Podcasts about Pocono Mountains

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  • 557PODCASTS
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Pocono Mountains

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Best podcasts about Pocono Mountains

Show all podcasts related to pocono mountains

Latest podcast episodes about Pocono Mountains

The nascar series
537: Full Race Replay/ Support Out Veterans 350/ N R R R A Cup Series

The nascar series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 56:03


Listen into the full Race of the Support our veterans 350 at Pocono.

The nascar series
536: Full Race Replay/ N R R R A Cup Series at Pocono 1/ N R R R A Cup Series

The nascar series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 59:59


Listen into the full N R R R A Cup Series First Race of the Pocono Doubleheader weekend.

The Voyages of Tim Vetter
Episode 252 Hunting in the Poconos with Jonathan Wright

The Voyages of Tim Vetter

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 59:11


Jonathan Wright is a hunter who runs the Pocono Browns deer camp in Pocono Summit, Pennsylvania. Jonathan is helping to promote the hunting lifestyle to people of color, who have often been excluded from the craft. I met Jonathan at Pocono Browns and we discussed his history with hunting, the various wild animals in the Poconos, his historic bear kill, what an experience is like at his camp, and much more. Check out Jonathan Wright and Pocono Browns: https://poconobrowns.com/ https://www.instagram.com/poconobrowns/ Support TVTV on Patreon: www.patreon.com/thevoyagesoftimvetter

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast
Podcast #61: Shawnee Mountain, Pennsylvania CEO Nick Fredericks

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 89:58


The Storm Skiing Podcast is sponsored by Mountain Gazette - Listen to the podcast for discount codes on subscriptions and merch.WhoNick Fredericks, President, CEO, and part-owner of Shawnee Mountain, PennsylvaniaRecorded onNovember 9, 2021Why I interviewed himBecause little Shawnee, hanging off the edge of the temperamental Poconos, is feisty enough to stand among its larger neighbors and welcoming enough that beginners swarm the place. Fifty-five percent of Shawnee’s skiers rented gear last season. That’s an enormous stat, and an incredible testament to what Shawnee is: one of the best top-to-bottom learning centers in the region, if not the entire country. The greens here are not the zigzagging catwalks cutting across double-blacks or 50-vertical-foot meadows tucked behind the baselodge (thought they have those too). They’re real trails, running from the summit back to the base, a nice 700 feet of vertical that feels like forever.From a ski-history point of view, Shawnee is a compelling story. Pennsylvania kept building ski areas long after the rest of the Northeast abandoned the exercise, and Shawnee is relatively new, coming online in 1975. It takes a certain swashbuckling energy and attitude to cut a ski area out of the raw earth, and most of the folks who founded our great ski areas are long gone. While Fredericks did not found Shawnee from an ownership point of view, he was there from day one, cutting trees to clear the trails and pounding nails to raise the summit lodge. That means he’s a treasure chest of institutional knowledge, a one-man encyclopedia devoted to all things Shawnee. He was there when the first skiers puttered their way to the top of the hill in their rear-wheel drive 1970s gashogs, and he was there when the resort pulled one of the great switcheroos in Pennsylvania skiing history, dropping the parking lots from the top of the hill to the bottom and reorienting the whole resort experience. He was there through the bankruptcies and the larger economic busts, the acquisition of Shawnee Peak in Maine and the dissolution of that ownership group, bank takeovers and uncertainty, until he finally got the keys to the place. It’s an awesome story, and I wanted to hear it from the man who’d lived it.What we talked aboutWhy Shawnee was designed as an upside-down ski area; the rustic Poconos of the 1970s; the resort’s early Wild West days; reminiscing on New York’s now-defunct Dutchess Ski Area; the longevity of Shawnee employees; why the ski area flipped from an upside-down layout to a lodge-at-the-bottom arrangement and how much time and effort it took to do that; what the ski area did with the facilities at the top of the mountain; Shawnee’s wild access road; the mountain’s year-by-year evolution into a larger ski area; the real-estate crash that drove the ski area into bank ownership; how Nick and his partners finally purchased the ski area in the mid-90s and who they had to outbid to buy it; the wild beavers who ruled Shawnee’s bottom; what happened to the old stone farm walls threaded throughout the base of Shawnee; the history of the ski area’s entry bridge; why the ski area’s setup works so well to foil would-be ski thieves; why Shawnee bought Pleasant Mountain, Maine, and changed the name to Shawnee Peak; how Nick helped drive the Maine ski area from 25,000 skier visits to 90,000 in one season; what eventually separated the mountains; thoughts on Boyne Resorts buying Shawnee; trail expansion opportunities; Shawnee’s master plan and how it will transform the resort, especially its bedbase; why the ski area eschews expert terrain; the mountain’s sophisticated snowmaking system and modern grooming fleet; how the ski area rethought its food service options; rethinking employee housing; possible new summer operations; the massive percentage of Shawnee skiers that rent gear; whether the mountain would ever bring back a lift along Country Club to allow park skiers to lap that section; Shawnee’s terrific natural glades; why the ski area doesn’t groom or open select chunks of the mountain after large snowfalls; Shawnee’s incredible beginner terrain; potential future lift improvements, including the possible fate of the double-double and F lift; how staffing shortages affected Shawnee last season; the logic of the affordable season pass; the positive impact of Covid on business; why the ski area joined the Indy Pass and why Shawnee will have blackouts on the pass for the first time this season; and why Shawnee started forging reciprocal pass partnerships with ski areas across the country.Why I thought that now was a good time for this interviewBecause Shawnee is an increasingly interesting player in the evolving pass wars that have displaced skiing’s tired business model of expensive single-mountain season passes. It was an early member of the Indy Pass. This season, Shawnee, for the first time, struck reciprocal pass partnerships with Seven Springs/Laurel/Hidden Valley, on the west side of the state; Mont du Lac, Wisconsin; and the king of the reciprocal lift ticket, Ski Cooper, Colorado. With Vail now in control of Jack Frost and Big Boulder, just down the road, and Shawnee’s two biggest competitors, Blue Mountain and Camelback, now under common ownership and likely to join their passes (and eventually join the Ikon Pass), Shawnee will need to keep getting creative. Turns out they have big plans – Fredericks’ commitment to constant improvement is reflected in Shawnee’s steady evolution over the decades, and he makes it clear in this interview that the mountain is nowhere near a finished product.Questions I wish I’d askedWhen Fredericks said Shawnee would consider turning Lift C – the high-speed quad – so that it could access Bushkill, I was a little confused as to where that lift would land. I followed up with Shawnee, and here’s what they said:“The one thought would be to remove F lift completely and move it so that when you got off the high-speed quad you could then take that lift across the summit (horizontally if you would) over to Bushkill, where F lift used to unload. We would be able to basically cut that lift in half.”So I’m reading that as saying that the quad would still terminate where it does now. Again, all this is just talk at the moment, but keep an eye out for the ski area’s master plan.Why you should ski ShawneeHave kids? Go there. Have an Indy Pass? Go. Want a low-key park to sharpen up your game? Go. Live in NYC? Go – it’s only 90 minutes away. Check your expectations: this is Pennsylvania skiing – there will be crowds, there will be a 50:1 beginner-to-expert ratio, there will be lift-loading shenanigans. It’s all part of the experience. Like most Pennsylvania ski areas, the snowmaking is good and consistent, the lifts are plentiful, and the trail network is cut in such a way as to make the mountain ski much larger than it is. Shawnee is easy to get to and easy to like. Plus, walking across the pond on the wooden footbridge is one of the great resort entrances in Northeast skiing. If you talk the game about supporting family-owned ski areas, this is a great place to turn your words into something tangible.Additional resourcesLift Blog’s inventory of Shawnee chairliftsHistoric Shawnee trailmaps – sadly, I can’t find one with the parking lots on top. If anyone has one, please email me a picture. Subscribe at www.stormskiing.com

Scroll Down: True Stories from KYW Newsradio
How climate change affects the colors of fall leaves

Scroll Down: True Stories from KYW Newsradio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 13:23


For leaf peepers, fall is a precious time of year. Green trees explode into vibrant colors, and many people even take road trips to watch it happen in places like the Poconos or upstate New York. So what makes the leaves change colors? And how does inclement or unseasonal weather, or even bigger and broader catalysts like climate change show themselves in the colors of the fall leaves? We asked Dr. Mingwang Liu, professor in Delaware Valley University's Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture to come on the podcast and talk about why the leaves change color and what they could look like a few decades from now.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Pocono Mountains Podcast
People in the Pocono Mountains

Pocono Mountains Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 20:44


Episode 31 - Introducing you to the people who make the Poconos a great place to live or visit! This episode features Jane Kohler, one of the smiling faces at the Jim Thorpe Visitors Center. Also, Brianna takes a ride with the Jim Thorpe Trolley Company. The Poconos is a year-round destination for millions and with 24-hundred square miles of mountains, forests, lakes and rivers with historic downtowns and iconic family resorts, it's the perfect getaway for a weekend or an entire week. You can always find out more on PoconoMountains.com or watch Pocono Television Network streaming live 24/7.

Cigar Hacks
Episode 206: Pocono Palooza 3.0 – Local Spotlight: Best Cigar Pub; Drums, PA

Cigar Hacks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 65:13


Find out what happens when a dozen Hacks land at Best Cigar Pub for lunch during Pocono Palooza. We are joined by a surprize guest; Cigar Craig. We interview one of the most knowledgable Best Cigar Pub staff members. ATB sets us up with an interesting Hidden Herf that stumps everyone. Local Spotlight – Best … Continue reading "Episode 206: Pocono Palooza 3.0 – Local Spotlight: Best Cigar Pub; Drums, PA"

Pocono Mountains Podcast
Halloween in the Pocono Mountains

Pocono Mountains Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 23:14


Episode 30 - Halloween is a great time to experience some frightening fun in the Poconos! From the Candle Shoppe of the Poconos which has a haunted past, to Hotel of Horror and the Old Jail Museum in Jim Thorpe as well as Pocono Axe Works and Trapdoor Escape Rooms, there is no shortage of October haunts to visit! The Poconos is a year-round destination for millions and with 24-hundred square miles of mountains, forests, lakes and rivers with historic downtowns and iconic family resorts, it's the perfect getaway for a weekend or an entire week. You can always find out more on PoconoMountains.com or watch Pocono Television Network streaming live 24/7.

Pocono Mountains Podcast
Moka Origins in the Pocono Mountains

Pocono Mountains Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 24:54


Episode 29 - The Poconos is known for many things: the outdoors, resorts, charming towns and so much more. Some of the best chocolate is made right here in the Pocono Mountains at Moka Origins. The bean-to-bar chocolate maker and coffee roaster is also on the campus of the Himalayan Institute which is highly regarded for its yoga, meditation and wellness retreat. The Poconos is a year-round destination for millions and with 2,400 square miles of mountains, forests, lakes and rivers with historic downtowns and iconic family resorts, it's the perfect getaway for a weekend or an entire week. You can always find out more on PoconoMountains.com or watch Pocono Television Network streaming live 24/7.

Casino Kombat
ECE knows Poconos! EP67

Casino Kombat

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 45:37


The Ramblin Gambler interviews East Coast Emissary in the Virtual VIP Lounge! He also discusses an important aspect of gambling that doesn't involve gambling, and teaches a new casino wisdom. It's the end of a month, so he recaps his results in the travel segment. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/casinokombat/support

Rabbits Whole
Not Buried, Planted: Healing from Momma

Rabbits Whole

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 62:30


Facing uncomfortable conversations that can no longer be avoided. Momma forms us in this world, she's our first initial interaction. The rut of things can unravel, unlearn and provide that blueprint of healing. Stop dating your mother - release mommy. Rabbit said this version of her is FIRE. While this process is not easy she's doing what needs to be done. Did Rabbit enjoy the mother/daughter trip to the Poconos ? Relationships are changing, watching to understand and CHANGE. Loving that little girl in you so you can understand YOU for YOU. Sunday October 10 is World Mental Health Day - take that day put yourself on DND and treat yourself to a day of mental relaxation and self care.Purchase your PlanHER+ stationary and apparel Website: www.bmplanherplus.comFollow Me:IG: Rebekah.Denise__Twitter: @_RebekahDeniseTikTok: @rebekah.deniseQuestions, Suggestions, Inquiries:rebekah.denise__@bmplanherplus.com

Pocono Mountains Podcast
Pocono Mountains Magazine - October 2021

Pocono Mountains Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 50:44


This month on Pocono Mountains Magazine: Brianna tours Jim Thorpe aboard Jim Thorpe Trolley Company to take in the fall foliage, goes on a picnic with Pocono Picnic, spooks us all with the The Candle Shoppe of the Poconos and discusses breast cancer awareness with Lehigh Valley Health Network. Christina Luna shows us the fun celebration of Hispanic heritage during Pocono Latin Fest. Jim tours The Rex Hotel in Promised Land, tees off at The Wake Zone - Indoor Golf + Taproom and samples some delicious treats at Moka Origins!!! Thanks to sponsors St. Luke's University Health Network, East Stroudsburg University and Lehigh Valley Health Network. Watch on PoconoTelevision.com, PTN (Channel 734 on Blue Ridge Cable), Roku, FireTV and YouTube!

