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Best podcasts about c suite

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Latest podcast episodes about c suite

"Executive Presence" 5.24.22

"The" Lance Jay Radio Network (Best Of Series)

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 14:24


Lance S/O's all of the people he sees getting promoted that were passed over while he was in corporate healthcare and tell stories about C-Suite power trips...

Drop In CEO
C-Suite Academy: Help Your Aspiring Leaders Message Big Ideas

Drop In CEO

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 12:34


On today's episode Deborah shares the common signs that your team's ideas may be getting lost in translation. Listen in as Deb shares how she helped her team communicate their ideas in a way that was efficient and had long term benefits for both the individual and the organization.   Create a personal career strategy that develops the leadership and communication skills you need to assess challenges, showcase your skills, and demonstrate your ability to be a C-Suite Leader. Learn more about the C-Suite Academy here: https://bit.ly/csawaitlist22 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

RBR+TVBR InFOCUS Podcast
The InFOCUS Podcast: Ralph Bachofen, Triveni Digital

RBR+TVBR InFOCUS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 14:21


They're providing "the guts" to ATSC 3.0 for broadcast television stations across the U.S. But, what does that mean for those in the C-Suite? For one, new revenue opportunities are on the horizon. Second, monitoring of ATSC 3.0 signals is more important now that lighthouses, ahead of SFNs, are lighting up in market after market.RBR+TVBR Editor-in-Chief Adam R Jacobson interviewed Ralph Bachofen, VP of Sales and Marketing at Triveni Digital, while attending the 2022 NAB Show in Las Vegas. His conversation can be heard in this freshly produced InFOCUS Podcast, presented by dot.FM.

#RockstarsRocking
2022 BenefitsPRO Broker of the Year Top 5 Finalist – Kim Eckelbarger

#RockstarsRocking

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 40:33


This episode of the #RockstarsRocking podcast features my good friend, rockstar Kim Eckelbarger, Founder and President of Tropical Benefits, out of the Tampa, Florida area.   We open up our conversation today celebrating Kim's amazing recognition as one of the five finalists for Broker of the Year by BenefitsPRO magazine and recognizing how and why she caught the eye of the industry. One of the ways she did this is through empowering HR Managers. From creating an HR roadshow to teach prospects how to be more effective in their duties and responsibilities, to teaching them how to communicate better with the C-Suite, to becoming an essential member of the decision-making team.   Beyond the day-to-day processes she puts into place, we also discuss the larger picture of her ethos and legacy. We talk about getting more women into the industry, how the industry needs to empower consumers to take charge of their healthcare and taking the step to sell her agency to focus on growing her legacy, while making sure her people were taken care of. Beyond her agency, she's also putting together a local healthcare network to get employees quality care at little to no out-of-pocket cost.   So, are you ready for more? Go ahead and grab your favorite ice-cold beverage and tap that play button, to tune in to this week's edition of the #RockstarsRocking podcast.     Episode Highlights:   -       Being recognized as a top 5 finalist for Broker of the Year by BenefitsPRO magazine -       Teaching HR Managers how to be better communicators with their C-Suite -       How to get more women and younger people into the industry -       Creating an HR roadshow to turn competitors into collaborators -       Making sure her people were taken care of when she sold her agency Creating a bigger legacy by creating a local healthcare network Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

April Garcia's PivotMe
How to Transition From C-Suite to Entrepreneur, Alicia Driskill Visionary Leader and Speaker

April Garcia's PivotMe

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 29:57


On PivotMe today, we have Alicia Driskill, a visionary leader and keynote speaker that left a high profile and lucrative role in entertainment and media to create her own business and movement with EvolveHer. She decided to leave her corporate role when she realized someone else was living her life. She explains how her transformation from corporate to entrepreneurship began after the loss of her dad and an encounter with a homeless person. Listen in to learn how to boldly shift your identity from your corporate titles to entrepreneur after transitioning. You will also learn the importance of documenting your wins to boost your confidence and having a community to support you in your entrepreneurial journey.  Pivotal Questions Asked: [7:53] Was there a particular moment when you were in corporate America that made you realize it wasn't working anymore? [10:02] Talk to us about that jump, how was the identity shift for you? [20:33] How do you self-sabotage and how do you get yourself out of it? [26:41] If you could tell the world one thing, what would it be?   In This Episode You Will Learn: [8:19] She describes the moment that she made the big jump to leave the corporate behind. [10:15] Her struggles with impostor syndrome as a new entrepreneur coming from the corporate. [17:14] The challenging yet exciting experience the EvolveHer space ended up becoming. [20:37] How she self-sabotages with lack of confidence and how she walks past that. [23:42] Boost your confidence by documenting your wins plus have a community to support you. [26:48] How to evolve by understanding your values and prioritizing what's important to you.  Quotes:   “With impostor syndrome, it's so important that you document all of your successes and that you celebrate little wins along the way.”- Alicia [24:37] “Remember to continue to evolve and give yourself the grace and the time to truly prioritize yourself so that you can always live the life that you want.”- Alicia [26:51]   Connect with Alicia: Website: https://www.evolveher.community/en Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/evolveHer/ IG: https://www.instagram.com/evolveher/ ________________________________________________ What can you do today? To Be Productive. Effective. Perform at your best. Even now. Are you struggling to stay focused? If you have the right framework, it takes the guesswork out of Productivity. Get our FREE mini-series 4 Steps: Doing More in Less Time. Visit pivot-me.com/4Steps to get it TODAY!

Catapulting Commissions with Anthony Garcia
Selling in the c-suite w/ Chris Chapman

Catapulting Commissions with Anthony Garcia

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 34:31


Chris Chapman is executive director at Capital Analytics and the founder and host of the Next Level Minds podcast. Chris has been doing sales since he was a kid when he went door-to-door trying to sell services that might help the busy homeowners in his neighborhood. In his first post-college job in IT staffing, he learned how to  build relationships with IT managers, CTOs and VPs. Then he transitioned into his current role with Capital Analytics, which publishes local business magazines. He project manages the development of each publication in his region, but he also then sells digital ads and event sponsorships to CEOs who are featured in the publication.   It's not easy to immediately get in touch with a CEO. Chris learned the hard way that you need to build relationships with the gatekeepers around the CEO. Treating the admin staff like the enemy isn't going to get you very far. If you're trying to reach the CEO of a smaller company– say 50 people or less– you can sometimes get lucky by dialing directly very early in the AM or after 5:00 PM and they'll answer their own phone. With larger companies, there are likely to be more touch points before you can reach the CEO. Be prepared to talk to at least 4 to 5 people before you win that call. When cold calling doesn't work and you need to do a drop by, you have to go in with confidence and kindness. Sometimes, you'll get lucky and the CEO will have a moment to meet; if not, you can leave behind a business card and a good impression.    When you're dealing with busy CEOs, you have to build rapport and add value quickly. Before he makes a cold call, he does all the research to learn everything he can about the CEO. He looks for mutual connections, finds out where they went to school, what other companies they've worked for, etc. He also taps into his network of other CEOs that he's worked with and exploits the FOMO effect. “This CEO is getting in on this opportunity. I'd hate for you to miss out on this.”    It's important, however, not to lead with rapport-building strategies. In fact, Chris and Anthony both agree that you have to lead with why you're calling. Get the point across about what you're trying to sell. Once they're warm to the idea, then you can work on building an authentic, personal connection. As he gathers rapport-building information about the prospect, he tracks every detail in his CRM. So when a CEO says she's gotta go because she has a tee time, he makes a note in the CRM that indicates the CEO has an interest in golf. Next time they meet, Chris can reference that in their conversation. For reps who aren't great at CRM management, he suggests putting rapport notes in the calendar invite to keep track.    Once you get that meeting with a CEO, Chris says selling to them is not much different than selling to a lower level executive. People are people. No matter who you're selling to, it's about building relationships with a person and helping find the proper solutions to the problems they experience. That really doesn't change based on the size of the company or the title of your prospect. And no matter who you're meeting with, pay them the respect of being prepared and dressing for success.   Chris always asks his prospects to rank on a scale of 1 to 10 how strongly they are considering his offer. He's essentially immediately asking for feedback, and he's open to accepting it whether it's good or bad. When he has that information, he asks what's holding them back from getting to a 10. That arms him with the information he needs to get them closer to a deal.   Chris' Next Level Minds podcast is a top-ranked business podcast that has been listened to in over 45 different countries. The podcast is dedicated to those who want to reach a massive next level in their career, business, or personal life. He interviews people who are successful in a variety of fields– founders, entrepreneurs, athletes, authors. He asks them to share their journey to success. He's learned two important things about successful people. First, they remain humble, no matter how successful they become. When you lose that, you sometimes lose the habits that got you to success in the first place. The other thing he has learned is that the most successful people never stop learning. They all have an insatiable desire to learn and to be masters of their craft, no matter what that might be. Chris Chapman on LinkedIn Next Level Minds podcast Chris Chapman on Instagram

Maximize Your Career with Stacy Mayer
How to Overcome the ‘Aggressive' Label at Work

Maximize Your Career with Stacy Mayer

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 29:49


Ep #124: How to Overcome the ‘Aggressive' Label at WorkDo you worry about receiving feedback that you're too aggressive at work? This is a topic that came up on a panel I was presenting on recently, and the way the women in the audience fixated on this problem was a big red flag for me. Because, how are you going to raise your hand, speak up more, share your opinions, ask directly for that promotion or pay increase, and build relationships with the executive team when you're constantly monitoring how “aggressive” you're being at work? Nope. Not on my watch. That's why I'm dedicating this episode of Maximize Your Career with Stacy Mayer to showing you a different path. One where you lean into the beautiful, powerful POSITIVE feedback you are already receiving right now, and one where you don't let your fear of being seen as aggressive completely hijack your career. Let's dive in.Join us inside my group coaching intensive, Executive Ahead of Time.

Essentially You
C-Suite Pep Talk

Essentially You

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 4:29


It's time for a pep talk. Whether you aspire to be a C-Suite executive or perhaps you have reached this destination. No matter where you are in your career journey, this pep talk is for climbers, playmakers, and those who have suddenly become overwhelmed at the size of problems you get to solve every day. 

Speaking to Influence
Ep 105: Cindy Lewis - CFO of Coho Partners, Ltd: Accountability and the Three C's of Influence

Speaking to Influence

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 36:04


The financial space doesn't seem like a natural place for vulnerability, but today's guest shares that honesty and openness while communicating with her team is the key to successful relationships and strong workplace culture. On this episode, Laura and Cindy explore the nuances of data-driven storytelling and how Cindy navigates the varying levels of financial understanding of the team members and stakeholders she engages with throughout her career.   Here are a few things you'll learn during this conversation: What it means to be a long-invested communicator The negative impact of uptalk How to set up productive goal-setting conversations with peers The difference between an executive vs. a leader How to ensure people take you seriously   During the 24-Hour Challenge, Laura invites you to find an accountability partner and create a goal with an end date after discussing Cindy has been positively impacted by peer support.   About Cindy:   Cindy Lewis is CFO at Coho Partners, Ltd., a $10B investment management firm whose goal is to generate a pattern of returns that offers protection in down markets and competitive returns in up markets.   You can connect with Cindy in the following ways: Website: www.cohopartners.com Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/cindytlewis/     To learn more about Dr. Laura Sicola and how mastering influence can impact your success go to https://www.speakingtoinfluence.com/quickstart and download the quick start guide for mastering the three C's of influence.   You can connect with Laura in the following ways:   LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/drlaurasicola LinkedIn Business Page: https://www.linkedin.com/company/vocal-impact-productions/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWri2F_hhGQpMcD97DctJwA Facebook: Vocal Impact Productions Twitter: @Laura Sicola  Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/vocalimpactproductions Instagram: @VocalImpactProductions See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Boomers Today
Five Steps to Navigating Your Caregiving Journey

Boomers Today

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 26:05


For the past thirty-five years Sue Ryan has been helping individuals – from entrepreneurs to Fortune 100 C-Suite leaders – serving more than 700 organizations of all sizes and in a multitude of industries – successfully navigate transitions in their businesses through her roles in enterprise application software sales. In parallel with Sue's professional career, she's been navigating roles of non-professional caregiving support for family and loved ones. She now navigates her caregiving journey positively, practicing massive acceptance and radical presence. She feels supported and balanced throughout all the transitions in her caregiving journey. Sponsor: https://www.seniorcare-nyfl.com/

