Podcasts about hitchhiker

Asking people, usually strangers, for a ride in their road vehicle

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Best podcasts about hitchhiker

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Latest podcast episodes about hitchhiker

The Sound of Success with Nic Harcourt
John Lloyd, the British television and radio producer behind hits like 'QI', 'Spitting Image' and 'Black Adder' talks about the music of his life, from Little Eva, The Beatles and Ten Years After to The HU and Dum Dum Girls.

The Sound of Success with Nic Harcourt

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 56:38


John Lloyd is an English television and radio comedy producer and writer whose work includes Not the Nine O'Clock News, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, Spitting Image, Blackadder and QI. He is also the author of the book "1,411 Quite Interesting Facts to Knock You Sideways", a collaboration with John Mitchinson and James Harkin. John is currently the presenter of BBC Radio 4's The Museum of Curiosity.

Dr. Creepen's Dungeon
S3 Ep103: Episode 103: The Strangest Ever Horror Stories

Dr. Creepen's Dungeon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 153:47


All of tonight's tales are original stories by the wonderful Michael Paige, kindly shared directly with me for the express purpose of having me exclusively narrate it here for you all. https://www.reddit.com/user/Atrophied_Silence/posts/ https://michaelpaigeblog.wordpress.com/ 1) Hitchhiker's Haven 2) The Lighthouse Project 3) The Man Who Ate Ghosts 4) Where the Caterpillars Die

Please Don't Follow Me Home
Hitchhiker's Guide to the Paranormal

Please Don't Follow Me Home

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 43:13


Jimi and Joei discuss the urban legends, myths and ghost stories around the famed phantom hitchhikers that can be found around the world!DON'T BE A FOOL, SEND US YOUR GHOUL! Do you have a paranormal story to tell? DM or email us your story at pleasedontfollowmehome@gmail.com. If we read it on the podcast, you will be dubbed our Ghoul of the Week! Sources: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/A229_roadhttps://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vanishing_hitchhikerhttps://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resurrection_Maryhttps://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Acts%208%3A26-40&version=NIV&interface=amphttps://m.youtube.com/watch?v=RFGMdp4fRoghttps://www.reddit.com/r/ufo/comments/qgqmrn/hitch_hiker_effect/https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=4ClccDCMpR4https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=hSdOsMlZ7vEhttps://fun107.com/the-ghostly-tale-of-the-redheaded-hitchhiker-of-route-44/In the works for years, a suicide machine will soon be tested in SwitzerlandSocial Medias: Facebook: Please Don't Follow Me HomeTwitter: @PDFMH Instagram: pdfmh_podcastHave a suggestion, location idea or a question? Please email us at pleasedontfollowmehome@gmail.com

You Don't Know Lit
127. Literary Nonsense

You Don't Know Lit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 51:39


Rhinoceros by Eugène Ionesco (1974) vs The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams (1981).

The Toby Gribben Show
Michael Fenton Stevens

The Toby Gribben Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 32:42


Michael Fenton Stevens is an actor and comedian. He is best known for being a founder member of The Hee Bee Gee Bees and the voice behind the Spitting Image 1986 number 1 hit "The Chicken Song". He also starred in KYTV, its Radio 4 predecessor, Radio Active and Benidorm as Sir Henry since Series 4 which was first broadcast in 2011, and as an anchor on 3rd & Bird on CBeebies.Fenton Stevens featured in regular roles as Hank in the 1996 series The Legacy of Reginald Perrin, and as Ralph in Andy Hamilton's 2003 television sitcom Trevor's World of Sport, as well as in the Radio 4 version of the latter which was broadcast in 2004. Stevens had previously appeared in a guest role in Drop the Dead Donkey, another television comedy series written by Hamilton, and appears regularly in various roles in Hamilton's Radio 4 sitcom Old Harry's Game. He has also featured in Ian Hislop's sitcom My Dad's the Prime Minister as the Home Secretary. He plays the eponymous Inspector Steine in Lynne Truss' long-running Radio 4 comedy series. From 2004 until 2005 he appeared in two series of Julia Davis's dark comedy series Nighty Night as the Reverend Gordon Fox. He also appeared in various roles in the Tertiary, Quandary and Quintessential Phases of the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy radio series. In 2007, he played the similarly named Michael Wenton Weeks in Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency. He has provided the voice of Mr Beakman, a toucan, in the CBeebies show 3rd & Bird. He has a recurring role in the sitcom My Family as Mr Griffith, the boss of the dental corporation "Cavitex". He has played Sir Henry in Benidorm since Series 4 which was first broadcast in 2011.Notable guest appearances have been as the next door hotel guest in "Mr. Bean in Room 426"; and alongside Hee Bee Gee Bees bandmate Angus Deayton as the brother-in-law of Deayton's character in an episode of One Foot in the Grave. He played Alan Perkins, a holiday rep in Spain in "The Unlucky Winner Is" episode of Only Fools And Horses. He played a guest role in Coronation Street in November 2004. In 2006, he guest-starred in the Doctor Who audio adventure The Kingmaker. He also appeared in Series 3 Episode 3 of Outnumbered, as a substitute player called 'Lance' in a tennis match, and in the "Music 2000" episode of Look Around You as the chairman of the Royal Pop and Rock Association. In 2022 he appeared as Tony Vanoli in a fourth season episode of Ghosts.He is a very successful Pantomime Dame, having written and appeared in a number of pantos over the years. From December 2006 until January 2007, he starred in and wrote the Cambridge Arts Theatre pantomime version of Aladdin in the role of Widow Twankey. In 2015, Stevens appeared as Dr. John Radcliffe in the Royal Shakespeare Company's production of Helen Edmundson's Queen Anne.Since 2020, with help from his son John Fenton Stevens, a series of podcasts has been released called My Time Capsule with guests such as Stephen Fry, Rebecca Front, Rick Wakeman, Mark Gatiss, Rufus Hound, David Mitchell, Anthony Head, Chris Addison, Rev Richard Coles, Griff Rhys Jones, Richard Herring and David Baddiel. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Hitchhikers Guide to the Plannerverse
The Hitch Hiker's Guide to the Plannerverse - Episode 131 - Wearables

The Hitchhikers Guide to the Plannerverse

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022


Wearables We have worn wrist watches for many years, in the last 10 years these have been replaced by activity watches and more recently smart watches connected to our smart phones. What do these offer to person that plans in a paper planner? Do they deserve a place in our lives? Or are they something we should avoid and just use a normal conventional wrist watch. Thank you to all our Patreon 

Emergency Exit Podcast Network
The Rewatch Party 120 - The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (2005)

Emergency Exit Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 94:53


Nick, Anthony, and Manny sit down to discuss and rate the re-watchability of the film, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, from 2005.    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0371724/

Southern Gothic
Campfire Tales: The Phantom Hitchhiker of Highway 365

Southern Gothic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 5:40


Help Southern Gothic grow by becoming a Patreon Supporter today! Connect with Southern Gothic Media: Join our New Facebook Group! Website: SouthernGothicMedia.com Merch Store: https://www.southerngothicmedia.com/merch Pinterest: @SouthernGothicMedia Facebook: @SouthernGothicMedia Instagram: @SouthernGothicMedia Twitter: @SoGoPodcast

Short and Spooky
Ep. 179 - WATCH-ALONG(The Hitchhiker, The Legendary Billy B.)

Short and Spooky

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 49:42


Rocktober continues! Short and Spooky (THE podcast about anthology shows) is still keeping the music-themed episodes flowing with a Watch-Along of a previously discussed show! Tom's pick is to watch The Hitchhiker episode "The Legendary Billy B." Sure you might know how we feel about the episode, BUT you haven't watched it with us yet... Cue up the episode and enjoy! Please rate, review, subscribe, and tell your friends! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/shortandspooky/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/shortandspooky/support

Stars on Suspense (Old Time Radio)
BONUS - Halloween Haunts: The Hitchhiker (1946)

Stars on Suspense (Old Time Radio)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 31:31 Very Popular


We close out this Halloween season of bonus spooky shows with an encore production of "The Hitchhiker" - Lucille Fletcher's harrowing account of horror on the highway that was later adapted for television by Rod Serling as an episode of The Twilight Zone. We've heard Orson Welles in the 1942 Suspense production of the story; today, we'll hear Welles return to the role of cross-country driver Ronald Adams - the man who encounters the sinister stranger thumbing a ride on the side of the road - in this episode of The Mercury Summer Theatre of the Air (originally aired on CBS on June 21, 1946). 

Old Time Radio - OTRNow
Episode 1: The OTRNow Halloween Radio Program #2 (Rats and Devil Dolls)

Old Time Radio - OTRNow

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 178:25


The OTR Radio Program Halloween-02Escape. March 17, 1950. CBS net. "Three Skeleton Key". Sustaining. The rats return to the lighthouse. The story was previously produced on Escape on November 15, 1949 and subsequently on August 9, 1953. The story was also heard on Suspense on November 11, 1956and October 19, 1958. Radio and Television Life Magazine awarded the sound effects on the previous broadcast of this script, "Best Of The Year.". Paul Frees; Jack Sixsmith (sound effects); William N. Robson (producer, director); James Poe (adaptor); Vincent Price ; Cliff Thorsness (sound effects creator, executioner); George Toudouze (author); Del Castillo (organist); Harry Bartell; Jeff Corey ; Gus Bayz (sound effects); Harry Esman (control engineer)-------The Hall Of Fantasy. February 09, 1953. Mutual net, WGN, Chicago origination. "The Dance Of The Devil Dolls". Commercials deleted. A good story about little voodoo dolls and their evil mistress. There are excellent organ themes and bridges. The program was rebroadcast on October 5, 1953. Richard Thorne (writer).------Inner Sanctum Mysteries. October 27, 1947. CBS net. "Till Death Do Us Part". Bromo Seltzer. Two newlyweds witness a murder; a woman's face is shot away! Running from the gunman, the couple find the dead body back in their tourist cabin! The landlady finds the corpse and the groom winds up killing her! The story has a terrible cop-out ending. The script was previously used on "Inner Sanctum" on October 16, 1945 and subsequently on June 4, 1951 and September 14, 1952. Paul McGrath (host), Everett Sloane, Mercedes McCambridge, Himan Brown (director), Dwight Weist (announcer), Emile Tepperman (writer). The Mercury Summer Theatre. June 21, 1946. CBS net. "The Hitch-Hiker". Pabst Beer. The masterpiece of suspense...a radio classic about a cross-country drive, with destiny along for the ride. Lucille Fletcher (writer), Orson Welles (producer, director, performer), Alice Frost (doubles), Bernard Herrmann (music), Ken Roberts (announcer). 1/2 hour. Audio Condition: Excellent. Complete.-----Lights Out. April 06, 1938. NBC net, Chicago origination. "Cat Wife". Sustaining. The script was used on the program previously. The story was voted by listeners "the best" "Lights Out" story. A man's cat-like wife goes too far. The show features a fine performance by Karloff and an even better one by the "Cat Wife," who receives no billing. Betty Winkler (possibly cast as, "The Cat Wife"); Boris Karloff; Arch Oboler (writer, producer, director);------- Suspense. November 18, 1948. CBS net. "Sorry, Wrong Number". Auto-Lite. An invalid woman battles the frustrations of the telephone system after she overhears a plot to murder someone. The story was previously produced on "Suspense" on May 25, 1943 (see cat. #3681), August 21, 1943, February 24, 1944  and September 6, 1945. The story was subsequently produced on "Suspense" on September 15, 1952, October 20, 1957 and February 14, 1960 . Agnes Moorehead, Lucille Fletcher (writer), Anton M. Leader (producer, director), Eleanor Audley, Ann Morrison, Paul Frees (announcer), Lucien Moraweck (composer), Lud Gluskin (conductor), Harlow Wilcox (commercial spokesman), William Johnstone (commercial spokesman).