The Woodpreneur Podcast
James Matthius: Pocono Table Company

The Woodpreneur Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 38:49


James Matthius: Pocono Table Company Welcome back to a brand new episode of the Woodpreneur Podcast. Today, your host Steve is joined by James Matthius, owner of Pocono Table Company. James' father always had a woodshop in the basement of their family home, so James was always around woodworking from a young age. His father often made cabinets, tables, and other furniture for their family, and he would teach James whenever he felt like learning.  As James grew older, his interest in woodworking went on the back burner for several years until he married and lived in his own house. He decided then that he wanted to start making things for his family and before long, friends would ask for something, which got the ball rolling for him. James began making decor items like wooden flags and cutting boards and soon decided to give woodworking a shot, so he started an Etsy account. “I completely got demolished on Etsy for a pretty good time because I didn't have any understanding of SEO, and how to take proper product photos, and how to word things to catch people's attention. So I decided, “Okay, I gotta, I gotta learn this; this is something I really need to learn.”  I went to YouTube, and I basically taught myself how to do all that. I'm still not good at it, but once I started applying those techniques, I saw sales coming in. And I said, “Oh, boy, alright, awesome.” That kind of lit a fire under me.”  James Matthius Read More

Pocono Mountains Podcast
Hispanic Heritage in the Pocono Mountains

Pocono Mountains Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 17:24


Episode 28 - Hispanic Heritage Month is celebrated each year in the Poconos and Jim Hamill introduces us to those with FLETCHA and Christina Luna visits Latin Fest and Inti Cuisine.  The Poconos is a year-round destination for millions and with 2,400 square miles of mountains, forests, lakes and rivers with historic downtowns and iconic family resorts, it's the perfect getaway for a weekend or an entire week. You can always find out more on PoconoMountains.com or watch Pocono Television Network streaming live 24/7.

The Lapped Traffic Podcast- Nascar
The Lapped Traffic Podcast- Ep259 Best of Show w/MIS, Pocono, & Nashville

The Lapped Traffic Podcast- Nascar

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 42:00


Ep#259!! Thank you to everyone that has followed and listened! Make sure you subscribe and set to auto download! Best of show!! Itunes- https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-lapped-traffic-podcast-nascar/id1191851979 Podbean- https://thelappedtrafficpodcast.podbean.com/ Twitter- @lappedtrafficpc Facebook- https://www.facebook.com/thelappedtrafficpodcast TikTok- @lappedtrafficpc Instagram- @lappedtrafficpc Youtube- https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA1FcdZAt28m5yzWUP7tj2Q Website- www.thelappedtrafficpodcast.com    

Short Term Rental Secrets Podcast
Ep 69 - Managing Luxury STRs While Working in the Medical Field with Dr. Rachel Gainsbrugh

Short Term Rental Secrets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 37:47


GUEST'S BIO Dr. Rachel Gainsbrugh is the co-founder of a luxury boutique brand covering GA, FL, the Poconos, and the smokies of TN. Providing luxury vacation and workforce housing for families, medical professionals, and workers in other industries. She's also an instructor at REI-USA, a national REIA organization, and has been featured on Bigger Pockets, Netflix, and several podcasts. HIGHLIGHTS OF THE EPISODE 01:05 Watch last week's free training by sending a message to support@strsecrets.com 01:34 Subscribe, share, and leave a review for Short Term Rental Secrets 02:08 Dr. Rachel Gainsbrugh introduction and background 04:26 How Dr. Rachel got into the STR industry 09:51 How Dr. Rachel found her first STR home 12:55 Dr. Rachel talks about her strategy for luxury properties 16:50 The price of luxury STRs per market 17:31 Additional services offered by Dr. Rachel for her properties 18:13 Dr. Rachel's goal for her STR business 19:38 What Dr. Rachel's team look like 23:54 Dr. Rachel's favorite market for her luxury rentals 26:17 Technologies and systems that Dr. Rachel use for her STRs 29:26 Why you should not use the Airbnb smart pricing 30:03 Mike and Dr. Rachel talk about the story of how Mike pursued his STR business 33:15 Acknowledgments to Dr. Rachel 33:24 Where can people connect with Dr. Rachel 34:11 Dr. Rachel's #1 secret to success with STR NOTABLE QUOTES "Take care of your people." - Mike Sjogren "Push through on something that you are definitely passionate about." - Rachel Gainsbrugh "Surround yourself with people that will support, encourage, and challenge you." - Mike Sjogren CONNECT WITH THE GUEST Rachel Gainsbrugh: Instagram | Linkedin CONNECT WITH THE HOSTS Michael Sjogren: Short Term Rental Secrets Facebook Group | Clubhouse | Instagram | Youtube | Facebook Page | Linkedin https://linktr.ee/the_airbnbguy Emanuele Pani: Clubhouse | Instagram | Facebook | Linkedin FREE MASTERCLASS TRAINING - https://www.strsecrets.com/masterclass

Finding Favorites with Leah Jones
Author Mike Keren loves cooking shows

Finding Favorites with Leah Jones

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 69:45


Mike Keren, an author and clinical psychologist based in the Poconos, loves cooking shows that teach you something and haven't turned cooking into sport. We talk about Julia Child, the Galloping Gourmet and the Canadian show Wall of Chefs. Mike's first memoir will be published on October 5th and we also talk about caretaking, the AIDS epidemic, COVID and family recipes. Keep up with Mike online on MikeKeren.com, @MikeKeren4 on Twitter In “Four Funerals, No Marriage: A Memoir”, author Mike Keren is plunged into a caregiving journey when his loving but difficult parents come to visit and both end up hospitalized over the course of one weekend. Keren had only recently left a career as a psychologist to pursue the world of high finance driven by his perceptions of how difficult it was becoming to deliver quality service in the current profit-driven health care environment. He, along with his life-partner, Tom, had been caregiving Tom's mom who was undergoing chemotherapy for ovarian cancer. Follow @findingfavspod on Instagram and Twitter. Rate and review on Apple Podcasts(five stars please) Show Notes Graphic Medicine Taking Turns The Galloping Gourmet The French Chef (Julia Child) Jacques Pépin Top Chef Masters Wall of Chefs The Big Family Cooking Showdown with Nadiya Hussain Mock Chestnut Torte (passover flourless chocolate cake) Banana Jam Homecooking Podcast

Pocono Mountains Podcast
Fall in the Pocono Mountains

Pocono Mountains Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 20:21


Episode 27 - Fall has arrived in the Poconos and there are plenty of things to do while you bask in the vibrant fall foliage including Carbon County Oktoberfest, Jim Thorpe Fall Foliage Festival, Pocono Slingshot Rentals, Hotel of Horror and desaki to top it all off! There are lots of ways to experience fall, just read the blog! The Poconos is a year-round destination for millions and with 24-hundred square miles of mountains, forests, lakes and rivers with historic downtowns and iconic family resorts, it's the perfect getaway for a weekend or an entire week. You can always find out more on PoconoMountains.com or watch Pocono Television Network streaming live 24/7.

Door Bumper Clear - Dirty Mo Media
230 – Bristol II: Let ‘Em Talk

Door Bumper Clear - Dirty Mo Media

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 111:11


Bristol Motor Speedway delivered a thrilling weekend of playoff racing and spotters TJ Majors, Brett Griffin and Freddie Kraft are in the Bojangles Studio to react to everything that went down under the lights. With tempers flaring and multiple heated arguments post-race, the crew has plenty to talk about after the first round of the NASCAR Cup Series Playoffs concluded. Shades of old Bristol showed throughout the tripleheader of races at the iconic short track and the guys discuss why that was and what to expect moving forward. Given the exciting racing on the concrete surface, many asked if it is still necessary to run the spring Bristol race weekend on dirt. Hear the spotters weigh in and what they wish to do instead of taking away a concrete surface Bristol race. As the intensity picked up late in the event on Saturday night, many playoff contenders suffered cut tires that jeopardized their chance at the championship. Hear how they recovered and what is expected to happen in similar situations with the Next Gen car. Chase Elliott was among those who suffered from a cut tire and he showed his frustration by taking a swipe at race leader Kevin Harvick later in the race. That then led to Elliott maintaining his line as a lapped car in front of Harvick for the remainder of the night as Elliott's teammate Kyle Larson drove by to win. This then sparked their heated confrontation post-race. The spotters break down the situation from both sides, provide insight from Harvick's manger Josh Jones who was in the middle of it all and share what they think might happen moving forward. They are also joined by Associated Press motorsports journalist Jenna Fryer to discuss what happened when Kevin Harvick and others told a media member to stop filming the conversation. Friday night's Xfinity Series race delivered plenty of drama too, as leaders AJ Allmendinger and Austin Cindric crashed while crossing the finish line. The guys discuss the incident and how the regular season championship came to be decided in dramatic fashion. In the Truck Series race, Chandler Smith's pass on Sheldon Creed for the win fueled a fiery debate. Hear what the gang thinks about Smith's move and how he passed his teammate John Hunter Nemechek a few laps later. The 2022 Cup Series schedule was released last week and the spotters analyze the major changes coming next season. Hear their opinions on the Clash at the LA Coliseum, racing on Easter Sunday, one off-week the entire year, Pocono losing its doubleheader, Gateway's Cup date, and Homestead returning to the playoffs. Then in Reaction Theatre, fans are fired up discussing Kevin Harvick leaving his helmet on, other people getting in the way of the drivers post-race, Chase Elliott's repeat offenses, plus two new songs.

The Short Term Show
Creating Pet-Friendly Profit-Focused Rentals with Rachel Gainsburgh

The Short Term Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 37:10


Rachel Gainsbrugh is a full-time IT Executive Pharmacist, part-time short term real estate market extraordinaire. After paying off her student loans, she and her husband were looking for a feasible way to catapult their savings in the right direction. Now, Rachel and her husband have listings all throughout the US, and work to help others who are just starting out in the field. She is an expert when it comes to capitalizing on specific markets and a variety of clients to keep her rentals booked and the cash flowing in,. I speak with Rachel about the benefits of the different markets that she works in - from Atlanta to the Poconos. We also speak about how to go about finding your ideal clientele and how certain markets might cater to different types of people. Rachel and I additionally delve into the prospect of managing pet-friendly listings and the perks versus the costs that might be connected to that decision. We additionally talk about the common fears when just starting out in the industry, as well as the inner workings of the market that people might not initially (but should) consider. Key Topics Making short term real estate work as a side hustle Hot markets in the country Perks of Atlanta real estate market How to find your clientele Community service-centered short term rentals Benefits and risks of being pet friendly How to keep your unit clean and pet friendly Time cost of cleaning up between pets Initial risks and reliefs related to new rentals Inner workings of a strong short term rental Common fears and how to overcome them The Short Term Shop University The Short Term Shop Facebook Group IGMS Your Porter Smart BnB OwnerRez Beyond Pricing Pricelabs Rachel’s Facebook Rachel’s Instagram

Pocono Mountains Podcast
Train Excursions in the Pocono Mountains

Pocono Mountains Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 19:05


Episode 26 - The railroad has a long history in the Poconos and continues to this day with two fantastic excursion trains operating throughout the year; The Stourbridge Line in Honesdale and the Lehigh Gorge Scenic Railway in Jim Thorpe. Go along with Jim, Chris and Ashley as they meet the conductors and share what you can experience during the fall foliage season and beyond! The Poconos is a year-round destination for millions and with 24-hundred square miles of mountains, forests, lakes and rivers with historic downtowns and iconic family resorts, it's the perfect getaway for a weekend or an entire week. You can always find out more on PoconoMountains.com or watch Pocono Television Network streaming live 24/7.

The Pilgrim's Odyssey
Finding Clarity When The World Is Upside Down

The Pilgrim's Odyssey

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 14:16


This isn't a rumor. It's just taken a while for it to become public. As of today, there are six planes filled with American Citizens and Afghan interpreters at the Mazar Sharif Airport being held hostage. It is finally being reported by mainstream news sources such as CBS. From a news report: A satellite image that was released on Sunday reportedly shows six airplanes that the Taliban is not allowing to fly out of Afghanistan. The planes are supposed to be carrying American citizens and Afghan interpreters who helped the U.S. Military. The satellite image follows a report from CBS News and remarks from a top U.S. lawmaker on Sunday that both said that the circumstances have effectively turned into a hostage situation. “Multiple planes that are ready to take American citizens and green card holders out of the country are being denied permission to leave by the Taliban,” CBS News reported, according to congressional and NGO sources. An email viewed by the network said that the flights were cleared to land in Qatar “if and when” the Taliban agreed to let them leave. A senior congressional source told the network that “the Taliban is basically holding them hostage to get more out of the Americans.” What has happened to America 2021 that this isn't leading every news program? What has happened that our government so cavalierly has left these people on the tarmac? It's enough to drive one crazy. In our upside-down world, we just visited the community of St. Tikhons Monastery and Seminary in the rural community of South Canaan, PA, nested in the hills of the Pocono Mountains. To many people, the scene of family and kids all centered around church might seem crazy. But it isn't. It's probably one of the sanest things I've seen in years. Counterculture and radical is a big family centered on faith and each other. Nothing crazy about it, just living as human beings were created to live, focused on the things that matter in life.

