Podcasts about autonomous

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard

Capacity for independence, control, discretion or political self-governance

  • 1,619PODCASTS
  • 3,581EPISODES
  • 35mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • May 25, 2022LATEST
autonomous

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about autonomous

Show all podcasts related to autonomous

Latest podcast episodes about autonomous

Winning In Asia: A ZoZo Go Podcast
Audi e-tron: German Engineering Meets Batteries and Software. Audi e-tron Owners Ruth & Ken Wilcox Tell All.

Winning In Asia: A ZoZo Go Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 47:01


San Francisco resident Ruth Wilcox decided to buy her first pure electric vehicle in 2020. She looked at a few different brands, including Tesla, but eventually decided to purchase an Audi e-tron. What made her elect the Audi over the others? And two years later, what have been the highs and lows of ownership? What about charging? And what are some of the quality issues Audi engineers need to address? Joining the conversation is Ken Wilcox, Ruth's husband. Ken loves his gasoline-powered Audi TTs. Ken finds that electric cars are lacking when it comes to the emotional joys of driving and shifting gears in a car powered by an engine that you can feel and hear. Ruth confesses to missing her beloved Saab, too. You will really enjoy the point-counterpoint (he-said-she-said) flow of our conversation this week on the Driving With Dunne podcast. #DrivingWithDunne / #ZozoGo https://twitter.com/Dunne_ZoZoGohttps://www.instagram.com/zo.zo.go/?hl=enhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/michael-dunne-a696901a/

Wheel Bearings
The Porter Wins

Wheel Bearings

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022


We’ve had a quite a variety of vehicles to drive in the past week. Robbie went all the way to Germany to drive the new BMW iX M60 from Munich to Lake Como in Italy. Nicole has been juggling Hyundais with a Sonata N-Line sedan at home and most of the brand’s electrified lineup in… Read More »The Porter Wins

The Catchup
Are EVs really just a fad?

The Catchup

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 50:55


This week, Daniel Garrett submitted our topic: Are EVs the true driver's test? Or, are they just a trendy fad? Our answer lies somewhere in between. What if instead of a trend, the answer is simple: a stopgap. Maybe EVs are just a trendy holdover until something more fuel efficient and environmentally friendly comes along. And while there's no doubt all of us will have to adjust to this brave new car world... maybe what's to come includes a resurgence of gas powered vehicles (this time with renewable fuel). Or, maybe it's new hybrids or hydrogen-powered vehicles we're driving around. Or maybe, we're not even driving at all!But before all of that, we get distracted by the futuristic rabbit hole that is Elon Musk. His latest endeavors seem to grow ever more head scratching. Why is it that the man who once said AI would be the downfall of human existence...is now working on a humanoid AI, with prototypes due later this year! What does the world stand to gain from this technology? Why is there an arms race toward this brave new future? And why is it so important that Elon Musk wants to keep these AI from talking to each other? There's a whole lot to discuss, and we get into all of it!Follow us:FacebookInstagramYouTubeOfficial WebsiteEmail us: TheCatchupCast@Gmail.comSupport the show

Sleep Whispers
299 Fade Out: Guided Imagery – Dinner Menu with Stuffed Lamb

Sleep Whispers

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 30:09


Enjoy another Tuck In & Fade Out episode featuring; A Guided Relaxation followed by a Guided Imagery of the preparation of a multi-course dinner menu with Stuffed Lamb. Try the podcast, The Fantastic History of Food: https://www.foodhistorypodcast.com/ Try my new podcast, Calm History on [Apple] or [Spotify] or [Android] Explore ALL of my podcasts: www.silkpodcasts.com Try FREE access to … Continue reading 299 Fade Out: Guided Imagery – Dinner Menu with Stuffed Lamb

The Tech Guy (MP3)
Leo Laporte - The Tech Guy: 1896

The Tech Guy (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 153:21


The Department of Justice is no longer prosecuting security researchers. Good password management when dealing with patient portals. Autonomous vs. traditional automotive vehicles. Why your video & audio is off sync sometimes while streaming video content? Is the idea of search engines broken? RAW vs JPEG images. Troubleshooting a computer. What is "powerwashing"? Plus, conversations with Sam Abuelsamid and Chris Marquardt. DOJ no longer prosecuting security researchers! Huzzah! NY Attorney General's Office launched an investigation into Twitch and Discord in connection to the mass shooting in Buffalo. Proper security through a Patient Portal for medical needs? Sam Abuelsamid and the 'Elon Musk Crash Course' documentary. Autonomous vs. traditional vehicles. Why is a TV sound & picture sync while streaming is off at times? What could be causing your streaming content to buffer constantly? Is the idea of "searching" in a search engine broken? Chris Marquardt and Focus & Bokeh. Working with RAW images vs JPEG. What are the benefits to "cookies"? Is your Windows PC dying? What are some signs that it may be time to replace it? Why a computer monitor or TV may not be connecting to your computer. What to know about "powerwashing" a Chromebook. Does a caller need both Frontier Communications & Dish network or can they ditch one of them? Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid and Chris Marquardt Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Show notes and links for this episode are available at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy/episodes/1896 Download or subscribe to this show at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy Sponsors: onepeloton.com go.acronis.com/techguy

The Tech Guy (Video HI)
Leo Laporte - The Tech Guy: 1896

The Tech Guy (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 154:04


The Department of Justice is no longer prosecuting security researchers. Good password management when dealing with patient portals. Autonomous vs. traditional automotive vehicles. Why your video & audio is off sync sometimes while streaming video content? Is the idea of search engines broken? RAW vs JPEG images. Troubleshooting a computer. What is "powerwashing"? Plus, conversations with Sam Abuelsamid and Chris Marquardt. DOJ no longer prosecuting security researchers! Huzzah! NY Attorney General's Office launched an investigation into Twitch and Discord in connection to the mass shooting in Buffalo. Proper security through a Patient Portal for medical needs? Sam Abuelsamid and the 'Elon Musk Crash Course' documentary. Autonomous vs. traditional vehicles. Why is a TV sound & picture sync while streaming is off at times? What could be causing your streaming content to buffer constantly? Is the idea of "searching" in a search engine broken? Chris Marquardt and Focus & Bokeh. Working with RAW images vs JPEG. What are the benefits to "cookies"? Is your Windows PC dying? What are some signs that it may be time to replace it? Why a computer monitor or TV may not be connecting to your computer. What to know about "powerwashing" a Chromebook. Does a caller need both Frontier Communications & Dish network or can they ditch one of them? Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid and Chris Marquardt Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Show notes and links for this episode are available at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy/episodes/1896 Download or subscribe to this show at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy Sponsors: onepeloton.com go.acronis.com/techguy

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)
The Tech Guy 1896

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 154:04


The Department of Justice is no longer prosecuting security researchers. Good password management when dealing with patient portals. Autonomous vs. traditional automotive vehicles. Why your video & audio is off sync sometimes while streaming video content? Is the idea of search engines broken? RAW vs JPEG images. Troubleshooting a computer. What is "powerwashing"? Plus, conversations with Sam Abuelsamid and Chris Marquardt. DOJ no longer prosecuting security researchers! Huzzah! NY Attorney General's Office launched an investigation into Twitch and Discord in connection to the mass shooting in Buffalo. Proper security through a Patient Portal for medical needs? Sam Abuelsamid and the 'Elon Musk Crash Course' documentary. Autonomous vs. traditional vehicles. Why is a TV sound & picture sync while streaming is off at times? What could be causing your streaming content to buffer constantly? Is the idea of "searching" in a search engine broken? Chris Marquardt and Focus & Bokeh. Working with RAW images vs JPEG. What are the benefits to "cookies"? Is your Windows PC dying? What are some signs that it may be time to replace it? Why a computer monitor or TV may not be connecting to your computer. What to know about "powerwashing" a Chromebook. Does a caller need both Frontier Communications & Dish network or can they ditch one of them? Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid and Chris Marquardt Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Show notes and links for this episode are available at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy/episodes/1896 Download or subscribe to this show at: https://twit.tv/shows/all-twittv-shows Sponsors: onepeloton.com go.acronis.com/techguy

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
The Tech Guy 1896

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 153:21


The Department of Justice is no longer prosecuting security researchers. Good password management when dealing with patient portals. Autonomous vs. traditional automotive vehicles. Why your video & audio is off sync sometimes while streaming video content? Is the idea of search engines broken? RAW vs JPEG images. Troubleshooting a computer. What is "powerwashing"? Plus, conversations with Sam Abuelsamid and Chris Marquardt. DOJ no longer prosecuting security researchers! Huzzah! NY Attorney General's Office launched an investigation into Twitch and Discord in connection to the mass shooting in Buffalo. Proper security through a Patient Portal for medical needs? Sam Abuelsamid and the 'Elon Musk Crash Course' documentary. Autonomous vs. traditional vehicles. Why is a TV sound & picture sync while streaming is off at times? What could be causing your streaming content to buffer constantly? Is the idea of "searching" in a search engine broken? Chris Marquardt and Focus & Bokeh. Working with RAW images vs JPEG. What are the benefits to "cookies"? Is your Windows PC dying? What are some signs that it may be time to replace it? Why a computer monitor or TV may not be connecting to your computer. What to know about "powerwashing" a Chromebook. Does a caller need both Frontier Communications & Dish network or can they ditch one of them? Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid and Chris Marquardt Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Show notes and links for this episode are available at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy/episodes/1896 Download or subscribe to this show at: https://twit.tv/shows/all-twittv-shows Sponsors: onepeloton.com go.acronis.com/techguy

Radio Leo (Audio)
The Tech Guy 1896

Radio Leo (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 153:21


The Department of Justice is no longer prosecuting security researchers. Good password management when dealing with patient portals. Autonomous vs. traditional automotive vehicles. Why your video & audio is off sync sometimes while streaming video content? Is the idea of search engines broken? RAW vs JPEG images. Troubleshooting a computer. What is "powerwashing"? Plus, conversations with Sam Abuelsamid and Chris Marquardt. DOJ no longer prosecuting security researchers! Huzzah! NY Attorney General's Office launched an investigation into Twitch and Discord in connection to the mass shooting in Buffalo. Proper security through a Patient Portal for medical needs? Sam Abuelsamid and the 'Elon Musk Crash Course' documentary. Autonomous vs. traditional vehicles. Why is a TV sound & picture sync while streaming is off at times? What could be causing your streaming content to buffer constantly? Is the idea of "searching" in a search engine broken? Chris Marquardt and Focus & Bokeh. Working with RAW images vs JPEG. What are the benefits to "cookies"? Is your Windows PC dying? What are some signs that it may be time to replace it? Why a computer monitor or TV may not be connecting to your computer. What to know about "powerwashing" a Chromebook. Does a caller need both Frontier Communications & Dish network or can they ditch one of them? Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid and Chris Marquardt Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Show notes and links for this episode are available at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy/episodes/1896 Download or subscribe to this show at: https://twit.tv/shows/radio-leo Sponsors: onepeloton.com go.acronis.com/techguy

The Tech Humanist Show
Does the Future of Work Mean More Agency for Workers?