Infinite Loops
Jeremiah Lowin — Make Original Mistakes (EP.130)

Infinite Loops

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 91:01


Jeremiah Lowin is the founder & CEO of Prefect, a dataflow automation company. Jeremiah joins Jim for his second appearance on Infinite Loops to discuss executing, storytelling, artificial intelligence and, of course, puns. Important Links: Prefect.io Disney Research Hub The story of the fake statue of Venus Show Notes: Slack, puns and the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy Planning, executing and the story of Prefect in 2022 Why naming things is a superpower If you can't pivot, you're dead Make original mistakes AI, storytelling, deep fakes and open source Books Mentioned: The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy; by Douglas Adams What Works on Wall Street; by Jim O'Shaughnessy The Beginning of Infinity; by David Deutsch

Stall It with Darren and Joe
Ep 67: The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Afterlife

Stall It with Darren and Joe

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 55:52


For this Halloween episode the lads bring to the table a catalogue of spooky tales, some less believable than others. Form ghostly hitchhikers, to mystery music in the night, and luminescent apparitions in Trabolgan.

Spooky, Wicked, Conspiracy History and Stories !
Episode 64 - Phantom Hitchhiker Stories!

Spooky, Wicked, Conspiracy History and Stories !

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 12:26


You ready for some spooky and wicked scary phantom hitchhikers that are in NC, SC, and MA? Well check out this podcast to get ready for a Spooky Halloween!! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Touring Fan Live
Hitchhiker Stories from the Road- Mike Dziama

The Touring Fan Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 58:10


LIVE IN STUDIOMike Dziama will be in studio to be our next guest on Hitchhiker Stories from the Road.Nest Saturday at 9pm Est Mike will be chatting about his passion for Pearl Jam, concerts and traveling. Tune in on our Facebook Live or YouTube live channel to watch it. Or you can listen to the podcast version starting Sunday wherever you listen to your favorite podcast.www.TheTouringFanLive.commedia@TheTouringFanLive.Comwww.facebook.com/TheTouringFanLiveInstagram-@TheTouringFanLiveCopyright The Touring Fan Live 2022

A Film By...
1986 - Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2

A Film By...

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 73:37


After a decade of silence... The buzzz is back!Our limited series "1986" is back with a bonus episode to discuss our love for the misunderstood Tobe Hooper sequel "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2." Are Chop-Top and the Hitchhiker the same person? What's the deal with Dennis Hopper's crazy revenge-seeking Ranger? We answer these questions and gush over K-Okla's sexy saw-swinging DJ, "Stretch" and provide some much needed clarity to the franchise's timeline of 9 films!www.afilmbypodcast.comafilmbypodcast@gmail.com@afilmbypodcast on Twitter and Facebook

ZakBabyTV
Hitchhiker HORRIFIED After Experiencing THIS

ZakBabyTV

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 27:16


The Roddenberry Podcast Network
Sci-Fi 5 Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy published - October 12, 1979

The Roddenberry Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 5:01


It was the radio show that Douglas Adams reluctantly turned into a novel, and the novel was almost procrastinated into obscurity. On this day in 1979 though, readers got a novelization that sparked the many more iterations of Adams' "Galaxy." The story on today's Sci-Fi 5. Follow Sci-Fi 5 for your daily dose of science-fiction history. Written by Brian Clayton Hosted by Ryan Myers Music by Devin Curry

Sci-Fi 5
Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy published - October 12, 1979

Sci-Fi 5

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 5:01


It was the radio show that Douglas Adams reluctantly turned into a novel, and the novel was almost procrastinated into obscurity. On this day in 1979 though, readers got a novelization that sparked the many more iterations of Adams' "Galaxy." The story on today's Sci-Fi 5. Follow Sci-Fi 5 for your daily dose of science-fiction history. Written by Brian Clayton Hosted by Ryan Myers Music by Devin Curry

Paranormal UK Radio Network
Bigfoot and the Bunny - The Phantom Hitchhiker Project: and America's Haunted Roadways with Clarissa Vazquez

Paranormal UK Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 98:01


The Phantom Hitchhiker Project: and America's Haunted Roadways with Clarissa VazquezAlso with special secret-squirrel shhhhhhh guest, Mr. Chris Balzano!Hey, do you need a ride??? n 2010, the Colorado Coalition of Paranormal Investigators set out too see if roadside crash sites resulted in Geographic Psychic Trauma (GPT) and subsequent phantom hitchhikers. During the ten years they actively conducted their research, they discovered more than just phantom hitchhikers on America's roadways and made a major scientific discovery in the process! Clarissa Vazquez, the founder of CCPI, takes you on a chilling journey down some of America's most haunted roadways and explains how GPT can result in phantom hitchhikers and other ghostly phenomena and how afterlife research can be conducted scientifically!

The Mutual Audio Network
Sorry Wrong Number and The Hitchhiker(101122)

The Mutual Audio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 72:55


Re-Imagined Radio presented a live performance by Willamette Radio Workshop actors and other community volunteers at Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver, Washington. We presented two radio dramas by Lucille Fletcher—"Sorry, Wrong Number" and "The Hitchiker"—to celebrate her work and Women's History Month. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Mutual Audio Network
Tuesday Terror for October 11th, 2022

The Mutual Audio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 2:32


The horror month continues as host Jeff brings Sorry Wrong Number and the Hitchhiker from Reimagined Radio, We're Alive #15.2, and Dos: After You #5! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Tuesday Terror
Sorry Wrong Number and The Hitchhiker

Tuesday Terror

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 72:55


Re-Imagined Radio presented a live performance by Willamette Radio Workshop actors and other community volunteers at Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver, Washington. We presented two radio dramas by Lucille Fletcher—"Sorry, Wrong Number" and "The Hitchiker"—to celebrate her work and Women's History Month. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Tuesday Terror
Tuesday Terror for October 11th, 2022

Tuesday Terror

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 2:32


The horror month continues as host Jeff brings Sorry Wrong Number and the Hitchhiker from Reimagined Radio, We're Alive #15.2, and Dos: After You #5! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Costing the Earth
The Prehistoric Hitchhiker's Guide to Climate Change

Costing the Earth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 27:42


Early humans adapted and survived in the face of a changing climate. Eleanor Rosamund-Barraclough joins an archaeological dig in Malta to learn the lessons for our own time. A team led by Dr Eleanor Scerri of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History is making remarkable discoveries about waves of human and animal habitation of the Mediterranean islands, but what can the fate of giant dormice, pygmy elephants and the hunters who may have relied on them for survival tell us about contemporary island life in a dangerous period of rising sea levels and searing summers? Producer: Alasdair Cross

The Brain Candy Podcast
EP655: Hitchhiker's Guide to Asteroids and Serial Killers

The Brain Candy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 60:41


We cover a ton today! First we follow-up on our conversation about nudist beaches and consider our feelings on nudist communities. We think people should probably keep their chonies on for several reasons. We learn the difference between comets, meteors, and asteroids, and are relieved that NASA is going to protect us from them (but Sarah is still mad at NASA for some littering). We hear about a serial killer database and the reasons why serial killing is on the decline, but we were shocked to learn the rates of female killers in the early 20th century. Plus, we theorize why mass killings are on the rise. Sarah reveals what Kelly Clarkson and Nietzsche have in common and the reason a common cliche is wrong after all. Join our book club, shop our merch, sign-up for our free newsletter, & more by visiting The Brain Candy Podcast website: Connect with us on social media: BCP Instagram: Susie's Instagram: Sarah's Instagram: BCP Twitter: Susie's Twitter: Sarah's Twitter: Sponsors: Betterhelp is a sponsor of The Brain Candy Podcast. Visit today to get 10% off your first month! Visit to take advantage of this limited-time offer for 10% off your next purchase! More podcasts at WAVE:

The Rabbi Sinclair Podcast
The Shadow of Faith - Sukkot

The Rabbi Sinclair Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 3:00


Why do we refer to 'faith' as a shadow? In 1972, Rabbi Yaakov Asher Sinclair opened SARM Studios the first 24-track recording studio in Europe where Queen mixed “Bohemian Rhapsody”. His music publishing company, Druidcrest Music published the music for The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1973) and as a record producer, he co-produced the quadruple-platinum debut album by American band “Foreigner” (1976). American Top ten singles from this album included, “Feels Like The First Time”, “Cold as Ice” and “Long, Long Way from Home”. Other production work included “The Enid – In the Region of the Summer Stars”, “The Curves”, and “Nutz” as well as singles based on The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy with Douglas Adams and Richard O'Brien. Other artists who used SARM included: ABC, Alison Moyet, Art of Noise, Brian May, The Buggles, The Clash, Dina Carroll, Dollar, Flintlock, Frankie Goes To Hollywood, Grace Jones, It Bites, Malcolm McLaren, Nik Kershaw, Propaganda, Rush, Rik Mayall, Stephen Duffy, and Yes. In 1987, he settled in Jerusalem to immerse himself in the study of Torah. His two Torah books The Color of Heaven, on the weekly Torah portion, and Seasons of the Moon met with great critical acclaim. Seasons of the Moon, a unique fine-art black-and-white photography book combining poetry and Torah essays, has now sold out and is much sought as a collector's item fetching up to $250 for a mint copy. He is much in demand as an inspirational speaker both in Israel, Great Britain and the United States. He was Plenary Keynote Speaker at the Agudas Yisrael Convention, and Keynote Speaker at Project Inspire in 2018. Rabbi Sinclair lectures in Talmud and Jewish Philosophy at Ohr Somayach/Tannenbaum College of Judaic studies in Jerusalem and is a senior staff writer of the Torah internet publications Ohrnet and Torah Weekly. His articles have been published in The Jewish Observer, American Jewish Spirit, AJOP Newsletter, Zurich's Die Jüdische Zeitung, South African Jewish Report and many others. Rabbi Sinclair was born in London, and lives with his family in Jerusalem. He was educated at St. Anthony's Preparatory School in Hampstead, Clifton College, and Bristol University. A Project Of Ohr.Edu Questions? Comments? We'd Love To Hear From You At: Podcasts@Ohr.Edu https://podcasts.ohr.edu/

The Chet Buchanan Show
How drunk hitchhiker managed to sneak a ride for TWO hours!

