Podcasts about The Hamptons

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  • Jan 21, 2022LATEST
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Latest podcast episodes about The Hamptons

Comments by Celebs
Comments By Bravo: Summer House Premiere, RHOSLC Breakdown, Miami in Montauk, OC, & More.

Comments by Celebs

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 82:39


There is so much to discuss this week. Isabel and Emma begin with the Summer House season premiere and they are sooooooo happy it's back. They get into the new housemates, Craig & Paige, Lindsay & Carl, Kyle's behavior, and what they expect from the summer. RHOSLC ~19:00 Next, they discuss all the news items from the week surrounding Salt Lake City. They begin with the discovery of Jennie's problematic Facebook posts and the internet/cast members initial reactions. Plus, her apology and what they think the future of SLC holds. They also touch on an interview with Mary's parents and her statements made on Twitter spaces. The episode focuses on the women spending time in Zion, and Jen/Meredith's explosive conversation at dinner.  “Mary Cosby's Parents Tell All”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1WXJNneHPpQ  “Mary Cosby Decided Twitter Spaces Was More Deserving of Her Time Than the RHOSLC Reunion”: https://www.vulture.com/2022/01/mary-cosby-broke-her-silence-on-skipping-rhoslc-reunion.html  RHOC ~47:00  They touch on Orange County, where they women head to Cabo. We see a budding relationship between Gina and Heather, more Noella storyline, and Jen's marital struggles. @poregan tweet: https://twitter.com/poregan/status/1484002065923854338  RHOM ~53:00  Finally, another amaaaaazing week in Miami. The women head to The Hamptons and are really bringing their A game. They get into the room picks, Lisa, and Marysol dropping a bomb at the dinner table, leaving everyone to grill Nicole.  Nicole Arch Digest: https://www.architecturaldigest.com/gallery/step-inside-the-chicly-understated-miami-home-of-real-housewives-cast-member-dr-nicole-martin  Shop our merch: shop.commentsbycelebs.com  Osea - code:CBC at oseamalibu.com Scribd - scribd.com/CBC Mejuri - mejuri.com/celebs Macy's - macys.com/lunarnewyear Acid League - code: celeb15 at acidleague.com Peloton - onepeloton.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

BEHIND THE VELVET ROPE
CANDACE BUSHNELL (on And Just Like That, Sex and the City, SJP, Kim Cattrall, Dorinda Medley & RHONY)!!

BEHIND THE VELVET ROPE

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 80:17


Candace Bushnell steps Behind The Rope. With all this talk from behind the scenes on “And Just Like That”, we could not think of anyone better to sit down and chat about it all with than the woman who started it all! Candace starts at the beginning - just how much life changed when her regular column for “The New York Observer” and best selling “Sex and the City" Anthology was turned into an international blockbuster show of epic magnitude for HBO. Candace talks about this transition, Darren Star, the birth of Carrie, Samantha, Charlotte, Miranda - which are you?, and the casting of Sarah Jessica Parker, Kim Cattrall, Kristin Davis and Cynthia Nixon which has forever changed her, their and our lives for the better. Never has there been a show that integrated fashion and pop culture so well. Magnolia Cupcakes, Cosmos, and Manolo Blahniks have never looked the same since. Candace chats about her own fashion, Pat Field, the many men of “Sex” that came and went, and how her own love of New York City helped shape the Big Apple as the fifth lead character. We pay homage to many of Candace's other NY Times Best Selling Novels such as The Carrie Diaries and Lipstick Jungle (Brooke Shields, anyone?). Of course we chat “And Just Like That”, the lack of Samantha and what really went on backstage between SJP and Ms. Cattrall. Being a permanent fixture on the scene in NYC and The Hamptons, Candace is friends with many a RHONY. We chat about The Real Housewives of NYC - who does she know, would she ever join, what type of Housewife would she be, being told "Not Well Bitch" by Dorinda - kinda and finally, is there any sex in her city? Thank you Ms. Bushnell. We are not worthy! @candacebushnell @behindvelvetrope @davidyontef BONUS & AD FREE EPISODES Available at - https://www.patreon.com/behindthevelvetrope BROUGHT TO YOU BY: BOMBAS - www.bombas.com/VELVET (Get 20% Off Any Purchase) TODAYTIX - www.todaytix.com/velvet ($10 Off First Purchase. Use Code “velvet”) INDEED - www.indeed.com/VELVET ($75 Job Credit to Upgrade Your Job Post. Valid Through March 31st, 2022.) ATHLETIC GREENS - www.athleticgreens.com/VELVET (Free 1 Year Supply of Vitamin D and Five Free Travel Packs With Your First Purchase) TALKSPACE - www.talkspace.com ($100 Off Your First Month. Use Code “velvet”) BEST FIENDS - (Download Best Fiends FREE Today on the App Store or Google Play.) WONDERY - (Listen to Even the Rich: Patty Hearst / Rich and Daily ad-free by joining Wondery Plus in the Wondery App) MERCH Available at - https://www.teepublic.com/stores/behind-the-velvet-rope?ref_id=13198 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Naughty But Nice with Rob Shuter
Wills and Kate Were caught on camera exchanging a rare flirty look. Cops pull over Alec Baldwin & Hilaria after warrant issued for his phone. In a Titanic moment Leonardo DiCaprio jumped into a frozen lake to save his dogs