Pocono Mountains Podcast
Pocono Mountains Magazine - September 2021

Pocono Mountains Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 50:59


This month on Pocono Mountains Magazine: Brianna Strunk goes on and under the river for a cleanup effort spearheaded by Kittatinny Canoes ahead of Pick Up the Poconos Day, Christina Luna helps us celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month, Jim Hamill goes to Second District Brew Farm with his family, then spends a day at Lake Wallenpaupack golfing at Paupack Hills and boating with Pocono Action Sports at Lighthouse Harbor Marina and even catches a ride on the Stourbridge Line talking fall foliage excursions. Brianna talks with experts about events surrounding Recovery Month, then she heads to Pocono Organics to see what's happening for this fall harvest and shows us how downtown Stroudsburg keeps getting more and more artsy with the Pocono Arts Council. Finally, Jim learns about the annual Delaware River Sojourn and the people who spend an entire week on the river. Thanks to sponsors St. Luke's University Health Network, East Stroudsburg University and Lehigh Valley Health Network. Watch on PoconoTelevision.com, PTN (Channel 734 on Blue Ridge Cable), Roku, FireTV and YouTube!

Law Offices Of Quibble, Squabble & Bicker
S3: Client 11 - Thought Crimes & Misdemeanors w/self-help podcaster Wize Otero

Law Offices Of Quibble, Squabble & Bicker

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 65:04


All the way from the Poconos, self-help podcaster Wize Otero arrives and works as a fake attorney to help with the client, Thought Crimes and Misdemeanors. While cross-examining the client, things veered to Stuck In My Mind, You're Going To Get Some Ultra, Libido Max, nipple clamps, a slobby dork, Real Wize Productions, an unconscious rapper, targeting lacrosse, curling expert, Brendan's herbal supplement, pai gow tiles, Nurse Wize, self-hatred, you love yourself, Harlem Heat, then they'll ghost you, the Scene Snobs, Thievery Corporation, Resident Evil: Echo the Dolphin edition, the graveyard shift, real degenerates, Vomit Girl, people jump around, cancel culture, Marquis de Sade, bastion of free speech, Louis C.K., sort of consented to it, Twitter is people, sissyfied, Fighting Flossers, leveling the playing field, bully the bulliers, kids were gay, you are a lesbian coffeehouse, Stockholm Syndrome and El Jefe. For other episodes, go to www.qsblaw.org. They are also internettable on: Instagram - @lawofficesofquibble; Twitter - @qsblaw; TikTok - @qsblaw; Uhive - https://www.uhive.com/web/shares/z/QTTCLFU; Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/quiblle.bicker.3; Tumblr - quibblesquabblebicker; Reddit - https://www.reddit.com/user/QuibbleSquabble or watch them on YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/c/LawOfficesofQuibbleSquabbleBicker --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/qsb/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/qsb/support

Pocono Mountains Podcast
Hiking in the Pocono Mountains

Pocono Mountains Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 23:06


Episode 25 - Hiking has a long history through the Pocono Mountains including multiple trails that bring out hikers of all skill levels. Edge of the Woods Outfitters in Delaware Water Gap caters to hikers as well! Learn all about the Appalachian Trail which brings thru-hikers into the Poconos each summer and get some tips on hiking safety from the NPS. The Poconos is a year-round destination for millions and with 24-hundred square miles of mountains, forests, lakes and rivers with historic downtowns and iconic family resorts, it's the perfect getaway for a weekend or an entire week. You can always find out more on PoconoMountains.com or watch Pocono Television Network streaming live 24/7.

The Real Build
110. The Small Details Matter To Become A Craftsman In Outdoor Living Construction - With Anthony Man Jr. Owner of Anthony Group Hardscapes

The Real Build

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 74:39


In this episode of The Real Build, I sat down with Anthony Man Jr., owner of Anthony Group Hardscapes. The outdoor living areas are becoming one of the most important areas of a home. People are spending more time outside with their friends and family. Anthony is a true craftsman when it comes to outdoor living construction. He focuses more on the small details and over-delivers in every project. Anthony is the owner of The Anthony Group. A residential and commercial excavating & hardscaping contractor. Their specialties include septic systems, retaining walls, pavers (interlocking & unit), paving stones, land clearing, grading, foundations, enhanced outdoor living, hardscaping, outdoor kitchens, snow plowing, sanding, and ice management. ​No matter the size of the project, they take pride in providing unique, highly skilled work that will add value to your property. From coordinating projects to taking care of any necessary oversight, we conveniently guide our clients through our services. His company Anthony Group Hardscapes services areas throughout Northern NJ, the Pocono region of PA, and upstate New York. With over 25 years in business and 35 years in the construction industry. Guest Social: Anthony Mann Jr. https://www.instagram.com/anthonygrouphardscapes/ Host Info: CONNECT WITH ME ON SOCIAL MEDIA: ▶︎ YOUTUBE | https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxAdSxHN0dIXZPhA-6p1HYA ▶︎ INSTAGRAM | https://www.instagram.com/imbillreiman ▶︎FACEBOOK| https://www.facebook.com/billy.reiman ▶︎ LINKEDIN | https://www.linkedin.com/in/bill-reim... ▶︎ TWITTER | https://twitter.com/ImBillReiman ▶︎ WEBSITE | https://www.rkreiman.com

Cars Yeah with Mark Greene
1888: J.K. Kelly Deadly Driver

Cars Yeah with Mark Greene

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 38:20


J.K. Kelly is an automotive author who first got hooked on motorsports after attending his first NASCAR event at Pocono. His most recent novel is titled Deadly Driver and blends his love for storytelling with his writing skills and the experience he had working with government agencies while at VP Racing Fuels and the time he spent in motorsports.

Winging it
Nudist Resort Visit - Interview With The Owner (Halsie Bowers)

Winging it

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 59:50


In today's episode, we are joined by Halsie Bowers the owner of a nudist resort called Sunny Rest located in the Pocono mountains. Halsie was actually born and raised at the resort and is currently raising her son there as well. She tells us all about what it was like growing up at a nudist resort. She also gives us some behind-the-scenes information of what it's like running a resort like this. However to get this interview the wingmen had to travel on-site and experience the resort for themselves. So yes, we literally got naked and pushed our own comfort zone to bring you this great content. If that doesn't earn a click of the subscribe button or a follow I don't know what will. Hunter will tell you all about his and Tyler's trip to the resort at the beginning of the episode. www.sunnyrest.com Lets Wing It!!! Enjoy, and don't forget to Subscribe! Seriously subscribe and follow us. It would mean a lot. Follow @WINGINGITPOD @WOTYOFFICIAL --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/wingingit/message

Keep Yourself Warm: A Dating, Relationship, and Sex Podcast

In this episode, the gang talks about bachelor and bachelorette parties. They all recently attended some parties, which is why they sound like they're in rough shape during the intro segment. Topics covered include how much planning should you do and normalizing turning down attendance at a party due to cost (10:21), co-bachelor/bachelorette parties and navigating bringing multiple friend groups together (16:45), and the importance of being a team player, deferring to the bride/groom, the strip club debate, and more (23:48). Finally, they wrap things up with f*ck/marry/kill about worst case bachelor/bachelorette party scenarios (33:21).NEW EPISODES DROP EVERY MONDAY!For listener submissions and booking contact keepyourselfwarmpod@gmail.comFind us on Apple PodcastsFind us on SpotifyFind us on Google PodcastsFind us on YouTubeInstagramTwitter

Board Games Are For Losers
Episode 40: Loser Talk - WBC DDCon 2021 Recap

Board Games Are For Losers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 62:37


In this Loser Talk episode the Double D's discuss how they organized a DDCon event when the 2021 World Boardgaming Championships were canceled.  They recap their experience and talk about some of the games they played there.  Also, Bill loves bears!

Winging it
We're Going To A Nudist Colony. Interview With Nelson The Dog

Winging it

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 53:56


This is the first episode with Max on as the official new cohost of Winging It. You might have seen us nominate Nelson for Wingman Of The Year. He's a high school football player in Indiana that had a video of him being interviewed go viral for hyping his teammates up. We also got Colton Howard that reporter that interviewed him on the show. But before the interview with them Hunter and Max talk about this weekends upcoming WOTY vlog that they are filming. Hunter and Tyler will traveling to a Nudist Resort in the Poconos this weekend and staying 2 nights there. Listen for the full details on this! @coltonhowardtv @nelsonknapke Nudist Vlog : 00:00-11:45 Nelson/Colton Interview : 11:50 Colton: 23:22 Lets Wing It!!! Enjoy, and don't forget to Subscribe! Follow @WINGINGITPOD @WOTYOFFICIAL --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/wingingit/message

Drink Beer, Think Beer With John Holl
Ep. 98 - Becky Ryman of Wallenpaupack Brewing Co.

Drink Beer, Think Beer With John Holl

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 49:26


Show notes from host John Holl:"Four years ago I was working on the Drink Beer, Think Beer book and needed some quiet time away. I decamped to my wife's family house in the Pocono mountains in Pennsylvania. As I was pulling out of the grocery store, stocked with supplies, I saw a newly constructed building where an Arby's had once stood, and through the windows it was clear fermenters were standing tall. Hopeful and intrigued I soon found out it was the soon-to-open Wallenpaupack Brewing Co. and was introduced to Becky Ryman. She founded the brewery with her brother and in the last four years has grown the business, serving an area that was underserved, and focused on being a good employer that puts the ideals of craft beer first.  Recently I was back up in the area again for a few days of downtime. I sat in the brewery's fenced in patio with Becky earlier this week. It was Sunday morning and brunch service had just begun. We talk about worry and success, difficulties ahead, and why beer – not seltzer – is still the focus.  This Episode is sponsored by:NZ HopsNZ Hops, the co-operative of Master Hop Growers are a passionate collective of farms dedicated to innovation and sustainability. Leading the charge in sustainable farm practices, some NZ Hops farms have over five generations of knowledge that inform their composting program, used by growers to promote healthy regenerative growth of hops year upon year. This creates high quality soil, a critical component of healthy growing conditions. At NZ Hops, they feel that sustainability is not only being a steward for the land, but for our future. We're in it together. New Holland Brewing Co.20 years ago, New Holland Brewing Company embarked on a journey into the unknown, brewing the first batch of Dragon's Milk Bourbon Barrel-Aged Stout. What started as a single barrel in the back of the brewery has transformed into the best-selling American-made stout today. Pairing rich notes of chocolate and coffee from roasted malts with deep tones of vanilla and oak from its time in bourbon barrels, each bottle of Dragon's Milk is a delicious adventure waiting to be opened.  Find Dragon's Milk near you at dragonsmilk.com.For more Drink Beer, Think Beer or to check out Beer Edge: The Newsletter for Beer Professionals, follow us on Twitter @thebeeredge and subscribe to our beer industry focused newsletter. There is more information, articles, and engaging content at Beer Edge. Host: John Holl Guest: Becky Ryman of Wallenpaupack Brewing Co.  Sponsors:  New Holland, NZ Hops, and The Beer Edge Tags: Beer, Poconos, Seltzer, Growth, Lager, Pale Ale, Rauchbier

Destination Marketing Podcast
149: DI Live With Christopher Keane and Brian Bossuyt

Destination Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 33:55


This week, Adam continues his trip to Baltimore, Maryland at the Destinations International Annual Convention. He is joined by Christopher Keane from Visit Baltimore and Brian Bossuyt from Visit the Poconos to talk about what's been going on in their destinations over the past year and a half. Learn about how they have helped their destinations stand out from the crowd and how an anti-littering campaign was utilized in tourism marketing. "You need to go back and look at what you've done really well in the past and how that may differ from other destinations and focus on that.  If you can focus on what you do really well, and make sure you can differentiate that from other destinations, you're going to be successful." -Christopher Keane "We are stewards of the destination. We have the resources and are the ones that are bringing the visitors, so we should be doing our part to make sure the destination is succeeding and the residents are succeeding as well." -Brian Bossuyt Visit Baltimore: https://baltimore.org/ Visit the Poconos: https://www.poconomountains.com/ If you are interested in any of Relic's services, please email adam@relicagency.com or visit https://www.relicagency.com/

Bye, Pumkin
Cabin Fever

Bye, Pumkin

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2021 72:06


Mob Wives, Season 2, Episode 9 This week, Drita goes to anger management, Carla is stuck in the middle, and Rene loses her shit in the Poconos. If you're not a member of the Bye Pumkin Patreon, you're missing out on bonus episodes. You can join for just $5 a month. Just click here and sign up.

Dave & Jay VS The World
#55 - Pocono Palace

Dave & Jay VS The World

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2021 62:35


The Boys talk Digger Land, Jays Adventure to Pocono Palace, Dave's unfortunate interaction with John Wayne Par and much more!