The Chet Buchanan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 3:43


This story sounds like is was straight out of a movie. How did he manage to do this!?

STARPODLOGPODCAST
StarPodLog #24

STARPODLOGPODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022


If you grew up in the 60's, 70's, or 80's, you will love StarPodLog!On this adventurous episode of StarPodLog, we consider the contents of Starlog magazine from 1981 in issues 47 and 48.Read along with your personal issue from your collection or for free here:https://archive.org/details/starlog_magazine-047/mode/2upMark Newbold talks about the Star Wars radio play. https://www.fanthatracks.com/   Paul Mount gives us the lowdown on the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy creator, Douglas Adams.Kirby Barlett-Sloan helps us to catch up on Doctor Who.https://the20mbdoctorwhopodcast.podbean.com/Main Man Jamie discusses comics of the early 80s!Shocking Jon reminices about the toys that were released in 1981. Follow him on the Shocking Things podcast:https://anchor.fm/shockingthingsBert Bruce considers the amazing work of John Carpenter.Joe Mulinaro fills us in on what George Lucas was up to on the Skywalker ranch. Check out the Rule the Galaxy podcast!https://jfm3rhs.wixsite.com/websitePlus: Superman's Sarah Douglas, Raiders of the Lost Ark, boardgames, and more on this episode of StarPodLog!We will attending Music City Multicon on October 29-31. https://musiccitymulticon.com/Join us at ShadowCon January 6-8!https://www.shadowcon.info/Don't forget to join our StarPodLog Facebook group:https://m.facebook.com/profile.php?id=469912916856743&ref=content_filterLove Starlog magazine?Join the Facebook group:https://m.facebook.com/profile.php?id=303578380105395&ref=content_filterSuscribe to our YouTube Channel “StarPodLog and StarPodTrek”:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCgE_kNBWqnvTPAQODKZA1UgMusic used with permission by Checkpoint Charley. Find us on Twitter and Instagram: @StarPodLog Reddit: u/StarPodTrek Visit us on Blogger at https://starpodlogpodcast.blogspot.com/ or iTunes or Spotify or wherever you listen to fine podcasts!If you cannot see the audio controls, listen/download the audio file hereDownload (right click, save as)

Haunted UK Podcast
BooPod Halloween Special - The Red Headed Hitchhiker of Route 44

Haunted UK Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 29:09


Welcome to the spooky month of October and also to this huge Halloween Collaboration special, released by members of the BooPod network. Our aim for these exciting special bonus episodes is to bring you, our amazing collective listeners, a spookfest series of stories from one of the most strangest, eeriest and unexplained areas in the world....The Bridgewater Triangle, where haunting's, ghost's, poltergeists, gruesome true crime, strange creatures, unexplained disappearances and UFO reports are a regular occurrence. So, as already stated, this is a multipart collaborative series of episodes, where one podcast show will take on a topic of interest from this strange place, delve into it, then pass you on to the next podcast show...and then the next, and so on. If you haven't already listened to our first episode in this Halloween Seasonal Special, then get yourselves over to the brilliant podcast show The Nightcap, who'll be giving you the full introduction into the whole series, as well as a historical run through of where The Bridgewater Triangle is and what goes on there. In season 2 and episode 3 of the Haunted UK Podcast, we dipped our toes into one of my most favorite elements of the paranormal....the Phantom Hitchhiker. Stories of these amazing apparitions have struck terror and intrigue into so many of us and our imaginations for years, and tales of these spirits come from all around the world, but in the deep, murky and strange land that is the Bridgewater Triangle, there's a phantom hitchhiker that puts many of these other entities to shame. In this episode, we'll hear about some of the best sightings and experiences, and we'll try to find out who this phantom hitchhiker could be....and when we're finished, it's over to the brilliant Skylark Bell podcast, who'll take this legend in a completely new direction.....you seriously don't want to miss it. They'll be another brief reminder of which Podcast to go to next, as well as details of all of the podcasts who are part of the BooPod network...but for now, let's get started. Have you seen a ghost, witnessed poltergeist activity, had a strange, unexplained paranormal experience? Have you ever stayed in a haunted location, or experienced something frightening on a ghost tour. Ever better, do you live or work in a haunted house or building? Have you encountered or seen a UFO, heard a story about an unsolved disappearance or mystery, or have you been lucky enough to witness a strange, unknown creature? If you have, then your story could feature on Season 3's listener stories finale episode. Simply type your story up and email it to hauntedukpodcast@hotmail.com, that's hauntedukpodcast@hotmail.com. It's easy to do, and if you like, you can remain anonymous. Huge thanks in advance to you all. Besides writing, recording, mixing and mastering this podcast, I also run a mixing and mastering studio called Pink Flamingo Music Productions. If you have a podcast or piece of music that you'd like mixing, mastering, or both, or if you'd like a piece of finished music written for a project that you're working on, then please email the studio with details of your enquiry to pinkflamingo.musicproductions@hotmail.com. That's pinkflamingo.musicproductions@hotmail.com. It's nowhere near as expensive as you'd think. Research sources https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tony_Cornell https://apologyispolicy.blogspot.com/2006/04/hitchhiker-of-route-44-fact-or-fiction.html https://newenglandghoststories.com/page/4/ https://trippingonlegends.com/2017/05/31/the-red-headed-hitchhiker-of-route-44/ https://occult-world.com/redheaded-hitchhiker-route-44/ https://strangenewengland.com/2015/10/12/red-headed-phantom-route-44/

The Danny Bonaduce & Sarah Morning Show
A Hitchhiker's Guide To Getting Stuck 10-6-22 Hour 1

The Danny Bonaduce & Sarah Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 30:54


Imagine hitching a ride on a semi truck and getting stuck for 100 miles (4:58) and Snoop Dogg has a new snack, will it get you high (16:00)?

Sonic The HedgePod
The Restaurant at the End of the Universe - Part 1: "A Generation Lost To RISK"

Sonic The HedgePod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 84:37


TV's Kevin & Daddy Host crack open the second book in the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series, the Restaurant at the End of the Universe. It's a reading full of seances, strategy game discussion, and why Kermit should not be in The Great Gatsby.

RockyTalkiePodcast
Episode 91 - Callback Etymology

RockyTalkiePodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 65:54


Jon, Aaron, and Jacob review Richard O'Brien's latest interview, discuss Rocky Horror helping to change outdated legislature in Colorado, and learn about the history of some old-school callbacks. Global News: Read Richard O'Brien's newest interview: https://dluxe-magazine.co.uk/coventry/interview-with-richard-o-brien-rocky-horror-show/ Listen to the Monarch album: https://monarch.lnk.to/OriginalSoundtrack Learn more about Monarch: https://countrynow.com/monarch-becomes-no-1-scripted-debut-of-2022-with-5-3-million-combined-viewers/ Community News: Learn about Rocky changing lewdness laws: https://www.yourconroenews.com/news/article/Classic-movie-has-town-busting-out-changes-to-17464417.php AAQ Sources: Roxy Album Belasco Album https://www.vocabulary.com/articles/chooseyourwords/entomology-etymology/ https://www.collinsdictionary.com/us/dictionary/english/loggie https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Janette_Scott https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triffid https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ann_Miller https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gleem https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FxNkjcQV85k https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Harrison https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oi! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hitchhiker%27s_Guide_to_the_Galaxy https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Carol_Burnett_Show https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_Acres https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mork_%26_Mindy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2gzTRwnFmFM Slowly I Turned https://www.threestooges.com/2017/11/01/slowly-i-turned-the-origin-of-the-three-stooges-niagara-falls-routine/ https://www.today.com/allday/slowly-i-turned-funny-story-behind-als-niagara-falls-reference-2D79321826 https://www.niagarafallsreporter.com/slowly.html https://www.phoefsutton.com/slowly-i-turned/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slowly_I_Turned https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MMJa24RXnRI https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Si3rNypdZdE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sCbXl-BR-9U https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MYP1OBZfFK0 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VHY6ZteIvC8 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8KpsUlvzbkk https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wTnGpaY3VKY Music: - Intro/Outro - Jupiter's Smile by The 126ers - Stings - Library at freesound.org Script by Aaron Tidwell and Meg Fierro Produced and edited by Aaron Tidwell and Meg Fierro Rocky Talkie is an Audiogasmic LLC Production

Normies Like Us
Episode 213: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre Franchise | Spooktober Week 1 | Normies Like Us Podcast

Normies Like Us

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 89:51


Texas Chain Saw Massacre - Episode 213: Yeehaw! Get ready for some country fried Horror as we kick off spooky season with a slasher classic - Texas Chain Saw Massacre!!!!! This franchise is bloody, disgusting, and a hell of a lot of fun. Join your hosts as they dig in on the Sawyer family - and the Sawyer family digs in on you! Its the Texas Chain Saw Massacre franchise on Normies Like Us! Who will listen and what will be left of them? Insta @NormiesLikeUs https://www.instagram.com/normieslikeus/ @jacob https://www.instagram.com/jacob/ @JoeHasInsta https://www.instagram.com/joehasinsta/ @MikeHasInsta https://www.instagram.com/mikehasinsta/

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 63 – Unstoppable Rewriter with Natasha Deen

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 58:10


I love interviewing other authors because every time I get to speak to one on Unstoppable Mindset I learn new concepts I hope I can use. I hope you feel the same way.   Our guest on this episode is Natasha Deen. She is an author of over 40 books written for youth, adults and everyone else in between. She made an interesting observation I love and which led to this episode's title. She observed that there are no great writers. There are only great rewriters. Listen to this episode to hear why she thinks this is so. I won't give it away.   About the Guest:   Guyanese-Canadian author, Natasha Deen has published over forty works for kids, teens, and adults, in a variety of genres, and for a variety of readerships. Her works include the JLG Standard Selection Thicker than Water, Guardian which was a Sunburst Award nominee, _and the Alberta Readers Choice nominated _Gatekeeper. Her YA novel, In the Key of Nira Ghani, won the 2020 Amy Mathers Teen Book Award and her upcoming novel, The Signs and Wonders of Tuna Rashad, is a CBC Top 14 Canadian YA books to watch for in spring 2022 and a JLG Gold Standard Selection. When she's not writing, she teaches Introduction to Children's Writing with the University of Toronto SCS and spends an inordinate amount of time trying to convince her pets that she's the boss of the house.   Social media links:   Visit Natasha at www.natashadeen.com and on Twitter/Instagram, @natasha_deen.   About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is an Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:20 Well, hi, and I am glad that you're with us again on an unstoppable mindset podcast episode. Today, our guest is Natasha Deen, except that she said to introduce her as she who would follow you home for cupcakes I buy into that. So true. Hey, listen, there's nothing wrong with a good cupcake. Or good muffins. Well, Natasha is an author, she's written over 40 books of various genres, and so on, we're going to talk about that. And she has all sorts of adventures and stories to tell. And so I think we will have a lot of fun on this podcast. So thanks for joining us. And Natasha, thank you for joining us today.   Natasha Deen  02:05 Thank you. And yes, thank you for joining my clan, I'm very excited to be here.   Michael Hingson  02:10 Well, tell me a little bit about you, you sort of the the early Natasha years and so on, and what you did how you got to the point of writing and anything else that you want to say,   Natasha Deen  02:20 Oh, well, I have an interesting, you know, that's gonna say like, I have a kind of an interesting origin story because I was born in Canada. But when I was three weeks old, my family moved back home to Guyana, South America, lived there, and then came back to Canada. So I'm a born Canadian, but my experience with Canada is an immigrant experience. Because the first country I knew was, you know, a country of, of coconuts and vampire bats. And you know, peacocks. And it was it was amazing, we lived No, we were just talking about previous residences. And the house we lived at, there was a stream in front of the house. And then there was a bridge that would connect you like you know, into the town. And I have, I can remember that we would get these huge rainstorms. And it would wash out the bridge. And then you'd either be well basically, as a kid, you were you were stuck, because you have to wait for the men to go find the bridge and bring it back and reattach because it just like a wooden bridge, or they'd have to rebuild it. And it was the same thing at school, like when the rains would hit, the teachers would just show off all the lights, and then we'd make paper boats, and we'd sail them down these like little these little rivers. And when I moved to Canada, the first time it rained, you know, I'm in school, and it starts pouring. And I'm so excited because I think for sure the teachers are going to turn off the lights and we're all gonna go sail paper boats. But it was like a loop was not to be as close the window and told me to pay attention. I'm like, but but but but no, I you know? And to answer your question about any desires to be a writer I did when I was a kid, I thought it would have been very cool to have a book on a shelf. But when I went to the teacher's library and the elders, parents, nobody knew nobody knew how to how to do it. And so I figured it was sort of like, you know, winning a lottery, or perhaps I don't know, some sort of happy, happy meeting, you have to sit down next to some editor on a train. And you mentioned that you really liked writing and they handed the contract right there. So I moved on to other other things. And it was after I graduated with my BA in psychology that I thought I'm just gonna give this writing thing at shot. And luckily for me, and you know, sort of all the writers who are up and coming like, we have the internet so we can, we can talk to the Google and the Google will tell us how how we navigate getting published and Contact, it's an editor's. So first sort of a snapshot.   Michael Hingson  05:04 So did you do anything with psychology? Or did you go straight into writing?   Natasha Deen  05:09 I so like dark secret, I was doing a couple of classes over the summer and preparation I had applied for my masters. And I was sitting there, and it was this really odd textbook that was telling you about, you know, counseling. And one of the techniques they had, they would repeat back to you what, you you know what the patient would say you repeat it back them, because the thinking of the time was, you know, hearing it, hearing it echo back would open up places. And I just, you know, what I remember, we had to do like a whole thing where we were practicing, you know, and it was the most, I realized I did not have the personality for it. Because if I was on the other side of the chair, and I'm saying to someone, I've had a really bad day, and they say back to me. So it sounds like you've had a really bad day. Yeah, yeah, my boss, my boss yelled at me. The boss yelled at you, I would have been like, No, I'm out. I'm gonna go find someone else to talk to you. Cool, actually, you know, talk back to me, instead of giving me a repeat of what I've like, I know what I just said, man. I just said it, you know? So. So that was about that. And I was also you know, so I thought, oh, I'll just, I'll just do a little bit of writing. And then, you know, I'll come back maybe what it is, I'm just tired, because I did school for, you know, 100 billionaires. And there's a danger, there's a danger of taking a break from from school, because then for people like me, we realize now we don't ever want to go back. Thank you very much. Well, we go do something else that someone else can have our desk. Okay, bye.   Michael Hingson  06:47 I remember when I was at UC Irvine, and working in physics and doing a lot with the computers, and there was a mainframe computer on campus. They had a psychology program, and it called Elijah. And it sort of worked like that. It would, if you type something in it would sort of repeat it back. But it was smart enough to deviate. And it could actually get you off in all sorts of unusual twists and turns. It was all about also psychoanalyzing you or, or creating conversations with you to try to figure you out, it was kind of fun. You could you could get absorbed with it for hours.   Natasha Deen  07:29 Well, that's amazing. They have I know that they have a digital version of rat training, mice mouse training. So you would you would train a mouse to like do a maze, but it was a digital mouse, which I appreciate it. I feel like mice have other things to do with their time than to run a maze forming.   Michael Hingson  07:48 Hey, I've read The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. I know about mice. They're they're in. They're in control of the universe. Go read the book.   Natasha Deen  07:56 I wouldn't, you know, I wouldn't doubt that. That sounds that sounds feasible to me.   Michael Hingson  08:00 So something to work on. Well, so how did you end up getting to the point where your first book was published?   Natasha Deen  08:08 Oh, yeah, that's a great, like, I so I, you know, I was I was writing and I was sending out and I think for a lot of writers, you know, we know this feeling, right? You're sending out to editors, you're sending out to agents, and nobody wants you. Right? And sometimes, as soon as you get the really nice rejection letters, like, dear Natasha, thank you so much. I really enjoyed the work, but it just didn't reach me in the way it should. And I'm just not as passionate. You know, I wish you luck. And those ones I didn't mind the ones that that used to irritate me were the ones that would say, Dear author, yeah. Yeah, no, thank you. And it was, like, they didn't capitalize their sentences. And it would just irritate me so much. But I think it was a day and I just spent like, two hours researching you, making sure I spelled your name, making sure I was professional in my letter, the least you could do is capitalized, you know, I, I don't want this, you know, give it to them or whatever. But it was just so I happened upon a small e publisher. And I'd heard really, really good things about them. I'm not sure if they're around anymore. But I've heard really great things about them. And a few friends who had published them said, they're really great because they don't send generic rejection letters. If they don't want your work. They will tell you, and I thought okay, I this is this is perfect for me, because then I can send it out and really someone will tell me if I'm doing something wrong, like what what is it that I'm doing so wrong with with, you know, my books? So I sent it out. And about a month later, I got an email saying, Hey, we really liked this. We'd love to publish it. Can we send you a contract? Yes. Yeah. Yeah, well, you know, I think I think that's kind of the thing with the industry sometimes, like, you know, we get enough kicks in the hand at art, we start wondering if we're in the right industry, we start wondering, do we have any kind of talent? Do we have any kind of skill? Are we just kidding ourselves? And so, you know, when I sent it out, I really, I was still thinking, Okay, I just don't think I'm a great writer, I don't think I have what it takes. And so it was a really good lesson about how subjective the industry can be, you know, and that that frustrating, heartbreaking thing, which is persevering. And you just have to keep going, because what else are you gonna do? You know, if you're built to be a writer, you're built to be a writer.   Michael Hingson  10:42 So you got a contract? And you published your first book? Did they do any editing or work with you on making any improvements before it was actually published?   Natasha Deen  10:53 Oh, yeah, yeah, I had to do a quitter, I think three, three rounds of edits. And then they were really great. I mean, they were, they were teeny tiny, small, small budget. But I really love that they did the very best they could for like, publicity and marketing, for their authors. And they, they would bring, like different opportunities, if you wanted to do it yourself. You could also like, expand out. And I think it's something for authors to think about, you know, that quite often we dream of, you know, the big, I don't know how many publishers, I think it's a big five now maybe even just sort of a big for publishers. But sometimes there's something to be said for for the small and plucky publisher, you know, you may not have necessarily the bragging rights, where everyone knows that publisher, they know who you're talking about. But in terms of that sort of one on one interaction with your editor, the responsiveness of your editor, and just the care they'll take with your work. And I really enjoyed my time with them.   Michael Hingson  12:01 So when was the first book published? Or when did you start working with this first publisher?   Natasha Deen  12:06 Oh, so 2007 It was actually it. So the first thing I'd sent them was a short story. And that was 2007. And then my first novel would then came out in 2009. And then in 2012, and those were all adult romances. And then, in 2012, I went into writing for ya. And I was, that's that was in The Guardian series. And the first book in that series is conveniently titled with enough guardian, which is, which is all about Maggie who sees the dead, and is currently being haunted by the ghost of the kid who bullied her. So that was that was in 2012. Ah,   Michael Hingson  12:49 so the bullies haunting her, and what does she do about that?   Natasha Deen  12:53 Well, that's, that's kind of the whole thing, right? Because it's like, do you? Do you stay quiet? Because he's, you know, he doesn't know she could see him? So does she stay quiet? And just sort of leave him in this limbo? You know, sort of till the end of time as justice for what he's done to her? Or does she actually just say to him, Look, I can see you and here we go. And so the story, the story explores, you know, that side of it, but also it's sort of exploring the idea of, you know, the way that our painful memories can can haunt us. And what do we do? Do we do we face them? Do we acknowledge them? Or do we just sort of push them down and pretend like they don't exist?   Michael Hingson  13:39 So how many books have you written in that series? Which is I guess about Maggie?   Natasha Deen  13:43 Yes. So there's, it's a trilogy. So there's three books in that series?   Michael Hingson  13:47 Okay. Are they all with the same ghosts are different ghosts,   Natasha Deen  13:51 the ghosts, there are one to two supernatural creatures who are there throughout the whole trilogy. But each each book it was it's it's it's kind of an interesting, it's it's fantasy mixed with horror mixed with supernatural mixed with a mystery. So in each book, she's dealing with a ghost who is dead. A ghost story? I guess it goes, who doesn't know that they're dead? And is trying to sort you know, why? What has happened to them? And usually someone has murdered them. And so it's all about trying to figure out who who, who done them in like, well, who did it and then they can move on?   Michael Hingson  14:36 Sounds like a fun series. Have any of the books been converted to audio at all?   Natasha Deen  14:41 Oh, I don't know. Like I know, in the key of near Ghani, I know she's, she's audio. And I think one or two books in the large series is but I'm not sure about the Guardian series. I don't think so. I don't think I don't not yet. I don't think   Michael Hingson  14:58 well If we can find electronic copies, and then we can, can do them in Braille, which is also fine.   Natasha Deen  15:07 Oh, that's wild. That's interesting.   Michael Hingson  15:10 It's not magically overly hard to do. So, you started with this one publisher? I gather you didn't continue with them. Because you said you're not sure if they're around anymore, did you go elsewhere? Or what happened?   Natasha Deen  15:25 I get? Well, they were they were strictly for adults. And I realized with Guardian that it was, it wasn't aimed for adults, it was aimed for teens. And then once I started writing for kids and teens, it just, it's a very different kind of experience writing for for people who are under 18. Because when you think about it, like an adult reader, it's a very sort of, I feel like it's a very direct connection, right? I'm going to write the story. And here you go. And you as an adult reader, you the only thing you're going to think about is, is this the genre that I love to read. And with kids, there's no such like, with with Kid readers, what you're looking at is you're going to write the book, but then there's going to be an adult in that child's life, who buys that book or boards a book for the child. And it's more than just a question of, oh, this is these are the kinds of stories I like, it's questions of how old is this kid because how old that child is determines the kind of story you're going to tell? And how you tell that story? You know, are they? Are they someone who is an add grade reader? Or are they someone who is striving or what we call a reluctant reader? So they're in grade five, reading at a grade three level? And so you don't there's there's all of these things? So things like, how big is the sentence? Like how long is the sentence? What is the vocabulary? Are the words, am I using words that are easy to pronounce, and easy to sound out? And, and it's just a very like, from a writer's perspective, it's a very, very fun exercise. Because how I'm gonna write a story for someone who is seven, is going to be wildly different than how I write a story for someone who is 17. And, you know, I love it. Because, you know, we talked about the idea that simple doesn't always mean easy. And certainly when you're writing for kids, you're, you're really getting down and asking those questions about where are they, in terms of their literacy rates? Where are they in terms of how passionate they are about reading, you know, and I think about that now, in a really different light. And I'm really grateful to all of the kid authors who around when I was growing up, because their care and attention and love of like, kids everywhere, really ignited a passion for for reading that I now because of them. I am not just an adult reader. I'm an out writer. And so yeah, I'm very thankful to them for for all that they did when I was a little kid and making sure that those stories were accessible to me and made me feel lifted up because I could read it myself.   Michael Hingson  18:16 What do you come up with some of the ideas like for The Guardian series, and that's pretty, pretty creative, and a lot of twists and whatnot, twists and turns, but just a lot of parts to it? How do you come up with an idea like writing about a creature who is dead who may not know they're dead, and certainly don't know that someone can see them? Someone who can see them? And going through all the different gyrations of that,   Natasha Deen  18:41 you know, it was really, it actually started off as an adult story. And I was aiming for a mystery like it just a straight, cozy mystery with a librarian who finds who finds a body in the trunk of her car. And it turns out that it is, in fact, her ex husband her near her, you know, what do you call that it and near do well? Well, ex husband. And of course, obviously suspicion starts to her. And I was really struggling with it. And it was just a thought one day that I had about wouldn't it be interesting if it was a girl like a teenager? And instead of an ex husband? What if she found the body of her bully in the back of the car? And then where would we go? And I and then I started thinking though, then wonder where we go and how can I make this more interesting? And then I thought, well, what if she could actually see the dad and at first it's like, you know, are people gonna think I did it. And then of course now it gets super complicated because oh, he's he's there. I have not heard of this terrible person. So sometimes it's just a story where you're thinking about how can I make it more interesting for the reader? And then sometimes it's so Well, I, you know, I was talking to, to a relative, and we were sort of joking around because they had a younger relative in their life, who loved them a lot and worried about them. But the the love and the worry meant that this younger relative could be quite overbearing with this person I was speaking to, you know, and they were like, I'm not that old, I could take care of myself. And I thought, you know, like, it was such an interesting idea for a story about what do you what do you do? What do you do when someone loves you, but they're just, they, you know, they just they're so caught up and knowing in their mind what is right for you, that your your own wants and needs are getting tossed to the side. And that was the start of the signs and wonders of Tish odd because I have tuna, and then there's her brother, Robbie and Robbie is he's loving, and he's a great brother, and he's a great son. But he's just convinced he knows what's good for everyone. And, you know, and adding to that complicate, like, complicating it is the idea is that his his husband has just died. And so He's grieving. And now this is how, you know, one part of his grief is manifesting is that tuna can't breathe. And she just really needs Robbie to like, get a life or at least get out of her life and give her give her some room. And when I was writing it, I knew I wanted her to be an aspiring screenwriter, I thought there would be lots of room for for funny if I could do it like that. And I was struggling with it. And then I went back and I was thinking about the beats of a screen a screenplay. Right? And so how does it like when do you when does the a story break into the B story and, you know, what are the fun and games and, and, and then I got the idea that every chapter heading would mirror a story beat. And that's that's how to knows. That's how to news personality would would show itself. And so So yeah, sometimes it's, it's you're trying to solve a some writer's block, and then you realize that you're the wrong genre, the wrong age group. And other time too. You've got your genre, and you've got your age group. But now you're just trying to sort through, how do you make it? How do you make it funnier, and, and, and I love I really love the chapter headings because it meant that for any kid who relatable anyone who reads the story, who also has to write, not only do you have the story, but now you have a very with the chapter headings now you know exactly where your story needs to go, because they're all your story beats right there for you.   Michael Hingson  22:39 When you're writing a book, and this is something I've always been curious about, especially if in dealing with fiction, some but when you're writing a book, is each chapter somewhat like a story and then you you transition and do things to make them all combined together? Or how do you deal with deciding what's a chapter and what's not a chapter?   Natasha Deen  23:02 Oh, yeah, that's a great question. Um, I think for me, you know, what we think about or what I think about is, what's the story problem. So with tuna, the story problem is that Robbie is just overbearing, and and she needs to, you know, get some space from him. And so that's, you know, that's one plot of the story. And then, you know, from there I go, Okay, well, how do I, how do I make this problem? More complicated, right? Or how do I make this problem? Like, how do I start giving this problem texture? And I thought, well, it would be really funny if two has a crush on a guy trusted, and like, what, what sibling wouldn't interfere? So and I thought, yep, that's perfect. So once I had those, then it's just like, here's my big problem. How do I make them? Little tiny problems? Right? And so what is the what's the saying about? How do you how do you eat an elephant like one one bite at a time? And that's sort of it like, here's my big problem. Now, how do I make it smaller? So, you know, the opening chapter tonight is gonna go and estrus now it's summer, she's got, you know, 60 days to finally tell this guy students, she really cares for him. So she's going to tell him and she just, she gets shy, you know, and then she she trips up over herself over it. And so the problem in that chapter, which is I really want to tell this person I care for them does not get solved. And the her now having to resort, okay, that didn't work. How do I ask him about it now? Like, what's my next step? Now that jumps me to my next chapter that jumps and hopefully that jumps the reader because there's there's a chapter question, okay, what is she going to do now? And we we go on. And so one of the things to think about with bigger stories that are like the, you know, 5060 80,000 word count is, there's probably going to be more than one problem that your character is trying to solve. And you're gonna have like that big external prominent character needs a job, your character needs to rob a bank, and then you're gonna have another story that will probably tie into that bigger one, right? So my character needs to draw a bank, but really, the robbing the bank, because they have a sick child, and if they robbed the bank, they can get the money, and they're gonna be able to, you know, pay for some private operation and save the life of their child, then that's how that's how we twine it together.   Michael Hingson  25:50 So you, you do kind of have different things in in different chapters. But by the same token, things can get away from you, or things can go off in different directions, which is what makes writing fun. And part of the adventure for you.   Natasha Deen  26:08 Yeah, yeah. And you're right, because you know, you're asking about the containment of the chapters, and every chapter is going to have a beginning middle end to it, it's just that in those chapters, there is no like Final the end, there's just an end to that particular scene, or an end to that particular moment, that's going to bump you into the next moment. And the next seat. Well,   Michael Hingson  26:31 so you going back to your story, you decided to write full time I gather, and that's what you do now.   Natasha Deen  26:40 I do, I did I write full time, and I also teach with the University of Toronto School of Continuing Studies, I teach their introduction to children's writing, and I visit schools, and I tell kids funny stories about growing up and being the weird kid in class. And, and I also, you know, teach at libraries and, you know, attend festivals and that kind of thing. And, and I still, you know, and I think as writers, we know this, right, that sometimes this job can be such a grind, because you're, you're alone in a room with just your thoughts, and the voices in your head, and you're trying to sort it. And sometimes it can feel like why, why did I choose this job, but he was just refreshing, there's got to be some better way to make money, but the roof over my head, but you know, like, I just, it's so much fun that more More times than not, I'm kind of waking up, as I'm thinking to myself like that, that eight year old nine year old 10 year old me would be so jazzed to know that we grew up to be an actual writer with books on the shelves, and, you know, award stickers on on the covers of our books. Like, how cool is that? You know? So?   Michael Hingson  27:58 Yeah, that's, that's pretty cool. By any standard? Well, tell me, do you, you must have support and help? Do you have someone who represents you? Do you have people that you work with in that regard? Or how does all that work that you now get to publishers? Or you get help doing the other things that you do? Yeah, that's   Natasha Deen  28:19 a great question. And I'm, I'm really lucky because in Canada, our publishers don't, you don't need to have an agent to be published in Canada. And America, it's a little bit different, right? Like you have some publishers where I can contact a publisher directly and saying, Hey, I've got this, this story. And I think, I really think it will fit your catalog. But a lot of the pressures are going to be, hey, my agent has my story. And they think it's, it's, you know, just jazzy. So go ahead and take a look. And then, you know, see your agent is going to work on on your behalf. So early on in my career, I it was just me, right, it was just me all by myself submitting to publishers, and I'm saying I really hope you like my story. And then in 2016, I signed with Amy Tompkins from the transatlantic literary agency. And so now she represents me. So instead of me sending out my work directly to the publishers, I send them to Amy and then Amy sends out on on my behalf. So for those upcoming writers who are listening to our podcast, there's there's many ways there's many ways to get your, your book on the shelf. You can you can absolutely talk to the publishers yourself. You can go through an agent or you know, you can you can self publish, right, you can be an independent author, as well. And there's pros and cons to both sides of that, oh, it's what fits you.   Michael Hingson  29:51 How important is then having someone to represent you're having representation in what you do.   Natasha Deen  29:59 Well and Mike Ace, I would like I love my agent. I think she's, she's the bee's knees. I just think she's amazing. So I really enjoy writing, like, like I enjoy, because like, I love being able to send her work and talk to her about the industry and all these kinds of things. And I do think and I, and again, I think it's going to come down to what is your goal as a writer, what is your you know, do you want to make a career out of it, like a full time career, in which case, an agent is going to be really helpful to that, because they can get you into it and get you into the bigger markets, so they can get you into the bigger publishers, right. If you want to be part time writer, then you know, it all depends. But I will say for for anyone who is looking for an agent, you know, do be aware that your agent is is going to be doing lots of work on your behalf, but they're not, they're not magic genie is you're not going to rub a lamp and all of a sudden, here's all the things that are going to happen. What your agent gives you the opportunity to do is knock on more doors, but there's still no guarantee about being contracted or any of those things. So it's really good to have a realistic idea of, of what you're what the job of an agent is. So it's good to go and make sure you do your research about what they do. They're very, you know, they're they're like, they're vital when it comes to things like reading over your contracts, making sure that your artistic well being is being protected. But having said that, you know, you can also hire an entertainment lawyer who will do the same thing for you. So, again, you know, the frustrating, and yet the very amazing thing about this industry is that it always comes down to you as the individual, what is it that you want? How do you see this journey. And once you know those things, then you can build your plan for creating, sort of creating the career of your dreams.   Michael Hingson  32:09 What are some of the mistakes up and coming or new writers tend to make in your experience,   Natasha Deen  32:17 in my experience, they set or their work far too soon. It's great if you've written your story, but it's not ready yet, as and that can be a hard thing to hear if you've been working on this story for like three or four years, but it's not ready yet, you finish your story. And you start working on something else. Like you've got to give yourself a month, six weeks, two months, where you're not looking at that story that you finished at all, Project eight, don't look at Project day. And then after that, four to eight weeks, go back and take a look at it. Because now what you've done is you've decoupled you're not as close to that story anymore. And you're going to be a lot more objective. So you know, it's important to like, edit, and revise your work. You know, I don't know, I was saying to a class at one of my school visits, there are no great writers, there are just really, really great rewriters and the professional writers, this is what we know that you're going to do it. And then you're going to do it again. And again. And again. And again, until it's finally in a place where it's readable for more than just yourself. So it's really important to edit, it's to have beta readers. And there are people who are going to read your work and offer you feedback on your work, what's working, what's not working. And they're, they're also really important because, you know, when we're working on our projects in in the quiet, we're telling the stories to ourselves. And that's great. But to be an author is to be able to tell a story to a wide variety of people who you will probably never meet in your whole entire life. So you need to get other brains and other you know, viewpoints on on your work. And so, you know, it's all those things. And then once you're ready, you know, do your research, look and buy do your research. I mean, go look up these publishers, and find out if they're reputable, and look at their submission guidelines. Agents are the same thing. Look at the submission guidelines. How do they want you to submit the work? What kind of work are they taking? If you can do that, you're probably about 95% ahead of a lot of the writers out there who will just gonna do you know, they're just gonna throw in that and they're just gonna submit to everybody. And, you know, it can be a really frustrating thing for editors and agents because they're only representing nonfiction. And here's this manuscript they've got to deal with or this email they've got to deal with with someone who's who wants to, you know them to represent their picture book or their, you know, suspense thriller for adults, and it's like, no, you need to, you need to have enough respect for your work and for your emerging career, to take the time and do the research. And it is going to take time, and it is going to be frustrating, because you're looking at their, you know, Twitter feeds, and their social media and the blogs and all these kinds of things. But in the long term, and in the long run, it will, it will only do good.   Michael Hingson  35:33 One of the things that seems to me when you're talking about great writers is either they have a real sense of what it is, that would make someone want to read their book or their story, or they know how to get that information and then will will put it to use, which may not mean that that makes them a great writer, but it certainly makes them a much better marketer. Yeah.   Natasha Deen  36:03 No, it's well, and you know, this is? Yeah, you know, like, the, the great thing is that there's lots of different readers out there. And there's lots of different writers out there. And I think it's really important for us as readers to understand that just because we don't like a book, doesn't mean the book is bad. It can just mean that we're not the reader for that book. And I like, you know, I'm the person, like, if you're gonna give me a book, and there's, there's animal characters in that book, those animal characters better survived through the book, because if not surviving through the book, I am not reading it, you know, and it is like, and I will give you full credit that it's an amazing book, it's probably beautifully written. But no, if there's dog on page one, that dog still needs to be there on page, the end and happy. I want I want my dogs if they've gone through what they've gone through, but it's all okay. So so things like that, you know, and I'm very careful about women in peril kind of books, right? I'm I, some of them, I can read some of them. I can't. And again, it doesn't mean that they're not great writers. And those aren't great stories. It just means that I'm not the reader for them.   