Podcasts about Human Element

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Human Element

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Best podcasts about Human Element

Latest podcast episodes about Human Element

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast
MGoPodcast 13.7: 2021-‘22 Basketball Preview

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 143:59


wsg Matt from Endless Motor. 1 hour and 32 minutes The Sponsors Thank you to Underground Printing for making this all possible. Rishi and Ryan have been our biggest supporters from the beginning. Check out their wide selection of officially licensed Michigan fan gear at their 3 store locations in Ann Arbor or learn about their custom apparel business at undergroundshirts.com. And let's not forget our associate sponsors: Peak Wealth Management, HomeSure Lending, Ann Arbor Elder Law, Michigan Law Grad, Human Element, The Phil Klein Insurance Group, SignalWire (use the code MUPPETS), Prentice 4M, where we recorded this, and introducing The View from the Cheap Seats podcast by the Sklars, who will now be joining us for the Hot Takes segments. Please go subscribe and like their podcast, and leave your hot takes about this game in the reviews. 1. The Frontcourt (Fours and Fives) starts at 1:00 Hunter Dickinson was pretty good, awesome in fact, and then just plain awesome as they doubled him and took away his favorite shoulder. He can develop that and/or a three. Moussa Diabate is going to be an IMPACT defender, can play the four, might develop a shot, switchable nightmare. Versatility with Brandon Johns able to play 4 or 5. He was more commanding as a starter, team X factor. Terrance Williams is about to bust out. Will Tschetter: redshirt or instant Wisconsin center? [The rest of the writeup and the player after THE JUMP] 2. The Backcourt: Wings and Guards starts at 32:24 Caleb Houstan is like bringing in an NBA three-and-D dude. Not going to feel like a freshman, can shoot over anyone 6'5” and lower so he could be the new Chaundee shoots it guy. Backups: all the fours and twos. Eli Brooks is the most important player on the team (no hot take). Kobe Bufkin is going to outplay his rankings—this year he's something in between freshman and sophomore Caris. Could see a jump from Zeb Jackson, or he could fall behind Isaiah Barnes. Not Jace's turn yet. Could be Frankie's turn soon but Devante Jones is your starting PG and could be an upgrade on Smith. 3. Big Ten Basketball Preview starts at 1:06:53 Tier 1: Illinois gets back Kofi and Curbelo, Trent Frazier is a problem for Brooks, who else can play on this team? Purdue brings back everybody, can a sophomore breakout from Ivey and Edey and Newman and Gillis take them all the way? Ohio State replaced its backcourt, waiting to see if Seth Towns can take a big role. Maryland found a center and a PG to go with Ayala and Scott. Tier 2: Indiana is 2015 Michigan football. They'll put four out so TJD can work alone inside, and brought in four transfers/recruits to do it. MSU has a few dudes but can't figure out which and when to play. Iowa and Wisconsin suffered huge losses. Nebraska > Penn State and Northwestern. Are 200 teams better than Minnesota? 4. Hot Takes, and Around the Big Ten, wsg Jamie Mac starts at 1:46:57 Signs of life from future opponents who looked like pushovers, signs of death from objects in the rearview mirror. Indiana has to be a frustrating follow, but not enough that we can wish Jamie luck on fixing that OL. MUSIC: “Silver Dollar”—Sierra Ferrell “Proofs”—Mates of State “In the Stone”—The Goon Sax “Across 110th Street”

Paul's Security Weekly TV
The Human Element of Security Awareness - Brian Reed - BSW #235

Paul's Security Weekly TV

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 30:37


It is Cybersecurity Awareness Month, but security awareness is a lot tougher than just dedicating a month to awareness activities. Security awareness is a journey, requiring motivation along the way. Brian Reed, Cybersecurity Evangelist from Proofpoint, joins Business Security Weekly to discuss the security awareness journey and how the human elements can help motivate us. Brian will discuss how personalized content and gamification can help achieve better outcomes for organizations and the individual.   This segment is sponsored by Proofpoint. Visit https://securityweekly.com/proofpoint to learn more about them!   Visit https://www.securityweekly.com/bsw for all the latest episodes! Show Notes: https://securityweekly.com/bsw235

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast
MGoPodcast 13.6: The Solution to College Crappe

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 91:55


1 hour and 32 minutes The Sponsors Thank you to Underground Printing for making this all possible. Rishi and Ryan have been our biggest supporters from the beginning. Check out their wide selection of officially licensed Michigan fan gear at their 3 store locations in Ann Arbor or learn about their custom apparel business at undergroundshirts.com. And let's not forget our associate sponsors: Peak Wealth Management, HomeSure Lending, Ann Arbor Elder Law, Michigan Law Grad, Human Element, The Phil Klein Insurance Group, SignalWire (use the code MUPPETS), Prentice 4M, where we recorded this, and introducing The View from the Cheap Seats podcast by the Sklars, who will now be joining us for the Hot Takes segments. Please go subscribe and like their podcast, and leave your hot takes about this game in the reviews. 1. Offense vs Nebraska starts at 1:00 Better in numbers than it felt. Sort of a Washington game but with dinky doo passing. The TE leak stuff was something they saw on film and kept working. McCarthy's arc read worked when they thought it was Cade, but they need a pop pass or something off of it because it's too obvious late. Had to use multiple guards—Stueber wrecked. Appreciation for the running backs—greatest hurdle of all time? McNamara deep accuracy, where'd you go? [The rest of the writeup and the player after THE JUMP] 2. Defense vs Nebraska starts at 23:45 Nebraska is very good at college crappe, not very good at fundamental football. DTs have a very good day again, impressive that Mazi Smith could keep going after the opening screen. Jenkins had the 3rd down stuff. Hinton was great. They're not pass rushers however, which is still a step-up problem. Michigan had crappe as well, especially when Morris and Hawkins played that 4th and 2. 3. Hot Takes, Special Teams, and Game Theory starts at 47:15 Not a lot of weird decisions—both teams punted on 4th and 1 in their own territory. Special teams battle wasn't as big as we expected because of Michigan's punt returns: one flub, one ran backwards, one let bounce and lucky it went in the endzone. The rest was great: Robbins added distance to his Boom. MAAR blood in Moody. 4. Around the Big Ten, wsg Jamie Mac starts at 1:14:03 Iowa-Penn State changed when PSU didn't have a backup quarterback, which is very hard to do in 2021 when your Will Levis can just go start at Kentucky. PSU's defense is legit: Luketa is doing the Micah Parsons stuff, and their secondary is filled with stars. MSU-Rutgers you can watch the highlights because that's all there was. Wisconsin's best RB was booted from the program. Ohio State is shoveling coal again. MUSIC: “You and Me ”—Penny and the Quarters “Maria También”—Khruangbin “On the News”—Your Old Droog “Across 110th Street”

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast
MGoRadio 7.5: A Shooting Gallery of Feet

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 63:47


1 hour and 3 minutes The Sponsors Thank you to Underground Printing for making this all possible. UGP makes custom apparel such as t-shirts and sweatshirts and was founded by 2 Michigan alums over 20 years ago. They have 3 retail locations in Ann Arbor and offer thousands of University of Michigan athletic products for sale, ranging from clothing to accessories and memorabilia. Check them out at ugpmichiganapparel.com. And let's not forget our associate sponsors: Peak Wealth Management, HomeSure Lending, Ann Arbor Elder Law, Michigan Law Grad, Human Element, The Phil Klein Insurance Group, Prentice4M, and made possible by SignalWire. The Video: 1. Nebraska Preview: Offense Get Martinez throwing off his back foot, and please get off the field ASAP. Respectable defense too but Seth thinks the OLBs are crackable. Special teams are a foot shooting gallery. 2. Nebraska Preview: Defense starts at 14:52 Not the 2018 confused guys, also not Wisconsin. Good LB and a pair of DTs. Can they be edged? 3. Wisconsin After UFR Starts at 30:53 Seth explains the Cade cyan for 15 minutes. 4. Seth's Hockey Podcast wsg Nate Wells Starts at 51:20 Part II of our preview for the year, featuring THE guy to talk about college hockey, even if he wants to talk about Minnesota and then have his internet cut out on him mid-segment so we couldn't get into how bad MSU and OSU are going to be. MUSIC: Tonight's featured musician is Via Mardot of Holland, MI, and three tracks off of self-titled 2020 album. Wife and I discovered her music last year, and I asked for this one personally. Olivia Mainville makes Frenchy indie with Pulp Fiction vibes. Find her on Instagram. My favorite of hers is Wreck but the songs I chose for the pod were: Stand War Tie to the Bar And because Sony bought Across 110th Street and slapped a claim on us, the opener and outro: “The Employee is Not Afraid”—Bear vs. Shark “Ruska Vodka”—Motorboat If you or a friend made some good tunes and don't have a label out scrubbing for them we'd be happy to feature you.

P3 - Project Privacy Podcast
The Human Element of Data Management

P3 - Project Privacy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 26:02


MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast
MGoPodcast 13.5: No Lucy Talk

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 78:43


1 hour and 19 minutes The Sponsors Thank you to Underground Printing for making this all possible. Rishi and Ryan have been our biggest supporters from the beginning. Check out their wide selection of officially licensed Michigan fan gear at their 3 store locations in Ann Arbor or learn about their custom apparel business at undergroundshirts.com. And let's not forget our associate sponsors: Peak Wealth Management, HomeSure Lending, Ann Arbor Elder Law, Michigan Law Grad, Human Element, The Phil Klein Insurance Group, SignalWire (use the code MUPPETS), Prentice 4M, where we recorded this, and introducing The View from the Cheap Seats podcast by the Sklars, who will now be joining us for the Hot Takes segments. Please go subscribe and like their podcast, and leave your hot takes about this game in the reviews. 1. Offense vs Wisconsin starts at 1:00 Long discussion about Cade: were the bad passes on him or the receivers? Little bit of both but we disagree on the degrees. McCarthy can run options however, which seems like an important thing. No more split zone in short situations: you're asking for impossible blocks. Tight ends got Wisconsinized. Hello Roman Wilson (don't step out). [The rest of the writeup and the player after THE JUMP] 2. Defense vs Wisconsin starts at 22:45 How Wisconsin was this? Quarterbackly: no. Wolf had two turnovers when he came in—similar to when Michigan lost Peters and fell apart here years ago. The front seven however! The DTs withstood some Wisconsin linemen. Ojabo had a GAME. Dax Hill had a game. Hinton and Smith and the young DTs with them looked pretty good. The interesting blitzes are an effect of running more zone. 3. Hot Takes, Special Teams, and Game Theory starts at 39:42 Seth reads off every 4th down decision and Brian says whether he would go or not go on that one. Really there was just one we thought they got too conservative. The pooch was a bad idea—20 yards in that circumstance is worth way more than 2 seconds. Special teams was a huge difference, e.g. punt from the 17, get it back on the 40. Moody hits all three. 4. Around the Big Ten, wsg Jamie Mac starts at 56:22 Western Kentucky could have hung with MSU if they didn't just kick field goals. Indiana broke Penix as well as everything else. Ohio State did to Rutgers all the things we were clamoring to do to Rutgers. Nebraska did terrible things to Northwestern, with a walk-on running back.  MUSIC: “Marigold”—Jelani Aryeh “Wet Leg”—Chaise Lounge “Future Me Hates Me”—The Beths “Across 110th Street”

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast
MGoRadio 7.4: Hard Times Come Again No More

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 68:03


1 hour and 9 minutes The Sponsors Thank you to Underground Printing for making this all possible. UGP makes custom apparel such as t-shirts and sweatshirts and was founded by 2 Michigan alums over 20 years ago. They have 3 retail locations in Ann Arbor and offer thousands of University of Michigan athletic products for sale, ranging from clothing to accessories and memorabilia. Check them out at ugpmichiganapparel.com. And let's not forget our associate sponsors: Peak Wealth Management, HomeSure Lending, Ann Arbor Elder Law, Michigan Law Grad, Human Element, The Phil Klein Insurance Group, Prentice4M, and made possible by SignalWire. The Video: [After THE JUMP: the player and what we said] -------------------------------------------- 1. Wisconsin Preview: Offense starts at 1:00 They thought they had a quarterback. Now they don't have a running back either. 2. Wisconsin Preview: Defense starts at 17:17 As Wisconsin as ever. That linebacker factory is incredible. Can we deep pass? Will we deep pass? 3. Rutgers After UFR Starts at 31:57 Things got stupid. 4. Seth's Hockey Podcast wsg David Nasternak Starts at 47:51 Part I of our preview for the year with all the expectations. MUSIC: Tonight's featured musician is Miko Marks, and three tracks off of her new album Race Records, which came out TODAY. The ‘Hard Times' cover is such a good one, and such a good pull, says this Civ VI American. Listen on your preferred listening link. Hard Times Long as I Can See the Light Long Journey Home And because Sony bought Across 110th Street and slapped a claim on us, the opener and outro: “The Employee is Not Afraid”—Bear vs. Shark “Ruska Vodka”—Motorboat If you or a friend made some good tunes and don't have a label out scrubbing for them we'd be happy to feature you. THE USUAL LINKS: Helpful iTunes subscribe link General podcast feed link What's with the theme music?

Inside Outside Innovation
Ep. 266 - David Schonthal, Professor at Northwestern University & Coauthor of The Human Element on Gaining Traction with New Ideas

Inside Outside Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 20:22


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with David Schonthal, Clinical Professor and Director of Entrepreneurship Programs at the Kellogg School of Management and Coauthor of the new book, The Human Element: Overcoming the Resistance That Awaits New Ideas. David and I talk about what keeps ideas from gaining traction and what you can do to avoid friction and resistance to new ideas. Let's get started.Inside Outside Innovation is the podcast to help new innovators navigate what's next. Each week, we'll give you a front row seat to what it takes to learn, grow, and thrive in today's world of accelerating change and uncertainty. Join us as we explore, engage, and experiment with the best and the brightest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses. It's time to get started.Interview Transcript with David Schonthal, Clinical Professor and Director of Entrepreneurship Programs at Northwestern University and Coauthor of The Human ElementBrian Ardinger: Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation, I'm your host, Brian Ardinger. And as always, we have another amazing guest. Today, we have David Schonthal. He is a Clinical Professor and Director of Entrepreneurship Programs at Northwestern University and Coauthor of the new book, The Human Element: Overcoming the Resistance that Awaits New Ideas. Welcome to the show, David. David Schonthal: Thanks, Brian. Nice to be here. Brian Ardinger: Hey, I'm excited to have you here. You have spent a lot of your career thinking about and watching what it takes to make new ideas happen. You've spent time at IDEO. You were co-founder of Matter, which is that 25,000 square foot innovation center in Chicago. Has some venture capital experience and that. And I thought we could start by telling the audience how you got into the innovation space in the first place. David Schonthal: By accident is the answer. It's sort of a long story, but I wound up becoming the COO of a medical device company in San Diego, California based on a radical shift from what I was doing before, which is tax software in London. To make a long story short, one of my former bosses called me up when I was just at my lowest point with tax and the UK, no offense to the UK, but it was winter, and it was like dark 18 hours out of the day. And he called me up and all of a sudden, I just, all I remember is him saying, yada, yada, yada San Diego, yada yada, yada. I was like, oh please.He's like, would you like to know what the business is? I was like, no, not important. So, I wound up going and being the head of operations for an early stage medical device company. And then basically from that point forward was just bit with the bug around bringing new ideas to market either in the startup space, through entrepreneurship or venture capital or in the corporate space through design and innovation.Brian Ardinger: And you've got a new book called the Human Element. I would imagine it packs a lot about the things that you've learned over that career. Since you've spent a lot of time seeing how early ideas get traction or not, what is the most striking problem that you see most people making when it comes to kicking off an idea?David Schonthal: I think maybe the best place to start is by most innovators and entrepreneurs' instinct that the idea is the thing that needs to be addressed. So, if a new product or service or strategy isn't being adopted by the market, most innovators instincts says well, let's make the product a little better. Let's change the way we talk about it. Let's drop the price. Let's promote it differently. And they make the thing or the strategy or the movement, the center of their attention. And in the course of my career, I've worked on some really amazing, I mean, some terrible, but also some really amazing innovations and products and services. And I was always surprised by how, even though clearly if these things were adopted into the market, they would make the world a better place, no matter how much we tweaked or change the idea that wasn't always the key to success of getting it introduced.And so about four years ago, turned my attention to thinking about what is it that stands in the way of change and partnered up with one of my colleagues at Kellogg, who was a behavioral psychologist named Loran Nordgren. And together we've been studying this problem from both the applied side, as well as the theoretical side.And that was the genesis of the book, which is that our instincts about innovation are too heavily biased on making the thing more appealing and not focused enough on helping the market adopt it by removing the friction that stands in the way. Brian Ardinger: Yeah. I love that. You kind of start off the book, this battle between what do you call fuel and friction. The idea that a lot of times, just to make an idea better, all you have to do is add more facts or more features or try to get more folks bought into it. But really, it's a lot about how do you eliminate the frictions around that? So, in the book you talk about four frictions. Let's outline and tell the audience how they can avoid them.David Schonthal: Sure. So, if you think about a new idea, like an airplane leaving the ground or a projectile flying through the air. Fuel, to your point Brian, are all of the things that propel that idea forward. The need that the customer has, features and benefits, promotional strategies, but like an airplane leaving the ground there are also forces that stand in the way, whether it's wind resistance or sheer or gravity. And so, the book is really focused on these forces, these headwinds of innovation and the four that we specify in the book, the four frictions, our number one inertia, which is our desire as human beings to tend to stick with the status quo. Despite the fact that we know the status quo might be imperfect, our habits are surprisingly powerful. And so, recognizing that inertia is a play anytime you're trying to get somebody to change from what they're doing today, to what you'd like them to do tomorrow. Effort is the second one. All of the ambiguity, all of the costliness, all of the exertion required to get somebody to make that change. The third friction is emotion. All of the anxiety and fear that comes along with changing from something that you do today to something you do tomorrow. And you might not think that emotion comes into play for small things, but emotion comes into play when you're buying a pack of gum or when you're putting on a new shirt.And then the fourth is what we call reactants, which is people's aversion to being changed by others. And each of them show up in varying degrees, depending on what you're working on in spotting them appropriately forecasting them ideally, so that they can be muted and mitigated is really the key. Brian Ardinger: And a lot of those frictions, they're almost not necessarily irrational, but they're definitely not something that you can take an economic model and say, well, clearly there's a cost benefit analysis and everybody should end up on this side of it because of the cost benefit analysis. But there's a lot of underlying things. And it seems a lot of this frictions around ambiguity or being comfortable with failure. How can you get folks more comfortable with that environment of ambiguity? David Schonthal: There's a couple of things that are packed into that question. Number one, ambiguity maps to the friction of effort. Effort we assume is like exertion, which is how much time and money will it take me to make a change. But you're pointing out appropriately that the other way effort comes in is ambiguity or a lack of clarity about how to go about doing something.And sometimes that ambiguity can be so overwhelming that people are afraid to get started because they don't necessarily know how to get started. We talk in the book about a couple of methodologies specifically around helping people with ambiguity. One is around road mapping in simplification. Oftentimes our desire to get people to change is to like keep adding or keep making something better, add facts or add arguments to get somebody to change from what they're doing, to what you'd like them to doing.I mean, just look at vaccines. For example, in the states. Like there's no ambiguity about the evidence that vaccines help protect against severe illness. There is no ambiguity. There is no doubting, the fact that if you get vaccinated, it will make the world a safer place. But that doesn't stop people from having resistance to that idea.And one thing might be around the ambiguity about how to go about getting a vaccine. One might be around the perceived effort of getting a vaccine. The fear about getting a vaccine. And so understanding why people do or don't do the things that they do is really the key to addressing it. So simplification, streamlining, making unfamiliar ideas more familiar. Oftentimes innovators have this instinct that because their idea is new and radical. We need to highlight its newness and its radicalness is part of its allure. Oftentimes that actually works against us because the newer and more radical something seems the less familiar it is. And the more anxiety we have about how we're going to start to use it. And the great example of that comes from Apple. And if you're old enough audience to remember the introduction of the Macintosh OS. In addition to creating a new machine, one of the things that Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak created was a created was a new operating system for how computers are used. And unlike PCs or DOS-based systems, which you really needed to learn the language of computers in order to do something on a computer, Steve Jobs and other great innovators tend to have their products and services operate the way the rest of your world works.So, when you're working on an Apple home screen, you're working on a desktop. And when you're creating a document and you want to store that document, you put that document in a folder. And when you want to get rid of it, you drag it into the trashcan. And these might seem sort of like cute user interface principles, but these were deliberately designed to make something wildly unfamiliar to people who had never worked on a computer to immediately feel more comfortable with it because it works, sounds, and it feels the way the rest of your world works. So even though something is new, doesn't mean that it should be projected as radically.Brian Ardinger: So, if I'm a new innovator or I'm a startup entrepreneur, I've got a new idea I want to start building that out. Do you recommend mapping out these particular frictions or how do you find out what your audience or what your customers are fearful about? David Schonthal: That's a great question. There are a couple of tools we bring to life in the book. One is called a Friction Map, which is anticipating the frictions that might stand in the way of your new ideas. So, it is a document that you can fill out with your team. Where you forecast based on some clear questions that are asked in the Map. What is the relevance? What is the amount of inertia that might be present? What's the amount of effort, friction that might be present? Emotional friction that might be present in reactants? And then there's another framework around remedies. How might you take each of these frictions, test them in the market, but also test possible remedies to overcome. And the more you can bring this into your design process.So, people will fill out a Business Model Canvas based on Osterwalder's work, or they'll fill out a Horizons Framework as they're forecasting what opportunities might exist. We also recommend filling out a Friction Map, which is what are the forces of resistance that might stand in the way. And what might we prototype to overcome those forces as a way of introducing this product or service or strategy.Brian Ardinger: And then do you go out and actually test those assumptions? David Schonthal: Absolutely. Each of them can be prototyped. And yes, testing them with different audiences, testing different ways of communicating or making unfamiliar things familiar. Or identifying the sources of emotional friction so that they can be addressed in the messaging, and the way products are communicated. All are easy enough to test in low fidelity and oftentimes save us a lot of effort down the road when it comes to scaling offers up. Brian Ardinger: One of the other things I liked about the book is that you have not only these frameworks, that people can understand the methodology and that around it, but you also bring out some case studies in the book. And one of them is around Flyhomes, which is a startup company that built a new business model in the real estate space, designed to address some of the frictions in the market. So, can you talk a little bit about that case study? David Schonthal: It's a great story. So Flyhomes, for those of you who are living in the United States while you're watching this can appreciate, we are in the midst of a bananas housing market, residential housing market. Debt has never been cheaper. Inventory has never been lower. And as a result, desirable homes are just flying off the market almost the same day that they're listed, which creates a whole conundrum for people who are trying to buy homes, particularly first-time home buyers. Because when inventory is low, typically the offers that get accepted by sellers, particularly when they have multiple offers, are all cash offers or offers that are perceived to be low risk. And low risk offers are ones that don't have contingencies attached to them. Don't have home sale contingencies. Don't have loan contingencies. In order to compete, in order to get a home buyer, you have to either bring all cash to the table or convince sellers that despite the fact that they've got these contingencies, that there's actually a high degree of certainty, that something will close.Flyhomes is a business that helps address this problem by making all buyers, all cash buyers, they have focused their business model on removing the friction that stands in the way of somebody buying a home in simultaneously removing the friction that stands in the way of a seller accepting the new one offer forum.They didn't start this way. Flyhomes began, in fact, the namesake doesn't come from homes flying off the market. It came from the fact that Stephen Lane and Tushar Garg who were young entrepreneurs, started the business by thinking, all right, in the world of real estate tech, in the world of residential real estate tech, the big names or the new market innovations where things like Trulia and Zillow and Redfin, that had two primary value propositions.One we're either going to take all home inventory off the MLS that exists only for real estate agents, and we're going to democratize it and make it so that anybody who's interested in looking at homes can see all available inventory, which is great. And then the second thing they typically did was discount brokerage. Meaning that if you worked with one of their agents, you would get cash back, they would discount their service fee and you would get some of that back in a rebate. And Steve and Tushar figured there was probably more that could be done in this market. And they being millennials themselves in doing some research, found that millennials, in addition to wanting to own homes, also desired travel, adventure, freedom.And why is it that when we make big purchases on electronics or appliances on a credit card, we get all the benefits that come with a credit card, like points and travel miles. Why don't we get something like that with homes? And so, they created a product called Flyhomes, which is for every dollar you spend on the purchase of a new home, up into a half a million dollars, you would get points on an airline.And they partnered with Alaska and Jet Blue. And Jet Blue actually sent out this mass email to all their frequent flyers saying we're now in this arrangement with Flyhomes, buy a home through Flyhomes get up to 500,000 frequent flyer miles on Jet Blue. In the first day, thousands of people signed up for the platform.And Steve and Tushar looked at themselves like this is going to be huge. And then nothing. Like nothing happened. Nobody was buying a home through Flyhomes. Nobody was actually using the service. There was enough alure or to the idea that got people interested to like check it out and sign up. But that wasn't actually helping people make the progress. They really wanted to make, which wasn't getting 500,000 airline points. It was actually getting the home that they wanted. Flyhomes could address the real problem or address the real progress. All of these bells and whistles wouldn't make things easier. It would just be bells and whistles for the sake of bells and whistles.So almost at the point of going out of business, they decided to pivot. And because they both had their real estate license started selling real estate. And by studying people in this kind of ethnographic way and actually getting out and selling real estate as realtors, they understood that the problem wasn't the points in adventure.The problem was is that people desired homes in competitive markets that they were unable to access. And after two or three chances of putting in bids and having those bids rejected, people were just giving up on real estate all together. And so Steve and Tushar decided that if they could help address the problem of democratizing the ability for home buyers to buy homes in really competitive markets, that would be a revolutionary change. That would really change the game. And so, they pivoted over from points to friction removal. And today. Flyhomes is growing like crazy. They do billions of dollars a year in transactions. They just raised a really big Series C at $150 million. It's all because they changed their business model from fuel addition to friction removal.Brian Ardinger: Excellent example. Now you've got a number of them in the book and that. What other hidden gems in the book that people should be excited about when they pick it up? David Schonthal: I think the most interesting stories and we try to have as many of them as possible in the book, so the ones that are counterintuitive. Like the ones that really check our biases and our assumptions about what we think the right way to do something is relative to what the science and the data tells us. And one of the things that I think readers who read this book will find is that in many cases, our instincts about what we ought to do to affect change are actually in some ways the opposite of what we ought to do to impact change.And we actually start the book off with a really fun story about the world's most successful car salesperson. A guy named Ali Reda, who works in suburban Detroit, in Dearborn, Michigan. Who outsells every other average car dealer in the United States, by a factor of 12 to one. He single-handedly sells as many as 1500 cars a year, which is more than most dealerships sell in total.And when you study Ali, and when you interview him and when you understand how he approaches car sales, that is so much different than his peers, what you learn is that he just frames his job radically different than every other salesperson. And I won't divulge too much about the secrets of how, but there's lots of examples in this book about how people who go left when everybody else goes right. And to succeed, but it's not just that they go left, it's understanding the psychology of what it is that they're doing differently than enables them to experience that success. Which is really, I think the beautiful thing about partnering with Loren on this is not only do we have examples about how these things work in practice, but we can also help people understand why they work psychologically.Brian Ardinger: So, you've been in this innovation industry for quite a long time. What are some of the biggest changes that you've come across and how do you see the innovation space kind of evolving? David Schonthal: That is a, the ability for people to create new ideas and make them real has never been easier. The cost of starting a new business, the cost of creating a new product or service with digital technology has enabled everybody who once had an idea on a napkin sketch.You now have the ability to make that sketch into something real and tangible and available in the market. And what I find now is, we've got a different problem, which is that the world is flooded with new ideas and flooded with new technologies. And whereas before it used to be hard to make an idea into a real thing. Now it's getting people to notice and pay attention and actually adopt your real thing. And one of the ways that we think about doing it is spending a lot of money on marketing and advertising and SEO and SEM. And yes, that's part of building awareness. But we don't often think about awareness as being one side of the equation. The other side is how do you make it easy for people to say yes. Well, one of the things we noticed about new products and services, particularly when you're creating a new consumer product is people will learn about it. They'll even go to the website, they'll put it in their cart, but at the moment before they check out, they'll abandon their cart, which means you've done half the job, right.You've gotten them interested to come to the site at the beginning. You've gotten them interested enough in the features and benefits to actually add that, or imagine that in their lives, but something is holding them back from actually pulling the trigger. And I think, now we've created a world where making the idea come to life has never been easier. But how do we make sure that it's easy for people to adopt that into their lives so that they can say yes, and to get noticed in that way. It's no longer about features and benefits. Now it's just about making things as frictionless and as effortless as possible for people to adopt. For More InformationBrian Ardinger: And the great thing about that is that's becoming easier as well. And people like yourself are helping in that process. So, David, thank you for coming on Inside Outside Innovation, to tell us a little bit about some of the secret sauce behind all that. I encourage people to pick up The Human Element. If people want to find out more about yourself or the book, what's the best way to do that? David Schonthal: HumanElementBook.com is a landing page that shares information about the book. You can find me on the Northwestern University, Kellogg School of Management faculty page, just Google my name, David Schonthal. And usually, you can find me there and I'd love to hear from you. Brian Ardinger: Well, thank you David, for being on the show and look forward to continuing the conversation as the years and the innovation evolve. David Schonthal: Thanks Brian. Me too. It was great to be here. Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  

Inside Outside
Ep. 266 - David Schonthal, Professor at Northwestern University & Coauthor of The Human Element on Gaining Traction with New Ideas

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 20:22


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with David Schonthal, Clinical Professor of Innovation and Entrepreneurship at Northwestern University and Coauthor of the new book, The Human Element. David and I talk about what keeps ideas from gaining traction and what you can do to avoid friction and resistance to new ideas. Let's get started.Inside Outside Innovation is the podcast to help new innovators navigate what's next. Each week, we'll give you a front row seat to what it takes to learn, grow, and thrive in today's world of accelerating change and uncertainty. Join us as we explore, engage, and experiment with the best and the brightest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses. It's time to get started.Interview Transcript with David Schonthal, Clinical Professor of Innovation and Entrepreneurship at Northwestern University and Coauthor of The Human ElementBrian Ardinger: Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation, I'm your host, Brian Ardinger. And as always, we have another amazing guest. Today, we have David Schonthal. He is a Clinical Professor of Innovation and Entrepreneurship at Northwestern University and Coauthor of the new book, The Human Element: Overcoming the Resistance that Awaits New Ideas. Welcome to the show, David. David Schonthal: Thanks, Brian. Nice to be here. Brian Ardinger: Hey, I'm excited to have you here. You have spent a lot of your career thinking about and watching what it takes to make new ideas happen. You've spent time at IDEO. You were co-founder of Matter, which is that 25,000 square foot innovation center in Chicago. Has some venture capital experience and that. And I thought we could start by telling the audience how you got into the innovation space in the first place. David Schonthal: By accident is the answer. It's sort of a long story, but I wound up becoming the COO of a medical device company in San Diego, California based on a radical shift from what I was doing before, which is tax software in London. To make a long story short, one of my former bosses called me up when I was just at my lowest point with tax and the UK, no offense to the UK, but it was winter, and it was like dark 18 hours out of the day. And he called me up and all of a sudden, I just, all I remember is him saying, yada, yada, yada San Diego, yada yada, yada. I was like, oh please.He's like, would you like to know what the business is? I was like, no, not important. So, I wound up going and being the head of operations for an early stage medical device company. And then basically from that point forward was just bit with the bug around bringing new ideas to market either in the startup space, through entrepreneurship or venture capital or in the corporate space through design and innovation.Brian Ardinger: And you've got a new book called the Human Element. I would imagine it packs a lot about the things that you've learned over that career. Since you've spent a lot of time seeing how early ideas get traction or not, what is the most striking problem that you see most people making when it comes to kicking off an idea?David Schonthal: I think maybe the best place to start is by most innovators and entrepreneurs' instinct that the idea is the thing that needs to be addressed. So, if a new product or service or strategy isn't being adopted by the market, most innovators instincts says well, let's make the product a little better. Let's change the way we talk about it. Let's drop the price. Let's promote it differently. And they make the thing or the strategy or the movement, the center of their attention. And in the course of my career, I've worked on some really amazing, I mean, some terrible, but also some really amazing innovations and products and services. And I was always surprised by how, even though clearly if these things were adopted into the market, they would make the world a better place, no matter how much we tweaked or change the idea that wasn't always the key to success of getting it introduced.And so about four years ago, turned my attention to thinking about what is it that stands in the way of change and partnered up with one of my colleagues at Kellogg, who was a behavioral psychologist named Loran Nordgren. And together we've been studying this problem from both the applied side, as well as the theoretical side.And that was the genesis of the book, which is that our instincts about innovation are too heavily biased on making the thing more appealing and not focused enough on helping the market adopt it by removing the friction that stands in the way. Brian Ardinger: Yeah. I love that. You kind of start off the book, this battle between what do you call fuel and friction. The idea that a lot of times, just to make an idea better, all you have to do is add more facts or more features or try to get more folks bought into it. But really, it's a lot about how do you eliminate the frictions around that? So, in the book you talk about four frictions. Let's outline and tell the audience how they can avoid them.David Schonthal: Sure. So, if you think about a new idea, like an airplane leaving the ground or a projectile flying through the air. Fuel, to your point Brian, are all of the things that propel that idea forward. The need that the customer has, features and benefits, promotional strategies, but like an airplane leaving the ground there are also forces that stand in the way, whether it's wind resistance or sheer or gravity. And so, the book is really focused on these forces, these headwinds of innovation and the four that we specify in the book, the four frictions, our number one inertia, which is our desire as human beings to tend to stick with the status quo. Despite the fact that we know the status quo might be imperfect, our habits are surprisingly powerful. And so, recognizing that inertia is a play anytime you're trying to get somebody to change from what they're doing today, to what you'd like them to do tomorrow. Effort is the second one. All of the ambiguity, all of the costliness, all of the exertion required to get somebody to make that change. The third friction is emotion. All of the anxiety and fear that comes along with changing from something that you do today to something you do tomorrow. And you might not think that emotion comes into play for small things, but emotion comes into play when you're buying a pack of gum or when you're putting on a new shirt.And then the fourth is what we call reactants, which is people's aversion to being changed by others. And each of them show up in varying degrees, depending on what you're working on in spotting them appropriately forecasting them ideally, so that they can be muted and mitigated is really the key. Brian Ardinger: And a lot of those frictions, they're almost not necessarily irrational, but they're definitely not something that you can take an economic model and say, well, clearly there's a cost benefit analysis and everybody should end up on this side of it because of the cost benefit analysis. But there's a lot of underlying things. And it seems a lot of this frictions around ambiguity or being comfortable with failure. How can you get folks more comfortable with that environment of ambiguity? David Schonthal: There's a couple of things that are packed into that question. Number one, ambiguity maps to the friction of effort. Effort we assume is like exertion, which is how much time and money will it take me to make a change. But you're pointing out appropriately that the other way effort comes in is ambiguity or a lack of clarity about how to go about doing something.And sometimes that ambiguity can be so overwhelming that people are afraid to get started because they don't necessarily know how to get started. We talk in the book about a couple of methodologies specifically around helping people with ambiguity. One is around road mapping in simplification. Oftentimes our desire to get people to change is to like keep adding or keep making something better, add facts or add arguments to get somebody to change from what they're doing, to what you'd like them to doing.I mean, just look at vaccines. For example, in the states. Like there's no ambiguity about the evidence that vaccines help protect against severe illness. There is no ambiguity. There is no doubting, the fact that if you get vaccinated, it will make the world a safer place. But that doesn't stop people from having resistance to that idea.And one thing might be around the ambiguity about how to go about getting a vaccine. One might be around the perceived effort of getting a vaccine. The fear about getting a vaccine. And so understanding why people do or don't do the things that they do is really the key to addressing it. So simplification, streamlining, making unfamiliar ideas more familiar. Oftentimes innovators have this instinct that because their idea is new and radical. We need to highlight its newness and its radicalness is part of its allure. Oftentimes that actually works against us because the newer and more radical something seems the less familiar it is. And the more anxiety we have about how we're going to start to use it. And the great example of that comes from Apple. And if you're old enough audience to remember the introduction of the Macintosh OS. In addition to creating a new machine, one of the things that Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak created was a created was a new operating system for how computers are used. And unlike PCs or DOS-based systems, which you really needed to learn the language of computers in order to do something on a computer, Steve Jobs and other great innovators tend to have their products and services operate the way the rest of your world works.So, when you're working on an Apple home screen, you're working on a desktop. And when you're creating a document and you want to store that document, you put that document in a folder. And when you want to get rid of it, you drag it into the trashcan. And these might seem sort of like cute user interface principles, but these were deliberately designed to make something wildly unfamiliar to people who had never worked on a computer to immediately feel more comfortable with it because it works, sounds, and it feels the way the rest of your world works. So even though something is new, doesn't mean that it should be projected as radically.Brian Ardinger: So, if I'm a new innovator or I'm a startup entrepreneur, I've got a new idea I want to start building that out. Do you recommend mapping out these particular frictions or how do you find out what your audience or what your customers are fearful about? David Schonthal: That's a great question. There are a couple of tools we bring to life in the book. One is called a Friction Map, which is anticipating the frictions that might stand in the way of your new ideas. So, it is a document that you can fill out with your team. Where you forecast based on some clear questions that are asked in the Map. What is the relevance? What is the amount of inertia that might be present? What's the amount of effort, friction that might be present? Emotional friction that might be present in reactants? And then there's another framework around remedies. How might you take each of these frictions, test them in the market, but also test possible remedies to overcome. And the more you can bring this into your design process.So, people will fill out a Business Model Canvas based on Osterwalder's work, or they'll fill out a Horizons Framework as they're forecasting what opportunities might exist. We also recommend filling out a Friction Map, which is what are the forces of resistance that might stand in the way. And what might we prototype to overcome those forces as a way of introducing this product or service or strategy.Brian Ardinger: And then do you go out and actually test those assumptions? David Schonthal: Absolutely. Each of them can be prototyped. And yes, testing them with different audiences, testing different ways of communicating or making unfamiliar things familiar. Or identifying the sources of emotional friction so that they can be addressed in the messaging, and the way products are communicated. All are easy enough to test in low fidelity and oftentimes save us a lot of effort down the road when it comes to scaling offers up. Brian Ardinger: One of the other things I liked about the book is that you have not only these frameworks, that people can understand the methodology and that around it, but you also bring out some case studies in the book. And one of them is around Flyhomes, which is a startup company that built a new business model in the real estate space, designed to address some of the frictions in the market. So, can you talk a little bit about that case study? David Schonthal: It's a great story. So Flyhomes, for those of you who are living in the United States while you're watching this can appreciate, we are in the midst of a bananas housing market, residential housing market. Debt has never been cheaper. Inventory has never been lower. And as a result, desirable homes are just flying off the market almost the same day that they're listed, which creates a whole conundrum for people who are trying to buy homes, particularly first-time home buyers. Because when inventory is low, typically the offers that get accepted by sellers, particularly when they have multiple offers, are all cash offers or offers that are perceived to be low risk. And low risk offers are ones that don't have contingencies attached to them. Don't have home sale contingencies. Don't have loan contingencies. In order to compete, in order to get a home buyer, you have to either bring all cash to the table or convince sellers that despite the fact that they've got these contingencies, that there's actually a high degree of certainty, that something will close.Flyhomes is a business that helps address this problem by making all buyers, all cash buyers, they have focused their business model on removing the friction that stands in the way of somebody buying a home in simultaneously removing the friction that stands in the way of a seller accepting the new one offer forum.They didn't start this way. Flyhomes began, in fact, the namesake doesn't come from homes flying off the market. It came from the fact that Stephen Lane and Tushar Garg who were young entrepreneurs, started the business by thinking, all right, in the world of real estate tech, in the world of residential real estate tech, the big names or the new market innovations where things like Trulia and Zillow and Redfin, that had two primary value propositions.One we're either going to take all home inventory off the MLS that exists only for real estate agents, and we're going to democratize it and make it so that anybody who's interested in looking at homes can see all available inventory, which is great. And then the second thing they typically did was discount brokerage. Meaning that if you worked with one of their agents, you would get cash back, they would discount their service fee and you would get some of that back in a rebate. And Steve and Tushar figured there was probably more that could be done in this market. And they being millennials themselves in doing some research, found that millennials, in addition to wanting to own homes, also desired travel, adventure, freedom.And why is it that when we make big purchases on electronics or appliances on a credit card, we get all the benefits that come with a credit card, like points and travel miles. Why don't we get something like that with homes? And so, they created a product called Flyhomes, which is for every dollar you spend on the purchase of a new home, up into a half a million dollars, you would get points on an airline.And they partnered with Alaska and Jet Blue. And Jet Blue actually sent out this mass email to all their frequent flyers saying we're now in this arrangement with Flyhomes, buy a home through Flyhomes get up to 500,000 frequent flyer miles on Jet Blue. In the first day, thousands of people signed up for the platform.And Steve and Tushar looked at themselves like this is going to be huge. And then nothing. Like nothing happened. Nobody was buying a home through Flyhomes. Nobody was actually using the service. There was enough alure or to the idea that got people interested to like check it out and sign up. But that wasn't actually helping people make the progress. They really wanted to make, which wasn't getting 500,000 airline points. It was actually getting the home that they wanted. Flyhomes could address the real problem or address the real progress. All of these bells and whistles wouldn't make things easier. It would just be bells and whistles for the sake of bells and whistles.So almost at the point of going out of business, they decided to pivot. And because they both had their real estate license started selling real estate. And by studying people in this kind of ethnographic way and actually getting out and selling real estate as realtors, they understood that the problem wasn't the points in adventure.The problem was is that people desired homes in competitive markets that they were unable to access. And after two or three chances of putting in bids and having those bids rejected, people were just giving up on real estate all together. And so Steve and Tushar decided that if they could help address the problem of democratizing the ability for home buyers to buy homes in really competitive markets, that would be a revolutionary change. That would really change the game. And so, they pivoted over from points to friction removal. And today. Flyhomes is growing like crazy. They do billions of dollars a year in transactions. They just raised a really big Series C at $150 million. It's all because they changed their business model from fuel addition to friction removal.Brian Ardinger: Excellent example. Now you've got a number of them in the book and that. What other hidden gems in the book that people should be excited about when they pick it up? David Schonthal: I think the most interesting stories and we try to have as many of them as possible in the book, so the ones that are counterintuitive. Like the ones that really check our biases and our assumptions about what we think the right way to do something is relative to what the science and the data tells us. And one of the things that I think readers who read this book will find is that in many cases, our instincts about what we ought to do to affect change are actually in some ways the opposite of what we ought to do to impact change.And we actually start the book off with a really fun story about the world's most successful car salesperson. A guy named Ali Reda, who works in suburban Detroit, in Dearborn, Michigan. Who outsells every other average car dealer in the United States, by a factor of 12 to one. He single-handedly sells as many as 1500 cars a year, which is more than most dealerships sell in total.And when you study Ali, and when you interview him and when you understand how he approaches car sales, that is so much different than his peers, what you learn is that he just frames his job radically different than every other salesperson. And I won't divulge too much about the secrets of how, but there's lots of examples in this book about how people who go left when everybody else goes right. And to succeed, but it's not just that they go left, it's understanding the psychology of what it is that they're doing differently than enables them to experience that success. Which is really, I think the beautiful thing about partnering with Loren on this is not only do we have examples about how these things work in practice, but we can also help people understand why they work psychologically.Brian Ardinger: So, you've been in this innovation industry for quite a long time. What are some of the biggest changes that you've come across and how do you see the innovation space kind of evolving? David Schonthal: That is a, the ability for people to create new ideas and make them real has never been easier. The cost of starting a new business, the cost of creating a new product or service with digital technology has enabled everybody who once had an idea on a napkin sketch.You now have the ability to make that sketch into something real and tangible and available in the market. And what I find now is, we've got a different problem, which is that the world is flooded with new ideas and flooded with new technologies. And whereas before it used to be hard to make an idea into a real thing. Now it's getting people to notice and pay attention and actually adopt your real thing. And one of the ways that we think about doing it is spending a lot of money on marketing and advertising and SEO and SEM. And yes, that's part of building awareness. But we don't often think about awareness as being one side of the equation. The other side is how do you make it easy for people to say yes. Well, one of the things we noticed about new products and services, particularly when you're creating a new consumer product is people will learn about it. They'll even go to the website, they'll put it in their cart, but at the moment before they check out, they'll abandon their cart, which means you've done half the job, right.You've gotten them interested to come to the site at the beginning. You've gotten them interested enough in the features and benefits to actually add that, or imagine that in their lives, but something is holding them back from actually pulling the trigger. And I think, now we've created a world where making the idea come to life has never been easier. But how do we make sure that it's easy for people to adopt that into their lives so that they can say yes, and to get noticed in that way. It's no longer about features and benefits. Now it's just about making things as frictionless and as effortless as possible for people to adopt. For More InformationBrian Ardinger: And the great thing about that is that's becoming easier as well. And people like yourself are helping in that process. So, David, thank you for coming on Inside Outside Innovation, to tell us a little bit about some of the secret sauce behind all that. I encourage people to pick up The Human Element. If people want to find out more about yourself or the book, what's the best way to do that? David Schonthal: HumanElementBook.com is a landing page that shares information about the book. You can find me on the Northwestern University, Kellogg School of Management faculty page, just Google my name, David Schonthal. And usually, you can find me there and I'd love to hear from you. Brian Ardinger: Well, thank you David, for being on the show and look forward to continuing the conversation as the years and the innovation evolve. David Schonthal: Thanks Brian. Me too. It was great to be here. Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast
MGoRadio 7.3: A Teddy Bear and a Bunch of Magnets

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 75:11


1 hour and 16 minutes The Sponsors Thank you to Underground Printing for making this all possible. UGP makes custom apparel such as t-shirts and sweatshirts and was founded by 2 Michigan alums over 20 years ago. They have 3 retail locations in Ann Arbor and offer thousands of University of Michigan athletic products for sale, ranging from clothing to accessories and memorabilia. Check them out at ugpmichiganapparel.com. And let's not forget our associate sponsors: Peak Wealth Management, HomeSure Lending, Ann Arbor Elder Law, Michigan Law Grad, Human Element, The Phil Klein Insurance Group, Prentice4M, and made possible by SignalWire. The Video: [After THE JUMP: the player and what we said] -------------------------------------------- 1. Rutgers Preview: Offense They're going to test Daxton Hill on the edge; let's see how that works out for them. 2. Rutgers Preview: Defense Not as bad, still doing the Stunt 43 thing. Can Michigan outflank them or is it another battle of Cannae? McNamara kind of game. 3. Gimmicky Top Five Favorite Rutgers Moments Since The Joined the Big Ten. Good Morning, Michigan has began a war with Rutgers University. Our Order, represented by some of Rutgers elite student leaders, see it fit that this rivalry be hereby declared. We have had enough of Michigan. Fence the Garden was brought forth because of Mr. Harbaugh, and us Scarlet Knights are ready to protect our state. We R battle ready. Tonight sparked the beginning of the end for Wolverine Football, and no longer will they return to their former glory. The Curse of The Bambino reigned for 86 years, Michigan's will last for 28. 4. NIU After UFR What happened on That One Drive is the only thing we learned. MUSIC: Tonight's featured musician is Terry Klein, from Austin, Texas, whom you can find at www.terrykleinmusic.com. He told me to save “Too Blue to Get That Far” for a loss but it's too good to sit on. That's Bart DeWin on the organ fyi. Straw Hat Too Blue to Get That Far Better Luck Next Time And because Sony bought our song and slapped a claim on us, the opener and outro: “The Employee is Not Afraid”—Bear vs. Shark “Russian Vodka”—Motorboat If you or a friend made some good tunes and don't have a label out scrubbing for them we'd be happy to feature you.

Trend Following with Michael Covel
Ep. 1008: David Schonthal Interview with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio

Trend Following with Michael Covel

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 52:46


Most marketers, innovators, executives, activists, or anyone else in the business of creating change, operate on a deep assumption. It is the belief that the best (and perhaps only) way to convince people to embrace a new idea is to heighten the appeal of the idea itself. We instinctively believe that if we add enough value, people will eventually say “yes.” This reflex leads us down a path of adding features and benefits to our ideas or increasing the sizzle of our messaging – all in the hope of getting others on board. We call this instinct the “Fuel-based mindset.” The Fuel-based mindset explains so much of what we do, from adding countless trivial features to software, to bolting a sixth blade onto a shaving razor. By focusing on fuel, innovators neglect the other half of the equation – the psychological Frictions that oppose change. Frictions create drag on innovation. And though they are rarely considered, overcoming these Frictions is essential for bringing new ideas into the world. David Schonthal highlights the four Frictions that operate against innovation: Why their best ideas get rejected – despite their undeniable value. How to disarm the forces of resistance that act against change. How to transform the very Frictions that hold us back into catalysts for change. David Schonthal's The Human Element is an great resource to help people overcome the powerful forces of human nature that instinctively resist change. Bio: David Schonthal is a Clinical Professor of Innovation & Entrepreneurship at Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management, where he teaches courses in new venture creation, design thinking, business acquisition, healthcare entrepreneurship, corporate innovation and creativity. He is also a Senior Director of Business Design at IDEO. In this episode of Trend Following Radio: New Ideas and Innovation The Human Element Improving the Idea Four Primary Frictions Apple Products Simplicity in Design Dating Apps Medical Innovations

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast
MGoPodcast 13.3: Advanced Time Management

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 78:21


1 hour and 19 minutes The Sponsors Thank you to Underground Printing for making this all possible. Rishi and Ryan have been our biggest supporters from the beginning. Check out their wide selection of officially licensed Michigan fan gear at their 3 store locations in Ann Arbor or learn about their custom apparel business at undergroundshirts.com. And let's not forget our associate sponsors: HomeSure Lending, Ann Arbor Elder Law, the Residence Inn Ann Arbor Downtown, Michigan Law Grad, Human Element, The Phil Klein Insurance Group, Information Entropy, the Raw Power app for iOS by Gentleman Coders, SignalWire (use the code MUPPETS and they'll buy your team lunch!), and this episode was supposed to be recorded at Prentice 4M, on the other end of The Bridge. Take their survey to decide what to do with Lucky's. 1. Offense vs NIU starts at 1:00 That was thorough. Takes us 15 minutes to bring up the passing game. The rushing game has a diversity of power instead of inside zone—split zone is really their IZ. It all works. [The rest of the writeup and the player after THE JUMP] 2. Defense vs NIU starts at 33:19 Also quite thorough. Michigan has never seen a QB keeper on an arc read (because they never see it in practice—zing!). Scripted drive put the DTs on edge duty, that got cleaned up. No attempts downfield Rocky? Ready for the Stanford 4th and 1 fire drill. 3. Hot Takes, Special Teams, and Game Theory starts at 47:30 Why are they kicking a field goal on 4th and 2 on their only successful drive? Seth thinks they had Caden Kolesar out there for Washington because he's a vet and the atmosphere wasn't going to bother him, but the plan was to go with AJ Henning all along. One that he let bounce showed why, what happened after that also showed why it was a good plan. Congrats to the specialists on their day off. 4. Around the Big Ten, wsg Jamie Mac starts at 47:30 Nebraska's defense holding Oklahoma to a manageable score is more surprising than Oklahoma's defense allowing Nebraska to shorten the game. Ohio State's defense is…bad? Does it matter? Michigan State faced a Miami team that punches itself in the face, but their new RB is legit. New Jersey defeated a maize and blue team with wings on their helmets. MUSIC: “Paving the Runway”—JJ Heller “Running Away”—Freak Power “Mr. Blue Sky”—cover by Mayer Hawthorne “Across 110th Street”

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast
MGoRadio 7.3: The Moth Joke

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 63:17


1 hour and 3 minutes The Sponsors Thank you to Underground Printing for making this all possible. UGP makes custom apparel such as t-shirts and sweatshirts and was founded by 2 Michigan alums over 20 years ago. They have 3 retail locations in Ann Arbor and offer thousands of University of Michigan athletic products for sale, ranging from clothing to accessories and memorabilia. Check them out at ugpmichiganapparel.com. And let's not forget our associate sponsors: Peak Wealth Management, HomeSure Lending, Ann Arbor Elder Law, Michigan Law Grad, Human Element, The Phil Klein Insurance Group, Prentice4M, and made possible by SignalWire. The Video:   [After THE JUMP: the player and what we said] -------------------------------------------- 1. Norm Macdonald Tribute with the Sklars starts at 1:00 Randy and Jason Sklar come on to remember the humor of Norm Macdonald, whose humor inspired them and the humor of this blog. Here's the Moth Joke: 2. NIU Offensive Preview starts at 27:01 They're a racecar with Rocky Lombardi under center. Tempo and a speedy running back, and they'll take their shots downfield. Alex doesn't hate any of their linemen. 3. NIU Defensive Preview starts at 37:31 They're bad—Seth says the program was torn apart by coaching changes and defections. Worst one was their DT whom they donated to Indiana. 4. Washington after UFR starts at 48:16 Other than John Donovan, how seriously do we take the dual pavings? Semi-seriously. MUSIC: Tonight's featured musician is Maxwell Thomas, a Chicago-based, eccentric yacht rocker who produces alt rock inspired by JRPGs. Ghost Rising Sun Traveler's Theme And because Sony bought our song and slapped a claim on us, the opener and outro: “Funk It Up Old School” “Russian Vodka”—Motorboat If you or a friend made some good tunes and don't have a label out scrubbing for them we'd be happy to feature you.

The Social-Engineer Podcast
Ep. 153 - Human Element Series - You Are Special And Other Lies With Cortney Warren

The Social-Engineer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 50:57


In this episode, Chris Hadnagy is joined by Dr. Cortney Warren. Dr. Warren is a Board-Certified Clinical Psychologist and former tenured Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV).  She is an expert on addictions, self-deception, eating pathology, and the practice of psychotherapy from a cross-cultural perspective. In addition to publishing in some of the field's top scientific, peer-reviewed journals, Dr. Warren is passionate about bringing theoretically grounded, empirically-supported psychological research to the general public. So, in addition to her academic work, Dr. Warren is a research consultant, keynote speaker, and writes a blog for Psychology Today.  September 13, 2021   00:00 – Intro  www.social-engineer.com  Managed Voice Phishing    Managed Email Phishing    Adversarial Simulations    Social-Engineer channel on SLACK    CLUTCH    www.innocentlivesfoundation.org  02:10 – Cortney Warren Intro  03:35 – How did you get started?  07:28 – Why is it so hard to be honest with ourselves?  10:01 – What gets the person from “it's easy to lie to myself” to “I'm readily open to admit this”  13:25 – Admitting the truth is just the first step  13:20 – There are certain ways humans lie to themselves.  One of them is “The Specialness Fallacy”  17:43 – How do people make the change in someone who doesn't want to make the change, they're not at that point yet?  21:45 – Is self-deception the same in every culture?  25:47 – Is there a particular culture that is more honest with themselves than others?  28:12 – Why is bringing research to the public such a mission for you?  31:41 – How do we make the change out of self-deception?  41:30 – Have you helped people in abusive relationships with your methods?  44:31 – When does your book come out? 44:47 – How to reach Cortney:  www.choosehonesty.com  Email: cortneywarren@choosehonesty.com  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CortneySWarren   Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrCortneyWarren    LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dr-cortney-s-warren-phd-abpp-a4188772/  YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQGXD7Ms5oR3GzsPZl3Tjl_9qj71MezHj   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cortneywarren/  45:37 – Who is your greatest mentor?  My mother, Karen J Warren  48:25 – Favorite Books:  Victor Frankl –Man's Search for Meaning  50:16 – Outro  www.innocentlivesfoundation.org  www.social-engineer.com 

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast
MGoPodcast 13.2: Who Flattened the Dogs Out?

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 91:49


1 hour and 32 minutes The Sponsors Thank you to Underground Printing for making this all possible. Rishi and Ryan have been our biggest supporters from the beginning. Check out their wide selection of officially licensed Michigan fan gear at their 3 store locations in Ann Arbor or learn about their custom apparel business at undergroundshirts.com. And let's not forget our associate sponsors: HomeSure Lending, Ann Arbor Elder Law, the Residence Inn Ann Arbor Downtown, Michigan Law Grad, Human Element, The Phil Klein Insurance Group,  Information Entropy, the Raw Power app for iOS by Gentleman Coders, SignalWire (use the code MUPPETS and they'll buy your team lunch!), and this episode was supposed to be recorded at Prentice 4M, on the other end of The Bridge. Take their survey to decide what to do with Lucky's. 1. Offense vs Washington starts at 1:00 Vastardis and co. were mauling Tuli and Taki. Lots of interesting runs with pullers going opposite directions. First play: T pull with a backside read. 2nd play: TE crosses one way, Jet and G pull the other way. OL going to come in for huge scores. UW leaving 2 safeties back, playing one high, so why not? UW had LB flying outside when RB did, were not going to get edged. YOU CAN BLOCK BEHIND THE LINE GUYS! Erick All did work. Honigford is replaceable. Roman Wilson cannot block. Bell missed. CADE: Bad reads. Didn't have a lot of time but he spent too long on 1st reads and missed 2nd reads. [The rest of the writeup and the player after THE JUMP] 2. Defense vs Washington starts at 32:37 Now you believe me about John Donovan. Why are you running on 4th and 4 when you haven't run before? Why aren't you reading an edge when Hutchinson is coming? Josh Ross much better game. Was popping OL. Mike Morris is happening. Hutchinson by god. Wanted to get Giles Jackson out in space and M had that anticipated. Tried to test Dax Hill on the edge once. Kris Jenkins is happening. Might be a little small still but breakout candidate. Live action for Rod Moore. 3. Hot Takes, Special Teams, and Game Theory starts at 51:20 Refs had just one (two but the 2nd was overturned) bad call. Their old fashioned punt led to that 4th down play because they have an upback. Good decision to go on 4th and 1, but decision to pass on 2nd and 2. UW: Why not have Jackson return? M: Why Kolesar if he dropped one? Michigan Foug'd one to Jackson and it looked scary until German Green hewed him down. Moody good from….60? 4. Around the Big Ten, wsg Jamie Mac starts at 1:05:51 QUACK! We look for more MOONs on the schedule. MUSIC: “Mr. Brightside”—cover by Jada Facer “I Ran”—cover by Janet Devlin “Who Let the Dogs Out”—cover by Matt Mulholland “Across 110th Street”

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast
MGoRadio 7.1: First-Time Red Bullers

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 72:44


1 hour and 13 minutes The Sponsors Thank you to Underground Printing for making this all possible. UGP makes custom apparel such as t-shirts and sweatshirts and was founded by 2 Michigan alums over 20 years ago. They have 3 retail locations in Ann Arbor and offer thousands of University of Michigan athletic products for sale, ranging from clothing to accessories and memorabilia. Check them out at ugpmichiganapparel.com. And let's not forget our associate sponsors: Peak Wealth Management, HomeSure Lending, Ann Arbor Elder Law, Michigan Law Grad, Human Element, The Phil Klein Insurance Group, Prentice4M, and SignalWire (use the code MUPPETS and they'll buy your team lunch!). [After THE JUMP: the player and what we said] -------------------------------------------- 1. Washington Offense starts at 1:00 Alex thinks the offensive line and John Donovan's play-calling are the problems. Also the quarterback. Also all of their receivers are hurt. 2. WMU After UFR: The Offense starts at 16:52 Jimmy Lake's defenses always know what they're doing however, and always have a never ending supply of NFL cornerbacks. Tuli and Taki up front will be a bigger test for our suddenly lively inner OL. 3. Phil Brabbs and Washington 2002 starts at 30:16 We remember the 2002 Michigan-Washington opener, from the perspective of the guy who made the winning kick none of us believed he would, and the guy who was given Red Bull for the first time before entering the stadium. 4. WMU After UFR: The Defense starts at 51:30 Recalibrating how much I love the running backs. They put a lot on Josh Ross. NHG's issues seemed fixable. Might also have to recalibrate how we think of DL statistics. MUSIC: Tonight's featured band is Goat Motor, the Chicago-based funk rock band for whom reader Dustin Fillion does the bass work. Check them out on Spotify, or on their Facebook page. “Hold Me Back” “Slate” “How Could I Be So Blind” And because Sony bought our song and slapped a claim on us, the opener and outtro: “Funk It Up Old School” “Russian Vodka”—Motorboat

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast
MGoPodcast 13.1: The Cover's Cursed

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 97:58


1 hour and 38 minutes The Sponsors Thank you to Underground Printing for making this all possible. Rishi and Ryan have been our biggest supporters from the beginning. Check out their wide selection of officially licensed Michigan fan gear at their 3 store locations in Ann Arbor or learn about their custom apparel business at undergroundshirts.com. And let's not forget our associate sponsors: HomeSure Lending, Ann Arbor Elder Law, the Residence Inn Ann Arbor Downtown, Michigan Law Grad, Human Element, The Phil Klein Insurance Group, and Information Entropy, the Raw Power app for iOS by Gentleman Coders, and SignalWire, which is the virtual office platform we recorded on during the pandemic because we'd had it up to here with Zoom (use the code MUPPETS and they'll buy your team lunch!) This episode was supposed to be recorded at Prentice 4M, on the other end of The Bridge, started by a couple of readers to have the perfect, affordable, safe, and clean living/renting/working space near campus. 1. Offense vs WMU starts at 1:00 Do we start with the good news (they can run), the bad news (Bell), or the future news (McCarthy). #SpeedInSpace is over—there were no reads and lots of fake reads that burned downs or delivered safeties and linebackers to the running backs immediately. In this game at least the RBs could put those defenders on their asses. JJ seems to be erratic. [The rest of the writeup and the player after THE JUMP] 2. Defense vs WMU starts at 28:58 One drive of bleeding plus a Not Angry About That throw over Gemon Green (and a taunting on Ojabo) and then not much. Just a few gashes from LBs getting out of position. Hinton looked like their best DT, Hutchinson got to spend a lot of time on the sideline while they rotated a lot of guys. Mike Morris, hello there. Secondary looked okay but shaky—they're better as a zone team. 3. Hot Takes, Special Teams, and Game Theory starts at 44:45 The hot takes are half the segment even though there was a lot of special teams, because the only game theory stuff was at the end of the 1st half (learn to manage a clock!). Much of the game was spent waiting around for Brad Robbins punts to land. Using Bell as a returner. Foug'ing it. 4. Around the Big Ten, wsg Jamie Mac starts at 1:00:35 We go long this time of year because there are so many games. Jamie does not recognize the existence of Iowa. MUSIC: “Stop Making This Hurt”—Bleachers “Stay High”—Childish Gambino “Nothing Else Matters”—cover by Phoebe Bridgers “Across 110th Street”

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast
MGoRadio 7.0: Blue Jumbo

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 66:41


1 hour and 6 minutes The Sponsors Thank you to Underground Printing for making this all possible. UGP makes custom apparel such as t-shirts and sweatshirts and was founded by 2 Michigan alums over 20 years ago. They have 3 retail locations in Ann Arbor and offer thousands of University of Michigan athletic products for sale, ranging from clothing to accessories and memorabilia. Check them out at ugpmichiganapparel.com. And let's not forget our associate sponsors: Peak Wealth Management, HomeSure Lending, Ann Arbor Elder Law, Michigan Law Grad, Human Element, The Phil Klein Insurance Group, Prentice4M, and SignalWire (use the code MUPPETS and they'll buy your team lunch!). [After THE JUMP: the player and what we said] -------------------------------------------- 1. WMU Preview starts at 1:00 We finally listed to you about putting the opponent previews first in these so you can listen to the rest on the way home from the game. Caleb Eleby gets the ball out quickly, has a LT who was a C last year and started at DT vs Michigan in 2018. Missing their star, Eskridge, who went in the draft as well as the star LT who also got drafted. Best offensive weapon is Skyy Moore. Defensively Seth thinks their good DT can get pushed around by Michigan's front, but this is still the defense to #SpeedinSpace to death. 2. John U. Bacon: Let Them Lead starts at 22:17 How do they let JUB take over a hockey team? Well it was the WORST hockey team. But anyway it's a new Bacon book so we go off the rails and you buy and read it at letthemleadbybacon.com. 3. Talking Michigan Football starts at 39:12 We FINALLY address the question everyone asks: What does Harbaugh have to do to keep his job? Answer is sell tickets to next year. Bacon: Washington game matters. 4. Seth's Hockey Podcast starts at 51:30 We're running out of guys who can't talk hockey so I get to the be dumb guy who shuts up as Brian and Alex Drain and Bacon discuss the better-than-Bama recruiting run Michigan's been on. MUSIC: Tonight's featured band is Georgia Mountain Stringband, which is reader Brendan Held's bluegrass band. Check them out on Spotify, or on their facebook page. “Hard Man to Love” “Choctaw Mackinon” “Bible Belt” “Across 110th Street”

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast
MGoPodcast 13.0.c: Otherwise Known as a Team

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 71:38


1 hour and 12 minutes The Sponsors Thank you to Underground Printing for making this all possible. Rishi and Ryan have been our biggest supporters from the beginning. Check out their wide selection of officially licensed Michigan fan gear at their 3 store locations in Ann Arbor or learn about their custom apparel business at undergroundshirts.com. And let's not forget our associate sponsors: HomeSure Lending, Ann Arbor Elder Law, the Residence Inn Ann Arbor Downtown, Michigan Law Grad, Human Element, The Phil Klein Insurance Group, and Information Entropy, the Raw Power app for iOS by Gentleman Coders, and SignalWire, which is the virtual office platform we recorded on during the pandemic because we'd had it up to here with Zoom (use the code MUPPETS and they'll buy your team lunch!) This episode however was recorded at Prentice 4M, on the other end of The Bridge, started by a couple of readers to have the perfect, affordable, safe, and clean living/renting/working space near campus. 1. Special Teams starts at 1:00 Two guys who took the jobs of two pros. If Ronnie Bell can get to punts and not drop them they're 75 percent of the way to being a top punt return team in this age of spread punts. Michigan doesn't spread punt; they need to find someone who can get to them like Khaleke Hudson. 2. Hot Takes and the Big Ten West starts at 19:04 We believe in Bert! Well above Northwestern maybe? Could Nebraska go 4-8 and KEEP Scott Frost? Wisconsin or Iowa? 3. The Big Ten East starts at 39:04 We discuss from worst to first. Rutgers is performing at a program all-time high under Schiano. Alex has been reading the Maryland blogs. Michigan State is still starting an Allen. Penn State and Michigan could form one super team to challenge OSU. INDIANA!!! 4. Stupid Predictions and State of the World starts at 57:44 Who's your boy on this team? Most disappointing thing about the season? Winner of the Big Ten East? C'mon, you know you want to say it. MUSIC: “Living Colour”—Cult of Personality “Edit”—Geese “Role Models”—Treeboy & Arc “Across 110th Street”

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast
MGoPodcast 13.0.b: The Rule of Kolesar

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 55:16


56 minutes The Sponsors Thank you to Underground Printing for making this all possible. Rishi and Ryan have been our biggest supporters from the beginning. Check out their wide selection of officially licensed Michigan fan gear at their 3 store locations in Ann Arbor or learn about their custom apparel business at undergroundshirts.com. And let's not forget our associate sponsors: HomeSure Lending, Ann Arbor Elder Law, the Residence Inn Ann Arbor Downtown, Michigan Law Grad, Human Element, The Phil Klein Insurance Group, and Information Entropy, the Raw Power app for iOS by Gentleman Coders, and SignalWire, which is the virtual office platform we recorded on during the pandemic because we'd had it up to here with Zoom (use the code MUPPETS and they'll buy your team lunch!) This episode however was recorded at Prentice 4M, on the other end of The Bridge, started by a couple of readers to have the perfect, affordable, safe, and clean living/renting/working space near campus. 1. Macdonald's Origin Story & D-Line starts at 1:00 Brian does not like this idea of taking the Ravens LBs coach and making him the coordinator of a defense that looks like a 5-2 in 2021. The three guys they plan to start have talent but there are a lot of walk-on names behind them. [The rest of the writeup and the player after THE JUMP] 2. Hot Takes and Linebackers starts at 17:08 Not as petrified as we were in spring, except Brian. Only two linebackers there are. We try to talk Brian into Nikhai Hill-Green—Seth thinks this is a good development because Barrett struggled against Wisconsin in a more linebacker-ish role. Not worried about Mullings because he was a two-year project. Colson should be fun. Josh Ross is mentioned like “He's good, next.” 3. The Secondary starts at 30:43 Immediately rip off the band-aid and discuss cornerbacks. Brian is the positive(!) one about Gemon Green, at least in man coverage. DJ Turner II has plausible deniability, the two 2020 cornerback recruits do not. May it be Ja'Den McBurrows to the rescue mid-season? The safeties are either the best tandem in the Big Ten, or that just because they have Dax Hill, but Seth thinks he will be in nickel role a ton this year with RJ Moten blooming at safety. 4. How it All Fits starts at 46:45 Please remember there's a nickel for every spread. Difference between this and Wisconsin. Can it work? It can't be worse. Maybe it can be 2011-style weird enough to kick the other team off the field sometimes. MUSIC: “DayLight/NightLight”—Aesop Rock “Do I Wanna Know?”—Arctic Monkeys “I'm Still Alive”—Cake “Across 110th Street”

SuperPower Success
The Human Element

SuperPower Success

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 29:57


Leaders are often focused on execution and meeting goals and deadlines but can claim to be too busy to focus on caring for their people. In her book, The Human Team, Jeanet Wade discusses the 6 Human needs that all of us have and how, as a leader, you can support your team and fulfill … Continue reading The Human Element →

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast
MGoPodcast 13.0.a: All the Fun Things

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 76:30


1 hour and 17 minutes The Sponsors Thank you to Underground Printing for making this all possible. Rishi and Ryan have been our biggest supporters from the beginning. Check out their wide selection of officially licensed Michigan fan gear at their 3 store locations in Ann Arbor or learn about their custom apparel business at undergroundshirts.com. And let's not forget our associate sponsors: HomeSure Lending, Ann Arbor Elder Law, the Residence Inn Ann Arbor Downtown, Michigan Law Grad, Human Element, The Phil Klein Insurance Group, and Information Entropy, the Raw Power app for iOS by Gentleman Coders, and SignalWire, which is the virtual office platform we recorded on during the pandemic because we'd had it up to here with Zoom (use the code MUPPETS and they'll buy your team lunch!) This episode however was recorded at Prentice 4M, on the other end of The Bridge, started by a couple of readers to have the perfect, affordable, safe, and clean living/renting/working space near campus. 1. Quarterback & Running Back starts at 1:00 We try to convince Brian to care about football by showing him all the wonderful things. Like Cade McNamara is the guy but his ceiling is…Shea Patterson? J.J. McCarthy is a much better floor. Not much from Bowman. But hey, running backs! Haskins is a Dude, way too good for Charbonnet to stick around. Corum is everything we desire in a running back. Picking out roles for Edwards makes it fun, as long as we can not think about how the backs were misused last year. [The rest of the writeup and the player after THE JUMP] 2. Wide Receiver & Tight End starts at 27:44 Ronnie Bell is he, but also the man who led the country in average YAC in 2019. Cornelius Johnson is an easy breakout candidate. Daylen Baldwin had legit Ohio State interest. AJ Henning inherits the Giles Jackson role, while Sainristil is the Jeter of the offense: coaches hype him every offseason, yet to see it. Don't sleep on Roman Wilson either. Tight end is thin unless the new wave of guys from nowhere appear, but All could have huge upside if he's only more like the guy who caught everything before he learned to block. 3. Offensive Line starts at 46:04 They clearly wanted Zinter to move to center but since that didn't happen it's Vastardis and both of Trente Jones and Karsen Barhart are waiting to get on the field. Not a terrible situation, really—Stueber can play and Hayes is locked in at LT, and they love Zinter, and the all-out melee at LG that Keegan won should mean he's pretty good. We disagree re: Moore. 4. Raw Takes and How it All Fits starts at 59:36 What is speed and space? It's Ronnie Bell leading the country in YAC. MUSIC: “Wolf Like Me”—TV on the Radio “Pegasi”—Jesca Hoop “Ghosts”—Ted Leo “Across 110th Street” THE USUAL LINKS: Helpful iTunes subscribe link General podcast feed link What's with the theme music?

Marketing Today with Alan Hart
Highlighting the Human Element in Marketing through Audio with HubSpot's Alanah Joseph

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 29:51


Alanah Joseph is the Senior Marketing Manager at HubSpot, responsible for marketing and operations of the HubSpot podcast network.  In this episode Alanah and Alan discuss her role in driving brand awareness and increasing listenership for its shows and the long-term strategy behind launching a podcast network.   “Just as product requirements have grown and changed over time, so have people's content needs. Alanah and HubSpot believe podcasts will fill that role and that companies and brands will seek out audio for inspiration and solutions to business problems. Listen as Alanah explains the strategy behind a podcast network and how it elevates content creation to ultimately help customers become better software users and better business practitioners overall. In this episode, you'll learn: Leveraging other creators to help spread your message Creating opportunities for growth via collaboration Highlighting the human element in marketing  Key Highlights: [01:20] Alanah is ambidextrous [03:00] How Alanah ended up managing the HubSpot podcast network [05:11] Transitioning from written content to audio [07:28] HubSpot's long-term content strategy [09:25] The vision behind the network [11:11] Working with content creators and podcast hosts [14:24] What Alanah has learned about workflow and content creation [19:20] What (and who) has made Alanah who she is today [20:53] Alanah's advice for her younger self  [21:57] A topic Alanah thinks marketers should be learning more about [24:23] The brand and organizations Alanah follows [27:11] The biggest threat and opportunity for marketers  Resources Mentioned:  HubSpot HubSpot Podcast Network Alanah Joseph HubSpot acquires The Hustle (and My First Million Podcast) Asana (tool to manage operations) Lunchclub CMO and Marketing Today Podcast Episode Subscribe to the podcast: Listen in iTunes (link: http://apple.co/2dbdAhV) Listen in Google Podcasts (link: http://bit.ly/2Rc2kVa) Listen in Spotify (Link: http://spoti.fi/2mCUGnC ) Connect with the Guest: Alanah LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/alanahjoseph/ Alanah Twitter: https://twitter.com/alanahjo  HubSpot Twitter: https://twitter.com/HubSpot Connect with Marketing Today and Alan Hart: http://twitter.com/abhart https://www.linkedin.com/in/alanhart http://twitter.com/themktgtoday https://www.facebook.com/themktgtoday/ https://www.linkedin.com/company/marketing-today-with-alan-hart/ Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/marketingtoday See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Legal Mastermind Podcast
EP 117 - Luke Russell - How to Capture the Human Element in Advertising

Legal Mastermind Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 30:21


Luke Russell founded Russell Media in 2009 after working in web development since 2006. Russell Media was created out of a desire to fill real marketing needs-not to be another company trying to make a buck. Russell Media uses Mass Tort Advertising for their clients and offer many effective ways to advertise. Check out Russell Media here: https://russellmedia.us/Luke Russell recently started the Lawful Good Podcast, a show about lawyers and the trials they face inside and outside the courtroom. This is a human-interest show. Find Lawful Good on all platforms and here: https://lawfulgoodpodcast.com/On This Episode, We Discuss...- Attention to Detail on a Firm Brand of Self- Using Facebook Ads for Mass Torts- How to Capture the Human Element in Ads & Podcasts

The Social-Engineer Podcast
Ep. 151 - Human Element Series - Dropping a Dime with Michael Roderick

The Social-Engineer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 44:55


In this episode, we are joined by Michael Roderick. Michael is the CEO of Small Pond Enterprises which helps thoughtful givers become thought leaders by making their brands referable, their messaging memorable, and their ideas unforgettable. He is also the host of the podcast Access to Anyone which shows how you can get to know anyone you want in business and in life using time-tested relationship-building principles. Michael's unique methodology comes from his own experience of going from being a High School English teacher to a Broadway Producer in under two years.   August 9, 2021   00:00 – Intro  www.social-engineer.com  www.innocentlivesfoundation.org  Managed Voice Phishing   Managed Email Phishing   Adverserial Simulations   Social-Engineer channel on SLACK   CLUTCH   02:08 – Intro to Michael Roderick, CEO of Small Pond Enterprises www.smallpondenterprises.com    www.accesstoanyonepodcast.com 03:20 – High school teacher – where did that come from and what were you teaching? 04:17 – You moved to New York and while teaching high school, you decided you wanted to be a            producer.  How did that come about? 09:49 -  Was all of what you are saying a plan of yours, or you just did it and it worked out? 11:45 – You were doing something for these people with no ask in return.  This makes such a psychological bond with these people.  Why would you do this? 14:41 – What framework did you create out of this experience? 19:45 – You've got direct and indirect approach, what are the other two? 23:07 – What methods do you use to find the detail about who you are approaching for the mutually beneficial approach? 27:19 – What's the “E”? 35:16 – Did you come up with “DIME”? 35:55 – How can an average person use the skills you talked about to cultivate a network? 39:49 – Finding Michael on the Internet: www.smallpondenterprises.com www.myreferabilityrater.com Social Media links (not mentioned in podcast) Twitter: https://twitter.com/MichaelRoderick  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/michael-roderick-1161571/  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mike.roderick.940  40:37 – Who is your greatest mentor? Jeff Madoff 41:37 – Favorite Books Your Brain at Work – David Rock Breakthrough Advertising – Eugene Schwartz  

Ivanti Insights
The Human Element of Preventing Supply Chain Attacks

Ivanti Insights

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 16:22


Host Adrian Vernon, Sr. Director of Product Management Chris Goettl, and VP of Security Daniel Spicer explore recent challenges concerning the rise in supply chain attacks.The conversation includes:How a supply chain can be attacked and why organizations should careThe reality of building systems using multiple off the shelf products and the importance of making sure those products and vendors are secureBest practices around defending against supply chain attacksThe new cybersecurity executive order

The Manufacturing Executive
Add a Powerful Human Element with Video Messaging w/ Ethan Beute

The Manufacturing Executive

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 48:57


Video messaging is not just a new technology to learn, it's a way to connect with human beings that aligns better with how people prefer to communicate these days. It allows you to lead with your very best asset — yourself. In situations where face-to-face sales meetings are not always possible, recording a video allows others to take in your message when it's convenient for them, builds a feeling of psychological proximity, and offers more personalized interaction than a wall of text. On this episode of The Manufacturing Executive, we connect with Ethan Beute, Chief Evangelist at BombBomb, author, and host of The Customer Experience Podcast, and discuss all the ways in which using video messaging in your business can increase trust, make complex issues more digestible, and boost customer relations with humanization. Here's a sneak peek: Getting into the routine of utilizing video messaging helps you develop a healthy habit of gratitude. A video message is the modern day handwritten note when used as a thank you or encouragement message. The Video Adoption Guide is the fastest way for you and your team to get going (and keep going!) with personal video messages. Overcoming the initial technology barrier can be challenging, so begin with simple, heartfelt messages like thank you, congratulations, and job well done. OPTIONAL: Check out these resources we mentioned during the podcast: Rehumanize Your Business: How Personal Videos Accelerate Sales and Improve Customer Experience, but Ehtan Beute and Stephen Pacinelli Joe Sullivan, Gorilla 76 Thinker & Founder You can find this interview, and many more, by subscribing to the The Manufacturing Executive Podcast on Apple Podcasts, on our website, or on Spotify.

The Social-Engineer Podcast
Ep. 149 - Human Element Series - Whats In a T with Teresa Abram

The Social-Engineer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 46:26


In this episode, Chris Hadnagy is joined by Teresa Abram.  Teresa is the founder of Handwriting P.I., a full-service handwriting analysis business. Teresa is not only a handwriting analyzer, but also a professional personality investigator who can spot the red flags of a dangerous personality, identify someone's strengths, and uncover what is holding someone back. Teresa's interest in handwriting started when she was just 14 years old and has led her to hosting her own podcast, “A Most Unusual T Party” where she uses the letter T to unlock pieces of a person's story...which is fascinating to listen to! July 12, 2021 00:00: Intro  www.social-engineer.com  Managed Voice Phishing  Managed Email Phishing  Adverserial Simulations  Social-Engineer channel on SLACK  CLUTCH  Innocent Lives Foundation  03:01: Teresa Abram Intro  Handwriting P.I.  A Most Unusual T Party  05:00: How did you get into this at 14 years old?  07:50: How does one practice handwriting analysis?  09:05: What is scary handwriting?  Psychopath scale.  10:00: Chris' handwriting  11:20: Can you fool handwriting analysis?  14:00: Can this be used by companies to vet potential employees?  16:05: InfoSec and Handwriting are similar. All science is accurate until it's not.  18:35: Universal gestures   21:53: Discussion about Social-Engineer COO Ryan  24:19: Does Handwriting PI do handwriting analysis for employers?  Combined with other disciplines.  26:31: Chris' handwriting sample  27:23: Banned by Hitler as witchcraft  28:16: How long has handwriting analysis been around?  28:51: Can you analyze in different languages?  How?  Incongruency  Methods  34:06: Methodology continued.  Turning the paper over.  Go to the letter “t”.  37:21: How long does handwriting analysis take to do?  38:12: What is another way you work with companies?  39:30: Wrap-up  Teresa on the internet:  Instagram: Handwriting_PI  Website: www.handwritingpi.ca    40:47: Teresa's mentor - Sheila Lowe, President of the American Handwriting Analysis Foundation  41:54: Favorite Books:   The Wisdom of Psychopaths by Kevin Dutton  Illusions by Richard Beck  44:00: How old is Teresa's Daughter?  And how did she like having a Mom who would read her handwriting?  46:00: Outro  www.pro-rock.com  www.innocentlivesfoundation.org  Chris Hadnagy on Twitter - @HumanHacker 

Hacking Humans
Introducing 8th Layer Insights: Deceptionology 101: Introduction to the Dark Arts

Hacking Humans

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2021 61:27


Have you ever noticed how fundamental deception is to the human condition? Deception and forms of social engineering have been with us since the beginning of recorded history. And yet, it seems like we are just as vulnerable to it as ever. But now the stakes are higher because technology allows social engineers to deceive at scale. This episode explores the psychology of deception, provides a foundation for understanding social engineering, offers a few mental models for exploration and exploitation, and discusses how we can prepare our mental defenses. Guests: Rachael Tobac: (LinkedIn), CEO of SocialProof Security Chris Hadnagy: (LinkedIn); CEO of Social Engineer, LLC; Founder of Innocent Lives Foundation; Founder of Social-Engineer.org Lisa Forte: (LinkedIn); Partner at Red Goat Cyber Security; Co-Founder Cyber Volunteers 19 George Finney: (LinkedIn); Chief Security Officer at Southern Methodist University; Founder of Well Aware Security Notes & Resources: CSO Online article on Social Engineering OODA Loop Understanding Framing Effects More examples of Framing Effects Harvard Business Review article on the Principles of Persuasion A blog series I did on Deception (Part 1), (Part 2). PsychologyToday article on Social Engineering Recommended Books (Amazon affiliate links): The Art of Deception: Controlling the Human Element of Security by Kevin Mitnick Ghost in the Wires: My Adventures as the World's Most Wanted Hacker by Kevin Mitnick Human Hacking: Win Friends, Influence People, and Leave Them Better Off for Having Met You by Chris Hadnagy Influence, New and Expanded: The Psychology of Persuasion by Robert Cialdini Pre-Suasion: A Revolutionary Way to Influence and Persuade by Robert Cialdini Practical Social Engineering: A Primer for the Ethical Hacker by Joe Gray Social Engineering: The Science of Human Hacking by Chris Hadnagy Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman. Transformational Security Awareness: What Neuroscientists, Storytellers, and Marketers Can Teach Us About Driving Secure Behaviors by Perry Carpenter Well Aware: Master the Nine Cybersecurity Habits to Protect Your Future by George Finney Music and Sound Effects by Blue Dot Sessions & Storyblocks. Artwork by Chris Machowski.

Late Night Grooves with Enlusion
Episode 135: Late Night Grooves #135

Late Night Grooves with Enlusion

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2021 57:23


Bi-weekly dose of the latest and best in progressive, trance and techno worlds from Kirill 'Enlusion' Smirnov.http://facebook.com/EnlusionMusichttp://twitter.com/_Enlusionhttp://soundcloud.com/Enlusionhttp://instagram.com/Enlusionhttp://vk.com/EnlusionTracklist:00:00 Basil O'Glue — Monarch (Original Mix) [Eat My Hat]06:31 Sphera — Micro Poetry (Original Mix) [Iboga]10:21 Basil O'Glue — Select (Original Mix) [FSOE UV]15:08 Facade — Razor Crest (Original Mix) [Forescape Digital]21:50 Roger Lavelle — We Are Now (Original Mix) [IAMT]26:05 Ben Rama — The 5th World (Zentrix Remix) [Techgnosis]30:08 Code Therapy — Polar Quest (Original Mix) [Techgnosis]35:32 James Monro — Places (Original Mix) [Digital Structures]40:26 Human Element — Hidden Dimension (Jossie Telch Remix) [IbogaTech]44:21 Peter Groskreutz — Creeper (Original Mix) [Techgnosis]48:15 Bass To Pain Converter — Close Range (Schysto Remix) [Techgnosis]52:38 Kreisel — Photons (Monococ Remix) [KRSL]

Planet Dextin
Dextin Montgomery: The Human Element

Planet Dextin

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 26:19


A difficult Sunday cannot stop a creative soul from creating a podcast. Today, I talk about the Human Element, the personality and aspect of humanity through the perspective of me. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/dextin-montgomery/message

Iboga Radio Show
Human Element - Blue Elephant (Original mix)

Iboga Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2021 2:48


Human Element - Blue Elephant (Original mix) Iboga Revival, Vol. 02 - Iboga Records http://musicshop.iboga.dk/store/view_release?release=1643 IBOGADIGITAL709 1. FREq - Strange Attractor (Original Mix) 2. Son Kite - Catch (Original mix) 3. Liquid Soul - Why (Original Mix) 4. Ace Ventura, Zen Mechanics - Mind=God (Original Mix) 5. Liquid Soul - The Source (Atmos Remix) 6. Ace Ventura - Serenity Now (Original Mix) 7. Perfect Stranger - No 1 (Original Mix) 8. Yotopia - Game On (Original mix) 9. Ace Ventura - Judo Chop (Original Mix) 10. Weekend Heroes - Sidewinder (Ticon Remix) 11. Atmos - One You Need (Original Mix) 12. Lish - Feel Good (Original mix) 13. Flowjob - Run Baby Run (Original mix) 14. Liquid Soul - Crazy People (Captain Hook & Domestic Remix) 15. Easy Riders - Rolling Stoned (Original Mix) 16. Perfect Stranger, Zen Mechanics - Desert Session (Original Mix) 17. Vibrasphere - Capsize (Sphera Remix) 18. Phaxe - Street Lights (Original mix) 19. Flowjob - 10000 Smiles Away (Original mix) 20. Behind Blue Eyes, Krusseldorf - Kisses from the Clouds (Phaxe Remix) 21. Human Element - Blue Elephant (Original mix) 22. Ticon, Weekend Heroes - Teleport (Original Mix) 23. Liquid Soul - Global Illumination (Martin Roth OMFG! Remix) 24. FREq - Return of the Masters (RPO Remix) 25. Ryan Hallifax - Love Song (Original Mix) 26. Peter Gun, Terzi - Acapulco (Original Mix) 27. Antix - Little Honey (Original Mix) 28. Tripswitch - Squeeze Theorem (Original Mix) We take a psychedelic trip down memory lane with the 2nd edition of the Iboga Revival compilation. Featuring some of the epic classics that have brought us so many moments of joy and dancefloor bliss, this close to 30 track compilation spans over a decade of truly impactful tunes, showing just how timeless the true gems are. Martin Knecht 2015 Iboga Records Iboga Records Publishing

The Social-Engineer Podcast
Ep. 147 - Human Element Series - Becoming Ben Franklin with Joe Navarro

The Social-Engineer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2021 48:26


In this episode, Chris Hadnagy and Maxie Reynolds are joined by one of our greatest friends and mentors, Joe Navarro.  After serving as an FBI agent for 25 years, Joe has become a nonverbal and behavioral expert. Since retiring, he has authored 14 books in 29 languages dealing with human behavior and body language. His book “What Every BODY Is Saying” remains the #1 selling body-language book in the world for over 12 years.  Joe's new book “Be Exceptional” brings 40 years of his observations and research into one book.   00:00 – Intro   Social-Engineer.com   Social-Engineer.org   InnocentLivesFoundation.org   SE Vishing Service   SE Phishing Service   Security Assessments   Certified Training Programs   Adversarial Simulations   Social-Engineer channel on SLACK   CLUTCH   June 24th: Chris at Living Security 2nd annual Breaking Security Awareness (digital conference for 2021)   03:54 – Joe Navarro Intro   www.jnbodylanguageacademy.com    https://www.jnforensics.com/media    https://www.jnforensics.com/books    www.twitter.com/navarrotells   05:40 – Discussion on Joe's newest book, “Be Exceptional”.  Why a book about being exceptional?  08:41 – Is the writing style in the new book purposely like the others, where you compiled people's behavior?  Did you start writing with this idea, or did the book come about after you had cataloged it all?  13:16 – What is the difference between excellence and perfection?  15:13 – “Whoever provides the most psychological comfort is going to be the soonest winner”  16:23 – Excellence is about experience and the journey  18:34 – How does someone get to the place where they have mastery over their emotions?  22:50 – How do you get people to have self-awareness and humility?  24:05 – Self-Mastery  26:12 – What is the ranking of success, if it's not “counting possessions”?  28:15 – How much of excellence is habit?  Is any of excellence based on genetics?   29:18 – Thoughts on Usain Bolt and other runners achieving excellence  32:44 – Thoughts on Benjamin Franklin achieving excellence  39:42 – “Be Exceptional” comes out June 29, a bit of discussion about book release  41:02 – Wrap Up  How to contact Joe:   www.joenavarro.net  www.jnbodylanguageacademy.com  www.jnforensics.com  Joe Navarro on Twitter: @NavarroTells  42:01 – Favorite Books  The Giving Tree   The Gift of Fear  The Desert Queen  The Power of Myth – Joseph Campbell  Heroditus – The History  44:22 – Joe's Mentors  Mom, Dad, Grandma   Jack Schafer   David Givens   Gerald Post – CIA  47:12 – Outro   www.social-engineer.org – newly redesigned   www.social-engineer.com   www.innocentlivesfoundation.org 

Expand Your Edge
Why Openness Is Essential For Any Startup or Fast-Growing Company

Expand Your Edge

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2021 47:39


Serial entrepreneur, Jonathan Taylor, has started seven companies, acquired 18 and sold three, for an undisclosed amount surpassing a quarter of a billion dollars. And yet he still was open to learning more effective ways to run businesses when he did the work of The Human Element. In this episode, he joins me to discuss his surprise at how often he was misunderstood, how openness was the grand simplifier, and how quickly it accelerates trust between people. We also debate whether or not one “needs” to be an asshole in business to succeed. Listen and subscribe, today!

Drive Time Sports Podcast
6-1 TAKING THE HUMAN ELEMENT OUT OF IT

Drive Time Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2021 19:51


Ryan is tired of hearing that the Nuggets slow starts against the Blazers are just "human nature" See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Take It Easy
Deshaun Watson Civil Suit Explained + “Buck You” Giannis Antetokounmpo Parody Song

Take It Easy

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2021 55:46


On today’s episode, after the Bucks’ crushed Miami on Monday, I wrote a Bucks’ Parody to Cee Lo Green’s Classic Song “F**k You”. Also, Clippers fans should be sweating, Anthony Davis finally got to the Free Throw Line, and Trae Young makes me love him even more. Finally, I want to discuss the Human Element, Legal Element, and Football Element of Deshaun Watson’s Civil Suit, with help of the Reporting of Jenny Vrentas and Greg Bishop of Sports Illustrated.

OKC First | Unafraid
SERMON | "The Human Element of the Divine Plan"

OKC First | Unafraid

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2021 37:42


The Fast Lane with Ed Lane
Defending Lebron, Human Element In QB Decisions, NASCAR Next - Gen Car Reveal

The Fast Lane with Ed Lane

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2021 22:42


Ed reacts to LeBron James comments about the new playoff format Norm Wood on the Hoos and Hokies & his media tenure as he hangs up his pen and keyboard. Rackley Roofing Rackley WAR Truck driver Timothy Peters previews Darlington Raceway NASCAR

A Phil Svitek Podcast - A Series From Your 360 Creative Coach
A Macro Idea to Consider on Earth Day

A Phil Svitek Podcast - A Series From Your 360 Creative Coach

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2021 1:08


It's Earth Day 2021! Although every day should really be Earth Day for the very notion I raise in this mini episode. Please listen and really consider. Likewise, I invite you watch documentaries to explore more (some good ones are Planet Earth, Planet of the Humans, Seaspiracy, An Inconvenient Truth, The 11th Hour, I Am Greta, Pump, More Than Honey, Here We Are, The Human Element, Racing Extinction and The Story of Plastic). After listening, kindly feel free to ask questions or offer opinions of your own, whether down in the comment section or by hitting me up on social media @PhilSvitek. Lastly, for more free resources from your 360 creative coach, check out my website at http://philsvitek.com. RESOURCES/LINKS: -Coach or Consultant Services: https://philsvitek.com/lets-work-together/ -Podcast Services: http://philsvitek.com/podcastservices -Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/philsvitek -Merchandise: https://shop.spreadshirt.com/phil-svitek---360-creative-coach/ -Adorama Affiliate Link: https://www.adorama.com/?utm_source=rflaid914115 -Instagram: http://instagram.com/philsvitek -Facebook: http://facebook.com/philippsvitek -Twitter: http://twitter.com/philsvitek -Master Mental Fortitude Book: http://mastermentalfortitude.com -Idyll Film: http://philsvitek.com/idyll -Elan, Elan Book: http://philsvitek.com/elan-elan -In Search of Sunrise Film: http://philsvitek.com/in-search-of-sunrise

Beer and a Movie
137: The Human Element - Godzilla Vs. Kong / Godzilla (1954)

Beer and a Movie

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2021 79:31


In this episode, we tackle the latest and most succesful Covid-19 Era blockbuster Godzilla vs. Kong. We then go back TO THE SOURCE and find out where it all started by watching Ishiro Honda's original Godzilla.  Oh yeah, and we drink some beer.  Connect with us on social media! http://www.twitter.com/beermovieshow http://www.instagram.com/beerandamovie http://www.facebook.com/beerandamovietx http://www.beerandamoviepodcast.com http://www.patreon.com/beerandamoviepodcast

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast
MGoPodcast 12.28: Figurative Cows

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 3, 2021 66:37


1 hour and 37 minutes The Sponsors Thank you to Underground Printing for making this all possible. Rishi and Ryan have been our biggest supporters from the beginning. Check out their wide selection of officially licensed Michigan fan gear at their 3 store locations in Ann Arbor or learn about their custom apparel business at undergroundshirts.com. And let’s not forget our associate sponsors: HomeSure Lending, Ann Arbor Elder Law, the Residence Inn Ann Arbor Downtown, Michigan Law Grad, Human Element, The Phil Klein Insurance Group, and Information Entropy, the Raw Power app for iOS by Gentleman Coders. And introducing SignalWire, which is the virtual office platform we recorded this on because we’ve had it up to here with Zoom (use the code MUPPETS and they’ll buy your team lunch!) 1. Recapping UCLA starts at 1:00 Shot quality disparity was huge, so the difference was really luck of the Juzang. Livers absence was noticeable because he’s your bucket man. Go down the line: Austin Davis and Hunter Dickinson are 50% at the rim. Missing 5 straight free throws. Wagner going 1/9 from the floor. Game-winning play gets Franz screamingly wide open and he hits nothing. Most flagrant hook and hold not called since the rule was put in place. Dickinson got scouted to death: right shoulder! [The rest of the writeup and the player after THE JUMP]   2. Who’s Returning and Transfer Portal? starts at 14:26 We think Eli is coming back, and Chaundee Brown is 50/50, expect the rest to go. Eli really helps where they have holes next year—if he was a great creator that would be even more. Don’t want to recruit over your guys, so if they can’t get back Chaundee might as well roll with the freshmen and see which can play. Haven’t ruled out Mike Smith (expected to sign in Chicago) or Austin Davis, but he’d have to take a 3rd role. 3. What’s Back for Next Year: Frontcourt starts at 23:38 Dickinson should get more effective, more patient, develop more post moves. Moussa Diabate at the very least should be a monster defensive center and play 30 minutes between the 5 and 4. Switchable terror, vertical terror, has an outside shot and can put the ball on the floor. In case of emergency Johns can chip in but he’s your 4 we think. See some Williams if his outside shot comes around, especially with Dickinson. Not seeing Tschetter yet but Houstan could do some 4 as well. He’s your new Livers: shoot, play D, has some athleticism that makes him a top-10 recruit. Alternatives if no Chaundee: Isaiah Barnes—GRIII-2. Jace Howard: And ones!   4. Raw Takes and What’s Back for Next Year: Backcourt starts at 44:51 Eli will have this team organized on both ends of the floor, strong defensive player especially when there’s a wing-sized guy like Smith next to him instead of another floor-bound dude. Frankie Collins is Smith-sized but bouncy, super-explosive, deadly in the open floor, radiates winner. Similar to Zavier Simpson there’s a shooting issue, but he’s not a set shotter like X so that could come around. Zeb Jackson needs to take the wheel—Michigan’s best case scenario is if he turns into a starter. Kobe Bufkin and Isaiah Barnes are two freshman shots at a SG who’s just a shooter. Bufkin is a big riser, combo guard size, can be a secondary playmaker, gives you a chance at a Dwayne Washington, though Washington needed another year. Where does the creation come from? MUSIC: "Things Change"—Black Heat “Life”—The Walters “In the Garden”—Real Estate “Across 110th Street”

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast
MGoPodcast 12.27: Read the Room

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2021 53:20


54 minutes. We’re doing that thing again where we publish a partial pod between games then finish up after the next one. The Sponsors Thank you to Underground Printing for making this all possible. Rishi and Ryan have been our biggest supporters from the beginning. Check out their wide selection of officially licensed Michigan fan gear at their 3 store locations in Ann Arbor or learn about their custom apparel business at undergroundshirts.com. And let’s not forget our associate sponsors: HomeSure Lending, Ann Arbor Elder Law, the Residence Inn Ann Arbor Downtown, Michigan Law Grad, Human Element, The Phil Klein Insurance Group, and Information Entropy, the Raw Power app for iOS by Gentleman Coders. And introducing SignalWire, which is the virtual office platform we recorded this on because we’ve had it up to here with Zoom (use the code MUPPETS and they’ll buy your team lunch!) 1. Recapping FSU starts at 1:00 Put that in your Seder. Florida State didn’t know what to do about Franz, Johns came alive. First time we’ve gotten to see Johns after a week to practice in this role, and first time we got to see Juwan coach with a week to prepare for a tournament opponent, something Beilein was always so good at. Chaundee can rise. FSU’s switching nerfed some of their better qualities. 2. Previewing UCLA starts at 25:21 Weird team that wants to be big but lost two bigs and now overplays their 6’9”/260 foul-prone guy because the next biggest player is 6’6”. Kind of like Maryland in that they have a lot of scary wings who take a lot of jump shots, plus a wild-haired point guard who can pass (top-50 assist rate). Were underrated with the rest of their conference but drill down into the Synergy numbers and there are a lot of weaknesses, not to mention they’re all way smaller than Michigan’s frontcourt and no bigger in the backcourt. 3. A Farewell to WBB, Hockey, and Giles Jackson starts at 42:57 Naz and the Browns took us as far as it could be believed, and further. Kind of like the 2009 basketball team that beat Clemson and hung with Blake Griffin, proving this is a program you can compete at. Hockey, man, at least it’s either star-touched Duluth or a team that’s never won it. Giles Jackson, man, at least we’ll always have the Indiana “return.” [The player after The Jump] MUSIC: "I’m a Midnight Mover"—Wilson Pickett “Angel Duster”—Run the Jewels “Across 110th Street”

OverDrive
Justin Williams on Tim Peel, the human element in hockey & the Hurricanes season so far

OverDrive

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2021 24:57


Stanley Cup Champion, Mr. Game 7, Special Advisor to the Hurricanes GM & Friend of the Show Justin Williams joined the OverDrive guys earlier today and got into a number of things including Tim Peel & his hot mic issue last night. As well Justin touches on why he likes the human element in sports & gets into the strong season the Hurricanes are having.

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast
MGoPodcast 12.26: Who We Thought They Were

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2021 74:26


This is the second of a pair of half-sized episodes so we could get one out between the games last weekend. The Sponsors Thank you to Underground Printing for making this all possible. Rishi and Ryan have been our biggest supporters from the beginning. Check out their wide selection of officially licensed Michigan fan gear at their 3 store locations in Ann Arbor or learn about their custom apparel business at undergroundshirts.com. And let’s not forget our associate sponsors: HomeSure Lending, Ann Arbor Elder Law, the Residence Inn Ann Arbor Downtown, Michigan Law Grad, Human Element, The Phil Klein Insurance Group, and Information Entropy, the Raw Power app for iOS by Gentleman Coders. And introducing SignalWire, which is the virtual office platform we recorded this on because we’ve had it up to here with Zoom (use the code MUPPETS and they’ll buy your team lunch!) 1. Recapping LSU starts at 1:00 That was terrifying. Hurrah for the regression to the mean on lean twos and floaters off the dribble. They were who we thought they were, weren’t they? Smith struggled with length but his offensive creation wasn’t missed when Chaundee was on the court. Also how nice is it that Michigan has so many guys who can win them a game? Also the refs: 10 really bad calls, split unevenly, felt worse because every possession was life or death. 2. Previewing FSU starts at 25:18 Remember the last FSU team? They’re like that: super duper tall, use a lot of bench in weird places, including having the best player on their team, Scottie Barnes, coming off the bench. This is because they can’t defend the rim without their two 7-foot centers who haven’t faced a lot of post-ups. Not great off-the-dribble shooters which is good news because no guard is less than 6’4”. 3. Big TEHN! starts at 48:23 We survey the carnage of our conference mates who didn’t make it out of the opening weekend, from least to most disappointing. Rutgers is now in the Big Ten since they didn’t make it out of Round 2 despite being expected to win at some point. [The player after The Jump] MUSIC: "Manifest"—Andrew Bird “Triumphant Sunday”—Soul Scratch “Across 110th Street”

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast
MGoPodcast 12.25: A McDonald’s Bag With Legs

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2021 45:42


We’re going to put out two half-sized episodes this week so we can preview LSU. The Sponsors Thank you to Underground Printing for making this all possible. Rishi and Ryan have been our biggest supporters from the beginning. They have awesome custom tees and hoodies and low, affordable prices, and tons of great Michigan apparel that you can wear proudly to support the maize and blue! Check out their wide selection of officially licensed Michigan fan gear at their 3 store locations in Ann Arbor or learn about their custom apparel business at undergroundshirts.com. And let’s not forget our associate sponsors: HomeSure Lending, Ann Arbor Elder Law, the Residence Inn Ann Arbor Downtown, Michigan Law Grad, Human Element, The Phil Klein Insurance Group, and Information Entropy, the Raw Power app for iOS by Gentleman Coders. And introducing SignalWire, which is the virtual office platform we recorded this on because we’ve had it up to here with Zoom (use the code MUPPETS and they’ll buy your team lunch!) 1. Recapping Texas Southern starts at 1:00 Zeb Jackson for ten minutes—just want that guy getting some confidence in his shot. Interesting high-low with Terrance Williams, since he’s not a spot-up threat right now: keep him on the court with Dickinson. Speaking of Dickinson: don’t want him contesting 20% guards—fouling out was just a ref show. Other wings turned down open catch and shoot threes.t 2. Previewing LSU starts at 20:22 Iowa stats but get there the opposite way: all the Isolation, very few baskets are assisted. They don’t play defense—Michigan will have to shoot well but that’s the big difference. Good news is Michigan just played at the football stadium in the BTT so they’re a bit used to shooting with the backdrop. LSU’s shooting is opponent-invariant, they don’t clean up their own boards because they try to block everything. Worried that LSU is so good at getting calls and converting at the line. [The player after The Jump] MUSIC: "The Offering"—Ikebe Shakedown “Across 110th Street”

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast
MGoRadio 6.8: Shaka Grew Out His Hair

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2021 93:00


The Sponsors Thank you to Underground Printing for making this all possible. Rishi and Ryan have been our biggest supporters from the beginning. They're also behind our Ann Arbor Institutions t-shirt program. They have awesome custom tees and hoodies and low, affordable prices. They also have tons of great Michigan apparel that you can wear proudly to support the maize and blue! Check out their wide selection of officially licensed Michigan fan gear at their 3 store locations in Ann Arbor or learn about their custom apparel business at undergroundshirts.com. And let’s not forget our associate sponsors: HomeSure Lending, Ann Arbor Elder Law, the Residence Inn Ann Arbor Downtown, Michigan Law Grad, Human Element, The Phil Klein Insurance Group, and Information Entropy, and introducing the Raw Power app for iOS by Gentleman Coders.   [After THE JUMP: the player and what we said] -------------------------------------------- 1. Ohio State starts at 1:00 Holding for the last shot good, holding for that long, not so good. Three point luck versus quality of looks. Why didn’t we recruit the kid from Grand Rapids? Lots of things could have been enough, but missing Livers when you lose a game of threes kind of makes it a one-note explanation. 2. Maryland starts at 19:26 Why is Morsell so mad? Oh right his face got dented. Anyway Maryland is very loud for a team that got put in a trash can three times by Michigan this year. Wondering if Turgeon really wanted to go with Howard or if he trusted those around him to break it up first. 3. Livepodding the Bracket Reveal starts at 30:45 First upset is App State isn’t in our bracket. Gonzaga got the tough draws that might be replaced by standby two’s. Seth’s about 20 seconds ahead so he gets to laugh for that long before the others learn things like MSU is in a play-in game. 4. Michigan’s Corner Preview starts at 57:20 Good draw? We skip the 16 seed (sorry Virginia) to get into LSU and St Bonaventure. LSU is athletic and long but not coached at all—they chuck and chuck some more. St Bonnies doesn’t pull their starters off the court, pretty mid-range heavy as well. Guards are chuckers but they have a PF who gets to the rim. FSU is really tall as usual, Colorado wins at home because of their elevation but they’re way more beatable down to Earth. 5. The 2 and 3 Seeds on Our Side starts at 1:20:28 Alabama is the most modern-coached team in the game—they shoot fast, shoot threes and at the rim, and are really good on defense. Texas is biglargehuge and could put Dickinson in foul trouble. MUSIC: Thanks to MGoReader Saulius Polteraitis from The Champaign Saints who offered to let us use their music on short notice here. Check them out on Spotify. "Ghost Wedding” "The Love Unconscious" "The Winter Electric" “Across 110th Street” If you or a friend made some good tunes and don't have a label out scrubbing for them we'd be happy to feature you.

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast
MGoPodcast 12.23: Mad Preemptively

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 28, 2021 72:20


1 hour and 13 minutes. Don’t forget: Next Saturday is our Roast of John U Bacon The Sponsors "Thank you to Underground Printing for making this all possible. Rishi and Ryan have been our biggest supporters from the beginning. They're also behind our Ann Arbor Institutions t-shirt program. They have awesome custom tees and hoodies and low, affordable prices. They also have tons of great Michigan apparel that you can wear proudly to support the maize and blue! Check out their wide selection of officially licensed Michigan fan gear at their 3 store locations in Ann Arbor or learn about their custom apparel business at undergroundshirts.com." And let’s not forget our associate sponsors: HomeSure Lending, Ann Arbor Elder Law, the Residence Inn Ann Arbor Downtown, Michigan Law Grad, Human Element, The Phil Klein Insurance Group, and Information Entropy, and introducing the Raw Power app for iOS by Gentleman Coders. 1. A Tribute to Louis Nix, and Indiana starts at 1:00 We pay tribute to the life of one of our favorite players from a rival. Used the same gameplan as Iowa because why not. Hunter Dickinson: one of the best offensive big men but also one of the best defensive big men? Player of the Year? Franz also playing out of his mind. IU made some weird decisions. Was the first half clunky? [The rest of the writeup and the player after The Jump] 2. Iowa starts at 23:51 We kind of talked about Iowa in the last segment but this is the real Iowa talk because HOLY COY. Remember when Garza went mano-a-mano with Jon Teske and scored 44 points? Yeah, Dickinson shut THAT guy down. Also Brandon Johns and Austin Davis did too while Franz took over the game. Most impressive win this year? 3. Around the Big Ten, WBB, Hockey, and a Softball Note starts at 39:58 Illinois can win out but needs MSU to beat Michigan twice. Also Ayo-less Illinois almost let Wisconsin come back and end it. Thank you MSU for doing that to them. Also: MSU—what the heck, beating Illinois and Ohio State? They went to a hack-a-thon against Illinois and dared the refs to call a foul on literally everything. OSU has a point about the officiating but also: LOL. Hockey gets a Red Tie, where they pepper their goalie (and crossbar) with shots and nothing goes in and the other team gets a stupid weird bounce. WBB also frustrating—note that we recorded this before the Maryland game was rescheduled for March 4. Meghan Beubien K-thon. 4. Raw Takes and Football Recruiting starts at 58:18 Will Johnson Hello! What this means for the in-state class and some other big targets that Johnson talks to. We also run quickly through the boards that I have a handle on (IE not LB, DL, or OL) and the shadow effect of recruiting 5-star quarterbacks in the class before. MUSIC: "I’d Fly Away"—Al Green “Mr. Big Stuff"—Jean Knight “Stupid Dreams"—Born Ruffians “Across 110th Street”

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast
MGoPodcast 12.22: Barnburners

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2021 98:32


1 hour and 39 minutes, wsg the Sklars Brothers to promote our Roast of John U Bacon The Sponsors "Thank you to Underground Printing for making this all possible. Rishi and Ryan have been our biggest supporters from the beginning. They're also behind our Ann Arbor Institutions t-shirt program. They have awesome custom tees and hoodies and low, affordable prices. They also have tons of great Michigan apparel that you can wear proudly to support the maize and blue! Check out their wide selection of officially licensed Michigan fan gear at their 3 store locations in Ann Arbor or learn about their custom apparel business at undergroundshirts.com." And let’s not forget our associate sponsors: HomeSure Lending, Ann Arbor Elder Law, the Residence Inn Ann Arbor Downtown, Michigan Law Grad, Human Element, The Phil Klein Insurance Group, and Information Entropy, and introducing the Raw Power app for iOS by Gentleman Coders.   1. The Game, Which is The Game this year starts at 1:00 That and that and that and the other thing and then yes, the officiating. The rest of the writeup and the player after The Jump] 2. Rutgers starts at 26:35 Anyone remember this game? Oh right, Pikiell admitted they’re going to settle for bad twos and then they did. 3. Raw Takes, Football Coaches, Around the Big Ten starts at 38:27 We manage to keep it on the rails long enough to talk about Illinois before descending into Michigan State basketball talk. Three of five, baby! MSU is on a roll! 4. The Sklars and a Gimmicky Top Ten Barnburners starts at 1:10:01 We bring in the Sklars to talk about our John U Bacon roast on March 6 to save the Ann Arbor Comedy Showcase. Then we play the Feud, as the Brothers Sklar have to guess our top ten Michigan barnburners in the last 20 years. MUSIC: "The Heat"—Jungle “Sleep Now in the Fire"—Rage Against the Machine “The Barn Tapes"—Andrew Bird “Across 110th Street”

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast
MGoPodcast 12.21: Steering Into the Skid

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 15, 2021 84:24


David Nasternak sitting in for Ace. The Sponsors Thank you to Underground Printing for making this all possible. Rishi and Ryan have been our biggest supporters from the beginning. They're also behind our Ann Arbor Institutions t-shirt program. They have awesome custom tees and hoodies and low, affordable prices. They also have tons of great Michigan apparel that you can wear proudly to support the maize and blue! Check out UGP’s holiday gift guide at ugp.io/holidaygiftguide and use the promo code NEWYEAR for 25% off your next purchase! Our associate sponsors are also key to all of this: HomeSure Lending, Ann Arbor Elder Law, the Residence Inn Ann Arbor Downtown, Michigan Law Grad, Human Element, The Phil Klein Insurance Group, and Information Entropy, and introducing the Raw Power app for iOS by Gentleman Coders. 1. Sports! Basketball vs. Wisconsin starts at 1:00 Other than Eli’s offense and everybody else’s in the first half it went as you might expect it to go when a projected 1-seed coming off a three-week hiatus visits a [checks notes] 3-seed. Switching defense was the key in the second half. Wisconsin’s Reuvers seems broken. The rest of the writeup and the player after The Jump] 2. Around the Big Ten starts at 28:58 This isn’t all about Michigan State, nor is it all about Illinois fans thinking Michigan tried to dodge a performance that almost lost them a game to Nebraska. Ohio State continues to destroy people. Michigan State, of course. 3. Raw Takes and Gimmicky Top Five Shovelfuls of Advice for People Who Don’t Live in Snowy Places starts at 51:37 We should all be very good at staying home by now. 4. Ace’s Hockey Podcast starts at 1:10:01 Michigan splits with Wisconsin, which is up there with Minnesota as the most dominant team in the Big Ten. Portillo starts and does alright. Rust not a huge issue but the Badgers’ talent is. MUSIC: "A Hazy Shade of Winter"—Simon & Garfunkel “Grey Ice Water"—Modest Mouse “20 Years of Snow"—Regina Spektor “Across 110th Street”

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast
MGoPodcast 12.20: Novak Flushed It

MGoBlog: The MGoPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2021 110:07


The Guest Zack Novak joined us for a segment, which is reason enough to put his Chicks Dig Scars shirt back up (think they’re organized by date created so you have to scroll to the end). Worth noting that Spike Albrecht does not have a shirt in the MGoStore. The Sponsors Thank you to Underground Printing for making this all possible. Rishi and Ryan have been our biggest supporters from the beginning. They're also behind our Ann Arbor Institutions t-shirt program. They have awesome custom tees and hoodies and low, affordable prices. They also have tons of great Michigan apparel that you can wear proudly to support the maize and blue! Check out UGP’s holiday gift guide at ugp.io/holidaygiftguide and use the promo code NEWYEAR for 25% off your next purchase! Our associate sponsors are also key to all of this: HomeSure Lending, Ann Arbor Elder Law, the Residence Inn Ann Arbor Downtown, Michigan Law Grad, Human Element, The Phil Klein Insurance Group, and Information Entropy. 1. Football Recruiting Doesn’t Suck Again starts at 1:00 Mo Linguist has been loosed in the Volunteer state and is making it into the new Massachusetts. Also three DTs, one or two or all three perhaps ticketed for nose, when it looked like none. The rest of the writeup and the player after The Jump] 2. Gimmicky Top Five Elements to Add to New NCAA Game starts at 26:00 I didn’t realize this would be serious things until right before the podcast so I’ll have to write an extensive article about all of my ideas later. More or less we’re looking for a Crusader Kings II version of dynasty mode, with the Madden engine and more cheating. 3. Big Ten Shootaround starts at 49:15 We go over what we’ve watched of the league. Illinois has figured out how to get Ayo right, Wisconsin can’t get Reuvers fixed and dies on the nights their fives can’t hit a three. Ohio State is weird, gets to the line, and can’t be ignored—credit to Chris Holtmann, who can’t recruit for some reason. Also Iowa: should they ever try to play defense? Also Michigan State. 4. The Zack Novak Hour starts at 1:29:52 The true story of the legendary dunk contest. The Twitter beef with former Purdue point guard Spike Albrecht. Playing for Beilein. The secrets of Sanderson revealed! MUSIC: “Scratch My Itch"—The Soul Snatchers “Getting On in Spite of You”—Remember Sports “War”—Mos Def “Across 110th Street”