Reinvent Yourself
#141: Tammi Leader Fuller (Sometimes you have to make sacrifices to start a new dream)

Reinvent Yourself

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 38:47


At 53, Tammi Leader Fuller left her big-time producer's job in television news to go back to her “childhood happy place”--camp! Well, back to a grown-up version called Campowerment, a place for “women to learn, connect, and grow.” Says Fuller, who was in the news business for 34 years: “I was Tammi from Miami. I covered riots, the boat lift, drug dealing...I'm a storyteller at heart.” Ten years ago, Fuller moved to Los Angeles and while continuing in the entertainment field, wrote a book “about how having it all is not having it all.” In 2013, she decided it was time to produce something else: “I wanted to bring women back to the time of their life when they were carefree.” Fuller says her summers loving camp in the Poconos and invented Campowerment to bring back that sense of joy.  “We take over empty shells of camps...go in 24 hours with a team and jeuge it up and make it suitable for women to live in cabins,” she says. “ [We like to] let them be a bit uncomfortable to grow.” And yes, there are color wars and campfire songs, even a snoring cabin! “It's heavily programmed. But in the off time people connect.”  Fuller sold her home to finance her business. “I sacrificed my life to make it happen… Now it's eight years later.”  FREE GIFT! Don't start your reinvention without downloading CoveyClub's starter guide called “31 Badass Tips for Launching Your Reinvention Without Fear!”

Interfaith Voices Podcast (hour-long version)
I Stepped on an Escalator and I Had to Follow it...The Spiritual Journey of Devi Parvati

Interfaith Voices Podcast (hour-long version)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 24:40


Devi Parvati breaks all kinds of stereotypes. Today the mystic who identifies as a practitioner of all traditions describes how her life changed when she attended a retreat at an Ashram in the Poconos in 1968.

Light After Trauma
Episode 54: Wounded in Combat: A Veteran's Journey to Healing with Michael “CQ” Carrasquillo