Michael Hingson  37:19 Yeah, Old Yeller is is a fine book. Except,   Natasha Deen  37:23 right. Hey, I tell you what, Michael, I mean, I get teased a lot because I'm the person who reads the ending before I read the rest of the book. But I blame that on Where the Red Fern Grows, because that book took out my heart. And I'm still not over it. I was when I read it. I'm still not over that book. And yeah, you know, and, and for me, it's like, Listen, if you're gonna ask me to spend however many hours, I need to know, it's gonna be worth my time, I need to know that these characters are gonna like, there's gonna be some kind of like, hopeful sort of note. The only time they don't do that as if it's a murder mystery. Because I want to I want to play along and see if I can find who the bad guy is before the detective does.   Michael Hingson  38:08 So dealing with animal books, of course, I mean, maybe it's the exception to a degree but then you have a book like Cujo, you know, from Stephen King, and, you know, do you really want I'm gonna I would love to have the dog not to have gotten rabies in the first place. But you know, that's the whole story.   Natasha Deen  38:25 I never I never rented the idea of a bad dog was just like no, no, I can't   Michael Hingson  38:31 start out a bad dog. That was the thing of course.   Natasha Deen  38:34 Oh, I know. I know what it is. No cuz you know there's only one ending for this poor dog. Yeah, right. Yeah. So so there is a dog in in tuna story and I want to sure all three out there that don't worry Everything Everything will be fine with magic.   Michael Hingson  38:57 Well, I appreciate that. I like books where were the animals survive? Of course I wrote thunder dog and Roselle survived in Thunder dog but they all they all do pass and but that's another that's another story.   Natasha Deen  39:12 Yes. That's it. And that's that's different. That's different. That's a   Michael Hingson  39:17 whole different you know? Yeah. And Roselle is somewhere waiting and watching and and monitoring and and occasionally probably yelling at us but you know, that's her.   Natasha Deen  39:29 That is yelling just just can't the ducks the doughnuts, man. Nothing.   Michael Hingson  39:36 What do you mean? Yeah, no, no, no, no, no. Roselle was also out there saying don't give them the donut. I want the donut. What do you do to those dumb ducks?   Natasha Deen  39:49 I feel like she would know that her bread will come later. Right?   Michael Hingson  39:54 Oh, well, maybe now but not then. Oh, yeah. Oh, no, no, thank you. is a lab What can I say?   Natasha Deen  40:02 No, I listened. We've got a husky mix. And I was joking around about how you definitely don't have to share DNA to the family because the look on her face when there's food. And just just the way she'll just look at you like, you're gonna share that right. And the long conversations I have with her room, like, I cannot share this. This is not appropriate. This is gonna make you really sick. You know, but I was thinking my husband one day I was like, as like, you know, I am pretty sure I get that same look on my face whenever I see through to just like, Oh, dang, is that? Oh, is that? Is that bread? Oh, man. Is that cheesecake? Hey, how you doing? Are you? Do you need some help on that? I can I   Michael Hingson  40:41 can totally help me. Make sure that that's really safe for you to eat.   Natasha Deen  40:45 Let me let me just make sure I Is that is that good. Let me let me tell you that bullet. Right. Let me take this for you.   Michael Hingson  40:52 You have you have children?   Natasha Deen  40:54 Yes. Yes, they're full grown boat. So they have kids of their own now.   Michael Hingson  40:58 So okay, so you have grandchildren? And and do we? Do we have any of them in your beta reader groups?   Natasha Deen  41:06 No, no. Because they Well, because they're they're still little adults, adult's? Oh, you know, I actually they'll read it afterwards. Because their schedules are pretty, their schedules are pretty intense. So   Michael Hingson  41:24 part of the evaluation process? Well, I   Natasha Deen  41:27 just feel bad, you know, looking them being Hey, hey, I know you're juggling, like 10 Different things now. But can I throw one more ball at you. And then also, like, I appreciate, like I use I use writer BETA readers, as opposed to just the quote unquote, regular folk, just because I usually by the time I'm done, I've got very specific questions about story structure, how the acts are transitioning? Can you can you see the a story B story? Where can you see the external? And so there needs to be a certain level of, I guess, like literary mechanical engineering? Do you know what I mean? Where I think to that? I think I think I think my family would be like, I love you. But stop asking me about the grammar. There's only so many times you can be like, okay, within what about, you know, when I when we're doing this metaphor, and it's, you know, like, just let me read it. Okay, so read it. So   Michael Hingson  42:29 how about today? Reading, I don't know, I'm trying to figure out what's happening to reading we've, we've changed a lot. Reading is now not just getting something on paper, we have electronic books, and so on. And I hear a lot of people say, Yeah, I read the books, it's not quite the same as reading a book. That's a full paper book, but I enjoy reading them as well. And of course, then there are a lot of people who just don't get into reading at all. But reading is so valuable, because it seems to me that one of the great advantages of reading is it gets you to sit and relax and take time away from everything else that probably we really don't need to be doing anyway. But we do it. But the reading gives you the opportunity to just sit down and let your mind wander. And it develops a lot of imagination. How do we get more people to do that?   Natasha Deen  43:30 That's a great question. And I'm not sure that I have a feasible? I'm not sure I have the answer. You know, but I think one of the things you said in the beginning was I think very well said that there is more than one way to access stories now. And I think that's really important. Right? If you are if you are someone who loves paper books, that's wonderful. But you know, for some of us, we're going to come to story differently. We want the story told to us, you know, or we want the story in some kind of a different, you know, when you're thinking about sometimes, like, finger dexterity and coordinate, you know, a screen is much easier to navigate. Than, then sometimes a book can be, and depending on the device you're using, it's going to be lighter. So if you have issues holding books, paper books, I mean, you know, this, these are like, these are the kindnesses that I think technology affords us, and that, you know, and if you're if you're busy, you can pop in that audiobook when you're sitting in the middle of rush hour and you can get to story that way. But I think a lot of it is is getting to folks when they're young and understanding that, again, not everybody comes to story the same way. And the thing that I think is magical about being a writer is that I can write I can write this Signs of wonders of tuna or Shawn, and I can give 30 people a copy of that book. And everyone will have the same book, not everyone is going to read the same story. Because at the moment time we start reading, we're going to bring our hopes, our dreams, our past experiences, our, you know, future or future hopes for us. Like we bring all of these things in how you know, do we have great relationships with our parents? Do we not, you know, how do we view the world? All of these things, like infuse the stories that we read, and they changed right there, they become another creature. So someone reads the book, and they say, Oh, yes, I read this. And this book is a cat. And someone say, no, no, no, it's not a cat. It was a chameleon. And someone else will say, No, it's a phoenix. And each of those people are correct, because that is how they interpret the story. And that's how they interpreted the book. And so you know, when we're talking about getting people, folks to love reading, it's getting them I think, a lot of times getting them young, understanding what are their what are the things that they love to read? What are the things that they love about the world? Let's, let's start there, and give them those kinds of stories. Like, you know, the idea that oh, I love this book, therefore, you must love this book is a really unkind to do to people. Because it says because I think of this like this, you must also think of this, like this, and and people are individuals, right? My mom's favorite book is To Kill a Mockingbird. I think I think it's a well written book. I can't stand the book. It sets my hair on fire every single time. You know, I have friends who really love the Great Gatsby, I'm not that person. Right? It doesn't mean that those people are wrong. I love the fact that my mom loves To Kill a Mockingbird, you know, and I love that my mom understands that's never going to be my favorite book. And she respects that. And so when, you know, when we were growing up, it was like, go to the library, even if she was like, Oh, that's okay. You know, she would give us space, if that's what you love. That's what you love. And I think we need to stop. Also, what's the word I'm thinking of? You know, I hear people a lot of times, especially with young readers, where they say things like, oh, but it's a graphic novel. There's not a lot of text in there. And, you know, how are they are they going to become readers? And it's like, be okay, granted, but when you look at a graphic novel, there's, there's images and who's looking at this book and reading through it has to be able to make intuitive leaps about you know, what's happening in this box versus what's happening in this box. And, you know, so it's still teaching, it's teaching life skills is teaching like human skills. And I think if we can leave, we can go from the point of taking the spotlight and putting like taking the spotlight and putting it on to the person who we want to get reading and having an open conversation where we respect where they're coming from. I think that can be really helpful.   Michael Hingson  48:11 Yeah, book like To Kill a Mockingbird is is an interesting book, I'm, I'd be curious to know what it is that the you've read, really find a problem with the book, but I can see that different people would certainly read that and deal with it in different ways. Oh, for me,   Natasha Deen  48:29 it was it was just this as you know, I'm a person of color in my everyday life, I've got to deal with micro aggressions and, and so in my, in my relaxed life, in in my fictional world, I don't want to have to I want space from that. I just want to be able to read something fun and something, you know, enjoyable. I don't want to have to read about the things that I'm trying to deal with in the real world, but at the same time, people really love it.   Michael Hingson  49:00 One of my favorite books is one that I'm sure today is not a favorite book for a lot of people. It's a Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's court by Mark Twain. And I love the plot. I love all the things that happened in it. It's just one of those books that has really stuck with me, and that I absolutely thoroughly enjoy. I guess also, I do have to say that I originally read it as a recording. It was a talking book produced by the Library of Congress. And the guy who read it was perfect. But it has always been one of my favorite books. I think it's just an incredibly creative book. And I admire that.   Natasha Deen  49:43 Yes, yeah. Well, I you know, it's easy because I really liked calm Sawyer and Hawk you know, I thought I mean different books. But yeah, they were fun characters, and I thought Twain had a very excellent storytelling style. I guess that's it. You're right. Yeah.   Michael Hingson  50:01 Well and, and different kinds of stories. I'm an okay Yankee Yankee in King Arthur's Court is hard. I like Tom Sawyer.   Natasha Deen  50:08 Well, did you did you know that he when he died, and like fact check me on this because I remember reading this years ago, but that his diary, he made sure as well that the diary could never be published for something like 100 years, because of the he was talking smack about so many people. He was like, they cannot be alive. But like,   Michael Hingson  50:33 yeah, I remember that. And it wasn't. So, of course, he knew we knew what he was going to die. He was born in 1835. And he said, I came in with Halley's comet, and I'll go out with it. And he did.   Natasha Deen  50:45 That's amazing. Hey,   Michael Hingson  50:48 it's just one of those things. Well, you know, before we wrap all this up, what's next for you? Where are you headed? What? What kind of projects do you have coming up?   Natasha Deen  50:58 Well, so yes, the tuna releases on June 7. I'm very, very excited about that. And then I'm just finalizing the book in the spooky SLIS series. And that's for early. That's for ages like 79 That's with Penguin Random House. And I'm very excited about that. That's, that's awesome. And Rockstar who live on in Lions Gate, and spooky creepy things happen. And awesome is convinced that there are supernatural creatures roaming the town. And rock star is convinced that because there is a science lab, it's probably just science running wild. And so the books, the book one opens up with a tree. That seems to be housing, a very evil spirit. But what will happen next?   Michael Hingson  51:48 Oh, you have to read the book to find out.   Natasha Deen  51:51 That's right.   Michael Hingson  51:54 Have you ever read books by David Baldacci?   Natasha Deen  51:56 Yes. Yeah, I just started reading him. Memory Man, I just I just started.   Michael Hingson  52:01 So and that's a that's a good one. But he also wrote, I think it's more for youth if I recall, but he wrote a series of four books. It's the Vega chain series. And if you ever get a chance to read those, it's a totally different Baldacci, then all of his mysteries, their fantasies, and it's a fantasy world, sort of, I don't want to give it away. But they're, they're well worth reading. I accidentally discovered them. I was looking to see if there was anything new by Baldacci out on Audible. And I found one of these and I read it on a on a plane flight and got hooked and so then could hardly wait for the next one to come out. So it's Vega, Jain V, GA and then chain.   Natasha Deen  52:48 Okay, yeah, thank you.   Michael Hingson  52:51 I think they fit into a lot of the things that you have been writing about. So they're, they're they're definitely worth reading. But there's nothing like reading conversations are great with people. But you get to meet so many more people in a book. And as I said, it seems to me that the most important thing about reading is sitting down and reading to let your imagination go. And you're right. The way you imagine is different than the way that I imagined. And we're all different. And that's the way it should be.   Natasha Deen  53:23 Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. Thank you, Michael. This was a lot of fun.   Michael Hingson  53:28 This was fun. I very much enjoyed it. And we need to do it again in the future. Yes, sir. So no tuna books are out yet. No, not yet. Next. So tunas tuna is new. It's coming out next Tuesday.   Natasha Deen  53:45 The signs and wonders of tuna are shot.   53:47 Wow. So that'll be fun. Well, we'll have to kind of watch for   53:51 it. Okay, sounds good.   53:55 If people want to learn more about you, and maybe reach out to you and talk to you about writing or any of those things, how can they do that?   54:04 Oh, on my website, www dot Natashadeen.com. And Natasha Deen is spelt D E E N. And Natasha is N A T A S H A.   54:18 So N A T A S H A D E E N.com. And they can contact they can contact you there and so on. And I assume you have links so that they can go buy books.   Natasha Deen  54:32 Yes, yes. Yes. It wouldn't be a website without it.   Michael Hingson  54:35 No, not an author's website. It would not be Well, this has been great. I really appreciate you coming on we will have to stay in touch. And we'll have to catch up to see how all the book sales go and how the the awards go once the new series are out. Thank you.   Natasha Deen  54:54 Yeah, sounds well make it a date, sir. They'll be perfect.   54:58 Absolutely. Well, Natasha, thanks for being here. And I want to thank all of you for listening and being with us today. This has been absolutely enjoyable. I hope you found it. So reach out to Natasha at her website, Natasha deen.com. And of course, I want to hear from you. So if you would like to reach out, please email me at Michaelhi at accessibe.com M I C H A E L H I at A C C E S S I B E.com. Or go to our podcast page, Michael hingson.com. hingson is h i n g s o n.com/podcast. And of course, we sure would appreciate it if you'd give us a five star rating after listening and, and come back and subscribe and listen to more unstoppable mindsets. We have all sorts of adventures coming up. And we would love you to be part of it. So if you'd like to be a guest, let us know if you know of someone who you think would make a good guest. Let us know that too. So again, thanks for being here. And Natasha, thank you once more for coming on unstoppable mindset.   Natasha Deen  56:03 Thank you, Michael. And thank you to all the listeners. I loved it. Thank you for spending time with us.   Michael Hingson  56:12 You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

United Public Radio
SOR Sept 28 22 The Phantom Hitchhiker Project With Clarissa Vazquez

United Public Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 183:27


SOR Sept 28 22 The Phantom Hitchhiker Project With Clarissa Vazquez

UFO Paranormal Radio & United Public Radio
SOR Sept 28 22 The Phantom Hitchhiker Project With Clarissa Vazquez

UFO Paranormal Radio & United Public Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 183:27


SOR Sept 28 22 The Phantom Hitchhiker Project With Clarissa Vazquez

Short and Spooky
Ep. 176 - Minuteman

Short and Spooky

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 69:25


Hey Minute-men AND Minute-women! Short and Spooky (The podcast about anthology shows) says hello to those lovely buns, yet again. That's right, this week the SpookyCrew is talking The Hitchhiker, with an episode called Minuteman. Sure it's a clever title about time travel but it's also about poor stamina in the bedroom. Something we know about all too well. It's got motorcycles, pyramids, and a little blood. So everyone should enjoy it. Listen NOW! Do it! Please rate, review, subscribe, and tell your friends! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/shortandspooky/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/shortandspooky/support

Words and Nerds: Authors, books and literature.
544. Gabriel Bergmoser & Dani Vee: The Hitchhiker

Words and Nerds: Authors, books and literature.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 44:41


Gabe Bergmoser & Dani Vee: The Hitchhiker

Spaced Out Radio Show
Sept. 28/22 - The Phantom Hitchhiker Project with Clarissa Vazquez

Spaced Out Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 174:24


Clarissa Vazquez is a paranormal author and investigator. She's a veteran of the United States Air Force, and while enlisted, she had her first paranormal experience. This led her to creating the Colorado Coalition of Paranormal Investigators in 2004.