Naughty But Nice with Rob Shuter

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 26:03


William and Kate have very few flirty moments due to royal protocol until now. Alec Baldwin and his wife, Hilaria, were pulled over by police in the Hamptons after  investigators issued a search warrant for his phone. Leonardo DiCaprio's skills from saving Rose transferred over into real life saving his two rescue huskies.  Rob's best pal Delaina Dixon from DivaGalsDaily's joins him today. Don't forget to vote in today's poll on Twitter at @naughtynicerob or in our Facebook group. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

myTalk Dirt Alert Updates
12/21 6AM: The new Batman character was based on Kurt Cobain

myTalk Dirt Alert Updates

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 1:48


The new Batman character was based on Kurt Cobain ; Alec Baldwin and Hilaria were pulled over in the Hamptons possibly for a search warrant for his cellphone; Taylor Swift and Joe Alwyn have NOT broken up.

KFI Featured Segments
@GaryAndShannon (12/20) - What's Happening

KFI Featured Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 6:52


Closing arguments are underway in the Ghislaine Maxwell trial // Deliberations begin in the trial of ex-officer Kim Potter // Moderna says their booster shot offers protection against the Omricron variant // Texas begins construction on a border wall // Rapper, Drakeo the Ruler, dies after being fatally stabbed at a music festival in Los Angeles // Alex Baldwin and his wife are pulled over in the Hamptons after a warrant was issued for Alec's phone // The Queen cancels her Christmas plans.

Indie Film Hustle® - A Filmmaking Podcast with Alex Ferrari
IFH 534: Swingers, Scream & Rudy - The Art of Producing with Cary Woods