The Tech Humanist Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 33:07


This week, we look at a few of the macro trends shaping both the labor market today and the future of work — such as the Great Resignation and collective bargaining — and examine how tech-driven business has both brought them about and potentially given workers more freedom and leverage. We also consider what all of that means for you if you're the one tasked with managing workers or leading a workplace forward, as well as what these trends might mean overall for humanity. Guests this week include Giselle Mota, Christopher Mims, Dr. Rumman Chowdhury, Dorothea Baur, John C. Havens, and Vanessa Mason. The Tech Humanist Show is a multi-media-format program exploring how data and technology shape the human experience. Hosted by Kate O'Neill. To watch full interviews with past and future guests, or for updates on what Kate O'Neill is doing next, subscribe to The Tech Humanist Show hosted by Kate O'Neill channel on YouTube. Full Transcript: Kate: The global workforce is experiencing an unprecedented level of change. The Great Resignation may look like a direct result of the COVID Pandemic, but the drivers behind this large-scale trend come from deep-rooted and centuries-old issues in employer-employee dynamics that have been amplified by evolving technology. So in this episode, we're exploring the lessons we've learned from the technologization — the impact of technology on work, as well as how the changing work landscape is pushing people to crave and demand more agency over our work and our lives. I recently had the opportunity to speak with Giselle Mota, Principal Consultant on the Future of Work at ADP, who offered some insight into the emotional human factor behind these changes. Giselle: “I think it's more about us realizing that work is not all that we are. Some people have left their very high-paying roles because they had stress about it, or because they need to be at home caregiving, or now they have issues with their own healthcare or mental health that came up, and they're prioritizing self over this idea of ‘I live to work I live to work I live to work,' right? The value system of humanity globally has shifted a lot, and people have been reassessing, ‘how do I want to spend my time?' ‘How do I want to live my life?' Work should not be driving all of that, our lives should be driving work experience. The ability to think about choosing when you're gonna work, ability to work from different places, how long is my work week, can I come in and out of my shifts throughout the day, can I work on projects, can I destructure and break down what work is and work at it my way? I think that's what we've been seeing.” Kate: Before we can fully understand why this is happening, we have to look at where we are and how we got here. Trends like the Great Resignation follow many years of jobs being automated or shipped overseas. Fewer people are needed to fill the remaining roles, so demand for workers in certain markets is disappearing, while in other markets, the supply of workers for a given job is so high that people aren't paid a living wage. With the rise of the ‘gig economy,' it's becoming less clear what level of education is needed to attain a well-paying job that will still be around in 5 years. Not that this is an entirely new phenomenon. Since at least the dawn of the industrial era, automation caused certain jobs to go out of favor while other jobs sprang up to fill the void. In the 21st century, with the advent of the Internet, algorithms, and ‘big data,' this cycle has been significantly accelerated. More jobs have been “optimized” by technology to prioritize maximum efficiency over human well-being, which is part of what's causing—as I talked about in our last episode—a global mental health crisis. And while the overview sounds bad, there is good news. As long as we can stay open-minded to change, we can work together to design solutions that work for everyone. And if we can do that, the future of work has the potential to be much brighter than the realities of today. To get there, we have to ask ourselves, what assumptions were made in the past to create the modern work environment, and which of those no longer serve us? Rahaf: “If we're gonna move to a more humane productivity mindset, we have to have some uncomfortable conversations about the role of work in our lives, the link between our identity and our jobs and our self-worth, our need for validation with social media and professional recognition, our egos…” Kate: That's Rahaf Harfoush, a Strategist, Digital Anthropologist, and Best-Selling Author who focuses on the intersections between emerging technology, innovation, and digital culture. You may have heard the extended version of this quote in our last episode, but her insight into how questioning our assumptions about work is playing into the changing work landscape felt equally relevant here. Rahaf: “We really have to talk about, ‘growing up, what did your parents teach you about work ethic?' how is that related to how you see yourself? Who are the people that you admire? You can start testing your relationship with work, and you start to see that we have built a relationship with work psychologically where we feel like if we don't work hard enough, we're not deserving. We don't ever stop and say, ‘does this belief actually allow me to produce my best possible work, or is it just pushing me to a point where I'm exhausted and burnt out?” Kate: Outside of our own personal assumptions about our relationship with work, there's also the relationship businesses and technology have with us as consumers, and how their assumptions about what we want are equally problematic. John: “I've read a lot of media, where there's a lot of assumptions that I would call, if not arrogant, certainly dismissive, if not wildly rude… You'll read an article that's like, ‘This machine does X, it shovels! Because no one wants to shovel for a living'!” Kate: That's John C. Havens, Executive Director of the IEEE Global Initiative on Ethics of Autonomous and Intelligent Systems. Here he's talking about the current belief held by a lot of the people creating modern technologies that everything can be automated, no matter the cost. John: “We've all done jobs that, elements of it you really don't like and wish could be automated, but usually that's because you do the job long enough to realize, this part of my job I wish could be automated. I've done a lot of, y'know, camp counseling jobs for the summer where I was outside, y'know I was doing physical labor… it was awesome! That said, you know, I was like, ‘this is great for what it was, I kind of don't want to do this for my whole life.' Yeah, a lot of people would not be like, ‘give me 40 years of shoveling!' But the other thing there that I really get upset about when I read some of those articles is what if, whatever the job is, insert job X, is how someone makes their living? Then it's not just a value judgment of the nature of the labor itself, but is saying, from the economic side of it, it's justified to automate anything that can be automated, because someone can make money from it outside of what that person does to make money for them and their family. We have to have a discussion about, y'know, which jobs might go away. Why is that not brought up? It's because there's the assumption, at all times, that the main indicator of success is exponential growth. And a lot of my work is to say, I don't think that's true.” In many ways, our society has failed to question the assumption ‘if something can be automated, automate it.' But as the great Ian Malcolm said in Jurassic Park, “your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn't stop to think if they should.” While automation of jobs is frequently thought of in a manufacturing context, more and more we're seeing automating creep into other areas as well, like decision-making and workplace management. The same factories where machines are replacing physical human labor have now been optimized to replace human thought labor and managers as well. Christopher Mims, tech columnist at the Wall Street Journal and author of Arriving Today, on how everything gets from the factory to our front door, calls this phenomenon “Bezosism.” Christopher: “Bezosism, it's like the modern-day version of Taylorism or Fordism… the bottom line is, this is how you optimize the repetitive work that people do. This isn't just Amazon, Amazon is just the tip of the sphere. Amazon is the best at doing this, but every other company that can is trying to do the same thing: make workers more productive by managing them with software and algorithms, kind of whatever the consequence is. Emily Gindelsberger talks about how, whether it's an Amazon warehouse, or any fast-food restaurant you can name, or a call center… all of these places are now managed by algorithm, and the workers are monitored by software. Instead of a boss telling them to work faster, it's the software cracking the whip and being like, ‘you're not working fast enough, you need to pick packages faster' in this Amazon warehouse, or ‘you need to flip burgers faster' if you work at a McDonald's. But this is becoming the dominant way that work is organized if you don't have a college degree, if you're an hourly worker. You know, the whole phenomenon of the gig economy, the rise of part-time work, subcontracting, the so-called ‘fissured workplace'—all of that is, as one person put it, do you work above the API, like, are you a knowledge worker who's creating these systems? Or do you work below the API, where, what's organizing your work and your life—it's a piece of software! I mean, it's designed by humans, but your boss is an algorithm. And that is becoming, other than wealth and income inequality, one of the defining characteristics of, almost a neo-feudalism, ‘cause it's like, ‘hey! we've figured out how to organize labor at scale, and extract the most from people and make them work as efficiently as possible… we'll just let the software do it!'” Kate: The acceleration of this style of management is a big part of the driver pushing people to question our assumptions about work and begin to demand more agency. If you've been following my work for a while, you've heard me say, “the economy is people”, and that means we can't talk about the future of work without talking about the future of the worker. The idea that people, especially those doing what is considered ‘unskilled' labor, have little agency over how they work isn't new. AI may have exacerbated the issue, but the problem goes back as far as labor itself. Labor unions arose in the early 19th century in an attempt to level the playing field and allow workers to express their needs and concerns, but as we've seen with the recent Starbucks and Amazon unionization stories, the battle for human rights and agency in the workplace is far from decided. And it isn't just factories and assembly lines—it's happening in every industry. In the tech industry, there's a subset of people known as “Ghost Workers,” a term created by anthropologist Mary L. Gray and computer scientist Siddharth Suri to describe the usually underpaid and unseen workers doing contract work or content moderation. They frequently work alone, don't interact with one another, and often aren't even aware who they're working for, so the idea of collective bargaining feels farther out of reach. Dorothea Baur, a leading expert & advisor in Europe on ethics, responsibility, and sustainability across industries such as finance, technology, and beyond, explains some of the human rights issues at play in this phenomenon. Dorothea: “If you look at heavily industrialized contexts or like, heavy manufacturing, or like, textile industry, the rights we talk about first are like the human rights of labor, health and safety, etc. But I mean, trade unions have come out of fashion awhile ago, a lot of companies don't really like to talk about trade unions anymore. So when we switch to AI you think, ‘oh, we're in the service industry, it's not labor intensive,' but the human factor is still there. Certainly not blue collar employees, at least not within the own operations of tech companies, and also maybe not as many white collar employees, in relation to their turnover as in other contexts, but there's a lot of people linked to tech companies or to AI, often invisible. We have those Ghost Workers, gig economy, or people doing low-payed work of tagging pictures to train algo—uh, data sets, etc., so there is a labor issue, a classical one, that's really a straightforward human rights case there.” Kate: Algorithms have worked their way into the systems that manage most of our industries, from factory workers to police to judges. It's more than just “work faster,” too. These algorithms are making decisions as important as where and how many police should be deployed, as well as whether bail should be set, and at what amount. The logical (but not necessarily inevitable) extreme of this way of thinking is that all decisions will be relegated to algorithms and machines. But if people with the ability to make decisions continue to give these types of decisions to machines, we continue to lose sight of the human in the equation. What little decision making power the workers had before is being taken away and given to AI; little by little, human agency is being stripped away. The question then becomes, what if an algorithm tells a worker to do something they think is wrong? Will they have the freedom to question the algorithm, or is the output absolute? Dr. Rumman Chowdhury, Director of the Machine Learning Ethics, Transparency, and Accountability team at Twitter, elaborates. Rumman: “So if we're talking about, for example, a recommendation system to help judges decide if certain prisoners should get bail or not get bail, what's really interesting is not just how this affects the prisoner, but also the role of the judge in sort of the structure of the judicial system, and whether or not they feel the need to be subject to the output of this model, whether they have the agency to say, ‘I disagree with this.' A judge is a position of high social standing, they're considered to be highly educated… if there's an algorithm and it's telling them something that they think is wrong, they may be in a better position to say, ‘I disagree, I'm not going to do this,' versus somebody who is let's say an employee, like a warehouse employee, at Amazon, or somebody who works in retail at a store where your job is not necessarily considered to be high prestige, and you may feel like your job is replaceable, or worse, you may get in trouble if you're not agreeing with the output of this model. So, thinking about this system that surrounds these models that could actually be a sort of identically structured model, but because of the individual's place in society, they can or cannot take action on it.” Kate: The jury — if you'll pardon the expression — is still out on these questions, but we do know that in the past, worker agency was a key element in the success of our early systems. In fact, in the early days of creating the assembly line, human agency was fundamental to the success of those systems. Christopher Mims again. Christopher: “The Toyota production system was developed in a context of extreme worker agency, of complete loyalty between employer and employee, lifelong employment in Japan, and workers who had the ability to stop the assembly line the instant they noticed that something was not working, and were consulted on all changes to the way that they work. Honestly, most companies in the US cannot imagine functioning in this way, and they find it incredibly threatening to imagine their hourly workers operating this way, and that's why they all—even ‘employee-friendly' Starbucks—uses all these union busting measures, and Amazon loves them… because they just think, ‘oh, god, the worst thing in the world would be if our ‘lazy' employees have some say over how they work. It's nonsense, right? There's an entire continent called Europe where worker counsels dictate how innovations are incorporated. You know, that's how these things work in Germany, but we have just so destroyed the ability of workers to organize, to have any agency… Frankly, it is just disrespectful, it's this idea that all this labor is “unskilled,” that what you learn in this jobs has no real value… I think companies, they're just in this short term quarter-to-quarter mentality, and they're not thinking like, ‘how are we building a legacy? How do we retain employees, and how do we make productivity compatible with their thriving and happiness?' They all give lip service to this, but if you push as hard as Starbucks for instance against a labor union, honestly you're just lying.” Kate: Throughout the 19th and 20th centuries, Unions were an imperfect but necessary solution to ensuring workers had access to rights, freedoms, and safety in certain workplaces. According to a 2020 report from the Economic Policy Institute, Unionized workers earn on average 11.2% more in wages than nonunionized peers, and Black and Hispanic workers get an even larger boost from unionization. However, it looks like the changing nature of work is changing unionization as well. Unlike the Great Depression, which expanded the reach of labor unions, the Great Recession may have ushered in a period of de-unionization in the public sector. From the 1970s to today, the percentage of U.S. workers in a union has fallen from 25 to just 11.7 percent. In a piece of good news for Amazon employees in New York, they successfully voted for a union in their workplace on April 4th of this year, marking the first victory in a years-long battle for Amazon employee rights and agency. Looking forward, it's hard to say whether unions will be the best solution to worker woes. As more jobs become automated and fewer humans are needed in the workplace, there