Podcasts about Medical research

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Wide array of research

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  • 1,803EPISODES
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  • May 20, 2022LATEST
Medical research

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Best podcasts about Medical research

Show all podcasts related to medical research

Latest podcast episodes about Medical research

Mayo Clinic Q&A
Consider all treatment options for ovarian cancer, including clinical trials

Mayo Clinic Q&A

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 10:10


Ovarian cancer is the fifth-leading cause of cancer death among women in the U.S. When ovarian cancer first develops, it might not cause noticeable symptoms. It often goes undetected until it has spread within the pelvis and abdomen. "Unfortunately, ovarian cancer often presents with very common symptoms, and these common symptoms are things that everybody will complain about at some point," explains Dr. John Weroha, a Mayo Clinic medical oncologist. "For example, constipation, bloating, maybe a little weight gain. These are very common symptoms, and oftentimes, people just kind of blow it off as being normal. So, that's how it hides and grows."Once ovarian cancer is detected, treatment depends on the stage when the disease is diagnosed. Stage 1 — the lowest stage — indicates that the cancer is confined to the ovaries. At this stage, a cure may be achieved with surgery alone. By stage 4, the cancer has spread to distant areas of the body. At this point, treatment is more complex, often involving drug therapies and potentially immunotherapy, which uses the immune system to attack cancer cells.Dr. Weroha encourages patients to explore all their treatment options, including clinical trials. "I think one of the biggest misconceptions that I see with patients is that clinical trials are supposed to be a last resort, and that is absolutely not true," says Dr. Weroha. "What we do at Mayo, and really everywhere else, is we try to bring clinical trials to our patients — not because we want to test whether or not this brand-new drug works, but we already believe the drug works. We think it's going to work, and we want to give that to our patients because they can't get it any other way, except through a clinical trial." On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Weroha discusses the latest treatments for ovarian cancer.  

Gap Year For Grown-Ups
Dr. Bree Johnston on Psychedelic Therapy to Ease Fear of Death

Gap Year For Grown-Ups

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 46:51


Today, Debbie talks with Dr. Bree Johnston, a geriatrician and a palliative care physician who is also certified in psychedelic therapies.In case you haven't noticed, the topic of psychedelic therapy has gone mainstream in the past several years. Taking a guided psilocybin trip is now viewed as a highly effective way to ease fear of dying. But it's complicated. It took Debbie several months to find just the right person to interview about the therapeutic benefits of psychedelics. Her research led her to Dr. Bree Johnston who is perfectly credentialed for this topic as well as being a notably clear and wise teacher for [B]OLDER podcast listeners. She's been a practicing physician for 35 years and recently became certified in Psychedelic Therapies and Research through the California Institute of Integral Studies.They talk about:- The problem of legality (she predicts psilocybin therapy will be legal in a few years)- Why psychedelic therapy is especially useful for older, dying patients- Her own psychonaut experiences- The dissolution of "self" and becoming part of a whole (a common experience on a psychedelic trip)- The current studies being done at Johns Hopkins and NYU- Microdosing- And her evaluation of which psychedelic therapies are currently most useful: psilocybin, MDMA (aka ecstasy), ketamine (not illegal but results can vary widely).They also explore the complexity that comes with medicalizing psychedelics as well as the ethics surrounding legalization.  This is a highly informative conversation with a knowledgeable physician. Mentioned in this episode or useful:Dr. Bree Johnston on LinkedInThe Trip Treatment by Michael Pollan (The New Yorker; February 5, 2015)How to Change Your Mind: What the New Science of Psychedelics Teaches Us About Consciousness, Dying, Addiction, Depression, and Transcendence by Michael Pollan (Penguin Press; 2018)The Pied Piper of Psychedelic Toads by Kimon de Greef (The New Yorker; March 21, 2022)Berkeley Center for the Science of PsychedelicsPsychedelic Therapy Training Certificate | California Institute of Integral StudiesThe Microdose NewsletterNew York Magazine Investigative Podcast: Cover Story: Power TripJohns Hopkins Center for Psychedelic and Consciousness ResearchCenter for Psychedelic Medicine | NYUA Really Good Day: How Microdosing Made a Mega Difference in My Mood, My Marriage, and My Life by Ayelet Waldman (Knopf; 2017)Brian Anderson - Studies at UCSFSacred Knowledge: Psychedelics and Religious Experiences by William Richards (Columbia University Press; 2015)Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies - MAPSMAPS NewsletterHandbook of Medical Hallucinogens by Charles Grob and Jim Grigsby (The Guilford Press; 2021)Note from DebbieIf you've been enjoying the podcast, please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts. It takes less than two minutes and it really makes a difference. It makes me feel loved and it also attracts new listeners.Subscribe to my newsletter and get my free writing guide: https://bitly.com/debbie-free-guide.Connect with me:Website: debbieweil.comTwitter: @debbieweilInstagram: @debbieweilFacebook: @debbieweilLinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/debbieweilBlog: Gap Year After SixtyEmail: thebolderpodcast@gmail.comDebbieWe are looking for a sponsor or a podcast networkIf you are interested in reaching a smart and thoughtful audience of midlife, and older, listeners, contact Debbie Weil.Media PartnersNext For MeEncore.orgMEASupport this podcast:Leave a review on Apple Podcasts: it will help us find a sponsor! If you are interested, contact Debbie WeilSubscribe via Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher or SpotifyCredits:Host: Debbie WeilProducer: Far Out MediaPodcast websiteMusic: Lakeside Path by Duck Lake

Blood Podcast
HLA-DQ heterodimers and transplantation, the genomic landscape of LGL leukemia, and an updated classification of hemochromatosis

Blood Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 21:56


In this week's episode we'll feature new research demonstrating that certain HLA-DQ heterodimers can help predict clinical outcome following hematopoietic cell transplantation. Next, we'll review a recent integrated and comprehensive genomic analysis that sheds new light on the molecular characteristics of large granular lymphocyte leukemia and its subtypes. Finally, we'll review the work of a group that proposes a new and more accessible hemochromatosis classification system based on clinical characteristics and genetic features. 

That Digital Show
How Garvan Institute of Medical Research is Driving Digital Frontiers in Genomics Analytics

That Digital Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 20:00


In this episode, Associate Professor Sarah Kummerfeld, Head of Data Science for the Garvan Institute of Medical Research, joins Jay and Theo to discuss the vital role cloud computing plays in genomic sequencing. Genomic sequencing has been contributing to medical research to improve the understanding and diagnosis of rare diseases for many years. However, sequencing a single genome produces approximately 100GB of data in its raw format, which then needs to be converted into a format that can be analyzed and shared with researchers. This process can take as much as 600 CPU hours per genome. The Garvan Institute knew that processing vast amounts of genomes was far beyond the capabilities of on-prem infrastructure. And during the COVID-19 pandemic, genomic sequencing took on even more importance. Sarah's team realized that moving to the public cloud was the only way, embarking on a pilot program to process 14,000 genomes. Listen in as Sarah reveals how the team at Garvan Institute reduced the time it took to sequence the virus from a PCR test from two days to about four hours – dramatically speeding up contact tracing and reducing the spread of COVID-19 in the community. She talks through how the team uses a system called Terra, and how it became easier to manage the privacy and security of genomic data in Google Cloud, and the vast capacity required for this data in the region. In fact, Sarah's team discovered that with Google Cloud, there was enough capacity available within Australia to run a pilot program three times as big. As biology increasingly becomes a data science, generating enormous pools of data, Sarah shares how the Garvan Institute is embracing the huge opportunity machine learning presents to help build and improve the vital genomic infrastructure for Australia.

The Mike Wagner Show
San Diego author Jason Boyce is my very special guest with “Chronic Fatigue Gone”!

The Mike Wagner Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 47:09


San Diego author Jason Boyce talks about his new book “Chronic Fatigue Gone” chronicling his experiences suffering from ME/CFS for 15 years plus experimenting with a number of therapies, pharmaceuticals, and vitamins to no avail and found the perfect combination that helps FIGHT (find out!) chronic fatigue caused by LYME, EBV, and more! Jason also uses his own body as a petri dish and research hundreds of hours to provide valuable insights, into therapies that'll potentially change lives plus provides advice on beating depression, getting back to sleep, staying motivated, positive and more! Check out the amazing book on Amazon and www. chronicfatiguegone.com ! #jasonboyce #sandiego #author #chronicfatiguegone #therapies #pharmaceuticals #vitamins #lyme #medicalresearch #amazon #audible #iheartradio #spreaker #spotify #itunes #googleplay #applemusic #youtube #podbean #anchorfm #mikewagner #themikewagnershow #mikewagnerjasonboyce #themikewagnershowjasonboyce

NEJM This Week — Audio Summaries
NEJM This Week — May 19, 2022

NEJM This Week — Audio Summaries

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 27:13


Featuring articles on childhood risk factors and adult cardiovascular events, results of two cases of pig-to-human kidney xenotransplantation, vaccine effectiveness against omicron in children and adolescents, the efficacy and safety of a BNT162b2 booster, catching up on REMs, and on NEJM Healer; a review article on brain tumors in children; a case report of a man with persistent cough and pulmonary opacities; and Perspective articles on reforming nursing home care, on progress toward pig-to-human xenotransplantation, and on being only halfway there with sudden infant death syndrome.

Mornings with John Mackenzie
John MacKenzie chats with Ros Bates, State member for Mudgeeraba, Shadow Minister for Health and Ambulance Services, and Shadow Minister for Medical Research, about Cairns hospital's overcrowding crisis due to a shortage of doctors & nurses in FNQ.

Mornings with John Mackenzie

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 9:04


John MacKenzie chats with Ros Bates, State member for Mudgeeraba, Shadow Minister for Health and Ambulance Services, and Shadow Minister for Medical Research, about Cairns hospital's overcrowding crisis, primarily due to a shortage of doctors & nurses in Far North Queensland An increase in mental health cases and covid numbers have also contributed to the Qld health system being in the "worst state", some health staff have said. Some Queenslanders have waited hours for an ambulance and emergency departments are overrun with patients needing medical attention.

Mayo Clinic Q&A
COVID-19 update

Mayo Clinic Q&A

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 21:12


The widespread availability of at-home COVID-19 tests have made it easier for people to know if they have the virus, and to take measures to protect themselves and others. But there is a downside. Because the majority of tests are now done at home and often not reported, the official counts on COVID-19 infection rates are not as accurate as they have been in past waves of the virus. "Because the majority of testing is being done at home, we can no longer tell you accurately about the positivity rate for a given community for a given state like we used to be able to," explains Dr. Gregory Poland, head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. "And this is problematic. It means that we lose our ability to understand what's called genetic epidemiology — the ability to trace how these variants are moving, how fast they're moving, and whether they're changing and evolving into yet different subvariants or new variants. We've lost that ability now."The most recent omicron subvariant, BA 2.12.1, has cases on the rise again and the U.S. passed a tragic milestone last week, reaching 1 million COVID-19 deaths in the country.In an effort to capture a more accurate picture, the latest tool being used by public health officials to track COVID-19 infection rates is wastewater surveillance. By looking for the presence of the COVID-19 virus shed by people, wastewater surveillance can give a more accurate picture of how much virus is in the community. This detects virus not only from those who test at home, but also from people who are asymptomatic and, therefore, didn't get tested.On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Poland discusses the current state of COVID-19 in the U.S., including what we know about the latest subvariants.

ASCO Guidelines Podcast Series
Exercise, Diet, and Weight Management During Cancer Treatment Guideline

ASCO Guidelines Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 13:25


An interview with Dr. Jennifer Ligibel from Dana Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, MA and Dr. Catherine Alfano from Northwell Health Cancer Institute and Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research in New York, NY, co-chairs on "Exercise, Diet and Weight Management During Cancer Treatment: ASCO Guideline." This guideline addresses recommendations for exercise, diet, and weight management for adult patients undergoing active cancer treatment, highlighting where there is evidence to recommend interventions, and where future research is needed. Read the full guideline at www.asco.org/supportive-care-guidelines.   TRANSCRIPT Brittany Harvey: Hello and welcome to the ASCO Guidelines podcast series brought to you by the ASCO Podcast Network, a collection of nine programs covering a range of educational and scientific content and offering enriching insight into the world of cancer care. You can find all the shows, including this one at asco.org/podcasts. My name is Brittany Harvey, and today I'm interviewing Dr. Jennifer Ligibel from Dana Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts, and Dr. Catherine Alfano from Northwell Health Cancer Institute, and Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research in New York, New York, co-chairs on 'Exercise, Diet and Weight Management During Cancer Treatment: ASCO Guideline'. Thank you for being here, Dr. Ligibel and Dr. Alfano. Dr. Jennifer Ligibel: Thanks for having us. Brittany Harvey: First, I'd like to note that ASCO takes great care in the development of its guidelines and ensuring that the ASCO conflict of interest policy is followed for each guideline. The full conflict of interest information for this guideline panel is available online with the publication of the guideline in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Dr. Ligibel, do you have any relevant disclosures that are directly related to this guideline topic? Dr. Jennifer Ligibel: I have no personal conflicts with this guideline. Brittany Harvey: Thank you. Dr. Alfano, do you have any relevant disclosures that are directly related to this guideline topic? Dr. Catherine Alfano: I have no conflicts. Brittany Harvey: Thank you. Then, getting into the content of this guideline. Dr. Ligibel, can you start us off with an overview of the scope of this guideline? Dr. Jennifer Ligibel: Sure. So, this guideline was developed to provide recommendations around exercise, diet, and weight management for patients undergoing active cancer treatment. We defined active cancer treatment as either the perioperative period or the period of time in which patients were receiving chemotherapy and/or radiation. This guideline specifically focuses on adult cancer patients and largely focuses on individuals undergoing treatment for curative intent. There were a number of reasons why we thought it was important to develop a guideline specifically for patients who were undergoing cancer treatment. There are a number of other guidelines that talk about the role of these types of lifestyle factors in preventing cancer, and also information widely available about the potential benefits of exercising more, consuming certain types of diets, or losing weight after cancer treatment is finished. But there's much less information about the feasibility and potential benefits and safety of increasing your exercise, changing your diet, or losing weight during cancer treatment. This is the time when oncology providers are primarily working with patients in a time when patients have a lot of questions about what they should be eating and what they should be doing. So, this guideline was developed to specifically try to provide guidance during treatment. Brittany Harvey: Yes, definitely an area in which guidance is very much needed. So, then Dr. Alfano, I'd like to next review the key recommendations of this guideline, starting with what are the recommendations regarding exercise during cancer treatment? Dr. Catherine Alfano: For exercise, the expert panel felt that the evidence was very strong. And so, oncology providers should recommend aerobic and resistance exercise during active treatment with curative intent because it can mitigate the side effects of cancer treatments. So, exercise has been shown during active cancer treatment to reduce fatigue, to either improve or preserve a patient's cardiorespiratory fitness, their physical functioning, their strength outcomes, and in some kinds of patients exercise has been shown to improve quality of life and reduce anxiety and depression. The evidence is not sufficient to recommend exercise specifically for improving cancer control outcomes yet. This is a source of ongoing study, but we felt that the evidence was strong enough that oncology providers should recommend aerobic and resistance exercise, and it should become the standard of care for all cancer patients. The second recommendation regarding exercise is that oncology providers may recommend pre-operative exercise for patients specifically undergoing surgery for lung cancer. So, this can be called prehab or pre-habilitation exercise. And this exercise has been shown to reduce outcomes like the length of hospital stay and postoperative complications. Brittany Harvey: Excellent. Thank you for reviewing those recommendations and the level of evidence behind them. So, then, Dr. Ligibel, what did the panel recommend regarding particular dietary patterns or foods for patients during cancer treatment? Dr. Jennifer Ligibel: One of the things that we recognized as a panel as we reviewed the evidence that shaped these guidelines was that there was much less evidence for both dietary factors and whether that was specific dietary patterns or some specific foods, as well as weight management, how those types of changes during treatment, affected outcomes, or even the feasibility of changing your diet or losing weight during cancer treatment. We, for this guideline, really relied on randomized trials to help shape our guidance, and we realized very quickly that there were few randomized trials testing dietary change or weight management during cancer treatment. So, as a panel, we debated for a long time about what we should say in this setting. We did find that there were a few randomized trials that specifically looked at neutropenic diets. We defined that as diets that omitted fresh fruits and vegetables for patients who had undergone treatment for hematologic malignancies, and in particular bone marrow transplants. Those studies were designed to look at whether those types of diets reduce the risk of infection. We did not see evidence that omitting fruits and vegetables during cancer treatment for those malignancies, reduced infection, and so the group provided a recommendation that neutropenic diets not be recommended for patients during cancer treatment, but we were unable to provide specific guidance regarding other dietary factors or the incorporation of specific foods during cancer treatment. As a group, we recognize the importance of a healthy diet for general health. But given that we were really looking at randomized trials of the effects of changing someone's diet during treatment, we ultimately did not make a recommendation for a particular diet during cancer treatment, but really called for more research with well-designed clinical trials to test the impact of things like plant-based diets, intermittent fasting, other types of diets for which there may be interesting preclinical evidence, but very little information in people about the benefits or even the safety of these types of diets during cancer treatment. Brittany Harvey: Understood, I appreciate you outlining the nuance of that recommendation, and also the areas for future research, which we can get into a little bit more in a little bit. So then, in the last category of recommendations, Dr. Alfano, what does the guideline state regarding interventions to promote intentional weight loss or avoidance of weight gain during cancer treatment? Dr. Catherine Alfano: So, when our panel reviewed the evidence for weight loss or the avoidance of weight gain during cancer treatment, unfortunately, we decided that ultimately, there's insufficient evidence right now to recommend either for or against intentional weight loss or the prevention of weight gain during active treatment to improve outcomes related to the quality of life or things like treatment toxicities, or ultimately cancer control outcomes. Brittany Harvey: Thank you, Dr. Alfano, for that recommendation, as well. So, Dr. Ligibel, in your view, what is the importance of this guideline? And how will it impact both clinicians and patients? Dr. Jennifer Ligibel: This guideline is really the first large-scale effort to pull together all of the data from randomized trials about the effects of changing your lifestyle, exercising more, in particular, changing your diet, changing your weight during cancer treatment. I think that as a panel, we found very clear and consistent evidence as Dr. Alfano outlined, that exercise has concrete benefits for patients during cancer treatment. I think that this is really an important call to action, both for providers in speaking about these topics to their patients, but also for payers. And as we think about our healthcare system, about how we're going to support patients in becoming more active in a safe way during their cancer treatment. I think that it's very important that we recognize that encouraging physical activity is not just telling people that they should go out and do it. We really need to think about how we support patients in making these types of lifestyle changes in a sustained way. So, I think that this guideline really provides clear evidence that exercise is important. It also provides clear evidence that we need more research in other areas. Patients are asking their oncology providers every day, what they should be eating, whether they should be thinking about losing weight, and we really don't have clear evidence to guide these conversations at this point. I do think it's important to recognize that as a panel, we all felt very strongly that this guideline should not be interpreted as saying that a healthy diet or maintaining a healthy weight during treatment wasn't important. But we were really struck by the dearth of high-level evidence to be able to help our patients make informed choices and I think that's something that, from this guideline, we really need to come up with a plan be better able to ask the question that comes up in the clinic every day of, 'Doctor, what should I eat?' Brittany Harvey: Those are excellent points. I appreciate the panel looking critically at the evidence that's actually out there to try and determine recommendations. So then, Dr. Ligibel just mentioned a few areas in which more research is needed. So, Dr. Alfano, what are the outstanding questions regarding optimal diet, weight management, and exercise during active cancer treatment? Dr. Catherine Alfano: Being treated for cancer makes many patients feel like they have no control over their health and that causes them enormous anxiety. Patients are really looking for things that they can do to take the reins of control back over their health to improve their long-term health and well-being during treatment. I want to underscore the importance of the oncology team in helping patients improve their exercise. Research has shown that 50% of patients undergoing cancer treatment are not getting enough exercise. Patients want to receive guidance about exercise from their oncology team. And importantly, patients whose oncology clinicians discuss exercise with them are more likely to make these healthy behavior changes. So, it really underscores the importance of the oncology team in helping patients to access these important components of their health that they're asking for. The appropriate referral for exercise in patients undergoing treatment for cancer can really depend on several factors such as comorbidities, treatment toxicities, and the patient's pre-existing physical activity level. For example, many patients can safely perform unsupervised exercise, but others may need supervised cancer-specific exercise because they've got problems that they need to deal with clinically supervised exercise or to participate in a formal cancer rehabilitation program prior to undertaking exercise on their own. I want to highlight for everyone that there are national efforts that are focusing on building referral algorithms and clinical decision support tools to help point to the most safe, feasible, and effective intervention for a given patient. Brittany Harvey: Excellent. Well, thank you both so much for outlining the recommendations here and describing the nuance that the expert panel went through. It was certainly a large effort that you've helped lead. And so, I want to thank you so much for your work on these guidelines, and for your time today, Dr. Ligibel and Dr. Alfano. Dr. Jennifer Ligibel: Thanks for having us. Dr. Catherine Alfano: Thank you. Brittany Harvey: Thank you to all of our listeners for tuning in to the ASCO guidelines podcast series. To read the full guideline go to www.asco.org/supportive-care-guidelines. You can also find many of our guidelines and interactive resources in the free ASCO Guidelines app available in iTunes or the Google Play Store. If you have enjoyed what you've heard today, please rate and review the podcast and be sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode.   The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.

The Adulting With ADHD Podcast
85 - ADHD, Gender Bias & Medical Research with Creator Sydni Rubio

The Adulting With ADHD Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 15:31


This week I talk with ADHD content creator Sydni Rubio about gender bias in medicine and what to look out for as a patient. Highlights: Sydni's diagnosis story and personal experience with gender bias Sydni gives her take as a scientist on the gender issues in medical research How can patients be more discerning when reviewing medical research Sydni's work with Inflow and how she came to do what she loves for a living Mentioned this episode: The gender gap in ADHD diagnoses - https://www.getinflow.io/post/diagnosis-data-review   Inflow - https://www.getinflow.io/blog Twitter handles: - Sydni @WhatTheADHD - Inflow: @get_inflow What in the ADHD? YouTube channel - https://www.youtube.com/c/whatintheadhd 

Mayo Clinic Q&A
Ask the Mayo Mom: Polycystic kidney disease can affect children, too

Mayo Clinic Q&A

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 25:33


Polycystic kidney disease is an inherited disorder where clusters of cysts develop within the kidneys, causing the kidneys to enlarge and lose function over time. The cysts, which are noncancerous sacs containing fluid, vary in size, and they can grow to be large. This disorder can occur in children and adults.The two main types of polycystic kidney disease, caused by different genetic flaws, are: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Signs and symptoms of ADPKD often develop between the ages of 30 and 40. In the past, this type was called adult polycystic kidney disease, but children can develop the disorder.Only one parent needs to have the disease for it to pass to the children. If one parent has ADPKD, each child has a 50% chance of getting the disease. This form accounts for most of the cases of polycystic kidney disease.  Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD). This type is far less common than is ADPKD. The signs and symptoms often appear shortly after birth. Sometimes, symptoms don't appear until later in childhood or during adolescence.Both parents must have abnormal genes to pass on this form of the disease. If both parents carry a gene for this disorder, each child has a 25% chance of getting the disease. Polycystic kidney disease also can cause cysts to develop in the liver and elsewhere in the body. The disease can cause serious complications, including high blood pressure and kidney failure.The disease varies greatly in its severity, and some complications from polycystic kidney disease are preventable. Lifestyle changes and treatments might help reduce damage to the kidneys from complications, but long-term interventions, including dialysis or kidney transplant, are sometimes needed.On this special Ask the Mayo Mom edition of the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, host Dr. Angela Mattke is joined by Dr. Christian Hanna, a pediatric nephrologist with Mayo Clinic Children's Center to discuss PKD in children.

Blood Podcast
Role of macrophage NOX2 in alveolar homeostasis, hydroxyurea versus peginterferon alfa-2a in high-risk PV and ET, and the emerging PV treatment landscape

Blood Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 20:56


In this week's episode we'll discuss an undescribed role for NOX2 in maintaining lung homeostasis through suppression of alveolar macrophage activation. We'll also cover results of a phase 3 randomized trial that compares the safety and efficacy of hydroxyurea and peginterferon alfa-2a in patients with high-risk polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia (or PV and ET, respectively). Finally, we'll go more in depth on the emerging treatment landscape for PV, and the limits of current clinical trial endpoints.

NEJM This Week — Audio Summaries
NEJM This Week — May 12, 2022

NEJM This Week — Audio Summaries

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 28:26


Featuring articles on the treatment of mild chronic hypertension during pregnancy, lenacapavir for HIV-1 treatment, booster vaccination against omicron in Qatar, and on reframing the quality question; a review article on preeclampsia; a case report of a man with chylous ascites; and Perspective articles on health care reform under the Biden administration, on supporting innovation in Medicaid policy, and on unmuting.

Mayo Clinic Q&A
Mohs surgery for melanoma

Mayo Clinic Q&A

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 11:13


Melanoma is the most serious type of skin cancer. It develops in the cells that produce melanin, the pigment that gives skin its color. Melanoma is one of the most common cancer types in the U. S. Roughly 2% of people will be diagnosed with melanoma of the skin at some point during their lifetime, according to the National Cancer Institute. Treatment for early stage melanomas usually includes surgery to remove the melanoma. Mohs surgery is a precise surgical technique used to treat skin cancer. During Mohs surgery, thin layers of cancer-containing skin are progressively removed and examined until only cancer-free tissue remains. "Mohs surgery is essentially skin cancer removal," explains Dr. Nahid Vidal, a dermatologic surgeon at Mayo Clinic. "It's a surgical removal process that's highly specialized, where we're removing the skin cancer with a goal of not only removing all of it, but also leaving behind as much healthy tissue as possible."Mohs surgery allows surgeons to verify in real time through pathology that all cancer cells have been removed at the time of surgery. This increases the chance of a cure and reduces the need for additional treatments or additional surgery.On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Vidal discusses skin cancer and the use of Mohs surgery to treat early stage melanoma.

Circulation on the Run
Circulation May 10, 2022 Issue

Circulation on the Run

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 18:07


This week, please join Guest Host Mercedes Carnethon and Author Brendon Neuen as they discuss the article "Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitors and Risk of Hyperkalemia in People With Type 2 Diabetes: A Meta-Analysis of Individual Participant Data from Randomized, Controlled Trials." Dr. Carolyn Lam: Welcome to Circulation on the Run, your weekly podcast summary and backstage pass to the journal and its editors. We're your co-hosts. I'm Dr. Carolyn Lam, Associate Editor from the National Heart Center and Duke National University of Singapore. Dr. Greg Hundley: And I'm Dr. Greg Hundley, Associate Editor, Director of the Pauley Heart Center at VCU Health in Richmond, Virginia. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Greg, this week's feature paper is on one of my favorite topics, SGLT2 inhibitors. And this time, looking at their association with the risk of hyperkalemia in people with type-two diabetes. Now this is something we've all been waiting to look at. It's a meta-analysis of individual participant data from randomized controlled trials, so a very important, clinically applicable discussion coming right up. But first, I'm actually going to talk to you about text messages. Dr. Greg Hundley: Wow, Carolyn. I can't wait to hear about this article. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Well, specifically the TEXTMEDS randomized clinical trial, which is our first paper today. It is a trial that examined the effectiveness of text-message delivered cardiac education and support on medication adherence following an acute coronary syndrome. Dr. Carolyn Lam: This is from Dr. Clara Chow from University of Sydney and her colleagues, who performed a single blind multi-center randomized controlled trial of post-ACS patients across 18 rural and urban centers and three time zones in Australia. The control group received usual care, and the intervention group additionally received multiple motivational and supportive weekly text messages on medications, and healthy lifestyle, with the opportunity for two-way communication. Dr. Greg Hundley: Wow, Carolyn. So text messaging to facilitate medication adherence. I can't wait to hear. So what did they find? Dr. Carolyn Lam: I think the design, it's such a neat study. However, the study found no significant impact on the primary outcome of medication adherence at six and 12 months, nor on LDL cholesterol or blood pressure. Dr. Carolyn Lam: However, intervention participants were more likely to achieve a normal body mass index and to eat guideline-recommended servings of fruit and vegetables. Qualitative analysis demonstrated a high level of acceptability, utility in being a unified source of information, high program engagement, and emotional support, especially during times of uncertainty. Dr. Greg Hundley: Interesting, Carolyn. Sounds like an impact on diet, so what did we learn from this study? Dr. Carolyn Lam: Well, customized and personalized text message-based prevention programs are indeed a scalable and low-cost means of delivering consistent education and support to patients following hospitalization for ACS. So this study shows it's feasible. The lack of impact, however, on medical adherence, though with better adherence to healthy lifestyle practices, suggests that maybe external factors, such as cost, may strongly influence medical adherence. These need to be addressed, in addition to education programs, to improve medical adherence. But all of this is discussed in a beautiful editorial entitled, "Opportunities and Challenges of Mobile Health Tools to Promote Health Behaviors" by Drs. Sharma and Avram. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. Carolyn, what a great summary. Well, my paper comes to us from Professor Mario Delmar from New York University School of Medicine, and Carolyn, exercise training as well as catecholaminergic stimulation increases the incidence of arrhythmic events in patients affected with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC, and this correlates with plakophilin-2 mutations. Now, Carolyn, separate data show that reduced abundance of plakophilin-2 leads to dysregulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis, and Carolyn, these authors studied the relation between exercise and or catecholaminergic stimulation, intracellular calcium homeostasis, and arrhythmogenesis in plakophilin-2 deficient murine hearts. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Ooh. So what were the effects? Dr. Greg Hundley: Right, Carolyn. For training, the mice underwent 75 minutes of treadmill running once per day, five days each week, for six weeks. And the authors observed that exercise disproportionately affected calcium intracellular homeostasis in plakifilin-2 deficient hearts, in a manner facilitated by stimulation of intracellular, beta-adrenergic receptors or hyper-phosphorylation of phospholamban. Dr. Greg Hundley: Now these cellular changes created a pro-arrhythmogenic state that can be mitigated by plakophilin receptor blockade. Additionally, Carolyn, these authors' data unveiled an arrhythmogenic mechanism for exercise-induced or catecholaminergic life-threatening arrhythmias in the setting of a deficit in plakophilin-2. They suggest that membrane-permeable beta blockers are potentially more efficient for ARVC patients. Dr. Greg Hundley: And also they highlight the potential for ryanodine-receptor channel blockers as treatment for the control of heart rhythm in this population at risk, and propose that plakophilin dependent and phospholamban-dependent, ARVC-related arrhythmias have a common mechanism. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Wow, thanks again, Greg. That was really, really a nice explanation. Well, for this next original paper, it looks at the question of the association between major bleeding and non-major clinically relevant bleeding, with subsequent mortality in hospitalized patients, and authors did this by exploring this relationship in the MAGELLAN and MARINER trials of extended thrombo-prophylaxis in hospitalized medical patients. Dr. Greg Hundley: Wow. Carolyn. I can't quite remember, and maybe for our listeners, remind us of the design of the MAGELLAN and the MARINER trials. Dr. Carolyn Lam: These trials evaluated, whether rivaroxaban compared with enoxaparin or placebo, could prevent venous thromboembolism without increased bleeding. The authors, led by Dr. Spyropoulos from the Feinstein Institute of Medical Research in New York, hypothesized that patients with major bleeding, but not those with non-major clinically relevant bleeding, would be at an increased risk of all-cause mortality. So Greg, would you like to guess what they found? Dr. Greg Hundley: Oh, Carolyn, you've put me on the spot here. I'm not sure. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Maybe just, did the authors get it right or wrong? Just.... Dr. Greg Hundley: I'm saying, they got it right. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Oh, always clever. They found that compared to patients with no bleeding, the risk of all-cause mortality for patient with non-major clinically relevant bleeding was not increased in MARINER, but was increased in MAGELLAN. Major bleeding, however, was associated with a higher incidence of all-cause mortality in both studies, while trivial bleeding was not associated with mortality in either study. These results really inform the risk benefit calculus of extended thromboprophylaxis in medically ill patients. Dr. Greg Hundley: Wow. Carolyn, great presentation. We've got some other articles in this issue. And let me tell you about two that I have. First is a Research Letter from Professor Frankel entitled "Trends in Opioid Use after Cardiac-Implantable Electronic Device Procedures in the United States, between the years of 2004 and 2020." And Tracy Hampton, from the National Association of Science Writers, presents some very recent news in the world of cardiology. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Nice. Well, there's an exchange of letters as well between Drs. Yang and Nagareddy regarding the article "Retention of NLP3 Inflammasome-Primed Neutrophils in the Bone Marrow is Essential for Myocardial Infarction-Induced Granulopoiesis." And finally, in the Editor's Page, a nice piece from Drs. Joe Hill, Darren McGuire, and James de Lemos on “Circulation: Best Papers, 2021.” Gosh, really, really nice issue. Now let's go on, though, to the feature discussion, yeah? Dr. Greg Hundley: You bet. Dr. Mercedes Carnethon: Welcome to this episode of Circulation on the Run podcast. My name is Mercedes Carnethon, one of the associate editors, and I'm a professor of preventive medicine at the Northwestern University Feinberg school of Medicine. I'm really excited today to have a guest with us. Dr. Brendon Neuen, who has shared with us his really outstanding research on SGLT2 inhibitors and the risk of hyperkalemia in people with type-two diabetes, a meta-analysis. So welcome to our podcast today, Brendon. Dr. Brendon Neuen: Thanks very much for having me Mercedes. It's a real pleasure to be here. Dr. Mercedes Carnethon: Well, thank you for joining us. We're really pleased that you chose Circulation to share with us your really important findings. Can you tell us a little bit about the rationale for your study and how you carried out your work? Dr. Brendon Neuen: Yeah, absolutely. So we know that in people with diabetes and people with CKD, hyperkalemia is a common occurrence, and it's a problem for two reasons as you'd be aware. Firstly, it is associated with cardiac dysrhythmias and secondly, perhaps at least as importantly, it limits the optimal use of treatments that reduce kidney disease progression and heart failure events. So that is, agents that block the renin angiotensin aldosterone system. Dr. Brendon Neuen: We now know, and we've got robust evidence from large outcome trials, that SGLT2 inhibitors reduce the risk of heart failure and kidney disease progression in people with and without diabetes, but we haven't really, up and until now, systematically evaluated their effect on potassium outcomes, particularly hyperkalemia. And so we set out to assess whether these agents affect serum potassium levels and alter the risk of hyperkalemia as well as hypokalemia. Dr. Mercedes Carnethon: Thank you. That sounds like a really excellent and well needed study, given how much we've heard within the field about the benefits of SGLT2 inhibitors. It's nice to see a careful evaluation of what some of the considerations are in their use. So tell us a little bit about how you carried out this study and what you ultimately found. Dr. Brendon Neuen: What we did was, we identified clinical trials that enrolled people with type two diabetes at high cardiovascular risk or with chronic kidney disease. And what we did is, we approached the investigators of each of these trials and asked them to collaborate on a large meta-analysis using individual participant data. Dr. Brendon Neuen: What that allowed us to do was, then, standardize across all of the trials of different outcome definitions, and allowed us to assess the effective SGLT2 inhibitors on a primary outcome of time to first serum potassium greater than or equal to six, defined as serious hyperkalemia, as well as hypokalemia, investigator-reported hyperkalemia events, and a range of other potassium-related outcomes in a broad population, including people with chronic kidney disease, people with heart failure, and people using different concomitant medications, such as diuretics and MRAs in the background. Dr. Mercedes Carnethon: So thank you, Brendon, for the explanation of the use of the meta-analytic design and the entry criteria of type-two diabetes and chronic kidney disease. Can you tell us, what were the outcomes across these studies? Dr. Brendon Neuen: The primary outcome we evaluated was time to first serious hyperkalemia, defined as a serum potassium greater than or equal to six, as well as a range of other potassium-related outcomes, including investigator reported hyperkalemia, change in potassium over time, as well as hypokalemia, defined as a serum potassium less than 3.5. Dr. Brendon Neuen: What we found was that overall SGLT2 inhibitors reduce the risk of serious hyperkalemia by about 16%. And that effect was consistent across the agents within the class, and across different subpopulations and trials. This effect was supported by a 20% risk reduction in investigator-reported hyperemia events and importantly, there was no difference in risk of hypokalemia, that is a serum potassium less than 3.5, between SGLT2-treated and placebo-treated participants. Dr. Mercedes Carnethon: Thank you for that summary. You know, one of the very impressive aspects of this clinical trial is certainly the size and the number of participants. Brendon, I was really struck by your description of the consistency of findings across the subgroups. And in particular, when I reviewed the findings in the paper, I noticed that serious hyperkalemia was higher in those with poorer kidney function. Did you find that surprising? Dr. Brendon Neuen: From clinical practice, we know that one of the major determinants of hyperkalemia risk is kidney function. It's a major problem that we run into in people with more advanced CKD. And what that means is that for people with more advanced chronic kidney disease, who are at high risk of hyperkalemia, the absolute benefits of SGLT2 inhibition on hyperkalemia risk are likely greater in these individuals, because they're at high risk of this outcome. Dr. Brendon Neuen: Other patients who might be at increased risk of hyperkalemia include those with heart failure or those taking mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists at baseline. And so you'd expect that if the relative effects are consistent across many subgroups, then the absolute risk reductions are likely to be larger in people taking MRAs or people with more advanced CKD. Dr. Mercedes Carnethon: Thank you so much for summarizing the importance of these findings and what they mean for our clinical audience. It's wonderful to have this sort of information from a meta-analysis because it allows us large sample sizes, where we can do things like you describe, such as describing subgroup effects. Dr. Mercedes Carnethon: It also presents us with very robust evidence that can be taken into clinical practice for our clinical audience to use. Based on what you found, how do you anticipate that these findings can be used by our clinicians? Dr. Brendon Neuen: Well, thanks, Mercedes. I think the reduction in risk of hyperkalemia that is observed in these data suggests that SGLT2 inhibitors might enable better use of other proven therapies that reduce cardio-renal risk in people with chronic kidney disease and people with heart failure. We all know that in treating these high risk patients, hyperkalemia is a problem. And by reducing the risk of hyperkalemia with SGLT2 inhibitors, it might enable better use of renin angiotensin system blockade and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists in people with chronic kidney disease and heart failure. Dr. Mercedes Carnethon: So you've provided a really excellent overall summary of the impact of these finding for clinical practice and the possible next steps. I wanted to end on a note of asking you what surprised you about these findings that might lead to further future investigations. Dr. Brendon Neuen: Thanks, Mercedes. I think that's a really interesting question. What was somewhat surprising, but also reassuring, was the consistency of the treatment effect on hyperkalemia, regardless of how we defined it, whether that was defined based on investigator-reported hyperkalemia events or central laboratory-measured serum, potassium levels, the treatment effect was very consistent. And I think that gives us some confidence about the robustness of these findings and their application to clinical practice. Dr. Mercedes Carnethon: Well, thank you so much, Brendon. I have really enjoyed this discussion with you today and this really important paper that is describing an important safety outcome for SGLT2 inhibitors in patients with type two diabetes. And again, I really want to thank you for sharing your excellent work with us here at Circulation. I anticipate that our readership, when they leave this podcast and pick up their journals, will be thrilled to read about all of the details about the excellent work that you and your team have carried out. So thank you very much for joining us today. Dr. Brendon Neuen: Thanks very much for having me, Mercedes. It was a real pleasure. Dr. Mercedes Carnethon: Thank you, and thank you again to our audience for joining us for this episode of Circulation on the Run. Speaker 5: This program is copyright of the American Heart Association, 2022. The opinions expressed by speakers in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association. For more, please visit ahajournals.org.

Moving Medicine
Resident, IMG, medical student research submissions now open with Sanjay Desai, MD

Moving Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 15:13


For more information on the AMA Research Challenge, visit: http://ama-assn.org/researchchallenge

Patients Rising Podcast
Updates from the Frontlines of Medical Research

Patients Rising Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 32:54


In recognition of ALS Awareness Month, we get a report from the frontlines of ALS research, including new breakthroughs that impact patients. Dr. Sharon Hesterlee, the Chief Research Officer at the Muscular Dystrophy Association, gives us the big picture on ALS research and other neuromuscular diseases. Plus, Terry and Dr. Bob discuss new health legislation, including a bill that would ban the QALY, a discriminatory health care metric that hurts patients with rare or chronic diseases. And Kate speaks with Jenny Jones, an advocate for Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP), about her advocacy work for this rare genetic condition. Hosts: Terry Wilcox, Executive Director, Patients RisingDr. Robert Goldberg, “Dr. Bob,” Co-Founder and Vice President of the Center for Medicine in the Public InterestKate Pecora, Field CorrespondentGuests: Sharon Hesterlee, Chief Research Officer at the Muscular Dystrophy AssociationJenny Jones, Patient Advocate and Author of Life's A PolypSara Healy, Patient CorrespondentJana Healy, Patient CorrespondentLinks: Terry Wilcox Applauds QALY Ban Bill - Patients Rising NowAmyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) - Diseases | Muscular Dystrophy AssociationRodgers, Banks, & Wenstrup Lead QALY Ban to Affirm Every Person's Life has Value - Energy and Commerce CommitteeQALY Bill | H.R.7634 - Protecting Health Care for All Patients Act of 2022ICER to Assess Treatments for Amyotrophic Lateral SclerosisMOVR Data Hub (neuroMuscular ObserVational Research) | Muscular Dystrophy AssociationLife's A Polyp - Youtube Channel Need help?The successful patient is one who can get what they need when they need it. We all know insurance slows us down, so why not take matters into your own hands? Our Navigator is an online tool that allows you to search a massive network of health-related resources using your zip code so you get local results. Get proactive and become a more successful patient right now at PatientsRisingConcierge.orgHave a question or comment about the show, or want to suggest a show topic or share your story as a patient correspondent?Drop us a line: podcast@patientsrising.orgThe views and opinions expressed herein are those of the guest(s)/ author(s) and do not reflect the official policy or position of Patients Rising.

Mayo Clinic Q&A
National Nurses Week

Mayo Clinic Q&A

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 25:35


At Mayo Clinic, the Department of Nursing consists of over 22,000 people, including nurses, patient care assistants, patient care technicians and social workers. Like many health care professionals, the COVID-19 pandemic has been a stressful and challenging time for those in the department."Throughout the pandemic, our nurses have continued to be there for their patients," says Ryannon Frederick, Mayo Clinic's chief nursing officer. "Our patient satisfaction actually increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. And that's really due to the excellence from our nursing staff. When you just imagine all the stress and strain they were feeling, and they continued to excel."Mayo Clinic's multidisciplinary approach relies on nurses to be an integral part of the care team. Frederick says nurses are the closest touch point to the patient, and they often identify opportunities to improve care. "We encourage nurses to speak up and advocate on behalf of the patients," explains Frederick. "Then we engage them to be part of the solution — to make sure that once we identify the problem, we also have a solution for it," says Frederick. "And our nurses do this each and every single day. "Each year, May 6-12 is designated National Nurses Week. This week acknowledges and celebrate nurses and the care they provide for their patients. On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Frederick shares her own professional journey at Mayo Clinic — from nursing student to chief nursing officer. She also discusses the role nurses will play in leading the future of health care, including the role of nursing research.

Mayo Clinic Q&A
What parents should know about the new hepatitis outbreak in children

Mayo Clinic Q&A

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 27:02


At least 16 countries and 10 U.S. states have identified unusual hepatitis cases in children. Experts advise that cases are extremely rare, with about 200 children affected worldwide. Hepatitis is inflammation of the liver. It is most commonly caused by a viral infection, although there are other potential causes. A common adenovirus is being investigated as a potential cause for this hepatitis outbreak. Adenoviruses are a group of viruses that typically cause respiratory and GI tract infections. On this special Ask the Mayo Mom edition of the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, host Dr. Angela Mattke discusses the recent hepatitis outbreak in children with Mayo Clinic Children's Center experts Dr. Nipunie Rajapakse, a pediatric infectious diseases expert, and Dr. Sara Hassan, a pediatric transplant hepatologist and gastroenterologist.

Blood Podcast
Microbiome and CD4 T-cell recovery after allogeneic HCT, and a paradigm shift to CAR T-cells in the second line for large B-cell lymphoma?

Blood Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 20:21


In this week's episode we'll discuss the effects of intestinal microbial diversity on patient outcomes following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant and review the results of three different phase 3 trials comparing CAR T-cells to autologous stem cell transplant in patients with refractory or early relapsing large B cell lymphoma, which have the potential to result in a paradigm shift in the standard of care for second-line therapy.

SBS Greek - SBS Ελληνικά
Lupus-causing gene paves way for new and tailored treatments - Σημαντική ανακάλυψη για αυτοάνοση πάθηση από Ελληνοαυστραλή επιστήμονα

SBS Greek - SBS Ελληνικά

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 6:25


Researchers from The Australian National University (ANU) have identified a gene called TLR7 that, when over-activated, is responsible for causing lupus, an autoimmune disease that can be life-threatening in severe cases.   - Μια σημαντική επιστημονική ανακάλυψη ανακοινώθηκε πρόσφατα, από το Αυστραλιανό Εθνικό Πανεπιστήμιο (Australian National University), και πιο συγκεκριμένα από ερευνητική ομάδα, του John Curtin School of Medical Research.

Full Story
The lifesaving Covid-19 treatments offering hope amid Australia's high case numbers

Full Story

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 20:56


With Australia's Covid cases per capita among the highest in the world, new antivirals such as Paxlovid and Lagevrio as well as intravenous treatments like sotrovimab are offering some hope for the severely ill, elderly and immunocompromised. However Australia's peak body for GPs says some people at greatest risk of dying from Covid are being prevented from accessing these treatments. Medical editor Melissa Davey breaks down what Australia's high case numbers and deaths mean, how these new treatments work, and the barriers to accessing them.

NEJM This Week — Audio Summaries
NEJM This Week — May 5, 2022

NEJM This Week — Audio Summaries

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 33:08


Featuring articles on baricitinib for alopecia areata, convalescent plasma for early SARS-CoV-2 infection, efficacy of a fourth mRNA vaccine dose in Israel, ivermectin for early Covid-19, a new image for cell sorting, and metric myopia; a review article on nonspecific low back pain; a Clinical Problem-Solving on looking back; and Perspective articles on designing Cures 2.0, on real-world evidence, and on addressing misinformation on social media.

Mayo Clinic Q&A
Ask the Mayo Mom: How and why endoscopy is used in children

Mayo Clinic Q&A

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 33:00


Endoscopy is a nonsurgical procedure used to visually examine the digestive system with a tiny camera on the end of a long, flexible tube. An upper endoscopy examines the stomach, esophagus and small intestines. A colonoscopy, which is another type of endoscopy, is used to examine the rectum, large intestine and colon.In children, endoscopy can be used to look for causes of unexplained abdominal pain, to diagnose swallowing disorders or to identify conditions including Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis and polyps. Undergoing any type of procedure can be stressful for kids, parents or caregivers. Dr. Pua Hopson, a pediatric gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic Children's Center, explains endoscopy is a relatively quick and painless procedure."An upper endoscopy typically takes 10 minutes, while colonoscopy may take 30 minutes," says Dr. Hopson. "I tell the kids it takes longer to put them to sleep with anesthesia or sedation than the actual procedure. And once you wake up, your parents will be right by your side."One condition Dr. Hopson commonly treats in children is eosinophilic esophagitis (e-o-sin-o-FILL-ik uh-sof-uh-JIE-tis), known as EoE. This is a chronic immune system disease in which a type of white blood cell (eosinophil) builds up in the lining of the esophagus. This buildup, which is a reaction to foods, allergens or acid reflux, can inflame or injure the esophageal tissue. Damaged esophageal tissue can lead to difficulty swallowing or cause food to get stuck when you swallow. EoE is diagnosed through biopsy using an upper endoscopy.On this Ask the Mayo Mom edition of the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, host Dr. Angela Mattke is joined by Dr. Hopson to discuss how and why endoscopy is used in children.

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research
280 - Treatments Targeting Neuroprotection in Alzheimer's Disease: February 2022

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 17:19


In February of 2022, 8 papers were published on the topic of using neuroprotective compounds as treatment for AD. Anusha will guide you through these papers exploring the entire drug discovery pipeline, from discovery to clinical trials.  Sections in this episode:  Drug Discovery (2.01)  Drug Development (4.59)  Clinical Trials (11.58) -------------------------------------------------------------- To find the numbered bibliography with all the papers covered in this episode, click here, or use the link below:https://drive.google.com/file/d/1zzsck-2adMbZB8_cYV6B-AyOwd2p_gqt/view?usp=sharingTo access the folder with ALL our bibliographies, follow this link (it will be updated as we publish episodes and process bibliographies), or use the link below:https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1bzSzkY9ZHzzY8Xhzt0HZfZhRG1Gq_Si-?usp=sharingYou can also find all of our bibliographies on our website: www.amindr.com. --------------------------------------------------------------Follow-up on social media for more updates!Twitter: @AMiNDR_podcastInstagram: @AMiNDR.podcastFacebook:  AMiNDR  Youtube: AMiNDR PodcastLinkedIn: AMiNDR PodcastEmail: amindrpodcast@gmail.com  -------------------------------------------------------------- Please help us spread the word about AMiNDR to your friends, colleagues, and networks! And if you could leave us a rating and/or review on your streaming app of choice (Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen to the podcast), that would be greatly appreciated! It helps us a lot and we thank you in advance for leaving a review! Don't forget to subscribe to hear about new episodes as they come out too. Thank you to our sponsor, the Canadian Consortium of Neurodegeneration in Aging, or CCNA, for their financial support of this podcast. This helps us to stay on the air and bring you high quality episodes. You can find out more about the CCNA on their website: https://ccna-ccnv.ca/. Our team of volunteers works tirelessly each month to bring you every episode of AMiNDR. This episode was scripted, hosted and edited by Anusha Kamesh, and reviewed by Kira Tosefsky and Ellen Koch. The bibliography was made by Anjana Rajendrani and the wordcloud was created by Sarah Louadi (www.wordart.com). Big thanks to the sorting team for taking on the enormous task of sorting all of the Alzheimer's Disease papers into episodes each month. For February 2022, the sorters were Sarah Louadi, Christy Yu, Ben Cornish, Eden Dubchak, Vrishali Salian, Kira Tosefsky, and Elyn Rowe. Also, props to our management team, which includes Sarah Louadi, Ellen Koch, Naila Kuhlmann, Elyn Rowe, Anusha Kamesh, and Lara Onbasi for keeping everything running smoothly.Our music is from "Journey of a Neurotransmitter" by musician and fellow neuroscientist Anusha Kamesh; you can find the original piece and her other music on soundcloud under Anusha Kamesh or on her YouTube channel, AKMusic.   https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMH7chrAdtCUZuGia16FR4w   -------------------------------------------------------------- If you are interested in joining the team, send us your CV by email. We are specifically looking for help with sorting abstracts by topic, abstract summaries and hosting, audio editing, creating bibliographies, and outreach/marketing. However, if you are interested in helping in other ways, don't hesitate to apply anyways.  --------------------------------------------------------------*About AMiNDR: *  Learn more about this project and the team behind it by listening to our first episode: "Welcome to AMiNDR!" 

Mayo Clinic Q&A
COVID-19 news update

Mayo Clinic Q&A

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 28:20


An estimated 3 out of 4 U.S. children and more than half of all adults have been infected with COVID-19, according to a report released on Tuesday, April 26 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But a Mayo Clinic expert says more information is needed to get the complete picture. "This was a convenient sample. In other words, people who were having blood drawn for other reasons were tested,"explains Dr. Gregory Poland, head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. "That does not reflect the full population or differences by race or geographic location. And the detection of antibodies does not necessarily mean that you are protected from infection. So, there's a lot of nuance around understanding that headline." The research study looked at more than 200,000 blood samples and found that signs of past infection rose dramatically during the omicron surge between December 2021 and February.Other COVID-19 news this week includes a push to make treatments more available, the rising incidence of new omicron subvariants, and changes in mask recommendations. Dr. Poland cautions that COVID-19 is still present and encourages wearing a mask in crowded spaces, even when there isn't a requirement to do so."If only one of us is wearing a mask and the other one isn't and is infected, you still have pretty high protection — but not the same level of protection as if both of us wearing one," says Dr. Poland. "So, it's it is not futile to be the only one wearing a mask. In fact, I think it sends a message."On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Poland discusses the latest COVID-19 news and answers listener questions.

Blood Podcast
Canakinumab in SCA, antigen-specific donor T-cells to prevent post-transplant relapse in ALL, and nasopharyngeal mucosal immunity defects in transplanted SCID patients

Blood Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 20:08


In this week's episode, we'll discuss the efficacy of canakinumab in children and young adults with sickle cell anemia, learn more about the use of donor-derived multiple leukemia antigen specific T-cell therapy to prevent relapse in post-transplant patients with ALL, and discuss the defects in nasopharyngeal mucosal immunity in patients with severe combined immunodeficiency after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

Science Weekly
What's behind the mysterious global rise in childhood hepatitis?

Science Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 10:04


Over the past few weeks, countries around the world have reported an unexpected increase in the number of children with hepatitis. So far about 200 cases have been reported. More than half have come from the UK, but there have also been reports from Spain, Japan and the US, among others. Although this is still a very rare disease, it is severe, with 10% of affected children needing a liver transplant. So what might explain this unusual rise? Guardian science editor Ian Sample speaks to Prof Deirdre Kelly about the current theories as to what could be happening, and how concerned we should be. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

NEJM This Week — Audio Summaries
NEJM This Week — April 28, 2022

NEJM This Week — Audio Summaries

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 28:57


Featuring articles on CT or coronary angiography in stable chest pain, protection against omicron by a fourth vaccine dose, a vaccine for RSV in pregnancy, nasal high-flow therapy during neonatal intubation, and reassessing quality assessment; a review article on understanding vaccine safety; a case report of a man with myalgias, fever, and bradycardia; and Perspective articles on the e-cigarette flavor debate and on breaking down the residency match rate.

Mayo Clinic Q&A
Advances in oral cancer treatment, reconstruction

Mayo Clinic Q&A

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 10:18


Oral cancer refers to cancers that originate in the mouth, tongue and back of the throat. Treatment options, which can vary based on the cancer's location and stage, include surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. The use of anatomic modeling and 3D printing have led to advances in surgical treatments for oral cancer."One of the advances that we've seen in the last 20 or 30 years in the treatment of head and neck cancers certainly has to do with the reconstruction," says Dr. Kevin Arce, an oral and maxillofacial surgeon at Mayo Clinic. "Often, we have to remove not only the cancer, but also the surrounding tissue that is normal. And to replace that can be quite challenging. We now have better abilities to reconstruct the structures that have been lost." Dr. Arce explains advances in the treatment of head and neck cancers now allow surgeons to bring in tissues from different areas of the body and reconstruct a tongue or rebuild a jaw. And the anatomical lab and 3D printing allow surgeons to perform patient-specific reconstruction that helps maintain function. "With these advancements, patients can obviously not only look the same, but speak and eat as they did prior to the surgery," says Dr. Arce. "At Mayo Clinic, we can do that all in house. We have a group of neuroradiologists and biomedical engineers who are a part of the institution, and we collaborate with them in these types of reconstructions."Early detection of oral cancer can lead to better treatment options and outcomes. April is Oral Cancer Awareness Month, aimed at reminding the public about the steps to take to reduce your risk of developing oral cancer. The two main risk factors are tobacco and alcohol use."Awareness of oral cancer is important," says Dr. Arce. "It's important to maintain that relationship with either your dentist or your primary care physician so they do at least an annual screen of the oral cavity to make sure that there is nothing unusual or a lesion that needs more attention."On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Arce discusses oral cancer treatment and prevention.

Science Weekly
Preventable author Devi Sridhar on how she handles Covid trolls

Science Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 14:01


As the news came out of China that there was a new virus infecting humans, scientists around the world promptly got to work sequencing genomes, gathering data and communicating what they found with the public. One of the scientists catapulted into the public eye was Devi Sridhar, a professor in global public health. Soon, she was advising the Scottish government on their Covid strategy, regularly appearing on TV and had gained a big social media following. Ian Sample speaks to Sridhar about her experience of the pandemic so far, what it was like working alongside politicians, and what she's learned from it all. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

AI and the Future of Work
Dipanwita ("D") Das, Founder and CEO of Sorcero, discusses how AI improves lives by helping life sciences experts accelerate medical research

AI and the Future of Work

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 36:14


Dipanwita ("D") Das, Founder and CEO of Sorcero, is an award-winning technology entrepreneur and AI innovator.  She is the CEO & Co-founder of Sorcero, a venture-backed AI Saas product startup, focused on using AI and NLP to inform critical decisions to improve lives.  Prior to starting Sorcero, D was the founder & CEO of 42 Strategies, managing digital transformation projects for Richard Branson's Virgin United, Al Gore's Climate Reality Project, and Bloomberg Philanthropies. Listen and learn...Why D says "...doing something that leaves a legacy of good" is a core element of Sorcero's mission.What D means by "...humans plus AI is greater than humans alone."How Sorcero strives to "accelerate vs. automate" decisions.How Sorcero helped doctors diagnose a rare form of metastatic breast cancer and save a life.What it means for patients that healthcare data is growing at a 36% CAGR.How Sorcero marries heuristics with NLP and transfer learning to help researchers. D's advice to females in male-dominated fields: "The only way to win is to persist."References in this episode...The Sorcero Life Sciences Intelligence PlatformD on TwitterPaddy Padmanabhan on AI and the Future of Work

Einstein A Go-Go
Brainwave Beers, AI Impressions and Immunology

Einstein A Go-Go

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 44:54


In science news, we explore how a Locked In Syndrome patient (ALS) communicating via brainwave, requested beer! And in celebration of the upcoming Day of Immunology, we have two immunity physician guests. First guest is Associate Professor Jason Trubiano, Head of Infectious Diseases, Austin Health, currently the Director of the Antimicrobial Stewardship and Drug and Antibiotic Allergy Services - the first and only Centre of its kind in Australia. Jason explains how understanding whether penicillin allergies diagnosed in childhood are still clinically present during adulthood – he aims to understand how immune cells contribute to these allergic reactions. Then we speak with Dr Kirsten Fairfax, from the Menzies Institute for Medical Research at the University of Tasmania. Kirsten explores the mechanisms that underpin the way cells are generated to make up blood. Recently, Kirsten used high-dimensional and advanced technologies to identify key genes that control how immune cells behave, including why some are more prone to autoimmune disorders. With presenters Dr. Shane, Dr. Laura, and Dr. Ailie.Program page: Einstein-A-Go-Go Facebook page: Einstein-A-Go-Go Twitter: Einstein-A-Go-Go

Infectious Diseases Society of America Guideline Update
The Latest on Long COVID (April 23, 2022)

Infectious Diseases Society of America Guideline Update

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2022 23:27


Dr. Kathleen Bell, Professor and Chair of the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at UT Southwestern Medical Center, and Dr. Nahid Bhadelia, associate professor of infectious diseases at Boston University School of Medicine and founding director of the BU Center of Emerging Infectious Diseases Policy and Research, discuss the latest research and information on long COVID. 

Mayo Clinic Q&A
People, partnerships drive innovation in patient care

Mayo Clinic Q&A

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 17:43


The Department of Medicine, which is the largest department at Mayo Clinic, is helping lead the transformation of health care. Important innovations include moving to digital and virtual care to meet patients where they are, and addressing health equity, all while keeping patients front and center."Patients are our North Star," says Dr. Vijay Shah, chair of the Department of Medicine at Mayo Clinic. "We're all about patients all day, every day. So, all of our strategies cascade out of that."Dr. Shah explains those strategies include practice innovations, digital transformation and internal and external partnerships. Internal partnerships include working alongside the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, the Center for Digital Health, Mayo Clinic Platformand others focused on improving patient care and developing cures.These partnerships are leading to innovations in teleheath and at-home care models, as well as new ways to use health data to improve treatments. And at the core of it all?"The most important pillar is our people and our culture," explains Dr. Shah. "Because our people are our greatest asset, and we're nowhere without them."  On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Shah and Natalie Caine, associate administrator, discuss the innovations happening in the Department of Medicine at Mayo Clinic.

The Medical Journal of Australia
Episode 467: MJA Podcasts 2022 Episode 15: COVID profits, vaccine mandates, oligopolies, and us, with Prof Martin Hensher

The Medical Journal of Australia

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 23:50


Vol 216, Issue 8: 25 April 2022. Professor Martin Hensher is the Henry Baldwin Professorial Research Fellow in Health System Sustainability at the Menzies Institute for Medical Research. He talks about the economics and COVID-19 vaccines and the opportunities Australia has to lead the region in vaccine development and manufacture, to accompany his coauthored Perspective published in the MJA. With MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.

Blood Podcast
Timing (and utility) of CNS prophylaxis in DLBCL, Apollo deficiency in a bone marrow failure syndrome, and GATA1 mutants in congenital anemia

Blood Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 17:28


In this week's episode we'll cover a retrospective study on the timing of high-dose methotrexate CNS prophylaxis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, results of which suggest end-of-treatment delivery might be preferred to earlier administration. The second research article describes how biallelic Apollo variants lead to an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome that resembles dyskeratosis congenita, albeit with normal telomere length. We'll conclude with research revealing how a rare form of congenital anemia is caused by novel missense mutations in GATA1.

NEJM This Week — Audio Summaries
NEJM This Week — April 21, 2022

NEJM This Week — Audio Summaries

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 28:31


Featuring articles on restricted calories and eating times in weight loss, asthma therapy in Black and Latinx adults, ivosidenib in IDH1-mutated acute myeloid leukemia, vaccine boost effects on protection against omicron, and fighting cardiac fibrosis with CAR T cells; a review article on early-onset colorectal cancer; a case report of a woman with transient ischemic attack and mitral valve masses; and Perspective articles on a change in the leading cause of death among U.S. children, on strengthening the Medicaid Reentry Act, and on Covid-19's devastating effect on tuberculosis care.

Mayo Clinic Q&A
Patient navigators help guide the cancer journey

Mayo Clinic Q&A

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 10:22


A cancer diagnosis can be overwhelming, and patients often have many questions about what their cancer journey will entail. At Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, patient navigators help guide patients through the health care system.Patient navigators are active members of the health care team, assessing and addressing a patient's immediate needs and identifying obstacles that might prevent them from getting the care they need. Patient navigators help patients and their families access cancer information, find resources to meet day-to-day needs, and offer emotional support. "Our role as patient navigators is to support with a lot of the nonclinical sides of their cancer journey, whether that's logistics, transportation or issues with lodging when they're coming to a Mayo Clinic site for care," explains Laura Kurland, a Mayo Clinic Cancer Center patient navigator. "Oftentimes, we're helping them understand the finances, whether that's insurance, or other things that are going to be coming up that are going to be financial stressors for them as they're going through their cancer care. And certainly, we're there to lend an ear and offer support as they're learning how to truly navigate the medical system."The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center has both general patient navigators who assist all patients and patient navigators who serve specific cultural patient populations. Mayo Clinic currently has navigators on staff serving these communities: Hispanic/Latino, American Indian/Alaskan Native and African descent. Kurland serves the Hispanic/Latino population and explains the important role the culture-specific patient navigators play."The patient populations that we work with come with different experiences," says Kurland."So our goal is to understand the values they bring and support them with what their needs are. Whether there are language barriers, or there are just gaps in cultural misunderstandings, our role is to help bridge those gaps, clarify misunderstandings and also be advocates to those populations."On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Kurland discusses the importance of patient navigators, why culture-specific navigators are needed, and how she helps patients access the care and support they need.

Mayo Clinic Q&A
Ask the Mayo Mom: Climate change and global childhood health

Mayo Clinic Q&A

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 25:56


From allergies and asthma to infectious diseases and even malnutrition, the indirect effects of climate change are taking a toll on our most valuable resource, kids!On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Ask the Mayo Mom host Dr. Angela Mattke, a Mayo Clinic pediatrician, is joined by Dr. Molly Herr, a pediatric anesthesiologist at Mayo Clinic Children's Center to discuss climate change and its effects on children's health. In addition to her clinical care for children, Dr. Herr has been an advocate and leader in Mayo Clinic's Green initiatives. She has also been involved with creating sustainable practices at Mayo Clinic and medical student education related to these topics.

NEJM This Week — Audio Summaries
NEJM This Week — April 14, 2022

NEJM This Week — Audio Summaries

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 26:13


Featuring articles on nirmatrelvir plus ritonavir for Covid-19, the treatment of acute Achilles' tendon rupture, rilzabrutinib in immune thrombocytopenia, mitapivat for pyruvate kinase deficiency, and global health and the moral clarity of Paul Farmer; a review article on cancer-associated hypercalcemia; a case report of a woman with pancytopenia; and Perspective articles on fully realizing SNAP's health benefits, on the 2022 Child Nutrition Reauthorization, and reflections on caring for the unvaccinated.

20-Minute Health Talk
Outsmarting endometriosis: How breakthrough research is leading the way

20-Minute Health Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 23:12


Diagnosing a disease usually requires a test or blood sample. But for women with endometriosis, diagnosis requires an invasive surgery. For April Summerford, a 36-year-old from Fresno California, that surgery actually worsened her disease. Wanting to do her part, she joined the ROSE study, which stands for Research OutSmarts Endometriosis. Led by Christine Metz, PhD, and Peter Gregersen, MD, the ROSE research team has spent the last seven years trying to find better treatments and less invasive ways to detect endometriosis.   Dr. Metz and Dr. Gregersen join April to discuss her decade-long battle, the ROSE study's innovative approaches to studying endometriosis, the medical gaslighting patients often face, and the problem of gender bias in research funding.   Meet our guests Dr. Christine Metz is co-director of the study and a professor in the Institute of Molecular Medicine at the Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research. Dr. Peter Gregersen is also co-director of the ROSE study, and director of the Feinstein's Robert S. Boas Center for Genomics and Human Genetics. April Summerford, is an endometriosis patient and ROSE study participant, who also runs the popular support group, Beyond Endo; AND hosts the FemFuture podcast, which covers women's health.

Mayo Clinic Q&A
Understanding the connection between diabetes and heart disease

Mayo Clinic Q&A

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 20:40


The World Health Organization reports that the number of people with diabetes has risen from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million by 2014. And that number is estimated to reach 552 million by 2030.One big concern for people with diabetes is the connection between diabetes and cardiovascular disease. People with diabetes are more likely to develop heart disease and are at higher risk of premature death."In people with diabetes, the risk of death due to heart diseases is approximately four or five times higher than in general population," explains Dr. Gosia Wamil, a cardiologist at Mayo Clinic Healthcare in London. "And this, obviously, is a major concern. There is now a strong research and scientific evidence about this link and association between cardiovascular disease and metabolic diseases, especially diabetes." So what can be done to help patients?Dr. Wamil explains that research has shown positive lifestyle changes such as quitting smoking, losing weight, exercising more, developing a healthy diet and controlling blood pressure, can all contribute to better heart health."We try to develop personalized management plans, we listen to our patients and try to understand what are the steps that they can take to improve their quality of life and to improve their future life and their health, " says Dr. Wamil.On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Wamil discusses the diabetes and heart disease connection.

The OTA Podcast
Orthopaedic research funding opportunities with the Department of Defense Congressionally-Directed Medical Research Program

The OTA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 22:36


Dr. Arun Aneja hosts a conversation with Dr. Akua Roach, Department of Defense Health Sciences Program Manager. They discuss the Congressionally-Directed Medical Research Program (CDMRP) funding to support peer reviewed orthopaedic trauma research. To learn about the CDMRP funding opportunities available, please visit: https://cdmrp.army.mil/ For additional educational resources visit https://ota.org/  Looking for CME?  OTA Podcast CME only on the ConveyMED Podcast App: Apple Store click here  Google Play click here  

The One Way Ticket Show
Dr. Rudolph E. Tanzi – Leading Brain & Alzheimer's Disease Specialist

The One Way Ticket Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 55:25


Dr. Tanzi is the Vice-Chair of Neurology, Director of the Genetics and Aging Research Unit, Co-Director of the Henry and Allison McCance Center for Brain Health, and Co-Director of the MassGeneral Institute for Neurodegenerative Disease at Massachusetts General Hospital. He also serves as the Joseph P. and Rose F. Kennedy Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Tanzi received his B.S. (microbiology) and B.A. (history) at the University of Rochester in 1980 and his Ph.D. (neurobiology) at Harvard Medical School in 1990. Dr. Tanzi was a key member of the teams that discovered the first Alzheimer's disease (AD) gene, the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene, and the two other early-onset familial AD genes, presenilin 1 and presenilin 2. As leader of the Cure Alzheimer's Fund Alzheimer's Genome Project, Dr. Tanzi identified several other AD genes, including CD33, the first AD gene shown to regulate neuroinflammation in AD. He also discovered the Wilson's disease gene and several other neurological disease genes. Dr. Tanzi's team was the first to use human stem cells to create three-dimensional mini human brain organoids of AD, dubbed “Alzheimer's-in-a-Dish”. This model was the first to recapitulate all three key AD pathological hallmarks. He and his team have successfully used these organoids to screen for approved drugs and natural products that can stop AD brain pathology. Dr. Tanzi has developed several novel therapies for AD including gamma secretase modulators targeting amyloid pathology (Phase 1 planned 2021) and AMX0035, which was already successful in a clinical trial of ALS and now under priority review for approval at the FDA. Dr. Tanzi also discovered that beta-amyloid plays a functional role in the brain as an anti-microbial peptide, supporting a potential role for infection in the etiology of AD. Dr. Tanzi serves as Chair of the Cure Alzheimer's Fund Research Leadership Group and on numerous scientific advisory and editorial boards. He has published over 600 research papers and is one of the top 50 most cited neuroscientists in the world. He has received the highest awards in his field, including the Metropolitan Life Foundation Award, Potamkin Prize, Ronald Reagan Award, Oneness in Humanity Award, Silver Innovator Award, the Smithsonian American Ingenuity Award, the Brain Research Foundation Award, and the Kary Mullis Award for Medical Research. He has also been named to TIME magazine's list of TIME100 Most Influential People in the World. Dr. Tanzi is also a New York Times bestselling author, who has co-authored the books Decoding Darkness, and bestsellers, Super Brain, Super Genes, and The Healing Self. Dr. Tanzi joins us to mark The One Way Ticket Show's 10th anniversary for our special series--a “one way ticket to optimal mental, physical and spiritual well-being”. On this episode of the program, Dr. Tanzi's conversation with Host Steven Shalowitz includes why today is rapidly becoming the golden age for solving age related brain diseases, lifestyle changes we can make to reduce the risk of Alzheimer's and questions around the brain-consciousness connection. Dr. Tanzi is just one of the engaging personalities featured on The One Way Ticket Show. During the regular season of the program, Host Steven Shalowitz explores with his guests where they would go if given a one way ticket, no coming back. Their destinations may be in the past, present, future, real, imaginary or a state of mind. Steven's guests have included: Nobel Peace Prize Winner, President Jose Ramos-Horta; Legendary Talk Show Host, Dick Cavett; Law Professor, Alan Dershowitz; Fashion Expert, Tim Gunn; Broadcast Legend, Charles Osgood; International Rescue Committee President & CEO, David Miliband; Former Senator, Joe Lieberman; Playwright, David Henry Hwang; Journalist-Humorist-Actor, Mo Rocca; SkyBridge Capital Founder & Co-Managing Partner, Anthony Scaramucci; Abercrombie & Kent Founder, Geoffrey Kent; Travel Expert, Pauline Frommer, as well as leading photographers, artists, chefs, writers, intellectuals, etc.

Ideas from CBC Radio (Highlights)
A Post-pandemic Future: Sir Mark Walport

Ideas from CBC Radio (Highlights)

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 54:08


The Henry G. Friesen International Prize in Health Research recognizes distinguished leadership, vision and innovation. The 2021 lecture was delivered by internationally acclaimed Professor Sir Mark Walport, known globally for his innovative work in health research. The topic of his talk is Medical Research and Innovation: Post-Pandemic Priorities.

Mayo Clinic Q&A
Ted Garding is a rare two-time living organ donor

Mayo Clinic Q&A

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 14:52


Fifty-seven-year-old Ted Garding is Mayo Clinic's first altruistic living liver donor. The living liver donation program allows a healthy person to donate a portion of his or her liver, which then regenerates over time. What makes Ted's story even better? He's a two-time altruistic organ donor, having previously donated a kidney back in 2010.  An altruistic, or nondirected living donor, is a person who donates an organ, usually a kidney, and does not name or have an intended recipient. "We were taught to help people in need, and we were blessed with good health in our family," says Ted. "And I am well aware that there are a lot of people that aren't as fortunate. Being kind to people and helping people in need has always been the most important thing to me."When Ted heard about living liver donation, he applied at Mayo Clinic, but expected he might get denied because he has one kidney and is in his 50s. But Ted was accepted, and in October 2021, the transplant happened in Rochester, Minnesota. The recipient reached out a few days later to thank him and told Ted he was her "guardian angel.""My own personal experience as a double living organ donor, personally, it's changed my life for the better," says Ted. "When you help someone in need, you're naturally going to feel better. I feel as though I've been blessed and that I am the one who received a gift." April is National Donate Life Month to raise awareness of the need for organ donors. In honor of Donate Life Month, Ted joins the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast to share his story.

Science Weekly
Why has the UK (finally) expanded its Covid symptoms list?

Science Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 12:51


This week, the UK expanded its official Covid symptom list to 12 symptoms including sore throat, loss of appetite, and a blocked or runny nose. British scientists have long called for a broadening of the list, but the change comes at a time when free rapid tests have been scr