Light After Trauma

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 60:08


In this week's episode, Alyssa sits down with veteran, PTSD survivor, and comedian Michael “CQ” Carrasquillo. Michael provides an in-depth perspective on his time serving in the military, from the moment he enlisted until the very moment in Afghanistan when he was shot 5 times in an ambush. Following two years of being in the hospital, Michael talks about his battle with PTSD, the survivor's guilt he struggles with, and how he came to find joy and laughter in life again. He is truly a hero, an inspiration, and resilient beyond belief.  Support the Podcast Read more about Michael's story: How One Veteran is Using Standup to Heal the Wounds of War Michael at Wounded Warrior Project Michael's Radio Show   Transcript:   Alyssa Scolari [00:23]: Hi everybody, welcome back to another episode of the Light After Trauma podcast. Welcome, welcome. Hope everybody is doing well. We have a really special episode happening for us today, a really special guest speaker. This was quite an emotional episode. It's a lot of tough stuff. But this episode is truly the epitome of finding light after trauma. So I am really looking forward to diving in. I know it's going to be a tough one, but it's an incredible story and I am really looking forward to hearing all of the details and just being able to bear witness to the strength that our guest speaker has today, to be able to bear witness to the strength that our guest speaker has. So today we are meeting with Michael CQ Carrasquillo. Now, Michael is a combat wounded army airborne infantry man. He served in both Iraq and Afghanistan at the height of combat operations in the early 2000s. He spent two years in an army hospital recovering from his injuries, underwent 40 plus surgeries, actually died twice and was eventually medically retired from service. Since then, he has tried just about everything from skydiving, golf, scuba diving, hunting, et cetera. Eventually, he found himself performing stand up comedy and loving it. That paved the way to hosting a weekly live internet radio pop culture talk show on WTF nation radio called POP Culture Warrior. All right, so with that being said, also, side note, I just want to incorporate in there that I sort of did the Spanglish version of Michael's name, during the introduction. So it is not the way that I first pronounced it. We're going to be as American with this pronunciation as possible, and it's going to be Carrasquillo, right? Michael Carrasquillo [00:23]: That's right, that's right. Alyssa Scolari [02:39]: That just feels wrong. Michael Carrasquillo [02:41]: Well, yeah, if you want to go Spanish, it's Carrasquillo. Alyssa Scolari [02:44]: Carrasquillo, that feels right. That feels right to me. Michael Carrasquillo [02:44]: Spanish Italian. Alyssa Scolari [02:51]: So hello, Michael, how are you? Michael Carrasquillo [02:54]: I'm good. I'm good. And for the simplest simplicity of it all, everyone refers to me as CQ. So feel free, CQ, a lot less formal. And got to- Alyssa Scolari [02:54]: Cool- Michael Carrasquillo [03:05]: ... respect the brand. Alyssa Scolari [03:07]: Oh, oh, my God, your hat. Michael Carrasquillo [03:09]: Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [03:11]: Dude, that's so cool. Okay, so everybody calls you CQ. That's just- Michael Carrasquillo [03:11]: Yep- Alyssa Scolari [03:16]: ... All right, all right. So we're rolling with it. So we've got CQ with us today. I have read about your story in the articles that you linked, and then obviously in the short description that you sent me. Michael Carrasquillo [03:33]: Sure. Alyssa Scolari [03:34]: Holy, Holy Mother of God. Michael Carrasquillo [03:39]: Am I what you expected? I'm just curious. Alyssa Scolari [03:43]: Well, when I was reading the articles, I thought to myself, this is somebody who has taken everything that he's been through, and he's really... I mean, I'm a big fan of humor therapy. Because it's like, if we don't laugh about it, we're just going to sob about it. So I have a very dark sense of humor. And I got that, that it's almost like you have been able to find the humor in all of this, which is just incredibly powerful. So is it what I would expect? No, I mean, to the listeners out there, I've got, like the background that I'm looking at, he's super into Marvel, we've got the Iron Man fist, the Iron Man, helmet, [inaudible 00:04:24] Man, some Funko Pop figures, which is like, as many of you know who are listening, right up my alley. So as soon as I saw the background, I was like, ooh, tell me what you have. Let's talk about all the toys you have. So yeah, and I mean, I guess, my first question, just to be able to inform the listeners so they can get on the same level as us is, can you talk just a little bit about what happened to you? I mean, first and foremost, just from my introduction alone, they know of your service, I know of your service. So I, and the listeners, thank you for your service. Michael Carrasquillo [05:04]: I appreciate it. Alyssa Scolari [05:06]: And could you talk to us about, how did you even end up enlisting in the first place? Michael Carrasquillo [05:14]: Yeah, from a 40,000 foot view, it's such a big, large chunk of story. And I really don't want to bore anybody with all the minutiae of little details. But kind of just from a high level, I was born and raised in New York City. Very poor upbringing. Literally kind of the ghetto, Spanish Harlem, upper Eastside. Teenage mom, dad not in the picture. So starting out in not the greatest of places. And I was a senior in high school when 9/11 happened. And so at that point, I didn't really know what I wanted to do. I was kind of lost, college wasn't for me. It was looking like just getting a job and working. And then when that happened, that kind of just... the military had never been a thing to me. It had never been like, oh, something I'm considering. Guys like me didn't join the military. Alyssa Scolari [06:12]: It wasn't even your radar. Michael Carrasquillo [06:14]: Yeah, if I'm being 100% honest, I think at that point in my life, I didn't know we still had military. You know what I mean? I'm 16, 17 years old, whatever. I'm like, wars aren't a thing anymore? Alyssa Scolari [06:26]: Right, it's old school. You have that kid mentality of like, that's not even a thing anymore. Michael Carrasquillo [06:31]: Exactly. Pre 9/11, this wasn't for those that weren't around, it had been a while since there had been any conflicts in my lifetime. And so when that happened, obviously it felt personal, even though obviously they're attacking the country, they literally attacked my home. Places that I roamed very frequently, my school wasn't that far from ground zero. And so obviously there was big uptake in commercials for the military and things, as the [inaudible 00:07:02] went on. And it just became this idea of, yeah, get some payback, like very immature. But at the same time, it was also, as I looked at it as more of a thing that was possible, it became this thing that was, I can get out. This is my way out. I come from a poor background, I come from nothing... I don't know, it was a way for me to kind of escape what was going on in my own life, and get away and do my own thing. And a way to be successful, I guess, on my own. I saw kids I grew up with that were into drugs and to gangs, they were either getting arrested or ended up in dead end jobs. And I was just like, there's got to be more to life. And yeah, so I enlisted, basically, almost right out of high school. I graduated, and then there were so many people enlisting at that time. They had thing called the Delayed Entry Program, since there were just so many people coming through and wanting to join that, you just basically signed in, you're sweared in, and you did all this stuff. But so I did that in the summer, I graduated, but it wasn't until January of 2003 that I actually officially entered into the army, went to basic training and did all that. So yeah, I joined the infantry, for those that don't know, when you think army, those are your guys. Those are the ground level combat troops. You're not a mechanic, you're not a cook, your whole job is fighting. You do nothing but train with weapons and explosives and things and conduct raids and all the things you would think about typical army guy stuff. Alyssa Scolari [08:44]: Did you have a choice in that or that was just kind of what you were given? Michael Carrasquillo [08:50]: Yeah, so basically, when you join the military, you'll take what's called the ASVAB, it's an aptitude test. And based on your scores, will be what jobs are available to you to sign up. Now, of course, you could score really well, and then, but I don't want to be a, I don't know, X-ray technician, and you scored well enough for it. But then there's things like needs of the army, where if there's too many people in that job, they're not going to keep accepting those people in the job. So there's facets of how you get into certain jobs. I scored well enough that I think out of the 240 odd jobs available, I qualified for 238 of them. Alyssa Scolari [09:30]: Wow- Michael Carrasquillo [09:30]: I think the only one was like something to do with nuclear technology or something like that, I didn't qualify for. But I scored really well on my test. Luckier brains, I don't know, a little bit of both. But at that time, silly me, I didn't think about a job, I didn't think about a career, I didn't think about what would help me when I leave the military. I thought about like, I want to shoot guns, I want to blow shit up. I want to do that stuff. And so I joined the infantry. And also, airborne, so the idea of jumping out of planes and directly engaging enemy combatants, to me, that was like, yeah, this is what I want to do. Alyssa Scolari [10:06]: That was like an adrenaline rush for you. You were like, absolutely. Michael Carrasquillo [10:09]: Oh, yeah. And so yeah, so I joined in January 2003, I started. And I went to Fort Benning, Georgia, did my basic training there, airborne school there. And then straight out of there, was sent to the Vicenza, Italy. I was stationed with the 1/73rd Airborne in Vicenza, Italy. It's an American-based, it's not Italian in any way. It's a quick reaction force, so the idea being, in a time of peace, we have a unit there overseas, where if something happens, we're able to react to that much faster than anyone in the states can. We're the tip of the spear, so to speak. We're halfway there. And so it's one of those things that, it was exciting, because this is really like the first time I'd left the country. Just turned 19 at that point, and green behind the ears and was like, oh, my God, I'm this infantry guy now, I'm this airborne guy now. And now I'm being stationed in Italy. And then right out the gate, they're like, oh, by the way, we're jumping into Iraq, we're invading Iraq. So I went from basic training and just getting into the military, to being in combat within a few weeks. Alyssa Scolari [11:19]: Oh, my gosh. Michael Carrasquillo [11:21]: Yeah, a lot to process, a lot to process. Alyssa Scolari [11:25]: Right, and zero time to do so. Because it's just like, hey, here we go. Michael Carrasquillo [11:30]: Yeah, pretty much. Alyssa Scolari [11:32]: Wow, so did things change for you in that moment of like, when it became clear to you that you were going to invade Iraq? Or were you still in that mindset of like, yeah, let's do this. Michael Carrasquillo [11:48]: I was terrified, I was absolutely terrified. It becomes real, real fast. Signing up for it, and doing the training, super gung ho, and then you get there. And honestly, it might have just been the fact that being a literal new guy, like somebody who, I'd just got there, I didn't feel very prepared. Because as much as you... basic training, they teach you to march and salute. It's why it's called basic training, you learn the basic things of being in the military. How to make a bed, how to dress in uniform. But as far as how to fight, we spent days at the range learning how to shoot, how to communicate with the team, but I really knew nothing. I mean, I knew nothing. I'd never been in a Humvee, the military vehicle. I'd never been in a Humvee before. Outside of the range, I'd never handled live ammunition. Like these are guys that, when they got the word, they had about six months. I mean, obviously, we train as part of our day-to-day, but this specific deployment, they had trained for six months to really gear up and be ready for it. And here I am, I show up like three weeks before the event. And at that point, it's not about training, it's about saying goodbye to your families and packing up rooms and getting the gear ready to go. And then going. So I really had no training leading up to that deployment with those guys. And so it was really difficult, really difficult at first. And a lot of these guys were, they had known each other for a long time and they trained together. And I'm this X factor that just shows up, that literally knows nothing. And it was difficult. The first six to eight months, it was not... I messed up a lot. I'd love to say I was this amazing, excellent soldier, but I messed up a lot. And it was just because I didn't know any better. Alyssa Scolari [13:46]: Right, how could you not? How could you not? The world is frantic, coming off the heels of 9/11, how could you know any differently? Michael Carrasquillo [13:57]: Yeah, pretty much. But I made it through the deployment and I found my way and kind of gained the respect of the guys by the end of the deployment. We were supposed to be there only three weeks, that's what we were told. We jump in, we secure some airfields, they bring in the rest of the army, and then they pull us out. And that's what the families had heard, that's what the wives and the kids and everybody. That's what we packed for, was three weeks. The unit was there a total of 15 months, continuously. And so yeah, about a year and some odd change. And finally, they pulled us out. And at that point, obviously we're a cohesive team and we're clicking on all levels. And I remember we get back from Iraq, and literally we touched down a couple different stops and then our final destination is in Italy, is in Aviano, Italy. And they're going to put us on a bus to go back to our base in Vicenza. And they say, hey, get it, we're back, enjoy this, celebrate it, spend time with the families. But just know, we just got word we're going back in a year. So this year is going to be all about training. We got to get better, we got to be better than we were before. And we find out quickly after that, that we weren't going back to Iraq, we were actually going to Afghanistan, the next one. And they said, as hard as you thought Iraq was, Afghanistan is going to be worse. And so that was kind of a buzzkill, as we got down. But that started the clock, that gave us an idea that in one year's time, we had to be ready to go back and do it again. This time, knowing from the start, that we were going to spend a year there. They told us, look, it's going to be a year. And so, it's a lot to ask of a person, of a man, a boy, really, barely. Alyssa Scolari [15:52]: A kid, right. You're barely an adult. Michael Carrasquillo [15:56]: Yeah. But that was tough. But we spent that year training hard. Spent a couple months in Germany, training in the mountains and really getting ready for it. And obviously, I felt much more prepared by the time that deployment came around. I was leading a team at that time. And yeah, I made it six months through that deployment. And then during a mission, I got ambushed. And I ended up getting wounded. I ended up getting shots. Another guy went down first, and I was kind of dragging him out of the situation. And I got shot twice. And then through the continued fighting, got shot three more times. And then my body was like, you know what, we're done. We're taking a timeout. And I kind of just collapsed. And yeah, was fortunate to survive. And I'm here now. Alyssa Scolari [16:49]: No, I was reading, you had what's called, is it the life saving, a type of specific training? Michael Carrasquillo [16:55]: Combat Lifesaver. Alyssa Scolari [16:57]: Combat Lifesaver, okay. So you had that specific training, so you were actually able, for a little while there, to kind of tell somebody how to care for your wounds immediately. Michael Carrasquillo [17:09]: Yeah. So what happens is, the way we did things. Because I'm sure every division, every company, everybody does things differently. But the way we did, you have a four-man team, two teams make a squad. So in your four-man team, there'd always be one guy who went through this course, Combat Lifesaver. You're not a medic, I never claimed to be a medic. They just teach you very, very important skills of how to splint the leg, how to start an IV, how to put on a tourniquet, how to treat a sucking chest wound. The things that like, these are things that are time critical. Because it could take a medic, who knows how long, to get to somebody. So the idea being, if you just know just enough to keep them stable for a medic to get to them, it increases their chances of survival. So in my team, my four-man team, I was the combat lifesaver. And it was a squad of us. So there was another team and they had a combat lifesaver guy as well. So when I got wounded, which, that's technically why, to explain why I was dragging a guy through gunfire, it's because we were doing an air assault mission. So as we landed, as we exited the helicopter, we got ambushed. They had the high ground, they started shooting at us. I look up the leaves, one of my guys got shot through the leg. But before I knew he had been shot, what had happened was, I had already exited the aircraft. And I was looking back and I just see him on the ground grabbing his leg, and I'm thinking, crap, he stumbled out the plane, he rolled his ankle- Alyssa Scolari [18:45]: Right, he sprained his ankle or something. Michael Carrasquillo [18:47]: Yeah, something. He's grabbing his leg, something, and I could see that he was kind of, I don't want to say screaming, but I could see he was yelling. And I'm like, ah, maybe he broke something. And so in my head I'm thinking, all right, I'm going to have to splint this leg, I'm going to have to fill out a report. We're going to have call in a 9-line MedEvac and get him out of here. I'm thinking, ugh, this is great. I'm just like, ugh, Jesus Christ, another thing I've got to deal with. Alyssa Scolari [19:07]: Right, one more thing I got to do. Michael Carrasquillo [19:08]: And then when the helicopter took away, because it's very loud, that's when I heard the gunshots, and I hear him screaming, "I'm hit, I'm hit, I'm hit." And so in that moment, I had to like, I just did what I did. I ran out, grabbed him and started dragging him to what I thought would be safety, a big rock with boulders, trying to drag him back to that. And as soon as I drag him back, my thought was all right, I'm going to have to check his wounds and everything. But as a team leader, you have to assess the situation and you have to coordinate with the guys, and make sure everybody's doing what they're doing, what they should be doing. And luckily, we trained so much. And this was, like I said, we're six months in, we're used to this kind of stuff. Everybody's doing what they needed to do. Nobody needed direction. We all know how to react to this. And so as I was trying to assess the situation and everything, that's when I got shot again, and I was down. The other team had kind of rotated towards, and that's when the other combat lifesaver guy saw me, and ran over to me. And he started working on me. Now, obviously, bullets are flying, explosions are happening. So it's a very intense situation. And like, we're talking to each other. Because at this point, I'm out of the fight. It's not that I don't want to be in the fight, my body was just like, you're done. You're taking the time out. And so I'm walking through him, like in my mind, I'm talking to him, and I'm like, "Hey, I think I'm in shock. I can't move." And first thing, I'm like, "I hope I didn't get hit in the spine." I don't feel anything, but I'm like maybe I severed my spine, and now I'm quadriplegic. And I'm telling him, "Hey, check my back, do you see anything?" And we're just talking it out. And he's like, "I see blood." I'm like, "Where?" He's like, "Everywhere." I'm like, "That's not good. Check my spine." I mean, I could kind of move my neck, I could kind of move my chest, but I was having trouble breathing. And what had happened was I had took two rounds to the chest, which my armor had stopped the rounds. But it had shattered all my ribs on one side and collapsed my lung. So I was having trouble breathing. And I'm just like, "Okay, check this, check this, check this." And as the adrenaline was starting to come down, I'm like, "Hey, something's wrong with my shoulder." And so he slid his hand in my vest, and he immediately pulled it out, and it's just drenched in blood. And he's like, "Dude, there's a hole in there." And I'm like, okay. And I know, again, for my training, entry holes, where the bullet goes in, typically very small, exit holes, very large. The larger the caliber, the larger the hole, it's a very, very big hole. And typically, when someone bleeds out and dies, that's the cause, is the exit hole. And so once he told me, there was a big hole in my back, I said, "Well, how big is it?" And he just kind of held up his fist to me, and he's like, "It's about that big." "All right, well, we need to... You got to get..." I'm recalling all my training, I'm like, "All right, we have these bandages, they're called Kerlix, they're tight packaged." Usually you unfurl it, unroll it and wrap it around somebody. I was like, "Dude, just pop it open, shove the whole thing in there. And just keep packing it as much as you can." So he starts doing that. And the whole time, luckily the other guys are doing what they have to do. They're repelling the enemy. And we had air support on standby. So Apache helicopters coming in and doing gun runs. It was crazy. And at one point, someone screamed, "Grenade!" And he immediately stopped what he was doing and he just threw his body over me, and covered me. And there was an explosion nearby. And just yeah, it was an intense little bit. I remember he, I think he was a private at the time, a low rank guy, and he started screaming at our platoon sergeant. And he's like, "You got to call those effing birds back in here. We got to get him out of here." And I hear the platoon sergeant screaming back like, "Nope, it's too hot. We can't risk it. Birds come in, they shoot it down or something, then we're really screwed." And so this guy, he starts, very low rank guy screaming at a very high rank guy like, "You get those [inaudible 00:23:04] effing birds back in here now, or he's going to die. It's going to be on you." And I immediately flashback to Combat Lifesaver training, stage one, reassure the victim, let them know it's going to be all right, he's going to be okay. And this guy is screaming, "He's going to die!" Alyssa Scolari [23:21]: He's literally going to die, like he's about to die. Gee, oh, my God- Michael Carrasquillo [23:26]: I'm like, oh, man, your bedside manner's not great, bruh. Alyssa Scolari [23:28]: Right, we got to work on that. Michael Carrasquillo [23:29]: Yeah. But to his credit, he put the fear of God in this man, and they called in the birds. And what they did was, we were on a mountainside, so they just kind of landed like a mile away down this mountainside. Because I remember seeing it land and they're like, "All right, the birds are here, we're going to get you there." And it looked like an ant. It was so tiny, this big Black Hawk helicopter was so tiny. And I'm just like, oh, God, I'm going to die before I get there. And their idea was, they were going to, because, again there's still gunfire and stuff, they wanted to drag me down the mountainside to keep me low. And I was like, "Dude, if you drag me down this mountainside, I will die before we ever get to this thing." I told him, I said, "Hey, man, pick me up, we just run." I have just the same amount of chance, if you pick me up and we run. And at this point, they had to strip my body armor off, I wasn't wearing my helmet. And I was just like, "We got to go, we got to go." And so they called over another guy, they pick me up. At this point, I was starting to get feeling back in my feet, and I couldn't move anything upper body. I had been shot through the bicep of my left arm, which severed all the muscles. And then I had been shot through my shoulder, I didn't have a shoulder anymore. So at this point, they just picked me up and we hauled ass. We ran down this mountain as fast as we could, and got me to the helicopter. And yeah, they got me out of there. And somehow, I stayed conscious the whole time. Alyssa Scolari [24:58]: Oh, my God. Michael Carrasquillo [25:00]: Got back to our base. They immediately rushed us into surgery, or me into surgery. And they knocked me out. I woke up three days later at the main base in Afghanistan, which was Bagram. And then from there, got sent to Germany. I was in Germany, at the main hospital in Germany for about a week, which they basically said, "There's nothing we can do for you." They're like, "You're too messed up." From Germany, I was there for a few days. And then they packaged me up and shipped me out. I ended up in Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, DC. And I spent the next two years recovering at the hospital. I spent six weeks in ICU. I actually died twice during this process, that they had to bring me back. But six weeks in ICU, and then about six months, I was an inpatient in the hospital, in the orthopedic ward, where they were rebuilding my body piece-by-piece. And I should have been in the hospital longer, but at about six months, they were like, "Look, you're good enough that you can kind of get up and walk around." And at this point, there were thousands of guys coming in every day. There were busloads of dudes coming into the hospital. And so they were like, "Look, we need the bed." So if you were able to walk, they put you in a building next door to the hospital. And basically, you would just kind of come in, spend the whole day in the hospital and then go back. It was like a hotel for the overflow. So I was good enough... if not for the so many people, I'd have been in the hospital proper for the whole two years. But about six months inpatient, and then about a year and a half of recovery, where I was just kind of coming in and out for surgeries. Coming in and out for physical therapy, occupational therapy, things like that. So yeah, and at the end of the two years, I medically retired. I was 22 years old and a disabled veteran, with two combat tours, and a Purple Heart and all these medals, and yada, yada, yada. So it was an intense couple of years. Alyssa Scolari [27:05]: And then you're kind of just on your own. And at this point, because I know you mentioned you have a wife, so at this point, you're not married, haven't met your wife yet? Michael Carrasquillo [27:14]: No, no. I actually, funny enough, I met my wife while I was at the hospital. She just happened to be someone who lived nearby. Well, actually, she didn't even live nearby. She was visiting family nearby. And it was on one of my kind of excursions out, because you get crazy in the hospital. So once in a while, once I was healthy enough, I would go out and just go to the mall or go, just to get out and do something. And I met her, yeah, I met her at the mall at a CD store. That tells you how long ago this was. Met her at a CD store at the mall. And yeah, that was a whole 'nother thing. But yeah, that's where we met. That's how we met. And then we just- Alyssa Scolari [27:58]: So you met her while on the process of recovery? Michael Carrasquillo [28:02]: Oh, yeah. Alyssa Scolari [28:03]: Fresh off of some of the most intense trauma anybody could ever possibly experience. You're still essentially a kid at 22 years old. At what point, for you, would you say, did the PTSD symptoms start? Because I read that there was like a point in your life where you shifted, like your mood shifted completely. When did that start to happen for you? Michael Carrasquillo [28:32]: Yeah, no, that's a fair question. I think the big change came, because for two years, the focus was on my physical health. And as it should be, I was literally dying. And I was literally being stitched back together. Alyssa Scolari [28:51]: I mean, right, we can't worry about your mental health, if you're not physically around to be able to get better. Michael Carrasquillo [28:56]: Right. And that was the case. And now, let me also specify, it's much different now. This is 2000, let's see, I got wounded in 2005. And it was kind of wild west back