The Leadership Hacker Podcast
Build Teams with Fun and Play with Matt May

The Leadership Hacker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 45:29


Matt May is Founder and CEO of Premier Team Building and Interactive experiences, he's also a speak and author of the Book, "Take the Fear out of Team Building." In this engaging and fun show, you can learn: Why “team building” is not a “bad word.” Why grown-ups have developed fear and anxiety around play and team building? How do you go about having fun/play yet keeping the learning real and authentic? How do you get folks to participate who just don't want to get involved.   Join our Tribe at https://leadership-hacker.com Music: " Upbeat Party " by Scott Holmes courtesy of the Free Music Archive FMA Transcript: Thanks to Jermaine Pinto at JRP Transcribing for being our Partner. Contact Jermaine via LinkedIn or via his site JRP Transcribing Services   Find out more about Matt below: Matt on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mattmayptb/ Matt on Twitter: https://twitter.com/PremierTeamBld Matt on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/premierteambuilding/ Matt's Website: https://premierteambuilding.com/   Full Transcript Below ----more---- Steve Rush: Some call me Steve, dad, husband, or friend. Others might call me boss, coach, or mentor. Today you can call me The Leadership Hacker. Thanks for listening in. I really appreciate it. My job as The Leadership Hacker is to hack into the minds, experiences, habits and learning of great leaders, C-Suite executives, authors, and development experts so that I can assist you developing your understanding and awareness of leadership. I am Steve Rush, and I am your host today. I am the author of Leadership Cake. I am a transformation consultant and leadership coach. I cannot wait to start sharing all things leadership with you   Our special guest on today shows Matt May. He's the founder and CEO of Premier Team Building & Interactive Experiences Company. He's also a speaker, an author of the book, Take The Fear Out Of Team Building. But before we get a chance to speak with Matt, it's The Leadership Hacker News. The Leadership Hacker News Steve Rush: The values and culture play a real part in leadership post pandemic. We're going to look at how environments have changed dramatically over the last 10 years and particularly since the pandemic. It's exposed weaknesses and for some businesses strengths and the effectiveness of company values and how they're put into practice. I want to dive in and have a quick look at how leadership drastically changes company culture and how values inform it. There's a fantastic report from the ILM called leading through values if you get a chance to get your hands on it, which gives you much more context and detail about the things I'm going to talk to you about. And just to throw something else into the mix that helps inform culture and values, right now. I wrote an article in CEOWorld Magazine and on LinkedIn called Mind The Gen Gap. For the first time, we now have four generations in the workforce, Baby Boomers, Gen Xers, Millennials, and Gen Zers or Gen Zers if you're in the UK. And the reason this is important is because values is the principles, the rules of the game, and we all have perspectives based on our generations. And whilst these are not scientifically proven, it's a good barometer and we should take it into consideration. The ILM research found that 69% of people will reconsider a job if the company culture seems to be toxic, 77% felt that company culture was incredibly important to them and the values that their boss also brings to the culture and 56% ranked opportunities for growth as more important than their basic salary and package. So, the top values that impact on culture are having a person centered and authentic approach with the core elements, being congruence. In other words, your words and actions make sense to your employees. Being genuine in essence, empathy, having a deep understanding of what it feels like for employees of every grade and every level and an unconditional positive regard for the individual. And only if there is a genuine approach to demonstrate these values from senior leadership. There can be congruency throughout the organization. You'd expect wellbeing of employees to be up there and of course, it is. The Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development, CIPD. Run a survey of over 3000 individuals in the UK. And the survey consistently found a 38% of workers experience work stress on a weekly basis. The problem in a lot of companies is that there is no clear standalone health and wellbeing strategy. In fact, only 8% of companies had such a strategy And at least 34% of managers expressed a need for independent authority and feel unempowered to really do anything. My observation here is if we have a people centered approach, wellbeing should be part of that, and we don't necessarily need to have a strategy or strategic. We do however need to be more thoughtful and compassionate. And as a talent management and learning and development, professional. It's music to my ears, to see self-directed on autonomous learning to sit up here in the top tier, there's been a significant shift away from organizations investing in organization-wide learning programs and much more focused self-directed autonomous learning and it's becoming more prominent in most company's culture. And this means that the company values are the basis of helping employees engage when it's meaningful and when it's right for them. But this strategy provides some challenges, too. Some people really struggle to learn on their own. They do need guidance, support, and others to help them on their journey. There are people not able to extract and absorb the information in the same way and still need that for face-to-face facilitator led sessions. And there's such a thing too, to have too much freedom. The number of possibilities can create overwhelm and anxiety. So, we have to sometimes help people direct them to the most appropriate resources. And their last one on my list today is recognition. Remuneration is important for sure but recognizing staff for good jobs well done is most important and a significant indicator in value-based leadership. Many employees want to feel that their work is being valued and valuing values plays an important role in this because they should stipulate in some way that there is a recognition of the hard work outside of the salary and the direct results as a result of their work. This will also inform great culture and culture can be formed so that this becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. The final thing I want to draw our attention to is your company's purpose is not your purpose and your mission, but finding that connectivity by what you do to why they do what they do will really help you find true purpose in your work, as well as in your life Values based culture gives you the principles to accelerate progress together and purpose will anchor the activities that bring people together to drive great culture. That's been The Leadership Hacker News, lets dive into the show. Start of Podcast Steve Rush: Joining on the show today is Matt May. He's the founder and CEO of Premiering Building & Interactive Experiences Company. Who's putting the fun and energy back into play. He's also a speaker, an author of the book, Take The Fear Out Of Team Building. Matt, welcome to the show my friend. Matt May: Thank you so much for having me. I'm thrilled to be here. Steve Rush: So, I'm really looking forward to our interactive experience today. But before we get into that, maybe you can just give our listeners a little bit of the journey from where it all began in theater to you and how you ended up running in interactive experiences firm. Matt May: Absolutely. So, I was in music and theater in high school, middle school. I always was creative. Hey, let's put on some sort of a show or a presentation or do something for the family and the parents and the yada, yada in the backyard, in the garage. And when I went to school undergraduate, I went for theater. I earned a dual major in theater and arts administration. So, I got that business side. I also was a camp counselor when I was a teenager. I went through a three-year counselor in training program as a camper. Took some psychology courses in undergrad, as well as a number of leadership courses. And I don't know if they're call all seminars or what but opportunities that were presented through a variety of organizations within the university setting. So that kind of all sorts of came together for me after I graduated school, I went to New York city and did the professional entertainment thing for a while, but I also was always kind of had an education thought in my head. So, I really did a number of different things. I finally left New York after five years. I said, I'm moving to sunnier pastures because I want to be able to have my coffee outside, whether it's January or June. Steve Rush: That's right, yeah. Matt May: [Laugh]. I moved to Florida in the states and really haven't looked back. But when I moved there, I started working in administration at a performing arts high school and college and had a number of different opportunities that I embraced and did. And finally sort of fell into team building per say. I happened to be bartending at a comedy show on campus at the Fort Lauderdale Performing Arts Center, the Broward Center for the Performing Arts. And the stage manager happened to be staffing an event, a team building event, just helping the company, which is actually based in Massachusetts. So not even close by. And she said, hey, do you want to do it? And I said, yeah, absolutely. And that was my first official team building as an assistant staff. And I said, oh, huh, there's something about this. So, jump ahead, several years I was facilitating, I started doing a lot of producing because of my theatre background. I was able to do production and logistics and whatnot, and finally said, you know what? I quite honestly, I'm tired of being on the front lines and not having control and what goes into all of the preparation beforehand and created my own company. And I like to call it a perfect storm because I have my logistics and my business and my entrepreneurship and my sales skills. And by the way, sales is my least favourite thing to do. But I get guess I have some sort of a knack for it. But then I also, when I facilitate jump on stage and I'm able to get people working together and be entertaining and whatnot. So, I'm able to use all of my experiences and all of my different training, whether it be from education or professional or theatre or business, and it kind of a perfect store and collides together. So that's kind of how I got to where I am now. And looking back, of course, hindsight is always 2020, I think. Oh, all right. Well, that's why I did all of those different things and worked in education and professional theatre and, you know, did some temping offices and whatnot so that all of this came together for me to where I am now, Steve Rush: Steve jobs, I think famously said you can't always connect the dots forward, but you can definitely connect them back. And that's perfect example, right? If you were trying to create the path to where you are now, you'd probably never get there. Matt May: No. And you just made me think, I don't know if I'm the only one, but I remember as a kid, when we would try to do mazes, you know, the mazes that you draw, the pen or the pencil through it all. Steve Rush: Yeah. Matt May: Some reason, they seem to be easier going backwards. Steve Rush: Oh, that's interesting perspective. I wonder if that's something to do with the way that our brains are wired as well. Matt May: It must be, I've never really researched it, and until you mention that Steve Jobs quote, I hadn't really thought of it, but I think that's on my to-do list this afternoon. Steve Rush: Shout out to all amateur neuroscientists, or any professional ones that listen to the show, they can maybe contact us and let us know. That'll be interesting to have a look at. Matt May: Yes. Steve Rush: So, the work that you do now, it's very still theatrical, isn't it? So, you get to be that front to stage guy, but also then be that production guy as well. Is there a natural kind of thing that you prefer? Are you more of a front man or more of a production man? Where would you say you're kind of true passion lie? Matt May: Geez, that's a tough question to answer. You know, certainly being a performer as I was younger and going to school for it initially, that's instilled in me, but it's funny. I will have clients who are new clients often come up to me after an experience ended and say, where did you come from? And the first few times that happened, I didn't understand it. But now I do, when I walk into a ballroom or whatever, and I'm setting up and managing staff and we're getting ready, it's very organized and logical. And you know, I'm just doing what needs to be done and I'm talking to a client or whatever, and it's very professional, but something happens that when I jump on stage or jump in front of a crowd or grab a mic or whatever, I just inherently turn it on if you will. Steve Rush: Yeah. Matt May: And that's what they refer to now. The challenge is, in my line of work is. I'm not there just to entertain, right. And I'm reminded of the late Alex Trebek from Jeopardy. He was never wanted to be introduced as the star of the show Jeopardy. It was always the host of the show because his feeling was that contestants were the stars. Steve Rush: Yes. Matt May: And I try to keep that philosophy that the participants in the experience, they are the stars, the light shines on them. When I start a program, I'm doing kind of what I like to think of as audience warm up. And yeah, I do my skit and whatnot, but that gets people going. But then once the experience really gets going and they get hands on, it's all about them. Steve Rush: Yeah. And of course, the biggest thing, most of all is, you're there to facilitate a learning outcome. Matt May: Exactly. Steve Rush: And that's the one thing that is different from a performance, because actually as a performer, you are still having an ambition to want to entertain, but you are not having to be as thoughtful of the specific way that you construct an experience so that somebody takes away a different learning outcome, right? Matt May: Correct. Correct. And when we're watching as patrons watching entertainment, whether it be on a screen or on a stage. We are there for them to entertain us. Where in my line of work, I'm not here to entertain you. As you said, I'm here to facilitate the experience. So, you put in as much as you're going to get out of it. Steve Rush: Exactly right. So, when we start to think about the whole concept of team building, when you mention that word to groups of individuals, what's the reason you get a different response. So, some people will love it and some people will running in fear from it. What causes that? Matt May: The simple answer in my opinion is bad experiences. Steve Rush: Yeah. Matt May: They have been thrust into experiences that didn't have positive outcomes for them, for whatever reason. So many people think of team building as trust falls or paintball or zip lining or white-water rafting, you know, extreme sports, if you will, or sitting in a room and being told, this is how you work together as a team, while watching a slideshow, right. I don't do any of those things. And I think it's because people have been thrust into those things, or that's the majority of their experience. They just have a negative connotation in their head that team building is a bad word. Now there's also, as you mentioned, some people are very excited about it. People who are extroverted and tend to be well, extroverts generally like it more because they're excited and their energy is locomotive full speed ahead. Where people who are more introverted and maybe have anxiety, or even if it's not full-blown anxiety just don't like to be in a crowd or don't like to be in a small group because they can't hide as easily. Those people have more apprehension. So, when they hear team building, I think their negative thoughts are even more heightened. Steve Rush: Of course, in any audience, you are going to have a mix of those types of individuals, because many will be extroverted and thinkers and feelers, and others will be introverted thinkers and feelers. How do you make sure that when you are constructing a session that you are thoughtful of those different types of personalities that might come out? Matt May: Well, our experiences are designed in such a way that everybody is on an even peel, equal, right. I generally tell clients; I don't want to know who the boss is. The CEO is here, okay great. Don't tell me who he is, or she is. I don't want to know because I want to treat every single person the same. Now Murphy's Law inevitably comes into play nine times out ten, and that's the person I wind up picking on [Laugh] just organically. And then, oh, that's the CEO, well, thanks for playing [laugh]. But generally, most of our experiences, Steve call for teams of ten, and we start off having everybody in the team of ten, doing a group exercise, and they're all doing the exact same thing before they even break out into, quotes, unquote. And I'm using air quotes here, roles and responsibilities that they will be in charge of, if you will, during the experience. Everybody does the same icebreakers and the same introductory games and challenges and activities. So that everyone is completely even keel. Then a lot of times when you break off into the experience, say it's building bikes for kids. For example, some people are more mechanically inclined, or they're really good with wrenches and they want to put something together great. Somebody else is better with puzzles and mind games and mind solving great. They'll focus more on that. Other people are better at marketing. And so, they'll kind of work on their team presentation more, but by the same token, a lot of times people say, well, you try this. This is not your forte or what you would normally gravitate to, this particular component. Why don't you try this? And that allows people to see their colleagues in a whole different light. Steve Rush: Yeah. Matt May: For example, sometimes the CEO or the C levels or the Directors, whatever will be on teams with somebody who's the front desk receptionist. And that person will, for whatever reason, wind up in more of a leadership role or whatnot. And then next thing you know, the boss is saying, you are totally underutilized signing for packages and answering the phone. We need to talk next week. And, you know, ultimately the person becomes an office manager or whatever, because he or she was seen in a different light. Steve Rush: I suspect that having the opportunity to throw away the natural conventions of the work labels gives everybody the opportunity to see how others behave and perform. Matt May: Absolutely. Steve Rush: Yeah, I love that. So as kids, when, you know, you first got up in front of your folks and did your, you know, theatre production and, you know, I probably did the same. What is it that causes some people like you, Matt, to continually have this energy to want to continually innovate and play where others like me will, you know, be a bit stuffy and go, well, I don't do any of that kind of stuff anymore? Matt May: Well, I don't know. I don't know if there's a certain quote unquote thing that is in me or not in you or whatever. I think some of it is inherent and its personality and as well as likes and desires, you know, what we follow or chase, but I think a big part of it too Steve is that we are conditioned as we grow up. Now I can only speak for the States, right. I can't speak for European school upbringing, but for the States, and this is changing to a degree, but for so long, it was sit at the desk, take the information that's presented to you, go home, do some exercises, commit it to memory, come back and regurgitate, wash, rinse, repeat, right? Steve Rush: Right. Matt May: So, as kids if we look at it, their favourite, well, I'm generalizing. Often the favourite part of the day is recess because they get to go outside and play. But as we get older, recess is removed from the school day. And by the time we're out of primary schools and into middle school, junior high, high school, and then certainly in college, we go, and we ask people to give us information and educate us that we are then going to theoretically use, but the play is gone. So, I think that's a big part of it is, just society. And don't get me wrong. Look, adulting is hard [Laugh] okay. Steve Rush: That's true. Matt May: We all have responsibilities. We can't play on the playground all day. We have to work so that we can survive and support our family or if we don't have a family, at least keep a roof over our head and keep us fed and clothed. But the fun element in our work and our workday seems to have been removed. Steve Rush: Yeah. Matt May: And it, takes like going on a boy's weekend to have our fun or the girls. I'm going out with the girls tonight or whatever. That is how we have our fun. Well, why can't we still have fun in the workday? And