The Movie Vault
Ep 70 - The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (2005) feat. Jonathan Stanhope

The Movie Vault

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 63:54


Ben's brother Jonathan joins the podcast for the second time to discuss one of his favorite Sci-Fi satire's, "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy". Jonathan informs the crew on the history of the series and how it was developed first through radio drama. The crew also discusses the series' place in Sic-Fi pop culture. Finally, a discussion of the Ig Noble Award Winners ends the episode. Join us or we'll destroy Earth and build a new one! Follow us on: Instagram-@themovievaultpod Twitter-@MovieVaultPod Email us- themovievaultpod@gmail.com Now also on You Tube! Check for videos of select episodes on our channel "Last Resort Network" This episode is brought to you by Hedman Anglin Agency. Contact them at 614-486-7300 for your home and auto insurance needs. If you do contact them, make sure to tell them that Ben and Zach sent you! Visit their website for more information at www.HedmanAnglinAgency.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Dragon's Lair Motorcycle Chaos
Biker Killed After Hitchhiker Injected Him With Posion

The Dragon's Lair Motorcycle Chaos

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 40:22


A biker died in Telangana's Khammam district after being allegedly injected with a suspected poisonous chemical by a pillion rider who requested a lift from him. Join us as we discuss!Get my new Audio Book Prospect's Bible from these links: United States https://adbl.co/3OBsfl5United Kingdom https://adbl.co/3J6tQxTFrance https://bit.ly/3OFWTtfGermany https://adbl.co/3b81syQ Help us get to 10,000 subscribers on www.instagram.com/BlackDragonBikerTV on Instagram. Thank you!Follow us on TikTok www.tiktok.com/@blackdragonbikertv Subscribe to our new discord server https://discord.gg/dshaTSTGet 20% off Gothic biker rings by using my special discount code: blackdragon go to http://gthic.com?aff=147Subscribe to our online news magazine www.bikerliberty.comBuy Black Dragon Merchandise, Mugs, Hats, T-Shirts Books: https://blackdragonsgear.comDonate to our cause with Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/BlackDragonNP Donate to our cause with PayPal https://tinyurl.com/yxudso8z Subscribe to our Prepper Channel “Think Tactical”: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-WnkPNJLZ2a1vfis013OAgSUBSCRIBE TO Black Dragon Biker TV YouTube https://tinyurl.com/y2xv69buKEEP UP ON SOCIAL MEDIA:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/blackdragonbikertvTwitter: https://www.twitter.com/jbunchiiFacebook : https://www.facebook.com/blackdragonbiker

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 6 -- The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to Navigating the Daily Chaos For the Serfs & Peasants

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 29:30


Part 6 -- The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to Navigating the Daily Chaos For the Serfs & PeasantsSIMPLY PUT -- We Cannot Say Much of the 'Really Good Stuff' on HereThat's Why We Created Paine.tvGET the Intel that's Too Hot For Anywhere ElsePAINE.TV...See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 5 -- The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to Navigating the Daily Chaos For the Serfs & Peasants

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 30:41


Part 5 -- The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to Navigating the Daily Chaos For the Serfs & PeasantsSIMPLY PUT -- We Cannot Say Much of the 'Really Good Stuff' on HereThat's Why We Created Paine.tvGET the Intel that's Too Hot For Anywhere ElsePAINE.TV...See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 4 -- The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to Navigating the Daily Chaos For the Serfs & Peasants

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 31:03


Part 4 -- The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to Navigating the Daily Chaos For the Serfs & PeasantsSIMPLY PUT -- We Cannot Say Much of the 'Really Good Stuff' on HereThat's Why We Created Paine.tvGET the Intel that's Too Hot For Anywhere ElsePAINE.TV...See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 3 -- The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to Navigating the Daily Chaos For the Serfs & Peasants

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 31:02


Part 3 -- The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to Navigating the Daily Chaos For the Serfs & PeasantsSIMPLY PUT -- We Cannot Say Much of the 'Really Good Stuff' on HereThat's Why We Created Paine.tvGET the Intel that's Too Hot For Anywhere ElsePAINE.TV...See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 2 -- The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to Navigating the Daily Chaos For the Serfs & Peasants

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 30:59


Part 2 -- The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to Navigating the Daily Chaos For the Serfs & PeasantsSIMPLY PUT -- We Cannot Say Much of the 'Really Good Stuff' on HereThat's Why We Created Paine.tvGET the Intel that's Too Hot For Anywhere ElsePAINE.TV...See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 1 -- The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to Navigating the Daily Chaos For the Serfs & Peasants

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 31:45


Part 1 -- The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to Navigating the Daily Chaos For the Serfs & PeasantsSIMPLY PUT -- We Cannot Say Much of the 'Really Good Stuff' on HereThat's Why We Created Paine.tvGET the Intel that's Too Hot For Anywhere ElsePAINE.TV...See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

SpyCast
"CIA Reports Officer, Russian Yacht Watcher, Satirist” – with Alex Finley

SpyCast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 64:11 Very Popular


Summary Alex Finley (Twitter; Website) joins Andrew (Twitter; LinkedIn) to discuss life as a CIA Reports Officer turned author. She lives in Barcelona. What You'll Learn Intelligence Her take on CIA analysts vs. case officers  Information and disinformation in fact and fiction  Ukraine, the 2016 election and the Russian historical playbook  The regularity even mundanity of much of daily intelligence life  Reflections Being an American in Barcelona  Viewing your own country from outside the goldfish bowl And much, much more… Episode Notes Alex Finley spent 6 years in the CIA as a Reports Officer - whom she describes as a bridge between the case officers and analysts. She is author of a trilogy of novels on the exploits of fictional CIA officer Victor Caro. Her most recent book, Victor in Trouble, completes the series (…or does it?) by looking at Russian influence operations and the contemporary intelligence landscape through a satirical lens.  She now lives in Barcelona, Spain - and yes, apparently it's as awesome as it sounds! – and she is the voice behind #YachtWatch, which tracks and exposes the activities of Russian oligarchs and their superyachts.  And… Satire is often described as fitting into three categories: Horatian, which offers light comedy and social commentary (e.g., Pride & Prejudice, Parks & Rec, The Colbert Report); Juvenalian, a darker and more abrasive take that can often take the form of speaking truth to power (e.g., Animal Farm, American Psycho, South Park) and Menippean, which casts moral judgement on beliefs or generic character flaws (e.g., Alice in Wonderland, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, Saturday Night Live). Which one does Alex use?  Quote of the Week "There, there were points where I found myself in the middle of nowhere, West Africa. And there are these moments where…how did I end up here? This makes zero sense. And then there were the bureaucratic Catch-22s." – Alex Finley. Resources *Andrew's Recommendation* Who are the Russian Oligarchs? (2022) A great visulacapitalist.com infographic - but if you want to go understand how they can afford their superyachts, start here *SpyCasts* CIA Officers Turned Authors – David McCloskey & James Stejskal (2022) NSA, CIA, Author - Alma Katsu (2021) Victor in the Rubble – Alex Finley (2016) *Beginner Resources* A Brief History of Spy Fiction, Stella Rimington, Crime Reads, (2018) [short essay] An Introduction to Satire, Jackson School District (n.d.) [2-page guide] Russia's Top Five Disinformation Narratives, State (2022) [webpage] Books Victor in Trouble, A. Finley (Smiling Hippo, 2022) The Revenge of Power, M. Naim (St. Martin's, 2022) Active Measures, T. Rid (Picador, 2021) The Misinformation Age, C. O'Connor & J. Weatherall (YUP, 2020) Victor in The Jungle, A. Finley (Smiling Hippo, 2019) Victor in The Rubble, A. Finley (Smiling Hippo, 2016) Great Spy Stories from Fiction, A. Dulles (Harper, 1969) Articles The Russian Firehose of Falsehood, C. Paul & M. Matthews, RAND (2016) Yellow Journalism, PBS (n.d.) Videos The Spy Writers You Love to Read, SPY (2019)  Russian Active Measures: Past, Present & Future, CSIS (2018) The Strategy Behind Russia's Disinformation Campaigns, DW News (n.d.) Meet the KGB Spies Who Invented Fake News, NYT (n.d.) Reports Combatting Targeted Disinformation Campaigns, DHS (2019) Primary Sources Disinformation: Russian Active Measures, Senate Intelligence Committee (2017) KGB Active Measures in SW Asia in 1980-82, Wilson Center Primary Source Collections Rumor Control Project Documents, Library of Congress  *Wildcard Resource* A Clockwork Orange (1962) [novel] A short, sharp satire that ruminates on the nature of society and free will – it will stay with you for a long time to come

Be. Scared
Is Picking Up a Hitchhiker Ever a Good Idea?

Be. Scared

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 36:57 Very Popular


If you're driving one night and someone is on the side of the road waving you down for a ride, regardless of how well they're dressed or how friendly they appear, perhaps it would be a wise move to just keep driving. Follow Be. Busta on Insta: @Be.Busta To listen to the podcast on YouTube: http://bit.ly/BeScaredYT Don't forget to subscribe to the podcast for free wherever you're listening or by using this link: http://bit.ly/BeScaredPod If you want to support the show, and get all the episodes ad-free go to: https://bescared.supercast.com/ If you like the show, telling a friend about it would be amazing! You can text, email, Tweet, or send this link to a friend: http://bit.ly/BeScaredPod If you would like to submit a story for the chance to have it narrated on this channel, please send your story to the following email: Bish.Busta@gmail.com Music: All music was taken from Myuuji's channel and Incompetech by Kevin Mcleod which can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/user/myuuji http://incompetech.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices