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Oil and Whiskey with The Roadster Shop
The Late Brake Show's Jonny Smith - Season 2 Ep.4

Oil and Whiskey with The Roadster Shop

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 142:17


Today's guest is the creator of The Late Brake Show YouTube Channel, automotive journalist and collector Jonny Smith The Late Brake Show bridges the gap between appreciation for the past and excitement about the future of automobiles. It doesn't matter if the car is an EV or V8, a barn find project car or a display of the newest technology, Jonny wants to talk about it. Jonny's personal garage is a snapshot of the automotive landscape. He has electric daily drivers, Japanese Imports, American Muscle Cars, and Eastern European imports all under one roof. He's been a journalist for more than 20 years and featured in various international publications. He has also had the privilege to be a presenter on several BBC television shows to include Fifth Gear and Mud, Sweat, and Gears. To stay up-to-date with Jonny and new car content, make sure to subscribe to The Late Brake Show on Youtube and follow along on Instagram @thelatebrakeshow. Don't miss the latest from The Roadster Shop. Be sure to follow us on Instagram @roadstershop Oil and Whiskey is an IRONCLAD original.

Bring Back V10s - Classic F1 stories
S7 E4: 2006 Hungarian GP - Button's first F1 win

Bring Back V10s - Classic F1 stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 87:34


Bring Back V10s ventures into the first year of F1's V8 era to look back at the 2006 Hungarian Grand Prix, where Jenson Button finally claimed the first win of his F1 career. Edd Straw and Scott Mitchell-Malm join host Glenn Freeman to discuss a crazy wet-dry race in great detail, looking at how Button and Honda triumphed, the brilliance of Fernando Alonso before he was forced into retirement, and a day to forget for Michael Schumacher. They also revisit the major news topics from the summer of 2006, including Mark Webber's split from Williams, the Renault mass damper controversy, and how title rivals Alonso and Schumacher both ended up picking up unique penalties that are no longer given out in F1 today. GET IN TOUCH: Use the hashtag #BringBackV10s on Twitter or email bringbackv10s@the-race.com Did you know The Race has an app? Download it today on iOS or Android 

The Clean Energy Show
148. No Miracles Needed to Replace 95% of Fossil Fuels by 2035

The Clean Energy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 50:54


A new book says stick with wind, water, solar and storage and we meet 95% of our climate targets by 2035 without new inventions. Plant-based eggs briefly become cheaper than real eggs. We will not have to strip the Earth of its minerals to address climate change: a debunking. Republican states are benefiting the most with Biden's climate bills. Brian orders a Tesla wall connector before it shoots up in price. A Canadian film is up for Best Picture at the Oscars GM invests a billion dollars in V8 engines and are wasting money No Miracles Needed, a book by Mark Jacobson, demonstrates how we have everything we need to address emissions by 2035. GUARDIAN article: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2023/jan/23/no-miracles-needed-prof-mark-jacobson-on-how-wind-sun-and-water-can-power-the-world Plant-based eggs cheaper than regular eggs briefly Pakistan power grid massively down due to aging infastructure A counter to misinoformation on the planet being ravaged by human addressing the climate crisis.  Contribute to us with PayPal Donate!https://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=VMDCRPHLNR8YE E-transfer: cleanenergyshow@gmail.com Buy us a cup of coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/cleanenergyshow  Consider rating The Clean Energy Show on iTunes, Spotify or wherever you listen to our show. Follow us on TikTok! @cleanenergypod Check out our YouTube Channel! @CleanEnergyShow Follow us on Twitter! @CleanEnergyPod Your hosts: James Whittingham https://twitter.com/jewhittingham Brian Stockton: https://twitter.com/brianstockton Email us at cleanenergyshow@gmail.com Leave us an online voicemail at http://speakpipe.com/cleanenergyshow See you next week!  

The Clean Energy Show
148. No Miracles Needed!

The Clean Energy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 50:50


A new book says stick with wind, water, solar and storage and we meet 95% of our climate targets by 2035 without new inventions. Plant-based eggs briefly become cheaper than real eggs. We will not have to strip the Earth of its minerals to address climate change: a debunking. Republican states are benefiting the most with Biden's climate bills. Brian orders a Tesla wall connector before it shoots up in price. A Canadian film is up for Best Picture at the Oscars GM invests a billion dollars in V8 engines and are wasting money No Miracles Needed, a book by Mark Jacobson, demonstrates how we have everything we need to address emissions by 2035. GUARDIAN article: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2023/jan/23/no-miracles-needed-prof-mark-jacobson-on-how-wind-sun-and-water-can-power-the-world Plant-based eggs cheaper than regular eggs briefly Pakistan power grid massively down due to aging infastructure A counter to misinoformation on the planet being ravaged by human addressing the climate crisis.  Contribute to us with PayPal Donate!https://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=VMDCRPHLNR8YE E-transfer: cleanenergyshow@gmail.com Here's where to find us: Follow us on TikTok! @cleanenergypod Check out our YouTube Channel! @CleanEnergyShow Follow us on Twitter! @CleanEnergyPod Your hosts: James Whittingham https://twitter.com/jewhittingham Brian Stockton: https://twitter.com/brianstockton Email us at cleanenergyshow@gmail.com Leave us an online voicemail at http://speakpipe.com/cleanenergyshow See you next week!   Please note: We had a publishing error this week and the file linked here may be replacing a defunct file previously uploaded.

Turn Four Podcast
2023 Racing Season Starts at Daytona Ep 55

Turn Four Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 46:50


Dan and Tim discuss their upcoming trip to the Rolex 24 at Daytona.  Dan breaks down the new Gran Touring Prototype (GTP) cars and engine difference prepared by Acura, Cadillac, Porsche and BMW.  Did someone say V8!  And Acura's 2.4L sounds very familiar to IndyCar fans.  What about the hybrid component? It's again very familiar.  Then we get into some IndyCar news Foyt, Ganassi, Juncos and let's not forget the 2024 Indy 500 entry.Engage with us on social media!Consider becoming a Patreon supporter at: https://www.patreon.com/turnfourpodcast  Twitter: @turnfourpodcas1Instagram: Turn_Four_Podcastwww.turn4podcast.comYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0KqoM_k5JAOjdJs1LMD9cg

El Garaje Hermético de Máximo Sant
Frases de pilotos… ¡Cuánta sabiduría!

El Garaje Hermético de Máximo Sant

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 14:59


Los pilotos son gente muy especial. Y algunos han dicho frases que se han hecho celebres por ser ingeniosas, divertidas, polémicas o, simplemente, inteligentes. Pero para mí son otra cosa: Pura cultura del motor. No te pierdas este vídeo… vas a aprender mucho… Porque lo que cuento en este vídeo lo ha dicho gente que sabe tanto de carreras como Chris Amon, Mario Andretti, Jim Clark, Juan Manuel Fangio, Colin McRae, Jean Ragnotti, Walter Röhrl, Pedro de la Rosa, Carlos Sainz sr y Jr., Ayrton Senna, Jackie Stewart o Gilles Villeneuve. ¡Imposible fallar! Hoy vamos a comenzar por los pilotos de rallye. Walter Röhrl “El secreto está en frenar un segundo después de lo que indica el sentido común y acelerar un segundo antes de lo que impera la lógica”. Jean Ragnotti “Sólo freno cuando veo imposible pasar a fondo” . Carlos Sainz Sr. “Los pedales están para pisarlos a fondo. Si quitas el pie del acelerador es para apurar una frenada y si sueltas el pie del freno es para volver a dar gas al máximo” . Colin McRae “Estoy en la meta, si hubiera ido a tope todo el rato no estaría aquí”. Y ahora vamos a la F1. Pedro de la Rosa. “He trabajado muy duro, muy muy duro para llegar hasta aquí ¿Sacrificios? Ninguno. Fue duro, pero no sacrificado, sacrificio es hacer algo que tú no quieres hacer” . Jim Clark “Cuando quiero ir más rápido no corro más, me concentro más”. Andretti-Villenueve Eso lo explicaba muy bien Mario Andretti en un frase a menudo atribuida a Gilles Villeneuve. “Si todo parece bajo control, es que no vas suficientemente rápido”. Gilles Villenueve “¿Cómo podemos conocer los limites si no tratamos de sobrepasarlos?” Juan Manuel Fangio “Para llegar primero, primero hay que llegar”. “Las carreras no se ganan en la primera curva. Muchas veces se pierden” “Muchos creen que saber pilotar es saber volantear. Saber pilotar es mucho más: es saber frenar. Frenar es todo un arte”. Chris Amon “La mala suerte no existe. Es algo que nos creemos, una escapatoria. En realidad llamamos infortunio a la conjunción negativa de hechos que no hemos sido capaces de prever”. Jackie Stewart “Las cosas te pueden salir bien o no, puedes ir rápido o no, pero el que diga que ama Nurburgring, o miente o es que nunca ha ido lo suficientemente rápido” . Carlos Sainz “Stop inventing”. Conclusión Como veis, los pilotos son gente muy especial, pero inteligente y hasta divertida… y bastante loco. Este es el típico video que, con vuestra ayuda, puede tener una segunda parte, ¿nos mandáis frases de pilotos? Coche del día En el video de deportivos americanos míticos, otro video del que hay que hacer segunda parte, hable del Plymouth Road Runner, pero no de la versión de competición, con morro afinado y protuberante alerón… Este Plymouth Road Runner Superbird 440 es un coche que me apasiona. Un coche grande, de 5,6 metros morro incluido, pesado con 1,7 toneladas pero que gracias a su motor V8 de 7,2 litros y 390 CV aceleraba y corría como una bestia.

Software Sessions
Victor Adossi on Yak Shaving

Software Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 110:47


Victor is a software consultant in Tokyo who describes himself as a yak shaver. He writes on his blog at vadosware and curates Awesome F/OSS, a mailing list of open source products. He's also a contributor to the Open Core Ventures blog. Before our conversation Victor wrote a structured summary of how he works on projects. I recommend checking that out in addition to the episode. Topics covered: Most people should use Dokku or CapRover But he uses Kubernetes anyways Hosting a Database in Kubernetes Learning technology You don't really know a thing until something goes wrong History of Frontend Development Context from lower layers of the stack and historical projects Good project pages have comparisons to other products Choosing technologies Language choice affects maintainability Knowing an ecosystem Victor's preferred stack Technology bake offs Posting findings means you get free corrections Why people use medium instead of personal sites Victor VADOSWARE - Blog How Victor works on Projects - Companion post for this episode Awesome FOSS - Curated list of OSS projects NimbusWS - Hosted OSS built on top of budget cloud providers Unvalidated Ideas - Startup ideas for side project inspiration PodcastSaver - Podcast index that allows you to choose Postgres or MeiliSearch and compare performance and results of each Victor's preferred stack Docker - Containers Kubernetes - Container provisioning (Though at the beginning of the episode he suggests Dokku for single server or CapRover for multiple) TypeScript - JavaScript with syntax for types. Victor's default choice. Rust - Language he uses if doing embedded work, performance is critical, or more correctness is desired Haskell - Language he uses if correctness and type system is the most important for the project Postgresql - General purpose database that's good enough for most use cases including full text search. KeyDB - Redis compatible database for caching. Acquired by Snap and then made open source. Victor uses it over Redis because it is multi threaded and supports flash storage without a Redis Enterprise license. Pulumi - Provision infrastructure with the languages you're already using instead of a specialized one or YAML Svelte and SvelteKit - Preferred frontend stack. Previously used Nuxt. Search engines Postgres Full Text Search vs the rest Optimizing Postgres Text Search with Trigrams OpenSearch - Amazon's fork of Elasticsearch typesense meilisearch sonic Quickwit JavaScript build tools Babel SWC Webpack esbuild parcel Vite Turbopack JavaScript frameworks React Vue Svelte Ember Frameworks built on top of frameworks Next - React Nuxt - Vue SvelteKit - Svelte Astro - Multiple Historical JavaScript tools and frameworks Underscore jQuery MooTools Backbone AngularJS Knockout Aurelia GWT Bower - Frontend package manager Grunt - Task runner Gulp - Task runner Related Links Dokku - Open source single-host alternative to Heroku Cloud Native Buildpacks - Buildpacks created by Heroku and Pivotal and used by Dokku CapRover - An open source PaaS-like abstraction built on top of Docker Swarm Kelsey Hightower's tweet about being cautious about running databases on Kubernetes Settling the Myth of Transparent HugePages for Databases Kubernetes Container Storage Interface (CSI) Kubernetes Local Persistent Volumes Longhorn - Distributed block storage for Kubernetes Postgres docs Postgres TOAST Everything I've seen on optimizing Postgres on ZFS Kubernetes Workload Resources Kubernetes Network Plugins Kubernetes Ingress Traefik Kubernetes the Hard Way (Setting up a cluster in a way that optimizes for learning) How does TLS work Let's Encrypt Cert manager for Kubernetes Choose Boring Technology A Linux user's guide to Logical Volume Management Docker networking overview Kubernetes Scheduler Tauri - Build desktop applications with web technology and Rust ripgrep - CLI tool to recursively search directory for a regex pattern (Meant to be a rust replacement for grep) angle-grinder / ag - CLI tool to parse and process log files written in rust Object.observe ECMAScript Proposal to be Withdrawn Ruby on Rails - Ruby web framework Django - Python web framework Laravel - PHP web framework Adonis - JavaScript NestJS - JavaScript What is a NullPointerException, and how do I fix it? Mastodon Clap - CLI argument parser for Rust AWS CDK - Provision AWS infrastructure using programming languages Terraform - Provision infrastructure with terraform language URL canonicalization of duplicate pages and the use of the canonical tag - Used by dev.to to send google traffic to the original blogpost instead of dev.to Transcript You can help edit this transcript on GitHub. [00:00:00] Jeremy: This episode, I talk to Victor Adossi who describes himself as a yak shaver. Someone who likes trying a whole bunch of different technologies, seeing the different options. We talk about what he uses, the evolution of front end development, and his various projects. Talking to just different people it's always good to get where they're coming from because something that works for Google at their scale is going to be different than what you're doing with one of your smaller projects. [00:00:31] Victor: Yeah, the context. Of course in direct conflict with that statement, I definitely use Google technology despite not needing to at all right? Like, you know, 99% of people who are doing like people like to call it indiehacking or building small products could probably get by with just Dokku. If you know Dokku or like CapRover. Are two projects that'll be like, Oh, you can just push your code here, we'll build it up like a little mini Heroku PaaS thing and just go on one big server, right? Like 99% of the people could just use that. But of course I'm not doing that. So I'm a bit of a hypocrite in that sense. I know what I should be doing, but I'm not doing that. I am writing a Kubernetes cluster with like five nodes for no reason. Uh, yeah, I dunno, people don't normally count the controllers. [00:01:24] Jeremy: Dokku and CapRover, I think those are where it's supposed to create a heroku like experience I think it's based off of the heroku buildpacks right? At least Dokku is? [00:01:36] Victor: Yeah Buildpacks has actually been spun out into like a community thing so like pivotal and heroku, it's like buildpacks.io, they're trying to build a wider standard around it so that more people can get involved. And buildpacks are actually obviously fantastic as a technology and as a a process piece. There's not much else like them and you know, that's obvious from like Heroku's success and everything. I know Dokku uses that. I don't know that Caprover does, but I haven't, I haven't really run Caprover that much. They, they probably do. Like at this point if you're going to support building from code, it seems silly to try and build your own buildpacks. Cause that's what you will do, eventually. So you might as well use what's there. Anyway, this is like just getting to like my personal opinions at this point, but like, if you think containers are a bad idea in 2022, You're wrong, you should, you should stop. Like you should, you should stop. Think about it. I mean, obviously there's not, um, I got a really great question at an interview once, which is, where are containers a bad idea? That's probably one of the best like recent interview questions I've ever gotten cause I was like, Oh yeah, I mean, like, you can't, it can't be perfect everywhere, right? Nothing's perfect everywhere. So it's like, where is it? Uh, and of course the answer was networking, right? (unintelligible) So if you need absolute performance, but like for just about everything else. Containers are kind of it at this point. Like, time has born it out, I think. So yeah, I always just like bias at taking containers at this point. So I'm probably more of a CapRover person than a Dokku person, even though I have not used, I don't use CapRover. [00:03:09] Jeremy: Well, like something that I've heard with containers, and maybe it's changed recently, but, but something that was kind of holdout was when people would host a database sometimes they would oh we just don't wanna put this in a container and I wonder if like that matches with your thinking or if things have changed. [00:03:27] Victor: I am not a database administrator right like I read postgres docs and I read the, uh, the Postgres documentation, and I think I know a bit about postgres but I don't commit right like so and I also haven't, like, oh, managed X terabytes on one server that you are making sure never goes down kind of deal. But the stickiness for me, at least from when I've run, So I've done a lot of tests with like ZFS and Postgres and like, um, and also like just trying to figure out, and I run Postgres in Kubernetes of course, like on my cluster and a lot of the stuff I found around is, is like fiddly kernel things like sort of base kernel settings that you need to have set. Like, you know, stuff like should you be using transparent huge pages, like stuff like that. But once you have that settled. Containers are just processes with name spacing and resource control, right? Like, that's it. there are some other ins and outs, but for the most part, if you're fine running a process, so people ran processes, right? And they were just completely like unprotected. Then people made users for the processes and they limited the users and ran the processes, right? Then the next step is now you can run a process and then do the limiting the name spaces in cgroups dynamically. Like there, there's, there's sort of not a humongous difference, unless you're hitting something very specific. Uh, but yeah, databases have been a point of contention, but I think, Kelsey Hightower had that tweet yeah. That was like, um, don't run databases in Kubernetes. And I think he called it back. [00:04:56] Victor: I don't know, but I, I know that was uh, was one of those things that people were really unsure about at first, but then after people sort of like felt it out, they were like, Oh, it's actually fine. Yeah. [00:05:06] Jeremy: Yeah I vaguely remember one of the concerns having to do with persistent storage. Like there were challenges with Kubernetes and needing to keep that storage around and I don't know if that's changed yeah or if that's still a concern. [00:05:18] Victor: Uh, I'd say that definitely has changed. Uh, and it was, it was a concern, depending on where you were. Mostly people who are running AKS or EKS or you know, all those other managed Kubernetes, they're just using EBS or like whatever storage provider is like offering for storage. Most of those people don't actually have that much of a problem with, storage in general. Now, high performance storage is obviously different, right? So like, so you'll, you're gonna have to start doing manual, like local volume management and stuff like that. it was a problem, because obviously CSI (Kubernetes Container Storage Interface) didn't exist for some period of time, and like there was, it was hard to know what to do for if you were just running a Kubernetes cluster. I think a lot of people were just using local, first of all, local didn't even exist for a bit. Um, they were just using host path, right? And just like, Oh, it's on the disk somewhere. Where do we, we have to go get it right? Or we have to like, sort of manage that. So that was something most people weren't ready for, especially if you were just, if you weren't like sort of a, a, a traditional sysadmin and used to doing that stuff. And then of course local volumes came out, but I think they still had to be, um, pre-provisioned. So that's sysadmin stuff that most people, you know, maybe aren't, aren't necessarily ready for. Uh, and then most of the general solutions were slow. So like, I used Longhorn (https://longhorn.io) for a long time and Longhorn, Longhorn's great. And super easy to set up, but it can be slower and you can have some, like, delays in mount time. it wasn't ideal for, for most people. So yeah, I, overall it's true. Databases, Databases in Kubernetes were kind of fraught with peril for a while, but it wasn't for the reason that, it wasn't for the fundamental reason that Kubernetes was just wrong or like, it wasn't the reason most people think of, which is just like, Oh, you're gonna break your database. It's more like, running a database is hard and Kubernetes hasn't solved all the hard problems. Like, cuz that's what Kubernetes does. It basically solves a lot of problems in a very generic way. Right. So it just hadn't solved all those problems yet at this point. I think it's got decent answers on a lot of them. So I, I mean, I don't know. I I do it. Don't, don't take what I'm saying to your, you know, PM meeting or your standup meeting, uh, anyone who's listening. But it's more like if you could solve the problems with databases in the sense before. You could probably solve 'em on Kubernetes now with a good understanding of Kubernetes. Cause at the end of the day, it's all the same stuff. Just Kubernetes makes it a little easier to, uh, do it dynamically. [00:07:50] Jeremy: It sounds like you could do it before, but some of the, I guess the tools or the ways of doing persistent storage were not quite there yet, or they were difficult to use. And so that was why people at the start were like, Okay, maybe it's not a good idea, but, now maybe there's some established practices for how you should run a database in Kubernetes. And I, I suppose the other aspect too is that, like you were saying, Kubernetes is its own thing. You gotta learn Kubernetes and all its intricacies. And then running a database is also its own challenge. So if you stack the two of them together and, and the path was not really clear then maybe at the start it wasn't the best idea. Um, uh, if somebody was going to try it out now, was there like a specific resource you looked at or a specific path to where like okay this is is how I'm going to do it. [00:08:55] Victor: I'll just say what I normally recommend to everybody. Cause it depends on which path you wanna go right? If you wanna go down like running a database path first and figure that out, fill out that skill tree. Like go read the Postgres docs. Well, first of all, use Postgres. That's the first tip there. But like, read those documents. And obviously you don't have to understand everything. You won't understand everything. But knowing the big pieces and sort of letting your brain see the mention of like a whole bunch of things, like what is toast? Oh, you can do compression on columns. Like, you can do some, some things concurrently. Um, you know, what ALTER TABLE looks like. You get all that stuff kind of in your head. Um, and then I personally really believe in sort of learning by building and just like iterating. you won't get it right the first time. It's just like, it's not gonna happen. You're get, you can, you can get better the first time, right? By being really prepared and like, and leave yourself lots of outs, but you kind of have to like, get it out there. Do do your best to make sure that you can't fail, uh, catastrophically, right? So this is like, goes back to that decision to like use ZFS as the bottom of this I'm just like, All right, well, I, I'm not a file systems expert, but if I. I could delegate some of that, you know, some of that, I can get some of that knowledge from someone else. Um, and I can make it easier for me to not fail catastrophically. For the database side, actually read documentation on Postgres or the whatever database you're going to use, make sure you at least understand that. Then start running it like locally or whatever. Again, Docker use, use Docker locally. It's, it's, it's fine. and then, you know, sort of graduate to running sort of more progressively, more complicated versions. what I would say for the Kubernetes side is actually similar. the Kubernetes docs are really good. they're very large. but they're good. So you can actually go through and know all the, like, workload, workload resources, know, like what a config map is, what a secret is, right? Like what etcd is doing in this whole situation. you know, what a kublet is versus an API server, right? Like the, the general stuff, like if you go through all that, you should have like a whole bunch of ideas at least floating around in your head. And then once you try and start setting up a server, they will all start to pop up again, right? And they'll all start to like, you, like, Oh, okay, I need a CNI (Container Networking) plugin because something needs to make the services available, right? Or something needs to power the ingress, right? Like, if I wanna be able to get traffic, I need an ingress object. But what listens, what does that, what makes that ingress object do anything? Oh, it's an ingress controller. nginx, you know, almost everyone's heard of nginx, so they're like, okay. Um, nginx, has an ingress control. Actually there's, there used to be two, I assume there's still two, but there's like one that's maintained by Kubernetes, one that's maintained by nginx, the company or whatever. I use traefik, it's fantastic. but yeah, so I think those things kind of fall out and that is almost always my first way to explain it and to start building. And tinkering iteratively. So like, read the documentation, get a good first grasp of it, and then start building yourself because you'll, you'll get way more questions that way. Like, you'll ask way more questions, you won't be able to make progress. Uh, and then of course you can, you know, hop into slacks or like start looking around and, and searching on the internet. oh, one of the things that really helped me out early learning Kubernetes was, Kelsey Hightower's, um, learn Kubernetes the hard way. I'm also a big believer in doing things the hard way, at least knowing what you're choosing to not know, right? distributing file system, Deltas, right? Or like changes to a file system over the network is not a new problem. Other people have solved it. There's a lot of complexity there. but if you at least know the sort of surface level of what the thing does and what it's supposed to do and how it's supposed to do it, you can make a decision on, Oh, how deep am I going to go? Right? To prevent yourself from like, making a mistake or going too deep in the rabbit hole. If you have an idea of the sort of ecosystem and especially like, Oh, here, like the basics of how I can use this thing, that's generally very good. And doing things the hard way is a great way to get a, a feel for that, right? Cause if you take some chunk and like, you know, the first level of doing things the hard way, uh, or, you know, Kelsey Hightower's guide is like, get a machine, right? Like, so, like, if you somehow were like, Oh, I wanna run a Kubernetes cluster. but, you know, I don't want use necessarily EKS and you wanna learn it the hard way. You have to go get a machine, right? If you, if you're not familiar, if you run on Heroku the whole time, like you didn't manage your own machines, you gotta go like, figure out EC2, right? Or, I personally use, hetzner I love hetzner, so you have to go figure out hetzner, digital ocean, whatever. Right. And then the next thing's like, you know, the guide's changed a lot, and I haven't, I haven't looked at it in like, in years, actually a while since I, since I've sort of been, I guess living it, but it's, it's like generate certificates, right? So if you've never dealt with SSL and like, sort of like, or I should say TLS uh, and generating certificates and how that whole dance works, right? Which is fascinating because it's like, oh, right, nothing's secure on the internet, except that we distribute root certificates on computers that are deployed in every OS, right? Like, that's a sort of fundamental understanding you may not go deep enough to realize, but if you are fascinated by it, trying to do it manually would lead you down that path. You'd be like, Oh, what, like what is this thing? What is a CSR? Like, why, who is signing my request? Right? And it's like, why do we trust those people? Right? And it's like, you know, that kind of thing comes out and I feel like you can only get there from trying to do it, you know, answering the questions you can. Right. And again, it takes some judgment to know when you should not go down a rabbit hole. uh, and then iterating. of course there are people who are excellent at explaining. you can find some resources that are shortcuts. But, uh, I think particularly my bread and butter has been just to try and do it the hard way. Avoid pitfalls or like rabbit holes when you can. But know that the rabbit hole is there, and then keep going. And sometimes if something's just too hard, you're not gonna get it the first time. Like maybe you'll have to wait like another three months, you'll try again and you'll know more sort of ambiently about everything else. You get a little further that time. that's how I feel about that. Anyway. [00:15:06] Jeremy: That makes sense to me. I think sometimes when people take on a project, they try to learn too many things at the same time. I, I think the example of Kubernetes and Postgres is pretty good example, where if you're not familiar with how do I install Postgres on bare metal or a vm, trying to make sense of that while you're trying to into is probably gonna be pretty difficult. So, so splitting them up and learning them individually, that makes a lot of sense to me. And the whole deciding how deep you wanna go. That's interesting too, because I think that's very specific to the person right because sometimes you wanna go a little deeper because otherwise you don't understand how the two things connect together. But other times it's just like with the example with certificates, some people they may go like, I just put in let's encrypt it gives me my cert I don't care right then, and then, and some people they wanna know like okay how does the whole certificate infrastructure work which I think is interesting, depending on who you are, maybe you go ahh maybe it doesn't really matter right. [00:16:23] Victor: Yeah, and, you know, shout out to Let's Encrypt . It's, it's amazing, right? think Singlehandedly the most, most of the deployment of HTTPS that happens these days, right? so many so many of like internet providers and uh, sort of service providers will use it right? Under the covers. Like, Hey, we've got you free SSL through Let's Encrypt, right? Like, kind of like under the, under the covers. which is awesome. And they, and they do it. So if you're listening to this, donate to them. I've done it. So now that, now the pressure is on whoever's listening, but yeah, and, and I, I wanna say I am that person as well, right? Like, I use, Cert Manager on my cluster, right? So I'm just like, I don't wanna think about it, but I, you know, but I, I feel like I thought about it one time. I have a decent grasp. If something changes, then I guess I have to dive back in. I think it, you've heard the, um, innovation tokens idea, right? I can't remember the site. It's like, um, do, like do boring tech or something.com (https://boringtechnology.club/) . Like it shows up on sort of hacker news from time to time, essentially. But it's like, you know, you have a certain amount of tokens and sort of, uh, we'll call them tokens, but tolerance for complexity or tolerance for new, new ideas or new ways of doing things, new processes. Uh, and you spend those as you build any project, right? you can be devastatingly effective by just sticking to the stack, you know, and not introducing anything new, even if it's bad, right? and there's nothing wrong with LAMP stack, I don't wanna annoy anybody, but like if you, if you're running LAMP or if you run on a hostgator, right? Like, if you run on so, you know, some, some service that's really old but really works for you isn't, you know, too terribly insecure or like, has the features you need, don't learn Kubernetes then, right? Especially if you wanna go fast. cuz you, you're spending tokens, right? You're spending, essentially brain power, right? On learning whatever other thing. So, but yeah, like going back to that, databases versus databases on Kubernetes thing, you should probably know one of those before you, like, if you're gonna do that, do that thing. You either know Kubernetes and you like, at least feel comfortable, you know, knowing Kubernetes extremely difficult obviously, but you feel comfortable and you feel like you can debug. Little bit of a tangent, but maybe that's even a better, sort of watermark if you know how to debug a thing. If, if it's gone wrong, maybe one or five or 10 or 20 times and you've gotten out. Not without documentation, of course, cuz well, if you did, you're superhuman. But, um, but you've been able to sort of feel your way out, right? Like, Oh, this has gone wrong and you have enough of a model of the system in your head to be like, these are the three places that maybe have something wrong with them. Uh, and then like, oh, and then of course it's just like, you know, a mad dash to kind of like, find, find the thing that's wrong. You should have confidence about probably one of those things before you try and do both when it's like, you know, complex things like databases and distributed systems management, uh, and orchestration. [00:19:18] Jeremy: That's, that's so true in, in terms of you are comfortable enough being able to debug a problem because it's, I think when you are learning about something, a lot of times you start with some kind of guide or some kind of tutorial and you follow the steps. And if it all works, then great. Right? But I think it's such a large leap from that to something went wrong and I have to figure it out. Right. Whether it's something's not right in my Dockerfile or my postgres instance uh, the queries are timing out. so many things that could go wrong, that is the moment where you're forced to figure out, okay, what do I really know about this not thing? [00:20:10] Victor: Exactly. Yeah. Like the, the rubber's hitting the road it's uh you know the car's about to crash or has already crashed like if I open the bonnet, do I know what's happening right or am I just looking at (unintelligible). And that's, it's, I feel sort a little sorry or sad for, for devs that start today because there's so much. Complexity that's been built up. And a lot of it has a point, but you need to kind of have seen the before to understand the point, right? So I like, I like to use front end as an example, right? Like the front end ecosystem is crazy, and it has been crazy for a very long time, but the steps are actually usually logical, right? Like, so like you start with, you know, HTML, CSS and JavaScript, just plain, right? And like, and you can actually go in lots of directions. Like HTML has its own thing. CSS has its own sort of evolution sort of thing. But if we look at JavaScript, you're like, you're just writing JavaScript on every page, right? And like, just like putting in script tags and putting in whatever, and it's, you get spaghetti, you get spaghetti, you start like writing, copying the same function on multiple pages, right? You just, it, it's not good. So then people, people make jquery, right? And now, now you've got like a, a bundled set of like good, good defaults that you can, you can go for, right? And then like, you know, libraries like underscore come out for like, sort of like not dom related stuff that you do want, you do want everywhere. and then people go from there and they go to like backbone or whatever. it's because Jquery sort of also becomes spaghetti at some point and it becomes hard to manage and people are like, Okay, we need to sort of like encapsulate this stuff somehow, right? And like the new tools or whatever is around at the same timeframe. And you, you, you like backbone views for example. and you have people who are kind of like, ah, but that's not really good. It's getting kind of slow. Uh, and then you have, MVC stuff comes out, right? Like Angular comes out and it's like, okay, we're, we're gonna do this thing called dirty checking, and it's gonna be, it's gonna be faster and it's gonna be like, it's gonna be less sort of spaghetti and it's like a little bit more structured. And now you have sort of like the rails paradigm, but on the front end, and it takes people to get a while to get adjusted to that, but then that gets too heavy, right? And then dirty checking is realized to be a mistake. And then, you get stuff like MVVM, right? So you get knockout, like knockout js and you got like Durandal, and like some, some other like sort of front end technologies that come up to address that problem. Uh, and then after that, like, you know, it just keeps going, right? Like, and if you come in at the very end, you're just like, What is happening? Right? Like if it, if it, if someone doesn't sort of boil down the complexity and reduce it a little bit, you, you're just like, why, why do we do this like this? Right? and sometimes there's no good reason. Sometimes the complexity is just like, is unnecessary, but having the steps helps you explain it, uh, or helps you understand how you got there. and, and so I feel like that is something younger people or, or newer devs don't necessarily get a chance to see. Cause it just, it would take, it would take very long right? And if you're like a new dev, let's say you jumped into like a coding bootcamp. I mean, I've got opinions on coding boot camps, but you know, it's just like, let's say you jumped into one and you, you came out, you, you made it. It's just, there's too much to know. sure, you could probably do like HTML in one month. Well, okay, let's say like two weeks or whatever, right? If you were, if you're literally brand new, two weeks of like concerted effort almost, you know, class level, you know, work days right on, on html, you're probably decently comfortable with it. Very comfortable. CSS, a little harder because this is where things get hard. Cause if you, if you give two weeks for, for HTML, CSS is harder than HTML kind of, right? Because the interactions are way more varied. Right? Like, and, and maybe it's one of those things where you just, like, you, you get somewhat comfortable and then just like know that in the future you're gonna see something you don't understand and have to figure it out. Uh, but then JavaScript, like, how many months do you give JavaScript? Because if you go through that first like, sort of progression that I, I I, I, I mentioned everyone would have a perfect sort of, not perfect but good understanding of the pieces, right? Like, why did we start transpiling at all? Right? Like, uh, or why did you know, why did we adopt libraries? Like why did Bower exist? No one talks about Bower anymore, obviously, but like, Bower was like a way to distribute front end only packages, right? Um, what is it? Um, Uh, yes, there's grunt. There's like the whole build system thing, right? Once, once we decide we're gonna, we're gonna do stuff to files before we, before we push. So there's grunt, there's, uh, gulp, which is like grunt, but like, Oh, we're gonna do it all in memory. We're gonna pipe, we're gonna use this pipes thing to make sure everything goes fast. then there's like, of course that leads like the insanity that's webpack. And then there's like parcel, which did better. There's vite there's like, there's all this, there's this progression, but how many months would it take to know that progression? It, it's too long. So they end up just like, Hey, you're gonna learn react. Which is the right thing because it's like, that's what people hire for, right? But then you're gonna be in react and be like, What's webpack, right? And it's like, but you can't go down. You can't, you don't have the time. You, you can't sort of approach that problem from the other direction where you, which would give you better understanding cause you just don't have the time. I think it's hard for newer devs to overcome this. Um, but I think there are some, there's some hope on the horizon cuz some things are simpler, right? Like some projects do reduce complexity, like, by watching another project sort of innovate so like react. Wasn't the first component, first framework, right? Like technically, I, I think, I think you, you might have to give that to like, to maybe backbone because like they had views and like marionette also went with that. Like maybe, I don't know, someone, someone I'm sure will get in like, send me an angry email, uh, cuz I forgot you Moo tools or like, you know, Ember Ember. They've also, they've also been around, I used to be a huge Ember fan, still, still kind of am, but I don't use it. but if you have these, if you have these tools, right? Like people aren't gonna know how to use them and Vue was able to realize that React had some inefficiencies, right? So React innovates the sort of component. So Reintroduces the component based model component first, uh, front end development model. Vue sees that and it's like, wait a second, if we just export this like data object, and of course that's not the only innovation of Vue, but if we just export this data object, you don't have to do this fine grained tracking yourself anymore, right? You don't have to tell React or tell your the system which things change when other things change, right? Like you, you don't have to set up this watching and stuff, right? Um, and that's one of the reasons, like Vue is just, I, I, I remember picking up Vue and being like, Oh, I'm done. I'm done with React now. Because it just doesn't make sense to use React because they Vue essentially either, you know, you could just say they learned from them or they, they realize a better way to do things that is simpler and it's much easier to write. Uh, and you know, functionally similar, right? Um, similar enough that it's just like, oh they boil down some of that complexity and we're a step forward and, you know, in other ways, I think. Uh, so that's, that's awesome. Every once in a while you get like a compression in the complexity and then it starts to ramp up again and you get maybe another compression. So like joining the projects that do a compression. Or like starting to adopting those is really, can be really awesome. So there's, there's like, there's some hope, right? Cause sometimes there is a compression in that complexity and you you might be lucky enough to, to use that instead of, the thing that's really complex after years of building on it. [00:27:53] Jeremy: I think you're talking about newer developers having a tough time making sense of the current frameworks but the example you gave of somebody starting from HTML and JavaScript going to jquery backbone through the whole chain, that that's just by nature of you've put in a lot of time right you've done a lot of work working with each of these technologies you see the progression as if someone is starting new just by nature of you being new you won't have been able to spend that time [00:28:28] Victor: Do you think it could work? again, the, the, the time aspect is like really hard to get like how can you just avoid spending time um to to learn things that's like a general problem I think that problem is called education in the general sense. But like, does it make sense for a, let's say a bootcamp or, or any, you know, school right? To attempt to guide people through the previous solutions that didn't work, right? Like in math, you don't start with calculus, right? It just wouldn't, it doesn't make sense, right? But we try and start with calculus in software, right? We're just like, okay, here's the complexity. You've got all of it. Don't worry. Just look at this little bit. If, you know, if the compiler ever spits out a weird error uh oh, like, you're, you're, you're in for trouble cuz you, you just didn't get the. get the basics. And I think that's maybe some of what is missing. And the thing is, it is like the constraints are hard, right? No one has infinite time, right? Or like, you know, even like, just tons of time to devote to learning, learning just front end, right? That's not even all of computing, That's not even the algorithm stuff that some companies love to throw at you, right? Uh, or the computer sciencey stuff. I wonder if it makes more sense to spend some time taking people through the progression, right? Because discovering that we should do things via components, let's say, or, or at least encapsulate our functionality to components and compose that way, is something we, we not everyone knew, right? Or, you know, we didn't know wild widely. And so it feels like it might make sense to touch on that sort of realization and sort of guide the student through, you know, maybe it's like make five projects in a week and you just get progressively more complex. But then again, that's also hard cause effort, right? It's just like, it's a hard problem. But, but I think right now, uh, people who come in at the end and sort of like see a bunch of complexity and just don't know why it's there, right? Like, if you've like, sort of like, this is, this applies also very, this applies to general, but it applies very well to the Kubernetes problem as well. Like if you've never managed nginx on more than one machine, or if you've never tried to set up a, like a, to format your file system on the machine you just rented because it just, you know, comes with nothing, right? Or like, maybe, maybe some stuff was installed, but, you know, if you had to like install LVM (Logical Volume Manager) yourself, if you've never done any of that, Kubernetes would be harder to understand. It's just like, it's gonna be hard to understand. overlay networks are hard for everyone to understand, uh, except for network people who like really know networking stuff. I think it would be better. But unfortunately, it takes a lot of time for people to take a sort of more iterative approach to, to learning. I try and write blog posts in this way sometimes, but it's really hard. And so like, I'll often have like an idea, like, so I call these, or I think of these as like onion, onion style posts, right? Where you either build up an onion sort of from the inside and kind of like go out and like add more and more layers or whatever. Or you can, you can go from the outside and sort of take off like layers. Like, oh, uh, Kubernetes has a scheduler. Why do they need a scheduler? Like, and like, you know, kind of like, go, go down. but I think that might be one of the best ways to learn, but it just takes time. Or geniuses and geniuses who are good at two things, right? Good at the actual technology and good at teaching. Cuz teaching is a skill and it's very hard. and, you know, shout out to teachers cuz that's, it's, it's very difficult, extremely frustrating. it's hard to find determinism in, in like methods and solutions. And there's research of course, but it's like, yeah, that's, that's a lot harder than the computer being like, Nope, that doesn't work. Right? Like, if you can't, if you can't, like if you, if the function call doesn't work, it doesn't work. Right. If the person learned suboptimally, you won't know Right. Until like 10 years down the road when, when they can't answer some question or like, you know, when they, they don't understand. It's a missing fundamental piece anyway. [00:32:24] Jeremy: I think with the example of front end, maybe you don't have time to walk through the whole history of every single library and framework that came but I think at the very least, if you show someone, or you teach someone how to work with css, and you have them, like you were talking about components before you have them build a site where there's a lot of stuff that gets reused, right? Maybe you have five pages and they all have the same nav bar. [00:33:02] Victor: Yeah, you kind of like make them do it. [00:33:04] Jeremy: Yeah. You make 'em do it and they make all the HTML files, they copy and paste it, and probably your students are thinking like, ah, this, this kind of sucks [00:33:16] Victor: Yeah [00:33:18] Jeremy: And yeah, so then you, you come to that realization, and then after you've done that, then you can bring in, okay, this is why we have components. And similarly you brought up, manual dom manipulation with jQuery and things like that. I, I'm sure you could come up with an example of you don't even necessarily need to use jQuery. I think people can probably skip that step and just use the the, the API that comes with the browser. But you can have them go in like, Oh, you gotta find this element by the id and you gotta change this based on this, and let them experience the. I don't know if I would call it pain, but let them experience like how it was. Right. And, and give them a complex enough task where they feel like something is wrong right. Or, or like, there, should be something better. And then you can go to you could go straight to vue or react. I'm not sure if we need to go like, Here's backbone, here's knockout. [00:34:22] Victor: Yeah. That's like historical. Interesting. [00:34:27] Jeremy: I, I think that would be an interesting college course or something that. Like, I remember when, I went through school, one of the classes was programming languages. So we would learn things like, Fortran and stuff like that. And I, I think for a more frontend centered or modern equivalent you could go through, Hey, here's the history of frontend development here's what we used to do and here's how we got to where we are today. I think that could be actually a pretty interesting class yeah [00:35:10] Victor: I'm a bit interested to know you learned fortran in your PL class. I, think when I went, I was like, lisp and then some, some other, like, higher classes taught haskell but, um, but I wasn't ready for haskell, not many people but fortran is interesting, I kinda wanna hear about that. [00:35:25] Jeremy: I think it was more in terms of just getting you exposed to historically this is how things were. Right. And it wasn't so much of like, You can take strategies you used in Fortran into programming as a whole. I think it was just more of like a, a survey of like, Hey, here's, you know, here's Fortran and like you were saying, here's Lisp and all, all these different languages nd like at least you, you get to see them and go like, yeah, this is kind of a pain. [00:35:54] Victor: Yeah [00:35:55] Jeremy: And like, I understand why people don't choose to use this anymore but I couldn't take away like a broad like, Oh, I, I really wish we had this feature from, I think we were, I think we were using Fortran 77 or something like that. I think there's Fortran 77, a Fortran 90, and then there's, um, I think, [00:36:16] Victor: Like old fortran, deprecated [00:36:18] Jeremy: Yeah, yeah, yeah. So, so I think, I think, uh, I actually don't know if they're, they're continuing to, um, you know, add new things or maintain it or it's just static. But, it's, it's more, uh, interesting in terms of, like we were talking front end where it's, as somebody who's learning frontend development who is new and you get to see how, backbone worked or how Knockout worked how grunt and gulp worked. It, it's like the kind of thing where it's like, Oh, okay, like, this is interesting, but let us not use this again. Right? [00:36:53] Victor: Yeah. Yeah. Right. But I also don't need this, and I will never again [00:36:58] Jeremy: yeah, yeah. It's, um, but you do definitely see the, the parallels, right? Like you were saying where you had your, your Bower and now you have NPM and you had Grunt and Gulp and now you have many choices [00:37:14] Victor: Yeah. [00:37:15] Jeremy: yeah. I, I think having he history context, you know, it's interesting and it can be helpful, but if somebody was. Came to me and said hey I want to learn how to build websites. I get into front end development. I would not be like, Okay, first you gotta start moo tools or GWT. I don't think I would do that but it I think at a academic level or just in terms of seeing how things became the way they are sure, for sure it's interesting. [00:37:59] Victor: Yeah. And I, I, think another thing I don't remember who asked or why, why I had to think of this lately. um but it was, knowing the differentiators between other technologies is also extremely helpful right? So, What's the difference between ES build and SWC, right? Again, we're, we're, we're leaning heavy front end, but you know, just like these, uh, sorry for context, of course, it's not everyone a front end developer, but these are two different, uh, build tools, right? For, for JavaScript, right? Essentially you can think of 'em as transpilers, but they, I think, you know, I think they also bundle like, uh, generally I'm not exactly sure if, if ESbuild will bundle as well. Um, but it's like one is written in go, the other one's written in Rust, right? And sort of there's, um, there's, in addition, there's vite which is like vite does bundle and vite does a lot of things. Like, like there's a lot of innovation in vite that has to have to do with like, making local development as fast as possible and also getting like, you're sort of making sure as many things as possible are strippable, right? Or, or, or tree shakeable. Sorry, is is is the better, is the better term. Um, but yeah, knowing, knowing the, um, the differences between projects is often enough to sort of make it less confusing for me. Um, as far as like, Oh, which one of these things should I use? You know, outside of just going with what people are recommending. Cause generally there is some people with wisdom sometimes lead the crowd sometimes, right? So, so sometimes it's okay to be, you know, a crowd member as long as you're listening to the, to, to someone worth listening to. Um, and, and so yeah, I, I think that's another thing that is like the mark of a good project or, or it's not exclusive, right? It's not, the condition's not necessarily sufficient, but it's like a good projects have the why use this versus x right section in the Readme, right? They're like, Hey, we know you could use Y but here's why you should use us instead. Or we know you could use X, but here's what we do better than X. That might, you might care about, right? That's, um, a, a really strong indicator of a project. That's good cuz that means the person who's writing the project is like, they've done this, the survey. And like, this is kind of like, um, how good research happens, right? It's like most of research is reading what's happening, right? To knowing, knowing the boundary you're about to push, right? Or try and sort of like push one, make one step forward in, um, so that's something that I think the, the rigor isn't in necessarily software development everywhere, right? Which is good and bad. but someone who's sort of done that sort of rigor or, and like, and, and has, and or I should say, has been rigorous about knowing the boundary, and then they can explain that to you. They can be like, Oh, here's where the boundary was. These people were doing this, these people were doing this, these people were doing this, but I wanna do this. So you just learned now whether it's right for you and sort of the other points in the space, which is awesome. Yeah. Going to your point, I feel like that's, that's also important, it's probably not a good idea to try and get everyone to go through historical artifacts, but if just a, a quick explainer and sort of, uh, note on the differentiation, Could help for sure. Yeah. I feel like we've skewed too much frontend. No, no more frontend discussion this point. [00:41:20] Jeremy: It's just like, I, I think there's so many more choices where the, the mental thought that has to go into, Okay, what do I use next I feel is bigger on frontend. I guess it depends on the project you're working on but if you're going to work on anything front end if you haven't done it before or you don't have a lot of experience there's so many build tools so many frameworks, so many libraries that yeah, but we [00:41:51] Victor: Iterate yeah, in every direction, like the, it's good and bad, but frontend just goes in every direction at the same time Like, there's so many people who are so enthusiastic and so committed and and it's so approachable that like everyone just goes in every direction at the same time and like a lot of people make progress and then unfortunately you have try and pick which, which branch makes sense. [00:42:20] Jeremy: We've been kind of talking about, some of your experiences with a few things and I wonder if you could explain the the context you're thinking of in terms of the types of projects you typically work on like what are they what's the scale of them that sort of thing. [00:42:32] Victor: So I guess I've, I've gone through a lot of phases, right? In sort of what I use in in my tooling and what I thought was cool. I wrote enterprise java like everybody else. Like, like it really doesn't talk about it, but like, it's like almost at some point it was like, you're either a rail shop or a Java shop, for so many people. And I wrote enterprise Java for a, a long time, and I was lucky enough to have friends who were really into, other kinds of computing and other kinds of programming. a lot of my projects were wrapped around, were, were ideas that I was expressing via some new technology, let's say. Right? So, I wrote a lot of haskell for, for, for a while, right? But what did I end up building with that was actually a job board that honestly didn't go very far because I was spending much more time sort of doing, haskell things, right? And so I learned a lot about sort of what I think is like the pinnacle of sort of like type development in, in the non-research world, right? Like, like right on the edge of research and actual usability. But a lot of my ideas, sort of getting back to the, the ideas question are just things I want to build for myself. Um, or things I think could be commercially viable or like do, like, be, be well used, uh, and, and sort of, and profitable things, things that I think should be built. Or like if, if I see some, some projects as like, Oh, I wish they were doing this in this way, Right? Like, I, I often consider like, Oh, I want, I think I could build something that would be separate and maybe do like, inspired from other projects, I should say, Right? Um, and sort of making me understand a sort of a different, a different ecosystem. but a lot of times I have to say like, the stuff I build is mostly to scratch an itch I have. Um, and or something I think would be profitable or utilizing technology that I've seen that I don't think anyone's done in the same way. Right? So like learning Kubernetes for example, or like investing the time to learn Kubernetes opened up an entire world of sort of like infrastructure ideas, right? Because like the leverage you get is so high, right? So you're just like, Oh, I could run an aws, right? Like now that I, now that I know this cuz it's like, it's actually not bad, it's kind of usable. Like, couldn't I do that? Right? That kind of thing. Right? Or um, I feel like a lot of the times I'll learn a technology and it'll, it'll make me feel like certain things are possible that they, that weren't before. Uh, like Rust is another one of those, right? Like, cuz like Rust will go from like embedded all the way to WASM, which is like a crazy vertical stack. Right? It's, that's a lot, That's a wide range of computing that you can, you can touch, right? And, and there's, it's, it's hard to learn, right? The, the, the, the, uh, the, the ramp to learning it is quite steep, but, it opens up a lot of things you can write, right? It, it opens up a lot of areas you can go into, right? Like, if you ever had an idea for like a desktop app, right? You could actually write it in Rust. There's like, there's, there's ways, there's like is and there's like, um, Tauri is one of my personal favorites, which uses web technology, but it's either I'm inspired by some technology and I'm just like, Oh, what can I use this on? And like, what would this really be good at doing? or it's, you know, it's one of those other things, like either I think it's gonna be, Oh, this would be cool to build and it would be profitable. Uh, or like, I'm scratching my own itch. Yeah. I think, I think those are basically the three sources. [00:46:10] Jeremy: It's, it's interesting about Rust where it seems so trendy, I guess, in lots of people wanna do something with rust, but then in a lot of they also are not sure does it make sense to write in rust? Um, I, I think the, the embedded stuff, of course, that makes a lot of sense. And, uh, you, you've seen a sort of surge in command line apps, stuff ripgrep and ag, stuff like that, and places like that. It's, I think the benefits are pretty clear in terms of you've got the performance and you have the strong typing and whatnot and I think where there's sort of the inbetween section that's kind of unclear to me at least would I build a web application in rust I'm not sure that sort of thing [00:47:12] Victor: Yeah. I would, I characterize it as kind of like, it's a tool toolkit, so it really depends on the problem. And think we have many tools that there's no, almost never a real reason to pick one in particular right? Like there's, Cause it seems like just most of, a lot of the work, like, unless you're, you're really doing something interesting, right? Like, uh, something that like, oh, I need to, I need to, like, I'm gonna run, you know, billions and billions of processes. Like, yeah, maybe you want erlang at that point, right? Like, maybe, maybe you should, that should be, you know, your, your thing. Um, but computers are so fast these days, and most languages have, have sort of borrowed, not borrowed, but like adopted features from others that there's, it's really hard to find a, a specific use case, for one particular tool. Uh, so I often just categorize it by what I want out of the project, right? Or like, either my goals or project goals, right? Depending on, and, or like business goals, if you're, you know, doing this for a business, right? Um, so like, uh, I, I basically, if I want to go fast and I want to like, you know, reduce time to market, I use type script, right? Oh, and also I'm a, I'm a, like a type zealot. I, I'd say so. Like, I don't believe in not having types, right? Like, it's just like there's, I think it's crazy that you would like have a function but not know what the inputs could be. And they could actually be anything, right? , you're just like, and then you have to kind of just keep that in your head. I think that's silly. Now that we have good, we, we have, uh, ways to avoid the, uh, ceremony, right? You've got like hindley Milner type systems, like you have a way to avoid the, you can, you know, predict what types of things will be, and you can, you don't have to write everything everywhere. So like, it's not that. But anyway, so if I wanna go fast, the, the point is that going back to that early, like the JS ecosystem goes everywhere at the same time. Typescript is excellent because the ecosystem goes everywhere at the same time. And so you've got really good ecosystem support for just about everything you could do. Um, uh, you could write TypeScript that's very loose on the types and go even faster, but in general it's not very hard. There's not too much ceremony and just like, you know, putting some stuff that shows you what you're using and like, you know, the objects you're working with. and then generally if I wanna like, get it really right, I I'll like reach for haskell, right? Cause it's just like the sort of contortions, and again, this takes time, this not fast, but, right. the contortions you can do in the type system will make it really hard to write incorrect code or code that doesn't, that isn't logical with itself. Of course interfacing with the outside world. Like if you do a web request, it's gonna fail sometimes, right? Like the network might be down, right? So you have to, you basically pull that, you sort of wrap that uncertainty in your system to whatever degree you're okay with. And then, but I know it'll be correct, right? But and correctness is just not important. Most of like, Oh, I should , that's a bad quote. Uh, it's not that correct is not important. It's like if you need to get to market, you do not necessarily need every single piece of your code to be correct, Right? If someone calls some, some function with like, negative one and it's not an important, it's not tied to money or it's like, you know, whatever, then maybe it's fine. They just see an error and then like you get an error in your back and you're like, Oh, I better fix that. Right? Um, and then generally if I want to be correct and fast, I choose rust these days. Right? Um, these days. and going back to your point, a lot of times that means that I'm going to write in Typescript for a lot of projects. So that's what I'll do for a lot of projects is cuz I'll just be like, ah, do I need like absolute correctness or like some really, you know, fancy sort of type stuff. No. So I don't pick haskell. Right. And it's like, do I need to be like mega fast? No, probably not. Cuz like, cuz so I don't necessarily don't necessarily need rust. Um, maybe it's interesting to me in terms of like a long, long term thing, right? Like if I, if I'm think, oh, but I want x like for example, tight, tight, uh, integration with WASM, for example, if I'm just like, oh, I could see myself like, but that's more of like, you know, for a fun thing that I'm doing, right? Like, it's just like, it's, it's, you don't need it. You don't, that's premature, like, you know, that's a premature optimization thing. But if I'm just like, ah, I really want the ability to like maybe consider refactoring some of this out into like a WebAssembly thing later, then I'm like, Okay, maybe, maybe I'll, I'll pick Rust. Or like, if I, if I like, I do want, you know, really, really fast, then I'll like, then I'll go Rust. But most of the time it's just like, I want a good ecosystem so I don't have to build stuff myself most of the time. Uh, and you know, type script is good enough. So my stack ends up being a lot of the time just in type script, right? Yeah. [00:52:05] Jeremy: Yeah, I think you've encapsulated the reason why there's so many packages on NPM and why there's so much usage of JavaScript and TypeScript in general is that it, it, it fits the, it's good enough. Right? And in terms of, in terms of speed, like you said, most of the time you don't need of rust. Um, and so typescript I think is a lot more approachable a lot of people have to use it because they do front end work anyways. And so that kinda just becomes the I don't know if I should say the default but I would say it's probably the most common in terms of when somebody's building a backend today certainly there's other languages but JavaScript and TypeScript is everywhere. [00:52:57] Victor: Yeah. Uh, I, I, I, another thing is like, I mean, I'm, of ignored the, like, unreasonable effectiveness of like rails Cause there's just a, there's tons of just like rails warriors out there, and that's great. They're they're fantastic. I'm not a, I'm not personally a huge fan of rails but that's, uh, that's to my own detriment, right? In, in some, in some ways. But like, Rails and Django sort of just like, people who, like, I'm gonna learn this framework it's gonna be excellent. It most, they have a, they have carved out a great ecosystem for themselves. Um, or like, you know, even php right? PHP and like Laravel, or whatever. Uh, and so I'm ignoring those, like, those pockets of productivity, right? Those pockets of like intense productivity that people like, have all their needs met in that same way. Um, but as far as like general, general sort of ecosystem size and speed for me, um, like what you said, like applies to me. Like if I, if I'm just like, especially if I'm just like, Oh, I just wanna build a backend, Like, I wanna build something that's like super small and just does like, you know, maybe a few, a couple, you know, endpoints or whatever and just, I just wanna throw it out there. Right? Uh, I, I will pick, yeah. Typescript. It just like, it makes sense to me. I also think note is a better. VM or platform to build on than any of the others as well. So like, like I, by any of the others, I mean, Python, Perl, Ruby, right? Like sort of in the same class of, of tool. So I I am kind of convinced that, um, Node is better, than those as far as core abilities, right? Like threading Right. Versus the just multi-processing and like, you know, other, other, other solutions and like, stuff like that. So, if you want a boring stack, if I don't wanna use any tokens, right? Any innovation tokens I reach for TypeScript. [00:54:46] Jeremy: I think it's good that you brought up. Rails and, and Django because, uh, personally I've done, I've done work with Rails, and you're right in that Rails has so many built in, and the ways to do them are so well established that your ability to be productive and build something really fast hard to compete with, at least in my experience with available in the Node ecosystem. Um, on the other hand, like I, I also see what you mean by the runtimes. Like with Node, you're, you're built on top of V8 and there's so many resources being poured into it to making it fast and making it run pretty much everywhere. I think you probably don't do too much work with managed services, but if you go to a managed service to run your code, like a platform as a service, they're gonna support Node. Will they support your other preferred language? Maybe, maybe not, You know that they will, they'll be able to run node apps so but yeah I don't know if it will ever happen or maybe I'm just not familiar with it, but feel like there isn't a real rails of javascript. [00:56:14] Victor: Yeah, you're, totally right. There are, there are. It's, it's weird. It's actually weird that there, like Uh, but, but, I kind of agree with you. There's projects that are trying it recently. There's like Adonis, um, there is, there are backends that also do, like, will do basic templating, like Nest, NestJS is like really excellent. It's like one of the best sort of backend, projects out there. I I, I but like back in the day, there were projects like Sails, which was like very much trying to do exactly what Rails did, but it just didn't seem to take off and reach that critical mass possibly because of the size of the ecosystem, right? Like, how many alternatives to Rails are there? Not many, right? And, and now, anyway, maybe let's say the rest of 'em sort of like died out over the years, but there's also like, um, hapi HAPI, uh, which is like also, you know, similarly, it was like angling themselves to be that, but they just never, they never found the traction they needed. I think, um, or at least to be as wide, widely known as Rails is for, for, for the, for the Ruby ecosystem, um, but also for people to kind of know the magic, cause. Like I feel like you're productive in Rails only when you imbibe the magic, right? You, you, know all the magic context and you know the incantations and they're comforting to you, right? Like you've, you've, you have the, you have the sort of like, uh, convention. You're like, if you're living and breathing the convention, everything's amazing, right? Like, like you can't beat that. You're just like, you're in the zone but you need people to get in that zone. And I don't think node has, people are just too, they're too frazzled. They're going like, there's too much options. They can't, it's hard to commit, right? Like, imagine if you'd committed to backbone. Like you got, you can't, It's, it's over. Oh, it's not over. I mean, I don't, no, I don't wanna, you know, disparage the backbone project. I don't use it, but, you know, maybe they're still doing stuff and you know, I'm sure people are still working on it, but you can't, you, it's hard to commit and sort of really imbibe that sort of convention or, or, or sort of like, make yourself sort of breathe that product when there's like 10 products that are kind of similar and could be useful as well. Yeah, I think that's, that's that's kind of big. It's weird that there isn't a rails, for NodeJS, but, but people are working on it obviously. Like I mentioned Adonis, there's, there's more. I'm leaving a bunch of them out, but that's part of the problem. [00:58:52] Jeremy: On, on one hand, it's really cool that people are trying so many different things because hopefully maybe they can find something that like other people wouldn't have thought of if they all stick same framework. but on the other hand, it's ... how much time have we spent jumping between all these different frameworks when what we could have if we had a rails. [00:59:23] Victor: Yeah the, the sort of wasted time is, is crazy to think about it uh, I do think about that from time to time. And you know, and personally I waste a lot of my own time. Like, just, just rec

MitsuTimes Podcast
Ep45: Eric's Turbo V8 AWD 3000GT

MitsuTimes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 82:18


Eric has been into the 3000GT platform for a long time and has been a pioneer in engine and drivetrain swaps that eventually led to the first non-6g7X car taking the crown in the platform. His V8 AWD 3000GT is a show stopper, not only is it fast as hell and reliable but it shows what the platform is capable of with enough effort. Eric's 4G63 swapped 3000GT is still top 10 on our 3000GT list. Eric talks us through his history with this platform and what led to the V8 swap. Eric talks about the car now and what the future holds for him and the platform. Eric talks about the events he plans to attend in 2023 and his goals for the year. Finally Eric shares where you can see his build and future builds as well as videos and pictures of the V8 3000GT as well as all those who have helped him along the way.

Jeep Talk Show, A Jeep podcast!
Episode 736 - Good Dog, Bad Dog?

Jeep Talk Show, A Jeep podcast!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 48:10 Very Popular


Good Dog, Or Bad Dog? Horrific Jeep crashes! Jeep, Goodbye To the V8? WINCH MOUNTING PLATE FOR FACTORY BUMPER! What Gas Should You Run In Your Jeep? #jeeptalkshow #jeeps #trucks #mopar #jeeplife #lifted #jeepwrangler #wrangler #offroading #srt #overland #cherokee #itsajeepthing #jeepbeef #jeepnation #rubicon #jeeps #gladiator #jeepgirl #jeepporn #jeeplove

Runtime Rundown
The One About 2022

Runtime Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 61:15


This week we look back at 2022! The show goes off the rails a bit, but we get back on track and read The New Stacks's yearly retrospective, talking about JavaScript at the edge, static site generators, and frameworks. We have an uninformed discussion about V8 isolates and have a lovely fireside chat! Music by Hina and Kevin MacLeod

Erst fahren, dann reden - der AUTO BILD Podcast
Folge 63: Bentley Flying Spur

Erst fahren, dann reden - der AUTO BILD Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 86:48


Luxus für die Weihnachtsfolge: Der Bentley Flying Spur bietet feinste Materialien, haptische Leckerbissen und einen 550 PS starken V8-Biturbo. Wir verraten wie sich die 200.000 Euro teure Luxuslimousine fährt, was uns begeistert hat und ob man sich im Flying Spur uneingeschränkt wohl fühlt. Und: Zur Feier des Tages ist die Weihnachtsfolge direkt im Bentley aufgenommen. Ho ho ho! Für mehr Infos zu unserem Partner und über Echte Autoliebe-Stories findet ihr auch auf dem CosmosDirekt.-Blog unter https://www.cosmosdirekt.de/magazin/autoliebe/. Schütze was du liebst! Mit CosmosDirekt.

Quick Spin
2022 Lexus LC 500h: The Spirit of Personal Luxury

Quick Spin

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 14:38


The world of personal luxury coupes exploded in the 1950s and 1960s. Land yachts like the Buick Riviera and the Continental MkII and, to a certain extent, the Jensen Interceptor. While the idea of personal luxury has effectively died, its spirit lives on in the wild Lexus LC. The aptly named Luxury Coupe exists between the world of brutal, luxury sports coupes and hyper-luxe grand tourers. This Lexus might not be as track hungry as, say, a Porsche 911, but it makes up for its lack of track performance with a hefty dose of luxury appointments on the interior and wild, striking design on the outside. While this Lexus is available with a naturally 5.0-liter V8, the hybrid variant replaces the screaming exhaust note with a fuel-efficient 3.5-liter V6 and electric motors. This hybrid might not be as potent as the V8, but its combined 354 hp is more than enough to hustle this 4,200-pound coupe to highway speeds. On this episode of Quick Spin, host Wesley Wren hops behind the wheel of the 2022 Lexus LC 500h to put it through its paces. Wren walks you around the LC 500 to highlight its styling and features before giving you a guided tour of its wild interior. Wren also takes you along for a live drive review. Wren also chats with Autoweek's Patrick Carone about this Lexus, where it stands in the market and what kind of competition it faces. Closing the show, the two break down what makes this car special.

ShopTalk » Podcast Feed
546: Ryan Dahl and Deno

ShopTalk » Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 59:45


Ryan Dahl stops by to talk about Node, Deno, JavaScript, testing, V8, and thoughts around getting started with Deno.

Unnamed Automotive Podcast
Episode 298: 2022 Chevrolet Silverado ZR2, Racing With Rich Energy Giveaway, Downloading Horsepower

Unnamed Automotive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 37:55


It's another big week of car talk on the Unnamed Automotive Podcast. Before our hosts get on a roll with this week's discussion, they first share a few updates about the podcast, and what kind of year it's been thanks to our dedicated listeners. THANK YOU! Then Benjamin and Sami jump into talking about the new 2023 Chevrolet Silverado ZR2. As if trucks aren't rugged and capable, this model takes things even further by featuring a 6.2 liter V8 engine and a super high tech and impressive damper setup known as DSSV. Benjamin explains what the recently updated Chevy truck does right and wrong, and also gets into the nitty gritty of the high-performance offroad truck world. Then Sami talks about a new F1 book called "Racing with Rich Energy" and explains how you can get your hands on a copy for free! Finally the show concludes with a smattering of downloadable horsepower news. Thanks for listening and don't forget to subscribe and reach out to our hosts on social media!

Beer Guys Radio Craft Beer Podcast
E345: Beer Cocktails and Cocktail-Inspired Beers

Beer Guys Radio Craft Beer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 43:01


When I first experienced beer cocktails I don't think that was even a term at the time.  As a kid my parents used to enjoy what they called "Tomato Beers."  It their simplest form it was simply tomato juice and a macro lager over ice with some salt and pepper.  To fancy it up they may use V8 juice or shove a celery stalk in the glass.  Sort of a podunk Michelada.  I stole sips at the time and I guess I enjoyed it; I sure do enjoy a Michelada now. It's likely you've dabbled with beer cocktails as well.  A simple Boilermaker or Black & Tan are technically beer cocktails.  Now we've got a whole variety to check out liked the Dublin Iced Coffee, Hazy Day Afternoon, or maybe an El Chapo. Beer cocktails can be pretty simple or overly complex.  But they're a fun way to mix things up with your beers.  If you've got a favorite let us know! And here's one to get you started... Hazy Day Afternoon Ingredients 1.5oz light rum 0.5oz guava nectar 0.5oz pineapple juice 0.5oz orange juice 0.25oz lime juice 0.5oz simple syrup Hazy IPA Preparation Combine all ingredients except IPA in a shaker and shake. Strain into Collins glass with fresh ice and top with IPA. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Day[0] - Zero Days for Day Zero
[binary] A Huawei Hypervisor Vuln and More Memory Safety

Day[0] - Zero Days for Day Zero

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 47:30


Will AI be your next vuln research assistant? ... Maybe? We also talk about a stack-based overflow in `ping` and a Huawei hypervisor vuln. Links and vulnerability summaries for this episode are available at: https://dayzerosec.com/podcast/174.html [00:00:00] Introduction [00:00:41] Spot the Vuln - A Nice Choice [00:03:49] ChatGPT - AI for Vuln Research? [00:21:46] Memory Safe Languages in Android 13 [00:31:28] [FreeBSD] Stack overflow in ping [00:40:59] Huawei Security Hypervisor Vulnerability [00:45:09] Chrome Browser Exploitation, Part 1: Introduction to V8 and JavaScript Internals [00:45:16] Chrome Browser Exploitation, Part 2: Introduction to Ignition, Sparkplug and JIT Compilation via TurboFan The DAY[0] Podcast episodes are streamed live on Twitch twice a week: -- Mondays at 3:00pm Eastern (Boston) we focus on web and more bug bounty style vulnerabilities -- Tuesdays at 7:00pm Eastern (Boston) we focus on lower-level vulnerabilities and exploits. We are also available on the usual podcast platforms: -- Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/id1484046063 -- Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/4NKCxk8aPEuEFuHsEQ9Tdt -- Google Podcasts: https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy9hMTIxYTI0L3BvZGNhc3QvcnNz -- Other audio platforms can be found at https://anchor.fm/dayzerosec You can also join our discord: https://discord.gg/daTxTK9

In Wheel Time - Cartalk Radio
VW drags with the Texas VW Drag Racing Association! We review the Toyota 4Runner.

In Wheel Time - Cartalk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 31:03


The classic VW ... seems we all had one or had friends and girlfriends with one at one point or another.  Even bare bones in design, they seemed pretty solid, but never fast.  That is until someone realized that a flat four could do more...Racing a VW seems to come and go over the years, after all they don't make V8 levels of noise, and they don't generally stand on the rear bumper...they just go fast when built right.  Joining us on this episode of In Wheel Time Car Talk is Clint Cox, who is helping us learn more about the VW race scene and the VW Drag Racing Association.  Keep in mind, we are talking flat 4s that are turbocharged, juiced, fuel injected and whatever else they can do so that it is the 8th mile under 8 seconds in the top classes.Some serious haul'n donkey here!In our feature segment, Don Armstrong is reviewing the new Toyota 4Runner that is still going strong with a V6 and 5-speed tranny.All this and more on this episode of In Wheel Time Car Talk.----  ----- Want more In Wheel Time Car Talk any time?     In Wheel Time Car Talk is now available on iHeart Radio!  Just go to iheart.com/InWheelTimeCarTalk where ever you are.-----   -----Be sure to subscribe on your favorite podcast provider for the next episode of In Wheel Time Car Talk and check out our live broadcast every Saturday, 8a-11aCT simulcasting on iHeart Radio, YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Twitch and InWheelTime.com.In Wheel Time Car Talk can be heard on you mobile device from providers such as:Apple Podcasts, Pandora Podcast, Amazon Music Podcast, Spotify, Google Podcasts,    Stitcher, iHeart Radio podcast, TuneIn + Alexa, Podcast Addict, Castro, Castbox and more on your mobile device.-----  ------  --------- ----- Want more In Wheel Time Car Talk any time? In Wheel Time Car Talk is now available on iHeart Radio! Just go to iheart.com/InWheelTimeCarTalk where ever you are.----- -----Be sure to subscribe on your favorite podcast provider for the next episode of In Wheel Time Car Talk and check out our live broadcast every Saturday, 8a-11aCT simulcasting on iHeart Radio, YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Twitch and InWheelTime.com.In Wheel Time Car Talk can be heard on you mobile device from providers such as:Apple Podcasts, Pandora Podcast, Amazon Music Podcast, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, iHeart Radio podcast, TuneIn + Alexa, Podcast Addict, Castro, Castbox and more on your mobile device.Follow InWheelTime.com for the latest updates!Twitter: https://twitter.com/InWheelTimeInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/inwheeltime/https://www.iheart.com/live/in-wheel-time-car-talk-9327/https://www.youtube.com/inwheeltimehttps://www.Facebook.com/InWheelTimeFor more information about In Wheel Time Car Talk, email us at info@inwheeltime.comTags: In Wheel Time, automotive car talk show, car talk, Live car talk show, In Wheel Time Car Talk

Mil etter mil - en podcast om bil
Gjest: Broom-Vegard avslører sitt verste bilkjøp

Mil etter mil - en podcast om bil

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 60:38


Vegard Møller Johnsen er redaksjonssjef i TV2s Broom.no. Biljournalisten du blant annet har sett på TV2 har eid så mange biler at han helt glemte en viss V8-motorisert BMW. I podcasten gjennomgås bil-CV-en og Broom-Vegard forteller om sin mildt sagt uvanlige «vinterbil». Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

We Are Auto
146. Lamborghini Huracan Sterrato, Mercedes-AMG S63, Tesla Semi Truck | News

We Are Auto

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 36:25


Thank you for listening to We Are Auto, the podcast about cars - for enthusiasts, by enthusiasts! Please leave a 5 Star rating and write a review!   In episode 146: - The new Lamborghini Huracan Sterrato - Mercedes keeps the V8 alive with the new S63 - Tesla Semi Truck deliveries            and more! Follow along! Facebook Instagram Youtube Website

The Rock Drive Catchup Podcast
FULL NOISE: Greg Murphy on Wild Card - The Last Shot doco

The Rock Drive Catchup Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 10:24


NZs finest V8 driver, Greg Murphy, joins us to talk about the fly-on-the-wall documentary about his comeback at Bathurst this year called Wild Card: The Last ShotSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

百车全说丨当相声听的汽车电台
2022年098期:凯迪拉克CT4 1.5T,真的便宜吗?

百车全说丨当相声听的汽车电台

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 52:43


※ 投稿邮箱:418150505@qq.com※ 本文章发布于订阅号:百车全说,订阅号阅读更加方便,欢迎关注。前30分钟聊CT4 1.5T,后面聊韩国世界杯小组赛出线。前两天凯迪拉克CT4上市了1.5T版本,很多媒体都在惊呼,这是20万以内唯一能买到的豪华品牌纵置后驱车型。的确,听起来很给力,但我依然觉得这款车拯救不了凯迪拉克的销量。因为CT4本就不畅销,大部分人还是觉得,有买CT4的预算不如直接买CT5算了。毕竟CT5看起来定位更高,价格也没贵多少,而在软硬件方面还明显比CT4有优势,如果不是预算不足,我有什么必要买CT4呢?所以当我得知CT4要上1.5T的时候,我第一反应是CT4的价格肯定会官降很多,可是没想到,CT4 1.5T的售价并没有降多少。入门的风尚型售价21.97万,高配豪华型售价23.17万。我相信大部分客户是拿1.5T豪华对比2.0T豪华,因为配置几乎一模一样。而2.0T豪华售价25.17万,两者就相差2万元。再结合凯迪拉克经销商动辄5-6万的优惠,实际两款车的差价也就1万出头。真的会有客户就差这1万多放弃2.0T购买1.5T吗?我不太相信。我甚至觉得凯迪拉克推出CT4的1.5T版本,是一个不明智的选择。我觉得凯迪拉克宁可把2.0T的CT4入门价再放低一些,也没必要用1.5T版本来拉低入门门槛。因为真的关注这个车的年轻人,多多少少都是冲着凯迪拉克美系车的情怀和纵置后驱的操控特性来的,所以动力对于他们来说,是无法妥协的一个重要环节。砍掉动力,让他们省一点钱,只是商家的一厢情愿。而原本2.0T的CT4就有入门价23.97万的风尚版,只是2023款上市给停产了,因此2.0T版本入门价格拉高到了25.17万,以此来给1.5T的产品定价腾出空间。人为的做出价格差异。那么今天这期节目,我们就来好好聊聊,这款凯迪拉克史上排量最小的车型,CT4 1.5T版本到底怎么样?定价到底贵不贵,1.5T选高配还是低配?和竞品对比又该怎么选?凯迪拉克CT4 1.5T到底怎么样?其实说到凯迪拉克,老一辈人或者8090后首先想到应该就是美式大V8的代表。尤其是上世纪50年代的凯迪拉克绝对是当时最巅峰的时刻,因为那时候的凯迪拉克基本都有三大特征。第一,巨大的发动机排量,现如今4.0L的排量放在那时候的凯迪拉克上简直就是对凯迪拉克的侮辱,人家起步就是6.4L,甚至8点几的排量都有过。《绿皮书》电影剧照第二是巨长的车身和火箭车尾。要说电影《绿皮书》大家都应该看过吧,电影中的那台浅绿色车是第二代的凯迪拉克De Ville Series 62系列,产于1961-1964年,它那巨长的车身长度已经超过了6米,所以要是在国内开,什么蓝牌绿牌,通通给我上黄牌,只有黄牌的轿车才是真正的豪华。《绿皮书》电影剧照同时还有它那火箭式车尾的造型相信一定给你们留下了深刻的印象。但是要我说,绿皮书里的那台凯迪拉克的车位还不够夸张。因为真要对那个黄金年代中的凯迪拉克们论资排辈,Eldorado系列才是金字塔顶端的存在,那可是一款让20世纪50年代的美国人都梦想成为其车主的车型,别说普通人了,连猫王、玛丽莲梦露这种知名人物都为之疯狂,所以50年代的凯迪拉克Eldorado就是当时美国梦的代名词之一。第三就是豪华丰富的配置,那时候电动车窗、自动大灯、自动空调、电动座椅就已经在凯迪拉克上普及开来,除了科技配置,你能想到的豪华配置应有尽有。但是你在回到现实,如今国内在售的凯迪拉克,好像只有配置高被传承了下来,排量是一年比一年低,出的车型也是一年比一年定位低。比如20年前的上汽通用凯迪拉克还在生产SLS赛威、CTS这种大排量中大型轿车。当时都有三种排量,2.8L、3.6L V6,还有4.6L V8。进口的还有凯雷德,也是6.2L V8的机头,所以十几年前的凯迪拉克最低排量也不过2.8L。但是反观现在的凯迪拉克,自2020年CT6 40T停产之后,已经长达2年之久全系都是2.0T了,现在上到CT6 XT6,下到CT4 XT4,六款产品用的都是同款2.0T。而且2.0T也是一年不如一年,现在的LSY完全不如之前的LTG性能那么强,改装潜力大了。CT4-V BLACKWING本以为之前凯迪拉克在浙赛带来了CT4/CT5 V之后,大家都认为这两款车要引入中国,从而把凯迪拉克的整体调性给拉一拉,让网友不再调侃凯迪拉克是个伪运动,起码以后在聊起M POWER、AMG、 RS还有阿尔法罗米四叶草的同时也能想到凯迪拉克V BLACKWING。CT5-V BLACKWING结果有趣的是这次凯迪拉克真的只是在秀肌肉,秀一下就跑了,然后就推出了个1.5T的CT4,好家伙营销学专家直呼凯迪拉克内行,深刻诠释了挂羊头卖狗肉。说回正题,这次凯迪拉克CT4推出了2023款,两款1.5T,两款2.0T,1.5T售价为21.97万、23.17万。2.0T售价为25.17万、25.97万。2.0T版本的动力总成没变,依旧是2.0T LSY引擎+8AT变速箱,最大马力237匹,最大扭矩350牛米。1.5T的发动机不用说,虽然代号不同,但是明眼人一看1498ml的排量就能发现这款发动机其实就是高功率版阿凡达1.5T,也就是和别克昂科威S上用的是同款,和威朗Pro上的也差不多。虽然是1.5T,但是看到账面数据后我还是有点出乎意料,最大马力211匹,最大扭矩270牛米,这个数据超过了很多低功率的2.0T,也快赶上了很多高功率的2.0T,就比如大众的高功率EA888,最大马力220匹,之前的奥迪A6L 45T 224匹。所以和自家2.0T的差距也不是非常大,差了26匹、80牛·米,官方的百公里加速也只慢了1秒。所以总的来说,并没有比2.0T的表现差太多。但是在变速箱上就差的比较多了,CT4一直用的是8AT,而CT5和CT6一直都是通用最先进的10AT。虽然比起同级豪华品牌的双离合来说,这个8AT已经算不错的了。而且新款的8AT据说经过了升级,拥有更合理齿轮比、更快换档效率、更平顺的档位切换感和更智能的换档逻辑。底盘上,CT4 1.5T和现款一致,都是前麦弗逊+后五连杆的独立悬架调校,偏运动的调教。新车还配备了E-boost电子助力制动系统。所以光看动力总成和底盘的账面数据,CT4确实还说得过去。但是真要说CT4最大的亮点,那一定是开起来后的感受。虽然211匹的最大马力还不足以让它的屁股扭来扭去,但是这种纵置发动机后驱布局的轿车在你开上后,你就能感受到它和横置引擎前驱车的不同了,那就是车尾很灵活。尤其是当你猛踩油门的时候,前驱车会有扭矩转向,但是并不会让你害怕,相反你还会一直顶着全油门在输出。但是以同样的方式再开后驱车时,只要一个方向没打好,它的车尾就有可能滑动起来,这种感觉是完全不一样的,一种是可控的,一种是不可控,只有在你全油门开过后驱车后,你才知道什么叫驾驶乐趣。说到配置那绝对是凯迪拉克的强项,即便是凯迪拉克最便宜的车型,CT4 1.5T车型依然是配置很高,比如无钥匙进入、远程遥控启动、BOSE音响、碰撞预警、低速自动刹车、前方行人探测预警、LKA车道保持系统、SBZA侧盲区预警系统等,但是上面这些很多都是25T豪华型才有的配置,所以即便是你要买1.5T的CT4,也更建议选择高配车型。CT4 1.5T和2.0T该怎么选?和CT5又该怎么选?目前1.5T的CT4价格,低配比2.0T便宜了3万2,高配便宜了2万。所以光从定价上来看,其实1.5T的价格并没有和2.0T拉开较大的差距。而且现在CT4 2.0T的优惠开口就是5万起步,6万也是有可能的,即便是2.0T版本,优惠完裸车价在20万,落地22万不到就能买到纵置后驱+2.0T高功率+8AT的中型轿车。这不比1.5T的CT4开出去性能更猛,更运动?况且买CT4的人绝大多数不就是冲着它的性能和和后驱去的吗?将近20万都花了,还在为这两三万纠结到底是买1.5T还是2.0T?如果这都纠结要我说真还不如老老实实去买思域,或者领克03。但是真想来店里打算花20多万买2.0T CT4的消费者,又有绝大多数转头买了隔壁的CT5。都是20多万,CT4后排不管是头部还是腿部空间真的都太小了,除非是单身,不然女朋友第一个不同意。再加上现在CT5也是优惠巨大,开口6万左右,29万多的28T豪华标准版落地也就25万,和2.0T的CT4相差3万,但是换来了更宽敞的后排和10AT变速箱。这也就是为什么CT5的月销能到大几千,而CT4却只有几百台,因为大哥把小弟的客户都抢走了。当然也有人会问,CT6也很便宜,为什么CT5客户不再加1-2万买CT6呢?其实,这就是像是A4L和A6L的区别,不是A4L客户买不起A6L,而是觉得没必要。A6L太过商务,A4L才像是白领上下班代步的车。CT5和CT6也是这种区别,很多年轻人觉得CT5的调性更符合自己,而CT6更像是买给老爸开的车。现在的CT4更像是四门两座版的CT5,要我说还不如直接将CT4去掉两个后车门,做成CT5的轿跑车版,说不定这样的销量反而更高,而且还不会影响到品牌的定位和形象。毕竟CT4就算出个两门版,我相信价格也肯定不会高过奥迪A5,而奥迪A5的Coupe两门版本不是大掀背,只要CT4出两门版,有掀背尾门,我相信销量可能比现在这个四门版本还会好。什么人会买CT4?其实CT4的定位感觉很尴尬,说它是中型轿车,结果后排还不如紧凑轿车的思域大。说它是紧凑级轿车吧,车长和轴距也有4760/2775毫米,绝对是A+级往上的定位,所以真的是高不成低不就。和合资车比,它品牌力还行,但是空间不行。和豪华品牌比,比如宝马1系、奥迪A3和奔驰A,虽然CT4定位更高,但实际空间差不多,品牌力又不行。所以CT4虽然动力不错,是纵置后驱运动型轿车,但好像优点也就这么多了,所以一句话评价CT4,那就是优点非常突出,调性非常运动,但是依然短板明显,劣势突出,而且它的优势只有很小一部分的人群才会看见,才能认可。或者说,CT4天生就是为注重操控和性能的小部分人群打造的,而且这一小部分人群还得是预算捉襟见肘。因此,即便凯迪拉克出了定价更低的1.5T版本,我相信也注定只有极少数真的差两万买2.0T CT4的人会买了吧。如果是你,你会买1.5T还是2.0T的车型?可以添加微信46415254加入我们的社群音频图文更新在订阅号: 百车全说每期抽三条留言,每人赠168元的“芥末绿”燃油添加剂一瓶点击订阅,每周三,周六更新会有提醒新听友可以搜索:百车全说2014,百车全说2015,百车全说2016,往期300多个小时的节目可供收听

Erst fahren, dann reden - der AUTO BILD Podcast
Folge 60: Ford Mustang Mach 1

Erst fahren, dann reden - der AUTO BILD Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 69:48


Der Mustang gehört zu den wichtigsten US-Cars. Seine Fan-Gemeinde ist seit den 1960er-Jahren riesig. Und der Mustang ist sich bis heute treu geblieben: Als Mach 1 kommt er als Sondermodell mit Fünfliter-V8, spektakulärer Optik und einem Sound, bei dem sich die Nackenhaare aufstellen. Aber wie fährt sich das Ponycar? Was verbraucht der V8 mit seinen 460 PS? Und wie steht es um die Materialien im Innenraum? Diese Fragen beantworten wir in der neuesten Folge! Für mehr Infos zu unserem Partner und über Echte Autoliebe-Stories findet ihr auch auf dem CosmosDirekt.-Blog unter https://www.cosmosdirekt.de/magazin/autoliebe/. Schütze was du liebst! Mit CosmosDirekt.

JedBangers Podcast
Entrevista: Gustavo Rowek

JedBangers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 71:56


Carlos Noro estuvo hablando con Gustavo Rowek y el ex baterista de V8 y Rata Blanca repasó su trayectoria desde los días fundacionales del Metal argentino hasta su actualidad, que lo tiene ocupado con varios proyectos. En el medio de todo eso, recordó anécdotas, opinó y explicó su visión de la música actual. Siempre es un placer escuchar a semejante músico y, además, un tipo lúcido. Esta vez no fue la excepción. 

Smith and Sniff
Pinin Popeye and the Ka rescuer

Smith and Sniff

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 59:12


Jonny has spotted a familiar face with badly cared-for car. Also in this episode, the man who tries to save Kas, laid back dentistry, buying an ex-courtesy car, the weird social media postings of Fiat's CEO, school run chic, the season of nutty perfume ads, a Chrysler 180 with an aftermarket fuel cap, the land where the V8 is normal, the truth about the Passat W8, JLR's boss steps down, how to save Jaguar, Renault 21 Turbo v Peugeot 405 Mi16, and a car podcast smackdown on the streets of Los Angeles. This episode is sponsored by carandclassic.com patreon.com/smithandsniff Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Aston Martin Heritage Podcast
Episode 6: End of an Era? The last of the Newport Pagnell V8's

Aston Martin Heritage Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022


In this our sixth episode, we revisit HWM Aston Martin at Walton-on-Thames to see a stunning Aston Martin V8 Vantage Le Mans. The V8 Vantage Le Mans represents the last of the fully handcrafted, coach-built era. Unveiled at the Geneva Motor Show in 1999, it was launched as a celebration of the run-out of this charismatic Tadek Marek engine, Virage chassis bloodline. The reference Le Mans reference Aston Martin's win of the 24hr race in a DBR1 of 1959. Production was between December 1999 and October 2000 from the Aston Martin Newport Pagnell facility. To consider this end of an era, along with the V600, we join in conversation with Guy Jenner, the CEO at HWM and Steve Waddingham, the Aston Martin Lagonda historian, where we hear stories about the cars and the people behind these special V8 cars and the transition to the Vanquish.

The Mike Hosking Breakfast
Greg Murphy: Motorsport legend on Supercars not returning to New Zealand in 2023

The Mike Hosking Breakfast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 3:18


Supercars will not be coming to New Zealand next year. The 2023 Supercars calendar was announced Wednesday, with the season beginning in Newcastle from March 10 and ending in Adelaide on November 26, but a New Zealand leg was missing from the schedule. Pukekohe Park Raceway had previously been the New Zealand home of Supercars, but the venue will close to motorsport activity from April next year after a change in ownership in 2021, leaving organisers scrambling to find a replacement. Hampton Downs was initially considered as the favourite for the new Kiwi leg of the V8 circuit, but acquiring funding to upgrade the facilities in time for the 2023 season became an issue. Supercars CEO Shane Howard said he is hopeful the championship will return to New Zealand in the future. “We are still in progressive talks with our counterparts there for an event in the future, however as they continue it is in the best interest of all parties involved to focus on 2024 and beyond. “We have every intention to return to New Zealand and we are confident of an announcement in the new year regarding a partnership with a new venue.” The Herald reported earlier this month that the 2023 Supercars calendar release was delayed whilst details were finalised around Pukekohe Park's replacement, with Quinn motorsport Group appealing to the New Zealand Government for financial help. The announcement suggests funding remains an issue. MBIE's manager of New Zealand Major Events Kylie Hawker-Green said the Government will continue discussions with Supercars organisers around financial support for the future. “Major international events generate significant economic, social and cultural benefits for Aotearoa New Zealand,” Hawker-Green said. “The Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment has previously supported the V8 Supercar events over five years from the former Major Events Development Fund and will continue to liaise with event organisers to consider how the government could support the event returning to Aotearoa New Zealand in future.” The date on the 2023 calendar that was set aside for New Zealand has now been given to Sandown, which will see the return of the traditional 500km, pre-Bathurst endurance race.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Punches and Popcorn
Ninja III: The Domination

Punches and Popcorn

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 67:06


Here it is, the epic culmination of the Ninja trilogy: Ninja III: The Domination. What happens when an aerobics enthusiast/lineswoman is possessed by the spirit of an evil ninja? Sho Kosugi comes to the rescue in a completely implausible mashup that answers the question "What happens when you combine The Exorcist with kung fu movies, and also Flashdance? And then add V8?" It's a rollercoaster ride for the ages.

The Dork-O-Motive Podcast
3.2 Small Blocks vs The World: The Wild Story of The 1971 Questor Grand Prix

The Dork-O-Motive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 100:08


Imagine a racing event where 30 of the best drivers came from all corners of the world to clash at the nicest race track ever built. Imagine that half of them would be driving F1 cars and the other half would be driving small block V8 powered open wheeled machines with way less tech but more horsepower. Imagine it were 1971.  This was the premise behind the Questor Grand Prix, a race held at Ontario Motor Speedway with a massive prize fund and more importantly bragging rights on the line.  Who won and how it all went down is only half the story. There's all kinds of cool sub plots here and if you love racing history, you'll totally dig this deep dive into one of the coolest and weirdest one off races in history. 

The Overlap Podcast
Episode 72: Darrell Amy: Revenue Growth Engine

The Overlap Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 68:37


Ford's Model T. The Chevy '350' V8. The Aston Martin V12. Thomas the Tank.   Famous Engines all, right? Well, on this week's Overlap Podcast, our boys Sid and Keith sit down with the author of the world's next truly iconic engine - yes, it's Darrell Amy, author of the soon-to-be iconic book "Revenue Growth Engine," with a podcast and master class of the same name.   Darrell's genesis for the Revenue Growth Engine was attempting to bridge the gap between Sales and Marketing within companies, but upon opening up the hood on several companies, he saw a common theme gumming up the works - the timing belt had come off. And by timing belt, of course we employ metaphor because we really mean use and management of time - finding a way to create and maintain work-life balance as a business owner.   Our boys get in the passenger's seat and let Darrell drive this conversation that will definitely be a value-added bonus that's even better than the little pine tree they give you for free at the car wash place to hang on your rear view mirror and make your interior smell vaguely like value-brand Pine-Sol.   Get ready to rev up your business and your life with this week's episode of The Overlap Podcast.   www.revenuegrowthengine.com (Podcast, Master Class, and more available)

Quick Spin
2023 Cadillac Escalade-V Review: Brash, Comfortable Fun

Quick Spin

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 14:52


Cadillac's Escalade is probably the first image that springs to your mind when you think of high-end, full-size SUVs. It's earned that by dominating the luxury SUV sales charts for a long time. Not resting on their laurels, the folks at Cadillac took their flagship SUV and added a hefty dose of horsepower before slapping on a V-Series badge. Formally named the 2023 Cadillac Escalade-V, this hot-rodded people mover features a 6.2-liter supercharged V8 that sends 682 hp and 653 lb-ft of torque through a 10-speed automatic transmission and a standard four-wheel-drive system. This all works together to help this three-ton luxury liner sprint to 60 mph in only 4.3-seconds. On this episode of Quick Spin, Autoweek's Executive Editor Tom Murphy slides behind the wheel of the 2023 Cadillac Escalade-V and puts it through its paces. Murphy guides you around the Escalade-V and shows off some of its best interior and exterior features. Later in the show, Murphy takes you along on a live drive review. Adding to the discussion, Murphy chats with host Wesley Wren about the Escalade-V, the competition and Cadillac's direction. Closing the show, the two talk about what makes this '23 Cadillac Escalade-V special.

Driven Car Reviews
2023 Land Rover Defender 110 V8 Has Bark And Bite

Driven Car Reviews

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 20:33


The new Land Rover Defender 110 is rough, tough and leading man handsome. With the new 518 horsepower 5-liter supercharged V8 it adds power and a baritone voice that's hard to resist. Tom Voelk drives a decked out 110 model because that's the only way you can get buy one, fully loaded (it can be had in the 90 as well). Beware, it doesn't come cheap, and it's a thirsty machine.

El Garaje Hermético de Máximo Sant
12 coches raros "made in spain"

El Garaje Hermético de Máximo Sant

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 18:36


No me lo neguéis, ¡sé que os gustan los coches raros! Como a mí. Y os he preparado una selección de rarezas con un rasgo en común: Ser de fabricación española, auténticos Made in Spain… desde utilitarios a superdeportivos, pasando por cabrios y TT… Es una selección algo particular, porque hay coches desde el año 1953 hasta 2017, muchos proyectos que no tuvieron continuidad y otros que siguen. Me he querido centrar en los más modernos, pero había algunos imprescindibles por su originalidad y otros que no podían faltar. Como os digo siempre, mi desafío es que me respondáis, sinceramente, a esta pregunta: ¿Los conocías todos? Vamos a comenzar con esta lista, esta vez por orden alfabético. 1. Biscuter (1953) Se trata de un diseño francés, del ingeniero Voisin, pero fabricación española. Para mí era un compendio de ideas originales siempre en busca de la sencillez. Por ejemplo, no tenía marcha atrás: Si querías dar la vuelta, cogías el coche, lo levantabas por detrás y le dabas la vuelta. Así de fácil. Aunque al final… ¡le pusieron marcha atrás! 2. Gato Montés (1971) Este modelo ha aparecido ya en varios de nuestros vídeos, pero es que es genial. Un ingeniero me dijo “para encontrar soluciones originales lo primordial es hacerse las preguntas adecuadas”. Y eso es lo que hizo José Artés de Arcos, el “alma mater” de este modelo. ¿Son suficientes 4 ruedas para un TT? ¿Es imprescindible la dirección en un coche? Pocos coches antiguos y modernos, superan en condiciones difíciles al Gato Montés… pocos, pero podría decir que ninguno. 3. Hispano Alemán Mallorca (1972) Este coche no tenía mucho misterio: Era, con más o menos acierto, un Lotus Super Seven fabricado en España con una carrocería ligeramente modificada y motor de Seat inicialmente de 1,4 litros y luego de 1,8, con potencias de 75 y 118 CV. Con menos de 600 kg el 1.4 volaba y el 1.8 despegaba. Era un coche delicado, porque utilizaba un eje rígido posterior y era un coche muy rápido, pero algo delicado. Tuvo un éxito de ventas discreto. Su fabricante, Talleres Hispano Alemán era propiedad de Bern Heiderich, ex piloto de caza, piloto de carreras, empresario e importador de BMW y Porsche. Un verdadero personaje. 4. URO Vamtac TS5 (1998) Danos un salto de casi 20 años para hablar de un caso de éxito. UROVESA es un fabricante español con sede en Santiago de Compostela que fabrica coches muy especiales destinados a servicios especiales, por ejemplo, militares. Es el caso del VAMTAC, acrónimo de Vehículo de Alta Movilidad Táctica. Es un modelo inspirado en el Humvee americano, pero con tecnología muy puesta al día. 5. Tramontana (2005) La primera versión del Tramontana se presentó en el Salón de Ginebra de 2005… yo estuve allí. Contaban que era una especie de cruce entre un F1 y un avión de caza. En la actualidad se fabrican más o menos 6 al año y cuentan con un motor Mercedes V12 6.4 litros turbo que entrega 720 CV y en las últimas versiones 888 CV para algo más de 1.000 kg de peso. El precio supera el medio millón. 6. Tauro V8 Spider (2010) Con franqueza, no tengo toda la info que me gustaría de este modelo “Made in Valladolid” por la marca Tauro Sport Auto. Se trata de un roadster basado en el Pontiac Solstice con propulsión trasera, motor V8 de 6,2 litros y 440 CV, procedente del Chevrolet Corvette. Se hicieron alrededor de unas 20 unidades, todas distintas y por un precio de partida de más de 100.000 €. A mí, de frente, me recuerda al Nissan 350 o 370 Z Cabrio. 7. Spania GTA Hispano (2015) Ha habido modelos anteriores, desde 2012, pero hemo elegido el último, presentado en 2015 con motor t8.0 litros V10 biturbo, con una potencia de 925 CV, caja de cambios secuencial de siete velocidades y una velocidad máxima de 370 km/h. No está nada mal.Este coche valenciano ofrece tecnología de primer orden, con un chasis monocasco de fibra de carbono que es una pasada. Se dijo que solo se iban a hacer 99, que no me parecen pocos. 8. Bultaco Lynx (2016) Se trata del primer y único coche fabricado por Bultaco… que no se llegó a fabricar. Bultaco volvió a abrir en 2014 para hacer una especie de moto-bici que no triunfó y quisieron hacer un vehículo inspirado en el KTM X-Bow. Como en el KTM el motor era un Audi TSI 2.0 Turbo que ofrecería entre 300 y 400 CV para 850 kg de peso. Muy prometedor. 9. Velantur Cars (2016) Se habló mucho en 2016 del “Tesla español”, porque iba a ser un coche eléctrico de lujo. Daba credibilidad al proyecto la presencia como socio de Hurtan, de uno de cuyos modelos hablaremos más adelante. Este modelo ofrecía una autonomía de 400 km y una potencia de alrededor de 180 CV… pero, con sinceridad, no sé en qué ha quedado este proyecto. 10. Boreas (2017) Otro coche fabricado en el levante español, en Santa Pola. Para quienes piensen que allí solo se cultivan naranjas que sepan que también se fabrican superdeportivos híbridos de nada menos que 1.000 CV. Bueno, no sé si se fabrican o se iban a fabricar, porque este coche lo lanzó en 2017 la empresa DSD Design&Motorsport, por lo que parece con una maqueta y con la idea de hacer una serie de 12 unidades a un precio que, al menos yo, desconozco. 11. Hispano Suiza Carmen (2017) Si 1.000 CV os parecen pocos, tranquilos, que este Hispano Suiza ofrece 1019 CV… seguro que esos 19 CV se notan, ¿verdad? Es 100x100 eléctrico, pero de este coche sí que se han fabricado unas cuantas unidades a un precio, no sé qué os parecerá a vosotros, de 1.815.000€. Si 1019 CV se os quedan “cortos” hay una versión “Carmen Boulogne” de de 1.114 CV por un poquito menos de 2 millones de euros… voy a hablar con el banco a ver si me lo financian. Este año han vendido uno. 12. Hurtan Author (2017) ¡Y llegamos a un coche granadino! Probablemente el proyecto más posibilista y de más largo recorrido de todos los que hemos visto aquí.Los Hurtan te pueden gustar o no gustar y hay quien los odia, pero desde luego son coche diferentes, todos distintos, como dice la marca “Taylor made”, hechos a medida. No tienen 1.000 CV…ni falta que les hace. Los tienes desde 143 hasta 223 CV más que suf icientes para disfrutar de este roadster. Y hablemos de precio: Desde poco más de 40.000€ puedes tener un coche único y artesanal. Conclusión. Como ves, un poco de todo. Admiro enormemente a estos emprendedores, yo diría que soñadores, capaces de perseguir sus sueños… pero no es fácil. En el caso de los superdeportivos tan exclusivos, quizás yo pequé de cierto conservadurismo… y es que me conformo con un simple Porsche 911 Turbo o un Ferrari 296 GTB… soy de gustos sencillos.

Stabby Stabby
Ninja III: The Domination (1984)

Stabby Stabby

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 84:13


This week the boys put on their best ninja outfits, sexily chug some V8 juice, and aerobicize their way through Canon Films cult classic Ninja III: The Domination. Along the way they plan for Dancing April, discuss hairy cops, explore the benefits of wearing spiked shoes, and once again confess their love for actor James Hong. Never forget – only a ninja can kill a ninja.Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LIOelgaYlM8IMDB: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0087805/Like a book club but for dissecting obscure thriller, exploitation, and horror movies. Next movie announced every Wednesday. New episodes every Monday. Follow us on the things:Linktree: https://www.linktr.ee/stabbystabbyInstagram:  @stabbypod  https://www.instagram.com/stabbypod/Letterboxd:   https://boxd.it/dp1ACGet the shirt: https://www.big-other.com/shop/p/stabby-stabby-podcast-tee

Quick Spin
2023 Toyota Sequoia Review: Doesn't Miss the V8

Quick Spin

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 15:00


To put it bluntly, the 2022 Toyota Sequoia was old. The second-generation Sequoia was launched at the end of the Bush administration. After nearly two decades in production, Toyota introduced the third generation of its Sequoia. This Sequoia follows the same formula as the similarly updated Toyota Tundra, which means that the 5.7-liter V8 is gone and a turbocharged, V6 hybrid powertrain is in its place. While the Tundra also offers a non-hybrid powertrain, the '23 Sequoia will only be available with Toyota's I-Force Max 3.5-liter V6 hybrid powertrain. This hybrid powertrain feeds power through a ten-speed automatic transmission to either the rear wheels in two-wheel-drive trim or all four wheels when ordered as such. Of course, the new Sequoia sees more than just a powertrain and features an entirely new shell and interior. On this episode of Quick Spin, host Wesley Wren climbs behind the wheel of Toyota's three-row off-roader and takes you along for the ride. Wren guides you around the new Sequoia to show off its features and new hardware before taking you along on a live drive review. Adding to the show, Wren chats with Autoweek's Mark Vaughn about the Sequoia's slow sales this year, the competitive set and more. Closing the show, the two break down what makes the new Sequoia special.

Total Car Score
S3E66: Why did Ford only put 700 HP with the F-150 Raptor R?

Total Car Score

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 15:28


In this episode we are at the Silver Lake Sands Dunes Park, in West Michigan for the first test drive of the 2023 Ford F-150 Raptor R to find out the reasons why the engineering team "only" put 700 HP on the new 5.2-L supercharged V8 engine, which still makes it the  most powerful F-150 Raptor ever. 

Unnamed Automotive Podcast
Episode 292: Benjamin's Press Vehicle Gets Stolen, 2022 Jaguar F-Pace SVR, 2022 Kia Sportage Hybrid

Unnamed Automotive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 47:06 Very Popular


The more things change, the more they stay the same. Benjamin finds himself in yet another hulking V8 powered monster: the 2022 Jaguar F-Pace SVR. With 550 ponies and an accompanying eight-cylinder soundtrack to boot, he has plenty to say about this European SUV while the rest of its rivals wave goodbye to high displacement engines for good. Sami on the other hand is here to talk about the new 2023 Kia Sportage Hybrid, and is amazed at how much it's grown over the years. Now reasonably high end, the Sportage has a few small issues but leaves some big impressions. Also, someone stole Benjamin's press vehicle this week. That sucks!

Tuned In
063: Creating 2000HP+ Works of Automotive Art.

Tuned In

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 86:42


Nelson Racing Engines produces some of the greatest aftermarket V8 engine packages on earth, and in this week's episode of Tuned In, NRE's founder, Tom Nelson, is here to talk us through the process from design, to fabrication, assembly, and finally, face-melting dyno runs.  Use ‘PODCAST75' for $75 off your first HPA course here: https://hpcdmy.co/hpa-tuned-inEven if you don't recognise the name, you've probably seen Tom's work in films like Furious 7, in which Vin Diesel's character, Dom Toretto, drives the Nelson Super Cars 1968 Dodge Charger, ‘Maximus'. That impressive machine was built in-house from the ground up, and features a 9.4-litre 2200hp twin-turbo Hemi motor — one of many incredible V8 packages that Nelson Racing Engines offer.In this episode, Tom looks back over his career, discussing his early days building fences in order to save up and buy a machine shop, through to his move into building complete turn-key cars costing upwards of a million dollars, and to his pumping ultra-high performance engine package business. Tom was one of the first in the V8 scene to recognise the potential of turbocharging over supercharging, and as such, he also has a huge amount of experience in not just building turbocharged V8s, but designing and fabricating the turbochargers themselves. Podcast host Andre Simon and Tom also dive into the ultra-high performance engine building world, discussing what it takes to make huge power reliably, and how to balance the aesthetics that NRE is so famous for with performance and serviceability. Lastly, Tom also talks business, discussing what has and hasn't worked over the decades, and exactly why his products — whether that be engine packages or full turn-key, Riddler-level builds, cost what they do. Follow Nelson Racing Engines here:IG: @nelsonracingenginesFB: @Nelson Racing EnginesWWW: nelsonracingengines.comInterested in learning to build your own performance engine? Start here: https://hpcdmy.co/engineb

Hablando de Autos
Cheyenne ZR2 y Escalade V-Series; ¿los compraríamos?

Hablando de Autos

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 34:47


Sergio y Beto hablan de dos modelos con el V8 de 6.2 litros de General Motors, que está en la Cheyenne ZR2 y en una versión supercargada en la Cadillac Escalade V-Series.  Discuten de las bondades de estos coches y el segmento que los compra y deciden si los comprarían o no.

El Garaje Hermético de Máximo Sant
Los pioneros: Coches raros y desconocidos

El Garaje Hermético de Máximo Sant

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 21:25


¿Sabes cuál fue el primer coche con cinturón de seguridad? ¿O con airbags? ¿O el primer eléctrico? ¿O el primer híbrido?... y así hasta 12. Porque hemos seleccionado 12 pioneros que fueron los primeros en algo. Y, a pesar de ello, algunos son casi desconocidos. Os voy a sorprender no solo porque muchos de estos coches sean poco conocidos o desconocidos. Sino porque hay muchos “Lugares comunes”: Ni el Ford T fue el primer modelo fabricado en serie ni un Volvo el primero en llevar cinturón, ni el Citroën Traction el primero de tracción delantera. O más “leyendas urbanas” que nos dicen que eléctricos e híbridos son lo último de la último… ¡y ya se fabricaban hace 100 años! 1. Flocken Elektrowagen (1888). Primer eléctrico. Muchos aficionados olvidan que en los comienzos del automóvil los coches eléctricos eran frecuentes. Y así era en 1888, cuando en las grandes ciudades muchos tranvías y autobuses usaban sistemas eléctricos muy sencillos, en vez de pesadas y humeantes máquinas de vapor. El Sr. Flocken, utilizó una “calesa” de caballos, montó un pequeño motor de 0,7 kW y una batería de unos 100 kg… 2. Lohner Porsche Semper Vivus (1900). Primer híbrido. Es que me parto de risa. Porque en el año 1900, ¡ya había híbridos! Y ahora nos quieren vender que esto de la hibridación es un invento reciente y muy moderno. Pues Porsche se adelantó al Prius 100 años… nada más. 3. Oldsmobile Curved Dash (1901). Primero fabricado en serie. Sin duda que el Ford T tiene el mérito de ser el primer automóvil de masas por su bajo precio de compra, posible gracias a su producción en cadena. Pero en contra de lo que se suele afirmar, no fue el primer coche construido en cadena, mérito le corresponde al Oldsmobile Curved Dash. 4. Spyker 60/80 HP (1903). Tracción total. En los primeros años del S.XX los ingenieros Émile Gustave Drouard y Joseph Valentin Laviolette diseñaron el Spyker 60/80 HP y presentaron su evolución un par de años más tarde, en París, el llamado 32/50 HP. Lo más llamativo de este coche era su tracción total. 5. Bucciali TAV-6 (1922). Primer tracción delantera. No, no fue el Citroën Traction Avant no fue el primer coche fabricado en serie con tracción delantera. El primer coche de producción con este sistema fue el Bucciali TAV-6, que se presentó en el Salón de París de 1922 tenía entre otras muchas, innovaciones, un sistema de tracción delantera. 6. Lancia Lambda (1923). Primero con chasis monocasco. Hoy en día todos los coches, salvo algún TT y alguna rareza, utilizan este sistema que ya en 1923 usó Lancia. En un chasis monocasco la propia carrocería es el chasis, con lo cual se ahorra peso, el chasis es más rígido y más bajo… 7. Stoewer Greif Junior (1931). Primero con cuatro ruedas directrices. En 1931, el fabricante alemán Stoewer fabricó un todoterreno militar con cuatro ruedas motrices y, además, directrices, con la idea de hacerlo más maniobrable, porque a partir de 35 km/h se desconectaba. Esta misma tecnología se aplicó a los Stoewer R180 y R200, también vendidos como BMW 325, entre 1936 y 1940. 8. Saab GT 750 (1958). Primero con cinturones de seguridad. La mayoría de los aficionados asocian los cinturones de seguridad a Volvo… no sin razón. Porque su Nils Bohlin trabajaba para Volvo cuando inventaron el cinturón de seguridad de tres puntos, que patentaron con en 1959 con el número 3.043.625. Volvo, generosamente, liberó esa patente. Y todos los coches acabaron llevando cinturón. Pero eso no impide que este Saab GT750, un gran olvidado, fuese el primero en llevar cinturón de serie. 9. Mercedes Benz W111 (1959). Primero con zonas deformables. Volvo tiene fama de ser una marca que trabaja mucho en la seguridad. Y es cierto. Pero en mi opinión una marca que ha trabajado tanto o más que Volvo es Mercedes. 10. Oldsmobile Jetfire Turbo Rocket (1962). El primero con turbo. Pues no: Ni BMW ni Porsche ni Saab… el primer coche con motor turbo fue un modelo americano en 1962. Y es que para potencia el “pequeño” motor, según estándares americanos, de Jetfire de solo 3,5 litros, pues ni cortos no perezosos le metieron un Turbo. 11. Mercedes Clase S W116 (1972). El primero con ABS. ¡Que bruto es el ser humano! ¿Por qué digo esto? Porque el sistema antibloqueo de frenos ABS es una aportación clave a la seguridad… pero al principio, tuvo el efecto contrario. 12. Oldsmobile Toronado (1973). Primero con airbag. Un precioso coupé americano con motor V8 y que el en 1973 el primero que se lanzó al mercado con unas bolsas gigantescas que se desplegaban e inflaban para proteger la cabeza, el torso y las rodillas de sus ocupantes. Coche del día. El Oldsmobile Toronado de 1973, que descubrí en una miniatura de 1/43 de la marca Auto Pilen.

Cars & Comrades
Unsafe At Any Speed, Chapters 4, 5, and 6

Cars & Comrades

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 104:47


We're back with more Ralph Nader content, this time covering Chapter 4: The power to pollute, Chapter 5: The engineers, and Chapter 6: The stylists. But first, we attempt to answer the age-old question: what is a truck?Main topic at 44:05Email us with tips, stories, and unhinged rants: carsandcomrades@gmail.com //Our social media links etc: www.linktr.ee/CarsAndComrades //Music by King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard: www.kinggizzardandthelizardwizard.com/polygondwanaland //Links/Sources:Nader, Ralph. Unsafe At Any Speed. New York, Grossman Publishers, 1965. //Nissan 240SX with a Ford flathead V8: https://www.motortrend.com/news/turp-0512-1994-nissan-240sx-296-cid-flathead-v8/ //https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dodge_Rampage //Smog pump supercharger https://youtu.be/TJTQ_XO3NK0 //Ch 4: The power to pollute https://imgur.com/a/rPsFX9 //Ch 5: The engineers https://imgur.com/a/9tVcpKn //Ch 6: The stylists https://imgur.com/a/oFKrEnI //

The Carmudgeon Show
Should Maserati Exist in 2022? — The Carmudgeon Show with Cammisa and Derek from ISSIMI Ep. 71

The Carmudgeon Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 60:31


Carmudgeon returns! After a short break, Jason and Derek have returned to discuss the past, present, and future of Maserati- and at the end of the day, should they even exist at all in the current car market? There's no doubt that the legacy Italian brand has taken a new shape molded by mass-market modern consumer tastes, influencing the birth of the Ghibli, Levante, and MC20. With V6 powertrains across the board, Jason and Derek, Maserati may have lost its' way, lacking the character of even the late Quattroporte V's ferocious, snarling V8. Without the direction it once had, will Maserati ever find its way in a market biased by EVs and SUVs? In highlighting brand identities, Jason and Derek naturally land on the discussion of the SUV's existence overall. Jason remarks on recent seat time in the Porsche Cayenne Coupe GTS, a vehicle which has become exceptionally dynamic to drive and whose existence allowed Porsche to continue making sports cars after flirting with bankruptcy. But a world of great SUVs, will the general consumer ever return to form and downsize back to smaller and lighter offerings? All this to unpack and more, brought to you by the Hagerty Podcast Network.

Unnamed Automotive Podcast
Episode 291: 2024 Polestar 3, 2022 Dodge Challenger RT Scat Pack Widebody, Cadillac Celestiq

Unnamed Automotive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 39:03


Sami just jumped off a plane from Copenhagen where he got up close and impersonal with the 2024 Polestar 3. While the automaker claims this is the true expression of the Polestar brand, Sami and Benjamin dive into whether or not that's true, drilling into the design language, technology, interior and psychology of the brand. Also, is Polestar luxury or not? Whats the deal here? Then Benjamin rekindles his love affair with all things V8 and powerful by testing out the latest 2022 Dodge Challenger Scat Pack, a large coupe that's in its last year of production. Old-school and still cool, the Scat Pack seems to occupy a sweet spot in the Challenger lineup. Finally, the pair put their heads together and congratulate Cadillac for making a car by hand, something Tesla has done for way too long. The Celestiq will cost an eye watering $300,000 and will be one of the few truly special Caddys out there according to the guys, and you may want to hear why.

America on the Road
Fall, Maine Woods, Ford Raptor: A Threesome Meant to Go Together

America on the Road

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 40:12


Few things seem like more fun than bashing around the Maine woods in a Ford F-150 Raptor. And that's just what America on the Road Co-Host Chris Teague did this past week. We've tested Raptors before but this one was equipped with an upgraded package that included 37-inch 50R17LT BFGoodrich All-Terrain T/A KO2 tires. Among other things, the beefy sidewall tires improved the ground clearance of the off-road marvel by over an inch. And they also had some other unexpected effects. Power was never a problem with 450 horsepower readily available from the 3.5-liter twin-turbo EcoBoost V-6. It channels its power through a 10-speed automatic transmission and a standard four-wheel-drive system and a two-speed transfer case. The Raptor's suspension is remarkably supple, meant to glide over obstructions instead of confronting them. The big question is this: after driving the Raptor with 37-inchers does Chris Teague prefer it to the Ram 1500 TRX? And what does Host Jack Nerad have to say about all that? In addition to having his own opinions about the Ford F-150 Raptor Nerad also tested another off-roader this week — the Lexus GX 460. While the Lexus name doesn't always conjure up an off-road image, the GX 460 is in many ways more at home on the trail than on suburban avenues. Underneath it is a truck that owes a lot to the fabled Toyota 4Runner. In fact, you could look at it as a more potent 4Runner since it is powered by a 301-horsepower 4.6-liter V8. Its one of a dwindling handful of V8s left on the market and delivers more power than the 4Runner's V-6. With four-wheel-drive and 329 lb-ft of peak torque, the Lexus GX 460 offers a robust 6,500-pound towing capacity. And it has trailer sway control to enhance straight-line tracking with a boat or camping trailer behind. In all, the Lexus GX 460 might not be what many of its prospective buyers think it will be with virtues they don't anticipate and foibles that might frustrate them. We'll discuss all of that in this episode of America on the Road. In the news, there is reason to be concerned if you're sharing the roadways with drivers who are misusing some advanced driver assistance systems. According to a new study, many drivers are asking those systems to perform tasks they are not capable of handling. And the results could be tragic for them and for others on the highway. We'll have the details on that coming up. Also in the news, recent federal legislation has thrown the EV market up in the air. Now government trade regulators are in talks with their European counterparts to try to resolve the problems it has caused. But once the law has been passed can its obvious flaws be fixed? We'll tell you our opinions next. And there are new developments in the partnership between Honda and Sony on electric vehicles. They've set a date, though they don't have a bridal registry anywhere. More to come on that too. Our special guest this week is Brittany Grande, GM Field Service Engineer She and Host Jack Nerad will talk about the critical shortage of auto technicians that is currently plaguing the industry. It might represent a big opportunity for you or someone you know. General Motors has a program that can make a big difference. And we'll talk with her about that. All that and more is served up hot right here on America on the Road.

Namsayin: Cars & Convos
Golden Acuity with Buddha Matsui of Gold Leaf Cannabis

Namsayin: Cars & Convos

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 98:31


The studio is packed with history this episode, The Namsayin boys are joined by local car legend and nationally celebrated cannabis grower, Buddha Matsui, of Gold Leaf cannabis. Buddha takes us through the late 80s, 90s and present day of the car culture here in Seattle and especially the energy found around local 206 neighborhood, Beacon Hill. First up however, new models, starting with the Germans. Mercedes Benz has released a new C63 AMG, a popular model in the states for its classic V8 in a small RWD sedan layout. But, the new version ditches the big powerful V8 for hybrid motors on the wheels, hybrid motors on the turbo and a 4 cylinder. The new version of the C class makes well into the 600 horsepower range as well as a staggering 752 foot-pounds of torque, making it the fasted C63, Mercedes has ever produced. The fellas discuss whether the new power plant will help or hinder the sales of the beloved model. Will the future look more like this, across all manufactures? Lastly, we go over the dynamics of the new ride and highlight the F1 technology being used and shared with other amazing machines like the AMG One hyper car. Then the platoon talks about natural disasters and automobiles. Florida is experiencing some bad hurricanes this season and the car gods have not been kind to a few individuals. The guys highlight a viral video of a very rare McLaren P1 hyper car, getting washed down the road along with its stable mate, a new Rolls Royce. A discussion of auto insurance and how cars in places like this get covered when the worst happens gets bounced around and we have all have a chuckle at the absurdity of it all. Next, we highlight a good old American company who is keeping the spirit of hot-rodding alive. Classic Performance Products makes a great deal of parts and accessories, but their newest item is a real sweet treat. They have developed a DIY bed shortening kit for the Ford F-100. Hardware, step-by-step video instructions, exact cut locations and measurements, making the entire setup a true weekend project. Hotrods will always have a special place in fella's hearts and highlighting the companies is always a labor of love. Staying in the Ford gear, the guys discuss factory performance upgrades and the benefits of OEM+. Ford is offering a plug-in engine and transmission upgrade that makes the 4 cylinder Bronco jump from 300 horsepower to a healthy 330 horsepower, matching that of the heavier, automatic only V6 Bronco. The fellas discuss the true potential and value available from Ford, when not a single bolt has to be removed and warranty stays intact. Finally, we dive into the 80s, 90s and 2000s Pacific Northwest car scene with Buddha Matsui. Buddha takes us through his youth, highlighting influences that cultivated his love of cars and sharpened his business skills. Buddha opens up about his father and the influence his father not only had on him, but on the world of denim / fashion as well. Buddha discusses the early days of car cruises and the creation of Syndicate Car Club when he was a young man. He then draws connections from the past to today, as he brings to light the successes he has had in the recreational cannabis industry and how the mindset of the car club and car community that club built, he tries to instill into his business practices and life everyday. Reach out to us at: Namsayin07@gmail.com Reach out to Buddha M: -The Aloha Friday project- IG: @goldleaf420 Walt F. IG: @Waffledesigns Al-Michael F. IG: @almichaelfranco Garrett N. IG: @g_rat206

The In-Between with Elizabeth Cheney
Lizdom of the Week: October 17th

The In-Between with Elizabeth Cheney

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 4:29


This week's Lizdom is about chasing your dreams and finding the ambition to take you there. I'm sure you've all heard of Elvis Presley. Well, after watching the new 'Elvis' movie, I've been inspired by his drive to follow his dreams and make them a reality. He was a dreamer for sure. The quote to carry you through this week was said by Elvis: "Ambition is a dream with a V8 engine." Chase your dreams - they matter. The ambition will come as you follow your path.  ************************************Follow me on Instagram!Follow me on TikTok!

The Carpool with Kelly and Lizz
CARPOOL IS A CANDY PODCAST NOW

The Carpool with Kelly and Lizz

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 49:06 Very Popular


Second summer is heating up today's episode with a controversial taste drive meets great eight (plus a few extras). An exciting invitation arrives, and ditch the drive-through brings the slow cooker magic and a delicious and healthy dessert. Kelly and Lizz talk about the hard-working food bloggers they could never be.  After deleting TikTok, Lizz has no idea what's going on with Gen Z, yet she's scraped the bottom of the barrel for today's millennial phrase of the day, “take several seats.” If you're too much, take several seats. In the spirit of Gen Z trends, Kelly and Lizz share the fall fashions they love and are resisting.  An invite arrives for the debut of the 2023 Kia Telluride in San Antonio, Texas and the gals wonder if the EV 9 invite is on its way next. Ford's CEO is sticking with the V8 manual experience in the new Mustang that debuted recently at the Detroit International Auto Show. How I Built This featured RJ Scaringe recently, and the Rivian story did not disappoint. And to wrap up industry news, the gals share why Toyota isn't all-in on electric vehicles — and why they aren't.  The ultimate taste drive and great twelve today is brought to you by listener demand and trolling comments on the ‘gram. The Carpool audience came out swinging for their favorite candy bars, so Kelly and Lizz are doing their due diligence today with just about every other bar you could think of. Was Kelly sleeping on the true winner? Is Lizz just scared for her marriage, or can she be unbiased in her vote? And will the gals de-throne Twix in the end? Oh, the chocolatey drama. Today's advice segment covers a few handy car-selling tips, and the show wraps with a full ditch the drive-through meal. A listener shares her slow-cooker chicken mushroom stroganoff with peas that looks FIRE, and Lizz shares a healthy PB and chocolate treat from Earthy Andy's Plant Over Processed. Thank you to our friends at Binto. With all this talk about fall, we need to consider boosting our immunity for flu season. Binto offers custom vitamin packs just for you. We love the Glow-Getter kit that helps with hormonal balance and gut health. With Binto you can connect with an actual health provider behind the scenes to ensure you're on track anytime.  → Head over to mybinto.com and use code CARPOOL for 20% off your order. → To share your ditch the drive-through recipe with us, call (959) CAR-POOL and leave us a message! → Want our advice on your next car (or just got a life question for us)? Shoot us an email for a chance to get your questions featured on the show at hello@thecarmomofficial.com Follow the Carpool Podcast on IG Follow Kelly on IG Follow Lizz on IG Visit thecarmomofficial.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The David Knight Show
INTERVIEW: Biden Plans "De-Carbonization" of Cars, But the V8 Sticks

The David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 65:37


Eric Peters, EPautos.com joins* jail, $10,000 or crush the truck — after cops see Facebook ad mentioning unauthorized equipment* Biden plans "De-Carbonization" of cars* Ford keeps V8 and sticks for Mustang* the "crime" of "aimlessly walking around"Find out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.comIf you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-show Or you can send a donation throughZelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.comCash App at:  $davidknightshowBTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7Mail: David Knight POB 994 Kodak, TN 37764Money is only what YOU hold: Go to DavidKnight.gold for great deals on physical gold/silver

The David Knight Show
20Sep22 Pandemic Over? GOP Won't Talk About "Emergency" Exec Order, Foundation of Medical Martial Law

The David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 181:40


* "Pandemic Over"? GOP comments show they knew all along that Trump E.O. of Emergency was the foundation for - Covid tyranny - 2020 election mail fraud - Mandates - Student Loan entitlement program…but there's something even more foundational that MUST be removed to stop martial law that's only been paused* Biden betrayed his union base to stop railroad strike derailing the economy just before the election. * The new normal of Myo-Kid-Itis, myocarditis for kids* Biden's CBDC plans hit another milestone and EU enlists Amazon and other companies to implement CBDC * A new "Church Committee" hearing to tackle online censorship?* Interview: Jail, $10,000 or crush the truck — after cops see Facebook ad mentioning unauthorized equipment; Biden plans "De-Carbonization" of cars; Ford keeps V8 and sticks for Mustang; the "crime" of "aimlessly walking around". Eric Peters, EPautos.com joinsFind out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.comIf you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-show Or you can send a donation throughZelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.comCash App at:  $davidknightshowBTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7Mail: David Knight POB 994 Kodak, TN 37764Money is only what YOU hold: Go to DavidKnight.gold for great deals on physical gold/silver

The REAL David Knight Show
20Sep22 Pandemic Over? GOP Won't Talk About "Emergency" Exec Order, Foundation of Medical Martial Law

The REAL David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 181:40


* "Pandemic Over"? GOP comments show they knew all along that Trump E.O. of Emergency was the foundation for - Covid tyranny - 2020 election mail fraud - Mandates - Student Loan entitlement program…but there's something even more foundational that MUST be removed to stop martial law that's only been paused* Biden betrayed his union base to stop railroad strike derailing the economy just before the election. * The new normal of Myo-Kid-Itis, myocarditis for kids* Biden's CBDC plans hit another milestone and EU enlists Amazon and other companies to implement CBDC * A new "Church Committee" hearing to tackle online censorship?* Interview: Jail, $10,000 or crush the truck — after cops see Facebook ad mentioning unauthorized equipment; Biden plans "De-Carbonization" of cars; Ford keeps V8 and sticks for Mustang; the "crime" of "aimlessly walking around". Eric Peters, EPautos.com joinsFind out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.comIf you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-show Or you can send a donation throughZelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.comCash App at:  $davidknightshowBTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7Mail: David Knight POB 994 Kodak, TN 37764Money is only what YOU hold: Go to DavidKnight.gold for great deals on physical gold/silver