I know fun is not necessarily something we use to measure success or productivity, but it doesn't mean it can't be prevalent. And it doesn't mean it doesn't help success and productivity. Steve Rush: I think you actually might be able to measure that. So, when you look at things like employee engagement, you'll see fun represent itself in different ways. So, commitment to the organization, prepared to stay, creativity, innovation, elements of peer group recognition, that kind of stuff. But often we don't apply that three-letter word to it because we feel it's got less relevance in a workplace. Matt May: Correct. Steve Rush: Would that be fair selection? Matt May: Absolutely. I think that's very fair. And I will let you in on, well, I guess it's not going to be a secret because I've already told other people coming out there right now. I am a Hallmark movie junkie. I fully admit it. I'm a sap. I'm a big romantic at heart. I love Hallmark movies. And there was one that I watch about a year ago now. And there was a line that I sort of kind of touched on a moment ago, but the line was, and I know that fun, isn't typical metric in the corporate world, but you know what it's worth because fun allows people to relax and be fully themselves, which makes them productive and more engaged. And that affects the bottom line. Steve Rush: Right. And is that something also that helps remove some of that fear and anxiety around team building as well? Matt May: Absolutely. And I've had, I don't want to say arguments. Discussions with people who have said anything competitive is not valuable in team building. Well, hold on, going back to the whole paintball, I will agree with you on that. I don't, for me, that is not exciting. That is not team building. That's just crazy, whatever. However, the majority of our team building experiences are competitive in nature. However, we're not talking about tackling each other and taking each other out with guns. We're talking about light-hearted competition. People are naturally competitive, Steve, right? Steve Rush: mm-hmm. Matt May: Again, I'm generalizing. Steve Rush: That's a fair generalization, yeah. Matt May: Yeah. When we start, we go to school, we earn, or we are provide with good grades for positive work and productive work. The mother of all, and I don't know if you have this over in the UK, but at least over here, the mother of all winnings is the lottery. People play, whether it's scratch off or the big one, people go to a casino for a night out, whatever, but they put their coin in the machine, pull that lever and they want to get the pay-out. We are competitively, we like to win things. So, when you tell people, hey, you are doing this for the winning title, and yes, you're going to win a gold medal at the end, whatever. It's just fun. We're just there to have some light-hearted competition, but people inherently enjoy that. Then they start talking smack to their colleagues. You're going down, whatever. Just again, it's all light-hearted fun. Nobody really means any ill will to each other. But doing that in an environment outside of the office allows you to see your colleagues in a different light Steve Rush: And neurologically, of course. It releases dopamine. Matt May: Right. Steve Rush: And that's a rewarding chemical transmitter, neurotransmitter that we thrive on. And you get a hit from that. So not only is it fun, it's also a learning, so you want more of it. Matt May: Exactly. We crave more of it once we've had the burst of it. Steve Rush: Yeah. Matt May: And like I said, the whole medals, I have a discussion and I usually talk about it on when to do team building exercises. I always say, if you have people that don't know each other and coming out of the pandemic, I have hear from more and more people, we're doing the sales meeting and 75% of our team has not met each other, other than on Zoom. Okay, well, then I would recommend doing it at the beginning. Well, we wanted to wrap up the three-day conference with it. Okay, we can do that. But if you're telling me, people don't know each other yet, do it at the beginning, they're automatically going to know nine other people from their direct team. The winning team is going to win gold medals. Maybe they'll wear them at lunch that day. Maybe they'll wear them that night to the cocktail reception. We'll encourage them to wear them the rest of the three days to remind everyone that they were the winners. Good for them. Well, that's a conversation piece right there. Somebody else might come up and say, we were robbed. Yeah, well, sorry. We got the medals, right. So, it automatically creates conversation. And again, it was based on that fun competition factor. Steve Rush: So, during your experiences as well, one of the things that I've noticed through the work that you do, Matt, is that there is always a purpose behind what you do. So mentioned kids for bikes earlier. So that's something that you use, exercise as a team together, but something that's also serving communities well. Just tell us a little bit about some of the things you do. Matt May: Well, as far as the philanthropic experiences, yes. Building bikes is for kids is one. We have an experience where we build wheelchairs for veterans, or maybe not even veterans for people who are mobility challenged. Foster care programs, kids entering foster care. Kids that need snacks. They don't get them during the school day when they're on vacation, places that they can go to get the snacks because they're underserved and maybe their parents can't afford to give them a snack every day. So, all of those types of things, many companies have CSR, Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives. And if we can align with them, that's great. Because, let's say, let's be honest. If we can get something out of it, i.e., getting our teams to work together, having fun, doing something out of the norm of the workday and give back, well, then it's win-win for everybody. Steve Rush: Yeah. Ticking all the boxes, right? Matt May: Exactly. And it doesn't have to be philanthropic. It could be a culinary program and your company, I don't know, maybe your company makes salsa. We could do a salsa margarita challenge. See, oh, wait, maybe that is the next new recipe for your brand, right. Or for an alternate version of your salsa, or maybe you make hospice sauce and, well, great. Let's use your sauce in this culinary team building experience. So, there are ways to incorporate the company as well. Steve Rush: Yeah, exactly. Love it. So, have you ever had a time where you've just had a participant who's just, you know, folded arms, stuffy, I'm not getting involved in any of this? Have you ever experienced any of that? Matt May: Yes [laugh]. Steve Rush: How do you deal with that? Matt May: To be honest with you, I don't, and I'll tell you why. Usually, well, it's never not happened. So, knock on wood. The person ultimately says, well, I look like a schmuck standing over here, and I'm the one who's not having fun. Who wants to be in the corner? Right. All by him or herself. If your colleagues bring you in and you insist upon being that stuffy jerk. Okay, fine. You're only hurting yourself. So, peer pressure I guess, is the bottom line. And I say that in a positive way, not a negative way. That ultimately your peers are going to say, come on, let's go. You're being a jerk. Steve Rush: [Laugh]. Matt May: And it happens, right. If somebody doesn't have the realization by themselves, that there are only hurting themselves and look like dunce. Somebody else, or several other members of the team are going to say, come on, let's go. Now, I'll be patting myself on the back. That rarely happens because our experiences are designed in such a way that you really can't sit out, starting right at the get go. And when I facilitate, and our other facilitators have been trained to really put on the charm immediately, put on the energy immediately. So, we inherently, not we, but the participants inherently say, okay, I'm already in this. Steve Rush: The one thing I notice in those experiences as well is the other thing of course, is that, that individual's looking at everybody else having loads of fun, thinking. Now I'm losing out. Matt May: Correct. Steve Rush: So, I know over the last couple of years, Matt, you've had to really pivot your business model as we were going through the experiences of the pandemic. But I wonder having had the experience of being face to face and virtual, what the pandemics really taught us about how we participate or get involved if the case around things like team building or activities, what's it really highlighted for us? Matt May: Well, I think that it's proven to us that face to face interaction is necessary. And it's certainly good for us. We learn so much more and we get and give so much more when we're face to face. When you're on a video call, yes, you can see the person, but you may not see the person's hand gestures because the camera is close, right. And you don't get the body language. You don't get the nonverbal cues. You don't get touch, right. Human beings need touch. There's a wonderful book and its old. And it was Tuesdays with Morrie, Mitch Albom. And there was a movie made with Jack lemon and Hank Azaria, many, many years ago. And I'm paraphrasing here, but Morrie was diagnosed with ALS, and he basically taught this former student, Mitch Albom life lessons. And one of them was, when we come into this world, we are cradled by our mothers, right. Until we learn to walk. And even then, we are constantly cradled by our parents. Craving human touch. When we die, nobody wants to die alone. I know this is a grim thought. And I apologize for doing that on the podcast, nobody wants to die alone. Steve Rush: Right. Matt May: So, we crave it, but why do we push it away for the majority of our lives? Why do we begin and end with it, but not continue to make it so important to us during our adult lives? But again, going back to face-to-face, handshakes. Now, I know people are still, some of them are nervous about that and whatnot, okay. Then do an elbow, bump, whatever. But when you touch someone's hand and you grasp it, you are having a physical connection that you don't get virtually. Steve Rush: Yeah. Matt May: Now, team building experiences and other were very valuable. They still are. We do them. I personally prefer face to face, but I know a lot of people are saying, we're just not ready to go back yet or we don't have the ability to bring in everybody just yet. We've got it six months down the line, but we want to do something right now. Great. So, it's still valuable because you're getting people interacting and hopefully having fun. But the face to face in person is just so much more valuable. Yes people were doing virtual events. I get that. But this wasn't even in our brains, right. As a thought, this conversation right now. Steve Rush: Right. Matt May: Because of the pandemic is why we're having this discussion. I can't articulate this. I don't know why, but going back, we never would've thought about that before. Steve Rush: That's true. And it's fair to say I think that people certainly in my experience in the last three to five months, I would say, are really grateful in when people come together as a group, there's definitely much more appreciation for that now. Matt May: Yes. It's not just, well, we're going to a sales meeting. It's oh my gosh. We're going to a sales meeting live and in person. Steve Rush: [Laugh] and therefore there's something deeply intrinsic that you refer to as that kind of cradling. That is a, also a very real metaphor for us wanting connection with people, isn't it? Matt May: Yeah. And when we're in face to face, at least in my experience. Observe people being more organically involved, right. When you have a computer screen behind you, how many times have we seen somebody looking down and we say, oh, well, he or she's checking text messages right now, or, you know, or, oh, oh, he's reading his email, we can tell. You're not as engaged because you have so many more distractions and there's no real accountability either. Steve Rush: That's right. Matt May: And I don't use that as a negative term. I use it as a positive term, even to ourselves, we're just not accountable because we have so many other things right in front of us on that fancy screen, that when you take that away and what's in front of you is an actual face. Oh my gosh. Okay. I'm totally engaged with you right now. Steve Rush: Well, fingers crossed for wherever anybody is listening to us in the world. They're going to get back to some level of connection and normality pretty soon, anyway. Matt May: Yes, I hope so. Steve Rush: So, this part of the show, Matt, is where we start to turn the tables, you've learned lots of different teams and had lots of different leadership experiences over your career. And I'm keen to really hack into those now. So, what I'm going to ask you to do, if you can, is try and think of all of those experiences and just distill them down to your top three leadership hacks. What would they be? Matt May: One is to utilize people's strengths and not only participants, but also staff and facilitators, right. In an office setting, in an assembly line, in a factory, whatever. We hire people based upon their qualifications and skills. So, let's do the same thing in a fun atmosphere. Now, again, this is going back to what I said before. Maybe let people get outside of their comfort zone, but at least for me with staff, I always want to find the right staff person, not only the experience, but the client. Steve Rush: Right. Matt May: What's the demographic of the client who is going to work best with that demographic? So that's one. Utilizing people's skills and strengths. My catch phrase is regress to kindergarten. Take off the sport coat, take off the tie, take off the high heels, whatever you're wearing. You're in a safe space. Nobody's judging you, if they are, judge them right back, because they're probably doing the exact same thing. It's not going to go anywhere. It's kind of like what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas. What happens in this room stays in this because if you don't have those inhibitions, you're going to organically be in a much better place to give of yourself for your team and the experience. And the third leadership hack. Geez, I would say. It's really kind of, my new catch phrase is, take the fear out of team building, which is the title of the book. And that is, let's give people experiences where at the end of it, they say, okay, so my goal is, when you see me walk in six months from now, you're not going to go, oh, that team building guy. Hopefully say, Ooh, what are we doing today? Or at the very least say, all right, let's see what he is got out of his sleeve today. Let's see how it compares to last time. Steve Rush: Mm-Hmm. There must have been some magical experiences you've had over your careers. If you could just maybe call one out. The most fun, extravagant experience that you've had with a group or, an individual in a group, what would that be? Matt May: It's hard to pinpoint one. And I can't remember the exact number. I facilitated a military care pack program. This is probably seven years ago or more. Those always get me. I'm a big supporter of the U.S. Military. And I know you're over in Europe, but I'm a big supporter of people who put their lives on hold to make our lives better. Steve Rush: Absolutely. Matt May: That is very important to me. So military care pack programs always hit me pretty, pretty tough. They hit me hard in a good way. Also, when you see a kid who is part of a boys and girls club or whatever, come into a room and they don't know why they're there. And then all of a sudden there are 12, 24, 50, bikes, and they're then told these are going to your organization. The look of huh, on their face is just amazing. And little ones are just, I don't have kids. I'm too old to start at this point, but boy, some of the things they do and say they just melt my heart and make me just crack up [laugh]. Steve Rush: Makes it all worthwhile, right? Matt May: Exactly. I'm always appreciative for that. Steve Rush: Well, the next part of the show we call it Hack to Attack. So, this is typically where something hasn't worked out for you. Maybe been pretty catastrophic, could have screwed up, but as a result of it, you've learned, and it's now a force of good in your life or work, what would be your Hack to Attack? Matt May: [Laugh] be careful what papers you sign to be quite honest. Steve Rush: [laugh] yeah. Matt May: Really and be careful with whom you go into business and protect yourself because you're the only anyone that's going to protect yourself. And I don't want to sound cold and snarky, but it's true. You can be a wonderful person and be very giving and loving and generous and still protect yourself. Steve Rush: Yes, you can. Matt May: And that's the business side of me, careful what you sign and know who you're getting into bed with proverbially. Steve Rush: Yeah. You're not the first guest mine you to have said that over the two years or so, we've been running the show. We must have at least half a dozen of our guests have, you know, some really similar circumstances where the greatest trusted relationships have gone wrong because of one piece of paper. Matt May: Exactly, exactly. And it's bad that happens. But it's the reality of the world we live in. Steve Rush: Certainly is. Now the last thing we're going to do is you get to go and give yourself some advice at 21. So, if that time travel happened now. You stood right in front of Matt. He's 21, you're in front of him. What's your advice? Matt May: Probably to embrace the opportunities that you're presented with wholly, don't be fearful of them. Again, hindsight is 2020. The older I get; I do subscribe more to the philosophy of everything happens for a reason. And for whatever reason right now, this is where you're supposed to be. And it may not be the happiest of circumstances, but what do you need to do to not only get through this but thrive beyond it and learn from it. Steve Rush: Great advice. Matt May: That would be my two words. It's okay. Steve Rush: Hmm. Love it. So, what's next for you and the team? Matt May: Well, we are very excited to be getting back to face-to-face experiences. Really trying to provide those to people who are ready. I hope more and more people continue to be ready and jump on this. My hope is that now, companies who are allowing people or have just made the decision to, we're not going to own real estate or rent real estate anymore, because we know work from home, works for us. Great. That money that you're saving, bring your people together. At least twice a year, quarterly is better. Have an all hands. Even if it's just lunch, an address from the CEO and a team building experience where people get to play and work together, hands on, do it. It's more important now than ever. My dream would be that it becomes instilled in everyone's minds that this is as important as ordering copy paper. Steve Rush: Right. DNA and the fabric of an organization should have all of those experiences to really exploit some of those unlearned or unobserved behaviors that you talked about earlier, right? Matt May: Exactly. Steve Rush: Yeah. So, when folks have listened into this Matt, where's the best place for us to send them so they can bump into some of the work and maybe get a copy of the book? Matt May: The best place is the website, which is premierteambuilding.com. It's premier as in like number one without the E at the end of it. But if you do happen to put it in, it'll direct you to the correct place. There's a contact form there. There's a links to Amazon where the book is. All of our social media links are there. You can follow us there. I love to travel personally. So, we do programs throughout the U.S., Canada, Mexico, abroad. I'd love to get over to the UK at some point. So more than happy to do that for anyone who's listening over there. Steve Rush: Course of action. Yeah, exactly. Well, Matt, listen, I've love chatting to you and you know, there's no surprise that you've been a success in the business that you're in and the energy and focus you bring to it. So, I just want to say thank you and we'll make sure all of those links are in our show notes. So, when folks have listened as well. They can dive straight over, but thanks for being on the show. Matt May: Thank you, Steve. Closing Steve Rush: I want to sign off by saying thank you to you for joining us on the show too. We recognize without you, there is no show. So please continue to share, subscribe, and like, and continue to get in touch with us with the great new stories that we share every week. And so that we can continue to bring you great stories. Please make sure you give us a five-star review where you can and share this podcast with your friends, your teams, and communities. You want to find us on social media. You can find us on Facebook and Twitter @leadershiphacker, Leadership Hacker on YouTube and on Instagram, the_leadership_hacker and if that wasn't enough, you can also find us on our website leadership-hacker.com. Tune into next episode to find out what great hacks and stories are coming your way. That's me signing off. I'm Steve Rush, and I've been your Leadership Hacker.  

Have A Seat...Conversations With Women In The Workplace
A Peek Inside the World of Supporting HNWI's, A Fascinating Conversation with Executive Assistant, Kaleen Skersies

Have A Seat...Conversations With Women In The Workplace

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 43:22


"At some point you cannot physically do everything that is on your list, I had to delegate to trustworthy individuals because I couldn't possibly do every single task myself; there just aren't enough hours in the day"Kaleen Skersies is an Executive Assistant to the CEO at Esper. Kaleen specializes in the holistic support of C-Suite executives as they lead their teams. Before joining Esper, Kaleen previously worked for multiple HNW individuals and has served as estate planner in the private service sector. I was excited to talk to Kaleen as she represents a segment of admin professionals that I haven't had the opportunity to talk with in depth, executive assistants who support high net worth individuals or HNWI's. Kaleen's engaging tales of the level of support that is expected for this incredibly niche client base was fascinating to hear, I was truly both astounded and impressed. Connect with Kaleen:https://www.linkedin.com/in/kaleenskersies/Find more conversations with fierce females at:www.haveaseatconversations.comSupport the show

iDigress with Troy Sandidge
Ep 54. The Blame Game: Marketing vs Sales, Which Is Really Responsible For Growth?

iDigress with Troy Sandidge

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 29:23


Who in your organization is genuinely responsible for growth? Is it marketing? Is it sales? Do you know?  Is your organization even running and tracking things in an optimal way for you to know what's working and what's not?The reality is that many teams, departments, and groups can be doing their jobs but aren't making any progress because they are not doing their jobs as individuals that complement the strengths and negate weaknesses for the organization's greater good.I keep it raw and real (and a little edgy) in this episode asking a lot of questions and hoping it compels you to truly think about your teams, the way you do marketing, your sales tactics, and the overall health of your business.Beyond The Episode Gems:See what the HubSpot CRM can do for your business at HubSpot.comSee all of the podcasts on the HubSpot Podcast NetworkWatch Agency Accelerated Episode: How To Prove ROI To Agency ClientsDiscover how Agorapulse is helping businesses measure the impact of social media and prove ROILearn more and join the Social Media Pulse Community for freeGet Two Free Months of Agorapulse on me: Social.Agorapulse.com/FindTroyJoin my All Things Strategy Community on Twitter for upcoming exclusive content!#####Support The Podcast & Connect With Troy:• Rate & Review iDigress: RateThisPodcast.com/iDigress• Get Strategy Solutions & Services: FindTroy.com•  Buy Troy's Book, Strategize Up: FindTroy.com/Strategize-Up•  Follow Troy on Twitter: Twitter.com/FindTroy•  Follow Troy on LinkedIn: LinkedIn.com/in/FindTroy

Drop In CEO
C-Suite Academy: The Number One Way to Sabotage Your Career

Drop In CEO

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 15:56


This week Deborah shares how your support system can influence your limiting beliefs, as well as formula for weighing and breaking through negative mindset habits. Listen in a Deborah shares how we can be influenced by others to take action in our careers in limiting ways and the key questions we should ask ourselves in order to build a career with no regrets.     Create a personal career strategy that develops the leadership and communication skills you need to assess challenges, showcase your skills, and demonstrate your ability to be a C-Suite Leader. Learn more about the C-Suite Academy here: https://bit.ly/csawaitlist22 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Anthony Vaughan
Should You Expand Your C-Suite with Internal or External Hires

Anthony Vaughan

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 7:03


Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast
S35E21 - BullyProof: Using Subtle Strength to Influence Alphas and Strengthen Society, with Dr. Rob Fazio

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 35:07


In this HCI Podcast episode, Dr. Jonathan H. Westover talks with Dr. Rob Fazio about his book, BullyProof: Using Subtle Strength to Influence Alphas and Strengthen Society. See the video here: https://youtu.be/HvILJhiBt7s. Dr. Rob Fazio (www.linkedin.com/in/robfazio) is a Leadership Psychologist and Executive Advisor at OnPoint Advising and Author of Simple is the New Smart and The Motivational Currency® Calculator. He specializes in global leadership and organizational success. He has over 20 years of experience advising on power, influence and motivation with elite and emerging talent. His advice on navigating turbulent times and politics has been featured in the NY Times and on CNN, Fox News Channel, and MSNBC. Based on his background in sport psychology he empowers clients to remove internal and external barriers to organizational effectiveness and to function at optimal levels. During the Covid-19 crisis he advised hospitals and executives on how to keep people mentally tough and grow through the experience. He has coached executive teams and talent throughout organizations including the C-Suite, surgeons, athletes, and emerging leaders. Rob is a Licensed Psychologist and founder of the nonprofit Hold the Door for Others. Please leave a review wherever you listen to your podcasts! Please consider supporting the HCI Podcast on Patreon. Check out the HCI Academy: Courses, Micro-Credentials, and Certificates to Upskill and Reskill for the Future of Work! Check out the LinkedIn Alchemizing Human Capital Newsletter. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Future Leader. Check out Dr. Westover's book, 'Bluer than Indigo' Leadership. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Alchemy of Truly Remarkable Leadership. Check out the latest issue of the Human Capital Leadership magazine. Ranked #5 Workplace Podcast Ranked #6 Performance Management Podcast Ranked #7 HR Podcast Ranked #12 Talent Management Podcast Ranked in the Top 20 Personal Development and Self-Improvement Podcasts  Ranked in the Top 30 Leadership Podcasts Each HCI Podcast episode (Program, ID No. 592296) has been approved for 0.50 HR (General) recertification credit hours toward aPHR™, aPHRi™, PHR®, PHRca®, SPHR®, GPHR®, PHRi™ and SPHRi™ recertification through HR Certification Institute® (HRCI®). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

C Suite
Ninety-Nine Problems But a Job Ain't One

C Suite

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 24:46


Cyber security is a field that's been experiencing rapid growth in the last 20 years. As we all become more virtually connected, online security has become an increasingly crucial priority for organizations of all sizes. In fact, there were a reported 3.5 million unfulfilled roles in cyber security in 2021, up 350% from 2013. With numbers like these, the need for more qualified professionals in this field is stronger than ever. In this episode of C Suite, Claudette discusses career paths in cyber security, what companies are looking for in their next search for talent, and how organizations can raise awareness about this ever-evolving career path. Along with her guests Francois Guay, the Founder of the Canadian Cybersecurity Network and Francois Guay & Associates, Deryck, TD's Senior Manager of Information Security, and Aliyah, a student who's pursuing a career in cyber security, Claudette will explore some of the factors contributing to the current war for talent in cyber security and how we can encourage more young people to pursue a career in the field.

DGTL Voices with Ed Marx
A Healthy Career (ft. Christopher Kunney)

DGTL Voices with Ed Marx

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 26:44


Christopher Kunney joins Ed Marx to discuss getting an invite to the C-Suite, leadership lessons and keeping fit.

The Corporate Dropout Podcast
99. Dana Farber: A Swift Ascent to the C-Suite Turned Corporate Dropout and CEO

The Corporate Dropout Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 55:59


Time Stamps: [1:17] - A little bit about Dana Farber [3:29] - About her dream school [5:11] - How did her life lead into PR [7:35] - Her job experience being a PR [9:22] - What she loves about PR [12:39] - Any challenges that she have encountered moving from like being a PR then switch to fashion, lifestyle and beauty? [15:10] - Her feeling in helping her clients [16:38] - Her thoughts about critical elements to a brand telling a story that resonates? [19:12] - Her tips that she can give to the  individual person who's trying to build a personal brand [22:30] - When starting a business [26:06] - Her story being a chief marketing officer [32:44] - Her AHA moment [35:17] - Her thoughts about virtue signaling [38:32] - How did she found Moonstone and what happened wen she came back to Chicago  [45:27] - The hardships that she felt when achieving those revenue goals [48:09] - Did she feel like she can say, Good that you're moving van blew up? [51:08] - What advice she would give for the female, that wants to be entrepreneur or founder that really wants to embrace —Connect with Dana:INSTAGRAM: Moonstone Marketing (@moonstonemktg)WEBSITE: https://www.moonstonemktg.com/Connect with Alessia:Text me! 949.541.0951Instagram: @corporatedropoutofficial and @alessiacitro__TikTok: @alessiacitro__Show Support:If you enjoy this podcast please Rate, Review, Subscribe and SHARE this out on Apple Podcasts at The Corporate Dropout Podcast Big shout out to our team that makes this show possible!If you are looking to start your own podcast or join the network, hit up @upstarterpods on Instagram! 

Leaders in Cleantech
Dr. Alex Ivanenko, HyPoint – 94

Leaders in Cleantech

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 39:14


What's it all about? Electric Flight!! We had just before Christmas an episode on battery flight, we turn our attention again to fuel cell Hydrogen powered flight. This is one of the use cases in transport I do see hydrogen having a big part to play. I talk technology, timelines, talent, and territory ( I like alliteration!) with CEO and Co-Founder Alex Ivanenko of Hypoint, developing the powertrains for regional electrified aviation. I hope you enjoy the episode. About Dr. Alex Ivanenko:  Dr. Alex Ivanenko is the co-founder and CEO of HyPoint, the NASA award-winning Silicon Valley startup pioneering air-cooled hydrogen fuel cell systems for aviation and urban air mobility. Prior to founding HyPoint, Alex held senior sales roles at both 3M Corp. (NYSE: MMM) and Owens Corning (NYSE: OC). He attended Saratov State Technical University, where he received his Bachelor's and Master's degrees, both in engineering, as well as a Ph.D. in electrochemistry. He splits his time between HyPoint locations in Menlo Park, California, and Sandwich, England. About HyPoint: HyPoint develops industry-leading hydrogen fuel cell systems for zero-emission aviation, aeronautics, and urban air mobility. Its NASA award-winning system features an innovative "turbo" air-cooling and oxygen supply system to deliver unprecedented energy density and specific power performance compared with existing battery and hydrogen fuel cell systems, dramatically increasing zero-emission aircraft operational time, utilization rate, and flight range at a lower total cost of ownership. HyPoint is backed by leading venture capital firms and has offices in Silicon Valley and the United Kingdom. Social links:  Dr. Alex Ivanenko LinkedIn: HyPoint Website: HyPoint - we make zero emission air transport possible HyPoint on LinkedIn: (55) HyPoint: Overview | LinkedIn Hypoint on Twitter: HyPoint (@hypointinc) / Twitter About Hyperion Cleantech Group: Hyperion Cleantech Group is the holding company for businesses focused exclusively in cleantech talent acquisition, retention, leadership development. working with some of the most innovative cleantech companies in the world, helping to find extraordinary talent to enable their growth and success. Partnering with leading cleantech VCs, as well as directly with founders and entrepreneurs in the sector. With our clients we are transforming business and growing a strong and prosperous cleantech economy. We work across EMEA and NORAM, with teams based in the UK, Germany and the US. Hyperion Executive Search is a retained search firm operating at Board, NED, C-Suite, VP and Heads of… level www.hyperionsearch.com Fully Charged Recruitment is a contingent recruitment firm operating in the Mid/Senior level. www.fullychargedrecruitment.com EPISODE LINKS Follow us online, write a review (please) or subscribe I'm very keen to hear feedback on the podcast and my guests, and to hear your suggestions for future guests or topics. Contact via the website, or Twitter. If you do enjoy the podcast, please write a review on iTunes, or your usual podcast platform, and tell your cleantech friends about us. That would be much appreciated. Twitter https://twitter.com/Cleantechleader Facebook https://www.facebook.com/DavidHuntCleantechGuide Instagram https://www.instagram.com/davidhuntcleantech/

C-Suite Intelligence
Resilience Redefined

C-Suite Intelligence

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 10:32


Faced with new challenges every day, the world we live in is full of setbacks. Stephen Miles and Taylor Griffin discuss how unfamiliar setbacks can test even the strongest leaders, and why leaders should practice embracing these learning moments.

Beers, Business, and Balls
Episode 86 (May 3, 2022): Frank “The Tank” Fleming, Barstool Sports

Beers, Business, and Balls

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 114:04


Frank “The Tank” Fleming, Barstool Sports (39:00 mark) BEERS: It's back to Boston this week, as we both take a crack at some of the City of Champions' most popular spots. Jake stops at North Shore favorite Lord Hobo's new location in Seaport, and comes home with an exclusive mixed four-pack that can only be purchased at their location. This time around, it's “DROP,” a milkshake double-IPA. It's got punch, it's got flavor, and it's got substance…what will Jake's rating be? Will talks the Trillium Fort Point dilemma; while it's full of good craft beer to please everyone's appetites, it's become a bit too much of a “pregame” spot for all the wrong reasons. Really Big Bird, however, is a HUGE standout beer that is definitely contributing to the out-the-door lines. BUSINESS: In our two years of podcasting, we feel like every single business segment has been leading to this. Elon Musk has officially reached a deal with Twitter, buying the social media company for a whopping $44 billion. How did the king of memes - the same guy who built two of the most promising companies in Tesla and SpaceX - become the owner of social media's biggest platforms? We discuss the Paypal Mafia, who could potentially be in Elon's C-Suite, and make bets on when (or if) this purchase actually goes through. In other news, Amazon has seen better days - they're down 26% in the past month alone due to labor crises, supply chain issues, and a disappointing earnings call. Is now the time to buy Amazon stock, or has the window come-and-gone? BALLS (presented by Manscaped): It's not every day you get the chance to talk with a character like Frank “The Tank” Fleming. From soda & hot dog reviews, to tireless rants about the Mets & Nets, you've seen Frank's musings on social media before. We discuss how far the Mets can go, why “Steve Trash” should be fired in Brooklyn, and who the New Jersey Devils should be building around in the coming years. Frank also needed to express his extreme dissatisfaction with NJ Transit. In other news, the Yankees are the hottest team in baseball, and they're right up there with their Big Apple counterparts in the Mets. We debate if we actually want a Subway Series Fall Classic. We also give our NFL Draft recap and declare our draft winners & losers. We're proud to present Manscaped as our latest partner! What guy wouldn't want The Right Tools for The Job?! Head over to manscaped.com/house, or use the code HOUSE at checkout for 20% off AND free shipping on your order. Thanks for listening! Remember to hit the follow button on Spotify, and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts. Join the conversation on Twitter and Instagram. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/beersbusinessandballs/support

Speaking to Influence
Ep 104: Trevor Garner - CFO of IdeaCrew: Building Trust and Courageous Conversations

Speaking to Influence

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 33:01


Today healthcare technology expert Trevor Garner shares the process of creating clarity and trust by communicating with both sides of a service-based tool. On this episode, Laura and Trevor discuss how his company works with politicians, government employees, and community members to make healthcare websites easy to understand and efficient to use. Trevor shares how his ability to stay vulnerable and open during conversation builds trust on multiple levels and opens the door to deeper, more productive communication.   Here are a few things you'll learn during this conversation: How non-verbal mannerisms impact conversation Two ways to be an effective communicator Simple ways to show you're listening Conversational tips for maintaining good working relationships Why the tech industry is working to improve empathy skills   During the 24-Hour Challenge, Trevor encourages you to focus on vulnerability. He asks you to be mindful of difficult moments and have the courage to express what you're feeling, opening the door to more vulnerable conversations that build trust.   About Trevor:   Trevor Garner is the Chief Financial Officer at IdeaCrew, focusing on healthcare, health benefits, and human services, to improve the experience for all involved. He is an expert in growing revenue and increasing profitability and is a sought-after business leader, community member, partner, and mentor.   You can connect with Trevor via email at Trevor@ideacrew.com or the website www.ideacrew.com     To learn more about Dr. Laura Sicola and how mastering influence can impact your success go to https://www.speakingtoinfluence.com/quickstart and download the quick start guide for mastering the three C's of influence.   You can connect with Laura in the following ways:   LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/drlaurasicola LinkedIn Business Page: https://www.linkedin.com/company/vocal-impact-productions/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWri2F_hhGQpMcD97DctJwA Facebook: Vocal Impact Productions Twitter: @Laura Sicola  Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/vocalimpactproductions Instagram: @VocalImpactProductions See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Leadership Hacker Podcast
It's Go Time with Jill McAbe

The Leadership Hacker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 55:49


Jill McAbe is a bestselling author of “It's Go Time: Build the Business and Life You Really Want.” Jill's recently been ranked #1 in Entrepreneur Magazine's inspiring education Entrepreneurs to watch in 2022. We dove into a bunch of topics in this awesome conversation, including: Jill's involuntary life reset and how that shaped her future. What is a “hot goal” and how you don't need willpower to achieve them. Learn about the MOMA method. What “all-in” really means. Join our Tribe at https://leadership-hacker.com Music: " Upbeat Party " by Scott Holmes courtesy of the Free Music Archive FMA Transcript: Thanks to Jermaine Pinto at JRP Transcribing for being our Partner. Contact Jermaine via LinkedIn or via his site JRP Transcribing Services   Find out more about Jill below: Jill on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/garydfrey/ Jill on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jillmcabe Jill on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jillmcabe Jill's Website: https://www.jillmcabe.com/   Full Transcript Below ----more---- Steve Rush: Some call me Steve, dad, husband, or friend. Others might call me boss, coach, or mentor. Today you can call me The Leadership Hacker. Thanks for listening in. I really appreciate it. My job as The Leadership Hacker is to hack into the minds, experiences, habits and learning of great leaders, C-Suite executives, authors, and development experts so that I can assist you developing your understanding and awareness of leadership. I am Steve Rush, and I am your host today. I am the author of Leadership Cake. I am a transformation consultant and leadership coach. I cannot wait to start sharing all things leadership with you Steve Rush: Jill McAbe is a special guest on today's show. Jill is the bestselling author of Its Go Time. She's also a teacher, coach, and a business guru, but before we get a chance to speak with Jill, it's The Leadership Hacker News. The Leadership Hacker News Steve Rush: We all know leadership can be tough, right? Despite the success. And sometimes a glory leadership can bring, the lows can be incredibly low. The job can feel quite lonely at times, especially when you have to make unpopular decisions. As leaders, we must all deal with stress, but the very best leaders handle the ups and downs with ease. They let things slide off their backs with resiliency, grace and grit, and it's not easy to do. Leaders can't afford to break down, lose their cool and be oversensitive. Instead, they must be steadfast, tough, no matter the up and downs. In an article from Entrepreneur Magazine, Kerry Siggins talks about five things that can make a big difference. Be determined. Determination is often overlooked as a leadership attribute but is needed to get through the difficult situations. You must be resolute in your vision, decision making and resiliency. During the early days of the pandemic, the uncertainty was unbearable. Like so many of the leaders many had to make difficult decisions about expenses and staffing. Kerry Siggins planned and kept one thing in the front of her mind, her determination to succeed. And that grew stronger than as she arrived in into the pandemic in the first place, determination helped drive her decision making and kept her focused and resolute. Know when to let things go. The flip side of determination is knowing when to say enough is enough. And when things aren't really working, and resiliency is not about consistently pushing through. Resiliency is also about letting know when to let things go to move on. There are times when you must be tough enough to back down, let go, change your mind, pivot, whatever words you want to use. Just because you think you are right doesn't make it so. So, when people around you and the evidence suggest that you are moving in the wrong direction, make the toughest decision of all and let go. It's quite natural to get defensive when you receive tough or unpleasant news through feedback, but it doesn't mean you should allow yourself to go there just because it's a natural response. If you want a toughen up as a leader, you must handle yourself with grace and hearing hard things as being part of the way we do things. Kelly's trick for doing this is to look for the truth in the information. She recently hired a consultant to perform a leadership competency assessment for her executive team. When going through the results, she was told. The reasons you haven't got grown the company faster is it takes you too long to assess and tell the people on your team that they haven't got what it takes. You let things is slide for too long. You must give this type of feedback faster and more directly. It's a problem for you. She was hurt by the words. She was inclined to defend herself and going to say that she did give people feedback all of the time and she wasn't afraid of those conversation. But instead of vocalizing those thoughts, she analyzed what was shared by compartmentalizing, the feedback. She could see that the individual consultant was right and gave her an opportunity to reflect and adapt her approach. She looked for the truth in his words, and face to feedback with action, Find gratitude. When most people think of gratitude, they envision what they're grateful for in life, such as family, health, and possessions. A more profound gratitude practice considers being thankful for the hard things in life as well. So, if you want to be stronger leader, you must look for the good that comes out of difficult situations. What are the hardships you're grateful for? What are the challenges that you've been faced with that you've now are faced and overcome? In her article Kerry talks about the overcoming addiction has been something she's really grateful for. And even though it causes pain is suffering for her life. She wouldn't change anything. And she's grateful for the lessons it taught her. Stop feeling sorry for yourself. It's harsh but true. Exceptionally leaders require us to stop feeling self-centered and sorry for ourselves. Being a leader is difficult at times and can be really thankless, but that's what you've signed up for. We can't allow ourselves to take things personally. We need to let things slide off our backs. We need to make sure that we face into every opportunity. That situation with passion and energy, our job is to make good decisions for our team and our company. Not necessarily to manage people's opinions. Our job is to lead, so lead with confidence. With leadership comes great responsibility, responsibility to make good decisions, be transparent, give good feedback, with standard our setbacks and to be a great leader we must toughen up. So, the leadership hack here is finding the sweet spot between awareness, compassion, and self-care. Getting that right means you can focus on the things that matter. Thanks Kerry, for sharing the article. Thanks all for listening to our Leadership Hacker News. Let's dive into the show. Start of Podcast Steve Rush: My special guest on today's show is Jill McAbe. She's a bestselling author, teacher and coaching the business success and finding one's purpose, particularly around the science of high performance and change. Her bestselling book. It's Go Time. Build the Business and Life You Really Want. Teaches the order of operations for building expertise-based businesses. Jill's also been recently ranked in entrepreneur as magazine as top 10 inspiring education entrepreneurs to watch in 2022. Jill, welcome to The Leadership Hacker Podcast. Jill McAbe: Thank you very much, Steve. I'm really happy to be here. Steve Rush: Jill. What's really great about your backstory is it's not followed traditional path to get you to where you got to. In fact, there's lots of bumps and twists and turns along the way. And we'd love for you to maybe just share a little bit about the backstory that led you here? Jill McAbe: Oh, wow. Alright. The super quick backstory that led me here, I would have to say as most stories do started when I was young, probably trying to figure out what I was going to be or do when I grew up, but that was a really difficult decision for me because I was very unsuccessful in school. I struggle with fairly significant dyslexia and what was called ADD now often termed a ADHD growing up. And so, I really struggled in school and my grades were poor, which made me realize that a lot of my options were limited at that time. It just felt like I wasn't going along a traditional track. And I very exceptional siblings. I like ridiculously exceptional siblings, you know, one scouted for professional sports, I'm Canadian. My older brother was invited to be a U.S. citizen upon the submission of his masters because it was so brilliant. And I had a sister who excelled in the arts and sports and academics and looked a little bit like Marilyn Monroe. So, it was really tough growing up. And my goal was simply to learn how to be successful because my mother used to, you know, worry about me and she'd say to me, Jill, some people are good at school. Others are good at life, and you'll be good at life. You're wise. Steve Rush: That's a great lesson. Isn't it? Wise words though seriously. At such a young age, because it would be really difficult to disassociate that, you know, some people just aren't academically gifted and others are, right? Jill McAbe: Yeah. It's interesting because when I ended up going back and doing my masters, I got (A) plus pluses across the board. So, the academics, it was really about not fitting into the way of learning that the schools liked to taught and my brain needing to comprehend information differently. Steve Rush: Yeah. Jill McAbe: And I think that led me. So, what got me here was frankly, a very bumpy road of trial and error. Sometimes I'd hit and I'd, you know, and I'd get a home run and I'd do really well. And other times there was a lot of hit and misses and I have spent a lifetime really studying and understanding and creating tools that help me be smarter than I am [laugh]. So, I love creating like tools to make decisions or tools to make things happen. And I love taking all this research and turning them into practical tools. Had a scientist tell me once, he's like, you're like a translator, you take our work, you make it very easy to apply. Steve Rush: Nice. And the tools that you created along the way, is that also a bit of a coping mechanism to help you with your dyslexia? Jill McAbe: Yeah, I'm sure it is. You know, what I understand. So, I was very fortunate, much more than many people who might have been in that situation because my mother actually is at the forefront of research at that time for how to rehabilitate people such as myself. So, I had a great deal of support and rehabilitation that a lot of people might not have access to that kind of help, but what I come to understand about people like me, and I'm sure there's some listeners who are going to relate is that I like to dive deep into things and the tools are actually a result of that. So, you know, I'm the person in class who sometimes annoying asks a hundred questions. So, if the teacher says something I say, but I read this other thing and no that's not consistent with. And if you look at this person's information, so I've always been someone who will find the question in something and dive deeper and explore it rather than accepting. Instantly what's been said, if it goes up against something I've heard that that doesn't fit with, but it's also allowed me to find consistencies from very diverse places. So, I found consistencies from leadership research you know, Neuroscience, Daoism, Christianity, you know, any of the religions really with, you know, business teachings. Like I will actually spot the through line and go how fascinating. And that's when I create the tool, when I see it come from all sorts of different directions. Steve Rush: Nice. What a gift too. Jill McAbe: Yeah. Yeah. You see, there you go. It's one of the things, it didn't feel like a gift growing up. Steve Rush: Right. Jill McAbe: But it can be used as a gift. Steve Rush: Definitely so, yeah. Now you had a moment in your life, which in your book, you actually called it, your involuntary life reset. Tell us a little bit about what happened? That was so significant and how would that then set you on a different path? Jill McAbe: Yeah, I was 40 and I thought my life was humming along really. In my early thirties, I found my first sort of calling, which was a restaurateur, and I opened a restaurant with my brother in Toronto and we actually became internationally successful, which was, you know, really, we just had a lot of passion. He was the chef. I was very good at operations, management, and leadership. And those two things together really brought together an incredible business and ended up selling that. Because this is a leadership podcast, I'm actually going to veer off a little Steve and just going to share something really fun. Steve Rush: Go for you. Jill McAbe: So, restaurants are known for having a lot of turnovers because they're known for having very transient workforce, but we had sort of high-end food and, you know, the sommelier where our servers. So, we had sort of a more educated staff and we were known for being, you know, a group where people didn't leave. When we sold it after seven years, the average person was with us for six years. Steve Rush: Wow. That's quite unusual in catering and hospitality, isn't it? Yeah. Jill McAbe: Yeah. And at the four-year mark I got, you know, I had these new ideas and so I started saying to the team, hey, you know, hey, let's try this, let's try this. And I thought I was this great leader, you know, because we were so successful, and my team was so happy, and they really resisted. And that Steve, I understood that there is a different kind of leadership to forged straight ahead than one who wants to turn a corner. In fact, that became, I didn't talk about this in my book. Because it wasn't, you know, necessarily just a leadership book, but that became my lifelong quest to really understand what does it take to turn a corner? How do we make a change? And my team would say to me, we're so successful. Why do we need to change? And I'd say, because we're successful because we forged ahead four years ago. Now everyone's copying us. It's time to be fresh again. And I started going to all sorts of courses and studying leadership. And I went to act my team who didn't want to, you know, try anything. And I said, listen, guys, I'm bored, I'm bored. And I need to be able to try this. So please will you please try these things for 30 days? And if you nix them, they're next. But if we like them and we enjoy how things are running, then we move forward. And I basically made this bargain with my team. We had about 30 staff just to give you a sense of the size of the business. It was small and that became my leadership lab. And then I'll fast forward. So, we sell the business and I really want to move off in this like leadership growth direction. And I got pretty good at understanding what motivated individuals and people and off I was going to go into this consulting direction, and I'd sold the business and clients were coming to me from all sorts of industries. And I'd say, what do I know about your industry? I'm a restaurant person. And they said, Jill, you know, we watched your operations for years as clients, they were tight. We'd like you to work for us, for sure you can help. And that's how my career started. But the involuntary life reset, I was hit by a car. The driver was talking on his cell. It was a very serious accident, both on his side and mine because he critically injured a couple of his children because they were not in seat belts and me. When the ambulance drivers came to my car, you know, one of them remarked they didn't think they were going to find a live body inside. So, it was 18 months of recovery. The life reset was that prior to that accident, I was pretty excited about being good at leadership and good at operations and good at cleaning up businesses. But after that accident, and it probably was relevant that the client that I had at the time was really horrible to his people. And so, he was sort of truly one of those people who was making money on the backs of others, there was thousands of people in his organization and the way he treated people was terrible. And so those two things at the same time really, really got me thinking about, am I just going to help people like that make money? Steve Rush: Right. Jill McAbe: I have to do something more meaningful. Steve Rush: And from the first time that you and I met, one thing that really struck me is you have a laser focus to serve others and it's unwavering. And I wonder how that moment shaped how you think about things now? Jill McAbe: Wow. yeah, I think, that's a great question. I think I was ashamed to be helping this man make money. There were people in his employee for 10 years making minimum wage. Steve Rush: Yeah. Jill McAbe: And he was so happy with the operational you know, one thing I have with this, I'm really good at mathematical. Like figuring things out. I have a real creativity to see solutions. I'm exceptional at it. And I was with his company for months and he offered me a lot of money to stay. And when I saw people who had worked in his employee for 10 years, it was a food manufacturing facility, and they were making minimum wage, which you can't live on in Toronto. And at the end of every day, if there was any, you know, food or any waste or whatever, all went in the garbage, he wouldn't let them take it. I was so sickened. So, I think growing up sort of sitting on the outside, not fitting in, made me someone who just watched people and cared about people. And I just realized I couldn't do that. Steve Rush: Yeah, yeah. And then fast forward to all of the experiences you've had, you managed to kind of collect them together and you created a real system now that helps people achieve high levels of motivation productivity within their work and their lives. At what point did you recognize that, you know, what you had was a thing? Steve Rush: Yeah. I created a tool called mind code, and I think that's the thing, you know, when I think about what the thing was that really changed the game because there was a lot of, I did all this research. I mean, for over a decade on, you know, goal setting or planning. And then I ended up getting certified in changed leadership. And then I did my master's in leadership. And I looked at all these different things. The behavioral science aspects really became powerful. A lot of us are looking at goal setting, planning, and implementation as different skill sets. And I realized, well, any project needs all of that. I'd studied project management but that was often overly complex for the needs of a small department or team. And I think I realized when it was a thing. First of all, when I would apply change leadership in organizations, and despite the fact that the organizations would look at me and say, this is not going to work, like point blank. I've had that said to me so many times. Steve Rush: Yeah. Jill McAbe: And we have succeeded anyway. And it's like, you're powerful to stop this? Or you're beyond saving. But the truth is, you're powerless to stop us when we understand change leadership. And Steve, I know you get that. Steve Rush: Mm-Hmm. Jill McAbe: It's like, no, you don't understand. I can rearrange your environment. I can add people and subtract people and you'll change and not even know you did. Steve, you know what I'm talking about, right? With change leadership. Steve Rush: I totally do, yeah. Jill McAbe: Yeah. Change is a equation. And once its supplied, change happens. Steve Rush: Right. Jill McAbe: So, I became sort of amazed at the power of this tool. When people would say, Jill, this will not work, and I will not do it. And I'm like, it will work anyway. One of my clients was like, oh my goodness, you can move mountains. And I'm like, it's not me. It's this tool. It's amazing [Laugh], you know, what's good about me is I'm willing to follow it. I'm willing to go through the steps. So really the system is not mine, you know, it's what I've learned. And my willingness to apply it, one of my clients and their organization did about 40 million and we're having a chat one day and I'm feeling pretty chuffed, you know, look at the great job I've helped you guys do this year. And he was not happy. Like he was visibly not happy. And I'm thinking what is going on? And he just said, yeah, yeah, no, no, no, it's good. I'm really happy with the organization, but I'm personally not happy. And I said, well, look, you know, we just use this tool that got an entire, and this was about 300 people that just got a, you know, a massive shift occur in your organization. What do you say we rework this and make it a personal transformation tool? And I later found out Steve, that the reason a lot of people don't create these tools for personal transformation is because there's no money in it. Steve Rush: Of course, yeah. Jill McAbe: Organizations simply pay more for that. And I've learned that the hard way because I tried to sell it. And I went from doing very well to not doing very well. So, I did learn the hard way. There's some truth in that, but yeah, I reworked it for a tool that individuals or teams can use. And that's a tool I called mind code and I share aspects of it in my book. And I think that's the moment when I realized when I reworked it, we used it on him first, it worked, then I used it on me. And now I've worked with dozens of people. I sell it as a standalone tool. I work closely with clients and use it and time and again, I mean, people have breakthroughs in their performance, and they have it fast. Steve Rush: Yeah. And a lot of breaking through performance is about decoding, almost our neurological pathways and our thinking that causes to get where we need to get to. And you have spent an enormous amount of time, energy, studying and focusing around behavioral science and neuroscience. And how has that really shifted your perspectives on the art of the possible? Jill McAbe: Wow. You know, what comes to mind? So, I'll say it is, my research started with behavioral science, which is, you know, really for the listeners, it's really thinking about what are the aspects in our environment that lead us to behave the way we do. And behavioral science would look at, you know, our social influences, our influence, our beliefs from growing up, our abilities, our personal abilities and our environment. And that was the first really profound. That was very profound research for me. I guess it goes back to this nurture versus nature question. Steve Rush: Right. Jill McAbe: And really understanding just how much in our environments, socially and physically were really causing us to be the person that we are. Like I used to think I was this autonomous thinking in control person of my life. And when I studied behavioral science, I understood, I was like a pinball in a pinball machine. Steve Rush: Yeah. Jill McAbe: I went wherever the people who had control of certain social and physical aspects of my reality wanted me to go. And we've seen that, you know, we've seen that in social media, like, come on, we've seen it over and over how fake news and environments and people can pull some levers and absolutely change. Steve Rush: Totally Jill McAbe: Yeah, absolutely change belief systems. Steve Rush: Yeah. Jill McAbe: So, I think that was when I realized, that's what got me interested there, but then there was this problem and this problem was, I couldn't seem to do it for me [Laugh]. Steve Rush: Right. Expert for everybody else, yeah. Jill McAbe: [Laughing] Like why isn't my life going the way I want to? You know, and when I got really honest with myself, there were some big things that I didn't seem to be able to do for myself. And honestly it was a fluke. My dyslexic brain wanted to, why, why, why, why, why does everybody talk about goals? Why does everybody talk about vision? And I decided to study the neuroscience underpinnings, and I'm fortunate to have a good friend who's a leading international academic, which means I have access to leading international academics, which means that somebody who had not normally give the time of day to someone like me, actually, you know, would sit down and have several conversations and guide me to cutting edge research that was, you know, just being published. And hadn't gotten down to the levels of press yet and consultants. I wanted to understand what was it about a goal that would make it work? Because if a goal worked, then all goals should work. So why were only some goals working? And that's when you know, I used to have the popular neuroscience of, you know, reticular activating system that almost infuriating neuroscientist, who's one of, you know, William Cunningham. Who's a leading neuroscientist in the area of goal cognition and the brain. And he just, please, don't talk about that. And, you know, because they really care about specifics and accuracy. And for some reason, it just really helped me to understand what created the kind of goal that was likely to be achieved? And then I was able to modify. And as I talk about in the book, I describe there's a popular system of goal setting called smart goals, which is you know, specific, measurable, attainable. I think realistic and timebound, and or something like that. Sometimes people change the acronym. Steve Rush: You're absolutely spot on. But it's commonly taught, isn't it? When you hear goals, they have to be smart. Jill McAbe: They have to be smart and smart goals have a critical flaw in that. Steve Rush: Yeah. Jill McAbe: They're not often meaningful and gives to the willpower of peace, but they're actually good for strategy. They're actually good for developing strategy, interestingly, strategy, fancy word for plan, right. But they're not a good tool for developing goal or outcome statements. And what do we want to be true at a later date? And that was really a flaw. And I ended up getting to speak to, I actually ended up getting to speak to, you know, one of the foremost goal researchers in the world as well and look at his, you know, 2000-page book on goals, like no joke. I've really got into studying this. I was so fascinated and really started to understand how we need to change the way we think about the outcome slash goal development piece to make our brains naturally want to work. And so, one of the things that's made mind code such a powerful tool. Mind code is an acronym that stands for eight steps of goal setting, planning, and execution. And one of the main things that makes it powerful is the act of doing it helps whoever uses it to automatically program their brain to want to work on it, which of course is very important for any goal is the application of your energy behind it. Steve Rush: Yeah. And you call these hot goals in your book, right? Jill McAbe: I use a term that I learned from a neuroscientist. So that's a term from a group of neuroscientists actually, oh, gee. I want to say his name was O'Reilly, but it's not, it might not be fresh at the moment, but it is a group of neuroscientists who studied the kind of goals that are the ones that determine how you behave. And so, it's a term from neuroscience that describes the trigger of action. And so, if you're hungry, for instance. The hot goal might be, you know, life, right? Like I want to keep living, so I need to eat. So, it's sort of the top goal. And if you're making a decision between two things, it's, you know, whatever it is that you're spending your time on or moving yourself toward, that's currently the hottest goal. So, it's a neuroscience-based term for what it is that's actually leading your behavior or triggering your behavior. Steve Rush: And what I particularly like about this focus, and certainly the focus you put on this is, it's actually directly correlated to mindset as well. So, you talk about having prevention and promotion goals. Well, I have often referred to mindset as being a prevention and promotion mindset, which I direct behaviors away from risk averse to protection. That's a prevention to promotion, which is, you know, what can I do next? What can I explore? What can I find new? what's alluring? How does that correlate to helping people get that depth of clarity in their goals? Jill McAbe: Absolutely. I think mindset is, this is sort of the prevention and promotion is really what I was looking at there, which fits beautifully with what you were saying is the biological push/pull Steve Rush: Yeah. Jill McAbe: Of why we do what we do. So biologically we are really moving ourselves. There's a part of our brain that we don't have cognitive access to. That's making decisions about our behavior. And that part of the brain is making decisions about, what we see, say, and do. Millisecond, up to ten seconds in advance of us even becoming aware of what we're going to see, say, or do, which is incredible. And it's basing those decisions about action on prevention goals, which is preventing us from harm. So, and that could be emotional or physical threat. And so that tends to be automatic. Our responses tend to be very automatic that prevent us from harm. And I actually share one with your listeners in a second, that I think will really help them understand an aspect of their lives of something that they might feel held back in at the moment, whatever it is. And then there's promotion goals that the brain is using, are to move us towards more life. And the promotion goals, the big one is to have babies, right? And so, it's like more life. Preserve humanity. And so, the problem with promotion goals is that more money, more happiness, a lot of the things that we strive for just aren't biologically understood as necessary to live. And so that's why we have to put a little more effort into forming our goals and outcomes and objectives so that they are understood biologically sort of by this part of the brain, the amygdala. So that the action center of our brain is actually going to automatically take action. And so, I really used it from this level of, so if I was going to link it to the mindset of the promotion things and what we want, what would be important is taking those things that we want and really deepening our clarity about what they are, so that this part of the brain that you can't. I talk about these two parts of the brain, having two different languages, one's using ideas and thoughts and concepts, and the part that we need to program, if you will, hot goals with promotion things, what we want, it doesn't understand words. So, we need to give it images. We need to give it emotions. We need to give it feelings, which is why we really need to create clarity around our future desire state in terms of visuals and emotions. Steve Rush: And of course, the bigger and deeper that emotional connection is the more likely of achievement of those goals, right? Jill McAbe: Yeah. Because the part of the brain that's determining our actions, milliseconds up to ten seconds in advance of the action being taken is the part of our brain that's connected to our emotional center. So, it's like a way of translating because if it can't understand ideas and concepts like success, what's that, right? Oh, you want a blue, two-story house, three blocks from the ocean. I can get that. So there needs to be a concreteness to what we want in a way that we can see it in another little hack is to see how it's good for others. Steve Rush: Hmm. Yeah. Jill McAbe: So, a lot of times we look at, you know, in my case where I'm helping individuals build businesses. But even when I was working with leaders and their team is to really take the time to explore the benefits to the group is actually very motivating for this part of the brain, because social, you know, being a safe part of a social circle is critical. And so when we understand something we want to achieve is going to be good for the collective that makes it more motivating. And what I see happening, or, you know, what I know when happens with groups and leaders is that we think that that's just a given, we have an objective and we're like, well, it's just a given that that will be really good. But unfortunately, that would be like saying, you know, going to a country where you don't speak a language and saying, it's just a given that they understand everything that you want. No, it's not just a given. We have to really make an effort to translate our concepts into the kind of images and emotions that the parts of our brain who will decide if we do this or not [Laugh]. Steve Rush: It's great perspective. Jill McAbe: So, we have to take a minute and onboard that part of the brain Steve Rush: Love it. It's a really interesting perspective. So, if we get our goals, we're really methodical about this. I'll say that again. Does willpower play into this? Jill McAbe: Yeah. So, I have a cheeky chapter in my book, you know, who needs willpower? So, no, right. It's just an easy home test. Everybody can do this. If you have a stated goal and you're working toward it, then you know, it's a hot goal. It's something that you're automatically working on and you're good. You're just going to keep moving in that direction. However, if you have a stated goal for yourself or your organization, and there is not regular progress being made on that goal, then you know, it's not hot and you know, you're not going to, which is a problem. So, willpower is not needed once you've properly established a goal. Steve Rush: That's fascinating. I think it's a common misconception that people think you must have to have willpower, but to your point, if you've articulated it so well, and it's got all of the right drivers that are neurologically linked to you, then it's just going to happen. Jill McAbe: You can't stop yourself, Steve. Steve Rush: Right. Jill McAbe: You actually cannot stop yourself once you have properly established a goal. I work with some organizations, one of my passions is helping companies develop vision and strategy. That's my strength, who I use sort of a bigger version of mind code for that. And we'll do their strategy for the next three years or five years. And when we're revisioning, that's why it's so important to be careful about the goals so that because when they're set properly, you actually can't stop yourself from working. You physiologically impossible to stop yourself from working on them because you've literally coded yourself. Because again, I think it's more than 90% of our action is triggered milliseconds up to ten seconds in advance. So, like that was the moment Steve, when I realized we have to stop focusing on the actions we're taking and start focusing on programming, the part of our brain that's taking action. It's like, we were looking at the wrong thing all this time. No wonder there are so many frustrated initiatives in the world. And so that's like one of my, you know, I get really excited. And then that's when I say, hey, be very careful what you decide to program in your subconscious, because not only do you not need willpower, you'll have to use willpower to stop working on it. Just so I'm accurate, because like my brain needs to be sort of accurate. Sometimes you need willpower to program the goal. So, you don't need willpower [laugh]. Steve Rush: Yeah, I get it. Jill McAbe: That's where you can use some willpower. Steve Rush: So, willpower becomes part of the goal setting process. Jill McAbe: Yes. It's part of the goal setting process. Steve Rush: Once it's set up. Jill McAbe: Yeah. Steve Rush: You're off. Jill McAbe: Yeah, exactly. Steve Rush: Got it. Jill McAbe: You're off. You're done. Steve Rush: Excellent. I love that. And I've never really, until I've read it in your book, I've never really had that aha moment that actually if you program your behaviors and you're thinking right at the outset and they're strongly aligned and they're hot goals, it just takes care of itself. Jill McAbe: Yeah. And it's not so instant to do that, but it is so worthwhile. Steve Rush: Yeah. So, you often hear people saying, you know, unless you're all in, it's not going to happen. So, when you hear somebody articulate the words, you have to be all in, what does that really mean for you? Jill McAbe: I personally use the term all in for my book. Probably what it means to me is faith. I mean, that's what it means to me. There was a point at which I was wondering, you know, am I going to be successful in developing my own education company? Or am I going to have to work as a consultant, some nice clients, some less nice clients, you know, what's my future look like? And there was a moment at which I really needed to make a decision if I was going to follow my heart and really try to make a go of my company, or go back to a world that I knew I could succeed in. And I guess having the life reset of the car accident, the stakes were a little higher because my life felt very empty after that car accident, I really felt like I lost it all. And I wondered what I had lost. I'd really gone into this 18-month rehabilitation but also significant depression and real questioning of what was the point of life. And all in for me was, like, well, I had to give it all.   I had to try my very best. I couldn't go back to just tolerating things and it meant going all in on my dreams and that's what it meant to me. And then it was also having the faith because I noticed that I was very good at helping organizations make striking advancements and teams make striking advancements when we'd work together. I'm very good at bringing forth the power of the individuals in the room. And then I thought, what is going on with me? Why have I been so successful at their businesses? And then in my own been, you know, lackluster result. Because after that crummy client, after my car accident, I only accepted clients who I really, really, really believed in. And I realized, yeah, I get results for people because I'm all in for them. And I have a hundred percent belief in them, and I was not taking action as though I knew I would succeed, but yet when working for my clients, I would take action with a singular focus that we would succeed. Steve Rush: Yeah, that's great. And now you're all in for you. How's that changed? Jill McAbe: [Laugh] most days. It's still harder. It's still harder when it's me! Steve Rush: Uh huh. Jill McAbe: But how has that changed? No, it's changed a lot. I've had, you know, is really, every day could be a slightly different answer. Some days I'm definitely feel like, you know, I can achieve anything and other days it's still running your own business is so challenging and there's lots of ups and downs. I think what's changed for me overall. Oh, well, I mean, the big picture is, when I really went after my dream. I mean, now I haven't established business. Back then I was not paying my way, you know, I'd gone from a fancy consultant to, you know, not being able to buy cereal and having my partner supporting me and you know, it was very humiliating for me. And now, I do, I mean, I have a business that, Entrepreneur Magazine is recognized as number one. Steve Rush: Exactly. Jill McAbe: You know, to watch in 2022. Like pretty important, actually. I'm pretty excited about that, but it's the people I also get to call, you know, it's the relationships that I've built along the way. There are so many extraordinary people who I call up and say, hey, you know, would you teach, you know, my people in BOOMU, would you teach them the stuff that know and they're like, sure. And that gets me every time, how many people I've reached out to and wanted to speak to or asked for them to do something for my community. An they say, yeah, and honestly, that's been one of the most exciting things is that I've been building something somewhat secretly. And even just now were sort of forming the outer view of the world. A lot of people who are only in our, like clients and students only see this because we are in a building phase, but it's truly a collection of incredible people sharing their gifts. And it's a dream. It's a dream come true. And I guess, because I almost got taken out of life with that car accident and I think COVID has helped us all see the need to maybe seize the moment. I'm really working towards building something that outlives me. Steve Rush: Awesome. I love it. So, this is a part of the show where we are going to turn the tables a little bit. We all know that you can't hack leadership, but I can hack your mind. And the objective of the next part of the show is, I want you to share with us your top tips, tools, ideas around leadership. So, what would be your top three leadership hacks, Jill? Jill McAbe: My top three leadership hacks. I'd say, this is just so small, but I think one of my favorite things. I teach, but I have a teach a collaborations course, and I think leaders listen first. And I think we know that leaders listen first, and you know, listening is power. Because understanding someone else's point of view before inserting your own is how to truly guide someone as opposed to speaking first. So that can be as simple as I have a very rigorous rule to always socialize for a moment before jumping into work. And in fact, it got me a quarter million-dollar contract once because I was representing a client and a possible investor came along and he was jumping in, you know, and he was like, all right, let's go. Let's talk business. And I looked at him and I held up my finger. This is the person with all the money. And I held up my finger and I said, just a moment. It's Monday morning, we socialize before we jump into work, how was your weekend? And he just looked at me like, who are you? We went to lunch, and I did a big project for his organization. And I do think that just taking a moment to be with people is critical. I'm going to say a leadership hack is definitely vision and having a clear vision. When I did my master's in leadership, I was amazed, you know, I thought I was going to go find the unequivocal way forward in leadership and discovered there are as many leadership theories as there are theorists. So, I realized, oh, there isn't one rule. And of course, my dyslexic brain wanted it to be easy, but it wasn't. But then there was the power of vision, which for over a century, nobody had been able to disprove could actually help you know, leaders outperform their competition by two to twelve times, which is staggering. And it got so boring to researchers. They couldn't disprove it. And vision, by the way, fancy word for big goal, right? Steve Rush: Big goal, yeah. Yeah. Jill McAbe: And so, these visions are really critical that they be underscored by purpose and long term and not all visions have that. I do have an article on LinkedIn about the kind of vision that has that. So, I'd say that's a hack because once you do that and get your organization on board, they're automatically working to worry about willpower. I mean, you don't have to worry about procrastination and willpower and people not working. Steve Rush: Totally. Jill McAbe: It's such false economy not to take that week and bring in a facilitator and get that vision done because it's such false economy just going to work. So that's a hack. And then the third one I'm going to say is, I have a tool for decision making. ABC decision. I'm pretty sure there's an article about that somewhere. I teach these courses as well through my website, but that one really helps us go back and it helps remind us where we are. (A) is aligned to your long- and short-term goals. (B) is broaden your options, always choose from at least three. (C) is compare contenders and do not use pro and cons, those are really bad. And then (D), detach before you decide so that you don't make emotionally biased decisions. And I think that once you have that vision, you have the ability to use something like A, B, C, D decisions to navigate and stay on course, those are my three hacks. Steve Rush: Brilliant. I love that last one, particularly because it's one of the things that we often are knee jerk about making decisions and just being ordered and considered gives you the space to think. Jill McAbe: Yeah. Steve Rush: Love it. Next part of the show we call it Hack to Attack. So, this is typically where something has not gone well in your life or work. Now you've already shared a couple of hacks to attacks already, but was there maybe something else in your work or your life that was maybe an aha moment that you've learned from that's now serving you well? Jill McAbe: A mistake that I seem to make regularly [laugh], which is embarrassing. In light of the show is, that I think I can outsmart my tools because I created them. Steve Rush: [Laugh]. Jill McAbe: [Laugh], you know what I'm talking about? Steve Rush: I totally understand that, yeah. Jill McAbe: So, I don't sometimes use them and then my projects don't go well, it's totally embarrassing. But I would say going back to really setting, I mean, for me, the tools, mind code and ABC decisions, I use the two of them in conjunction, but for me, it's going back and creating that second half. For me, it's that I stop using particularly my goal setting and planning tools, my execution, I'm pre-programmed on execution. I'm excellent execution because I program myself to be, so it's going back. Yeah, I have big fails or projects that are super lackluster, and then I realized I didn't start them the way I teach other people to start. Steve Rush: It's ironic. I, however Jill McAbe: [laugh] Steve Rush: It's reality. The reason that those tools were created in the first place, because it gave you results, it gave you processes, it gave you a methodology and you know what, we're human, aren't we? At the end of the day. And it's easy sometimes just to leave out some of those foundations, but the fact that, you know, that is a really powerful thing. Jill McAbe: Yeah. Like they bring out my smarts, right. I think I'm so smart. But the point is, they actually draw forth my smarts. Steve Rush: Yes. got it. So last part of the show, you get to do some time travel, bump into Jill at 21 and give us some advice. What would your words of wisdom be? Jill McAbe: So, this one is not leadership related at all. Steve Rush: Cool. Jill McAbe: Or business related. When I think about this question, I think about what would 21-year-old me actually listen to? And that's key, right. Because I might say a lot of things to 21-year-old me, but I have to go back and ask myself, what would 21-year-old me actually take action on? And so, with that in mind, I would tell 21-year-old me to go find the course in miracles. Steve Rush: Mm-Hmm. Jill McAbe: And I think 21-year-old me who was, you know, not into anything around faith and prayer or meditation or anything like that, I think almost really anti all those things because of how I had grown up. Would've been fascinated by a concept that there would be such a thing as a course in miracles. And I think that that would have helped 21-year-old me accelerate my career dramatically faster. Steve Rush: If only I could have bumped into a course of miracles at 21, in fact, I probably wouldn't have even listened to anything. I'd have said to me at 21, if I'm being brutally honest, but hey, that's another show. Jill McAbe: [laugh]. Steve Rush: So, I've absolutely loved talking with you. You are an incredible example of learning by doing and turning it into something powerful that's a force of good. And just delighted that we have the opportunity to share your story and some of your models and tools with our audience. If our listeners wanted to get hold of a bit more of your insights, how to access a copy of the book, It's Go Time, find out a little bit about BoomU, you where's the best place for us to send them? Jill McAbe: Come on over to my website would be a great start, jillmcabe.com with just one C a atypical spelling and or boom-u.com. And that's where free copy of my book can be found or link to my brand-new podcast, Thinking Vitamins, where I am sharing actionable ideas and practices that boost abundance and anyone interested in learning about MindCode would be able to learn all about that there and my other sweet of performance skills for leaders and entrepreneurs. So, I think that would be the place to send them. Steve Rush: And the good news is, is that if they're listening to this right now, they'll also find them in our show notes so they can head straight over as soon as they're done listening. Jill, I just want to say thank you for being part of our community. I've loved to chatting with you. And it's no surprised that, you know, Entrepreneur Magazine have recognized you as someone to watch this year. So, thanks for being part of our community. Jill McAbe: I'm grateful for the opportunity to be on the show. I've really enjoyed speaking with you. Steve Rush: Thank you, Jill.   Closing Steve Rush: I want to sign off by saying thank you to you for joining us on the show too. We recognize without you, there is no show. So please continue to share, subscribe, and like, and continue to get in touch with us with the great new stories that we share every week. And so that we can continue to bring you great stories. Please make sure you give us a five-star review where you can and share this podcast with your friends, your teams, and communities. You want to find us on social media. You can find us on Facebook and Twitter @leadershiphacker, Leadership Hacker on YouTube and on Instagram, the_leadership_hacker and if that wasn't enough, you can also find us on our website leadership-hacker.com. Tune into next episode to find out what great hacks and stories are coming your way. That's me signing off. I'm Steve Rush, and I've been your Leadership Hacker.  

Create and Grow Rich Podcast
Episode #85 - Making a Way with Compassionate Leadership for C-Suite with Tara Jaye Frank

Create and Grow Rich Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 43:14


Are you leading the way for others? If you need to know how, Tara is here to lead the way! In today's episode of The Create and Grow Podcast, we speak with Tara Jaye Frank. Her work, fueled by a deep belief in the creative power and potential of everyone, focuses on building bridges between people, ideas, and opportunity. Before founding her culture and leadership consultancy, Frank spent twenty-one years at Hallmark Cards, where she served in multiple executive roles, including Vice President of Creative Writing and Editorial, Vice President of Business Innovation, Vice President of Multicultural Strategy, and Corporate Culture Advisor to the President. Tara Jaye Frank resides in Dallas, Texas, with her rockstar husband, two of their six children, and their three dogs. She is also a proud Spelman Alumna, and a member of the Executive Leadership Council, the Network of Executive Women, and Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. Topics Covered on this episode of The Create and Grow Podcast: 00:00 - Introduction to Making a Way with Compassionate Leadership for C-Suite 03:15 – Who Is Tara Jaye Frank 07:30 - What can People Start Doing on Leadership for C-Suite 10:06 - Focus on the Norm 14:30 - Tara's Take on Cultural Competence 17:45 - Activities for C-Suite 21:26 – Why Cultivate Self-awareness? 25:50 - Guard Your Ego 28:49 - The Work of Carol Dweck Growth Mindset 34:04 - The Employee Centric View 38:22 - Adaptability to All Subscribe:  Spotify | YouTube Connect with Genein Letford: Visit CAFFE Strategies Visit geneinletford.com Follow Genein on Facebook  Connect with Tara Jaye Frank : https://tarajayefrank.com/ https://wearethewaymakers.com/   #PowerOfJournaling #PerspectiveShifting #SeeingYourLifeFromAnOutsidePerspective #CAFFEStrategies #Intercultural #Diversity #InterculturalCreativity

The Thoughtleadership Podcast
#44 - Building a 7-Figure Thought Leadership Business with Speaking, While Being in the Tech Industry w/Cherry Rose Tan

The Thoughtleadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 35:31


Meet our podcast guest: With over 15 years of experience in Tech, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship, futurist Cherry Rose Tan has built a reputation as the First Mover in several industries, including crypto, edtech, and mental health. A crypto Investor since 2015, Tan partnered with her brother and resulted in the creation of Paycase Financial, a Canadian blockchain pioneer that provides infrastructure and liquidity to global financial markets. Tan's latest company #REALTALK, the mental health movement for the tech industry, is known for being North America's first and largest platform on Founder Mental Health. Specializing in working with high-net worth and C-Suite clientele, Tan grew the movement to 40,000 leaders and 70 national champions in four years, with a synonymous Top 14 Business podcast on iTunes as well. Currently, Tan is the Entrepreneur in Residence at the Schulich School of Business, where she advises a global ecosystem of 200 startups and 3,000 members. As a Venture Partner for GoingVC Partners, one of the largest angel networks in San Francisco, she holds expertise in early-stage B2B SaaS, network effects, and regulated industries like crypto and cannabis. Early in her career, Tan has been an award-winning K-12 educator, teaching in Canada's most exclusive schools. With a M.A. in Education from the University of Toronto, she specialized in gamification as a teacher-researcher and holds a 25-year history as a gamer, where she ranked #17 (out of 25 million users) on Neopets, a virtual pets website that served as a precursor to the metaverse. As an Innovation Keynote Speaker, Tan is represented by the Speakers Bureau of Canada, with her first book being released in late 2022. Her companies have been featured on Forbes, Inc., The Globe and Mail, CBC, Nasdaq, Reuters, Insider, and MarketWatch for being disrupters in their respective industries. Rate, Review, & Subscribe on Apple Podcasts Did you find the episode valuable? If yes, please leave a rating and a review on our podcast show! By doing so, you are creating a ripple-effect of positive impact. The more people can discover this episode, the more rising thought leaders can we support to truly step into their biggest, boldest version of themselves. Also, have you already subscribed to the podcast? If not, make sure to do so not to miss the upcoming episodes! Links mentioned in this episode: Connect with Cherry Rose: Twitter: https://twitter.com/cherryrosetan LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/cherryrosetan Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thisischerryrose Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thisischerryrose For more live trainings & interviews, join our community of 1250+ rising thought leaders! The Thought Leadership Accelerator Community: https://www.facebook.com/groups/tlacommunity/

Drop In CEO
C-Suite Academy: Holding Yourself Accountable to Your Career Aspirations

Drop In CEO

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 19:04


On today's episode Deborah shares how she helps others advocate for themselves in order to grow and achieve more within their organizations. Listen in as Deborah discusses the formula for creating a career path, how to gain confidence in your work, and why you should look to leadership and communicate your goals with them.     Create a personal career strategy that develops the leadership and communication skills you need to assess challenges, showcase your skills, and demonstrate your ability to be a C-Suite Leader. Learn more about the C-Suite Academy here: https://bit.ly/csawaitlist22   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Selling To Corporate
STC069 The steps to take when raising your rates with corporate companies

Selling To Corporate

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 36:44


Key Resources Mentioned in this Episode:   Join The C Suite ® now! If you're looking to get the best support in selling your services to corporate organisations, not to mention hundreds of email templates, swipe files and proposal outlines so that you really can convert at much higher rates and sell your services more successfully then click here to join the waitlist now.   Take the Selling to Corporate ® offer quiz and find out what the best offer is that you could sell to corporate.    Converting Corporates Bundle: If you're looking to learn the foundational pieces to successfully sell your services to corporate organisations, grab this fabulous self study programme here! You'll learn how to; Create your 250K corporate sales plan, set your business development strategy for success, understand and successfully generate qualified leads and hear from real hiring managers on their top tips for pitching to organisations!    Book an exploratory chat with me! I'm offering exploratory sessions with me so that you can ask any questions you have about The C Suite ® and how it can benefit your business. These opportunities are incredibly limited - so if you'd like my eyes on your business and a totally transparent conversation about how The C Suite ® could support your goals, schedule your call today.   Top 5 Business Development Questions: If you're looking to convert more business development calls into sales? You need to be asking the right questions and getting the best information to support future work. Download my Top 5 BDQs here and start getting quality information from your prospects.   If you've been consuming the content and LOVE the show, please make sure you take five minutes out of your day to leave a review. 

Our Voices Matter Podcast
Changing Corporate Culture - Allie Danziger

Our Voices Matter Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 37:25


What does it take to change corporate culture?   It's a question countless corporations are asking as diversity, equity, inclusion and belonging take center stage.This week, my guest and I explore this topic from multiple perspectives.Allie Danziger is a whip smart, young entrepreneur whose insight is gleaned from her experience in the world of internships -- and the C-Suite.Allie had eight internships under her belt by the time she graduated from UT-Austin in 2007.  She started her first business at age 24.  Integrate was one of the first agencies in Texas that specialized in this new thing called social media.After growing that business, Danziger sold it and started a new one.  During the pandemic.Enter Ampersand Professionals.  The company is on a mission to democratize access to that first, hard-to-get internship.  Often an important stepping stone to a successful career.And because the company concentrates on eliminating barriers to include those often left behind, Ampersand is also building diversity in corporations of all sizes.Embracing "The Other"Danziger and her team have a front row seat to current changes in corporate culture.  However slow it might be, Danziger says smart companies are embracing change.Because they realize if they don't, employees will walk out the door."Culture no longer means a ping pong table and beer at 4 o'clock on Fridays, right?," says Danziger. "Culture now means a place where I can show up and be myself and be respected no matter what "other" I'm coming from."Changing Corporate MindsetThat changing corporate mindset now extends to the recruitment of entry level talent and the desire for more diversity.   And that is Ampersand's sweet spot. A new crop of graduates is about to enter the workforce.   If you're in that category, Allie offers some valuable perspective as you embark upon your new life as a young professional.Wherever the journey takes you, it will help to remember this.  The stepping stones on your path to success are part of a changing corporate culture that is also seeking to find its way.www.ourvoicesmatterpodcast.comwww.lorellemedia.comThis podcast is devoted to empowering us all to better understand each other's differences...one story at a time.  Emmy Award-winning journalist, Linda Lorelle, guides guests through insightful, unexpected conversations that reveal our common humanity.  This show is not about politics per se; it is about finding a way to reclaim civility in the context of the contentious times in which we live, by sharing our personal and professional stories, in hopes that others might find a glimpse of themselves.Support the show (http://patreon.com/OurVoicesMatterPodcast)

Business Bros
Positive Culture in Workplace with DDS Dobson-Smith

Business Bros

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 30:50


942 I have notched up over 25 years of working in small, medium, and large corporations. I literally grew up in the hospitality industry [my parents owned a pub and restaurant in the UK] and I started my career as a college professor teaching hotel and business management. I've since held a range of senior, executive, and C-Suite level roles across a host of sectors and companies including renowned retailer Marks & Spencer Plc, travel and tourism company Eurostar International, Crossrail Ltd - the company charged with building a new railway through the center of London, music giant Sony Music Entertainment, and Essence Global - part of the world's largest advertising company, WPP. I'm a member of the Advisory Board of WE Global Studios, a full-stack Innovation Studio and digital DIY Platform that powers the success of women entrepreneurs around the world. I serve as adjunct faculty at California Institute of Integral Studies where I teach counseling psychology to graduate students. I also run a private psychotherapy practice, called SoulFull Therapy, in the state of Connecticut My career has provided the opportunity for me to work across all continents and to develop the awareness, empathy, and skills to work successfully with people from all diverse walks of life in culturally humble ways. I'm certified as an Executive Coach by both the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development and the Oxford School of Coaching & Mentoring, I'm credentialed with the International Coach Federation, and am a coach-supervisor through the Coaching Supervision Academy. I've been working in the field of Neuro-Linguistic Programming [NLP] since 2001 - I'm a double-certified INLPTA Master Practitioner and Trainer of NLP, and a Neuro-Linguistic Psychotherapist under the NLPtCA. I'm also licensed to administer MBTI [Step I and Step II] and FIRO-B psychometric tools. Over the years I have had the opportunity to train with many luminaries in the transpersonal field including Louise Hay, Marianne Williamson, Dr. Patricia Crane, Deepak Chopra, and Dr. Brant Cortright. In 2007 I became a Reiki Master and Teacher under the guidance of Christina Moore, in 2020 I completed an internship in The Narrative Enneagram, and in 2022 I qualified as a sound healer using crystal bowls. I'm a native Brit and have lived in the US with my husband, David, and our two cats, Harper and Hemingway, since April 2014. When not working you can usually find me geeking out over some psychological concept or losing myself in repeats of The Voice, X-Factor, and American Idol on YouTube. ________ Want your customers to talk about you to their friends and family? That's what we do! We get your customers to talk about you so that you get more referrals with video testimonials. Go to www.BusinessBros.biz to be a guest on the show or to find out more on how we can help you get more customers! #Businesspodcasts #smallbusinesspodcast #businessmarketingtips #businessgrowthtips #strategicthinking #businessmastery #successinbusiness #businesshacks #marketingstrategist #wealthcreators #businessstrategies #businesseducation #businesstools #businesspodcast #businessmodel #growthmarketing #businesshelp #businesssupport #salesfunnel #buildyourbusiness #podcastinglife #successgoals #wealthcreation #marketingcoach #smallbusinesstips #businessmarketing #marketingconsultant #entrepreneurtips #businessstrategy #growyourbusiness --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/businessbrospod/support

PCTY Talks
C-Suite Expectations from the Owner's Box with David P. Samson

PCTY Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 30:42


Trying to hit it out of the park when presenting to your executive team? Join former Miami Marlins President David P. Samson and PCTY Talks host Shari Simpson as they discuss what matters most to the CEOs when they work with HR. Guest: David P. Samson, Former Miami Marlins President and podcast host of Nothing Personal with David Samson Nothing Personal with David Samson is a daily sports podcast hosted by David Samson. No guests. No callers. No BS. 45 minutes per day, Monday-Friday. David is dedicated to decoding the endless musings of players, owners and others in a concise, articulate and entertaining manner. Samson was in charge of a Major League Baseball team for 18 years, with winning a World Series ring, building a new ballpark, hosting an All-Star game, and buying and selling a franchise, among his many experiences and accomplishments. His breadth of knowledge covers all aspects of sport. This podcast will be the destination for fans of sports and entertainment who want to hear the truth about real situations as they occur each day. Every segment will give his audience a unique perspective, not found anywhere else. His voice is strong and unwavering, his brand is honesty and his reach is extraordinary. And remember, it's just business...It's nothing personal!   Mentioned in the episode: Podcast: Nothing Personal with David Samson

Embark
Coach (Barbara) Roche: Step Out of Your Comfort Zone

Embark

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 29:06


Barbara Roche, or 'Coach Roche' develops leaders, inspires confidence and gets people talking. She also adds a booty-shaking dance routine or fun movement break into almost every program she develops.Join us for this smart and savvy conversation about how to see yourself better so you can raise yourself up and forward.About Barbara RocheHer mission is to help more women advance to the C-Suite. And to eradicate death by PowerPoint!She's  a player-coach. When Barbara is not speaking, she's  coaching presenters, leaders and aspiring keynoters. She's coached CEOs, pitch teams, job candidates, and TEDx speakers.A native Bostonian, Barbara is a proud member of Red Sox Nation. She  lives a secret life as a fitness instructor."Time to stop playing small. Step up, speak up, stand out."

CX Chronicles Podcast
CXChronicles Podcast 167 with Chuck Frydenborg, CEO at MarketMuse

CX Chronicles Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 47:20


Hey CX Nation,In this week's episode of The CXChronicles Podcast #167 we welcomed Chuck Frydenborg, CEO at MarketMuse.MarketMuse uses AI to accelerate content planning, creation and optimization. The MarketMuse platform identifies content quality issues on your site and builds blueprints that show you exactly how to write to cover a topic comprehensively.Publishers, content creators and e-commerce managers use MarketMuse to realize improvements in search performance. This is yet another potential tool that customer focused business leaders can add to their arsenal to create world-class customer experiences in their growing business. People often forget that brand new customers start the very beginning of their customer experience with a company or brand by engaging with their content. White-papers, case studies, blogs, industry reports and podcasts are becoming the new normal for modern marketing efforts to get new people into your sales funnel or customer journey. In this episode Chuck and Adrian chat through how he has tackled The Four CX Pillars: Team,  Tools, Process & Feedback throughout his career + shares some of the tips & tricks that have worked for the team at MarketMuse as they've grown their customer portfolio & revenues.**Episode #167 Highlight Reel:**1. Why we are going to see more CX/CS leaders joining the C-Suite in the future 2. How your content often kicks off your entire customer experience with new customers 3. Improving the way that your company proves your time to value (TTV)  4. Ensuring your company has the right customer focused leader setting you up for success5. Why communications & expectations setting is paramount for every leadership team Huge thanks to Chuck for coming on The CXChronicles Podcast and featuring his team's work and efforts in pushing the customer experience and content optimization space into the future.Click here to learn more about Chuck FrydenborgClick here to learn more about MarketMuseIf you enjoy The CXChronicles Podcast, please stop by your favorite podcast player and leave us a review. This is the easiest way that we can find new listeners, guests and future customer focused business leaders to tune into our weekly podcast. And be sure to grab a copy of our book "The Four CX Pillars To Grow Your Business Now" on Amazon +  check out the CXChronicles Youtube channel with all of our video episodes & customer focused business leader content!Reach out to CXC at INFO@cxchronicles.com for more information about how we can help your business make customer happiness a habit!Support the show (https://cxchronicles.com/)

Wealth, Actually
EP-116 DISRUPTION IN WEALTH MANAGEMENT with MATTHIAS KUHLMEY

Wealth, Actually

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 27:25


The Wealth Management Industry is in the midst of massive demographic change. Business models are evolving, old entrants are retiring or merging, technology is leveling the playing field. As a result, clients are demanding more value and the industry is coping with a rapidly shifting landscape. As "Wealth Management" clamors for direction, new expertise to manage this change is emerging. With us today is MATTHIAS KUHLMEY, Chief Development Officer at Hightower Advisors and the developer of the "Disruption in Wealth Management" Module for Columbia University's Wealth Management program. Matthias Kuhlmey began his professional journey as a trained musician, landing somewhatfortuitously in the field of global finance where he has been active as an advisor, capital marketexpert, and corporate executive for the past 20+ years. Whereas the origins of his two worlds cannot be more different. Matthias has beenpassionately exploring parallels, especially in observing how technology has been disruptingboth industries. Lowering the barrier of entry, preparing the path for a creative (r)evolution.Matthias is a thought-leading critic of socioeconomic affairs, C-Suite executive of one of theleading firms in the independent space for financial advice, and lecturer at Columbia School ofProfessional Studies in New York City. Background Overview 1. “Disruptive Trends in WM” 2. Big opportunity to define disruption in the context of WM (Music Industry as an example) 3. Ttrust and lack of trust in the system; emerging stores of value 4. The firm of the future; what to consider, trends to build on, etc. Independent Movement Around the Registered Investment Advisor Space             -“Wire House” to Independence             -Regulatory and definition Clarity             -Transparency             -Client -centric Digitization             -Movement away from vertical integration             -Firms now have access to best in breed technology through 3rd party sources             -Vendor selection and maintenance             -Tech as differentiator is now tech as equalizer Product to Service Shift in Industry             -Move away from commoditized offerings             -Relationship oriented advice             -Shifting consumption models- the move to digital             -the importance of Shared mission The Impact of Political Risk              -Mitigating Store of Value Risk             -The Erosion of Trust of “free markets”             -The emergence if digital assets Growth – Organic             -No one solution- but it must be process driven             -Value proposition must be overwhelmingly obvious             -Relationships must be monetizable             -Accountability driven Growth – Inorganic             -Deal Activity has exploded             -Risks- integration             -Emphasis on culture and operations vs transaction             -Organizations must be prepared via network and hierarchy models Future of Wealth             -Access to clients based on value proposition – necessitates specialization             -Talent pool incomplete- not diverse enough, not digital enough, not empathetic enough             -Women- a huge driver of change both as clients and industry leaders             -Meaning of money broader- aspirational sustainable, impact             -Corporate leadership needs new skills to lead the new type of worker and service client             -Economic incentive of workplace culture important but psychological safety is key How Do We Stay In Touch? https://www.linkedin.com/in/matthiaskuhlmey/ https://sps.columbia.edu/faculty/matthias-paul-kuhlmey Recent publications: o Succession: A Relevance Crisiso The Money (R)evolutiono The Values Dimension Resources Columbia SPS:Master of Professional Studies In Wealth Management https://www.amazon.

Excellent Executive Coaching: Bringing Your Coaching One Step Closer to Excelling
EEC 225: Executive Transitions - How to Successfully Transition into a New C-Suite Role

Excellent Executive Coaching: Bringing Your Coaching One Step Closer to Excelling

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022


Are you taking on a new leadership job and you want to make sure you do not fail into the 40% of leaders that fail? How about the First 90 Days, isn't that enough of an onboarding book? Can you walk the audience through the Double Diamond Framework© of Executive Transitions? What are the most common executive transitions challenges, why is there such a high failure rate & what is the true cost of failure to organizations? Navid Nazemian When it comes to executive transitions, Navid Nazemian speaks with an authority that is grounded in research and complemented by authentically demonstrated experience. His ICF accredited coach education took him on a three year journey across three continents in Europe, Africa and America. Working with 100+ C-level coaching clients worldwide, Navid distills key insights, guidance and coaching for maximizing leadership impact in this book. Using strategies designed to avoid and overcome obstacles quickly, he has helped numerous c-suite coaching clients to successfully eliminate unproductive actions and solve their toughest, most complex transition challenges. Excellent Executive Coaching Podcast If you have enjoyed this episode, subscribe to iTunes. We would love a review on iTunes or other platform. The EEC podcasts are sponsored by MKB Excellent Executive Coaching that helps you get from where you are to where you want to be with customized leadership and coaching development programs. MKB Excellent Executive Coaching offers leadership development programs to generate action, learning, and change that is aligned with your authentic self and values. Transform your dreams into reality and invest in yourself by scheduling a discovery session with Dr. Katrina Burrus, MCC to reach your goals. Your host is Dr. Katrina Burrus, MCC, founder and general manager of www.mkbconseil.ch a company specialized in leadership development and executive coaching.

Resilient
Tom Morris on a philosopher's lemonade stand: ancient wisdom for today's leader

Resilient

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 57:04


Tom Morris, PhD, professor, author and a self-proclaimed public philosopher talks with Bill Marquard, managing director, Monitor Deloitte, and host of the Becoming Resilient series about how ancient wisdom can help leaders be resilient in the face of disruption.

C-Suite Intelligence
C-Suite Intelligence returns for season 2

C-Suite Intelligence

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 0:58


The go-to podcast for high performers and aspiring leaders is back for a second season. Hear top executive coaches at The Miles Group discuss how successful leaders amp up their game, even as business conditions grow more complex every day.

Purpose 360
Driving Purpose From the C-Suite to the Boardroom with Dan Hesse

Purpose 360

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 52:25


In 2007, the recently merged Sprint Nextel was only six months away from going bankrupt. But under Dan Hesse, its new CEO, the company focused on a new strategy and internal culture that prioritized employee satisfaction to improve customer experience. This led to Sprint Nextel placing first in the wireless industry in customer satisfaction and ranking #1 in total shareholder return among all S&P 500 companies in his final two years as CEO, 2012 and 2013. Dan believed in the power of stakeholder-based capitalism to build culture and drive business success before many of his peers. Now retired from the C-suite (he also served as President and CEO of AT&T), Dan serves on various boards to help companies build and elevate purpose-driven cultures that support ESG commitments. We invited Dan, Board Member of JUST Capital, PNC, and Akamai Technologies, to share how purpose remains the driving force behind his leadership, business success, and counsel for companies today. Listen for Dan's insights on: The three things CEOs and boards must do to advance purpose initiatives that build both stakeholder and shareholder value. The biggest barriers to