Podcasts about International Monetary Fund

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International financial institution

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Best podcasts about International Monetary Fund

Show all podcasts related to international monetary fund

Latest podcast episodes about International Monetary Fund

WSJ Minute Briefing
Texas Governor Bans Covid-19 Vaccine Mandates at Businesses

WSJ Minute Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 2:14


In China car sales drop as the industry deals with the impact from the global chip shortage. The board of the International Monetary Fund backs the head of the fund, Kristalina Georgieva, following an investigation into her role in a data-rigging scandal at the World Bank. Keith Collins hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The OMFIF Podcast
The Italian G20 Presidency

The OMFIF Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 34:29


Building on OMFIF's status as an independent think tank for central banks, the Sustainable Policy Institute brought together policy-makers, technology experts and investors on 29-30 September 2021 to push the boundaries of the discussion on the role of monetary policy, regulation and disclosure, as well as address key practical challenges, in driving greener financial markets to achieve net zero at a two day virtual symposium. Ignazio Visco has been governor of the Bank of Italy since November 2011 and is chairman of the joint governing board of the Insurance Supervisory Authority. He is a member of the governing council and general council of the European Central Bank, the general board of the European Systemic Risk Board, the board of directors of the Bank for International Settlements, the steering committee of the Financial Stability Board, the board of governors of the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank. He is also alternate governor for Italy at the International Monetary Fund and the Inter-American Development Bank. He takes part in the G7, G10 and G20 finance ministers and central bank governors meetings. View more from the symposium here. 

CB On Air
TT8: How does fintech impact central bank autonomy?

CB On Air

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 20:09


Fintech presents unique opportunities for central banks. In this episode, representatives from the International Monetary Fund discuss how, from a legal perspective, central banks should address the impact of fintech on their governance.

Ones and Tooze
Scandal at the IMF and World Bank

Ones and Tooze

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 24:49


On this episode of Ones and Tooze, Cameron Abadi and Adam Tooze discuss the scandal swirling around Kristalina Georgieva, who runs the International Monetary Fund. Also, what the steep rise in China's life expectancy says about China—and about the United States. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The World Next Week
World Bank-IMF Meetings, Czech Elections Amid Pandora Papers Leak, and More

The World Next Week

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 32:16


The World Bank Group and the International Monetary Fund hold their annual meetings, the Czech Republic holds closely watched elections in the wake of the Pandora Papers leak, and the Group of Twenty (G20) convenes for an emergency summit on Afghanistan.

Climate 21
Using Finance To Protect And Enhance Biodiversity While Simultaneously Sequestering Carbon - A Chat With Ralph Chami

Climate 21

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 73:28


In previous episodes of this podcast, both Prof Sir David King of the Cambridge Centre for Climate Repair and Rob Gardner of St James' Wealth Management mentioned the role of whales, elephants, and biodiversity in general in sequestering carbon. Interested to know more I came across Ralph Chami, Assistant Director at the International Monetary Fund and co-founder of Rebalance Earth whose seminal paper on placing a financial value on the carbon sequestration of whales (initially) kicked off this whole field. I invited Ralph to come on the podcast to talk about these exciting new findings and how we can use finance to protect and enhance biodiversity while simultaneously sequestering carbon. It was a fascinating conversation. I thoroughly enjoyed it. I learned loads as always, and I hope you do too.If you have any comments/suggestions or questions for the podcast - feel free to leave me a voice message over on my SpeakPipe page, head on over to the Climate 21 Podcast Forum, or just send it to me as a direct message on Twitter/LinkedIn. Audio messages will get played (unless you specifically ask me not to).And if you want to know more about any of SAP's Sustainability solutions, head on over to www.sap.com/sustainability, and if you liked this show, please don't forget to rate and/or review it. It makes a big difference to help new people discover the show. Thanks.And remember, stay healthy, stay safe, stay sane!Music credit - Intro and Outro music for this podcast was composed, played, and produced by my daughter Luna Juniper

The Michael Yardney Podcast | Property Investment, Success & Money
Uh-Oh. Is this the beginning of the end of our property boom With Dr. Andrew Wilson

The Michael Yardney Podcast | Property Investment, Success & Money

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 38:30


Is this the beginning of the end of the property boom? If you've been following the property news lately you be forgiven for thinking so. The Chiefs of two of the biggest banks have suggested that regulators should step in and introduce macro-prudential controls to slow down our booming housing markets. In the closing statements of the ‘Housing Market and Financial Stability' speech delivered by the RBA's Assistant Governor Michele Bullock on Wednesday, Bullock hinted at the possibility that the RBA could intervene in Australia's housing market. The International Monetary Fund has issued warning about Australian house prices and Digital Finance Analytics principal Martin North gave a chilling forecast that home prices in Sydney and Melbourne outer suburbs could fall a staggering $200,000 while the crash could be even worse for apartments when lending rules were tightened. So, should we be scared? That's what I'm going to be chatting about with Australia's leading housing economist Dr. Andrew Wilson today. And here's a spoiler alert – NO you don't need to worry! Now if you have been a subscriber to this podcast for a while or followed my blogs or YouTube videos, you'd know for the last 3 years I have recorded a weekly Property Insiders video chat with Dr Andrew Wilson. And his assessment of and forecasts for our economy and property markets have been remarkably accurate so whether you're a beginning property investor or an experienced I'm sure you'll benefit from my chat with Andrew today which is the audio of one of our recent Property Insider videos. However, since we recorded this video Federal Treasurer Josh Frydenberg has given the green light to introducing macroprudential curbs to mortgage lending. The last time lending restrictions were implemented in 2017, the focus was on dampening investor lending and the high percentage of interest-only mortgages. However, this time around the main concern seems to be an increasing share of loans on a high debt-to-income ratio. 22 percent of new mortgage holders now have debt that exceeds their income by more than six times, up from 16 percent a year ago. But, as you'll hear Andrew Wilson explain in our chat, regulators should be aware of unintended consequences. Their crackdown is likely to hit first home buyers rather than Australia's wealthy. Targeting debt-to-income ratios will have a limited impact on higher-wealth households, who often have multiple streams of income. However, it will affect lower-income households and those purchasing property for the first time. There are several reasons the debt-to-income ratios have risen over the past year. Firstly, low interest rates by their nature allow people to service more debt as repayments fall. And second, the share of lending to first-home buyers has increased significantly on the back of HomeBuilder, the federal government's First Home Loan Deposit Scheme, and individual state government incentives. First-home buyers tend to be more indebted as they stretch to get into the market. Given improving homeownership rates is the goal of these government schemes, it seems counterproductive to limit first-home buyers by reducing their ability to borrow. And another reason that debt to income ratios have increased is that many established homeowners have upgraded their homes over the last year or two, partly because of the low-cost borrowing, partly because the value of the home has increased considerably given them equity to upgrade and also because of the increased requirements for more space such as a zoom room, etc. My Property Update Chat with Andrew Wilson Looking back over the first 9 months of this year, our property markets have performed even more strongly than anyone ever expected, with the rates of house price growth at levels not seen for a number of decades. In fact, all capital city markets have already experienced double-digit capital growth so far this year and many locations will experience growth of more than 20% over 2021. Of course, it must be remembered that the last peak for our property markets was in 2017, and in many locations, housing prices remain stagnant over the ensuing couple of years and it was really only earlier this year that new highs were reached. Meaning that average price growth was unexceptional over the long term. But over the last week or two, there seems to have been a sudden change of sentiment about our booming housing markets. A sense of urgency has crept into the tone of those at the helm of our big banks, as the CEOs of two of Australia's largest banks have sounded off about emerging lending risks. Topics We Discuss on Today's Show: Whether or not the high debt-to-income ratios of home buyers is really a problem Price growth has averaged a modest 4% per annum since 2017 – despite record falls in mortgage rates over that period Monthly house price growth in most capital cities has halved over the past three months and continues to track downwards The Reserve Bank does not have a role in setting house prices. The RBA's mandate to stimulate employment which currently means keeping interest rates low The Australian Prudential Regulatory Authority, and its purpose of making sure the banks are operating soundly and there is no deterioration in lending standards. There seems little to be concerned about current lending practices as interest-only loans are essentially a non-issue these days, and with rental vacancies at near-record lows, the market needs property investors. Why more Aussies are joining the millionaire club as Australian household wealth reaches record levels, and what that means Resources: Michael Yardney Dr. Andrew Wilson, chief economist My Housing Market As our property markets move forward why not get the team at Metropole to build you a personalised   Strategic Property Plan – this will help both beginning and experienced investors. Get a bundle of eBooks and reports www.PodcastBonus.com.au Shownotes plus more here: Uh-Oh. Is this the beginning of the end of our property boom With Dr. Andrew Wilson Some of our favorite quotes from the show: “You see, targeting debt to income ratios will have limited impact on higher wealth households.” – Michael Yardney “We're doing our homework, we're doing our research, we're doing a lot online, and we're just making quick decisions.” –  Michael Yardney “I've seen it over and over again that unless you grow out to where it is, you end up going back to where you are.” – Michael Yardney PLEASE LEAVE US A REVIEW Reviews are hugely important to me because they help new people discover this podcast. If you enjoyed listening to this episode, please leave a review on iTunes - it's your way of passing the message forward to others and saying thank you to me. Here's how  

South Sudan In Focus  - Voice of America
South Sudan in Focus - September 28, 2021

South Sudan In Focus - Voice of America

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 30:00


South Sudan's Auditor General says millions of dollars the International Monetary Fund lent to South Sudan to pay salaries of civil servants in 2020 was diverted into individuals' accounts; Residents in Jonglei State capital Bor are complaining about a lack of clean drinking water after the only station supplying the town with purified water shut down due to flooding in the area; The Police Commissioner in Maridi County was gunned down by unknown men

Economist Radio
Money Talks: Volatile gas

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 27:41


The price of natural gas is rocketing, with global consequences. Is volatility in this crucial fuel here to stay? We also ask why an investigation at the World Bank has put Kristalina Georgieva, the head of the International Monetary Fund, in the spotlight. And, after our adventures in DeFi-land last week, economist Eswar Prasad assesses who should control the future of money and payments. Patrick Lane hostsSign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Money talks from Economist Radio
Money Talks: Volatile gas

Money talks from Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 27:41


The price of natural gas is rocketing, with global consequences. Is volatility in this crucial fuel here to stay? We also ask why an investigation at the World Bank has put Kristalina Georgieva, the head of the International Monetary Fund, in the spotlight. And, after our adventures in DeFi-land last week, economist Eswar Prasad assesses who should control the future of money and payments. Patrick Lane hostsSign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Podcast – The Burning Truth
Dystopian Scheme To Use Your Internet History To Affect Your Credit Score

Podcast – The Burning Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 11:20


__ Follow Casey on Facebook, Twitter, & Snapchat @CaseyTheHost__ This isn’t a dystopian science fiction movie, this is real. The International Monetary Fund wants to start using your internet browsing history to change your credit score. What could possibly… The post Dystopian Scheme To Use Your Internet History To Affect Your Credit Score appeared first on The Burning Truth.

The Take
Trying to heal Afghanistan without international aid

The Take

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 22:13


Forty million Afghans still in the country live under the fear of their hospitals and healthcare system falling apart. Without international aid, medical supplies are running short. Since the Taliban took control of the country, the United States has led the way for other countries -  plus the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank - to stop necessary assistance from flowing into Afghanistan. As a result, doctors are left in the heartbreaking situation of doing their best to keep patients alive without proper resources. In this episode, we hear from those doctors who implore the international community to help heal Afghans rather than leaving them to die. In this episode:  Dr Najmussama Shefajo: Ob/Gyn specialist, founder of Shefajo Group of Laboratories, and president of the Afghanistan Society of Obstetricians & Gynecologists Dr Tankred Stoebe, President of MSF Germany (@MSF) Dr Ashuq Urrahman, physician in Kabul Dr Muhammad Mustafa Sahibzada, physician in Kabul Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

Keen On Democracy
Yanis Varoufakis on an Alternative to Capitalism

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 41:13


In this episode of “Keen On”, Andrew is joined by Yanis Varoufakis, the author of “Another Now: Dispatches from an Alternative Present”, to paint the picture of a world where a global hi-tech uprising has birthed a post-capitalist society in which work, money, land, digital networks and politics have been truly democratised. Yanis Varoufakis is an economist and politician who, as Greece's finance minister in 2015, led the struggle against the European Union's and the International Monetary Fund's austerity and bank bailout policies. Since then he co-founded DiEM25 (the Democracy in Europe Movement) and is the leader of MeRA25, DiEM25's political party in Greece. Before his election to Greece's Parliament, Varoufakis taught economics in universities in Britain, Australia, the United States and Greece for three decades. He holds a chair in economic theory at the University of Athens and is Honorary Professor of Political Economy at the University of Sydney, Honoris Causa Professor of Law, Economics and Finance at the University of Torino, Visiting Professor of Political Economy at King's College, London, and Doctor of the University Honoris Causa at the University of Sussex. Visit our website: https://lithub.com/story-type/keen-on/ Email Andrew: a.keen@me.com Watch the show live on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajkeen Watch the show live on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ankeen/ Watch the show live on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lithub Watch the show on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/LiteraryHub/videos Subscribe to Andrew's newsletter: https://andrew2ec.substack.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Creating Wealth Real Estate Investing with Jason Hartman
1734 FBF: National Debt, Millennials & The Clash of Generations by Laurence J. Kotlikoff

Creating Wealth Real Estate Investing with Jason Hartman

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 56:21


Today's Flash Back Friday comes from Episode 265, originally published in June 2012. Jason Hartman hosts Professor Laurence Kotlikoff, author of The Clash of Generations: Saving Ourselves, Our Kids, Our Economy, regarding the problems with the economy and the effect that the astronomical national debt and government spending will have on generations to come. ** LIVE ORLANDO CONFERENCE ** Join us for Empowered Investor LIVE: https://www.EmpoweredInvestor.com Free Mini-Book on Pandemic Investing: https://www.PandemicInvesting.com Jason's TV Clips: https://vimeo.com/549444172  Asset Protection, Tax Savings & Estate Planning: http://JasonHartman.com/Protect  What do Jason's clients say? http://JasonHartmanTestimonials.com Easily get up to $250,000 in funding for real estate, business or anything else  http://JasonHartman.com/Fund  Call our Investment Counselors at: 1-800-HARTMAN (US) or visit https://www.jasonhartman.com/ Guided Visualization for Investors: http://jasonhartman.com/visualization Professor Kotlikoff paints a picture of the magnitude of these issues very clearly, explaining that the fiscal gap is $211 trillion. He explains that we would have to raise every federal tax immediately and permanently by 64 percent or cut all non-interest spending by the government (Medicare, Social Security, defense spending, etc) by 40 percent. “The country is broke, totally broke,” says Professor Kotlikoff. He emphasizes that this applies to today, not 75 years down the road. Jason and Professor Kotlikoff also discuss why the 2007 quadrupled money base through money printing hasn't hit the streets yet in the form of hyperinflation. Essentially, banks are being bribed to hold money reserves by the Fed. In simplistic terms, the Federal Reserve prints the money, lends it out at very low interest rates to the banks, and then the banks deposit it back with the Federal Reserve and get a higher interest rate. This makes banks more solvent over time without the public ever knowing what is going on. Professor Kotlikoff also talks about a proposal to fix the financial system, which he refers to as a fragile system, presently a “trust me” banking system where the public is unaware of what the banks are doing with their money. Laurence J. Kotlikoff is a William Fairfield Warren Professor at Boston University, a Professor of Economics at Boston University, a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Fellow of the Econometric Society, a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, President of Economic Security Planning, Inc., a company specializing in financial planning software, a frequent columnist for Bloomberg and Forbes, and a blogger for The Economist and The Huffington Post. Professor Kotlikoff received his B.A. in Economics from the University of Pennsylvania in 1973 and his Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University in 1977. From 1977 through 1983 he served on the faculties of economics of the University of California, Los Angeles and Yale University. In 1981-82 Professor Kotlikoff was a Senior Economist with the President's Council of Economic Advisers. Professor Kotlikoff is author or co-author of 15 books and hundreds of professional journal articles. His most recent books are The Clash of Generations (co-authored with Scott Burns, MIT Press), Jimmy Stewart Is Dead (John Wiley & Sons), Spend ‘Til the End, (co-authored with Scott Burns, Simon & Schuster), The Healthcare Fix (MIT Press), and The Coming Generational Storm (co-authored with Scott Burns, MIT Press). Professor Kotlikoff publishes extensively in newspapers, and magazines on issues of financial reform, personal finance, taxes, Social Security, healthcare, deficits, generational accounting, pensions, saving, and insurance. Professor Kotlikoff has served as a consultant to the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, the Harvard Institute for International Development, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the Swedish Ministry of Finance, the Norwegian Ministry of Finance, the Bank of Italy, the Bank of Japan, the Bank of England, the Government of Russia, the Government of Ukraine, the Government of Bolivia, the Government of Bulgaria, the Treasury of New Zealand, the Office of Management and Budget, the U.S. Department of Education, the U.S. Department of Labor, the Joint Committee on Taxation, The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, The American Council of Life Insurance, Merrill Lynch, Fidelity Investments, AT&T, AON Corp., and other major U.S. corporations.

FT News Briefing
How community banks were small business saviours during the pandemic

FT News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 9:00


Read a transcript of this episode on FT.comhttps://www.ft.com/content/e03bcc3e-c418-47e6-9037-0f0030529af0The US tomorrow will withdraw all of its troops from Afghanistan and the country faces a potential economic catastrophe. The International Monetary Fund's chief economist warns that emerging market economies can't afford another ‘taper tantrum.' Plus, FT contributing editor, Brendan Greeley, explains how US community banks played an instrumental role in keeping small businesses alive during the pandemic. IMF's Gopinath says emerging economies can't afford ‘taper tantrum' reduxhttps://www.ft.com/content/873ca2e8-63d2-40dd-842d-5409169166faHow US community banks became ‘irreplaceable' in the pandemichttps://www.ft.com/content/4face0c6-c1fb-47af-972b-8749e92b4bafWearables company Whoop valued at $3.6bn after SoftBank investmenthttps://www.ft.com/content/f3dde553-0aa1-4137-bc50-093b1003fa71The FT News Briefing is produced by Fiona Symon and Marc Filippino. The show's editor is Jess Smith. Our intern is Zoe Han. Additional help by Gavin Kallmann, Michael Bruning, and Persis Love. The show's theme song is by Metaphor Music. The FT's global head of audio is Cheryl Brumley. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Market Champions
173|QE, Process and Market Narratives ft. Mark Dow with Srivatsan Prakash

Market Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 63:07


Mark Dow is a global macro trader and author of the blog Behavioral Macro. Previously, he worked as a policy economist at the U.S. Treasury and the International Monetary Fund, after which he was a senior Portfolio Manager at Pharo Capital, a $10B fund. Here he talks about why QE isn't money printing, what's driving markets, narratives and much more!

Rabbi Daniel Lapin
Ep 123 | Daniel Lapin Going Six Rounds in London Boxing Ring This September

Rabbi Daniel Lapin

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 88:11


Hear one of our youngest Happy Warriors say, “How the world rrrrrreally works”. The same clowns who gave us destructive lockdowns and meaningless mask mandates spent $300 million per day! The one mistaken conviction that made American politicians and bureaucrats believe they could convert Afghanistan into Vermont. Almost no American diplomats have ever known a religious friend. Why you need a job with the International Monetary Fund. If you are thinking of marrying someone and all you know is that they have earned an advanced academic degree, run for your life. If you know their beliefs and values you have valuable information. How Vice President Kamala Harris terrified the Chinese government. How an important American institution just hired an atheistic rabbi. Enjoy a free glimpse into the Bible at https://www.wehappywarriors.com/scrolling-through-scripture-free-lesson . What does it mean that, in the last term, 3 out of 9 Supreme Court justices were Jewish? The worst cities in America in which to have a late night car breakdown. The mysterious link between suicide and living on handouts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rabbi Daniel Lapin's podcast
Daniel Lapin Going 6 Rounds in London Boxing Ring This September

Rabbi Daniel Lapin's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 86:54


Hear one of our youngest Happy Warriors say, “How the world rrrrrreally works”. The same clowns who gave us destructive lockdowns and meaningless mask mandates spent $300 million per day! The one mistaken conviction that made American politicians and bureaucrats believe they could convert Afghanistan into Vermont. Almost no American diplomats have ever known a religious friend. Why you need a job with the International Monetary Fund. If you are thinking of marrying someone and all you know is that they have earned an advanced academic degree, run for your life. If you know their beliefs and values you have valuable information. How vice president Kamala Harris terrified the Chinese government. How an important American institution just hired an atheistic rabbi. Enjoy a free glimpse into the Bible https://www.wehappywarriors.com/scrolling-through-scripture-free-lesson What does it mean that in the last term, 3 out of 9 Supreme Court justices were Jewish? The worst cities in America in which to have a late night car breakdown. The mysterious link between suicide and living on handouts.

World Business Report
IMF suspends Afghanistan's access to funds

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 26:26


The International Monetary Fund says Afghanistan no longer has access to its resources.

Business Matters
IMF suspends payments to Afghanistan

Business Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 53:22


The International Monetary Fund has said it will withhold funds to Afghanistan, which were due to be handed over within days. The decision was made due to the lack of "clarity within the international community regarding recognition of a government in Afghanistan." We also hear from Aisha Wahab, council member in Haywood City in California. She was the 1st Afghan American Woman Elected to Public Office in the United States. Also in the programme, in a bid to clamp down on nationwide protests Cuba introduces a new law restricting use of social media. Canadian court hearings to determine whether the senior executive of the Chinese tech giant, Huawei, Meng Wanzhou, should be extradited to the United States have ended after two and half years. The Canadian government prosecutor said the court should have no difficulty in finding Ms Wanzhou guilty of commiting fraud, and so should be handed over to the Americans. Plus, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports on how whilst it's still only August, many retailers and hospitality venues are already planning ahead for the Christmas season. PHOTO: Afghan currency dealers/Getty Images

World Business Report
UPDATE: IMF suspends payments to Afghanistan

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 15:06


The International Monetary Fund has said it will withhold funds to Afghanistan, which were due to be handed over within days. The decision was made due to the lack of "clarity within the international community regarding recognition of a government in Afghanistan." Also in the programme, in a bid to clamp down on nationwide protests -- Cuba introduces a new law restricting use of social media.

The OMFIF Podcast
In focus: SPI symposium

The OMFIF Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 6:31


OMFIF's Emma McGarthy and Natalia Ospina discuss the forthcoming Sustainable Policy Institute symposium, ‘Revolutionising finance for net zero', taking place on 29-30 September. The event will bring together a network of key policy-makers, regulators, public and private sector investors and ESG experts for a two-day event to push the boundaries of the discussion on the role of monetary policy, regulation and disclosure as well as addressing key practical challenges in driving greener financial markets to achieve net zero. The symposium will provide crucial insights into COP26 preparations, its results and consequent actions. It will allow participants to have their voice heard and influence such an important policy area at this critical point of time and move the industry beyond words into action. Hear from headline speakers from over 30 financial institutions, including Banque de France, Deutsche Bundesbank, International Monetary Fund, The World Bank Group, Banco Central do Brasil, Bank of England, Riksbank, European Platform on Sustainable Finance, BNY Mellon, National Bank of Cambodia and World Wide Fund for Nature. Register here.

[i3] Podcast
60: MFS's Ward Brown - Emerging Market Debt, the IMF and Geopolitics

[i3] Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 30:01


Ward Brown is a fixed income portfolio manager for MFS Investment Management and runs an emerging market debt strategy. Brown started focusing on emerging markets, while he worked at the International Monetary Fund. We talked about his time at the IMF, geopolitical tensions and the global pandemic. Enjoy the show! Overview of podcast with Ward Brown, Fixed Income Portfolio Manager, MFS 2:00 Studying economics and looking at how credit conditions affect business cycles 3:00 Working for the IMF 4:30 “I really learned applied economics at the IMF and part of applied economics is thinking about the political implications” 6:30 Providing help and advice to emerging markets is the most applied form of economics. 7:00 “Quantitative easing seems to have been around for a long time, but it is really new territory” 9:30 Is an investment in EM debt just a currency play? 9:45 “The long run benefits come from the often higher carry that is offered in emerging market debt.” 11:00 Hard, local, combined or blended approaches to currency in EM debt 14:00 Chinese bonds will enter the FTSE World Government Bond Index. Will this cause issues? 15:20 “The Chinese bond market is mainly institutional and mainly local investors” 17:00 How do geopolitical trends influence your investment decisions? 17:30 “You have to be careful where to take risk in China” 19:30 On EM corporate bonds 20:30 “Some of the interesting opportunities that we are looking at is ones that have suffered from the pandemic” 21:30 Political intervention, gaming in China 22:00 “Do companies have the balance sheet strength to get through perhaps not the best exit of the pandemic?” 23:08 “When investing in emerging markets, expect the unexpected” 24:00 “The market has priced in quite a bit of (rate) hikes” 25:00 On duration. “Right now, it is the 5-year part of the curve” 27:30 How does the current pandemic stack up against other periods of fluctuation, such as the Asian Financial Crisis?

World Business Report
Chinese gaming shares slide

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 26:30


Tencent and NetEase shares recovered some ground after slipping 10% in early trade, and Josh Ye, technology and media journalist at the South China Morning Post explains the background. Also in the programme, to cushion the blow of the pandemic, the board of governors at the world's lender of last resort, the International Monetary Fund, has approved the largest injection of resources in its history. Tara Sinclair is associate professor of economics and international affairs at George Washington University, and tells us how the additional $650bn might be used. Plus, as voters in Zambia prepare to head to the polls next week, we take stock of the country's economy. Musician Fumba Chamo discusses the challenges ordinary Zambians are facing as a consequence of high inflation. Zambian economist Twivwe Siwale explores the root causes of that inflation, following depreciation in the value of Zambia's currency, the kwacha. And we hear from Bupe Mulapesi, who runs a strawberry farm near Lusaka, how the pandemic has impacted business.

FT News Briefing
Optimism soars on the airline industry's recovery

FT News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 10:10


Read a transcript of this episode on FT.comhttps://www.ft.com/content/219d15f1-b6fa-471c-b0ed-2a2c4163f757Forests in the US that generate the carbon offsets bought by companies including BP and Microsoft are on fire; Goldman Sachs looks to scale back its asset management business; and the International Monetary Fund has issued a warning over using cryptocurrency as legal tender. Plus, the FT's Philip Georgiadis explains whether the airline industry's resurgence is here to stay. Carbon offsets going up in smoke as company-linked forests burn with climate reporter, Camilla Hodgsonhttps://www.ft.com/content/3f89c759-eb9a-4dfb-b768-d4af1ec5aa23?Goldman mints billions through investments it is looking to shrinkhttps://www.ft.com/content/9fb175d7-fcf2-4d82-be0a-62ec49b6ab27IMF warns on crypto as national currency ahead of El Salvador launchhttps://www.ft.com/content/c36c45d2-1100-4756-a752-07a217b2bde0?Clouds lift as confidence returns to battered airline industry with acting transport correspondent, Philip Georgiadishttps://www.ft.com/content/9214f0a8-cc60-4511-be5d-4362462e1896The FT News Briefing is produced by Fiona Symon and Marc Filippino. The show's editor is Jess Smith. Our intern is Zoe Han. Additional help by Gavin Kallmann, Michael Bruning, and Persis Love. The show's theme song is by Metaphor Music. The FT's global head of audio is Cheryl Brumley. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The TADAT Podcast
Episode 12.2 - COLOMBIA VIRTUAL ASSESSMENT

The TADAT Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 25:36


In this episode, we will have a conversation with Katherine Baer, Deputy Director of the Fiscal Affairs Department at the International Monetary Fund. Katherine was the pioneer of the virtual TADAT assessments, which started with Colombia in July 2020, exactly a year ago. Today she will share her experience in the Colombian TADAT assessment.

CoinDesk Reports
MONEY REIMAGINED: Why Bitcoin Needs Its Critics - A Conversation With Noelle Acheson

CoinDesk Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 49:20


You can think of this week's episode as a nod to what crypto people call the “no coiners,” an effort to listen to the community's critics and weigh the value of their analysis.This episode is sponsored by Unique One Network, Mimo and Quantstamp.To do so, “Money Reimagined” co-hosts Sheila Warren and Michael J. Casey are joined by Noelle Acheson, head of Market Insights at Genesis. (A trading company, Genesis is owned by CoinDesk parent Digital Currency Group.) The trio take a couple of crypto-critical essays and dissect them.At a time when cryptocurrencies seem to be under attack, especially from government officials, it's tempting for people in the crypto community to drop into defensive mode, which mostly translates into dismissive mode. Whether it's criticisms of bitcoin's energy usage, complaints about illicit activity through crypto, or people pointing out how many outrights scams are run through this technology, the industry's response is typically to mock the critic for their ignorance or hypocrisy in ways that can sound to outsiders like whataboutism. Sure, sometimes it's warranted, as with Crypto Twitter's response to Sen. Elizabeth Warren's (D-Mass.) claim earlier this week that a crypto-based financial system would be run at the “whims of some shadowy, faceless group of super-coders.” Some memes were acutely on point; many others were just downright hilarious.But often the knee-jerk dismissiveness backfires against the community. It can come across as cult-like, a failure to embrace and learn from criticism and a reluctance to consider the views of others. This is not how you bridge divides and expand adoption. So, in its own humble attempt to take a more reflective stance, “Money Reimagined” takes a look at two noteworthy criticisms of the crypto space. One is a thoughtful essay entitled “I, Token: The untold story of the hole in Bitcoin's heart” from Brett Scott, an essayist who explores the intersection of money and society, often with the bent of an anthropologist. The piece argues that bitcoin enthusiasts fail to imbue the cryptocurrency with true meaning because they focus on the “function” of bitcoin (what it does) and not its structure (what it is). Along the way, he makes some compelling points about the difference between “price” and “value.”The other is a blog post by International Monetary Fund staffers Tobias Adrian and Rhoda Weeks-Brown, in which they argue cryptoassets are not viable for governments to explore as alternatives to state-run currencies.We hope you enjoy listening. -Unique One Network is an interoperable Platform for DeFi enabled NFT Marketplaces, in a variety of sectors, built on Polkadot Parity Substrate. Unique One Network's cross chain NFT hub facilitates transfers between a variety of blockchains and ecosystems, unleashing the power of NFTs with myriad innovative capabilities. Find out more at Unique One Network.-Mimo is home of the world's #1 euro-algorithmically pegged token minted at an interest rate of just 2%. Lock in your crypto assets, access their liquidity, and stabilize your portfolio by hedging against inflating coins. Open a Vault and experience the power of Mimo today at mimo.capital.-Quantstamp is the leader of blockchain security, having secured over 100 billion USD worth of digital assets. Visit quantstamp.com to learn why top DeFi projects like Maker, Compound and BarnBridge trust Quantstamp to secure the financial infrastructure of tomorrow. Learn more at quantstamp.com/blog.Image credit: Stanislav Gvozd/iStock/Getty Images Plus, modified by Coindesk

SBS German - SBS Deutsch
Pandemic is 'far from over'in the United States - Die Pandemie nimmt Ausmasse an, die über den gesundheitlichen Aspekt hinausgehen

SBS German - SBS Deutsch

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 8:08


America's top health agency has again revised its guidelines for mask wearing, as the Delta variant of Covid-19 hits the unvaccinated population hard. Meanwhile, the United Nations says 600-million children are being affected by school closures in response to the pandemic - with devastating consequences. And the International Monetary Fund has singled out access to vaccines as the biggest cause of a widening gap in growth forecasts between rich and poor countries across the globe. - Die Zahl der Todesfälle durch Covid-19 ist vergangene Woche weltweit um 21 Prozent gestiegen. Der Treiber ist die Delta-Variante. Die Vereinten Nationen warnen wegen des anhaltenden Fernunterrichts vor verheerenden Folgen für 600 Millionen Kinder. Der Internationale Währungsfond weist auf die zunehmende Kluft zwischen Ländern mit und solchen ohne Impfstoff.

BFM :: General
IMF Releases Updated Growth Forecasts

BFM :: General

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 3:52


The International Monetary Fund has released updated forecasts for the global economy, with revisions highlighting the disparity between wealthier nations and developing countries. Dhanya tells us more. Image Source: Josh Appel, Unsplash

New Books Network
Massimo Rostagno et al., "Monetary Policy in Times of Crisis: A Tale of Two Decades of the European Central Bank" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 49:16


In July 2021, nine summers after its then president saved the euro with three choice words (“whatever it takes”), the European Central Bank published the results of a thoroughgoing review of its strategy. A policy framework built for times when inflation posed a modest upside challenge had coped – but only just – with successive financial, sovereign-debt, banking and health crises that threatened chronically weak inflation at best and deflation at worst. Essential to the review was research conducted to mark the 20th anniversary of the ECB in 2019 and now updated and published as a book: Monetary Policy in Times of Crisis: A Tale of Two Decades of the European Central Bank (Oxford UP, 2021) by Massimo Rostagno, Carlo Altavilla, Giacomo Carboni, Wolfgang Lemke, Roberto Motto, Arthur Saint Guilhem and Jonathan Yiangou. This exhaustive analytical history concludes that the ECB operated two policy regimes – one from 1999 to 2012 and a second crisis-informed strategy until the narrative ends before the onset of the pandemic. With its strategic review over, the history lessons from this book will be an essential guide to ECB thinking as it prepares a slow and careful unwinding of its emergency policy settings. Massimo Rostagno has been the ECB's Director General Monetary Policy since August 2017 and has worked at the central bank since 1998. He has served as head of the Monetary Policy Strategy Division and Director Monetary Policy and, before that, worked at the Banca d'Italia and the International Monetary Fund. He holds a PhD in economics from the University of California, Los Angeles. (Any views expressed are personal and not necessarily those of the ECB). *The author's own book recommendations are Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty (Harvard University Press, 2014) and The Populist Temptation: Economic Grievance and Political Reaction in the Modern Era by Barry Eichengreen (OUP USA, 2018). Tim Gwynn Jones is an economic and political-risk analyst at Medley Global (Energy Aspects). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in European Studies
Massimo Rostagno et al., "Monetary Policy in Times of Crisis: A Tale of Two Decades of the European Central Bank" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 49:16


In July 2021, nine summers after its then president saved the euro with three choice words (“whatever it takes”), the European Central Bank published the results of a thoroughgoing review of its strategy. A policy framework built for times when inflation posed a modest upside challenge had coped – but only just – with successive financial, sovereign-debt, banking and health crises that threatened chronically weak inflation at best and deflation at worst. Essential to the review was research conducted to mark the 20th anniversary of the ECB in 2019 and now updated and published as a book: Monetary Policy in Times of Crisis: A Tale of Two Decades of the European Central Bank (Oxford UP, 2021) by Massimo Rostagno, Carlo Altavilla, Giacomo Carboni, Wolfgang Lemke, Roberto Motto, Arthur Saint Guilhem and Jonathan Yiangou. This exhaustive analytical history concludes that the ECB operated two policy regimes – one from 1999 to 2012 and a second crisis-informed strategy until the narrative ends before the onset of the pandemic. With its strategic review over, the history lessons from this book will be an essential guide to ECB thinking as it prepares a slow and careful unwinding of its emergency policy settings. Massimo Rostagno has been the ECB's Director General Monetary Policy since August 2017 and has worked at the central bank since 1998. He has served as head of the Monetary Policy Strategy Division and Director Monetary Policy and, before that, worked at the Banca d'Italia and the International Monetary Fund. He holds a PhD in economics from the University of California, Los Angeles. (Any views expressed are personal and not necessarily those of the ECB). *The author's own book recommendations are Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty (Harvard University Press, 2014) and The Populist Temptation: Economic Grievance and Political Reaction in the Modern Era by Barry Eichengreen (OUP USA, 2018). Tim Gwynn Jones is an economic and political-risk analyst at Medley Global (Energy Aspects). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/european-studies

Business Matters
Google owner posts record profits

Business Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 53:05


Google owner Alphabet makes record financial successes – we hear from Sean Hollister at tech site The Verge about how the company made such an impressive post-pandemic recovery. The International Monetary Fund tells us about vaccine inequality in the world – Petya Koeva Brooks says there's ‘no better investment' than in reducing the gap. Meanwhile, the World Health Organisation has called for e-cigarettes to be regulated, warning that they are dangerous to health, and can lead children and young people in to smoking tobacco. Dr Rudiger Krech is director of health promotion at WHO. Finally, the American gymnastics champion, Simone Biles, has pulled out of the US women's team final in the Tokyo Olympics, citing mental health concerns – we discuss all of this with guests Lori Ann LaRoccoa, senior editor atCNBC in New Jersey and Simon Littlewood from ACG Global in Singapore. (Image: Google logo seen displayed on a smartphone. Credit: Omar Marques/ SOPA Images/ LightRocket via Getty Images)

World Business Report
Update: Google posts record financial successes

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 7:24


Record sales and revenue as Google's owner Alphabet beats expectations. We hear more about how the tech giant has recovered post-pandemic. We also look at the latest on the global inequality in covid vaccines from the International Monetary Fund's Petya Koeva Brooks.

The Tightrope with Dan Smolen
Future Work in Local Food Production

The Tightrope with Dan Smolen

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 39:19


Podcaster Dan Smolen sees future work in local food production. We have a serious food problem. And, according to the International Monetary Fund, the price of food has jumped 47 percent in the past year. Our once reliable agricultural model scaled a food pipeline driven on abundant water, millions of acres of rich farmland, a huge supply chain, and cheap labor. However, the pandemic and climate change destroyed that model. Most of the food that we eat travels long distances to reach our tables. During the long journey, our food loses nutritional value. Instead, growing fresh local food ensures that we are better fed. And that provides us better health outcomes. To feed the nation and the world, we must pivot to a new model that drives future work in local food production. Podcast guest Maurice Small is a nationally recognized regenerative farmer and social entrepreneur. He helps people to find and do meaningful work in regenerative farming. Maurice also helps urban farmers to become instruments of food justice. As a result, people in need gain access to fresh and sustainable protein and produce. “Food justice means that we all eat, and we all eat well.” Maurice is leading the charge for future work in local food production. Full interview starts at 6:37 About our guest: Maurice Small has cultivated a national following for sustainable agriculture and healthy lifestyles in underserved communities. He collaborates with stakeholders in government, business, academia, and community to help people eat and live well. His company, Small Enterprises, and his farm are located in Atlanta, Georgia. EPISODE DATE: July 23, 2021 Social media: – Website – Instagram – LinkedIn – Tumblr – Twitter – YouTube  Please Subscribe to The Dan Smolen Podcast on: – Apple Podcast – Android – Google Podcasts – Pandora – Spotify – Stitcher – TuneIn …or wherever you get your podcasts. You may also click HERE to receive our podcast episodes by email. Image credits: Fresh produce, Manassas, Virginia Farmers' Market; Portrait, Maurice Small; Podcast button, J. Brandt Studio for The Dan Smolen Experience.

The John Batchelor Show
1512: Fintech Start-Up Planet. Matthieu Favas @TheEconomist

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2021 11:45


Photo:  Mme Christine Lagarde, Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund, addressing in 2018 at the Singapore FinTech Festival, the largest FinTech festival in the world. Fintech Start-Up Planet.  Matthieu Favas @TheEconomist Financial technology is the technology and innovation that aims to compete with traditional financial methods in the delivery of financial services. https://www.economist.com/finance-and-economics/2021/07/12/investment-in-fintech-booms-as-upstarts-go-mainstream

CrossroadsET
Live Q&A: FBI Criticized Over Tweet On Reporting Family Members; China Launches New Currency War

CrossroadsET

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 65:14


The FBI is being criticized for a tweet saying Americans should report family members and peers for suspicious behaviors in a campaign to prevent extremism. And in other news, a new currency program through the International Monetary Fund is allegedly being used by the Chinese government in a possible bid to undermine the US dollar. In this live Q&A with Crossroads host Joshua Philipp we'll discuss these stories and others, and answer questions from the audience. ⭕️ Subscribe for updates : http://bit.ly/CrossroadsYT ⭕️ Donate to support our work: https://www.bestgift.tv/crossroads ⭕️ Join Patreon to Support Crossroads: https://www.patreon.com/Crossroads_Josh

The TADAT Podcast
Episode 16: A Farewell Chat with Michael Keen

The TADAT Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 31:22


Summary: We sit down with Michael Keen, Mick as we affectionately call him, during his last week before he retires as Deputy Director of the Fiscal Affairs Department at the International Monetary Fund. Mick is a renowned economist of international stature and repute. Before joining the Fund, he was Professor of Economics at the University of Essex and visiting Professor at Kyoto University. He is a prolific writer and author on economic and fiscal issues and renowned author. He has served on various international editorial boards and was awarded the CESifo-IIPF Musgrave prize in 2010. He was, just before retiring, the TADAT line manager. He shares with us some insights and wisdom from his career of working in the taxation domain for over 26 years.

Macro Musings with David Beckworth
Agustin Carstens on Agustin Carstens on Central Banking in Emerging Markets, the Distributional Footprint of Monetary Policy, and Central Bank Digital Currency

Macro Musings with David Beckworth

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2021 50:05


Agustin Carstens leads the Bank for International Settlements or the BIS in his role as general manager and previously served as the governor of the Bank of Mexico. He also served as the deputy managing director of the International Monetary Fund. Agustin joins David on Macro Musings to discuss the new BIS 2021 annual report. Specifically, David and Agustin discuss the macroeconomic developments of the past year, the distributional footprint of monetary policy, the evolving role of central banking, and the outlook for central bank digital currency (CBDC).   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Agustin's BIS profile: https://www.bis.org/author/agust%C3%ADn_carstens.htm   Related Links:   *Annual Economic Report 2021* by the BIS https://www.bis.org/publ/arpdf/ar2021e.htm   U.S. Monetary Policy and the Global Financial Cycle* by Silvia Miranda-Agrippino and Hélène Rey https://academic.oup.com/restud/article/87/6/2754/5834728?login=true   David's blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David's Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

PBS NewsHour - Health
IMF projects U.S. economy to grow 7% due to robust vaccinations, but warns of inflation

PBS NewsHour - Health

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 8:15


An annual report released Thursday by the International Monetary Fund projects that the U.S. economy will grow roughly 7% this year as federal stimulus programs fuel consumer spending -- but that growth raises the risk of inflation. The report also urges the U.S. to help other countries cope with the pandemic. Kristalina Georgieva, managing director of the IMF, joins Judy Woodruff to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
IMF projects U.S. economy to grow 7% due to robust vaccinations, but warns of inflation

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 8:15


An annual report released Thursday by the International Monetary Fund projects that the U.S. economy will grow roughly 7% this year as federal stimulus programs fuel consumer spending -- but that growth raises the risk of inflation. The report also urges the U.S. to help other countries cope with the pandemic. Kristalina Georgieva, managing director of the IMF, joins Judy Woodruff to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
IMF projects US economy to grow 7% due to robust vaccinations, but warns of inflation

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 8:15


An annual report released Thursday by the International Monetary Fund projects that the U.S. economy will grow roughly 7% this year as federal stimulus programs fuel consumer spending -- but that growth raises the risk of inflation. The report also urges the U.S. to help other countries cope with the pandemic. Kristalina Georgieva, managing director of the IMF, joins Judy Woodruff to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Seneca's 100 Women to Hear
Kristalina Georgieva: Head of the International Monetary Fund

Seneca's 100 Women to Hear

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 33:21


Kristalina Georgieva is the second woman, after Christine Lagarde, to hold the job of Managing Director of the powerful IMF. We revisit this fascinating conversation from early 2021; in it Georgieva tells how the IMF helped some member countries avoid economic collapse during the pandemic, and why she puts a relentless focus on gender equality. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

South Sudan In Focus  - Voice of America

The International Monetary Fund provides debt relief to Sudan for the country's commitment to major economic reform; a South Sudanese surgeon helps refugees from neighboring Sudan and host communities in Upper Nile State; and Jonglei State police report an increase in traffic accident fatalities in Bor Town.

The TADAT Podcast
Episode 3 - Gender and Revenue Administration Podcast Series

The TADAT Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 34:54


Welcome to the third episode in the Gender and Revenue Administration Podcast Series. A special collaborative series by the International Monetary Fund's Fiscal Affairs Department and the TADAT Secretariat. This is Wofai Ibiang from the TADAT Secretariat. The first two episodes featured leaders in Tax and Customs' Administrations who shared their views and strategies on how to seek gender equity in their organizations. This episode is moderated by Ms. Vicki Perry, Deputy Director, Fiscal Affairs Department of the IMF, with guests Ms. Deborah Jenkins, Deputy Commissioner, Small Business at the Australian Taxation Office (ATO), and Ms. Doris Akol, Senior Policy and Engagement Advisor for the International Center for Tax and Development (ICTD)'s DIGITAX program. Ms. Jenkins shares her perspective on the role of gender at the ATO and how the Australian government's clear commitment has set the country as one of the leaders in gender equality. Ms. Akol shares insights regarding the facilitation of gender equality in Uganda. Both speakers highlight pragmatic steps that countries can adopt towards improving gender equality, especially in tax administrations.

The Long View
Sonal Desai: Navigating Historically Low Yields and Stretched Valuations

The Long View

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 46:16


Our guest this week is Sonal Desai. Sonal is executive vice president and chief investment officer of the Franklin Templeton Fixed Income Group. In addition to her responsibilities overseeing many of Franklin's fixed-income teams, Sonal also co-chairs the group's fixed-income policy committee and is a member of Franklin Resources executive committee as well as the firm's management and investment committees. Sonal is a listed portfolio manager at a number of strategies, including Core Plus, Strategic Income, and Global Fixed Income. Sonal joined Franklin in 2009 from Thames River Capital in London. Prior to that, Sonal worked at the International Monetary Fund and as director and senior economist at Dresdner Kleinwort Wasserstein. She earned her bachelor's in economics from the University of Delhi and her doctorate in economics from Northwestern University. BackgroundBioFranklin Strategic Income A Franklin Total Return A Franklin Low Duration Total Return A Fiscal and Monetary Policy“On My Mind: Adrift--Has Monetary Policy Become Unanchored?” by Sonal Desai, franklintempleton.com.“On My Mind: Modern Magical Thinking,” by Sonal Desai, franklintempleton.com, March 12, 2019. “On My Mind: Bringing the Economy Back From Life Support,” by Sonal Desai, franklintempleton.“On My Mind: Now Let's Get Those Jobs Back,” by Sonal Desai, franklintempleton.“If You Open It, They Will Come,” by Sonal Desai, advisorperspectives.com, June 5, 2020.“Quick Thoughts: Why Our Managers Disagree on Inflation, Rates, and Growth,” by Stephen Dover, John Bellows, Sonal Desai, and Francis Scotland, franklintempleton.com, April 23, 2021. “U.S. Macro Outlook: Let's Bend the Economic Growth Curve,” by Sonal Desai and Nikhil Mohan, franklintempleton.com, April 22, 2020.“On My Mind--Inflation: The Devil We Knew,” by Sonal Desai, franklintempleton.com, Feb. 26, 2021. Bonds “Sonal Desai: ‘In Fixed Income, Active Investment Historically Has Been the Winning Strategy,'” by Sonal Desai, advisoranalyst.com, Nov. 8, 2019. “On My Mind: A Tale of Two Recoveries,” by Sonal Desai, franklintempleton.com, April 22, 2021.“Too Much of a Good Thing?” by Sonal Desai, David Yuen, John Beck, and David Zahn, franklintempleton.com, April 8, 2021.

Marketplace Morning Report
Have you tried getting an Uber or Lyft lately?

Marketplace Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2021 8:40


In some cities, the cost of an Uber to the airport could rival that of the flight itself. There are long wait times and elevated prices for rides right now. We take a closer look at why. Plus, a new estimate on how long the global computer chip shortage could last. One CEO says it could be years. Also, the unequal distribution of COVID vaccines is threatening permanent economic recovery, according to leaders from the International Monetary Fund, World Health Organization, World Bank and World Trade Organization. And, how efforts at Howard University’s College of Fine Arts aim to address a lack of diversity in Hollywood’s executive suites.

Marketplace All-in-One
Have you tried getting an Uber or Lyft lately?

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2021 8:40


In some cities, the cost of an Uber to the airport could rival that of the flight itself. There are long wait times and elevated prices for rides right now. We take a closer look at why. Plus, a new estimate on how long the global computer chip shortage could last. One CEO says it could be years. Also, the unequal distribution of COVID vaccines is threatening permanent economic recovery, according to leaders from the International Monetary Fund, World Health Organization, World Bank and World Trade Organization. And, how efforts at Howard University’s College of Fine Arts aim to address a lack of diversity in Hollywood’s executive suites.

The Good Fight
What Went Wrong In India

The Good Fight

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2021 50:20


Even as many affluent countries are beginning to see the light at the end of the tunnel of the COVID-19 pandemic, India is facing a terrifying rise of cases and deaths. According to Raghuram Rajan, the former governor of the Reserve Bank of India and the former Chief Economist at the International Monetary Fund, a large part of the blame for the pandemic rests with Narendra Modi; but the government's poor performance also has its roots in a deeper failure of the country's institutions. In this week's conversation, Yascha Mounk and Raghuram Rajan discuss the role of government in preventing catastrophes, the suppression of free speech in India, and how decentralizing the economy can empower local communities and strengthen democracy.  This transcript has been condensed and lightly edited for clarity. Please do listen and spread the word about The Good Fight. If you have not yet signed up for our podcast, please do so now by following this link on your phone. Email: podcast@persuasion.community  Website: http://www.persuasion.community Podcast production by John T. Williams and Rebecca Rashid Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Connect with us! Spotify | Apple | Google Twitter: @Yascha_Mounk & @joinpersuasion Youtube: Yascha Mounk LinkedIn: Persuasion Community Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Stephanomics
America's Economic Recovery Isn't Roaring For Everyone

Stephanomics

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2021 33:58


After more than a year of pandemic, the U.S. economy is roaring back and is now expected to grow by 9.4% in the second quarter. That's fueling a mad scramble across U.S. industries desperately in need of workers. But for all the momentum, pockets of poverty and stagnation remain behind the rosy American facade. And no place represents that reality better than Youngstown, Ohio. On this week's podcast, U.S.-based economics reporter Shawn Donnan digs into the decades-long economic slide in this Eastern Ohio city and the flailing attempts to revive it. More than 61,000 people worked in Youngstown's booming manufacturing industry in 1990, but this past March it employed just over 23,000. The latest blow occurred in 2019, when General Motors closed its doors in nearby Lordstown and took 4,500 jobs with it. A struggling effort to make Youngstown a hub of 3D printing, launched under former President Barack Obama, shows how hard it is for the Rust Belt to regain its former glory. Bloomberg Chief Economist Tom Orlik discusses the International Monetary Fund's proposal to end the pandemic and Johannesburg economics reporter Prinesha Naidoo reports on the growing Covid-19 calamity in Africa, where delayed vaccination campaigns could leave 39 million more Africans in extreme poverty this year. And host Stephanie Flanders sits down with Germany's Olaf Scholz, the finance minister vying to replace Angela Merkel as chancellor, to ask about his campaign and why Germany is moving ahead with a controversial gas pipeline with Russia.