may be a time when there are only a few employees in a given department, which makes it harder to organize and empower collective bargaining. At the same time, being the only person working in your department may in fact give you more power to influence decisions in your workplace, as Christopher Mims explains. Christopher: “If you reduce the number of humans that work in a facility, it's like a tautology—the ones that remain are more important! Because in the old days, you could hire thousands of longshoreman to unload a ship, if one of them didn't show up, like, who cares? But if you're talking about a professional, today, longshoreman who's making in excess of 6 figures, has these incredibly specialized skills, knows how to operate a crane that can lift an 80,000 lb. shipping container off of a building-size ship, and safely put it on the back of a truck without killing anybody—that person doesn't show up to work, you just lost, y'know, a tenth of your productivity for that whole terminal that day. This is also an example of this tension between, like, it's great that these are good-paying blue-collar jobs, there aren't that many left in America, however, their negotiating power is also why the automation of ports has really been slowed. So that is a real genuine tension that has to be resolved.” Kate: So far in this episode, we've talked a lot about factory workers and the types of jobs that frequently unionize, but the future of work encompasses everyone on the work ladder. In the past, all of the problems regarding lack of worker agency has applied to ‘white collar' jobs as well. The modern office workplace evolved in tandem with factories, and the assumptions about how work should be organized are just as present there. Vanessa: “Our work environments, with who was involved with it and how they were constructed, is something that has been done over a long period of time. And the people who have been involved in that who are not White men, who are not sort of property owners, who are not otherwise wealthy, is a really short timeline.” Kate: That's Vanessa Mason, research director for the Institute for the Future's Vantage Partnership. Here she's explaining how workplace culture evolved from a factory mindset—and mostly by the mindset of a particular subgroup of people. Offices may feel like very different places from factories, but when you look at the big picture, the organizational structures are guided by many of the same ideas. Vanessa: “I think that a lot of organizations and offices are fundamentally sort of command and control, kind of top-down hierarchies, unfortunately. You know, the sort of, ‘the manager does this! Accountability only goes one direction! There's a low level of autonomy depending on what level you are in the chart!' All of those treat humans like widgets. I think that we have to keep in mind that history and that experience, like I still bring that experience into the workplace—basically, I'm in a workplace that was not designed for me, it's not meant for me to succeed, it's not meant for me to even feel as socially safe and as comfortable. There's a lot of research about psychological safety in teams. Like, our teams are not meant to be psychologically safe, they're set up to basically be office factories for us to sort of churn out whatever it is that we're doing in an increasingly efficient manner, productivity is off the charts, and then you receive a paycheck for said efforts. And it's only right now (especially in the pandemic) that people are sort of realizing that organizational culture 1) is created, and 2) that there's an organizational that people didn't realize that they were kind of unintentionally creating. And then 3) if you want your organizational culture to be something other than what it is, you need to collectively decide, and then implement that culture. All of those steps require a sort of precondition of vulnerability and curiosity which people are really frightened to do, and they're trying to escape the sort of harder longer work of negotiating for that to occur.” Kate: And that's what's needed from our managers and leaders as we navigate to a brighter future of work: vulnerability and curiosity. The vulnerability to admit that things could be better, and the curiosity to explore new ways of structuring work to allow more room for agency and decision-making to bring out the best in everyone. If the idea of a union sounds scary or expensive, perhaps there are other ways to allow employees the have more agency over how they work. A world in flux means there's still room to test new solutions. Lately, one of the changes business leaders have tried to make to their organizations is to bring in more diversity of workers. Women, people of color, neurodivergent minds, and people with disabilities have all been given more opportunities than they have in the past, but as Giselle Mota explains, just bringing those people into the workplace isn't enough. Giselle: “I read a study recently that was talking about, even though a lot of diverse people have been hired and promoted into leadership roles, they're leaving anyway. They don't stick around an organization. Why is that? Because no matter what the pay was, no matter what the opportunity was, some of them are realizing, this was maybe just an effort to check off a box, but the culture doesn't exist here where I truly belong, where I'm truly heard, where I want to bring something to the forefront and something's really being done about it. And again it has nothing to do with technology or innovation, we have to go back to very human, basic elements. Create that culture first, let people see that they have a voice, that what they say matters, it helps influence the direction of the company, and then from there you can do all these neat things.” Kate: If you're managing a workplace that has functioned one way for a long time, it may not be intuitive to change it to a model that is more worker agency-driven. How can you change something you may not even be aware exists? Vanessa Mason has a few tips for employers on what they can do to help bring about a new workplace culture. Vanessa: “And so what you can do, is really fundamentally listening! So, more spaces at all hands for employees to share what their experience has been, more experience to share what it is like to try to get to know co-workers. You know, anything that really just surfaces people's opinions and experiences and allows themselves to be heard—by everyone, I would say, also, too. Not just have one team do that and then the senior leadership just isn't involved in that at all. The second thing is to have some kind of spaces for shared imagination. Like all the sort of popular team retreats that are out there, but you certainly could do this asynchronously, at an event, as part of a celebration. Celebrating things like, y'know, someone has had a child, someone's gotten married, someone's bought a house—all of those things are sort of core to recognizing the pace and experience of being human in this world that aren't just about work and productivity. And then some way of communicating how you're going to act upon what you're hearing and what people are imagining, too. There's a bias towards inaction in most organizations, so that's something that certainly senior leadership should talk about: ‘How do we think about making changes, knowing that we're going to surface some changes from this process?' Being transparent, being accountable… all of those sort of pieces that go along with good change management.” Kate: A 2021 paper in the Journal of Management echoes these ideas, stating that communication between employers and their workers need to be authentic, ongoing, and two-directional, meaning that on top of listening to employee concerns, managers also needed to effectively communicate their understanding of those concerns as well as what they intended to do about them. A professional services firm analyzing a company's internal messaging metadata was able to predict highly successful managers by finding people who communicated often, responded quickly, and were action-oriented. Of course another thing many workplaces have been trying, especially in the wake of the COVID pandemic, is allowing employees to work remotely. Giselle Mota again. Giselle: “I think all we're seeing is we're just reimagining work, the worker, and workplace. Now that the pandemic happened, we learned from like Zoom, ‘wait a minute, I can actually work remotely, and still learn and produce and be productive, on a video!' But now, we can add layers of experience to it, and if you so choose to, you can now work in a virtual environment… people are flattening out the playing field. Companies that used to be die-hard ‘you have to work here in our office, you have to be here located right next door to our vicinity,' now they've opened it up and they're getting talent from across the pond, across the globe, from wherever! And it's creating new opportunities for people to get into new roles.” Kate: Although COVID and Zoom accelerated a lot of things, the idea of people working from home instead of the office isn't actually a new one. AT&T experimented with employees working from home back in 1994, exploring how far an organization could transform the workplace by moving the work to the worker instead of the other way around. Ultimately, they freed up around $550M in cash flow by eliminating no longer needed office space. AT&T also reported increases in worker productivity, ability to retain talent, and the ability to avoid sanctions like zoning rules while also meeting Clear Air Act requirements. As remote work on a massive scale is a relatively new phenomenon, the research is still ongoing as to how this will affect long-term work processes and human happiness. It is notable that working remotely is far less likely to be an option the farther you drop down the income ladder. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, only 9.2% of workers in the bottom quartile of wage-earners have the ability to work remotely. The availability also varies depending on the job you're doing, with education, healthcare, hospitality, agriculture, retail, and transportation among the least-able to work remotely, and finance and knowledge workers among the most-able. Because we aren't entirely sure whether remote work is the best long-term solution, it's worth looking at other ways to attract high-value workers—and keep them around. One idea? Invest in career planning. Technology is making it easier than ever for employers to work with their employees to plan for a future within the company. AI has made it possible to forecast roles that the company will need in the future, so rather than scramble to fill that role when the time comes, employers can work with a current or prospective employee to help prepare them for the job. In my conversation with Giselle Mota, she explored this idea further. Giselle: “A lot of companies are now able to start applying analytics and forecast and plan, ‘okay, if this is a role for the future, maybe it doesn't exist today, and maybe this person doesn't yet have all the qualifications for this other role. But, they expressed to us an interest in this area, they expressed certain qualifications that they do have today, and now AI can help, and data can help to match and help a human, you know, talent acquisition person, career developer, or manager, to help guide that user to say, ‘this is where you are today, this is where you want to be, so let's map out a career plan to help you get to where you should be'.” Kate: She went on to explain that employers don't need to think about jobs so rigidly, and rather than looking for one perfect person to fill a role, you can spread the tasks around to help prepare for the future. Giselle: “I was talking to someone the other day who was saying, ‘y'know, we have trouble finding diverse leadership within our organization and bringing them up,' and I was talking to them and saying, ‘break down a job! Let people be able to work on projects to be able to build up their skillset. Maybe they don't have what it takes today, fully, on paper to be what you might be looking for, but maybe you can give them exposure to that, and help them from the inside of your organization to take on those roles.” Kate: All of these changes to work and the workplace mean that a lot of office workers can demand more from their jobs. Rather than settle for something nearby with a rigid schedule, people can choose a job that fits their lifestyle. As more of these jobs are automated, we are hopefully heading for an age where people who were relegated to the so-called “unskilled” jobs will be able to find careers that work for them. Because it is more than the workplace that is changing, it's also the work itself. I asked Giselle what types of jobs we might see in the future, and she had this to say. Giselle: “As we continue to explore the workplace, the worker, and the work that's being done, as digital transformation keeps occurring, we keep forming new roles. But we also see a resurgence and reemergence of certain roles taking more importance than even before. For example, leadership development is on the rise more than ever. Why? Because if you look at the last few years and the way that people have been leaving their workplaces, and going to others and jumping ship, there's a need for leaders to lead well. Officers of diversity have been created in organizations that never had it before because the way the world was going, people had to start opening up roles like that when they didn't even have a department before. As we move into more virtual experiences, we need creators. We're seeing organizations, big technology organizations, people who enable virtual and video interactions are creating layers of experience that need those same designers and that same talent—gamers and all types of creators—to now come into their spaces to help them start shaping the future of what their next technology offerings are gonna look like. Before, if you used to be into photography or graphic design or gaming or whatever, now there's space for you in these organizations that probably specialize in human capital management, social management… To give you a quick example, Subway! Subway opened up a virtual space and they allowed an employee to man a virtual store, so you could go virtually, into a Subway, order a subway sandwich down the line like you're there in person, and there's someone that's actually manning that. That's a job. And apart from all of that side of the world, we need people to manage, we need legal counsel, we need people who work on AI and ethics and governance—data scientists on the rise, roles that are about data analytics… When Postmates came out and they were delivering to people's homes or wherever it was, college campuses, etc., with a robot, the person who was making sure that robot didn't get hijacked, vandalized, or whatever the case is—it was a human person, a gamer, it was a young kid working from their apartment somewhere, they could virtually navigate that robot so that if it flipped over on its side or whatever, it would take manual control over it, set it right back up, and find it and do whatever it needed to do. So that's an actual role that was created.” Kate: While many people fear that as jobs disappear, people will have to survive without work — or rather, without the jobs that provide them with a livelihood, an income, a team to work with, and a sense of contribution — the more comforting truth is that we've always found jobs to replace the ones that went out of fashion. When cars were invented, the horse-and-buggy business became far less profitable, but those workers found something else to do. We shouldn't be glib or dismissive about the need individual workers will have for help in making career transitions, but in the big picture, humans are adaptable, and that isn't something that looks like it will be changing any time soon. Giselle: “Where we're seeing the direction of work going right now, people want to have more agency over how they work, where they work, themselves, etc. I think people want to own how they show up in the world, people want to own more of their financial abilities, they want to keep more of their pay… If you just wade through all of the buzzwords that are coming out lately, people want to imagine a different world of work. The future of work should be a place where people are encouraged to bring their true full selves to the table, and that they're heard. I think we've had way too much of a focus on customer experience because we're trying to drive profitability and revenue, but internally, behind the scenes, that's another story that we really need to work on.” Kate: The more aware we are of the way things are changing, the better able we are to prepare for the future we want. Even in the face of automation and constantly-evolving technologies, humans are adaptable. One thing that won't be changing any time soon? Workers aren't going to stop craving agency over their jobs and their lives, and employers aren't going to stop needing to hire talented and high-value employees to help their businesses thrive. Hopefully you've heard a few ideas in this episode of ways to lean into the change and make your business, or your life, a little bit better. Even more hopeful is the possibility that, after so much disruption and uncertainty, we may be entering a moment where more people at every stage of employment feel more empowered about their work: freer to express their whole selves in the workplace, and able to do work that is about more than paying the bills. That's a trend worth working toward. Thank you so much for joining me this week on The Tech Humanist Show. In our next episode, I'm talking about why it behooves businesses to focusing on the human experience of buying their product or service, rather than the customer experience. I'll see you then.