then, so many people, they were not prepared for this. And now, mental health is such a much more bigger part of the holistic healing process. So this isn't the case now, but at that time, the sole focus was on my physical health. And once, after two years, once I got the green thumb that like, hey, you're as good as you're going to get. It was like, sign here, you're not in the military anymore. Good luck! And I walked out the door. I never took classes on transitioning back into civilian life, or what to do next. Now- Alyssa Scolari [28:56]: No, none of that was even a thing- Michael Carrasquillo [29:44]: ... you're a disabled veteran- Alyssa Scolari [29:46]: ... right? Michael Carrasquillo [29:47]: Yeah. So I kind of got tossed out. And I did the only thing I could think of, I bought a house in the mountains of Pennsylvania, the Pocono Mountains to just hide away. And I just wanted to be left alone, I'm getting this retirement pay, which is not enough, you're not rich by any means, but it's enough to pay the bills, and I can just live a nice, quiet life. And it's all I needed. And for a couple years, I did that. What I didn't realize was the slow kind of descent into this, this darkness. I mean, physically, even today, I'm not all there. I have severe nerve damage, and I have limitations in my mobility and things like that. But for the most part, I had my health. But there's so much that goes on with survivor's guilt of the guys that didn't make it. The why me? I didn't have a word for it, back then. PTSD wasn't as widely known. Alyssa Scolari [30:46]: Yeah. Michael Carrasquillo [30:47]: And so I was going through these depressions spouts, I was suffering from severe anxiety. I wouldn't go out. There could be a whole week, I didn't step foot outside my house. And yet, I'm up all night. I'm patrolling my own... which, again, we lived out in the woods. We're a mile from our nearest neighbor. But I'm like doing patrols in my house, triple checking doors and windows and just all these things that I just, I took them as, oh, this is normal. And my wife, God bless her, she didn't know what I was dealing with. And how could she? And she would ask me, "Hey, are you all right? Is everything..." I'm like, "Yeah, I'm fine. Fine, sure, yeah, cool." But yeah, I was going through a lot, I was going through a lot. And I'm just very fortunate that I had some people kind of get involved in my life, and organizations and people and met the right... Yeah, I got very lucky. because the path I was headed down was not good. And it took me a long, long time to kind of really get to a good place. Because it's a process, but it was good, it was good. Alyssa Scolari [32:03]: Yeah, it's a long and arduous process I can only fathom. It's PTSD and survivor's guilt, and also just not even understanding it. And you go from being okay, one minute, to then feeling intensely suicidal. And you feel like you're going out of your mind at some points, I would imagine. Michael Carrasquillo [32:26]: Yeah, yeah. No, it was a lot. Over the course of a couple years, so many changes in my life. I mean, I went from being this poor kid who didn't know any better, and then being in the infantry and airborne. We're trained and bred to be the cockiest, SOBs out there. We're invincible, we're untouchable, you have to be, you have to be. We have to believe that. I really, not really, but I really believed that I was unbreakable, I was untouchable. Alyssa Scolari [32:58]: You have to, if not, I think the fear of even doing it would be too much. Michael Carrasquillo [33:03]: Yeah, yeah. I've explained to people, I'm like, I have to go out on a mission, watch one of my friends die, go back, and then be like, all right, tomorrow, we're going back out. You have to have this mentality of, that can't be me. You have to have this kind of dark sense of humor too, to just kind of mask the pain and the hurt that you're going through. And so then to get injured and survive, it messes with your mental state, it messes with your psyche. I went from the pinnacle of physical health. I was solid muscle, I was fast, I was lethal. Now, I can't wipe my own butt. I couldn't, like if somebody rolled me into a closet, well, that's just where I live now. Because I couldn't use my hands. Both arms were completely encased. If I had an itch on my nose, I had to ask for help. And so to be 22 years old, and feel that this is the rest of your life, you're going to be this potato that's just sitting here and having the world happen around you, it was devastating to my mental state. And fortunate enough for me, I was able to regain the majority use of my arms and hands. Again, still not perfect, but to what it could be, they were considering cutting off my arms. They really were considering saying, look, the damage is so extensive that you're going to be better if you just cut them off now and learn to use the prosthetics. The sooner you get that started, the better. And I was like, let's give it a little bit. Alyssa Scolari [34:38]: Right, let's hold off on that. Michael Carrasquillo [34:39]: Yeah, I was stubborn that way. Alyssa Scolari [34:42]: Well, for good reason. Michael Carrasquillo [34:45]: Yeah, it really played into my mental state, because I felt like I was on the top of the mountain, and now just fell off and rolled all the way to the bottom. And I felt broken and defeated. And again, not having people to talk about, understand and feeling like you're the only one in the world going through this. Obviously, that's ridiculous. But... Alyssa Scolari [35:09]: Not when you're in it, it's very real. That's your reality, when you're in it. Michael Carrasquillo [35:14]: Yeah, absolutely. And really feeling as if I'm the only person going through this, no one's going to understand me. Because we're trained, suck it up, drive on, rub some dirt in it, get up and keep going, like, you try. And you can fake it for so long, but it wears you down. If you're not able to talk about it and get the help that you need, whether it's counseling or medication or whatever, it will take you down, man. I've seen some really strong guys really, really tumble down. And not even need to be physically injured to go through this kind of stuff. I had the excuse of, oh, yeah, I was physically injured. But I know guys who came out perfectly fine and just spiraled out of control. And I can understand, in talking to some of them, I can understand, you're like, oh, what do I have to complain about? I survived. I came out without a scratch. And it's like, well, that's not the point. It's not that I have an excuse to have PTSD, the fact that it's... Yeah, it's a whole thing. Alyssa Scolari [36:20]: It is, it is. And that's, I think to me, is an element of survivor's guilt, which is like, well, what do I have to be upset about? I survived, there are people who are mourning the loss of their loved ones. But I think you make a fantastic point, which is that PTSD truly doesn't discriminate. Not even just being in the army, but even right down to, before I was in private practice and was a trauma therapist, I worked with the police department. And did a lot of work with police. And just the sheer number of police suicides, and people who were not injured, who were never injured in the line of duty, nothing of that nature. The suicide attempts, because of the untreated trauma, the noise in your brain that you simply can't shut off, it doesn't discriminate. Michael Carrasquillo [37:18]: Yeah, I mean, sexual trauma survivors, I had a good friend of mine who got into a pretty bad car accident, and came out of in fine, little shaken up, but fine. And she couldn't drive for a while. And I'm like, well, that's PTSD. That's a snapshot, you went through a traumatic event, and it is now affecting your life moving forward. It's affecting you to act, I don't want to say normal, because what is normal? Alyssa Scolari [37:46]: Right, what does that mean?- Michael Carrasquillo [37:48]: But acting in a way that you weren't before. I once gave a talk at an elementary school, which I thought it was going to be older kids, and it turned out to be much younger kids, which I'm like, I don't think they're prepared to hear this kind of stuff. But I had this little kid ask me, "What is PTSD?" And I had to stop, and really, how can I explain this in a way that such a small child could understand? And so basically what I came up with on the spot, is I said, "When you learn things, when you do things, your brain is changing. You're learning how to do things. When you go through a trauma event, something scary, something happens, your brain is trying to protect itself. It's trying to teach itself, to learn from it." And I said that, "Sometimes you go through this event, and your brain decides, I don't want to do that again. And so we develop certain ways to handle that. It's a normal reaction, it's the way the brain is trying to protect itself. And sometimes that doesn't help us. As much as the brain is intending to help us, it actually makes things more difficult." I've talked about how, why do I get so anxious when I'm at a market or outside and I feel like I'm being watched, and I feel... It's like, oh, well, because years ago, when I'd be out in the market, I'm worrying about someone blowing me up or shooting me, or a sniper. And even though I know I'm not in that place right now, my brain is correlating the idea of feeling exposed. And so it is triggering a response to say, be on alert. Be on the lookout. Something can happen right now. I was driving one day and a piece of trash kind of blew across the road. And I swerved wildly, and my wife was like, "What the hell?" And I was like, "It surprised me." And she goes, "It was just like a paper bag or whatever." And I'm like, "Yeah, but I don't know, it just..." I used to drive in Iraq. I used to drive in Afghanistan, I was the driver. And something like that could be, it could be an explosive, bag of garbage or something, it could be an explosive. It could be a guy popping out with an RPG that was hiding behind something. The brain, it's something we can't consciously control. And it's correlating these things that I went through. I remember somebody telling me something about how the way the brain, certain repetitive actions, or certain being at a high level of adrenaline or on edge for a certain amount, changes your brain chemistry. And the idea is, when you're in combat, that is you, you are at 100% all the time. You are on high alert all the time. Alyssa Scolari [40:39]: You never shut it off. Michael Carrasquillo [40:40]: It's never shut off. I wake up, and it might be different for combat specialty guys who are like... we're sleeping out in the wilderness, we're out where the enemy is. We're not maybe in a big safe base or whatever. But you're on high alert all the time. You're listening for sounds, listening for the slightest change in anything. So you're on this constant level of the highest level of alert. It's equated to a guy who's a defensive lineman in football, where he's watching the movements. He's watching the eyes of the quarterback, he's watching all these things. But he's doing that for 30 seconds of a play. And then he takes a break, then he comes back. But it's like doing that all day, every day, for a year without getting a break. And that fundamentally changes the way your brain operates. Alyssa Scolari [41:28]: Absolutely. Michael Carrasquillo [41:29]: It's not something you walk away from and go, well, I'm not in combat anymore. Alyssa Scolari [41:33]: Right, your brain is still wired for protection. And your brain doesn't stop doing that even when you're home. The hyper vigilance just doesn't go away. For you, what would you say, because you went from being traumatized, having survivor's guilt, which I think PTSD, I think recovery is a lifelong journey. What was the most helpful for you? Because now you're a comedian, you find the joy in life. How did you get to that spot? What was the most helpful for you? Michael Carrasquillo [42:14]: Yeah, I mean, you hit the nail on the head in that it's a journey. It's a long road. I still struggle, I still have lots of struggles. I have a service dog, which helps me when I'm out and about in the world, it gives me just a sense of comfort. But for years before I had the dog, I don't like being in crowds. I don't like being outside. I surround myself in my little bubble. I'm happy in my bubble. But no, it's a long process. It's understanding that, for me, and this is for me, because not everybody is the same. For me, it was opening up about it. And being okay to talk about it. And this is something that took years, years, this is not an easy solution. But I had a really great guy come into my life, became my mentor. And I would watch him talk to people, and just open up about all these things. And I'm like, oh, my God, they're going to think you're crazy. They're going to think you're a psycho, you can't admit to having those thoughts. You can admit to having those feelings. And he always did it so easily. It fascinated me. And I started studying him like, how can you do that? How do you do that? I remember one day he told me, "We all carry this baggage with us, different types, different sizes, all that. And if you can equate it to, when I tell my story, when I share what I'm going through, I'm extending out some of that baggage. And I'm saying, hey, can you help me carry this? And the load gets lighter." And I called BS. And I was like, "That's ridiculous, that's not how it goes." Alyssa Scolari [43:45]: That's a bunch of shit, yeah. Michael Carrasquillo [43:48]: But I started, little by little. "How are you doing?" Instead of just the, "I'm good, I'm good." "It's good days and bad days." Little by little. Alyssa Scolari [43:58]: Even that little shift, that little, subtle shift makes such a difference. Michael Carrasquillo [44:03]: It does. And over time, I was able to kind of open up more and more with my wife, with my family, with my friends. And once that started to lift some of the burden, I realized, oh, I like this feeling, I want more. And so opening up more and sharing more, and started seeing therapy. And because therapy is such a bad, dirty word... Alyssa Scolari [44:24]: So stigmatized, yeah. Michael Carrasquillo [44:25]: Yeah, but it helped so much. For a little while, I was on medication just to help with some of the anxiety, help with sleeping and things like that. But pretty soon, over the course of a long time and creating relationships and understanding I'm not alone, and accepting that this isn't unique, this isn't something only I've gone through. And I can talk about and I can share with it and connect with people, opening up my circle more and more. Yeah, it helped over time. I got to a pretty good place when people started coming to me and letting things off their plate, and I could be there. It's being there for someone else. And starting to get out of my own head of, my own problems are the worst thing in the world. And being able to share that. And then hear what someone else is going through and empathize with them and sympathize with them. And go through it with them and give them advice and listen to them. So once I was starting to give of myself, that was a big game changer. It was all in steps. First, it was admitting that I'm not okay, then it was opening up, then it was being there for others. I started doing volunteer work and just getting out of my own head. And being a positive influence. And then that changed things. And then eventually, I got into a place where I was okay, as physically as good as I'm going to get, mentally, pretty darn good. And then, okay, what can I start to do to challenge myself? I've grown to the edges of these boundaries, now how can I break those boundaries? How can I extend past them? And so for one thing, comedy came into my life. And basically, I heard about this program for veterans, like, oh, they teach the arts, they teach writing and music, all these different things. But one of the things that caught my eye was this comedy stand up class. And for someone who doesn't like being the attention, I don't like being the center of attention. I don't like everyone looking at me, I don't like everybody waiting for me to say something. I don't like that feeling. I figured, wow, this is the way to literally, it's the sensory training where you put yourself in that situation and learn to be okay with it. And really, when I started it, [inaudible 00:46:43] it's a six-week class, once a week, do a little performance at the end, and you're done. And I was like, cool, this will be my, I'm just going to go through it, I'm going to check it off the list, I did it. I've learned something and I'm going to move on. But in the process of going through it, I fell in love. It was so, for me, therapeutic to put my thoughts on paper, and to make the decision to take traumatic things in my life and massage them a little bit, to make them funny, and to find the joy and laughter. I talk about being shot in my standup. I talk about that day. I talk about my recovery and some of the things that I went through. But always in the vein of like, hey, let's laugh together about this. How ridiculous is this? Alyssa Scolari [47:33]: Right, like, this is so surreal, and so unbelievable. Michael Carrasquillo [47:36]: Right, exactly. And so that was a big step forward for me, in being able to make light of it and control the narrative in a way. It was weird, because with comedy, you want it to be based in reality, but the fact is, you've got to punch it up a little bit to make it funny. And so having, in essence, having this paintbrush to paint the story the way I wanted to, and to make it my own, it was kind of therapeutic. And nothing like getting a laugh, I was addicted to making the audience laugh, and it was such a good time. I did it for a while, I did it for a couple years. And then my son came around and I took a step back, because I wanted to be good dad, and I'm not going to be some traveling comedian that's on the road 50 weeks out of the year. And so I took a step back with that. And then like a year later, pandemic hits. So just as I was about, all right, I'm ready to start getting back out there and doing comedy, and then the pandemic hit. Alyssa Scolari [48:34]: Of course. Michael Carrasquillo [48:35]: But that's how I ended up falling into doing a weekly live show online. And it's been awesome, because I can do it from home and I can get all that fun stuff out, and do what I'm passionate about, but still be around part of my family. Alyssa Scolari [48:51]: Here's what's also really, really beautiful to me, as I hear you talk. It's like, I think back, as you're telling me, to the bio that I read, where it's like since everything that you've gone through, you have also done other things like skydiving, scuba diving. And then I think back to what you were telling me about how you were truly an adrenaline lover, addicted to adrenaline. And for people who develop PTSD, it's very, very tough to get that love for adrenaline, because typically, our brains compute that as like, oh, this is danger. So to me, you stepped back into yourself truly. And that is, I think, the most beautiful thing. You are that person again. You have been able to get back in touch with yourself when PTSD pulls you so far away from yourself. Michael Carrasquillo [49:50]: No, it's true. It's absolutely true. I rarely pat myself on the back, but something I do feel is true, is that I'm a better version of myself now than before I got shot. As awesome as I was, I'm a better version of myself now. I'm much more humble and have humility and appreciative and want to give back of myself. And all those adventures came from a time when, like I said, as I was trying to expand this bubble and grow past myself, I realized I had opportunities in front of me, if I would just be open to them. And so it became anything that gets put in front of me, I'm going to say yes to. And so being a disabled veteran, especially at that time, there was all these organizations like, hey, we'll take you fishing. Hey, we'll do this. And hey, we'll do that. And I wasn't broke, but I wasn't made of money. So I was like, I can't do those things. But oh, no, no, we'll pay for you. Travel included and equipment included. And so I said yes to scuba diving, I said yes to skydiving. I did a veteran exchange program where I went to Israel for a week. And they sent Israelis to the States. And so I did that. And I traveled, I went to Germany, went to Venezuela. And my wife's from El Salvador, so I traveled to El Salvador. I just started trying to challenge myself and just say yes, be open to opportunities. Not everything's going to click, I did a golf program where you learn to play golf. And they even get you these really nice clubs and everything. I absolutely hated it, hated it, hated it with a passion. The clubs are still sitting in a closet somewhere. But there are things that, I really enjoyed the scuba diving, I really enjoyed the skydiving. I played racquetball for a little while. There is professional racquetball out there, I helped the professional Racquetball Association create its first division for disabled people. Because I was like, look, I can't be the only one that's enjoying it. There's no way I'm going to compete with these guys that are full abled, full bodied, whatever you want to call it. Alyssa Scolari [52:06]: Right, with people who haven't been shot. Michael Carrasquillo [52:08]: Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [52:09]: It's not right. Michael Carrasquillo [52:10]: But we created a division and got guys with, amputees that are playing, we got a wheelchair division, things that... It's been an awesome ride. And then it eventually, after a couple years, it went full circle where I hadn't been working, I hadn't been doing anything other than charity work and all these adventures and things like that. And I got to a point where I was like, you know what, I think I'm ready to get back to work and do something. Not just do stuff, but have a vision, have a goal. And I wanted us to have, we had a small little house, and I felt at a place where like, I want more, I can do more. And I got a job and started working and doing stuff. And obviously the service dog helped with that a lot. To be able to tolerate certain things. But then yeah, my son came around. And it's been an adventure. It's been something. Alyssa Scolari [53:08]: And with every word that you speak, all I can think to myself is, you are rewriting the narrative and actively changing those patterns in your brain that tell you that every single thing is a danger. You're getting out there and you're proving yourself and your brain otherwise. Michael Carrasquillo [53:27]: Yeah, it's not easy. It's not easy. Alyssa Scolari [53:30]: No, no, oh, God, no. Michael Carrasquillo [53:32]: I still deal with a lot of self doubt, I question myself constantly, anxiety. If I send out an email, I'm like, did that make sense? Are they going to think I'm weird? All these things, but I have to constantly just not let those voices take over and just like, no, do it. Trust in yourself, you've done it, you've been okay, just keep going. And I slip up, I make mistakes. Something me and my wife have developed a long time ago is, being comfortable not being comfortable. And so I have days where nothing necessarily needed to happen, I just wake up and I'm in a mood. And so we've coined the term, I'm blue. That's just our thing. And so if she spots it, or if I spot it myself, I'll be the first to tell her, "Listen, it's one of those days, I'm blue. I just need..." And she knows, okay, he needs some space, he needs some time. I'm here, he knows I'm here. Or if I'm struggling with something and I'm having a lot of anxiety, my wife will be like, "Do you need some time? How are you doing?" And we just check in with each other. Check in with myself and check in with her and it's been helpful to have that support, it's an effort. It takes a village. But good days and bad days, but more good than bad. So that's a good a thing. Alyssa Scolari [54:52]: Yeah, yes. Wow. So this show, can you just remind, I know I said it in the intro, but can you just remind the listeners, where can they find you if they want to hear more? Michael Carrasquillo [55:08]: Sure, sure. Alyssa Scolari [55:09]: And by listeners, I mean me, because I want to hear more. Michael Carrasquillo [55:12]: No, yeah. So POP Culture Warrior, which is my show. It's a weekly live show, so we do in front of a live audience, live virtual audience. You can find us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram. The places that we go live are Facebook, YouTube, Twitch, Twitter actually has, Periscope as its live thing and then our website. But yeah, it's a fun show. I have a passion, obviously, for comic books and movies and video games and things. So each episode, I'll just talk about what you know what's happening this week in those categories. And then we started doing celebrity interviews, believe it or not, it. I had a couple people I knew from my travels, who hopped on. And we did a call and we talked. I've had Clark Gregg, who was Agent Coulson in The Avengers. Louie Anderson, who's a legendary comedian, Matt Iseman, the host of American Ninja Warrior. So I had a couple friends of friends who came onto the show, and it was obviously well received. And so we just kind of made it a thing. And now, I mean, we've had amazing people; actors. We just had, literally when was it, today's Wednesday, so yesterday, I was talking with Efren Ramirez, who was Pedro in Napoleon Dynamite. Alyssa Scolari [56:24]: Oh, that's so cool. Michael Carrasquillo [56:27]: Yeah, we had a great conversation yesterday. And it's awesome, because it's very interactive. The audience can participate, ask questions. It's all super interactive. Actually, right now. I mean, if you can get to the page, I don't know when this is getting released. But we're doing a giveaway. We hit one of our goals. And so like, I'll send out care packages full of pop culture swag, and things. I've been given autographs from different events and different things. And so I give away celebrity autographs and it's just a fun thing to thank the audience for hanging out and being part of it. So yeah, it's POP Culture Warrior, like I said, Twitter, Instagram, or wherever. One of my nephew's made me start a TikTok, I'm not going to be putting up TikTok videos, but- Alyssa Scolari [57:10]: Ha, you have a TikTok, me too. Michael Carrasquillo [57:12]: I mean, for the show, I might post some stuff. But anywhere you can find social media, look up POP Culture Warrior. Alyssa Scolari [57:20]: POP Culture Warrior. Michael Carrasquillo [57:21]: Yeah, we're around. And it's a fun show. It's Tuesdays 8:00 PM until usually question mark, but the first hour we do the headlines, and in the second hour, we'll have a celebrity guest or some type of guest. And yeah, it's been really fun. We're at 57 episodes and going strong. Alyssa Scolari [57:41]: Awesome. Michael Carrasquillo [57:41]: This fall is going to be intense, I've already had some conversation with some pretty big stars, talking like the leads of movies that are coming out this fall- Alyssa Scolari [57:51]: Nice- Michael Carrasquillo [57:51]: ... will be [crosstalk 00:57:52]. So yeah, it's going to be pretty cool. We're building to something awesome, so I'm excited. Alyssa Scolari [57:57]: Oh, that's so cool. I will link that, I'm also going to link the articles that you had shared with me in the show notes for the listeners. So you all can check out those articles. That is POP Culture Warrior, POP Culture Warrior, we'll be putting that in the show notes as well. Thank you isn't honestly even fitting. I don't want to thank you, because it doesn't feel like it would do it justice. But I just am expressing sincere, genuine and overwhelming gratitude for your vulnerability, your strength and just the way that you are humanizing this process. Because I think a lot of people can see wounded veterans as just... I feel like we don't humanize them enough. And you're doing that, you're doing that. And you are fighting the good fight. And I am so thankful you're here. Michael Carrasquillo [58:59]: I appreciate it. Thank you. And thank you for carrying some of my baggage for me. I appreciate you and what you're doing. So yeah, this has been fun. Alyssa Scolari [59:09]: Thanks for listening, everyone. For more information, please head over to lightaftertrauma.com, or you can also follow us on social media. On Instagram, we are @lightaftertrauma, and on Twitter, it is @lightafterpod. Lastly, please head over to patreon.com/lightaftertrauma to support our show. We are asking for $5 a month, which is the equivalent to a cup of coffee at Starbucks. So please head on over. Again, that's patreon.com/lightaftertrauma. Thank you and we appreciate your support.

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2641 - The Impact of Nuclear Weapons in the Cold War Era w/ Martin Sherwin

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 62:59


Emma hosts Martin Sherwin, University Professor of History at George Mason University, to discuss his recent book Gambling With Armageddon: Nuclear Roulette From Hiroshima To The Cuban Missile Crisis, on how war on the international stage changed when we entered the nuclear age. They begin with the moments in the climax of the Cuban Missile Crisis, and how, despite Kennedy, Castro, and Khrushchev being viewed as the main actors, the world came minutes from nuclear warfare without any of them knowing, calling into question any level of control in this crisis. Then, Emma and Martin bring us back to the bombing of Hiroshima, and how the United States could've put a stop to them by denouncing them, but instead legitimized them and instilled them as a symbol of American supremacy, before looking into Eisenhower's role in putting nuclear devices at the forefront of warfare post-WWII, centering them in the arms race with the USSR and using the CIA for outlying reformist (aka Communist to the US) governments – thus setting the stage for the Bay of Pigs. Sherwin gets into the vast differences in worldviews that pulled our relationship with Cuba in all sorts of directions, from Kennedy's use of Cuba to posture in the lead-up to his election, forcing his hand in the Bay of Pigs conflict, and ensuring he must act in the Cuban Missile Crisis, to the countless war hawks advising him. He concludes the interview reflecting on the importance of overlapping views on the conflict between Khrushchev and Kennedy in bringing it to a close, and how close we came to nuclear warfare despite that. Emma rounds out the first half by touching on Nancy Pelosi's maintenance of college loan debt as a social mobility tax, working up her best libertarian excuses to take it out of Biden's hands. And in the Fun Half: Emma, Brandon, and Matt talk about the CDC's need for a new face for their messaging, Chris from Seattle discusses what influence the left can take from the 80s PSA crash test dummies, and Brandon waxes poetic on what might be necessary to move leftism into mainstream common sense logic. Next, Emma gets her way as the fun half shifts to sports, looking into the NFL's vaccine conundrum and the sect of athletes sticking to their anti-science staff, before they move onto intra-Italian-American antagonism as Chris Cuomo takes on a New York chef's new exclusive rules against vaccinated consumers. Cory from Indianapolis gives a couple updates on continued police abuse and brutality, Brian from the Poconos touches on the right's new election audit, and Brandon nails the take on great yard sign debate, plus, your calls and IMs!   Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ (Merch issues and concerns can be addressed here: majorityreportstore@mirrorimage.com) You can now watch the livestream on Twitch Check out today's sponsor: BetterHelp gives you access to your own fully licensed and accredited therapist via phone, chat, or video. A lot of therapists elsewhere have long waitlists and it can take weeks or months before they can see you… But when you sign up with BetterHelp, they match you with a therapist based on your specific needs, and you'll be communicating with them in less than 24 hours. BetterHelp is giving our audience 10% off their first month when you go to https://betterhelp.com/majorityreport Support the St. Vincent Nurses today as they continue to strike for a fair contract! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere, at https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel! Check out The Nomiki Show live at 3 pm ET on YouTube at patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Matt's podcast, Literary Hangover, at Patreon.com/LiteraryHangover, or on iTunes. Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada, at patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop    

Kyle Moucha Won’t Shut Up!
Kyle Moucha Won’t Shut Up! – S6E7 – Lo’JAK

Kyle Moucha Won’t Shut Up!

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 103:19


Oh boy, this ones a doozy! On this episode of Kyle Moucha Won't Shut Up! The boys discuss the upcoming (now past) Basement show plus the comedy night Kyle is hosting in September (more details to come)! Enjoy music from Aussie punk rockers THE DERRYA - straight outta Melbourne, and the 8th track off of “Wasted & Waiting” from brunch! And then Kyle reveals how he slyly got himself nominated for Best Bartender in the Poconos! What a joke!! Continue Reading → The post Kyle Moucha Won't Shut Up! – S6E7 – Lo'JAK appeared first on Moot.tv.

Dr. Osi's - Tembo Sounds Show
Show # 421 - Pt 1 - Chilling in The Poconos - Afro House Mix

Dr. Osi's - Tembo Sounds Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 60:18


We took some time off, and headed to the Pocono Mountains of Pennsylvania, but managed to throw down a wicked Afro House set.

Dr. Osi's - Tembo Sounds Show
Show # 421 - Pt 2 - Chilling in The Poconos - R&B - Old School HipHop Mix

Dr. Osi's - Tembo Sounds Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 59:48


We took time and headed to the Pocono Mountains of Pennsylvania, and dropped some gems.

Obstacle Running Adventures
237. Toughest Mudder Poconos with Javier Escobar!

Obstacle Running Adventures

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 63:41


Lots of great events in the northeast this weekend!  Extreme Ravine, Rugged Maniac, Bonefrog, Tough Mudder, etc. but none of them had our eye like Toughest Mudder in the Poconos! Our first sponsored athlete and in general good friend Javier Escobar had a team of four that won their category of the race!  He called in to talk about the storm which had lightning that struck an obstacle, his team situation where they were down a man for a period of time, and much more! 0:00 - 2:14 - Intro 2:14 - 13:10 - Quick News 13:10 - 14:00 - Content Preface 14:00 - 58:45 - Javier Escobar Interview 58:45 - End - Outro ____ News Stories: Spartan Pro Team Ridiculousness Karin Karlson Married Morgan McKay Pregnant Spartan Utah Beast Podium: Men and Women Spartan Utah Ultra Podium: Men and Women Spartan Utah Super Podium: Men and Women Spartan Utah Sprint Podium: Men and Women Tougher Mudder Poconos Podium: Men and Women Toughest Mudder Poconos Podium: Men, Women, and Teams Bonefrog New Jersey Podiums: Men and Women Newbsanity's Extreme Ravine Matt B Davis and Josh Chace Professional Breakup Fuck Off Mud Factor Secret Link ____ Related Episodes: 77. Boston Tougher, Tough, and Toughest Mudder with Elites! 124. Toughest Mudder East with Elites! 150. World's Toughest Mudder Hot Lap Recap, Javier Escobar's Pit Planning Party, and Mike's Lap By Lap Experience! 151. World's Toughest Mudder Brunch Audio and Bar Crawl Interviews! 152. World's Toughest Mudder Pit Crew Debriefing, and Drunk Javier Escobar Interview! 197. Mine Falls Trail Running Festival with Escobar, Chace and Hooper! 144. Hot Runs with Javier Escobar! ____  Next episode we will be running (walking is more likely) and covering Tough Mountain Challenge in Newry, Maine! ____ The OCR Report Sponsored Athletes: Javier Escobar and Kelly Sullivan! Support us on Patreon for exclusive content and access to our Facebook group For a podcast shirt, send $20 to Katelyn-Ritter-8 on Venmo with your size and address Check out our Threadless Shop Use coupon code "adventure" for 10% off MudGear products Use coupon code "ocrreport20" for 20% off Caterpy products Like us on Facebook: Obstacle Running Adventures Follow our podcast on Instagram: @ObstacleRunningAdventures Write us an email: obstaclerunningadventures@gmail.com Subscribe on Youtube: MStefano Running Intro music - "Streaker" by: Straight Up Outro music - "Iron Paw" by: Dubbest

The Teardown
12 Questions with Ryan Vargas

The Teardown

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 13:46


After a disappointing wreck at Pocono and a heartfelt interview, Ryan Vargas shares more on the aftermath of that day, discusses a day at Darlington gone wrong and why he wishes he could race with less emotion. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Fascination Street
J. Keebler - Musician (Good Stuff)

Fascination Street

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 59:20


J. KeeblerTake a walk with me down Fascination Street as I get to know J. Keebler from the band Good Stuff. In this episode J and I chat about him growing up in the Pocono Mountains, falling in love with music and getting his first guitar. Then he tells me about the time he came home to his parents' house with a piano someone had given him! We discuss the therapeutic aspect that writing and performing music has on him, and he lets me play a song. We cover what it is like not being able to perform during the Covid pandemic and what his plans are coming out of it; before we end with an EXCLUSIVE new song by his band Good Stuff!Follow J. and Good Stuff on social media:Twit: @GDKeeblerInsta: @GoodStuffTheBandFB: Good Stuff

The Final Lap Weekly - NASCAR Talk Show
TFLW - Mind Blown! Ganassi SOLD

The Final Lap Weekly - NASCAR Talk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 52:42


We recap the Pocono double header weekend, hear from road course ace AJ Allmendinger, discuss the double breaking news of Gordon running Hendrick and Trackhouse Racing buying Chip Ganassi Racing, preview Road America, and Rowdy Dragon has your Fantasy NASCAR picks for Road America. This was a fun show!  Hosted by Kerry Murphey and Toby Christie. Support the show: http://patreon.com/thefinallap See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

NASCAR on NBC podcast
Pocono: A memorable doubleheader with a masterful pass by Kyle Larson, the grit of Alex Bowman, and Kyle Busch winning with only one gear

NASCAR on NBC podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 40:20


NASCAR on NBC analyst Jeff Burton on revisiting the doubleheader concept (1:00); what can be transferred to other tracks and how? (2:30); how to keep fans' energy up throughout the weekend (4:30); Burton's case for bringing back more practice and qualifying (6:30); dissecting Kyle Larson's masterful pass for the lead in Race 1 (8:45); whether it makes a difference when a teammate is involved (10:45); the code of racing in Cup (12:15); does Pocono cause more cut tires at the end of a run? (14:30); why Alex Bowman deserves more credit than just “being lucky” (15:45); a “step-up moment” for Bowman (17:45); NASCAR's talks with Hendrick Motorsports about “addressing” their cars (19:45); NASCAR's role in scrutinizing the fastest teams (22:15); what Kyle Busch meant about needing to use all four of his tires as good as they should (24:15); how Kyle Busch won only with fourth gear (27:00); Burton explains the most impressive part of what Kyle Busch did with only fourth gear (29:00); on the 18 becoming the best Gibbs/Toyota car (31:00); Kurt Busch's push for the playoffs (32:15); on what's next for Brad Keselowski and Penske (34:00); Road America preview (36:00).Privacy Policy and California Privacy Notice.

Door Bumper Clear - Dirty Mo Media
220 – Pocono: Winning Cures All

Door Bumper Clear - Dirty Mo Media

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 85:04


A packed doubleheader weekend at Pocono Raceway left plenty for spotters Freddie Kraft, T.J. Majors and Brett Griffin to unpack this week. Freddie, Bubba Wallace and 23XI Racing scored an organizational best fifth-place finish and Freddie tells us how they did it. T.J. describes an up and down couple days at the Tricky Triangle for Joey Logano. And Brett prepares for his trip to Road America for cheese curds and a return to the spotters stand. Chevrolet has dominated through the first half of 2021. However, has their advantage run its course? Hear what had the industry talking after Nashville and how it may have impacted the manufacturers' performance at Pocono. Starting with Saturday's Cup Series event, hear the crew's take on Brad Keselowski's contact with Cole Custer that turned the No. 41 into the wall. Who was at fault and what's up with Custer's sophomore slump after a playoff appearance last season? Is a family feud brewing in the field? Hear what William Byron had to say about Ryan Blaney after the race and how Blaney responded on Twitter later that night. Kyle Larson was a corner away from his fourth consecutive Cup Series victory on Saturday before blowing a tire. The spotters react to the late turn of events that led to someone finally beating Larson. Sunday's Cup race turned into a fuel mileage dash to the finish. Hear how strategy helped Bubba Wallace score his top-five, what the crew believes went wrong for Denny Hamlin and Byron, and how in the world Kyle Busch pulled off the victory. Plus, the spotters talk the stress of managing the fuel mileage game. With Wallace creeping back into the playoff picture, hear where the points shake out now with two months before the playoffs begin. Who should be worried? Who is coming on strong? The guys talk how Pocono changed things and why the race to the post-season is heating up. John Hunter Nemechek took a bow after his Truck Series victory on Saturday, as he beat team owner Kyle Busch for the third time in five races. After taking a risk dropping back to trucks, the crew debates what Nemechek's next career move might be. Jeff Gordon is leaving FOX for a larger role with Hendrick Motorsports. Hear what the guys think this does to the FOX booth and how Gordon will impact HMS moving forward. Another major team move seems imminent as reports say Brad Keselowski to Roush Fenway Racing is a done deal. The gang reacts to that news and discusses who the next free agent might be. In Reaction Theatre, all of Freddie and Bubba Wallace's fans show up, the GOAT gets called out and a new song has everyone laughing. This week's What an Idiot segment goes international and find out what happened after Alex Bowman ordered 48 tacos.

NASCAR on NBC podcast
Nashville: Kyle Larson's winning ways and the role that team owner Rick Hendrick is playing to ensure he stays on top of his game

NASCAR on NBC podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 41:48


NASCAR on NBC analyst Dale Jarrett on the NASCAR Cup Series being back in Nashville (1:00); how the surface responded to rubber and racing (2:30); the Kyle Larson in 2021 comparison to Jeff Gordon in 1998 (4:30); making the most of a second chance (6:30); how running sprint and stock cars is making Larson a better driver (8:30); applying the homework from NASCAR to racing sprint cars (11:00); how other teams might be able to pick up on what makes Larson so good … but also how leaning his secrets doesn't matter (13:30); the long leash that Hendrick Motorsports has given Kyle Larson on running dirt races (16:00); DJ's message to Rick Hendrick: “You're the smartest guy I've ever known” (18:30); the takeaways from how Cliff Daniels and Kyle Larson managed the only nervous moment of Sunday's race (21:00); “lessons learned” from the other races that got away (23:00); will competitive jealous be a factor at Hendrick Motorsports (25:30); the Chase Elliott disqualification for five loose lug nuts (28:00); why did so many miss the boat on brakes? (30:30); how the track changed and what the future of resin and PJ1 might be (32:00); Pocono preview (36:00).

The Dale Jr. Download - Dirty Mo Media
341 – Kerry Earnhardt: Accepted or Rejected

The Dale Jr. Download - Dirty Mo Media

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2021 125:07


Dale Earnhardt Jr. welcomes his brother Kerry Earnhardt on for a long-awaited conversation at the table about Kerry’s childhood, meeting his father and living with Dale Jr. Along with co-host Mike Davis, the crew first discusses NASCAR’s inaugural weekend racing at Circuit of the Americas in Austin, Texas, and shares their opinions on racing in the rain. Hear what Dale Jr. thought about the lack of visibility the drivers faced, changes he’d like to see NASCAR make when racing in the rain and his reaction to what the drivers said afterwards. North Carolina’s governor announced a proposed plan to provide $10 million to Charlotte, Rockingham and North Wilkesboro speedways last week. Dale Jr. weighs in on his ideal vision for North Wilkesboro’s future, why it may have renewed purpose now and the shift in thinking on where NASCAR wants to race. Kerry Earnhardt then enters the studio and fills in the gaps about his childhood that Dale Jr. never knew. The eldest Earnhardt son details his family situation from a young age, when Dale Sr. left the picture and what life was like growing up with no knowledge of his other family. Hear how he found out about his Earnhardt side, how he met his grandmother and why it took so long to meet his dad in person. Learn how long it took Kerry to build up the courage to go out back of Mammaw’s house and greet his dad. Hear how the interaction went and what happened at the front door when Kerry went to see his dad and meet Dale and Kelley for the first time. Then Kerry details how his young adult life went, sharing about being too young when he first got married and had kids. He continued to grow closer to his Earnhardt side around the same time, eventually living with Dale Jr. in the doublewide trailer across from their dad’s shop. Find out what Dale did in the middle of the night that pissed Kerry off. Who caused the phone bill to be so damn high? They explain. When Kerry didn’t pay his share of a bill once, you won’t believe what Dale Jr. did and how Kerry responded. Stories about working together at the dealership start rolling next and we get both sides of the story about Dale Jr. getting fired. Plus, hear about their days racing street stocks and late models together. Find out how involved their dad was working on their cars and how much success they found on track Then Kerry details how he ascended up the racing ranks quickly, going from Concord to Daytona. Hear the legendary story of what Kerry did at Daytona one time and how Dale Jr. was relieved of his spotting duties for his brother. Plus, a special story about Kerry’s Victory Lane celebration at Pocono. As Kerry then secured an opportunity to race at Dale Earnhardt Inc., find out how it all came shockingly crashing down the night of his father’s death. Find out what Kerry has been up to since moving on from his racing career, including details about the legal battle he faced trying to use the rights to his last name with his Earnhardt Outdoors brand. The guys then crack open some cold ones to end the show and promote the launch of Kerry’s new beer. In Ask Jr. Presented by Xfinity, Dale talks about convincing Mike Helton to run his 2014 Daytona 500 winning paint scheme and answers a question about how teams will cheat given the Next Gen car. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices