Podcasts about Progreso

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Latest podcast episodes about Progreso

El Podcast de Robotania
304 El podcast de Robotania: libros, cultura y entretenimiento

El Podcast de Robotania

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 42:00


Te platico que estuve haciendo en vacaciones. Te comparto mi opinión del documental 'Moonage Daydream' de David Bowie en Cinepolis Klic. Te platico de los libros: 'Minuet' de Lorena Velasco Terán y Mauricio Sánchez Serrano Ed. Doon Cómics, 'Emilia y el mar' de Diana Coronado Ilustraciones de Gonzalo Gómez Ed. Progreso, 'Diarios y cuadernos' 1941 - 1995 de Patricia Highsmith con Anagrama / Oceáno de México & 'Solitario' de Alice Oseman con VR Editoras. Te invito a 'Fedora' y 'Bugs Bunny at the Synphony' en Conjunto Santander de Artes Escénicas. Te comparto mi opinión de 'Madre solo hay dos' & 'Matilda el musical' en Netflix y Avatar el camino del agua. Te invito al 2000 Pop Tour en Auditorio Telmex de Guadalajara.

Más que En Forma
Por qué Usar Anabolizantes Perjudica el Progreso

Más que En Forma

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 46:21


En este programa hablo sobre: Cómo y cuándo se utilizaban antes los anabolizantes Farmacias VS Labs Unders Quién y cómo utiliza ahora los anabolizantes Por qué la mayoría están peor utilizando anabolizantes que sin ellos Si quieres que sea tu entrenador: antonioyuste.com/ayudame/

Radio EME
Sebastián Cantoni

Radio EME

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 13:44


Presidente de San Martín de Progreso sobre su actualidad

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 89 – Unstoppable BIPOC Advocate and Social Entrepreneur with Peter Bloch Garcia

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 68:51


So, who reading this knows the definition of BIPOC? Listen to this episode and Peter Bloch Garcia will define the word for you right at the start. Peter's life after being in school stayed in education where primarily taught at the secondary school level.   Later, he decided to move out of being a direct educator and into working for and serving with a number of not-for-profit agencies in the Washington State area.   Our conversation ranges far and wide and, as far as I am concerned, is one of the most pertinent discussions I have had in quite a while. We talk about everything from racial inequity to climate change and how all interrelate together.   I urge you to listen and even leave the interview with a list of books Peter suggests for outside reading. I hope you will give this episode a 5 rating and that you also will review it. Enjoy and be inspired. That's the best thing I can suggest.     About the Guest: Peter Bloch Garcia is the son of a Mexican immigrant, and grew up in Yakima, Washington. He began his career as an educator, later becoming a foundation program officer focused on improving education quality and access for students from low-income and BIPOC youth, and empowering them to advocate for systemic change.   When he learned that foundations do not equitably support BIPOC communities, he organized others to form the Latino Community Fund of Washington State, where he served as Board President, Treasurer and Executive Director to steward growth and development of a vitally needed organization. He was instrumental in forming and leading Progreso: Latino Progress, a c4 organization to build political power in the Latine community for more representation and voice at state level issues.   While at LCF he increased resources to enhance community leadership, build capacity of non-profit organizations, and advocate systems change to improve the well-being of Latine residents across the state. As head of Progreso, he coordinated with LCF to increase Latine voter registration and civic participation and engaged Latine community voice to lobby for racially equitable policies at the state and local levels.  His leadership with LCF and Progreso was honored when he received the American Society of Public Administration northwest chapter's Billy Frank, Jr. Award for Race and Social Justice in 2017.   To round out his experience and impact in the community, Peter moved to the public sector to focus on economic equity and justice by supporting neighborhood business districts in BIPOC communities to improve safety, placemaking, and community building events.   Peter is passionate about advancing racial equity and addressing climate change through movement building of BIPOC communities for systemic change. He is also dedicated to moving the nonprofit sector to improve their internal organizational cultures to match the values of their mission and become intentionally anti-racist in practice. He is a co-host with Tania Hino of Adelante Leadership podcast to encourage and inspire more Latine community members to step into leadership.   He serves on the Seattle Foundation Community Programs board committee, the board of Evergreen Social Impact, and as treasurer of Sustainable Seattle.   At Valtas Group, Peter has served in the following Interim ED roles. ●      Seattle International Foundation (SIF) ●      Mockingbird Society Peter's educational background includes -       BS in English and Secondary Education, Western Washington University -       MPA, University of Washington, Evans School of Public Administration, Concentration: Public & nonprofit management, social enterprise, quantitative analysis, financial management, community & economic development, and urban environmental sustainability. -       Certificate in Leading DEI Initiatives, Northwestern University   Social Media Links:   LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/peter-bloch-garcia-ba878810/ Facebook https://www.facebook.com/peter.b.garcia Twitter @pblochgarcia   Adelante Leadership https://www.adelanteleadership.com/     Valtas https://www.valtasgroup.com/peter-bloch-garcia.html Seattle International Foundation https://seaif.org/ The Mockingbird Society https://www.mockingbirdsociety.org/ Latino Community Fund https://www.latinocommunityfund.org/     Poetry 2019 San Jose Poetry Center Finalist https://www.deanza.edu/english/creative-writing/red-wheelbarrow.html Real Change https://www.realchangenews.org/news/2000/12/28/poetry-dec-28-2000 Poets West https://www.poetswest.com/books.htm Blue Mountain Review https://issuu.com/collectivemedia/docs/bluemountainreviewseptember2021   About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes* Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:20 Well, hi again, wherever you happen to be. This is Michael Hingson. And you are listening to unstoppable mindset. And today we get to meet Peter Garcia. Or would you rather go by Peter Bloch Garcia?   Peter Bloch Garcia  01:34 It's Peter Bloch Garcia.   Michael Hingson  01:35 Peter Bloch Garcia. All right. And Peter grew up in Yakima, Washington, and as spent most of his life in I guess the the Northwest, has been an educator and a foundation person who's been responsible for a number of things, and he'll talk to us about that, and definitely an advocate. And among other things, Peter has spent a lot of time dealing with education and quality of access for low income and bipoc people. And I asked Peter, and I'm gonna ask you again, what is bipoc? Because I think probably a lot of us haven't heard of it at least, I hope I'm not the only one.   Peter Bloch Garcia  02:16 Yeah, happy to in No, I don't believe you are the only one. Because it's a relatively new term that's emerged in the last few years. It's actually an acronym that stands for black indigenous people of color. And it's being used more as an inclusive way. But also to amplify the significance of an importance of addressing racism by calling out and emphasizing the importance of black and indigenous aspects of that of people of   Michael Hingson  02:54 color. Got it? We have acronyms for everything nowadays, don't we?   Peter Bloch Garcia  02:58 Yes, it is. Nothing. More is a common noun, though. Yeah.   Michael Hingson  03:04 And that's fair. But we we do like to describe everything. Well, tell me a little bit about you growing up and kind of how you got to where you are?   Peter Bloch Garcia  03:14 Well, so basically, my story is, so my mom is an immigrant from Mexico. And I was born here in the United States after she came to the US. And she came without speaking English, but learned it fairly quickly. And how that sort of has shaped me, you know, we grew up with as we got older, we, me and my siblings had very typical or stereotypical even challenges and situations that are typical of folks of color in this country and in society. From a background like that, it is a time Yakima was it was very much of a migrant farming community. And growing up there, I was really not very happy growing up there for a variety of reasons, both the typical traumas and issues within our family, as well as the extended community that was not very inclusive, and but I didn't have the language. I didn't know I didn't really understand why or what was happening. But what I think was really important to me that shaped me who I am today was that I had some adults in my life who were very influential one was, I was in a youth employment and training program for low income kids. That was federally funded back in the day, and my case manager. Her name's You and Karaca, she, she saw more in me than I saw in myself. But also, as an African American woman, she was starting to talk to me, it started, that's where I think I started getting some of the language to understand issues around race. But it wasn't until I went to college where I also got active on campus. Back then, in in mid 80s, you know, if race in this country was seen as something that we had already dealt with in the past, oh, that was something in the 60s. In fact, all kids of color, pretty much were seen on campus as taking somebody else's seat, taking a white student seat, or that we got into the school, because we weren't qualified, but it was a affirmative action thing that we we didn't really belong, you know, all of that stuff. And so I spent something like, you know, in my spare time on is an undergraduate as a student activist and, and try to work on improving things, recruiting more students of color, supporting the students of color, improving our, our graduation rates, and things such as that. And then I went into teaching after that, partly because I felt so privileged from my kind of background to have gotten a college education. Some of my siblings didn't graduate high school. And yet, here, I was going through college, and I wanted to give back. So I first started going into education, because I wanted to, to, you know, share the kind of education that I felt privileged by with other kids like me. So I started going into teaching, and I taught for a number of years, I taught in different countries, Mexico and Italy. I taught for a short time in New York City. But I left teaching eventually, and I ended up working in nonprofits. And that's where you mentioned the foundation work, which was purely coincidental, because I didn't know there was a sector on giving money away, you know, philanthropy, right. But I learned a foundation.   Michael Hingson  07:14 What kind of places did you teach high school, college or why taught   Peter Bloch Garcia  07:18 mostly secondary levels? So high school and more of the years was spent in middle school? Sixth, seventh, and eighth grades, some ninth 10th? In a few junior level classes. You say? Go ahead. I was just gonna say I was an English teacher, mostly. But I taught a little bit of social studies as well.   Peter Bloch Garcia  07:41 Which kind of relates Oh,   Michael Hingson  07:45 well, you said something really interesting. Which I thought about a lot. I know it's true. But you said that people probably in the 80s sort of thought, well, race is all taken care of it was all dealt with in the 60s and 70s. But the view generally was that people of different races were taking seats from white people. Yeah. And I think actually, there are still a lot of people who think that way today, but nevertheless, that doesn't sound like it was really dealing with race, of course, does it?   Peter Bloch Garcia  08:26 Right. Yeah. I mean, it is still definitely a part of the frame. You know, especially with our immigration policy, you know, for the last 30 some years, it's been Oh, we got to control immigrants, immigration, because they're taking our jobs kind of thing.   Peter Bloch Garcia  08:43 But I think to your question,   Peter Bloch Garcia  08:49 it it was it still was rooted in racism from my, my perspective. But it was sort of a, it was sort of an excuse, like, you know, no, no, we don't have to deal with racism, because it was done before. And, and no sort of self awareness of the privilege. In fact, there was this one class I was taking. In college, it was an ethnic studies, political science kind of class. And the professor throughout this, this term of reverse discrimination in a lecture once and in my study group with friends. They mentioned something about reverse discrimination. And I said, Oh, but that's not what he meant. But at that time, in that period of time, there was this belief that reverse discrimination was rampant all over the country. And that's where, you know, it's reverse discrimination because folks of color students of color are taking the seats of white students then they're not they're not qualified to be here kind of thing. So It was about race and racial bias. But also the system at the time itself was not doing a good job of encouraging more kids of color to go to college.   Michael Hingson  10:11 What do you think about this whole concept of they're taking our jobs? And today we're talking about immigration, and well, we're letting them in our country, and they're taking our jobs.   Peter Bloch Garcia  10:24 Well, I mean, there's been plenty of research that's been done on that to show a how that's not true. And the type of workers and partly like, there's more experts in that in that research field that have disproven that over time. And again, and there's even other research that talks about how countries with thriving economies, it's because they are thriving economies, because they have a growing immigrant population all the time. They have they continue that, like you're adding to the workforce, and that sort of thing. So there's plenty of other evidence to counter it. But, you know,   Michael Hingson  11:13 nevertheless, it gets promoted.   Peter Bloch Garcia  11:15 It is an important political wedge, it's promoted as a political wedge,   Michael Hingson  11:18 right? And I'm still looking for the jobs that they are taking, because most of the time when I hear about that I'm I'm sort of looking at people that I know. And I know a number of people who have come from other countries. And mostly, I haven't seen people who live here. And I guess, if we say, white people, or whatever, or are people who come from here, necessarily even wanting to work in those jobs, yeah, which is a little. Now my, my mystery about that is, of course, I've spent a lot of time in New York. And for the longest time, cab drivers were white guys and white women, and so on. And that's evolved. And I've never figured out exactly why that's the case, because it's just in the US. It's just the economics. But you know, but in general, I just don't see that as really being anyone's taking anyone's job.   Peter Bloch Garcia  12:20 Well, and I've heard the expression not as frequently as I did back then. But I still hear it from time to time. Often it's with In fact, just maybe three or four years ago, I was at this social gathering. And there were some high school students who were just graduating high school and applying to college. And one of the young men said, Well, I didn't get accepted, because they, they probably prioritize some students of color over me. And I was like, Really, though, like, it's an easy go to steal that, that folks of color have been getting privileges and special treatment that it's become on, the system's become unfair. However, when I used to, when I used to challenge people, I did not challenge that young man. He wasn't I just overheard his conversation I was like, right. But I would often say to people, well, if there was so many more advantages for folks of color to go to college, and or over employment opportunities, why are they so why are the numbers so low in college? Why are the numbers so low in terms of percentages of employment, for folks of color, in fact, it's, you know, for African Americans, no matter what the what the the unemployment rate is, nationally, historically, African Americans have always had twice the level of unemployment, whether in good times or bad times, economically, their unemployment is twice the rate for white populations. So there's, there's lots of other evidence of it not being you know, that there's still systemic challenges with racial equity, but yet, the myths and the beliefs of people still hold on and come up.   Michael Hingson  14:19 Of course, we're dealing with, in this case, race and so on. Whereas if we really want to get to statistics, we could deal with persons with disabilities whose unemployment rate is something close to 20 times what it is for so called Able bodied people, and it is just as much a prejudicial issue, whereas the reality is, it isn't that we can't do the work. So we're not given the opportunity to do the work.   Peter Bloch Garcia  14:48 Right. And, and, you know, do you do you know, if within the disabilities population or the disabled populations, the intersectionality of race within that is that Like if if a disabled person is is disabled white person has a 20%? Or what how did you how did you say   Michael Hingson  15:09 20 times as much? The unemployment rate typically is between 65 and 70%. Yeah. Is it as it defines it? Is it different based on race? Oh, there are definite differences.   Peter Bloch Garcia  15:21 Probably I suspect there is. But given that I'm curious, just curious.   Michael Hingson  15:27 But the overall, I think the overall number from census and yeah, so Security Administration and others is, is that number is it is a different? racially? I don't have the statistics, but I think I have heard that it is. So you're not going to find that. A look. I know blind people who are very prejudiced against people who are black. Yeah. And it's an extremely unfortunate. We know that's a learned behavior. Right. Personally speaking. Not having ever seen color. It doesn't matter to me a single solitary bit. But it is it is an issue that we we encounter. Yeah. And we've got to get over that somehow. And the whole immigration thing is such a problem, because we have allowed it to become political, which makes it even worse. To to deal with.   Peter Bloch Garcia  16:24 Yeah, yeah. For sure.   Michael Hingson  16:26 How do we how do we deal with the immigration thing? Do you have any thoughts?   Peter Bloch Garcia  16:31 Well, to me, the anti immigrant views are one form of racism. In fact, there's a there's a guy I know. And I'm forgetting I'm totally blanking on his name right now. Oh, no. Got it. Eric Ward, Eric Ward, who? I think he's currently the Executive Director of that lost the name I have may come up with it later. Eric Ward, had done research that showed how there was a symbiotic social relationship between the rise in anti immigrant speech and media coverage, leading to violence against African American people and other races. And I think, Raisa Yeah, well, right. Right, right. And we probably saw that play out. We will we all saw it play out more. So during the the racist and the racially biased and statements that the former person who's currently under indictments   Michael Hingson  17:51 who shall not be named.   Peter Bloch Garcia  17:54 Right, when he would say these things, there was an increase in hate crimes, you know, people being accosted at gas stations and, and things So. So. So I think of, you know, anti immigrant sentiment, being an extension of racist views, mindsets and values. And so in order for us to address anti immigrant mentalities and thinking, we have to address the root causes of racism. And I think within that, we have to look at how do we help individual people learn? How do we shape or restructure or reshape our organizational systems have, you know, our nonprofit organizations, that's where I've been spending a lot, so many of my years working in and thinking about how to use those spaces of organizational structure to undo racism. And then there's the systemic level, that racial inequity is perpetuated from the policies and the systems that have excluded or set barriers for equal access. So so in order to, to address it, it's sort of a three pronged strategy, I believe. Yeah, not and I would say also, at the, at the beginning place, for the individual level, is learning about racial bias, because there's a lot more research and writing just about I'd say, in the last four years, there's more books that are coming out than ever before when I was young. That's partly why I didn't have any language to understand my world around me that right, but yet, there's been so much more great work that's been done in this field, and more and more books coming out in the last four years than ever I've seen in my life.   Michael Hingson  19:53 What's unfortunate is that in some quarters, people want to ban books. I mean, there there's a lot of there's a lot The value in what To Kill a Mockingbird teaches. Yeah, and, and similar books and yet people want to get rid of those. And that is just crazy.   Peter Bloch Garcia  20:10 It is the To Kill a Mockingbird one in particular. I'm a huge fan of having been an English teacher actually not just because of that, but when I I used to have to teach it To Kill a Mockingbird is a frequently taught book in like eighth or ninth grade, right. And every year I would teach it, and I swore I don't know, I probably read the book like 10 times. And every time I would read it, I would see a new insight into Oh, my God, look what she was doing. Look what Harper Lee was, was raising with that story. So I'm a huge fan of it. And I think though to to that point about book banning, I think that's partly the how the power structure of the system, as we're going through these social changes, with the emergence of more consciousness, more intentionality, to eliminate racism, you know, that thank God for the Black Lives Matter movement. Thank God for the me to movement. And all of these, these these social reckonings that have been happening, I'd say, really, more so than in the last six years. I think that there's more more of the, the white privilege mentality that is desperately wanting to hold on because they see it as a loss, they see it if if we give those people of color, the same thing, I'm going to lose something, right. So they are striking out at anything that they think is going to challenge the system, the status quo, or the system or their privilege. And so that's where I think some of the, in fact, I swear, I just saw a post on social media about librarians, getting harassed and called names from folks who are wanting them to banned books in our library. So kids are not exposed to these sorts of ideas.   Michael Hingson  22:11 I am a great fan of and collect old radio shows as a hobby. And I think that it is part of our history. And some of it, from time to time reflects racism. One of my favorite shows, and I'll explain why is Amos and Andy, which is about two black guys. And I've had an opportunity to interact with one of the foremost experts on Amos and Andy, some time ago. And for me, my history with Amos and Andy is that Bob long before I really understood a lot about old radio. I grew up watching Amos and Andy on television. Well, you know, I didn't see the colors, but I didn't even know they were black. And I didn't even understand all of that. Okay, so anyway, I learned later that it was taken off television, because black people objected to being portrayed that way. And I can appreciate that intellectually looking back on it. But I asked this expert from the the, the whole issue of Amos and Andy. So when did they stop? Really referring to Amos and Andy is black. And what she said was basically, it started out that way, when Amos and Andy came to New York, they asked where all the dark people lived, and so on. But by 1937, it wasn't even talked about. They were just there they were characters, and yes, they had the voices they did. But there wasn't really a lot of reference to black or white or anything else. And you could draw your own inferences. And I know a lot of people did. But it across the board as a radio program was extremely entertaining, and came up with a lot of very good plots that people reacted to, in fact, on Saturdays during the matinees people would the this, the theater, people would cut off the film so that everybody could listen to Amos and Andy. Hmm. And and I appreciate the problems with the show from that the standpoint of race, but at the same time, it was something that across the board was very entertaining to people, but now we see discussions of well, we can't have that our libraries. We should get rid of that. That doesn't help either.   Peter Bloch Garcia  24:35 Right. Yeah. Well, and you're reminding me of so one of the ways that racial bias has been perpetuated has been through media. Right? In fact, I mean, there's much more research of late on this looking back at movies and television shows and and I was I remember thinking about this a few years ago when my my kids were young. And I thought, Oh, I'm going to I'm going to look up those movies that I enjoyed as a kid. And I'll watch them with my kids. And so I watched them. And I was stunned at how many racial stereotypes they would they would portray in these movies. And I'm like, Oh, heck, I can't share that. And that's, but we just grew up with it. Right? It was that's part of where our racial biases come from the images, the stereotypes that were used throughout media, and similar within the nonprofit sector, actually, I kind of think the nonprofit sector has perpetuated racial stereotypes as, as all folks of color are poor. Because most of the time, I mean, this is the whole premise of of fundraising, for nonprofits, as they put pictures of the very small percentage that they're actually serving of the kids of color, or colleges. And universities do this all the time. It's the they find the few kids of color in their organization, and they put their pictures up there, and they go, they tell the sad story, oh, this poor child, he had all these disabilities or challenges and, you know, setbacks and, and we turn their life around and give to us so that we can, you know, keep doing that. But it's perpetuating a deficit based story, right, and a stereotype in that set entire industry. And I'm seeing there's actually, and I'm, I'm not remembering his name, but there's a guy, I think he does a TED talk. But he's been developing this work around asset framing. And he he talks about it as the media is that as the news, he goes into journalism, I think his angles, about that, of how here's an example of the way the traditional story talks about communities of color, from a very deficit based, there's always problems Oh, the crime or the blah, blah, blah. And then he illustrates how to how to change that it doesn't mean that there aren't still needs within and disproportionality within communities of color. But there's a way to frame that that is what he calls sort of his asset framing. So that's another area that's emerging more and more so these days that I think is helpful.   Michael Hingson  27:29 But I think the issue also has to be in part, that we can't deny our history, what we should do is learn from it. And so taking programs like Amos and Andy away, and just denying that they existed, doesn't help either. Well, and   Peter Bloch Garcia  27:45 but it has to be brought forward as a as a learning opportunity. Right. And, and, in fact, Michael, I think, you know, I'm still, I still continue to be surprised at what how little or we received in our high school, or college history courses about the inclusion of people of color in history,   Michael Hingson  28:11 or, or any minority group. Right,   Peter Bloch Garcia  28:14 right. And, and, and, like, in fact, there's a woman, Roxanne Dunbar Ortiz, she's written a number of books, one of them in particular is the Indigenous People's History of the United States. And I only just read this maybe a year or two ago. And it was mind blowing, I had no idea. And I'm somewhat fairly informed by other things I've read about Native American, you know, information in books and literature, but it's still eye opening. There's such a rich history of within our diverse populations that has been excluded.   Michael Hingson  28:53 Yeah. And we shouldn't do that. But we do. We we, in our high school environment, don't discuss it didn't discuss it. Right. I hope it's better than it was. I have not taken high school history lately. But I'm aware that there is so much that we didn't discuss and refuse to really look at the rich history that all of us, whether it's race, persons with disabilities, and recognizing all of the things that that people have contributed. One of the poll, most famous cardiac surgeons in the early 1900s was Jacob Lawton, who was blind. You know, and there's so many others, and there are so many different people who have contributed to our country, and they're not all white men. And there's no reason that we should be excluding those other than some improperly placed attitude, shall we say?   Peter Bloch Garcia  29:55 Yeah, well, and Michael, I'm wondering, I got a question for you. What As a couple years ago, I felt like I was seeing more disabilities. Inclusion around the term when organizations and people were talking about D i diversity, equity and inclusion, they were adding another lever, was it I forget which letter it was useability. A, was it a thing so and so it was being more included a couple years ago, but I'm not hearing so much about it being included. These Well,   Michael Hingson  30:35 the problem with saying diversity, equity, inclusion, and accessibility doesn't deal with it. So that deals with part of the issue with for persons with disabilities, if you will, but the issue still comes down to social acceptance, issues still comes down to equals, and I and I realized that the term disability has an implication. But we have totally warped the concept as far as I am concerned, of diversity. When you talk to people about diversity, they'll talk to you about race, gender, sexual orientation, social class, and so on. You don't hear discussions of disability, which is why inclusion has gotten to be part of it. Yeah, but then they want to add in accessibility. But again, that is a nebulous term. So accessibility is as relevant for Latino people or black people, it is for persons with disabilities in that sense. And so we need to change our definition, if you will, of disability, and include it directly in the discussion. Or another way to put it is if you're truly going to call yourself inclusive, then you have to be inclusive, you can't be partially inclusive. It either is or it isn't. And I tend to believe in the quantum orientation of the word either you're inclusive, which means you're going to involve disabilities as well, or you're not inclusive at all, you can't have it both ways.   Peter Bloch Garcia  32:05 Right? Yeah. And so   Michael Hingson  32:09 I think there's there continues to be a significant effort. There are places where it's getting better, New York announced some about a month ago, that and it's not going to happen instantly, there's a lot to be done to make it happen. I forget his 2045 or 2050, or something, but they're going to make 95% of all the subway stations in New York City wheelchair accessible. And that's a major undertaking to do, given that a lot of those subway stations were not, and are very difficult to make accessible. So that's a major commitment. On the other hand, are they going to hire blind architects to help make that happen? Because they are blind architects? Are they going to do other things? There's, there's a lot to the process. Yeah, yeah. And so I'm not I'm not trying to leave out persons of race or whatever, or different races, as opposed to blind people. But we need to get back to really expecting and demanding equity and inclusion across the board.   Peter Bloch Garcia  33:14 Yeah, yeah. For sure, you,   Michael Hingson  33:17 you talk a lot about racial equity and inclusion and climate change. Tell me something about that, why you bring the two together?   Peter Bloch Garcia  33:28 Well, for me,   Peter Bloch Garcia  33:32 for a couple of reasons, actually. But, you know, for me, I think at this stage of my life, where I want to spend my efforts and energy is to address racism and climate change, because I think there are two root problems or root roots to so many other issues, that if we, I like to think about getting upstream or to the root of an issue, so that if we can fix that, then so many other things will will improve consequent to that. And for climate change. You know, if we don't, as humans address climate change and reverse it, the predictions, the scientific predictions are so severe, that, you know, college access to college education kind of won't matter because the college might be underwater, when the seas as the seas continue to rise, you know, like, that's just one. There's so I'm kind of being facetious about that, but but   Peter Bloch Garcia  34:39 not all three.   Peter Bloch Garcia  34:42 And so, for me, part of the the view is that it if we don't reverse climate change, there are going to be so many other catastrophes from hurricanes to forest fires can Continue devastation, that it will wreak havoc on so many of our other people's lives and our systems, that some of the other issues kind of won't matter so much not that they aren't important, I'm just saying that people are going to be so strapped we, as human beings around the world or, you know, we're facing more droughts, etc, when basic needs are not going to be met. So we need to at the same time address climate change, but how I connect these two, and why they are connected, is, is that racism at its root is about power. And I think the same sort of mindset or thinking that is, the foundational beliefs or mindsets of racism, are about power in the same way that has led us down the system's paths towards creation of climate change, like the if we which which are about a power, exploitation control. There's there's so many different factors and variables to it. But I see the two definitely in are interlinked. And even so, in addition to that, I guess I'd say, there's, there's plenty of other research that's been describing this is that people of color, historically have always had a disproportionate disproportion disproportionate environmental impact from pollution from where they live, where their housing is built upon waste sites, or air pollution quality. In the city of Seattle, there's one of the poorest neighborhoods where life expectancy is nine years lower than if you just drive 20 minutes to the wealthier neighborhood where the families in that neighborhood are. And that's because of the air pollution, the air pollution is so severe in the poor neighborhood, which is mostly folks of color, that, that it's affecting their health in just a short distance away, right. So there's always been that disproportional environment or environmental exposure. And our systems have not necessarily changed that. And that's where climate change is continuing to impact folks of color more so as a frontline impact as climate change continues to increase. For more folks of color percentages of folks of color are going to be experiencing the impact sooner and more severely.   Michael Hingson  37:41 So what kinds of things are you doing to advance dealing with these issues?   Peter Bloch Garcia  37:45 Well, so with with climate change, I have done some work here in Washington before we formed a few years ago, we formed a coalition of bipoc coalition called front and center. And we worked with other mainstream environmental organizations to propose legislation. That was we came up with a more racially equitable policy proposal, we tried to work on it legislatively at the time in Olympia here in Washington State, we we didn't get it passed that legislatively. So then we organized a statewide ballot initiative. It was close, but it still didn't pass. But but those were some of the kinds of in that coalition continues to work today. And so I'm involved in another environmental organization and that sort of thing. But most of my time has been, because like I say, I don't believe that. I believe that these two things are so intertwined, that most of my time lately has been spent on anti racism work that will also benefit and lead to systems change. For climate issues.   Michael Hingson  39:00 Do you think that we need to somehow completely tear down the process that we're using and start over? Can we can we make progress with doing things the way we are to promote racial and other kinds of difference equity, if you will, as well as dealing with climate change? Or maybe climate change can help lead us to the other?   Peter Bloch Garcia  39:25 So had you asked me this question? Maybe four years ago? I would have I would be giving you a different answer. I think four years ago, I would have said, I don't have a lot of belief or hope in the existing system, that it's going to be able to change enough in my lifetime. But what I'm seeing on a broad scale, and in talking to folks about there is been finally what I never thought I would see in my lifetime Is some social reckoning around race. And even even some of the opinion polling is starting to shift focus on on their understanding of climate change. In fact, it was maybe only just about six years ago, I attended a chamber of commerce conference, and one of the keynote speakers at this conference, you know, it was mostly for profit corporations, lobbyists and different elected leaders across different levels of our regional and local governments. And the keynote speaker was saying how he said, it doesn't matter. His talk was about how, even if you personally as your business does not believe that climate change is real, you're going to have to, to change your opinion, because more people believe it's true, whether or not you think it is or not, but that was only six years ago, right. And similarly, in the same way that we have anti rhetoric constantly in our politics, that's shaping public opinion, we have had an enormous amount of, of misinformation about climate change climate change deniers, politicians, claiming that it was, you know, it was a hoax from China or whatever, you know, it was, we've had so much of that influence. But even that has started to change. And some more of the folks who have claimed before in at the federal level are finally seeing the impacts like in Florida, that how they cannot continue denying the impact of climate change that's happening right on their shores, you know. So so there's some of that, but that that's what I've seen starting to change in the last few years, and especially around race, there does seem to be a social reckoning, a desire from people wanting to change to learn. Whereas my own racial bias, there was that book that came out, and it's getting more and more broadly read the book, white fragility. And it's, I think it's really helping people see things that like, oh, yeah, we cannot continue down this road. Look what it's led us to, we have to change course. There was a part of your question, I didn't answer that. What was what was the question again?   Michael Hingson  42:31 Why is there air? I think the question basically was, oh, burn it all down? Do we burn it all down on start over?   Peter Bloch Garcia  42:42 And that's where so so I similarly, I would have said six years ago, when I used to do more direct lobbying work or direct policy advocacy work, that there was such a lack of understood fundamental understanding about racial inequity. Like, I would talk to potential candidates who were running for elected office and do interviews with them and say, What's your view on racial equity? And what would you do if you got elected to advance it? And nine times out of 10, they didn't know what I meant by racial equity. But these days in the last several years, I'd say, I'm starting to see much more understanding the policies that are coming out of our legislature are. In fact, in fact, some of the advocacy and lobbying started to shift a little bit of when when I was going with in coalition's to talk to policymakers, and we'd say, Okay, we like this, we want to support this issue. But we want it to include some aspects that will address the racial inequity in this issue. And they'd say, Oh, okay, that sounds great. But what should it be? So so then we would come up with their recommendations to make it more racially equitable. But that was a new thing. And now, I'd say in the last four years, more and more elected folks are coming up with, you know, talking to folks in the community, asking for their solutions, so that they can make new new policies and new improved systems to break down the barriers that have been in place that have perpetuated. So these days, I'm much more optimistic that the system is finally moving in a way that is going to start undoing it, self and improving. But secondly, I guess I've come to the belief, Michael, that our systems are so massive, our organizational structures are so entrenched, that we would never be able to tear them all down, that we have to work within the structures that we are given and that's where so my work around antiracism has been focusing on. There's this whole sector of nonprofit organizations and structures. So How do we work within the structure because some of those structures actually have some value, there were some aspects of structural things that were supposed to be in place to, you know, to ensure that nonprofit organizations had some level of assurances or accountability that their missions were going to benefit the public. Right. It was a, some sort of checks and balance. But the way the how the organization's were implementing is where the the perpetuation of racism has been occurring. So I'm still working within the system of nonprofit structures to shift the way that people think about how it shows up, what does racism and power show up within our existing structures? And how can we work within that to make to, to do things better, or undo racism?   Michael Hingson  45:55 So I have a couple questions. Let me start with with this one, which is kind of more general and it just came to mind, we tend to let's talk about climate change, as an example, we tend to not want to pay attention to or deal with things that collect well, that don't affect us directly. And so climate change is a very existential thing. How do we, in our educational system, for example, start teaching people to be more curious? And to look a little bit farther than just their own psyche? And I, I can think of, of answers to that question. And it depends on where in the country you live, because some people have beliefs that are so entrenched, that there's just no discussing it. Yeah. And as you point out, there are places where there's a little bit more open to openness to it, but it still is an issue that we're going to have to deal with. And you talked about climate change, look at what's going on in California. Yes, all of the fires with the Colorado River, now being where it is, and Lake Mead is 27% of where it normally is. And we're going to have to figure out these things. And I suppose some people can say, well, you can blame it on climate change, but it's natural. Well, it's not natural, right, in the scheme of what we need to do or can do to address it. So how do we get people to be more open and look beyond themselves a little bit?   Peter Bloch Garcia  47:29 The last part of that question for me is about undoing racism. Because being an anti racist is about caring about other people. It is about its fundament anti racism is fundamentally about love. You know, when Dr. King talked about the beloved community, it's a creation of a caring community. And it's a recognition that my, my, my future is completely intertwined with your future. And that we have a mutual inextricable interconnectedness in our in a shared positive future, right. That value or that it's almost like a value that we need to teach. Right. But how you teach that is it's something I continue to experiment with in my work with nonprofits, right? Sometimes I draw from Dr. Keen kings writing, but also Bell Hooks, one of her books called all about love talks about love and an aspect of within society, within family within within organizations. But there's the other part of your question, that is exactly what some researchers are grappling with trying to figure out. Why is it that we as human beings, they sit you know, that they've they've recognized that that because climate change is, you don't see it happen? I don't know how to say this very well. I'm not saying this very well. Climate change has been happening, but it's been happening over time and so slowly, that sometimes it's been hard for people to recognize it right when it's happening, but it's accumulating so much like you say in California, that it's undeniable, right? It's speeding up, and it's speeding up. And I just heard this, my wife and I'm not going to remember the name of it, but she had me listen with her to to a news program. I can't remember if it was an NPR program. And it was this story. Was it Lake Mead was that the lake that completely dried up, there's a lake in California that did completely dry up a few years back.   Michael Hingson  49:49 Not like me, but there are some so I'm not sure which one was in the program.   Peter Bloch Garcia  49:55 There was it was one that dried up a few years back already and completely. But what, what what happened? He goes in and I had never heard of this, right? I was like, Oh my God, how did I never hear this before? Because he's he talks about he's the story he's starting with is how Salt Lake is drying up. Right? And the ramifications of if Salt Lake completely dries up what a disaster it will be, it will be a disaster to the families who make a living whose economy depends on it, not just the the birds and the species, etc. But he also goes and says he tells the story about this other lake in California that did dry up and it caused so many other disasters and the impact of it was so massive, it's the state of California had to spend like billions of dollars for the ramifications of of that one lake drank drying up. And that was small compared to what Salt Lake is.   Michael Hingson  50:57 Well in Lake Mead is fed by the Colorado River, which is why it is so low compared to where it normally is because the water just isn't there.   Peter Bloch Garcia  51:06 Yes. Well, and that's part of what he said. Like I think I thought this was fascinating in his story where 70% I think he said of Salt Lake is from the reason it's shrinking. The reason is shrinking 70% of the reason it's shrinking is because the rivers that feed Salt Lake is being diverted. Right. And that's in it's being diverted for agricultural reasons, which is important. But that's again, a systemic challenge, because we have had the technology to to implement agriculturally, to be more to ensure that the water that we are using for irrigation systems will be more efficient and not wasted. But we haven't really implemented that.   Michael Hingson  51:53 Right. Tell me about the nonprofits that you work with. And you started one I believe,   Peter Bloch Garcia  52:00 Oh, yeah, I well. I've helped start a few of them. But what the one that that I talk most about? From my end, I've learned so much from getting started a few years back is called the Latino community fund Washington State. I started that when I was working in in the foundation world where there was some research that came out that pointed out how foundations everybody assumes that Oh, foundations give money to all these poor folks of color, right? Well, in reality, foundations were only giving 1.3% of their foundation grant dollars to Latino nonprofit organizations, all communities of color combined, it was only 8.6, which is significantly disproportionate to the size of the populations for the inequities in the systems. And so a few of us started up what's called Latino community fund in Washington State to try and see what we could do to move more resources to Latino programs and organizations here in the state.   Michael Hingson  53:05 So what are you doing today, primarily?   Peter Bloch Garcia  53:08 So, I mean, I continue to support Latino community fund. But mostly as I've been working in different nonprofits, I've been serving as a Interim Executive Director. Currently, I'm working for one called the mockingbird society, actually, a reference to Harper Lee's, To Kill a Mockingbird. And its mission is to eliminate youth homelessness, and transform the foster system to one of caring and doing that with a lens of racial disproportionality. And so what I've been doing it within these kinds of organizations, and I do some consulting projects, from time to time, working with boards, working with staff, to work within the structure of the nonprofit organization to to adopt an anti racist practice, to move towards an anti racist culture of the organization that all people in the organization can be happy health healthy and thrive, as well as how they deliver either programs services in the community, or how they engage and develop the organ of the community that they're working in. In fact, I just came out with an article that I co authored. I think I just sent you the link to it. Now, if you can't access it, let me know and I might be able to find some other way to share it with you. But a few months ago, like for Well, let me back up the story a little bit because it was where were these notions had been coming from and why I focus on this so much of my work is part of my story of you know, I think when I When I was working, when I started working in foundations, I was they were miserable places to work. But I also started a graduate graduate school program. And in that program, they had a series of courses on leadership. And I think at that time, I had assumed that leadership meant the people at the top of the hierarchy, as commonly what that definition meant. In my leadership courses, I was doing all this reading and a part of the program to realize, oh, leadership is actually a set of behaviors or actions that people do wherever you are within structures, whether it's society, whether it's in an organization, whether it's in a family, or your neighborhood, or wherever. So I remember thinking, Hmm, oh, okay, well, maybe I'm a leader. Maybe that means does that mean I'm a leader, right. And so over the years, then I started looking at, like, around me in the organizations that I was at, and especially when these organizational cultures were so toxic, so painful places to work. I was trying to figure out well, why, you know, they have this wonderful mission statement, or externally, they're seen as having such a great purpose. But yet inside, it was a toxic, horrible place to be. Right. It was like the opposite of their own mission and stated values. So I've spent many years trying to figure out like, what do we do about that? Again, back to your earlier question of within this structure, how can we make it better? And that's where I use a lot of the draw, I draw from a lot of the previous work that others have done, especially around identifying characteristics of white supremacy culture, you know, I think what is there's like 15 or 16 of those, and the work that they've done, folks, prior to me, learning about them have done to identify what are the antidotes to white supremacy culture. And that's where I think there is also a complete alignment of the antidotes to white supremacy, culture, with the effective leadership behaviors and practices. And so that's where I'm working on trying to empower more Latino leadership for folks to see themselves in that and to step into it, right, but to have some understanding of it based on the values that are also going to advance anti racism. And that's where I've been working with a friend of mine. And working with a friend of mine, Tanya, you know, Gonzalez, and we came out with a podcast series ourselves called adelante leadership. And we're interviewing a whole series of folks that are unrecognized, often unrecognized Latino community leaders, but having them share their wisdom, knowledge and experience to inspire and encourage others. And similarly, about when was it earlier this year, a lot of this thinking and work I've done with friends and colleagues in the nonprofit space led me to put on a workshop at the Washington nonprofit conference called applying anti racist leadership across the whole organization. And that workshop led to me co authoring a piece that just came out yesterday with a title very similar to that.   Michael Hingson  58:40 The reality is that if we really talk about leadership, and we look at leaders who are recognized, because maybe they lead companies, and so on, and they're the, the ultimate people in charge are the people who direct the smart leaders are the ones who know when to give up leadership to other people in the organization, because those people have specific expertise or gifts, that make them more able to strengthen part of the organization. And the wise leaders, the one that knows how to essentially what I'm saying is create a team where everybody can contribute and feel like that they can contribute.   Peter Bloch Garcia  59:26 And that example, is one of the antidotes to white supremacy culture. Sure, it is about sharing power. We you know, the example you're citing to me sounds like sharing power and that's where, you know, the, the, the, but not all, but right the people who are the CEO of an organization if they don't have sort of an awareness about power, because it they will never even be consciously or intentional to to share it because that's right Talk in the same way that racism is the default. So is hoarding power is the default?   Michael Hingson  1:00:07 Sure it is. And it makes you and the organization a whole lot less effective. When to use your terms you hoard power. Yeah, rather than recognizing the gifts that everyone has. And you talk about love and joy and healing, as being part of what one needs to do to deal with improving equity across the board. And the the good leader is joyous in finding other people who can add value to what they do. And for me, I've led organizations and one of the things that I say to most people and other people on this podcast have heard me say it before is, my job isn't to tell you what to do. My job is to add value to enhance what you do. You and I will figure that out together. Right? Absolutely, then that's what we really need to do is find more ways to work together, and we've got to make it a volitional process. Or we're, we're going to be in a real world of hurt, and it's going to become worse as time goes by, whether it's with climate change, racial or Yeah, attitudinal toward persons with disabilities or whatever the case happens to be.   Peter Bloch Garcia  1:01:17 Absolutely. Right. Right. And that's where for me, I think, fundamentally, you're reminding me, Michael, it's like, why, why this is important, these issues are important to me, is because at least if we can make some progress, it will reduce the pain and the harm and the hurt so that maybe more people will surely have opportunities to experience more happiness and joy. That everybody, that should be mental, right?   Michael Hingson  1:01:47 It should be. And we've got to get over thinking that we're better because they're different than us. Yes. So much. Well, Peter, tell me how can people reach out to you maybe learn more about you or find ways to work with you? And so on? Oh,   Peter Bloch Garcia  1:02:08 gosh, well, so I'm on Facebook and LinkedIn. Peter Bloch Garcia B L O C H oftentimes, P because it's pronounced block, but it's spelled with a ch instead, people often mix that up. Yes. But you know, any, I'm always responding to people on that reach out to me on LinkedIn or Facebook. They can find out more about the work I'm doing with my friend Tanya. on Atlantic leadership. It's Adelante leadership.com. They can find our jeeze, like to write it out.   Peter Bloch Garcia  1:02:53 It's a test. It is.   Peter Bloch Garcia  1:02:56 It is it's like, right, actually, because,   Michael Hingson  1:03:03 Oh, it's okay. Yeah,   Peter Bloch Garcia  1:03:05 A D, E, L, A, N, T, E, and then leadership all together as one word. Right? Yeah. Adelante means to like, kind of push forward to go forward. It's got sort of a, a sentiment in Spanish. That's, that's an encouragement to, you know, advance. And so, and we're kind of combining it trying to do some of these interviews, both in English and Spanish, so that it's a bilingual podcast. But it's adelanteleadership as one word.com.   Michael Hingson  1:03:42 And you're gonna say something about the podcast? How people can listen. Oh, right.   Peter Bloch Garcia  1:03:48 Yeah. And the podcasts are also available wherever podcasts like on Spotify or Apple, whatever platforms that people access podcasts they can find Atlantic leadership on   Michael Hingson  1:04:05 if people feel that they might be able to contribute to it, how can they explore being guests,   Peter Bloch Garcia  1:04:11 they can email us at, I think there's a mechanism on the website, but also other people have reached out to me through LinkedIn or Facebook. They have emailed me that way, too. I think we have a Facebook or LinkedIn adelante page. No, I know we have. I know we have an unrelenting LinkedIn page. Maybe that's where I've had some people reach out that I'm talking to this one young woman. She's, uh, I don't know how old she is. Dang, she's smart, young, Latina, like PhD, etc. That she just came across us on the internet on social media and emailed us. Cool. Yeah.   Michael Hingson  1:04:55 Well, I want to thank you for being here. And I want to continue this in the future. Sure, I'm sure there's going to be more that we can talk about. So I hope that we get you to come back on maybe you and Tanya both ought to come back on at some point. And because I'd love to continue this discussion, it's been fascinating. And I've learned a lot, and I hope others have as well. So I'm really glad that you were able to be here. And all of you listening, wherever you are, please reach out to Peter and learn more about Atlanta leadership.com. And learn more about the efforts that are going on and help all of us get rid of these prejudices around difference, because it doesn't matter whether you're dealing with race, or disabilities, or any topic that identifies somebody is different than somebody else, we've got to get rid of it. We've got to start recognizing we're all on the same planet, and we need to work together. So, Peter, thank you, but also, again, all of you, thank you. If you'd like to comment on today's podcast, please do so. You can email me at Michaelhi at accessibe A C C E S S I B E.com. Or go to the podcast page, Michael hingson H i n g s o n.com/podcast. Or, again, wherever you find this podcast. And as Peter said, wherever you can find podcasts. And I would ask that you give us a five star rating, please say positive things and give us a great rating. We appreciate it. Your comments and your thoughts are what help us. If you know of anyone else who should be a guest on our podcast, please let us know. And we would be glad to talk with you and them about that. So once again, Peter, thank you very much for being here with us today.   Peter Bloch Garcia  1:06:46 Thank you for having me. It's my pleasure.   Michael Hingson  1:06:53 You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

Resilience and Resistance Podcast
Blanca Perez-Solarte

Resilience and Resistance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 49:24


Marisol's mom, Blanca, joins the podcast to talk family history, growing up in poverty along the US/Mexico border, teenage pregnancy, hard work, her love of Kool-Aid, and finding joy regardless of the circumstances. Blanca's story includes being born and raised in Mission, TX in a three-room home without running water. Largely raised by her grandparents who were field workers, her parents met one another while also working in the cotton fields of the Rio Grande valley in Texas. Blanca's mother gave birth to her at age 16 and became a single mother soon after as Blanca's father José left the family when Blanca and her brother Joe (José) were still toddlers. The neighborhood where Blanca was raised was a tight-knit community where outgrown shoes that no longer served one family were given to another family equally in need. It was also the location of a factory that previously manufactured toxic pesticides that are now illegal to use. The danger of the site was unknown to the surrounding community, and when the plant closed the neighborhood used the empty, contaminated structure to hold mercados. The neighborhood children regularly played in the toxic dirt and abandoned pesticide containers. As a result, many residents still struggle with cancers, birth defects, and other illnesses related to the toxic exposure. Blanca tells the story of finding and reuniting with her father at age 14. With the help of her tia, Blanca finds her father and grandmother living in nearby Progreso, TX. She continued to have a relationship with her father since that time and encouraged her brother Joe to have a relationships with him as well.Blanca's mother Guadalupe left for Illinois for work when Blanca was eight, leaving her with her grandparents until she made the move to Illinois at 13. It was moving to a mostly white community that she first experienced prejudice. It was in Carpentersville that Blanca met Marisol's ‘nerdy jock' dad after he recently immigrated to the US from Colombia. Blanca became pregnant with Marisol at 15 and gave birth to her at 16. Marisol's father was 17. Being a single mom, Blanca was forced to drop out of high school but earned her GED when she was 20.Marisol was four when her parents got married, and she was the flower girl—and ring thief! The family moved in together for the first time and saved for a house before they got pregnant with another child. To be able to have a home and be able to provide for her children, as opposed to her childhood, brought Blanca great joy. The loss of her grandfather, also named Guadalupe, who was a loving father figure throughout her life, is the most difficult experience Blanca has faced. Finally, Marisol and Blanca also reminisce about the old neighborhood. And, no, Blanca will never leave Carpentersville—which she affectionately (and correctly) calls the ‘hood. They also talk through how being a young mom has impacted their mother-daughter relationship. Watch this episode here - https://youtu.be/6hNgkMCod90Instagram: @Resilience_and_ResistanceLinks:Marisol's website: https://www.marisolerlacher.com/LinkedIn: Marisol - www.linkedin.com/in/marisol-solarte-erlacherIf you are interested in Marisol Solarte-Erlacher supporting your business or organization by speaking or training on topics such as Work Trauma for BIPOC women, Racial Battle Fatigue, supporting mental health in traumatic times, and building resilience in employees and resilient leadership in BIPOC women. Contact her directly at marisol@marisolerlacher.com if you want to learn more.Check out exclusive offers from from our sponsorshttps://www.theplug-agency.com/sponsorsProduction CreditsArt: Maite Nazario | http://www.maitenazario.comMusic: Inte-Gritty by Bianca MikahnPodcast Editing and Production: https://www.theplug-agency.comDistribution by: The Plug Podcast Network - https://art19.com/nSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Podcast Red Inka + Audio Libros
03.07.52 Los Miserables de Victor Hugo (3ra Parte: Marius - Libro séptimo: El culo del gato - Cap 02 El fondo más bajo)

Podcast Red Inka + Audio Libros

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 4:57


Los Miserables Autor: Víctor Hugo Tercera Parte: Marius Libro séptimo El culo del gato Cap II : El fondo más bajo. Ahí se desvanece el desinterés. Se esboza vagamente el demonio; cada cual para sí. El yo sin ojos aúlla, busca, tantea y roe. El Ugolino social está en esa sima. A las siluetas hoscas que andan rondando por ese foso, casi animales, casi fantasmas, no les interesa el progreso universal, nada saben ni de esa idea ni de ese nombre, sólo les preocupa saciarse individualmente. Carecen casi del todo de conciencia y llevan dentro una especie de eclipse que infunde temor. Tienen dos madres, ambas madrastras: la ignorancia y la miseria. Tienen un guía: la necesidad; y ninguna otra forma de satisfacerse que no sea el apetito. Son brutalmente voraces, es decir, feroces, no como el tirano, sino como el tigre. Esas larvas pasan del sufrimiento al crimen; filiación fatídica, engendramiento vertiginoso, lógica de la sombra. Lo que repta en el tercer foso social no es ya la exigencia ahogada de lo absoluto; es el manifiesto de la materia. Allí el hombre se vuelve dragón. Tener hambre, tener sed, es el punto de partida; ser Satanás es el punto de llegada. De esa cueva sale Lacenaire. Acabamos de ver, en el libro cuarto, uno de los compartimentos de la mina superior, de la gran zanja política, revolucionaria y filosófica. En ella, acabamos de decirlo, todo es noble, puro, digno, honrado. En ella es posible equivocarse, desde luego, pero el error es venerable porque implica un gran heroísmo. El conjunto de la labor que en ella se lleva a cabo tiene un nombre: Progreso. Ha llegado el momento de divisar otras profundidades, las profundidades repulsivas. Debajo de la sociedad, insistamos en ello, y hasta el día en que se disipe la ignorancia, estará la gran caverna del mal. Esa cueva se halla debajo de todas las otras y es la enemiga de todas. Es el odio sin excepción. En esa cueva no hay filósofos. Su puñal no afiló nunca una pluma. Su negrura no tiene relación alguna con la negrura sublime del escritorio. Los dedos nocturnos que se crispan bajo ese techo asfixiante no hojearon nunca un libro ni abrieron un periódico. Para Cartouche, Babeuf es un explotador; para Schinderhannes, Marat es un aristócrata. El objetivo de esa cueva es que todo se venga abajo. Todo. Incluidas las zanjas superiores, que aborrece. No se limita a minar con su repulsivo pulular el orden social actual; mina la filosofía, mina la ciencia, mina el derecho, mina el pensamiento humano, mina la civilización, mina la revolución, mina el progreso. Se llama, sencillamente, robo, prostitución, asesinato. Está hecha de tinieblas y quiere el caos. Su bóveda es de ignorancia. Todas las demás, las de arriba, no tienen sino un objetivo: suprimirla. A eso tienden, con todos sus órganos a un tiempo, tanto mejorando la realidad cuanto contemplando lo absoluto, la filosofía y el progreso. Si destruimos la cueva Ignorancia, destruiremos el topo Crimen. Recapitulemos en pocas palabras parte de lo que acabamos de escribir. El único peligro social es la Sombra. Humanidad equivale a Identidad. Todos los hombres son de la misma arcilla. No hay diferencia alguna, al menos aquí abajo, en la predestinación. La misma sombra antes; la misma carne durante, la misma ceniza después. Pero la ignorancia, si se amasa mezclada con esa arcilla humana, la vuelve negra. Esa negrura incurable se mete dentro del hombre y se convierte en el Mal.

Oso Trava Podcast
¿Cómo medir tu Progreso Personal?

Oso Trava Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 6:27


A la hora de fijarnos metas, tambien debemos fijar sus medidores, de no hacerlo no podremos ver progreso nunca, las metas binarias no funcionan para evolucionar. Aquí te comparto los tipos de metas que existe y cómo debes adaptar las tuyas para poder alcanzarlas más rápido y con más claridad.Si te gustó el episodio compártelo en Instagram y menciona a Oso como @osotravaSi te gusta el podcast, ¿podrías considerar dejar una breve reseña en Apple Podcasts / iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/oso-trava/id1549032591 Tarda menos de 60 segundos y realmente marca la diferencia para llegar a más gente. ¡También disfruto mucho de leer las reseñas!Para obtener notas del programa, links de lo que mencionó Oso y episodios anteriores, visita podcast.osotrava.com.Regístrate para recibir el newsletter de Oso Trava (Viernes de Cracks) por correo electrónico cracks.la/viernes.Sigue a Oso:Twitter: twitter.com/osotravaInstagram: instagram.com/osotravaYoutube: youtube.com/crackspodcast

Circularidad
Infraestructura Resiliente PROGRESO - Certificación Casa

Circularidad

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 21:07


En este episodio compartimos con Andrea Moreno, Coordinadora de Gestión Ambiental, Ingeniera Ambiental con una maestría en estrategias público privadas de Desarrollo Sostenible. Durante el episodio se presenta el proyecto Certificación casa para Guatemala, una certificación que permite a los proyectos de infraestructura desarrollarse bajo standares internacionales que mejoran las condiciones con el ambiente. El episodio invita a conocer más de la certificación para todos aquellos desarrolladores que quieran sumarse.

Mira quien Habla
Santiago Casas con Carlos Mira en Mira quién Habla 15-DIC-2022

Mira quien Habla

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 19:22


Entrevista de Carlos Mira en Mira quién Habla a Santiago Casas, analista económico de Libertad y Progreso, para hablar de economía.

Circularidad
Infraestructura Resiliente PROGRESO - Aguatemala

Circularidad

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 21:01


En este episodio nos acompaña Andrea Aldana, Coordinadora de Gestión Ambiental, Ingeniera Ambiental de Cementos Progreso. Nos platica del proyecto Aguatemala, desarrollado en el Departamento de Gestión Ambiental. Andrea explica como el agua es un recurso esencial para la supervivencia y el bienestar humano, siendo vital para la mayor parte de sectores de la economía y el desarrollo, por lo que se ha evaluado la importancia la correcta gestión del recurso a través del proyecto AGUATEMALA que permite contribuir al tratamiento de aguas residuales ordinarias, por medio de una combinación de tecnología verde-gris. Este diseño se adapta a las características topográficas y climáticas del país y su operación y mantenimiento es de bajo costo.

Convierte Más con Vilma
El progreso en ventas como mejor aliado en el 2023 | Ep. 889

Convierte Más con Vilma

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 5:48


Partiendo de que todo depende desde que óptica miramos las cosas, podremos ser fuentes de buscar soluciones y optimismo, o no. Como líderes en los negocios debemos aprender a mirar el progreso y el camino recorrido más allá de solo el resultado y justo de eso te hablo en este episodio, ¡Dale play y comparte si te gustó! RECURSOS ➡ La técnica más efectiva de ventas ➡ Diferencia entre marketing digital y growth marketing ➡ La profesión del futuro en marketing: Growth Marketer ➡ Táctica – Los disparadores de Marketing ➡ Certifícate en Growth Marketing ➡ Nuevas formas de vender más hoy en día en digital MÁS INFO: Este es el podcast de Vende Más con Vilma Núñez. Cada día te esperamos con un nuevo episodio lleno de ideas y tips de marketing y ventas que harán crecer tu negocio. Para más información, puedes consultar estos enlaces: ➡ Sitio web ➡ Cursos ➡ Plantillas y recursos ¡SÍGUENOS! ➡ Instagram: @Conviertemas + @Vilmanunez ➡ Facebook: Convierte Más + Vilma Nuñez ➡ TikTok: @VilmaNunez + @ConvierteMas ➡ YouTube: Vilma Núñez + Convierte Más ➡ Twitter: @VilmaNunez + @ConvierteMás ―――――――――――――――――――――――――――――――― Y no olvides suscribirte y valorar nuestro podcast ★★★★★ ――――――――――――――――――――――――――――――――

Primera Emisión con Pedro Ferriz de Con
AMLO intenta descarrilar la historia de México con su oscuridad: Pedro Ferriz

Primera Emisión con Pedro Ferriz de Con

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 9:44


Pedro Ferriz De Con en su Editorial señala que el presidente Andrés Manuel López Obrador con sus actos oscuros intenta descarrilar la historia de México de su futuro y de su progreso y asegura que les toca a los buenos mexicanos luchar y defender a México.

Desayunos Informativos Europa Press
El futuro económico y empresarial de Castilla y León | Progreso, Innovación y Desarrollo

Desayunos Informativos Europa Press

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 66:52


En esta nueva edición de los Encuentros Informativos de Europa Press, te ofrecemos un encuentro celebrado en el Museo Patio Herreriano de Valladolid que lleva por título 'El futuro económico y empresarial de Castilla y León | Progreso, Innovación y Desarrollo'. Para esta cita, contamos con la presencia de Carlos Fernández Carriedo, Consejero de Economía y Hacienda de la Junta de Castilla y León; Lorenzo Amor, Vicepresidente de la CEOE y Presidente de ATA; y Santiago Aparicio, Presidente de la CEOE Castilla y León. Podemos escuchar a todos ellos, en un coloquio moderado por la delegada de Europa Press en Castilla y León, Ana Rodríguez  

Nuestra Voz
Pilar Cisneros, Diputada Progreso Social Democrático / Lunes 12 de diciembre 2022

Nuestra Voz

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 109:12


Mesa de trabajo con los Jefes de Fracción

Ethos Podcast
#98 - Ethos Podcast - Tolerancia, censura y otros fangos en los que no tenemos nada que ganar.

Ethos Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 75:47


El día 17 de diciembre estaremos toda la mañana en el espacio Cromátika, en Madrid, grabando en directo el episodio número 100 de Ethos Podcast junto a otras 50 personas.¿Te unes? Hazte con tu entrada aquí. https://ti.to/ethospodcast/directo¿No puedes venir? También tienes una opción para apoyarnos y que podamos llegar al episodio 200 algún día. Entra en la web y hazte con tu entrada digital, tendrás acceso exclusivo a la grabación del mismo dos semanas antes de su publicación en ninguna otra parte.Recuerda, tienes ambos tipos de entrada en: https://ti.to/ethospodcast/directo¡Nos vemos allí!En este episodio 98, hablamos de los trabajos más raros que hemos tenido cada uno, troleamos a Carlo y su nuevo OnlyFans, y nos metemos en el fango del tema de la súper tolerancia y censura actual tratando cosas como el fitness, la industria y la sociedad en general.Links mencionados:The Twinkie Diet: https://edition.cnn.com/2010/HEALTH/11/08/twinkie.diet.professor/index.htmlGlenn A Gaeser et al. 2021: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34755078/

Lamies Podcasts
La testarudez impide todo progreso

Lamies Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 3:07


Cada Día con Dios - 8 Diciembre

Así como suena
6. Tu dinero importa

Así como suena

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 28:32


Si bien el dinero por sí solo no da la felicidad da algo de tranquilidad y confianza, y éstos son factores claves para tener bienestar. En México nos hemos tardado en confiar y en aprovechar los beneficios que los bancos y otras instituciones financieras podrían ofrecernos. En este episodio Regina Reyes-Heroles platicó con banqueros para entender y explicar las causas de esta  reticencia o desconfianza, pero también cómo, a través de la inclusión y la educación las instituciones financieras pueden ser agentes de oportunidades. La acompañan  Alejandro Díaz de León, ex Gobernador del Banco de México, Luis Niño de Rivera, ex presidente de la Asociación de Bancos de México y Daniel Becker, actual presidente. 

Consejero de bolsillo, Infonavit para ti.

Si bien el dinero por sí solo no da la felicidad da algo de tranquilidad y confianza, y éstos son factores claves para tener bienestar. En México nos hemos tardado en confiar y en aprovechar los beneficios que los bancos y otras instituciones financieras podrían ofrecernos. En este episodio Regina Reyes-Heroles platicó con banqueros para entender y explicar las causas de esta  reticencia o desconfianza, pero también cómo, a través de la inclusión y la educación las instituciones financieras pueden ser agentes de oportunidades. La acompañan  Alejandro Díaz de León, ex Gobernador del Banco de México, Luis Niño de Rivera, ex presidente de la Asociación de Bancos de México y Daniel Becker, actual presidente. 

Club 700 Hoy
Dios tiene tu futuro en sus manos

Club 700 Hoy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022


La vida está llena de diferentes etapas, y no siempre es fácil adaptarse a cambios que podrían truncar nuestros planes. Las historias que te presentamos en este episodio te ayudarán a recordar que todo tiene un propósito y que Dios tiene tu futuro en Sus manos. Una de nuestras entrevistadas es Rosie Rivera, la hermana de la cantante Jenni Rivera, quien nos cuenta cómo pudo enfrentar una importante prueba en su vida.

Club 700 Hoy - Video Podcast - CBN
Dios tiene tu futuro en sus manos

Club 700 Hoy - Video Podcast - CBN

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022


La vida está llena de diferentes etapas, y no siempre es fácil adaptarse a cambios que podrían truncar nuestros planes. Las historias que te presentamos en este episodio te ayudarán a recordar que todo tiene un propósito y que Dios tiene tu futuro en Sus manos. Una de nuestras entrevistadas es Rosie Rivera, la hermana de la cantante Jenni Rivera, quien nos cuenta cómo pudo enfrentar una importante prueba en su vida.

Secretos De Un Hombre Superior
El Progreso Viene De La Incomodidad y El Dolor

Secretos De Un Hombre Superior

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 10:13


Lo doloroso no siempre es malo y lo placentero no siempre es bueno. No caigas en la trampa.Estos son los últimos días para aprovechar nuestra MEMBRESÍA PERMANENTE de la Universidad Superior Eso significa que con sólo un pago obtienes acceso de por vida ilimitado a TODOS mis programas actuales y futuros.El 1 de diciembre cambiará la membresía y pasará de ser PERMANENTE a una anual.Ve a universidadsuperior.com/platinum y aprovecha esta oportunidad antes de que desaparezca para siempre.Support the show

Club 700 Hoy - Video Podcast - CBN
Lo que el dinero no puede comprar

Club 700 Hoy - Video Podcast - CBN

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022


Si tú crees que el dinero significa felicidad y tu meta es estar económicamente estable, en este episodio podrás escuchar dos interesantes historias que te ayudarán a poner tus prioridades en orden. Conoce al pequeño Melvin y la sabiduría que trae la simplicidad, y también cómo Dios obró de la manera más inesperada en las finanzas de una familia. Descubre que lo que realmente vale la pena va más allá de lo económico.

Club 700 Hoy
Lo que el dinero no puede comprar

Club 700 Hoy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022


Si tú crees que el dinero significa felicidad y tu meta es estar económicamente estable, en este episodio podrás escuchar dos interesantes historias que te ayudarán a poner tus prioridades en orden. Conoce al pequeño Melvin y la sabiduría que trae la simplicidad, y también cómo Dios obró de la manera más inesperada en las finanzas de una familia. Descubre que lo que realmente vale la pena va más allá de lo económico.

Pamela Cerdeira
Cómo vamos en el índice de progreso social

Pamela Cerdeira

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 8:45


En entrevista con Pamela Cerdeira, para MVS Noticias, en su sección ‘economía para todxs', Sofía Ramírez, directora de México cómo vamos, nos habló del índice de progreso social.

Club 700 Hoy - Video Podcast - CBN
Dios quiere darle un nuevo propósito a tu vida

Club 700 Hoy - Video Podcast - CBN

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022


No dejes que los errores del pasado te impidan ver el futuro con ojos de esperanza. Las dos historias que te presentamos en este episodio te enseñarán claramente cómo Dios puede darle un nuevo propósito a tu vida. Aun cuando sientes que quieres rendirte y que todo está perdido, siempre hay esperanza y puedes aprender a vivir con tu nueva identidad espiritual.

New Books Network en español
Alexander Fattal, "Disparando cámaras para la paz. Juventud, fotografía y el conflicto armado colombiano" (2019, 2021)

New Books Network en español

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 50:40


El libro de Alexander Fattal es un excelente ejemplo de la antropología comprometida con las comunidades. Una antropología que no se queda en la mera extracción de datos sobre una comunidad o población, sino que busca dejar algo a esa comunidad y a las personas que la componen. Fattal es profesor asistente del Departamento de Comunicación de la Universidad de California en San Diego y artista documental. Fundador del proyecto Disparando Cámaras para la paz y de la ONG del mismo nombre, así como del proyecto AjA, una ONG sin ánimo de lucro dedicada a empoderar juventudes históricamente en desventaja de San Diego y la Región de Tijuana. “Disparando Cámaras para la paz. Juventud, fotografía y el conflicto armado colombiano”, editado y publicado en 2019 por la Peabody Musseum Press, una editorial asociada a la Editorial de la Universidad de Hardvard, visibiliza las problemáticas de una comunidad urbana compuesta por población vulnerable en las periferias de Bogotá, Colombia. Lo especial aquí es que la exposición de tales problemáticas las conocemos a través de la autorrepresentación fotográfica de niños, niñas y jóvenes de la misma comunidad. El libro hace un recorrido fotográfico de esas imágenes tomadas por las juventudes del barrio el Progreso en el contexto colombiano de violencia y desigualdades de los primeros años del siglo XXI. El libro ha sido destacado con varios reconocimientos y premios. Entre ellos están: el premio John Collier Jr. de la Society for Visual Anthropology (2021), la mención honorifica en el premio a Mejor Libro en Estudios Visuales y Culturales de América Latina entregado por LASA (Latin American Studies Association) (2022), y una la medalla de bronce en el premio otorgado por la Independent Publisher Book. En 2020, el libro es publicado por la Editorial de la Universidad del Rosario, en Colombia para la distribución en el país de origen de la investigación y con un alcance a toda Latinoamérica. Para más información del libro: Harvard University Press Editorial Universidad del  Presentador y anfitrión del podcast: Diego A Garzon-Forero

Club 700 Hoy
Dios quiere darle un nuevo propósito a tu vida

Club 700 Hoy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022


No dejes que los errores del pasado te impidan ver el futuro con ojos de esperanza. Las dos historias que te presentamos en este episodio te enseñarán claramente cómo Dios puede darle un nuevo propósito a tu vida. Aun cuando sientes que quieres rendirte y que todo está perdido, siempre hay esperanza y puedes aprender a vivir con tu nueva identidad espiritual.

Noticentro
Detienen a activistas por intentar pegarse a ‘El grito'

Noticentro

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 1:25


•Mérida, Kanasín y Progreso concentran el 83% de homicidios•Más información en nuestro podcast

Nuestra Voz
Diputada Pilar Cisneros, Jefa de Fracción Progreso Social Democrático / Miércoles 9 de noviembre

Nuestra Voz

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 105:09


Gobierno desconvoca proyecto Eurobonos de sesiones extraordinarias porque dos diputados de la Comisión de Asuntos Económicos están fuera de Costa Rica y, según explica Presidencia en un comunicado de Prensa, “se desea respetar su derecho de conocer las mociones de fondo que hay sobre el proyecto”.

Club 700 Hoy - Video Podcast - CBN
La importancia de la familia

Club 700 Hoy - Video Podcast - CBN

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022


Jessica y Vania nos hablan de las tradiciones y la importancia de la familia en la comunidad hispana. La familia está en el centro del plan de Dios para la felicidad y el progreso de Sus hijos. Estos testimonios te ayudarán a cambiar tu perspectiva y ver el propósito de la familia.

Club 700 Hoy
La importancia de la familia

Club 700 Hoy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022


Jessica y Vania nos hablan de las tradiciones y la importancia de la familia en la comunidad hispana. La familia está en el centro del plan de Dios para la felicidad y el progreso de Sus hijos. Estos testimonios te ayudarán a cambiar tu perspectiva y ver el propósito de la familia.

Espacio Cripto
Ep. 90: Update de comunidad: el progreso de nuestra comunidad en los últimos meses

Espacio Cripto

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 38:29


Newsletter Espacio Criptohttps://www.getrevue.co/profile/EspacioCripto Espacio Cripto en Instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/espaciocriptopod/ Espacio Cripto en Telegramhttps://t.me/joinchat/g9wpiyIXhEY2ODk5 Espacio Cripto en Youtubehttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCe23iMDaKg1vQi2bJz9fF1Q Sigue @sonoropodcast en todas las redes sociales.

Entrevistas ADN
La OEA verificará que no hay acción golpista, dijo legislador Eduardo Salhuana

Entrevistas ADN

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 10:20


El congresista de Alianza para el Progreso dijo que la comunidad internacional comprenderá que las afirmaciones del presidente Pedro Castillo y su canciller, César Landa, no tienen sustento.

Ethos Podcast
#95 - Ethos Podcast – ¿Por qué procrastinamos y lo dejamos todo para mañana?

Ethos Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 50:47


Todos procrastinamos. Y todos, lo creas o no, somos más constantes y disciplinados de lo que creemos en muchas cosas.En este episodio vamos a hablar un poco más al detalle de por qué dejamos cosas para otro momento, qué hacer para no verlo siempre como algo negativo y cómo crear una estrategia para hacer lo que hemos dicho que queremos hacer de forma un poco más sencilla.¿Te vienes a la grabación en directo del episodio número 100?Puedes seguir votando hasta el día 1 de noviembre por la ciudad, fecha e incluso precio del evento aquí: ethospodcast.typeform.com/evento/Si tu reproductor favorito de podcasts no tiene la opción de link integrado, el link a la web para dejarnos tus preferencias es: ethospodcast.typeform.com/evento/Links mencionados:Derek Sivers - Keep earning your title, or it expiresTim Urban - Inside the mind of a master procrastinator

Mujer Ponte Dura
117: Una autoestima baja retrasa tu progreso hacia una pérdida de peso exitosa

Mujer Ponte Dura

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 16:18


Este tema de la autoestima es uno súper amplio, muchas veces escucho decir a mujeres y hombre que quieren bajar peso porque tienen autoestima baja y la realidad es que aunque es un buen estímulo el autoestima baja no viene de cuanto sea ese número en la báscula. ¡No! Vine de verte bajo una percepción errónea. creeme , he atendido mujeres hermosas, delgadas sintiéndose igual que alguien con libras demás. De donde surge? Wow pudiera darte una razón… pero no la hay por que son muchas las que pueden estar influyendo en este proceso agotador… que vuelvo y te repito… NO TIENE QUE VER con estar gordo o flaco… tiene que ver con tus creencias específicamente aquellas que te limitan, tiene que ver con no conocerte… y una percepción que se ha creado por años dentro de tu cabeza. Lamentablemente toda la realidad se distorsiona y sentirte así siempre limitará tu proceso de perder peso aunque tengas esa meta bien clara. ¿Por qué? Es justo de lo que te hablo en el nuevo episodio de Ponte dura podcast. Vista pontedura.com/podcast

Martha Debayle
Emprendimiento femenino: progreso social y económico. Martes 25 de octubre de 2022.

Martha Debayle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 18:47


Si ya andan con todo en el emprendimiento femenino, les traemos a una expertaza a hablar sobre social media y negocios. ¿Sabían que el 36% de las mujeres en México son propietarias de una pequeña o mediana empresa?

Comite de Lectura
[Hora Libre] T.2, E.10: Los dilemas éticos del progreso tecnológico

Comite de Lectura

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 16:57


En el último episodio de la segunda temporada de #HoraLibre, Mario Zúñiga analiza algunos de los dilemas éticos que nos presenta el progreso tecnológico y cómo podemos gestionarlos para evitar los malos usos de ciertas tecnologías sin privarnos de los enormes beneficios que pueden reportar a la sociedad.

Radiocable.com - Radio por Internet » Audio
Sobremesa: Si defienden el progreso, ¿por qué desprecian las reivindicaciones de los jóvenes?

Radiocable.com - Radio por Internet » Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 0:01


En una semana hemos oído en varias ocasiones el ‘antes se vivía peor’ para justificar la precariedad de la juventud española. Pero,

Podcast de Juan Ramón Rallo
Lo que el cartel del PSOE nos dice sobre el concepto de progreso de la nueva izquierda

Podcast de Juan Ramón Rallo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 14:39


El PSOE ha conmemorado los 40 años de la victoria electoral de Felipe González proclamando que el PSOE ha traído 40 años de progreso para España. Pero el concepto de "progreso" del PSOE ha cambiado radicalmente durante estas últimas cuatro décadas. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/juanrallo. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

El Washington Post
Debate Lula vs. Bolsonaro. Liz Truss en el Reino Unido. La economía de Guatemala

El Washington Post

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 20:44


Sobre el debate hablamos con Henrique Gomes Batista del diario "O Globo". Del futuro de Liz Truss, con Celia Maza, corresponsal de "El Confidencial". Y del papel de la empresa privada guatemalteca, con José Miguel Torrebiarte, presidente del grupo Progreso

QUIERO MI RUSH
El progreso y la ñapa.

QUIERO MI RUSH

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 9:40


Cuando dejamos de ver el resultado como el premio. Tal vez eso sí, es una ñapa muy sabrosa.

The Unlimited Spanish Podcast: Aprende español | Habla español | Learn Spanish | Speak Spanish | TPRS
#298 Errores y progreso en el aprendizaje del español

The Unlimited Spanish Podcast: Aprende español | Habla español | Learn Spanish | Speak Spanish | TPRS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 13:30 Very Popular


144.314 ¿Qué es ese número? Ah, es el número total de reglas gramaticales que he memorizado. Así hablaré sin errores. Ah, ya veo… ¡Buena suerte! La vas a necesitar.   ¡Hola! Soy Óscar, y no vas a necesitar buena suerte para hablar español fluidamente. Aquí estoy yo para ayudarte. Gracias por acompañarme en un nuevo episodio del podcast de unlimitedspanish.com. Hoy: Hablo de errores y progreso contestando un mensaje de un estudiante. A continuación, practicaremos la fluidez con un ejercicio de preguntas y respuestas. Si quieres los cursos completos con horas de audio diseñados para desarrollar tu fluidez, no lo pienses más. Visita www.unlimitedspanish.com, sección productos. Hay varios niveles. Bien, empecemos con el tema de hoy. Hace unos días, Jim me envió este correo electrónico que me gustaría comentar. Lo leo aquí: Los métodos que presentas son claros y muy efectivos. Estoy de acuerdo que escuchar mucho contenido comprensible y escuchar una y otra vez las mini-historias es mucho mejor que estudiar reglas gramaticales. Sin embargo, debe existir una manera de reforzar las reglas gramaticales aprendidas por la escucha de contenido. ¡Existe tanta contaminación gramatical de la lengua materna! La confusión surge cuando el alumno intenta producir comunicación espontánea. Surgen dudas tales como “¿He dicho esto de manera correcta?" Para hablar con fluidez, tenemos que hablar sin preocuparnos si hablamos con perfección o no, pero después de la conversación las dudas duran. Es aún peor con la producción escrita. En esta situación, si no estoy seguro de qué escribo, ¿Qué hago? ¡Muy buenas reflexiones, Jim! Gracias por tu mensaje. Jim tiene razón respecto a que es muy importante escuchar contenido comprensible. Es decir, dependiendo del nivel del estudiante de español, es necesario seleccionar un contenido que no sea difícil de comprender. Un error típico es escuchar audio demasiado difícil con la idea de intentar forzar el progreso. Es siempre mejor bajar el nivel hasta que sea fácil entender la mayoría de las palabras. Así, el cerebro está en modo “comprensión”. Si es muy difícil, el cerebro acaba desconectando y deja de prestar atención. A continuación, Jim pregunta cómo reforzar las reglas gramaticales en la producción del idioma. Como bien dice, existe mucha interferencia del idioma nativo del estudiante en el idioma que se está aprendiendo. Esto es lo que contesté: Gracias por el mensaje. El estudiante típico que usa mis cursos ya ha estudiado un poco de español con cierta gramática formal y está frustrado porque no puede hablar. Por eso, en mi método, insisto que para mejorar la fluidez  es necesario escuchar mucho y no basarse en reglas formales para producir el idioma. Ahora bien, teniendo esto claro, no hay nada de malo en consultar un libro de gramática para dudas puntuales. Respecto a escribir bien, es muy importante leer mucho, y sobre todo leer texto que sea similar a lo que quieres escribir. Por ejemplo, si quieres escribir texto que describa cosas que pasan en la actualidad, puede ser una buena idea leer muchos artículos periodísticos. Esa es la base: leer mucho. Por supuesto, practicar también es importante, pero yo dedicaría el tiempo de esta manera: 90% lectura, 10% escritura. Si estás suficientemente motivado, un buen ejercicio es leer un artículo un par de veces y luego intentar escribir un resumen sin mirar el artículo, a ser posible, usando expresiones y vocabulario propio del artículo. Luego consultas el artículo y analizas qué podrías haber hecho mejor.  Y como he dicho antes, no está mal consultar la gramática para dudas. Por otra parte, tenemos que tener en cuenta que el proceso de aprendizaje de un idioma supone cometer muchos errores, tanto a nivel hablado como escrito. Esto es normal. A medida que uno progresa, se cometen menos y menos errores. Con el tiempo se desarrolla la “intuición del nativo” que, sin saber la regla gramatical concreta, sabe que cierta frase “suena mal”. Esta habilidad es la que queremos desarrollar. Podemos observar, por ejemplo, como los niños cometen bastantes errores, pero con las numerosas horas de escucha y lectura, van disminuyendo con el tiempo. Hay metodologías que intentan evitar en lo posible que el estudiante cometa errores desde el principio, pero esto acaba dañando la producción espontánea del idioma, que está fuertemente ligada al desarrollo de la fluidez. Además, crea una ansiedad innecesaria. Espero haberte ayudado. Vale, esta es la respuesta. ¿Qué te parece? Creo que puede ser útil para estudiantes en este tipo de situaciones. Si tienes preguntas de este tipo, puedes enviarme un mensaje a través de mi website unlimitedspanish.com. Intento contestar todos los mensajes. Quizás haga un episodio con tu pregunta :) Consigue el texto de este episodio en mi web: https://unlimitedspanish.com/podcasts/

Máximo desempeño
La mayor alegría y satisfacción es el progreso

Máximo desempeño

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 46:53


Nuestro invitado en el episodio #180 es Juan Pablo Socarrás, diseñador industrial y de modas, gestor social y empresario.Juan Pablo quiso desde muy joven tener la oportunidad de estudiar diseño de modas, pero esta no fue una decisión fácil, ya que venía de una familia de médicos que tenía otras expectativas sobre su futuro profesional. Finalmente, optó por la carrera de diseñador industrial sin abandonar nunca su pasión por la moda. Para su fortuna, resultó ser la mejor decisión, ya que esta carrera le brindó muchas herramientas y conocimientos que le han ayudado a abordar la moda desde contextos más amplios y profundos.Otra de sus grandes pasiones siempre ha sido el trabajo con comunidades y en la medida en que se fue preparando y buscando el camino que realmente le hacía feliz, logró convertirse en lo que algunos llaman un 'etnógrafo' de la moda. En este episodio, Juan Pablo nos contó cómo una de las pruebas más difíciles que ha tenido, superar el cáncer en su niñez, le ayudó a desarrollar habilidades importantísimas para ser un gran ser humano. En esta etapa aprendió a escuchar —que es uno de sus grandes dones— aprendió a ser resiliente, a ser feliz con las cosas simples, a entender a los demás, a tener la certeza de que siempre todo va a estar bien y a valorar el regalo que es la vida.Juan Pablo cuenta que, aunque muchas decisiones que ha tomado han sido de controversia para su familia o la sociedad, al final del día, esa fuerza para luchar por sí mismo y por sus convicciones es lo que lo ha hecho un héroe para aquellos que lo rodean.Detrás de este talentoso diseñador, hay un niño que se levanta todos los días para permitirse el asombro de conocer nuevas cosas, descubrir personas de todos los rincones y de crear proyectos maravillosos. Acompáñame a conocer la inspiradora historia que rodea a este talentoso diseñador.

Más que En Forma
Falta de Progreso por querer lucir para la Playa todo el año

Más que En Forma

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 20:30


En este programa hablo sobre: Por qué ves a los Influencers Fitness en forma todo el año Cuántos años tardaré en conseguir la cantidad de músculo que quiero Cuándo se puede ganar músculo sin grasa Los volúmenes de los 90 vs los de ahora Tipos de perfiles según cómo les afecta verse gordos Si quieres que sea tu entrenador: antonioyuste.com/ayudame/

El Podcast de Logan
El Podcast de Logan 77 The Matrix-19 días y 500 noches-Viewtiful Joe-Orígenes de Marvel Vol. 1-El progreso

El Podcast de Logan

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 112:02


Comite de Lectura
Las noticias con Augusto Townsend: revelan mal uso de financiamiento estatal a políticos (19 09 22)

Comite de Lectura

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 15:01


Augusto Townsend comenta el reportaje de Punto Final que da cuenta de varios casos de uso irregular del financiamiento estatal a la política que involucran a Perú Libre, Somos Perú y Renovación Popular, así como otro caso de contrataciones a allegados que involucra a Alianza para el Progreso en el Parlamento. También reseña lo que reveló Latina sobre cómo Yenifer Paredes consiguió los sellos que le incautaron en su casa en Cajamarca, entre otras noticias de interés.

Ethos Podcast
#92 Ethos Podcast - La carga de la ambición y la importancia de mirar atrás.

Ethos Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 62:10


Esta semana hablamos de ambición.Esa fuerza que nos lleva a levantarnos temprano y a hacer cosas por las que mucha gente nos llamaría «locos».¿Estamos persiguiendo un horizonte infinito que nunca alcanzaremos? ¿Tiene sentido mirar atrás y repasar lo que hemos ido consiguiendo para seguir adelante?Todo esto y mucho más en este episodio 92 de Ethos Podcast.¿Te gusta? ¡Déjanos una review en tu app de podcast favorita!Ayuda inmensamente a que otros nos encuentren y el podcast siga creciendo. Este episodio está patrocinado por Programa DOCE.Utiliza el código "HERMANE" para llevarte un 10% sobre el precio original por ser oyente del podcast.

Comite de Lectura
La Noticia del Día Explicada: 9 congresistas consumieron alcohol en Congreso junto a Freddy Díaz

Comite de Lectura

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 2:53


Nueve congresistas miembros de la bancada de Alianza Para el Progreso, consumieron alcohol en las instalaciones del Congreso junto a Freddy Díaz, el mismo día en el que el legislador habría abusado sexualmente de una de las trabajadoras de su despacho en su oficina congresal. Los legisladores de APP, no obstante, han señalado que se trató meramente de un "brindis".

Conclusiones
¿Por qué destituyeron a la presidenta del Congreso de Perú?

Conclusiones

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 45:13


Menos de dos meses duró en su cargo la presidenta del Congreso de Perú, Lady Camones. La filtración de un audio en el que se oye al líder del Partido Alianza para el Progreso, César Acuña, presuntamente pidiéndole que agilice el proyecto de un nuevo distrito electoral para beneficiarle desencadenó una nueva crisis política en el país. A raíz de este audio, la mayoría del Legislativo acordó una moción de censura y destitución de Camones, mientras ella pedía ser investigada, algo que ya está haciendo la Fiscalía. Camones dijo que sentía que su privacidad había sido violada por la filtración de ese audio, y que no reflejaba ningún acto de corrupción. En Conclusiones, el congresista independiente Edward Málaga Trillo explica desde su perspectiva la situación en el país.Para conocer sobre cómo CNN protege la privacidad de su audiencia, visite CNN.com/privacidad