Scandinavian MIND
Einride's new autonomous trailer and fashion education's digital makeover (with Saina Koohnavard)

Scandinavian MIND

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 41:05


In this episode we discuss:Einride's Mesh event and the newly launched autonomous trailer.Inside fashion education's digital makeoverWith: Konrad Olsson, Editor-in-Chief & Founder, Erik Sedin, Junior Editor, Oliver Dahle, Fashion contributor, and Saina Koohnavard, fashion lecturer. Scandinavian MIND Weekly is our show about current trends and events within business, tech, fashion, design, culture, and more. From the Nordic perspective of our team of editors and contributors. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oxford Sparks Big Questions
How do you create autonomous robots that can investigate under the sea?

Oxford Sparks Big Questions

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 14:42


How do you retrieve data from sensors embedded in underwater settings - such as those monitoring ecosystem change, for example? Well, when human divers aren't an option (which is often the case) it's over to the autonomous robots! In this episode of the Big Questions Podcast we speak to Prof Nick Hawes from the Oxford Robotics Institute about the challenges - and possibilities - that such robots bring to the field.

Winning In Asia: A ZoZo Go Podcast
Ted Cannis, CEO, Ford Pro: Master Plan for Smart Electric Commercial Vehicles

Winning In Asia: A ZoZo Go Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 46:16


In June, 2021, Ted Cannis was appointed CEO of Ford Pro, the vitally-important division focused on commercial vehicles like the Ford F-Series trucks and Transit vans. Ford sees enormous opportunity to grow this division in terms of revenues and profits in the next three years. In our conversation, Ted Cannis shares examples of how small to medium sized businesses can get a lot more efficient and profitable in a short space of time through connected car software applications. Ford is also rolling out the F-150 Lightning and E-Transiti to commercial customers in the US and European markets in 2022. This will be a gigantic test to see whether battery-powered vehicles can meet or exceed the experience now delivered by gasoline-powered vehicles. Cannis offers a pragmatic view, saying that electric vehicles will be right for some customers while others - for example companies that do a lot of towing - might prefer to stay with gasoline engines and powertrains, at least for the time being. #DrivingWithDunne / #ZozoGo https://twitter.com/Dunne_ZoZoGohttps://www.instagram.com/zo.zo.go/?hl=enhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/michael-dunne-a696901a/

TechStuff
An Update on Autonomous Vehicles

TechStuff

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 48:15


Not all self-driving cars are made equal. We take a look at the various levels of autonomous driving and speculate on how long it might be until we have a truly autonomous car on the roads. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Daily Tech Headlines
Uber Eats Launches Autonomous Delivery Trials in LA – DTH

Daily Tech Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022


Uber Eats launched two autonomous delivery pilots in Los Angeles, Spotify tests promoting artists’ NFTs, and Germany publishes its first cryptocurrency income tax guidance. MP3 Please SUBSCRIBE HERE. You can get an ad-free feed of Daily Tech Headlines for $3 a month here. A special thanks to all our supporters–without you, none of this wouldContinue reading "Uber Eats Launches Autonomous Delivery Trials in LA – DTH"

Sleep Whispers
298 Acorns: New TV Show, Movie, Podcasts, & Tip to end your Post-it Addiction!

Sleep Whispers

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 10:31


Acorns for your squirrels to nibble on at any time of the day:  TV show: Catfish: The TV Show>justwatch.com Movie: A Teacher>justwatch.com Podcast: New Scientist Weekly> https://www.newscientist.com/podcasts/ Podcast: Lockdown Babies> https://anchor.fm/lockdown-babies Podcast: Mindfulness for Beginners> https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/mindfulness-for-beginners/id1493806566 Tip: Use dry erase boards instead of Post-it notes Inspiration: Having one enemy is too many and having a … Continue reading 298 Acorns: New TV Show, Movie, Podcasts, & Tip to end your Post-it Addiction!

Blue Economy Podcast
Miniature undersea autonomous vessels, with Advanced Navigation

Blue Economy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 27:03


Peter Baker, subsea product manager, with Australia-based Advanced Navigation, called in from Sydney to talk about HYDRUS – Advanced Navigation's new “miniature undersea autonomous vessel” product that's small enough to serve as a carry-on item on most  flights. 

The Political Life
Eric Tanenblatt on the State of the Autonomous Vehicle Industry

The Political Life

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 19:59


This week we are pleased to present part two of our conversation with Eric Tanenblatt. As a reminder, Eric is the Global Chair of Public Policy and Regulation at Dentons, the world's largest law firm. At Denton's, Eric started up an autonomous vehicle practice, which now collaborates with 70+ partners around the globe within the autonomous vehicle ecosystem.   In this episode, Eric gives Jim a concise update regarding the current state of the growing autonomous vehicle industry and shares some insight on the progress of electric vehicles in the United States - with particular focus placed on industry leaders like Waymo and Cruise and their work in metro areas like San Francisco, Phoenix, and New York City. Check out Eric's writing on autonomous vehicles and keep an eye out for Denton's 'Global Autonomous Vehicle Index' here: https://www.thedriverlesscommute.com   Have a suggestion, or want to chat with Jim? Email him at Jim@ThePoliticalLife.net    Follow The Political Life on Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn and Twitter for weekly updates.

SAE Tomorrow Today
109. Pursuing AV Micro-Transit on a Global Scale

SAE Tomorrow Today

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 53:47


May Mobility's self-driving shuttles have provided more than 300,000 autonomous rides in nine cities in the US and Japan. And CEO Edwin Olson is just getting started. He has a recipe for transforming transportation – and quality of life – worldwide: . ·        A policy of listening to people to understand the unique transit challenges they face in their communities – inaccessible public transit, for example, or a long trudge from the bus stop to the dining district. ·        A strategy to work with cities, state agencies, and private enterprises to customize autonomous vehicle (AV) services that fill mobility gaps. ·        A powerhouse partnership with Toyota capable of providing vehicles, services, and resources on a global scale. ·        A game-changing approach to AV software development, known as multi-policy decision-making. . The underlying technology is critical to ensure safety and build trust, of course, but Olson argues that success starts with a human touch and understanding each community's unique needs. . “Autonomous cars are hard, and every city brings new challenges for us to solve,” he says. “There is nothing quite so motivating . . . as a real-world point of contact with riders and cities to determine where to focus and what to fix.” . We'd love to hear from you. Share your comments, questions and ideas for future topics and guests to podcast@sae.org. Don't forget to take a moment to follow SAE Tomorrow Today (and give us a review) on your preferred podcasting platform. . Follow SAE on LinkedIn, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. Follow host Grayson Brulte on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Instagram. . Sign up for the SAE SmartBrief

Transport Topics
Transport Topics (May 12, 2022)

Transport Topics

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 2:18


Autonomous driving technology company Aurora Innovation will collaborate with Covenant Logistics to refine a self-driving truck system that could robotically emulate the speed of human team driving. Covenant will be using the Pittsburgh-based self-driving technology company's Aurora Horizon product. It is a robotic driver-as-a-service business model that will offer fleets the ability to purchase vehicles powered by the Aurora Driver system, subscribe to use Aurora Driver and use Aurora-certified fleet service partners to operate autonomous mobility and logistics services.

The Uptime Wind Energy Podcast
EP112 – Autonomous Robots for Offshore Wind?

The Uptime Wind Energy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022


How to explain sharp increases in power purchase agreement (PPA) prices? According to a Q1 report, PPA prices are up 28.5% over last year - and the trend is expected to continue. It's more complicated than 'just' supply and demand. Allen and Rosemary discuss the global market, regulatory forces, and how governments might respond. Meanwhile, Amazon has announced 37 new renewable energy projects in 8 countries, NREL and GE want to stabilize the power grid with wind turbines, freeze-thaw batteries are taking us a step closer to seasonal storage, and ice-detection has a distinct ring to it. Also, a robot has proven it can perform a bolt check, autonomously, from inside a turbine - which could be huge for offshore operations.  Sign up now for Uptime Tech News, our weekly email update on all things wind technology. This episode is sponsored by Weather Guard Lightning tech. Learn more about Weather Guard's StrikeTape Wind Turbine LPS retrofit. Follow the show on Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Linkedin and visit Weather Guard on the web. And subscribe to Rosemary Barnes' YouTube channel here. Have a question we can answer on the show? Email us! 

Winning In Asia: A ZoZo Go Podcast
Roger Atkins: Why I Chose The Jaguar I-Pace Over The Tesla Model X And The Audi E-tron.

Winning In Asia: A ZoZo Go Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 46:40


Roger Atkins is, without a doubt, one of the most knowledgeable and influential voices in the world of electric vehicles. He has a following of several hundred thousand people on LinkedIn. What people like about Roger is his deep knowledge, his self-deprecating sense of humor and his candor. In this episode of Driving With Dunne, I ask Roger about his 18 months of experience driving a Jaguar I-PACE. Why did he choose the Jaguar over other electric models? What have been the highs and lows? And, most important, will his next car be an I PACE - or something completely different? We also touch on the time he had afternoon tea in London with Richard Branson. And whom he considers the most impressive executive in the global electric car business.#DrivingWithDunne / #ZozoGo https://twitter.com/Dunne_ZoZoGohttps://www.instagram.com/zo.zo.go/?hl=enhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/michael-dunne-a696901a/

Sleep Whispers
297 Trivia Time: 30 new curious facts

Sleep Whispers

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 36:34


Enjoy another Trivia Time episode with 30 new curious facts. Soothe your eyes with Umay REST ($100 off with code SILK): https://umay.rest/rest/ Try the podcast, Your Brain on Facts: https://yourbrainonfacts.com/ Try my new podcast, Calm History on [Apple] or [Spotify] or [Android] Explore ALL of my podcasts: www.silkpodcasts.com Try FREE access to ALL 400+ of my archive and bonus … Continue reading 297 Trivia Time: 30 new curious facts

The Final Straw Radio
Liaizon Wakest on Autonomous Social Media and the Fediverse

The Final Straw Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 73:16


This week, we spoke with Liaizon Wakest. Liaizon grew up in an anarchist commune in rural America. They can be found climbing into dumpsters from Mexico to Kazakhstan looking for trash to make art with. In recent years they have been focused on research into ethical technology and infrastructural anarchism. For the hour we speak about the interoperable, open source ensemble of federated online publishing servers and platforms known as the Fediverse and its most popular component, Mastodon. This conversation takes place in the context of media hullabaloo about Elon Musk seeking to purchase Twitter, the paradigm in which a rich egomaniac can own the addictive social media platforms over which so much social and political life is engaged and what positives we can draw from alternatives like Mastodon and the Fediverse. You can find Liaizon's account on Mastodon (an analog of twitter) at @liaizon@social.wake.st or on Pixelfed (an analog of Instagram) at @wakest@pixelfed.social. And you can follow us on Mastodon by finding @TheFinalStrawRadio@Chaos.Social or by visiting https://chaos.social/@TheFinalStrawRadio in a web browser. Another interesting anarchist media project engaging the Fediverse is Kolektiva, which has a PeerTube instance at https://Kolektiva.Media (analog of youtube) and Mastodon at https://Kolektiva.Social where they're welcoming new users. Kolektiva includes participation from projects like Sub.Media and AntiMidia You can find a real good interview by our comrades at From Embers about Mastodon which I mention in the interview from February 3rd, 2022 entitled Social Networks, Online Life and The Fediverse: https://fromembers.libsyn.com/social-networks-online-life-and-the-fediverse Announcement Eric King Arrives at USP Lee: call-in continues As a quick update on the situation of Eric King, he has been transferred this week from USP Atlanta to USP Lee where he and his supporters are concerned he'll be placed into solitary and isolated for attack. You can find info on his situation as well as who to contact to press for his return to a medium security facility to match his current security points, visit SupportEricKing.Org and find the May 3rd, 2022 post whose title starts “Eric Transferred” . ... . .. Featured Track Beauty, Power, Motion, Life, Work, Chaos, Law by DJ Shadow from Our Pathetic Age

Sleep Whispers
296 Acorns: New TV Show, Movie, Podcasts, & Amazon Shopping Tip!

Sleep Whispers

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 11:18


Acorns for your squirrels to nibble on at any time of the day:  TV show: Derek>justwatch.com Movie: Waiting for Lightning>justwatch.com Podcast: Twilight Histories>twilighthistories.com Podcast: Based On A True Story>basedonatruestorypodcast.com Podcast: Find Your Daily Calm>redcircle.com/shows/find-your-daily-calm Amazon Tip: resort reviews to the most recent Inspiration: Make the most of every day. Unsaid words, missed opportunities, and wasted … Continue reading 296 Acorns: New TV Show, Movie, Podcasts, & Amazon Shopping Tip!

Home Ed Matters Podcast
Season 8 - Episode 17

Home Ed Matters Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022


We've reached the end of another academic year (our eighth!). We're marking the moment with our annual 'Celebration Friday', a fun time at Spring Harvest and Alton Towers, and sharing some highlights from the books we've read and activities we've done this year.

Stories from 400 Feet
Building a Tool to Save Lives: Founder Divy Shrivastava Talks About How Paladin Got into Developing Autonomous Drone as a First Responder Solutions

Stories from 400 Feet

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 8:18


When  a childhood friend's house burned down in his tight knit Indian immigrant community, Divy Shrivastava began asking questions. What did fire fighters and other first responders need to ensure better outcomes in emergencies? He kept hearing the same things: first responders needed more information before arriving on scene. From here, he built Paladin, a drone as a first responder system that can be deployed the second a 911 call is placed. For our third podcast in the AUVSI series, we spoke with Divy to learn more . 

e-flux podcast
Isabelle Fremeaux and Jay Jordan: We Are “Nature” Defending Itself: Entangling Art, Activism and Autonomous Zones

e-flux podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 46:31


Andreas Petrossiants discusses We Are “Nature” Defending Itself: Entangling Art, Activism and Autonomous Zones (Pluto Press/Journal of Aesthetics and Protest, 2021) with authors Isabelle Fremeaux and Jay Jordan. An excerpt from the book was published in e-flux journal issue 124.  “Since 2004, through the work of the Laboratory of Insurrectionary Imagination, we have questioned how to radically transform and entangle art, activism, and everyday life amidst the horrors of the Capitalocene. A decade ago, we deserted our metropolitan London lives, rooting our art activism in a place that French politicians had declared “lost to the republic,” known by those who inhabited it as la ZAD (the “zone to defend”). On these four thousand acres of wetlands, turned into a messy but extraordinary canvas of commoning, an international airport project was defeated through disobedience and occupation. This is an extract from our latest book, where an art of life is populated by rebel farmers and salamanders, barricades and bakeries, riots and rituals.” —Isabelle Fremeaux and Jay Jordan   Isabelle Fremeaux is an educator and action researcher. She was formerly Senior Lecturer in Media and Cultural Studies at Birkbeck College London. Jay Jordan is an art activist and author, cofounder of Reclaim the Streets and the Clandestine Insurgent Clown Army.

HxGN Radio
How do we enable an autonomous and sustainable future?

HxGN Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 19:02


Achieving autonomy across industries and applications is vital to sustainability through lower carbon emissions, reduced waste, increased productivity and, above all, ensuring the safety of people. But how do we get there? This episode of HxGN Radio features Sandy Kennedy, VP of innovation; Lee Baldwin, autonomy segment manager; and Neil Gerein, senior director of marketing from Hexagon's Autonomy & Positioning division, explaining how assured positioning builds a foundation empowering autonomous solutions. Sandy, Neil and Lee will each be speaking at HxGN LIVE Global as part of the Autonomy & Positioning Reality Summit in June 2022. To learn more about the Summit and to join us, visit https://hxgn.biz/APRSummit

Winning In Asia: A ZoZo Go Podcast
Diego Rodriguez, Former IDEO Partner & Intuit CPO: How Design Thinking Separates Champions From Also-Rans

Winning In Asia: A ZoZo Go Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 47:30


In the early 2000s, a small group of friends in Palo-Alto, California started a movement to transform the way products are designed and developed. It came to be known as Design Thinking. Early pioneers included David M. Kelley, founder of IDEO and Diego Rodriguez, one of his star team leaders. The central idea of design thinking is to center all development not around the product or service but around how human beings feel when they experience them. It may sound simple or obvious. But if the process were easy, then why do so many companies still develop mediocre products? In this episode of Driving With Dunne, Diego Rodriguez walks us through the "how" and "why" of design thinking. Mercedes and Ford are among scores of companies weaving design thinking into future product designs. If you are interested in building better products, you will love this episode.#DrivingWithDunne / #ZozoGo https://twitter.com/Dunne_ZoZoGohttps://www.instagram.com/zo.zo.go/?hl=enhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/michael-dunne-a696901a/

Techstination
AirSelfie Air Neo autonomous flying camera arrives

Techstination

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 16:02


Sleep Whispers
295 Story Time: “The Philosopher's Stone” by Hans Christian Andersen

Sleep Whispers

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 34:09


Enjoy another Story Time episode featuring,  “The Philosopher’s Stone” by Hans Christian Andersen. Try the podcast, Ghost Town: https://www.ghosttownpod.com/ Try my new podcast, Calm History on [Apple] or [Spotify] or [Android] Explore ALL of my podcasts: www.silkpodcasts.com Try FREE access to ALL 400+ of my archive and bonus episodes: https://bit.ly/sw241 Listen with these pillow-friendly headphones (discount products … Continue reading 295 Story Time: “The Philosopher’s Stone” by Hans Christian Andersen

Paul's Security Weekly TV
Austin Peay State, Basis Theory, Authtech, Hivemapper Dashcam, & Devo Autonomous SOC - ESW #271

Paul's Security Weekly TV

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 46:06


This week in the Enterprise News: Basis Theory raises $17 million funding round, Crunchbase Funding Round Profile, Devo Acquires AI-Powered Security Automation Innovator to Deliver the “Autonomous SOC”, Hivemapper Dashcam, Authtech, Twitter accepts Elon Musk's $44 billion offer, Austin Peay State University on Twitter, Basis Theory raises $17 million funding round, & more!     Visit https://www.securityweekly.com/esw for all the latest episodes! Show Notes: https://securityweekly.com/esw271

Action and Ambition
Knightscope Helps Make The United States of America The Safest Country in The World By Building Autonomous Security Robots

Action and Ambition

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 28:27


In this episode, we are joined by William Santana Li, CEO of Knightscope, a company that builds Autonomous Security Robots (ASRs) that are a unique combination of self-driving technology, robotics, A.I., and electric vehicles to help officers and guards have eyes, ears, and voice on the ground at multiple locations at the same time. The massive amount of data generated by the ASRs feeds into their Knightscope Security Operations Center (KSOC) user interface that our clients utilize to secure better the places you live, work, study, and visit. William explains the future of the security sector with the advancing technology. Tune in to learn more!

The Tech Humanist Show
How Tech and Social Media Impact Our Mental Health

The Tech Humanist Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 29:00


On this week's episode, we're talking about how technology and social media impact our mental health, and has led to a mental health crisis that some have called “the next global pandemic.” From the algorithms that decide what we see to the marketing tricks designed to keep us constantly engaged, we explore how our assumptions about work have led to a feedback loop that keeps us feeling worse about ourselves for longer. But never fear! At the Tech Humanist Show, we're about finding solutions and staying optimistic, and I spoke with some of the brightest minds who are working on these problems. Guests this week include Kaitlin Ugolik Phillips, John C. Havens, Rahaf Harfoush, Emma Bedor Hiland, and David Ryan Polgar. The Tech Humanist Show is a multi-media-format program exploring how data and technology shape the human experience. Hosted by Kate O'Neill. To watch full interviews with past and future guests, or for updates on what Kate O'Neill is doing next, subscribe to The Tech Humanist Show hosted by Kate O'Neill channel on YouTube. Full Transcript: Kate: Hello humans! Today we look at a global crisis that's affecting us all on a near-daily basis… No, not that one. I'm talking about the other crisis—the one getting a lot less media attention: the Global Mental Health Crisis. In December, Gallup published an article with the headline, “The Next Global Pandemic: Mental Health.” A cursory Google search of the words “mental health crisis” pulls up dozens of articles published just within the past few days and weeks. Children and teenagers are being hospitalized for mental health crises at higher rates than ever. And as with most topics, there is a tech angle: we'll explore the role technology is playing in creating this crisis, and what we might be able to do about it. Let's start with social media. For a lot of us, social media is a place where we keep up with our friends and family, get our news, and keep people updated on what we're doing with our lives. Some of us have even curated feeds specifically with positivity and encouragement to help combat what we already know are the negative effects of being on social media too long. There's a downside to this, though, which I spoke about with Kaitlin Ugolik Phillips, the author of The Future of Feeling: Building Empathy in a Tech-Obsessed World. Kaitlin: I wrote about this a little bit in an article about mental health culture on places like Instagram and Pintrest where you have these pretty images that have nice sayings and sort of the commodification of things like anxiety and depression and it's cool to be not okay, but then you're comparing your ‘not-okay'ness to other people's. Kate: We've even managed to turn ‘being not okay' into a competition, which means we're taking our attempts to be healthy and poisoning them with feelings of inferiority and unworthiness, turning our solution back into the problem it was trying to solve. One of the other issues on social media is the tendency for all of us to engage in conversations–or perhaps ‘arguments' is a better word–with strangers that linger with us, sometimes for a full day or days at a time. Kaitlin explains one way she was able to deal with those situations. Kaitlin: Being more in touch with what our boundaries actually are and what we're comfortable and capable of talking about and how… I think that's a good place to start for empathy for others. A lot of times, when I've found myself in these kind of quagmire conversations (which I don't do so much anymore but definitely have in the past), I realized that I was anxious about something, or I was being triggered by what this person is saying. That's about me. I mean, that's a pretty common thing in pscyhology and just in general—when someone is trolling you or being a bully, it's usually about then. If we get better at empathizing with ourselves, or just setting better boundaries, we're going to wade into these situations less. I mean, that's a big ask. For Millennials, and Gen Z, Gen X, and anyone trying to survive right now on the Internet. Kate: But social media doesn't make it easy. And the COVID pandemic only exacerbated the issues already prevalent within the platforms. Part of the problem is that social media wasn't designed to make us happy, it was designed to make money. John C. Havens, the Executive Director of the IEEE Global Initiative on Ethics of Autonomous and Intelligent Systems, elaborates on this idea. John: Often times, the value is framed in exponential growth, right? Not just profit. Exponential Growth is an ideology that's not just about getting some profit or speed, it's about doing this. But when you maximize any one thing, other things by definition take less of a focus. And especially with humans, that can be things like mental health. This is not bad or evil, but it is a decision. And in this case it's a key performance indicator decision, the priority is to get something to market, versus, how can we get something to market focused on well-being? How can we make innovation about mental health? Kate: The upside is that our time indoors led some people to more quickly realize the issues with technology and its effects on us. Early in the pandemic, I spoke with Rahaf Harfoush — a Strategist, Digital Anthropologist, and Best-Selling Author who focuses on the intersections between emerging technology, innovation, and digital culture — about what she learned about our relationship to technology during that time. Rahaf: For me I think it just amplified a lot of the issues with the way we were using tech before. I noticed in my social networks and friend groups, people were home more, so what can we do but turn to our online, to this never-ending content and distraction and connections. And in the first couple weeks, everyone was about the Zoom everything, and then there was a Zoom burnout… for me, there's a couple big issues at play. The first is that we have more bandwidth because we're at home, so we're consuming more information. A lot of these platforms leverage this addictive constant-refresh, breaking-news cycle, and with something as complex and nuanced as COVID, a lot of us were glued to our screens refreshing refreshing refreshing… that was not the best thing I could have done for my mental well being or anxiety. At one point I was like, “i need to step away!” because I was just addicted to the news of instead of increasing knowledge. And the other thing is that for many people, the forced pause made us realize that we use productivity as a coping mechanism, and what does it mean that we have more time? A lot of people started trying to make their personal time as productive as their professional time—pushing themselves to pick up 10 new hobbies and learn 10 new languages and take 10 new classes! One or two of those things is great, but I really saw people loading up. That was a good indication to me of our lack of comfort with not doing anything. I noticed I was guilting myself for not writing and not learning and then I was like, you know what? we're undergoing this immensely traumatic, super-stressful thing… it's okay to not do anything, like that's fine. Kate: If you're anything like me, that's a lot easier said than done. Even if you've mostly resumed your life as normal, you're probably still in the habit of working all day, and then filling your free time with more work, hobbies, or time on social media. I asked Rahaf what someone trapped in this cycle could do about it. Rahaf: Your brain needs at least a week to just unwind from the stress of work. If you're just constantly on planes and in deliverables and client stuff… you're never going to take the time to imagine new opportunities for yourself. The trick is we have to balance periods of actually producing the thing with periods of intangible creativity. A lot of the thinking you can't see—in our culture, we don't like things that we can't see. But how many of us have gone for a walk about got that idea, or were daydreaming and got that idea? So creatives, we need that downtime. And by the way, downtime isn't taking a coffee break and being on social media. Downtime is really downtime. Daydreaming, just letting your brain go. Which is why we need a different framework, because for a writer or strategist, like you, you spend so much time thinking about things… but to think about things, you need the time to think about them!” Kate: Most of us don't have the luxury to just shut off our Internet usage entirely. If you're someone, like most of us, who needs technology to get by. , how do we find that balance? And why is it so difficult? Rahaf: I think it's because we've shamed ourselves into thinking if we're not doing stuff, it's a waste. And that's the problem, the problem is intentional recovery, prioritizing and choosing rest, that's really hard for us, because we constantly hear these stories of CEOs and celebrities, and Elon Musk sleeping on the floor of his factory, and Tim Cooke waking up at 4:30 in the morning, and we think, I can't take a nap, I can't watch a movie, I can't go for a walk, because then I'm not really committed to being successful! And that's the most toxic belief system we've incorporated into our society today, especially for creatives. The breakthrough that I had was that it's not actually about systems or organizations, it's about us as people. We are our hardest taskmasters, we will push ourselves to the limit, even when other people tell us to take a break. If we're gonna move to a more humane productivity mindset, we have to have some uncomfortable conversations about the role of work in our lives, the link between our identity and our jobs and our self-worth, our need for validation with social media and professional recognition, our egos… all of these things battle it out, which is why I can't just come on here and be like, “okay guys, take a break here, do this…” we're not going to do it! We really have to talk about, ‘growing up, what did your parents teach you about work ethic?' how is that related to how you see yourself? Who are the people that you admire? And then there are statements you can ask yourself, like “if you work hard, anything is possible!” All these things, you can start testing your relationship with work, and you start to see that we have built a relationship with work psychologically where we feel like if we don't work hard enough, we're not deserving. And not only do we have to work hard, we have to suffer! We have to pull all-nighters! Think of the words we use, ‘hustle' and ‘grind'… these horrible verbs! The reason that's important to dig into is that our views about our work become assumptions that we don't question. We don't ever stop and say, ‘does this belief actually allow me to produce my best possible work, or is it just pushing me to a point where I'm exhausted and burnt out? The second thing is, a lot of the stories we've been told about success aren't true. As a super-quick example, if there's an equation for success, most people think it's “hard work = success.” But in reality, while hard work is important, it's not the only variable. Where you're born, your luck, your gender, your race… all of these things are little variables that add into the equation. So what I don't like about “hard work = success,” it's that the flip side of that tells people, “if you're not successful, it's because you aren't working hard enough.” And part of the awakening is understanding that there are other factors at play here, and we're all working pretty hard! We don't need more things telling us that we're not enough and we're not worthy. Rahaf: When I had my own burnout, I knew better but didn't do better. That was really frustrating to me, it's like, I have the knowledge, why could I not put the knowledge to practice? And then I realized, all these belief systems and stories are embedded in every IG meme and every algorithm that asks you to refresh every 10 seconds, and every notification that interrupts your time, and the design of these tools to socially shame people for not responding fast enough. With Whatsapp for example, the blue checkmark that lets you know if someone has seen your message. What is that if not social pressure to respond? We've also shaped technology to amplify the social norms that if you're ‘left on read,' that's a breach of etiquette. Kate: We, as a culture, believe things about success that aren't true. Then, we program those beliefs into our technology, and that technology ramps up and exacerbates the speed at which we're exposed to those flawed ideas. It creates a downward spiral for the user — or, the person using these platforms — to believe these untrue truths more deeply, broadening the disconnect between our ideal selves and reality. And yet, despite these outside forces at play, there is an urge to place responsibility on the user, to say that each of us is solely responsible for our own mental health. Emma Bedor Hiland — the author of Therapy Tech: The Digital Transformation of Mental Healthcare — calls this “Responsibilization” Emma: I draw from the work of Michelle Foucault who writes about neo-liberalism too. So the way I use it in the book is to say that there is an emphasis when we talk about neo-liberalism upon taking responsibility for yourself, anything that could be presumably in your control. And in this day and age, we're seeing mental health, one's own mental health, being framed as something we can take responsibility for. So in tandem with this rollback of what would ideally be large-scale support mechanisms, local mental health facilities to help people in need, we're seeing an increasing emphasis upon these ideas like ‘use the technology that you can get for free or low cost to help yourselves.' But at the same time, those technologies literally don't speak to or reflect an imagined user who we know in this country need interventions most badly. Kate: Thankfully, we live in a world where once a problem has been identified, some enterprising people set out to design a potential solution. Some of those solutions have been built into our technology, with ‘screen time tracking' designed for us to think twice about whether we should spend more time on our phones, and Netflix's “are you still watching?” feature that adds a little friction into the process of consuming content. When it comes to mental health specifically, there is a growing Telemental Healthcare industry, including online services such as BetterHelp, Cerebral, or Calmerry. These, however, may not be the solutions we want them to be. Emma: “A lot of my research, it's so interesting looking back at it now, my interviews with people who provide tele-mental health were conducted prior to the pandemic. It was really challenging at that time to find people who were advocates and supporters of screen-based mental health services, they told me that their peers sort of derided them for that because of this assumption that when care is screen-based, it is diluted in fundamental ways that impact the therapeutic experience. Which is understandable, because communication is not just about words or tone or what we can see on a screen, there's so much more to it. But when interactions are confined to a screen, you do lose communicative information. One of the things I've grappled with is I don't want it to seem like I don't think telemental health is an important asset. One of my critiques is that a lot of the times in our discussions, we assume people have access to the requisite technologies and access to infrastructure that makes telemental healthcare possible in the first place. Like having smart devices, even just Smartphones, if not a laptop or home computer station, as well as reliable access to an internet connection, in a place where they could interface with a mental healthcare provider. So a lot of the discourse is not about thinking about those people whatsoever, who due to the digital divide or technology gap, even using technology couldn't interface with a healthcare provider. Some of my other concerns are related to the ways our increased emphasis and desire to have people providing screen-based care also are actually transforming people who provide that care, like psychiatrists, psychologists, etc, into members of the digital gig economy, who have to divide up their time in increasingly burdensome ways, and work in ways where their employment tends to be increasingly tenuous. Relatedly, I am also worried about platforms. I know people are becoming more familiar with the idea that these places exist that they can go to on their laptops or wherever, assuming they have that technology, and be connected to service providers, but as we've seen with Crisis Text Line, there are a lot of reasons to be concerned about those platforms which become hubs of collecting and aggregating and potentially sharing user data. So while I think telemental healthcare services are important, I'd like to see dedication of resources not just to technologically facilitated care, but using that care to direct people to in-person care as well. We know due to the COVID Pandemic, we saw so many people offering services that were solely screen-based, and for good reason. A lot of clinics that provided healthcare for people without insurance or who are living, considered in poverty, relied upon in-person clinic services, and haven't been able to get them due to their shuttering due to the pandemic. So I worry about the people who we don't talk about as much as I worry about the negative consequences and affects of mental healthcare's technologization Kate: So while some people's access to mental healthcare has increased with technology, many of the people who need it most have even less access to help. On top of that, the business model of these platforms makes it so that healthcare professionals have to work harder for longer in order to make their living. On top of all this, as a means of sustaining the companies themselves, they sometimes turn to sharing user data, which is a major concern for myriad reasons, one of which is people who use that data to create predictive algorithms for mental health. Next, Emma elaborates on this concept. Emma: People have been trying this for a number of years; aggregating people's public social media posts and trying to make predictive algorithms to diagnose them with things like ADHD, depression, anxiety… I'm still unsure how I feel about trying to make predictive algorithms in any way that try to make predictions in any way about when people are likely to harm themselves or others, simply because of how easy it is to use that type of software for things like predictive policing. I write in the book as well that people want to harness internet data and what people do on social media to try to stop people from violent behavior before it starts, so it's very much a slippery slope, and that's why I find data sharing in the realm of mental health so difficult to critique, because of course I want to help people, but I'm also concerned about privacy. Kate: For those saying, “but what about the free services? Things like Crisis Text Line or Trevor Project?” Emma: Crisis Text Line, when it comes into fruition in 2013 and it says, “we can meet people where they are by allowing them to communicate via text when they're experiencing crises”… I think that's a really laudable thing that was done, and that people thought it was an intervention that could save lives, and based on research from external and internal researchers, we know that is the case. But for people who might not be aware, Crisis Text Line doesn't put people in contact with professional mental healthcare workers, instead it's often people who have no background or training in mental healthcare services, and instead go through training and serve as volunteers to help people in dire moments need and crisis. In Therapy Tech I also describe how I perceive that as a form of exploitative labor, because although in the past there were conversations about whether to provide financial compensation for volunteers, they ultimately decided that by emphasizing the altruistic benefits of volunteering, that sort of payment wasn't necessary. And then I compare that to Facebook's problematic compensation of its content moderators, and the fact that those moderators filed a lawsuit against Facebook—although it hasn't been disclosed what the settlement was, at least there's some acknowledgement that they experienced harm as a result of their work, even if it wasn't volunteering. So I do take some issue with Crisis Text Line and then, in relation to neo-liberalism and responsibilization, again I feel that CTL is not the ultimate solution to the mental healthcare crisis in this country, or internationally, and CTL has created international partners and affiliates. I underwent training for a separate entity called Seven Cups of Tea which is both a smartphone app as well as an internet-accessible platform on a computer. And Seven Cups of Tea's training, compared to what I know CTL volunteers have to go through, is incredibly short and I would characterize as unhelpful and inadequate. For me it took 10 minutes, and I can't imagine it would take anyone more than a half hour. So the types of things I learned were how to reflect user statements back to them, how to listen empathetically but also not provide any advice or tell them what to do, because you never know who's on the other end! At the time I conducted the research, I started to volunteer on the platform. A lot of the messages I got were not from people who were experiencing mental distress necessarily, but from people who just wanted to chat or abuse the platform. But even though I only had a few experiences with people who I felt were genuinely experiencing mental distress, I still found those experiences to be really difficult for me. That could be just because of who I am as a person, but one of the things I've realized or feel and believe, is that my volunteering on the platform was part of a larger-scale initiative of 7CoT to try to differentiate between who would pay for services after I suggested to them because of my perception of them experiencing mental distress, and those whose needs could be fulfilled by just being mean to me, or having their emotions reflected back to them through superficial messaging. I very rarely felt that I was able to help people in need, and therefore I feel worse about myself for not being able to help as though it's somehow my fault, related to this idea of individual responsibilization. Me with my no knowledge, or maybe slightly more than some other volunteers, feeling like I couldn't help them. As though I'm supposed to be able to help them. I worry about the fatalistic determinism types of rhetoric that make it seem like technology is the only way to intervene, because I truly believe that technology has a role to play, but is not the only way. Kate: Technology isn't going anywhere anytime soon. So if the products and services we've built to help us aren't quite as amazing as they purport themselves to be, is there a role for tech interventions in mental health scenarios? Emma explains one possible use-case. Emma: I think technology can help in cases where there are immediate dangers. Like if you see someone upload a status or content which says there is imminent intent to self-harm or harm another person. I think there is a warrant for intervention in that case. But we also know that there are problems associated with the fact that those cries for help (or whatever you want to call them) are technologically mediated and they happen on platforms, because everything that happens via a technology generates information / data, and then we have no control, depending on the platform being used, over what happens with that data. So I'd like to see platforms that are made for mental health purposes or interventions be held accountable in that they need to be closed-circuits. It needs to be that they all pledge not to engage in data sharing, not engage in monetization of user data even if it's not for-profit, and they need to have very clear terms of service that make very evident and easily-comprehendible to the average person who doesn't want to read 50 pages before agreeing, that they won't share data or information. Kate: Now, I do like to close my show with optimism. So first, let's go to Rahaf once again with one potential solution to the current tech issues plaguing our minds. Rahaf: To me one of the most important things that we need to tackle—and I don't know why we can't just do this immediately—we need to have the capacity on any platform that we use to turn off the algorithm. Having an algorithm choose what we see is one of the biggest threats, because think about all the information that you consume in a day, and think about how much of that was selected for you by an algorithm. We need to have an ability to go outside of the power that this little piece of code has to go out and select our own information, or hold companies accountable to produce information that is much more balanced. Kate: And that sounds like a great solution. But how do we do that? We don't control our technology, the parent companies do. It's easy to feel hopeless… unless you're my friend David Ryan Polgar, a tech ethicist and founder of All Tech Is Human, who's here to remind us that we aren't bystanders in this. I asked him what the most important question we should be asking ourselves is at this moment, and he had this to say. David: What do we want from our technology? This is not happening to us, this is us. We are part of the process. We are not just magically watching something take place, and I think we often times forget that. The best and brightest of our generation should not be focused on getting us to click on an ad, it should be focused on improving humanity. We have major societal issues, but we also have the talent and expertise to solve some of these problems. And another area that I think should be focused on a little more, we are really missing out on human touch. Frankly, I feel impacted by it. We need to hug each other. We need to shake hands as Americans. I know some people would disagree with that, but we need warmth. We need presence of somebody. If there was a way that if we ended this conversation and like, we had some type of haptic feedback, where you could like, pat me on the shoulder or something like that… everybody right now is an avatar. So I need to have something to say like, “Kate! You and I are friends, we know each other! So I want a greater connection with you than with any other video that I could watch online. You are more important than that other video.” But right now it's still very two dimensional, and I'm not feeling anything from you. And I think there's going to have to be a lot more focus on, how can I feel this conversation a little more. Because I mean listen, people are sick and tired right now, ‘not another Zoom call!' But if there was some kind of feeling behind it, then you could say, “I feel nourished!” whereas now, you can sometimes feel exhausted. We're not trying to replace humanity, what we're always trying to do is, no matter where you stand on an issue, at the end of the day, we're actually pretty basic. We want more friends, we want more love… there are actual base emotions and I think COVID has really set that in motion, to say, hey, we can disagree on a lot in life, but what we're trying to do is get more value. Be happier as humans, and be more fulfilled. Be more educated and stimulated. And technology has a major role in that, and now, it's about saying how can it be more focused on that, rather than something that is more extractive in nature? Kate: Whether we like it or not, the Internet and digital technology play a major role in our collective mental health, and most of the controls are outside of our hands. That can feel heavy, or make you want to throw in the towel. Those feelings are valid, but they aren't the end of the story. I asked David for something actionable, and this is what he had to say. David: Get more involved in the process. Part of the problem is we don't feel like we can, but we're going to have to demand that we are, and I think frankly some of this is going to come down to political involvement, to say ‘we want these conversations to be happening. We don't want something adopted and deployed before we've had a chance to ask what we actually desire.' So that's the biggest part is that everyone needs to add their voice, because these are political issues, and right now people think, ‘well, I'm not a techie!' Guess what? if you're carrying around a smartphone… Kate: All the more reason we need you! David: Right! We need everybody. Technology is much larger. Technology is society. These are actually social issues, and I think once we start applying that, then we start saying, ‘yeah, I can get involved.' And that's one of the things we need to do as a society is get plugged in and be part of the process. KO: There are a lot of factors that contribute to our overall sense of happiness as humans. And although it may sound like a cliche, some of those factors are the technologies that we use to make our lives easier and the algorithms that govern the apps we thought we were using to stay connected. But that doesn't mean things are hopeless. If we keep talking about what matters to us, and make an effort to bring back meaningful human interaction, we can influence the people building our technology so that it works for our mental health, instead of against it.

Loving Without Boundaries
EPISODE 189: Marie Lepage Interview

Loving Without Boundaries

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 53:10


EPISODE 189 Interview with Marie Lepage. Marie grew up in conservative Christianity but is now an active polyam voice within the post-religious community, providing coaching to ENM folx. They began their public work as a means of healing theirself, processing their trauma, and connecting with others who struggle as well. Marie started their own podcast called Everyone's Autonomous which discontinued in August 2021 and merged into "Marie, Myself, & I". They continue to guest appear on other platforms, speaking about their activism with toxic dogma, the deconstruction of monogamy, secular spirituality, and all things intrapersonally deconstructive. Marie has been the administrator and facilitator of an ex-religious support group in the Twin Cities since 2015 and has led breakout sessions at MNPolyCon. If you get value out of the Loving Without Boundaries podcast, then consider becoming one of our patrons! Not only will you enjoy exclusive content made just for you, your support will also help us continue creating educational content while helping more people have a deeper understanding of consensual non-monogamy and healthy, sex positive relationships in general. https://www.patreon.com/lovingwithoutboundaries

Winning In Asia: A ZoZo Go Podcast
What Does China Want? Elizabeth Economy, Author, The World According to China.

Winning In Asia: A ZoZo Go Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 41:18


In this conversation, Michael chats with Elizabeth Economy. Liz is the author of "The World According To China" and let's us know what China is thinking and how the US falls into their plans. #DrivingWithDunne / #ZozoGo https://twitter.com/Dunne_ZoZoGohttps://www.instagram.com/zo.zo.go/?hl=enhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/michael-dunne-a696901a/In our conversation, Hau gives us an insider's view of how the Mustang Mach E grew from concept to production in less than three years. As you might imagine, there were more than a few dramatic twists and turns along the way. Also, I am sure that you will be surprised and amazed by Hau's own personal story, from escaping war-torn Vietnam in 1975 to becoming one of the auto industry's most accomplished executives

Sassy SoulVersations with Tierney Jordan
3. A Sensual Faith w/ Lyvonne Briggs

Sassy SoulVersations with Tierney Jordan

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 30:42


Sassy Spirituality with Tierney C. Jordan! Tierney is a public theologian, digital content creator, and host of Sassy Spirituality, a digital sacred space that allows us to explore how our spirituality can be Saucey, Autonomous, Soul-Searching, Sensual, and Yearning. If you're interested in a liberated approach to all things spiritual, you're certainly found the right place. Join us biweekly on Tuesdays and engage the global conversation by using #SassySpiritualityPod. Support the Podcast: Monthly Donations - https://www.patreon.com/iamtierneyjOne Time Donation - https://paypal.me/SassySoulPod Connect with Lyvonne:Website: https://linktr.ee/lyvonnep Twitter | IG | TikTok: @lyvonnebriggsSensual Faith Academy: https://www.patreon.com/lyvonnebriggs Connect with Tierney:IG: https://instagram.com/iamtierneyj Twitter: https://twitter.com/iamtierneyj Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tierney.ridley Website: https://www.tierneyjordan.com/Connect with the Podcast: IG: https://instagram.com/sassyspiritualitypod Twitter: https://twitter.com/sassyspiritpod Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/sassysoulpod Email: info@tierneyjordan.com

Drone Radio Show
What do investors look for in the UAS Industry? - Vadim Tarasov, Advanced Autonomous Solutions Fund

Drone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 27:14


What do investors look for in the UAS Industry?  Vadim Tarasov is founding partner of Advanced Autonomous Solutions Fund, a fund investing in unmanned solutions globally.  The fund believes that automation will play a key role in transformation of the largest industries in the next 2-5 years and only a handful of companies will serve as a backbone for such automation.  One of those companies is UAVOS, which specializes in the design, development and manufacturing of unmanned vehicles and autopilot systems, as well as components such as servo drives, pan-tilt platforms, rescue/emergency landing systems.   In addition to being a partner at Advanced Autonomous Solutions Fund, Vadim is also Chairman of the Board at UAVOS.  He has more than 15 years experience as a board member, investor and executive leader with highly disruptive technology companies.    In this episode of the Drone Radio Show, Vadim talks about Advanced Autonomous Solutions Fund, UAVOS and he provides an investor's perspective into the UAV market and the future of autonomous operations. 

Innovating with Scott Amyx
Interview with Ritukar Vijay CEO of Ottonomy

Innovating with Scott Amyx

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 26:58


Ottonomy robots help navigate businesses with staffing shortages for retail and restaurant industries.

The WAN Show Podcast
I Got COVID... - WAN Show April 22, 2022

The WAN Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 166:17


Purchase the MSI Optix MPG321QRF-QD Monitor at: https://geni.us/fH1m Join JumpCloud & a community of IT professionals at: https://cloud.jumpcloud.com/WAN Get 20% Off Pulseway's IT Management Software at https://lmg.gg/PulsewayWAN Floatplane Developer Application Forms: Front end: https://forms.gle/Tr3kvqYAuDTFaFiA8 Back end: https://forms.gle/PBBKya1zcD27iPew8 Check out the WAN Show & Podcast Gear: https://lmg.gg/podcastgear Check out the They're Just Movies Podcast: https://lmg.gg/tjmpodcast Timestamps: (Courtesy of NoKi1119) 0:00 Chapters 1:46 Intro 2:30 Topic #1 - Special guest introduction 3:08 Guest collabing with LMG, Hot Wheels case build 4:02 Hosts in the video, staff issues 7:03 James helping with the build video, size of footage 9:14 NAS upgrade videos idea, discussing speedrun community 17:28 Kickstarter Edition Pebble Time gift 20:16 Health tracking via smartwatches V.S. Oura 26:10 Thanking guest 29:32 Topic #2 - Linus has COVID 32:49 Experience with YT experimental & statistics 36:12 Social Blade & YouTube's censoring issues 44:23 Linus's frustration, Elon Musk "the Founder" conundrum 53:06 Elon's familial record, lack of a PR team in Tesla 56:46 Tesla has a press team, dissolved PR department 58:58 Tesla's arrogance & "transparency" 1:01:36 Suing independent media, Elon & Dogecoin, Starlink in Ukraine 1:06:26 Stock purchase disclosure 1:09:22 Merch Message about stopping watching due to "politics" 1:12:18 LTTStore new bottle colors 1:15:36 Topic #3 - Dell's proprietary DDR5 connectors 1:15:52 Embargo ft. calling Clark, summarizing CAMM 1:19:03 Thoughts on CAMM & upgradable laptops 1:28:21 Sponsors 1:32:02 Topic #4 - Google banning third-party call recording apps 1:34:26 Topic #5 - Front license plates privacy advocate arguments 1:36:24 Privacy & utility discussion 1:38:08 Linus on Google's decisions, recording call option 1:43:43 Topic #6 - Netflix shares, rates going up 1:46:36 Netflix's rug pulling habit 1:52:45 Middle ground for shows, audience V.S. shareholders 1:54:33 CNN+'s streaming service closed, comparing with FP 2:00:05 Linus promises to show labs hire, different FP tiers 2:03:42 Topic #7 - Tesla uses engineering chips in sold cars 2:06:24 Devil's advocate on trying to salvage chips 2:08:12 Topic #8 - Tesla stops shipping mobile connector chargers 2:11:23 Linus's take on the charger, cars prices increasing 2:15:03 Topic #9 - GPU scalpocalypse over, prices falling 2:16:14 Linus's tin-foil level hot-take, Arc coincidental timing 2:17:46 Luke's warm-take, struggles wafer production & pricing 2:19:26 Linus's tin-foil on material pricing & inflation 2:22:45 Merch Messages 2:23:02 Luke's "Slick" origin 2:24:26 Biggest failure while making a video 2:25:34 How to MM, 420 waterbottles sold 2:26:18 Cereals & milk of choice 2:29:08 Places Linus & Luke wants to go 2:30:18 Gaming-focused videos idea for Channel Super Fun 2:31:13 Advices for young tech professionals & education 2:34:36 Thoughts on Star Citizen 2:35:43 Thoughts on autonomous ride-along companies 2:36:30 What podcasts do Linus & Luke listen to 2:39:58 Star Citizen bartender beer animation then softlocked 2:40:57 Autonomous driving discussion, Openpilot 2:42:33 Linus Greenscreen Tips 2:45:16 Outro

The Race to Value Podcast
Leveraging Autonomous AI to Close Care Gaps and Improve Quality and Equity, with Dr. Michael Abramoff and Seth Rainford

The Race to Value Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 59:17


Have you ever had an idea that you just had to make real? No matter what it took… no matter what obstacles were in your way… no matter how many times people told you no… you just couldn't stop until it existed? Well, this is one of those stories. It begins with an idea in 1988 and leads to the first-ever autonomous AI to be approved by the FDA for diagnosis without physician input. Dr. Michael Abramoff, MD, Ph.D. is the Founder and Executive Chairman of Digital Diagnostics, the autonomous AI diagnostics company which was the first in any field of medicine to get FDA authorization for an autonomous AI.  Dr. Abramoff is a neuroscientist, a practicing physician, and holds a Ph.D. in Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning. In 1988, Michael was working on artificial intelligence during his residency and began to think a computer could diagnose diabetic retinopathy. Given the technology available at the time, this idea may have been a bit of a stretch. Still, Michael set out to prove it could be done. Joining him in this interview is Seth Rainford, the President and COO at Digital Diagnostics.  Seth focuses on expanding market opportunities and driving operational excellence within the company. He brings more than a decade of executive experience to Digital Diagnostics including the successful management of large-scale P&L's, strong organic & inorganic business development expertise, as well as complex multi-site operations leadership within the healthcare industry. In this episode, we talk with Dr. Abramov and Seth about the 30-year journey that led to the founding of Digital Diagnostics, and the first-ever FDA-approved Autonomous AI in healthcare. Plus, we explore the challenges they continue to work through as they commercialize their product to support organizations looking to win in value-based care! Episode Bookmarks: 01:30 Introduction to Dr. Abramoff and Seth Rainford and how the first-ever autonomous AI solution became FDA-approved for diagnosis without physician input 03:30 The scalability of Artificial Intelligence in healthcare and the recent failure of IBM Watson Health 06:00 “We are at an inflection point with AI…specifically with Autonomous AI.” 06:30 The parallel paths between AI and the discovery of DNA and its eventual use in the courtroom. 07:45 Why should we limit diagnosis to human cognition when autonomous AI has been proven to be safe and effective? 08:45 An overview of the history of AI, from advancements in neuroscience and sensory processing, ML, artificial neural networks, to autonomous AI in healthcare. 10:45 Where IBM Watson failed – it started with “glamour AI” (i.e. winning at Jeopardy) instead of trying to solve problems in healthcare 12:00 Most of what we hear about in healthcare is assistive AI -- not autonomous AI. 13:20 There is no need for human oversight in autonomous AI for making FDA-approved diagnoses in healthcare. 15:15 Referencing a recent NEJM Catalyst Op-Ed that criticizes autonomous AI in healthcare 16:30 Lessons learned from the challenges of assistive AI and how the develop of a completely autonomous AI solution started with FDA approval 18:30 “In considering the best ways to improve population health outcomes, we must include autonomous AI.” 19:00 Humans are not necessarily better than AI when it comes to diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy 19:20 Referencing NEJM study using assistive AI diagnosis of breast cancer and how radiologist involvement with AI didn't improve outcomes 22:00 Health inequities with diabetic retinopathy in various minoritized populations 23:00 Recent CMMI focus to advance health equity in value-based care 23:45 “Diabetic Retinopathy is the main cause of blindness and this is disproportionately impacting minorities and rural populations due to lack of access to care.” 25:00 The importance of the diabetic eye exam and how to make testing more accessible through autonomous AI

Sleep Whispers
Announcement: I've launched a new podcast! It is titled, Calm History.

Sleep Whispers

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 12:35


I’ve launched a new podcast titled, Calm History.  Listen to Calm History for FREE on: [Apple] or [Spotify] or [Android] The first five episodes include: The History of Rubber & Charles Goodyear, The Titanic, Joan of Arc, Henry Ford, & a fun Quiz Quest of History episode. Visit my new web page to explore ALL … Continue reading Announcement: I’ve launched a new podcast! It is titled, Calm History.