countries between 1993-5 and 2016-18. Worldwide, the researchers calculated that increases in red and processed meat consumption, aligned to increases in trade, accounted for 10,898 attributable deaths in 2016–18, an increase of nearly 75% on the figures for 1993-5.  The global meat trade contributed to increases of 55% and 71%, respectively, in attributable deaths and DALYs in developed countries between 1993-5 and 2016-18.  The equivalent figures in developing countries were significantly higher: 137% and 140%, respectively, largely as a result of increased demand for meat, prompted by rapid urbanisation and income growth, suggest the researchers. Between 1993– 2018, island nations in the Caribbean and Oceania and  countries in Northern and Eastern Europe became particularly vulnerable to diet-related disease and deaths associated with large meat imports.  The island nations have limited land for meat production, so depend heavily on meat imports, while many of the European countries, such as Slovakia, Lithuania and Latvia, benefited from regional trade agreements and tariff exemptions after joining the European Union in 2003-4, which accelerated meat imports, explain the researchers. In 1993–5, the top 10 countries with the highest proportion of deaths attributable to red meat consumption included Tonga, United Arab Emirates, Barbados, Fiji, Gabon, Bahamas, Greece, Malta, Brunei and Saint Lucia.  In 2016–2018, the top 10 included The Netherlands, Bahamas, Tonga, Denmark, Antigua and Barbuda, Seychelles, United Arab Emirates, Singapore, Croatia and Greece. The meat trade in these countries accounted for more than 7% of all deaths attributable to diets high in both red and processed meat in 2016-18. The trends in attributable DALYs more or less mirrored those for attributable deaths. Attributable death and DALY rates associated with global meat trade fell in 34 countries between 1993–5 and 2016–18. But this was partly due to population growth exceeding increases in meat imports in 24 countries, while domestic meat production increased in 19.  In more than a half of these countries (20) the absolute number of diet-related deaths and DALYs rose in tandem with increased meat consumption between 1993-5 and 2016-18. And some countries, including Brazil, Paraguay, Argentina and Germany increasingly acted as net meat exporters, changing their land use, with consequent biodiversity loss. This is an observational study, and as such, can't establish cause. And the researchers acknowledge that many countries import and process red meat items for export, which may have skewed their findings. Nevertheless, they conclude: “This study shows that global increases in red and processed meat trade contribute to the abrupt increase of diet-related [non-communicable diseases]... Future interventions need to urgently integrate health policies with agricultural and trade policies by cooperating between responsible exporting and importing countries.”     Glyphosate levels sharply increase by 1,208% within the human body University of California San Diego The environmental dangers of glyphosate in Roundup and other weed killer products have been well documented. Now new research, from a team led by Paul Mills of the University of California San Diego, has found it could be negatively affecting human health – especially in lower-income communities, as illustrated by the 1,208 percent increase in human glyphosate levels. The study tracked people in southern California over age 50 from the years 1993 to 1996 as well as from 2014 to 2016. Urine samples were collected from these persons (periodically) during that time. Number of persons testing positive for glyphosate in their urine went up by 500 percent within 20 years The researchers determined the percentage of persons testing positive for glyphosate went up an alarming 500 percent during that time period.  And, for some, glyphosate levels surged by a frightening 1,208 percent. A past UK trial of rats fed low doses of glyphosate – over their lifetimes – were found to have a higher risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Research out of King's College in London found this toxic herbicide ingredient can cause non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in rats at just 4 nanograms/kg. By the way, this amount is 437,000 times below levels that are allowed in the United States. In more recent research, the levels of glyphosate in the humans studied were proportionately 100-fold higher. Further research regarding the connection between glyphosate and liver disease are being planned.  But, what we already know has been published in JAMA. Important to note: people who live in rural areas near farms that use Roundup are at the highest risk for exposure.  Yet, traces of this herbicide ingredient – left on fruits and vegetables – can easily make its way into the bloodstream of anyone who consumes these foods. Glyphosate weed killer in Roundup considered “probable carcinogen” by World Health Organization While Roundup was developed to kill weeds, many weed types have actually become resistant to the herbicide. This is causing some farmers to use even more Roundup. Glyphosate has been listed as a “probable human carcinogen” by WHO (the World Health Organization). It has also been linked with birth defects, ADHD and autism. Studies on humans have shown Roundup causes liver damage even when found in “permissible amounts” in tap water. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease currently affects 90 million Americans and is on the verge of becoming a global epidemic. Associated disorders such as diabetes, obesity and metabolic syndrome are also soaring. Glyphosate in Roundup weed killer INCREASES the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease While the known causes of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease include overeating, sugary foods and a sedentary lifestyle, some health professionals are beginning to wonder if glyphosate exposure is exacerbating this trend. NAFLD symptoms include chronic fatigue, nausea, abdominal pain and/or swelling, weight loss, jaundice, itching, confusion and swelling of the legs. Untreated, NAFLD can lead to liver cancer and liver failure. Unfortunately, glyphosate residue has been showing up in increasing amounts in our food supply. It has even been detected in wine, table salt and vaccines. So, it really isn't a wonder how glyphosate levels in the human bloodstream have increased by 1,208 percent. If you're outraged by this, take the time to voice your opinion to your state representatives. And, at the very least, eat organic fruits and vegetables – as often as possible to avoid this cancer-causing substance.   Study finds psychedelic microdosing improves mental health University of British Columbia, November 23, 2021 An international study led by UBC Okanagan researchers suggests repeated use of small doses of psychedelics such as psilocybin or LSD can be a valuable tool for those struggling with anxiety and depression. The study, recently published in Nature: Scientific Reports, demonstrated fewer symptoms of anxiety and depression, and greater feelings of wellbeing among individuals who reported consuming psychedelics in small quantities, or microdosing, compared to those who did not. Microdosing involves regular self-administration of psychedelic substances in amounts small enough to not impair normal cognitive functioning. Considering this is the largest psychedelic microdosing study published to date, the results are encouraging, says UBCO doctoral student and lead author Joseph Rootman. "In total, we followed more than 8,500 people from 75 countries using an anonymous self-reporting system—about half were following a microdosing regimen and half were not," Rootman explains. "In comparing microdosers and non-microdosers, there was a clear association between microdosing and fewer symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress—which is important given the high prevalence of these conditions and the substantial suffering they cause." The study is also the first to systematically examine the practice of stacking, or combining microdoses of psychedelics with other substances like niacin, lions mane mushrooms and cacao, which some believe work in conjunction to maximize benefit. Rootman works with Dr. Zach Walsh, a psychology professor in UBCO's Irving K. Barber Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. Dr. Walsh says it's an exciting time for research in this area. "These findings highlight adults who are microdosing to treat their mental health conditions and enhance their wellbeing—rather than simply to get high," says Dr. Walsh. "We have an epidemic of mental health problems, with existing treatments that don't work for everyone. We need to follow the lead of patients who are taking these initiatives to improve their wellbeing and reduce suffering." Study co-author Kalin Harvey is the chief technology officer of Quantified Citizen, a mobile health research platform. He says this study highlights the potential of citizen science. "The use of citizen science allows us to examine the effects of behaviors that are difficult to study in the lab due to regulatory challenges and stigma associated with the now discredited 'war on drugs.'" According to the Canadian Mental Health Association, one in five Canadians personally experience a mental health problem or illness each year. This is one of the many reasons Dr. Walsh says conducting innovative psychological research is imperative. "These cross-sectional findings are promising and highlight the need for further investigation to better determine the impacts of factors like dosage and stacking," explains Dr. Walsh. "While the data is growing to support the use of psychedelics like psilocybin in large doses to treat depression and addiction—our data also helps to expand our understanding of how psychedelics may also help in smaller doses."

Breaking Biotech
103 - CD47 Companies FALL on New Data! Biogen Negativity Continues with Looming NCD Decision

Breaking Biotech

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 37:22


Two CD47 targeting companies announced data updates from their clinical programs: Shattuk Labs and ALX Oncology. Both have suffered major stock price declines and in this episode, I go through the updates and discuss the potential of their molecules moving forward. Biogen cannot catch a break with the latest news continuing to contribute to new stock price lows. However, Medicare is close to announcing their National Coverage Determination (NCD) decision on Aduhelm, which will be a big mover for the stock. Help out the show (or join the discord) by becoming a patron at: https://www.patreon.com/breakingbiotech Follow me on twitter @matthewlepoire Send me an email matthewlepoire@gmail.com www.breakingbiotech.com #breakingbiotech Disclaimer: All opinions expressed by Matt (or his guests) in this podcast are solely his (their) opinions. You should not treat any opinion expressed by Matt in this podcast as a specific inducement to make a particular investment or follow a particular strategy, but only as an expression of his opinion. Matt's opinions are based upon information he considers reliable, but Matt cannot warrant its completeness or accuracy, and it should not be relied upon as such. Matt is not under any obligation to update or correct any information provided in this podcast. Past performance is not indicative of future results. Matt does not guarantee any specific outcome or profit. You should be aware of the real risk of loss in following any strategy or investment discussed in this podcast. #biotech

Den of Rich
#340 - Alexey Strygin

Den of Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 141:54


Alexey Strygin is a longevity enthusiast and bioentrepreneur, co-founder of Gray Matter (part of Lactocore Group), a company focused on the development of therapeutic peptides vs. mild cognitive impairment, other age-related CNS diseases, and aging. Alexey teaches a course on Entrepreneurship in Biotechnology in Masters Program at Moscow State University. Alexey is a fellow in 1st cohort of On Deck Longevity Biotech or ODLB. It is a continuous community for people to come together to build, join, or invest in revolutionary longevity biotechnology startups. Previous experience includes Insilico Medicine, a unicorn pioneering AI application for drug discovery, Centaura focused on radical interventions in aging, Cryno, and Skolkovo Foundation.FIND ALEXEY ON SOCIAL MEDIALinkedIn | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter================================PODCAST INFO:Podcast website: https://www.uhnwidata.com/podcastApple podcast: https://apple.co/3kqOA7QSpotify: https://spoti.fi/2UOtE1AGoogle podcast: https://bit.ly/3jmA7ulSUPPORT & CONNECT:Support on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/denofrichTwitter: https://www.instagram.com/denofrich/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/denofrich/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/denofrich

Learning Futures
BioSense Network: exploring biotech with computational microscopes

Learning Futures

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 43:47


Join Dr. Sean Leahy for this bonus episode of the Learning Futures podcast to discuss the BioSense Network, a newly funded research project aimed at establishing a community of learners exploring biotechnology with a computational microscope.Sean interviews his colleagues about this innovative research grant in collaboration with the Arizona State University School of Molecular Sciences, the ASU Biodesign Institute, and the Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College at ASU. Panel members: Host: Dr. Sean Leahy - twitter: @seanthenerdDr. Abhishek Singharoy - twitter: @abhisekhsingha1Dr. Punya Mishra - twitter: @punyamishraCassandra Kellaris  Details (in case you want to jump right to the action): (04:30) - Sean and team discuss what BioSense actually is… (05:25) - bridging textbook biotechnology with reality - what does this mean?(11:45) - combination of the biotechnology team and education, crucial to creating this new approach to biotechnology education. (18:35) - a network of educators, how will this work change the landscape of STEM education and STEM workforce development etc.?(27:10) - use of high-powered computing to create zero-cost technology access to educators and students(30:10) - conversation around the four identified “tangible” goals / outcomes of the project, namely: communicate, promote, inspire, and enhance…(32:50) - educational modules for educators, what is entailed in the development and implementation of these modules? How this process differs from a traditional learning approach?This project has been made possible by funding from the Department of Defense STEM program @DoDstem.The Learning Futures Podcast is produced at the Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College at Arizona State University. Executive Producers are Dr. Sean Leahy and Claire Gilbert. The show is produced by Dr. Clarin Collins and Karina Muñoz Baltazar.

The Richie Allen Show
Episode 1369: The Richie Allen Show Tuesday November 23rd 2021

The Richie Allen Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 113:59


Richie is joined by Professor Dolores Cahill. Dolores Cahill holds an honours degree in Molecular Genetics from Trinity College Dublin and a PhD in Immunology and Biotechnology from Dublin City University. Dolores has received international recognition for her biomedical research. On today's show, Professor Cahill discusses:What's the reality of adverse reactions to covid jabs?Are the jabs harming pregnant women? Will the jab eventually be compulsory for everyone in the UK?What can we do to stop the roll-out?Read more on Dolores Cahill at www.worlddoctorsalliance.com 

I AM BIO
Antimicrobial Resistance: The Silent Pandemic

I AM BIO

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 26:53


We are on the precipice of a looming crisis. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is the evolution of deadly pathogens like bacteria and fungi to resist all current antimicrobial medicines. In this episode, we talk about how the dwindling supply of new antibiotics is fueling this silent pandemic, and why we need a continued pipeline of new antibiotics to avoid this crisis.Guests:Ankit Mahadevia, Spero TherapeuticsHenry  Skinner, AMR Action FundMary Dwight, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation 

Future Hindsight
Our Public Health: Michele Goodwin

Future Hindsight

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 38:04


The Social Contract and Our Bodies The pandemic has given us a glimpse into the ways our health is woven into the social contract. The high number of deaths from COVID are the result of the government's failure to collaborate with international organizations and with our own state lawmakers. We leaned on essential care workers, many of whom are people of color. And yet, they often lacked PPE, challenging what it really means to be “essential.” The Inequality of Health Racism is a preexisting health condition in the United States. COVID unveiled the institutional and infrastructural inequalities that have existed in our healthcare system for decades, which we see with the alarming rates of death among Black and Latino children. These inequalities and social stereotypes affect every corner of healthcare. For example, Black adults are 2 to 6 times more likely to suffer an amputation than a white adult, especially for common conditions like diabetes. Women's Health Increasingly, aspects of women's health, such as reproduction, pregnancy, abortion, birth, and motherhood have been criminalized in the United States. Criminalization especially affects Black and brown women so that medical care has become a weapon to turn health issues like a stillbirth into a criminal offense. However, in creating these sorts of precedents, all women—regardless of race—are then subject to suffering under this weaponization of healthcare, which we see happening across the country right now. FIND OUT MORE: Michele Goodwin is a Chancellor's Professor at the University of California Irvine and founding director of the Center for Biotechnology and Global Health Policy. She is the recipient of the 2020-21 Distinguished Senior Faculty Award for Research, the highest honor bestowed by the University of California. She is an elected member of the American Law Institute, as well as an elected Fellow of the American Bar Foundation and the Hastings Center (the organization central to the founding of bioethics). She is an American Law Institute Adviser for the Restatement Third of Torts: Remedies. Goodwin has won national awards for excellence in scholarship, outstanding teaching, and committed community service. Gov. Paul Patton of Kentucky commissioned her a Colonel, the state's highest title of honor for her outstanding contributions to K-12 education. She's the recipient of the Be The Change Award, the Sandra Day O'Connor Legacy Award by the Women's Journey Foundation, and was named Teacher of the Year by the Thurgood Marshall Bar Association in 2018. Goodwin received a commendation from the United States House of Representatives for Outstanding Teaching.  You can follow Michele Goodwin on Twitter at @michelebgoodwin

Opto Sessions: Stock market | Investing | Trading | Stocks & Shares | Finance | Business | Entrepreneurship | ETF

Ali Urman is ARK Invest's Genomic Revolution analyst, responsible for the company's research on Gene editing, DNA sequencing, Stem cell technologies & Immunotherapy. As of September 2021, ARK's AUM stood at a colossal $42.4 billion, spearheaded by investing legend and household name, Cathie Wood. To speak to ARK's Genomics analyst as a global pandemic thrusts Biotechnology into the spotlight was a huge privilege.And Ali doesn't disappoint. We discuss the Genomic revolution – how the sequencing of the first human genome cost $1bn and took 13 years, whereas today, that same process costs anywhere between $100-$1000, and takes just 1-2 days. Ali explains the transformative convergence of Next-generation DNA sequencing, Artificial Intelligence & CRISPR gene editing before we break down exactly how ARK picks their Genomics stocks! Enjoy the episodeFor an insight into Ark's research process, check out Ali's WIP articles on Medium - The latest two on Gene Editing, linked here:- https://medium.com/@aurmanARK/predicting-the-trajectory-of-prime-editing-lessons-from-base-editing-3351e58e53ff- https://medium.com/@aurmanARK/gene-editing-could-get-an-upgrade-e5e4aa0b6966 Thanks to Cofruition for consulting on and producing the podcast. Want further Opto insights? Check out our daily newsletter: https://www.cmcmarkets.com/en-gb/opto/newsletter------------------Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future results.CMC Markets is an execution-only service provider. The material (whether or not it states any opinions) is for general information purposes only and does not take into account your personal circumstances or objectives. Nothing in this material is (or should be considered to be) financial, investment, or other advice on which reliance should be placed. No opinion given in the material constitutes a recommendation by CMC Markets or the author that any particular investment, security, transaction, or investment strategy is suitable for any specific person.The material has not been prepared in accordance with legal requirements designed to promote the independence of investment research. Although we are not specifically prevented from dealing before providing this material, we do not seek to take advantage of the material prior to its dissemination.CMC Markets does not endorse or offer opinions on the trading strategies used by the author. Their trading strategies do not guarantee any return and CMC Markets shall not be held responsible for any loss that you may incur, either directly or indirectly, arising from any investment based on any information contained herein. for any loss that you may incur, either directly or indirectly, arising from any investment based on any information contained herein.

I AM BIO
Pressure on STEM from Covid and Inequity

I AM BIO

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 27:18


Not only do we need STEM students, but we also need them from every corner of the population, because innovation thrives through diverse perspectives; through the people who bring both their talents and backgrounds to the work.  In this episode, we dig into the importance of kids learning about STEM early in their educations, the impact of the pandemic on students and teachers, and what the future of STEM education looks like. Guests:Barak Balva, SanofiKimberly Bryant, Black Girls CodeJen Colvin, Learning Undefeated Jo Webber, STEMconnector 

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.05.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 59:44


Sins Of Omission: The AZT Scandal By Celia Farber Spin Nov. 1989 On a cold January day in 1987, inside one of the brightly-lit meeting rooms of the monstrous FDA building, a panel of 11 top Aids doctors pondered a very difficult decision. They had been asked by the FDA to consider giving lightning-quick approval to a highly toxic drug about which there was very little information. Clinically called Zidovudine, but nicknamed AZT after its components, the drug was said to have shown a dramatic effect on the survival of Aids patients. The study that had brought the panel together had set the medical community abuzz. It was the first flicker of hope - people were dying much faster on the placebo than on the drug.  But there were tremendous concerns about the new drug. It had actually been developed a quarter of a century earlier as a cancer chemotherapy, but was shelved and forgotten because it was so toxic, very expensive to produce, and totally ineffective against cancer. Powerful, but unspecific, the drug was not selective in its cell destruction.  Drug companies around the world were sifting through hundreds of compounds in the race to find a cure, or at least a treatment, for Aids. Burroughs Wellcome, a subsidiary of Wellcome, a British drug company, emerged as the winner. By chance, they sent the failed cancer drug, then known as Compound S, to the National Cancer Institute along with many others to see if it could slay the Aids dragon, HIV. In the test tube at least, it did.  At the meeting, there was a lot of uncertainty and discomfort with AZT. The doctors who had been consulted knew that the study was flawed and that the long-range effects were completely unknown. But the public was almost literally baying at the door. Understandably, there was immense pressure on the FDA to approve AZT even more quickly than they had approved thalidomide in the mid-60s, which ended up causing drastic birth defects.  Everybody was worried about this one. To approve it, said Ellen Cooper, an FDA director, would represent a "significant and potentially dangerous departure from our normal toxicology requirements."  Just before approving the drug, one doctor on the panel, Calvin Kunin, summed up their dilemma. "On the one hand," he said, "to deny a drug which decreases mortality in a population such as this would be inappropriate. On the other hand, to use this drug widely, for areas where efficacy has not been demonstrated, with a potentially toxic agent, might be disastrous."  "We do not know what will happen a year from now," said panel chairman Dr. Itzhak Brook. "The data is just too premature, and the statistics are not really well done. The drug could actually be detrimental." A little later, he said he was also "struck by the facts that AZT does not stop deaths. Even those who were switched to AZT still kept dying."  "I agree with you," answered another panel member, "There are so many unknowns. Once a drug is approved there is no telling how it could be abused. There's no going back."  Burroughs Wellcome reassured the panel that they would provide detailed two-year follow-up data, and that they would not let the drug get out of its intended parameters: as a stopgap measure for very sick patients.  Dr. Brook was not won over by the promise. "If we approve it today, there will not be much data. There will be a promise of data," he predicted, "but then the production of data will be hampered." Brook's vote was the only one cast against approval.  'There was not enough data, not enough follow-up," Brook recalls. "Many of the questions we asked the company were answered by, 'We have not analyzed the data yet,' or 'We do not know.' I felt that there was some promising data, but I was very worried about the price being paid for it. The side effects were so very severe. It was chemotherapy. Patients were going to need blood transfusions. That's very serious.  "The committee was tending to agree with me," says Brook, "that we should wait a little bit, be more cautious. But once the FDA realized we were intending to reject it, they applied political pressure. At about 4 p.m., the head of the FDA's Center for Drugs and Biologics asked permission to speak, which is extremely unusual. Usually they leave us alone. But he said to us, 'Look, if you approve the drug, we can assure you that we will work together with Burroughs Wellcome and make sure the drug is given to the right people.' It was like saying 'please do it.'"  Brad Stone, FDA press officer, was at that meeting. He says he doesn't recall that particular speech, but that there is nothing 'unusual" about FDA officials making such speeches at advisory meetings. "The people in that meeting approved the drug because the data the company had produced proved it was prolonging life. Sure it was toxic, but they concluded that the benefits clearly outweighed the risks."  The meeting ended. AZT, which several members of the panel still felt uncomfortable with and feared could be a time bomb, was approved.  Flash forward: August 17, 1989. Newspapers across America banner-headlined that AZT had been "proven to be effective in HIV antibody-positive, asymptomatic and early ARC patients," even through one of the panel's main concerns was that the drug should only be used in a last-case scenario for critically-ill AIDS patients, due to the drug's extreme toxicity. Dr. Anthony Fauci, head of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), was now pushing to expand prescription.  The FDA's traditional concern had been thrown to the wind. Already the drug had spread to 60 countries and an estimated 20.000 people. Not only had no new evidence allayed the initial concerns of the panel, but the follow-up data, as Dr. Brook predicted, had fallen by the waysite. The beneficial effects of the drug had been proven to be temporary. The toxicity, however stayed the same.  The majority of those in the AIDS afflicted and medical communities held the drug up as the first breakthrough on AIDS. For better or worse, AZT had been approved faster than any drug in FDA history, and activists considered it a victory. The price paid for the victory, however, was that almost all government drug trials, from then on, focused on AZT - while over 100 other promising drugs were left uninvestigated.  Burroughs Wellcome stock went through the roof when the announcement was made. At a price of $8,000 per patient per year (not including blood work and transfusions), AZT is the most expensive drug ever marketed. Burroughs Wellcome's gross profits for next year are estimated at $230 million. Stock market analysts predict that Burroughs Wellcome may be selling as much as $2 billion worth of AZT, under the brand name Retrovir, each year by the mid-1990s - matching Burroughs Wellcome's total sales for all its products last year.  AZT is the only antiretroviral drug that has received FDA approval for treatment of AIDS since the epidemic began 10 years ago, and the decision to approve it was based on a single study that has long been declared invalid.  The study was intended to be a "double-blind placebo-controlled study," the only kind of study that can effectively prove whether or not a drug works. In such a study, neither patient nor doctor is supposed to know if the patient is getting the drug or a placebo. In the case of AZT, the study became unblinded on all sides, after just a few weeks.  Both sides of the contributed to the unblinding. It became obvious to doctors who was getting what because AZT causes such severe side effects that AIDS per se does not. Furthermore, a routine blood count known as CMV, which clearly shows who is on the drug and who is not, wasn't whited out in the reports. Both of these facts were accepted and confirmed by both the FDA and Burroughs Wellcome, who conducted the study.  Many of the patients who were in the trial admitted that they had analyzed their capsules to find out whether they were getting the drug. If they weren't, some bought the drug on the underground market. Also, the pills were supposed to be indistinguishable by taste, but they were not. Although this was corrected early on, the damage was already done. There were also reports that patients were pooling pills out solidarity to each other. The study was so severely flawed that its conclusions must be considered, by the most basic scientific standards, unproven.  The most serious problem with the original study, however, is that it was never completed. Seventeen weeks in the study, when more patients had died in the placebo group, the study was stopped short, and all subjects were put on AZT, no scientific study can ever be conducted to prove unequivocally whether AZT does prolong life.  Dr. Brook, who voted against approval, warned at the time that AZT, being the only drug available for doctors to prescribe to AIDS patients, would probably have a runaway effect. Approving it prematurely, he said, would be like "letting the genie out of the bottle."  Brook pointed out that since the drug is a form of chemotherapy, it should only be prescribed by doctors who have experience with chemotherapeutic drugs. Because of the most severe toxic effects of AZT - cell depletion of the bone marrow - patients would need frequent blood transfusions. As it happened, AZT was rampantly prescribed as soon as it was released, way beyond its purported parameters. The worst-case scenario had come true: Doctors interviewed by the New York Times later in 1987 revealed that they were already giving AZT to healthy people who had tested positive for antibodies to HIV.  The FDA's function is to weigh a drug's efficacy against its potential hazards. The equation is simple and obvious: A drug must unquestionably repair more than it damages, otherwise the drug itself may cause more harm than the disease it is supposed to fight. Exactly what many doctors and scientists fear is happening with AZT.  AZT was singled out among hundreds of compounds when Dr. Sam Broder, the head of the National Cancer Institutes (NCI), found that it "inhibited HIV viral replication in vitro." AIDS is considered a condition of immune suppression caused by the HIV virus replicating and eating its way into T-4 cells, which are essential to the immune system. HIV is a retrovirus which contains an enzyme called reverse transcriptase that converts viral RNA to DNA. AZT was thought to work by interrupting this DNA synthesis, thus stopping further replication of the virus.  While it was always known that the drug was exceedingly toxic, the first study concluded that 'the risk/benefits ratio was in favour of the patient."  In the study that won FDA approval for AZT, the one fact that swayed the panel of judges was that the AZT group outlived the placebo group by what appeared to be a landslide. The ace card of the study, the one that cancelled out the issue of the drug's enormous toxicity, was that 19 persons had died in the placebo group and only one in the AZT group. The AZT recipients were also showing a lower incidence of opportunistic infections.  While the data staggered the panel that approved the drug, other scientists insisted that it meant nothing - because it was so shabbily gathered, and because of the unblinding. Shortly after the study was stopped, the death rate accelerated in the AZT group. "There was no great difference after a while," says Dr. Brook, "between the treated and the untreated group."  "That study was so sloppily done that it really didn't mean much," says Dr. Joseph Sonnabend, a leading New York City AIDS doctor.  Dr. Harvey Bialy, scientific editor of the journal Biotechnology, is stunned by the low quality of science surrounding AIDS research. When asked if he had seen any evidence of the claims made for AZT, that it "prolongs life" in AIDS patients, Bialy said, "No. I have not seen a published study that is rigorously done, analyzed and objectively reported."  Bialy, who is also a molecular biologist, is horrified by the widespread use of AZT, not just because it is toxic, but because, he insists, the claims its widespread use are based upon are false. "I can't see how this drug could be doing anything other than making people very sick," he says.  The scientific facts about AZT and AIDS are indeed astonishing. Most ironically, the drug has been found to accelerate the very process it was said to prevent: the loss of T-4 cells.  "Undeniably, AZT kills T-4 cells [white blood cells vital to the immune system]" says Bialy. "No one can argue with that. AZT is a chain-terminating nucleotide, which means that it stops DNA replication. It seeks out any cell that is engaged in DNA replication and kills it. The place where most of this replication is taking place is the bone marrow. That's why the most common and severe side effect of the drug is bone marrow toxicity. That is why they [patients] need blood transfusions."  AZT has been aggressively and repeatedly marketed as a drug that prolongs survival in AIDS patients because it stops the HIV virus from replicating and spreading to healthy cells. But, says Bialy: "There is no good evidence that HIV actively replicates in a person with AIDS, and if there's isn't much HIV replication in a person with AIDS, and if there isn't much HIV replication to stop, it's mostly killing healthy cells."  University of California at Berkeley scientist Dr. Peter Duesberg drew the same conclusion in a paper published in the Proceedings, the journal of the National Academy of Sciences. Duesberg, whose paper addressed his contention that HIV is not a sufficient cause for AIDS, wrote: "Even if HIV were to cause AIDS, it would hardly be legitimate target for AZT therapy, because in 70 to 100 percent of antibody positive persons, proviral DNA is not detectable... and its biosynthesis has never been observed."  As a chemotherapeutic drug, explained Duesberg, explained Duesberg, AZT "kills dividing blood cells and other cells," and is thus "directly immunosuppressive."  "The cell is almost a million-fold bigger target than the virus, so the cell will be much, much more sensitive," says Duesberg. "Only very few cells, about one in 10,000 are actively making the virus containing DNA, so you must kill incredibly large numbers of cells to inhibit the virus. This kind of treatment could only theoretically help if you have a massive infection, which is not the case with AIDS. Meanwhile, they're giving this drug that ends up killing millions of lymphocytes [white blood cells]. It's beyond me how that could possibly be beneficial."  "It doesn't really kill them," Burroughs Wellcome scientists Sandra Lehrman argues. "You don't necessarily have to destroy the cell, you can just change the function of it. Furthermore, while the early data said that the only very few cells were infected, new data says that there may be more cells infected. We have more sensitive detection techniques now."  "Changes their function? From what - functioning to not functioning? Another example of mediocre science," says Bialy. "The 'sensitive detection technique' to which Dr. Lehrman refers, PCR, is a notoriously unreliable one upon which to base quantitative conclusions."  When specific questions about the alleged mechanisms of AZT are asked, the answers are long, contradictory, and riddled with unknowns. Every scientific point raised about the drug is eventually answered with the blanket response, "The drug is not perfect, but it's all we have right now." About the depletion of T-4 cells and other white cells, Lehrman says, "We don't know why T-4 cells go up at first, and then go down. That is one of the drug mechanisms that we are trying to understand."  When promoters of AZT are pressed on key scientific points, whether at the NIH, FDA, Burroughs Wellcome or an AIDS organization, they often become angry. The idea that the drug is "doing something," even though this is invariably followed with irritable admissions that there are "mechanisms about the drug and disease we don't understand," is desperately clung to. It is as if, in the eye of the AIDS storm, the official, government-agency sanctioned position is immunized against critique. Skepticism and challenge, so essential to scientific endeavour, is not welcome in the AZT debate, where it is arguably needed more than anywhere else.  The toxic effects of AZT, particularly bone marrow suppression and anemia, are so severe that up to 50 percent of all AIDS and ARC patients cannot tolerate it and have to be taken off it. In the approval letter that Burroughs Wellcome sent to the FDA, all of 50 additional side effects of AZT, aside from the most common ones, were listed. These included: loss of mental acuity, muscle spasms, rectal bleeding and tremors.  Anemia one of AZT's common side effects, is the depletion of red blood cells, and according to Duesberg, "Red blood cells are the one thing you cannot do without. Without red cells, you cannot pick up oxygen."  Fred, a person with AIDS, was put on AZT and suffered such severe anemia from the drug he had to be taken off it. In an interview in the AIDS handbook Surviving and Thriving With AIDS, he described what anemia feels like to the editor Michael Callen: "I live in a studio and my bathroom is a mere five-step walk from my be. I would just lie there for two hours; I couldn't get up to take those five steps. When I was taken to the hospital, I had to have someone come over to dress me. It's that kind of severe fatigue... The quality of my life was pitiful... I've never felt so bad... I stopped the AZT and the mental confusion, the headaches, the pains in the neck, the nausea, all disappeared within a 24-hour period."  "I feel very good at this point," Fred went on. "I feel like the quality of my life was a disaster two weeks ago. And it really was causing a great amount of fear in me, to the point where I was taking sleeping pills to calm down. I was so worried. I would totally lose track of what I was saying in the middle of a sentence. I would lose my directions on the street."  "Many AIDS patients are anemic even before they receive the drug." Says Burroughs Wellcome's Dr. Lehrman, "because HIV itself can infect the bone marrow and cause anemia."  This argument betrays a bizarre reasoning. If AIDS patients are already burdened with the problems such as immune suppression, bone marrow toxicity and anemia, is compounding these problems an improvement?  "Yes AZT is a form of chemotherapy." Says the man who invented the compound a quarter-century ago, Jerome Horowitz. "It is cytotoxic, and as such, it causes bone marrow toxicity and anemia. There are problems with the drug. It's not perfect. But I don't think anybody would agree that AZT is of no use. People can holler from now until doomsday that it is toxic, but you have to go with the results."  The results, finally and ironically, are what damns AZT. Several studies on the clinical effects of AZT - including the one that Burroughs Wellcome's approval was based on - have drawn the same conclusion: that AZT is effective for a few months, but that its effect drops of sharply after that. Even the original AZT study showed that T-4 cells went up for a while and then plummeted. HIV levels went down, and then came back up. This fact was well-known when the advisory panel voted for approval. As panel member Dr. Stanley Lemon said in the meeting, "I am left with the nagging thought after seeing several of these slides, that after 16 to 24 weeks - 12 to 16 weeks, I guess - the effect seems to be declining."  A follow-up meeting, two years after the original Burroughs Wellcome study, was scheduled to discuss the long range effects of AZT, and the survival statistics. As one doctor present at that meeting in May 1988 recall, "They hadn't followed up the study. Anything that looked beneficial was gone within half a year. All they had were some survival statistics averaging 44 weeks. The p24 didn't pan out and there was no persistent improvement in the T-4 cells."  HIV levels in the blood are measured by an antigen called p24. Burroughs Wellcome made the claim that AZT lowered this level, that is, lowered the amount of HIV in the blood. At the first FDA meeting, Burroughs Wellcome emphasized how the drug had "lowered" the p24 levels; at the follow-up meeting, they didn't mention it.  As that meeting was winding down, Dr. Michael Lange, head of the AIDS program at St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital in New York, spoke up about this. "The claim of AZT is made on the fact that it is supposed to have an antiviral effect," he said to Burroughs Wellcome, "and on this we have seen no data at all... Since there is a report in the Lancet [a leading British medical journal] that after 20 weeks or so, in many patients p24 came back, do you have any data on that?"  They didn't.  "What counts is the bottom line," one of the scientists representing Burroughs Wellcome summed up, "the survival, the neurologic function, the absence of progression and the quality of life, all of which are better. Whether you call it better because of some antiviral effect, or some other antibacterial effect, they are still better."  Dr. Lange suggested that the drug may be effective the same way a simple anti-inflammatory, such as aspirin, is effective. An inexpensive, nontoxic drug called Indomecithin, he pointed out, might serve the same function, without the devastating side effects.  One leading AIDS researcher, who was part of the FDA approval process, says today: "Does AZT do anything? Yes, it does. But the evidence that it does something against HIV is really not there."  "There have always been drugs that we use without knowing exactly how they work," says Nobel Prize winner Walter Gilbert. "The really important thing to look at is the clinical effect. Is the drug helping or isn't it?"  "I'm living proof that AZT works," says one person with ARC on AZT. "I've been on it for two years now, and I'm certainly healthier than I was two years ago. It's not a cure-all, it's not a perfect drug, but it is effective. It's slowing down the progression of the disease."  "Sometimes I feel like swallowing Drano," says another. "I mean, sometimes I have problems swallowing. I just don't like the idea of taking something that foreign to my body. But every six hours, I've got to swallow it. Until something better comes along, this is what is available to me."  "I am absolutely convinced that people enjoy a better quality of life and survive longer who do not take AZT," says Gene Fedorko, President of Health Education AIDS Liaison (HEAL). "I think it's horrible the way people are bullied by their doctors to take the drug. We get people coming to us shaking and crying because their doctors said they'll die if they don't take AZT. That is an absolute lie." Fedorko has drawn his conclusion from years of listening to the stories of people struggling to survive AIDS at HEAL's weekly support group.  "I wouldn't take AZT if you paid me," says Michael Callen, cofounder of New York City's PWA coalition, Community Research Initiative, and editor of several AIDS journals. Callen has survived AIDS for over seven years without the help of AZT. "I've gotten the shit kicked out me for saying this, but I think using AZT is like aiming a thermonuclear warhead at a mosquito. The overwhelming majority of long-term survivors I've known have chosen not to take AZT."  The last surviving patient from the original AZT trial, according to Burroughs Wellcome, died recently. When he died, he had been on AZT for three and one-half years. He was the longest surviving AZT recipient. The longest surviving AIDS patient overall, not on AZT, has lived for eight and one-half years.  An informal study of long-term survivors of AIDS followed 24 long-term survivors, all of whom had survived AIDS more than six years. Only one of them had recently begun taking AZT.  In the early days, AZT was said to extend lives. In actual fact, there is simply no solid evidence that AZT prolongs life.  "I think AZT does prolong life in most people," says Dr. Bruce Montgomery of the State University of New York City at Stony Brook, who is completing a study on AZT. "There are not very many long-tern survivors, and we really don't know why they survive. It could be luck. But most people are not so lucky."  "AZT does seem to help many patients," says Dr. Bernard Bahari, a New York City AIDS physician and researcher, "but it's very hard to determine whether it actually prolongs life."  "Many of the patients I see choose not to take AZT," says Dr. Don Abrams of San Francisco General Hospital. "I've been impressed that survival and lifespan are increasing for all people with AIDS. I think it has a lot to do with aerosolized Pentamidine [a drug that treats pneumocystis carinii pneumonia]. There's also the so-called plague effect, the fact that people get stronger and stronger when a disease hits a population. The patients I see today are not as fragile as the early patients were."  "Whether you live or die with AIDS is a function of how well your doctor treats you, not of AZT," says Dr. Joseph Sonnabend, one of New York's City's first and most reputable AIDS doctor, whose patients include many long-term survivors, although he has never prescribed AZT. Sonnabend was one of the first to make the simple observation that AIDS patients should be treated for their diseases, not just for their HIV infection.  Several studies have concluded that AZT has no effect on the two most common opportunistic AIDS infections, Pneumocystic Carinii Pneumonia (PCP) and Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS). The overwhelming majority of AIDS patients die of PCP, for which there has been an effective treatment for decades. This year, the FDA finally approved aerosolized Pentamidine for AIDS. A recent Memorial Sloan Kettering study concluded the following: By 15 months, 80% of people on AZT not receiving Pentamidine had a recurring episode. "All those deaths in the AZT study were treatable," Sonnabend says. "They weren't deaths from AIDS, they were deaths from treatable conditions. They didn't even do autopsies for that study. What kind of faith can one have in these people?"  "If there's any resistance to AZT in the general public at all, it's within the gay community of New York," says the doctor close to the FDA approval, who asked to remain anonymous. "The rest of the country has been brainwashed into thinking this drug really does that much. The data has all been manipulated by people who have a lot vested in AZT."  "If AIDS were not the popular disease that it is - the money-making and career-making machine - these people could not get away with that kind of shoddy science," says Bialy. "In all of my years in science I have never seen anything this atrocious." When asked if he thought it was at all possible that people have been killed as a result of AZT poisoning rather then AIDS he answered: "It's more than possible."  August 17, 1989: The government has announced that 1.4 million healthy, HIV antibody-positive Americans could "benefit" from taking AZT, even though they show no symptoms of disease. New studies have "proven" that AZT is effective in stopping the progression of AIDS in asymptomatic and early ARC cases. Dr. Fauci, the head of NIH, proudly announced that a trial that has been going on for "two years" had "clearly shown" that early intervention will keep AIDS at bay. Anyone who has antibodies to HIV and less than 500 T-4 cells should start taking AZT at once, he said. That is approximately 650,000 people. 1.4 million Americans are assumed HIV antibody-positive, and eventually all of them may need to take AZT so they don't get sick, Fauci contended.  The leading newspapers didn't seem to think it unusual that there was no existing copy of the study, but rather a breezy two-pages press release from the NIH. When SPIN called the NIH asking for a copy of the study, we were told that it was "still being written." We asked a few questions about the numbers. According to the press release, 3,200 early AARC and asymptomatic patients were devided into two groups, one AZT and one placebo, and followed for two years. The two groups were distinguished by T-4 cell counts; one group had less than 500, the other more than 500. These two were then divided into three groups each: high-dose AZT, low-dose AZT, and placebo. In the group with more than 500 T-4 cells, AZT had no effect. In the other group, it was concluded that low-dose AZT was the most effective, followed by high-dose. All in all, 36 out of 900 developed AIDS in the two AZT groups combined, and 38 out of 450 in the placebo group. "HIV-positive patients are twice as likely to get AIDS if they don't take AZT," the press declared.  However, the figures are vastly misleading. When we asked how many patients were actually enrolled for a full two years, the NIH said they did not know, but that the average time of participation was one year, not two.  "It's terribly dishonest the way they portrayed those numbers," says Dr. Sonnabend. "If there were 60 people in the trial those numbers would mean something, but if you calculate what the percentage is out of 3,200, the difference becomes minute between the two groups. It's nothing. It's hit or miss, and they make it look like it's terribly significant."  The study boasted that AZT is much more effective and less toxic at one-third the dosage than has been used for three years. That's the good news. The bad news is that thousands have already been walloped with 1,500 milligrams of AZT and possibly even died of toxic poisoning - and now we're hearing that one third of the dose would have done?  With all that remains so uncertain about the effects of AZT, it seems criminal to advocate expanding its usage to healthy people, particularly since only a minuscule percentage of the HIV-infected population have actually developed ARC or AIDS.  Burroughs Wellcome has already launched testing of AZT in asymptomatic hospital workers, pregnant women, and in children, who are getting liquid AZT. The liquid is left over from an aborted trial, and given to the children because they can mix it with water - children don't like to swallow pills. It has also been proposed that AZT be given to people who do not yet even test positive for HIV antibodies, but are "at risk."  "I'm convinced that if you gave AZT to a perfectly healthy athlete," says Fedorko, "he would be dead in five years."  In December 1988, the Lancet published a study that Burroughs Wellcome and the NIH do not include in their press kits. It was more expansive than the original AZT study and followed patients longer. It was not conducted in the United States, but in France, at the Claude Bernard Hospital in Paris, and concluded the same thing about AZT that Burroughs Wellcome's study did, except Burroughs Wellcome called their results "overwhelmingly positive," and the French doctors called theirs "disappointing." The French study found, once again, that AZT was too toxic for most to tolerate, had no lasting effect on HIV blood levels, and left the patients with fewer T-4 cells than they started with. Although they noticed a clinical improvement at first, they concluded that "by six months, these values had returned to their pretreatment levels and several opportunistic infections, malignancies and deaths occurred."  "Thus the benefits of AZT are limited to a few months for ARC and AIDS patients," the Fench team concluded. After a few months, the study found, AZT was completely ineffective.  The news that AZT will soon be prescribed to asymptomatic people has left many leading AIDS doctors dumbfounded and furious. Every doctor and scientist I asked felt that it was highly unprofessional and reckless to announce a study with no data to look at, making recommendations with such drastic public health implications. "This simply does not happen," says Bialy. "The government is reporting scientific facts before they've been reviewed? It's unheard of."  "It's beyond belief," says Dr. Sonnabend in a voice tinged with desperation. "I don't know what to do. I have to go in and face an office full of patients asking for AZT. I'm terrified. I don't know what to do as a responsible physician. The first study was ridiculous. Margaret Fishl, who has done both of these studies, obviously doesn't know the first thing about clinical trials. I don't trust her. Or the others. They're simply not good enough. We're being held hostage by second-rate scientists. We let them get away with the first disaster; now they're doing it again."  "It's a momentous decision to say to people, 'if you're HIV-positive and your T4-cells are below 500 start taking AZT,'" says the doctor who wished to remain anonymous. "I know dozens of people that I've seen personally every few months for several years now who have been in that state for more than five years, and have not progressed to any disease."  "I'm ashamed of my colleagues," Sonnabend laments. "I'm embarrassed. This is such shoddy science it's hard to believe nobody is protesting. Damned cowards. The name of the game is protect your grants, don't open your mouth. It's all about money... it's grounds for just following the party line and not being critical, when there are obviously financial and political forces that are driving this."  When Duesberg heard the latest announcement, he was particularly stunned over the reaction of Gay Men's Health Crisis President Richard Dunne, who said that GMHC now urged "everybody to get tested," and of course those who test positive to go on AZT. "These people are running into the gas chambers," says Duesberg. "Himmler would have been so happy if only the Jews were this cooperative." 

What Are You Sporting About?
Ep. #68 –Shikha Tandon–Fmr. Olympian turned biotech & chemist on implementing athleticism in her career with Protector of Athletes™

What Are You Sporting About?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 25:10


Shikha TandonShikha Tandon is currently the Director of Partnerships, Silicon Valley Exercise Analytics (SVEXA), and also serves on the Board of Directors for a non-profit organization, Bridges of Sports. She is an Olympian swimmer (represented India at the 2004 Athens Olympics), Arjuna Awardee, and won 37 International medals for India, 146 National medals, and created 75 National Records. Shikha holds a Master of Science in Biology, Master of Science in Biotechnology, and Bachelor of Science in Biotechnology, Genetics, Biochemistry. In her professional career, she has combined her academic knowledge with athletic experiences to work as the Science Program Lead at the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA), as well as various fitness wearable and technology companies.Connect with Shikha on Instagram, Twitter About Sivonnia DeBarrosSivonnia DeBarros – the Protector of Athletes – is a first-generation lawyer and law business owner, woman in business and a former track and field Division-I College athlete. DeBarros is passionate about helping athletes in business protect their brands through collaborative partnerships, education and support necessary to carry them to the next level. DeBarros's practice areas are Business, Employment, Sports, and Entertainment. Learn more about her services at www.prosportlawyer.com and www.sldebarros.com.

Business Innovators Radio
Ep. #68 –Shikha Tandon–Fmr. Olympian turned biotech & chemist on implementing athleticism in her career with Protector of Athletes™

Business Innovators Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 25:10


Shikha TandonShikha Tandon is currently the Director of Partnerships, Silicon Valley Exercise Analytics (SVEXA), and also serves on the Board of Directors for a non-profit organization, Bridges of Sports. She is an Olympian swimmer (represented India at the 2004 Athens Olympics), Arjuna Awardee, and won 37 International medals for India, 146 National medals, and created 75 National Records. Shikha holds a Master of Science in Biology, Master of Science in Biotechnology, and Bachelor of Science in Biotechnology, Genetics, Biochemistry. In her professional career, she has combined her academic knowledge with athletic experiences to work as the Science Program Lead at the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA), as well as various fitness wearable and technology companies.Connect with Shikha on Instagram, Twitter About Sivonnia DeBarrosSivonnia DeBarros – the Protector of Athletes – is a first-generation lawyer and law business owner, woman in business and a former track and field Division-I College athlete. DeBarros is passionate about helping athletes in business protect their brands through collaborative partnerships, education and support necessary to carry them to the next level. DeBarros's practice areas are Business, Employment, Sports, and Entertainment. Learn more about her services at www.prosportlawyer.com and www.sldebarros.com.What Are You Sporting About?https://businessinnovatorsradio.com/what-are-you-sporting-about/Source: https://businessinnovatorsradio.com/ep-68-shikha-tandon-fmr-olympian-turned-biotech-chemist-on-implementing-athleticism-in-her-career-with-protector-of-athletes

Dr. GPCR Podcast
#53 with Dr. Timo De Groof

Dr. GPCR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 56:37


About Dr. Timo De Groof Dr. Timo De Groof studied Biochemistry and Biotechnology at the University of Ghent where he graduated in 2015. During his master's studies, he specialized in Biomedical Biotechnology and Structural Biology/Biochemistry. During his last year of studies, Timo performed research in the biopharmaceutical company Argen x and gained experience in the identification and characterization of llama-derived antibodies in inflammatory diseases and oncology. From 2015 to 2019, he completed his Ph.D. in the Medicinal Chemistry group at VU University Amsterdam under the supervision of prof. dr. Martine Smit. During his Ph.D., Timo, together with Dr. Raimond Heukers, developed a nanobody platform within the research group and used this platform to develop nanobodies targeting viral G protein-coupled receptors with a special focus on the human cytomegalovirus-encoded chemokine receptor US28. During his Ph.D., he used these nanobodies as research tools, to investigate different GPCR conformations, while also focusing on their therapeutic potential in oncology and transplant infectious disease. Starting from September 2019, Timo started working as a postdoctoral researcher at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel in the In Vivo Cellular and Molecular Imaging (ICMI) group that is focused on translational/clinical applications of nanobodies. He currently is focusing on the development of nanobody-based immunotracers as part of the IMI/EFPIA project entitled "Immune Image". Moreover, he is closely involved in multiple projects where he focuses on the generation of nanobodies against "difficult-to-target" proteins. In the near future, Timo hopes to combine his previous GPCR experience with his current focus to set up his own research line focusing on translational applications of GPCR-targeting nanobodies. ------------------------------------------- Imagine a world in which the vast majority of us are healthy. The #DrGPCR Ecosystem is all about dynamic interactions between us who are working towards exploiting the druggability of #GPCR's. We aspire to provide opportunities to connect, share, form trusting partnerships, grow, and thrive together. To build our #GPCR Ecosystem, we created various enabling outlets. For more details, visit our website http://www.DrGPCR.com/Ecosystem/ ------------------------------------------- Are you a #GPCR professional? - Register to become a Virtual Cafe speaker http://www.drgpcr.com/virtual-cafe/ - Subscribe to our Monthly Newsletter http://www.drgpcr.com/newsletter/ - Listen and subscribe to #DrGPCR Podcasts http://www.drgpcr.com/podcast/ - Support #DrGPCR Ecosystem with your Donation. http://www.drgpcr.com/sponsors/ - Reserve your spots for the next #DrGPCR Virtual Cafe http://www.drgpcr.com/virtual-cafe/

GES Center Lectures, NC State University
#9 – Doria Gordon and Greg Jaffe – NGO perspective on governance of gene editing

GES Center Lectures, NC State University

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 53:17


Genetic Engineering and Society Center GES Colloquium - Tuesdays 12-1PM (via Zoom) NC State University | http://go.ncsu.edu/ges-colloquium GES Mediasite - See videos, full abstracts, speaker bios, and slides https://go.ncsu.edu/ges-mediasite Twitter - https://twitter.com/GESCenterNCSU NGO perspective on governance of gene editing Dr. Doria Gordon, Lead Senior Scientist at Environmental Defense Fund, and Gregory Jaffe, JD, Director of the Project on Biotechnology at Center for Science in the Public Interest www.edf.org/people/doria-gordon | cspinet.org/biography/gregory-jaffe and @JaffeGregory This talk will describe six principles for the proper governance of gene editing, addressing issues such as transparency, stakeholder engagement, government oversight, and voluntary stewardship, that were adopted by six US non-governmental organizations. Abstract Biotechnology, which includes gene editing and other technologies, has the potential to address urgent food security, environmental, and human health dilemmas. However, these technologies also raise potential for societal concerns, environmental and health risks, and conflicts with cultural and spiritual values. Previous experience with the introduction of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) into the food system have in some instances resulted in public mistrust, underscoring the need for more transparency, better governance, and oversight of these technologies when they are deployed. To address these potential concerns, representatives of six conservation and consumer non-governmental organizations developed six principles for responsible governance of gene editing in agriculture and the environment, which were published in an August 2021 article of Nature Biotechnology. This webinar will present the principles and invite questions and discussion on both the principles and possible next steps for implementation. Related links: https://www.keystone.org/our-work/emerging-genetic-technologies/ngoroundtable/ Speaker Bios Dr. Doria Gordon is a Lead Senior Scientist in the Office of the Chief Scientist at Environmental Defense Fund, with a focus on ecosystems. Prior to EDF, she spent 25 years working in science, conservation, and management for The Nature Conservancy in Florida. Dr. Gordon is also a Courtesy Professor of Biology at the University of Florida and a Research Associate at Archbold Biological Station. Her current research focuses on the scale and measurement of net carbon sequestration in natural and agricultural systems. She also works on governance of genetically engineered organisms in agriculture and the environment, and risk assessment for invasiveness in plant species. Dr. Gordon completed a M.S. and Ph.D. in Ecology at the University of California at Davis following an undergraduate degree in Biology and Environmental Studies at Oberlin College. Gregory Jaffe is the Director of the Project on Biotechnology for CSPI. Jaffe came to CSPI after serving as a Trial Attorney for the U.S. Department of Justice's Environmental and Natural Resources Division and as Senior Counsel with the U.S. EPA, Air Enforcement Division. He is a recognized international expert on agricultural biotechnology and biosafety and works on biosafety regulatory issues in the U.S. and throughout the world. He was a member of the Secretary of Agriculture's Advisory Committee on Agricultural Biotechnology and 21st Century Agriculture from 2003-2008 and was reappointed to a new term in 2011. He was also a member of FDA's Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee from 2004-2008. In addition, he provides biosafety expertise to the International Food Policy Research Institute and Cornell University's Alliance for Science. Jaffe earned his BA with High Honors from Wesleyan University in Biology and Government and then received a law degree from Harvard Law School. GES Center - Integrating scientific knowledge & diverse public values in shaping the futures of biotechnology. Find out more at https://ges-center-lectures-ncsu.pinecast.co

I AM BIO
"Nothing to Lose": Patients Fight to Be Heard

I AM BIO

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 34:02


Today we have two powerful stories. Each one is as different as the disease that it's about. Yet there is a common thread: patients want and need to be heard. You will hear from a mom who will do whatever it takes to save her son's life.  And you will learn about a young woman who is fighting for herself and her underserved patient community.  Guests:Amber Freed, SLC6A1 ConnectMelodie Blackwell, COCCI

The Mushroom Hour Podcast
Ep. 100: Mycoworks - Mycelium Leather, Reishi & the Future of Fashion (feat. Phil Ross)

The Mushroom Hour Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 107:15


Today on Mushroom Hour we have the privilege of interviewing Phil Ross of MycoWorks. A pioneer in cultivating living materials for art and design, Phil began using mycelium in the 1990s as a medium for sculpture. Almost three decades on, Phil and his team of artists are now complemented by engineers, biologists, production specialists and material scientists in bringing the first Fine Mycelium™ material, Reishi™, to the world. Anyone who sees his work or hears him speak, can't help but have their mind set alight by a spark of inspiration. Phil is one of those unique individuals who can take something ancient, like fungi, and derive novel uses for it that not only shift how we see fungi, unlock new ideas and new fields of discovery, but really expand humanity's entire “realm of the possible”. His lifetime of work with mycelium hints at the vast ocean of infinite opportunities that await humanity as we explore kingdom fungi.    TOPICS COVERED:   Cooking as a Primer on the Practicum of Biotechnology  Push and Pull of Tropisms  Fungi as a Cypher to Understand Nature  From Forests to Graffiti - Learning to “Read” the Environment  Polypore Inspirations for Reishi™ Fine Mycelium Leather Products  Indigenous Use of Mycelium Leather  Medicinal Qualities of Reishi Mushrooms  Cultural Responses to the Gross and the Grotesque  Fashion as a Means of Communication  How MycoWorks Creates Reishi™ Fine Mycelium Leather  Mycelium Sheet Polymer & Leathercraft Learning Curves  Scaling Up to the Future of MycoWorks  The Transformation of Phil Ross  Future of Mycelium Materials   EPISODE RESOURCES:   Mycoworks website: https://www.mycoworks.com/  Mycoworks IG: https://www.instagram.com/mycoworks/  Louis Pasteur: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_Pasteur  Claude Levi-Strauss "The Raw and the Cooked": https://www.amazon.com/Raw-Cooked-Mythologiques-Claude-L%C3%A9vi-Strauss/dp/0226474879  Rudy Rucker "Ware Tetralogy": https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ware_TetralogyCarl Woese: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Woese  Susan Oyama "Evolution's Eye": https://www.amazon.com/Evolutions-Eye-Systems-Biology-Culture-Cultural/dp/0822324725  Ganoderma lucidum (fungus): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ganoderma_lucidum   Lenzites betulina (fungus): https://www.mushroomexpert.com/lenzites_betulina.html

The Bull & The Bear
Biotech ETF Showdown (IDNA vs. ARKG vs. BBH)

The Bull & The Bear

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 12:22


Biotechnology can make a positive difference in everyone's lives. From cancer to the common cold, biotech companies have become instrumental in helping understand the ailments that have mystified the medical community for decades. Biotech companies work hard to study diseases and, more importantly, find treatments and cures for them. The biotechnology sector of the market started getting headlines as companies scrambled to find a solution to the COVID-19 pandemic. My research shows a growing trend in the sector that can earn investors sizable profits in the years to come. Plus, chief investment strategist Adam O'Dell considers biotech to be the next big wave in the stock market. In this episode of The Bull & The Bear, I tell you about the biotech sector and explain the best way to invest in this growing trend moving forward. Be sure to subscribe to our https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCt9RDMMAOPBAIWODmDGactQ?sub_confirmation=1 (YouTube channel) for more videos like my weekly Marijuana Market Update. Have something you want us to talk about? Email thebullandthebear@moneyandmarkets.com and give us your thoughts. Check out https://moneyandmarkets.com/ (moneyandmarkets.com), and sign up for our free newsletters that deliver you the most important and unbiased financial news, commentary, and actionable advice. Also, follow us on: https://www.facebook.com/moneyandmarkets (Facebook) https://twitter.com/TheMoneyMarkets (Twitter) https://www.linkedin.com/company/money-and-markets (LinkedIn)

I AM BIO
Escaping the Food Allergy Prison

I AM BIO

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 29:35


Every three minutes in the United States, an allergic reaction to foods sends someone to the emergency room. Today, we explore what life is like when you must avoid certain foods. But we also learn that there is hope for an escape from the food prison. Researchers like Clemson University's Sachin Rustgi are using cutting-edge genetic engineering tools to make foods safer for those living with allergies and food sensitivities.   Guests:Sachin Rustgi, Clemson UniversityLisa Gable, FAREEmily Brown, Food Equality Initiative