Indie Film Hustle® - A Filmmaking Podcast with Alex Ferrari

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 74:39


Today on the show we have legendary film producer Cary Woods. Cary Woods is a film producer best known for producing worldwide blockbusters such as Scream and Godzilla, the beloved independent films Kids, Cop Land, and Gummo, and modern classics like Rudy and Swingers.Woods is also responsible for producing the breakthrough features of such notable directors as James Mangold, Doug Liman, M. Night Shyamalan, Alexander Payne, Harmony Korine, and Larry Clark, as well as the screenwriting debuts of Jon Favreau, Kevin Williamson, and Scott Rosenberg.Woods' filmography features a lineup of A-List actors, including: Robert Downey, Jr., Robert De Niro, Sylvester Stallone, Marisa Tomei, Christopher Walken, Harvey Keitel, Mike Myers, Laura Dern, Heather Graham, Ray Liotta, Burt Reynolds, Drew Barrymore, Matthew Broderick, Courteney Cox, Timothy Hutton, Andy Garcia, Neve Campbell, Sean Astin, Michael Rapaport, Jean Reno, and Steve Buscemi.Born and raised in the Bronx, Woods graduated from the USC Gould School of Law before beginning his career at the William Morris Agency (now WME). As an agent, Woods represented - and in many cases introduced audiences to - the likes of Gus Van Sant, Uma Thurman, Jennifer Connelly, Milla Jovovich, Charlie Sheen, Matt Dillon, Todd Solondz, and most prominently, Gregory Peck.At WMA, Woods also represented many of the industry's most successful stand-up comedians including Sam Kinison, Andrew Dice Clay, Gilbert Gottfried, Sandra Bernhard, Tommy Davidson, and Jackie Mason.After developing the Indie favorites Heathers and Drugstore Cowboy as an agent, Woods accepted a position at Sony Pictures Entertainment (the parent company of Columbia Pictures and TriStar Pictures) as a Vice President - Office of the Chairman, reporting directly to Peter Guber. Woods later segued to a production deal at Sony, resulting in the release of a succession of iconic films, including So I Married An Axe Murderer, Rudy, Only You, and Threesome.After starting his own production company - Independent Pictures - the explosive release of the 1995 cultural phenomenon Kids (starring then-newcomers Rosario Dawson and Chloe Sevigny) began a streak of culturally significant, critically-acclaimed independent films produced by Woods under his banner.The next few years saw the releases of Citizen Ruth (the first film from future two-time Oscar winner Alexander Payne), Beautiful Girls (which introduced American audiences to Natalie Portman), and Swingers (springboarding Vince Vaughn to comedy mega-stardom).His 1996 film Scream (the most successful film of "Master of Horror" Wes Craven's career) marked a turning point for the entire genre, grossing over $170 million and setting a box office record that would stand for 22 years. The film instantly and single-handedly pivoted horror toward postmodernism, spawning a massive billion-dollar franchise (consisting of successful sequels, a TV series, toys, and Halloween costumes), as well as inspiring countless knock-offs in the years since.Gummo - the directorial debut of Kids' screenwriter Harmony Korine - received the FIPRESCI Prize at the 1997 Venice Film Festival. Bernando Bertolucci, the famed director of Last Tango in Paris, praised the film, calling it "The one revolutionary film of the late 20th century."In 1998, the first US-produced entry of the iconic Godzilla film franchise would become Woods' and Independent Pictures' single highest-grossing film, earning nearly $400 million.Woods would go on to serve as co-Chairman, and Chief Creative Officer of Plum TV, in which he was a founding partner. Broadcasting in the nation's most affluent markets (i.e. Aspen, the Hamptons, Miami Beach), the luxury lifestyle network would go on to earn eight Emmy Awards.Enjoy my conversation with Cary Woods.

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 141 Part 2: How Emerging Jewelry Designers Can Cut Through the Noise with Writer & Editor, Amy Elliott

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 26:26


What you'll learn in this episode: Why the most important thing a jewelry designer can invest in is high-quality photography How Amy finds the topics she writes about for JCK's “All That Glitters” blog How designers can find the story that helps them break through the crowded marketplace Who today's most exciting emerging and independent designers are How the jewelry industry changed during the pandemic, and what retailers must do to engage young consumers About Amy Elliott Amy Elliott is a writer, editor and brand storyteller who specializes in fine jewelry and fashion, and is fluent in other lifestyle categories, including food, weddings and travel. As a former staff editor at The Knot, Bridal Guide, Brides Local Magazines + Brides.com and Lucky, Amy is known for delivering high-quality editorial content across a variety of print and digital media. After recently serving as the Engagement Rings Expert for About.com, Amy joined the freelance staff of JCK as its All That Glitters columnist, while contributing articles about jewelry trends, estate and antique jewelry and gemstones to its prestigious print magazine. Amy also serves as the Fine Jewelry Expert for The Bridal Council, an industry organization composed of luxury bridal designers, retailers and media, and her byline has appeared in Gotham, Hamptons, DuJour, Martha Stewart Weddings, GoodHousekeeping.com and more. Additional Resources: Amy's Website Amy's Twitter Amy's Instagram JCK Article: Cicadas Swarm on Sienna Patti Gallery in Lenox, Mass. JCK Article: Christopher Thompson Royds' Flowers Bloom at Sienna Patti Gallery JCK Article: Look What Happens When Annoushka Gives Peridot A Go Examples of posts that reflect the intersection of jewelry with history, culture and current events: Bob Goodman Wants Jewelers To Join Him in Disrupting the Status Quo: https://www.jckonline.com/editorial-article/bob-goodman-jewelers-disrupting/ The Ten Thousand Things x Met Museum Collaboration Is Coming In Hot: https://www.jckonline.com/editorial-article/ten-thousand-things-x-met-museum/ Go “Sea” Some Serious Silver Treasures At Mystic Seaport Museum: https://www.jckonline.com/editorial-article/sea-as-muse-silver-seaport-museum/ New Jewelry From Rafka Koblence, Olympic Wrestler Turned Designer: https://www.jckonline.com/editorial-article/new-jewelry-from-rafka-koblence/ Transcript: As author of the “All That Glitters” blog for JCK, Amy Elliott has a front row seat to the jewelry industry's up-and-coming trends and designers. She's also been lucky enough to work with some of these designers, helping them refine their brands and create stories that resonate with customers. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about what designers and retailers should do to stay relevant with younger consumers, how art jewelry has influenced high jewelry, and what jewelry trends to watch out for in the coming months. Read the episode transcript here.  Sharon: When you say you like strong, new collections, what catches your eye when somebody's presenting a new collection to you or sends you a press kit or email? Amy: Every time I'm ever interviewed for something, I always say this, but photos are so important, beautiful, beautiful photos. Whatever budget you have, use it for the photography. I love glamorous jewelry. I love high jewelry. I love glamor, big, bold, extremely extravagant jewels; from an editorial standpoint, I love them. I love to excite the senses with beautiful jewelry that makes you stop in your tracks. So, the jewels have to be beautiful, and you need to have beautiful photos to accurately portray that. It's just a strong point of view.  Boucheron came to me, and they have a whole series inspired by a cat that belonged to the Maison Boucheron early on in their life. His name is Vladimir, and it's a whole collection that takes this Persian cat with his swept fur. There's a story there; there's a heritage story. I love that. I love to take a new collection and look back at how it came to be. I love figuring out what a designer's signature is, whether they're well-established or they're just coming out. Every once in a while you'll find a newcomer with a strong point of view and you're like, “I've never seen this before. I'm so excited to tell that story.” Sharon: I think it's so important to say or to reiterate that for everybody, no matter what kind of jewelry you're selling, whether it's fine jewelry or antique jewelry. I'm thinking of some of the tradeshows when I've talked to dealers and they're like, “Oh, I don't have the money for photos.”  Amy: I don't know what to say. I've been saying it for 20 years and it's still a problem. There are some designers that are really overexposed and there are some that are underexposed. I'm always excited to discover somebody I'm not following on Instagram. How exciting! A lot of times, they're international. I'm connected with a PR firm in Paris right now. They've been calling me a lot, and it's a goldmine of designers that don't get featured a lot over here. I think I'm the only editor at JCK that covers estate and antique jewelry. I'm always covering auctions and exhibitions in that vein and all of the art fairs. I've written about Sienna Patti up in the Berkshires several times. It really is a pleasure, and anything goes. I have an action-packed calendar for the holidays. Sharon: It sounds like it, yes. Sienna Patti, I know she's in the western part of Massachusetts.  Amy: Yes, she's in the Berkshires. Sharon: She has an art jewelry gallery I'd love to get to someday. How does art jewelry fit in here? Does it catch your eye if the right photos are sent to you? Do you see it taking more of the market or having a higher profile? Amy: It's interesting. The one thing I will say, and it's so hard to speak in terms of trends when you're dealing with very expensive, high-end, collectible jewelry, but what I have noticed a little bit of is the selling of sweet sets, something that might be convertible, a multipiece set. Christopher Thompson Royds does that. You get a beautiful box, and then it's an earring that can be worn three or four different ways. Annoushka did a collaboration with Fuli Gemstones. Beautiful, bright green peridot like you've never seen. It was not really a collection; it was an eight-piece set. That is what the customer is being asked to buy into, and that feels very collector, very connoisseur, a very specific kind of angle. It's a very specific customer that is going to want to invest in jewelry that can be worn but is presented as an art object or sculpture or something to display in your home as sculpture, but then you can take it out and wear it. I see that as a direction with very, very high-end jewelry that's being shown in galleries, this notion of buying a boxed set. Sharon: When you said sweet sets, I was thinking edible sweets. That's interesting. Amy: Sets of jewels.  Sharon: There's an idea. Tell us who the emerging, independent designers are today. Who should we keep our eye on? Who's overlooked? Who's being so creative, knocking it out of the park, but you don't hear talked about? Who's collectible? Amy: I know this is a very informed and qualified audience, Sharon, so I'm sure these names are going to be familiar to many in your audience, but I think the industry has collectively embraced the work of Harwell Godfrey. Sharon: Now, that's one I don't know.  Amy: Lauren Harwell, I think she's based in LA, and she has a strong point of view. It's beautiful inlaid jewels, weighty, substantial, geometric, absolutely a strong point of view, Sharon. Sharon: I see her on Instagram a lot.  Amy: Yes, Harwell Godfrey is probably one of the strongest voices to emerge in the pandemic era. Before that it was Anna Courey, absolutely with her diamond ear cuffs. I think she set us on a course with that. Glenn Spiro is an under-the-radar but highly, highly couture jeweler. There's a book out from Assouline on him that Jill Newman wrote. I think his name is going to become more well-known among collectors. He's a private jeweler based in London, I believe, and I think we're going to be hearing more about that. Anytime there's a book or an auction, the names are elevated; the names are surfaced and get a little more traction, so I definitely would be watching Glenn Spiro. Nikos Koulis has been around for the last three or four years. He's Greek, and it's sort of neo-Art Deco, very geometric, very strong uses of color, edgy, really modern. Bea Bongiasca with her enamel and ceramic pieces— Sharon: How do you say that? Is she here? Amy: Bea. I think she's based in London but is Italian. She works at Central St. Martin's. Alice Cicolini, also British, does extremely beautiful work with enamel. I think her work is going to be really collectable in the coming years. I think she has a strong point of view. Sharon: Can I interrupt? What does that mean, a strong point of view? What does that mean to you? Amy: It means singular and inimitable.  Sharon: You know it's her when you see the piece of work. Amy: Yes. It's very singular and striking and absolutely inimitable. There's a lot of borrowing of ideas that goes on in the jewelry industry. I think the people I'm mentioning here, their voices present themselves to me as something unique. You can't replicate it; you're not going to see that show up in some form on Amazon. Maggi Simpkins, we all fell in love with her in the Brilliant and Black exhibit at Sotheby's. She did the most beautiful pink diamond ring. Everything is centered in these fan-like, feathered cocoons of gems. It's very feminine and lavish and beautiful. So, Maggi Simpkins is someone, and then Studio Renn. My editor at JCK, Victoria Gomelsky, writes for the New York Times and she did a piece on them. She really has seen everything. They are part of an exhibit that is now ongoing at Phillips that Vivienne Becker curated. I think Studio Renn is a newcomer that is going to be sticking around for a while. Finally, there's Fabio Salini, who's also part of the Vivienne Becker capsule at Phillips. Those are just a few. It changes all the time, but the pandemic era has brought incredible work from the designers in our industry, and they are just now hitting their stride. After all that time creating and dreaming and ruminating, refining their voices, cultivating their Instagram audiences, getting feedback from buyers—now they're out there in the world and ready to be embraced.  Sharon: What about pre-pandemic? Everybody's at home in their living room thinking and designing, so I could understand why it's emerging right now, but what about pre-pandemic? Do you see a big difference? Amy: Yes, the industry has modernized considerably since the before times. The biggest difference is that a mom-and-pop jeweler in the middle of country who had a website but never updated it, they've gone in there, hired a firm, hired a chat bot, completely modernized. The pandemic era forced the industry to fast-track into the digital age. That is a huge, huge difference, making it so you are available to your customers, wherever they may be, whether that's texting or someone dedicated to Instagram inquiries. A lot of this is being done on Instagram now, and that was not true in January 2020. Since jewelry emerged as a category that is a portable asset, it's not a flash in the plan; it has staying power. It's not like buying a trendy handbag, but using your discretionary income to buy jewelry became a thing and was embraced a lot of people during the pandemic as they were sparkle scrolling, as they call it, on their phones. Sharon: I haven't heard that term.  Amy: A lot of people used the time to upgrade their engagement rings and wedding bands, so the bridal industry saw a huge boost. The jewelry industry is really healthy right now, I think, in terms of sales, but what I have noticed is not everybody has a wedding band. Not everyone has a budget to upgrade to a big, giant, 20-carat eternity band, so I'm noticing a lot of brands creating price points under $1,500. They're creating little capsules, creating diffusion lines, if you will, so a customer with modest means can have that same meaningful purchase, that same, “I'm investing and treating myself to something that will last, my first diamond bracelet or my first diamond pendant.” I'm seeing more of those opportunities at the retail level. Sharon: That's interesting. In terms of the emerging designers you've mentioned, is this trickling down to the rest of us who don't have $15,000 to go out and buy a trinket tomorrow? Amy: There's definitely a spectrum. I think estate jewelry in general is so hot, and there are a gazillion ladies on Instagram. They're moving delicate, little gold charms for $200 a pop. There's so much. I hate the term low-hanging fruit, but there is so much attainable luxury out there at the regular-person level. If you're the type to spend $200 on a bunch of drinks on a Saturday night, you can easily do that and buy yourself a beautiful paper clip chain estate piece on someone's Instagram feed.  Also, even further than the art jewelry investment piece, there's a run on pink diamonds, practically, and yellow diamonds were a big story coming out of JCK. That color, yellow, that bright, hopeful, joyful feeling that yellow presents, suppliers and manufacturers—cases were filled with yellow diamond engagement rings. A lot of people are talking about a potential uptick in yellow diamond engagement ring sales, both from the rarity of the investment angle and from the pure joy of it, the feeling that it gives. Also, there's this idea that today's young woman getting engaged doesn't want anything to do with what her mother had. Any ring that remoted resembles that chunky, big, platinum, three-stone diamond ring from 1990, she wants something completely new and different feeling, and yellow diamonds fulfill that. They check that box. I have heard from some of my diamond tiara friends that people are buying very high-end and special loose, fancy-colored diamonds from an investment standpoint because it's a portable asset and they are decreasing in supply. Like I said, there's a whole spectrum of possibilities. Sharon: It's interesting you mention that diamonds are not so much in demand for young women getting engaged or getting married today. Sometimes I look at my diamond wedding ring, which is actually an upgrade from my first one, and I look at it and go, “This looks really dated.” What are you seeing in terms of what's more contemporary or modern? Amy: Here's what everyone's doing. Everyone is taking their old jewelry and up-cycling it, whether their old engagement ring, in your case, or they're taking their grandmother's engagement ring that was given to them and creating a whole new design and style. Heirloom stones are recast as something new and wearable. It could be an engagement ring; they could be breaking apart a clustered diamond pin and creating a “diamonds by the yard” style necklace. That is a huge trend right now because it also covers sustainability. You have this precious item in your possession, but it just isn't your style. You have the materials to work with a designer to make it something new you can wear and enjoy. I feel like every independent designer I speak with nowadays has taken on commissions along those lines. Entire businesses are being built around that very concept of reimagining old jewelry. Sharon: What about non-diamond wedding rings or engagement rings? Are other stones being used besides yellow diamonds?  Amy: I think we can anticipate a sapphire—I hate to say a sapphire boom because jewelry is slow and static, but blue sapphires. The Crown season four, I think, came out last winter, and it centered around Diana. There's a whole generation of young women out there that were not clued into that story, and that blue sapphire engagement ring from Garrard was back in the spotlight again, even though Kate Middleton wears it as hers now. Anyway, there's a whole generation of consumers for whom Diana's blue sapphire ring was not on their radar. Then there is a movie coming out with Kristen Stewart in the starring role called “Spencer” that will center on Diana. I think that's going to put the blue sapphire engagement ring on people's radar again. Honestly, any time the royals or once-were royals are in the news—and they are—it definitely trickles down into consumer appetite. Sharon: Amy, you've seen a lot from both sides of the desk. You've seen the big people; you've talked to people on the business side; you've talked to the designing side, the creative side, and I know you've written several books and things like that. If you had to distill it down into one book or a couple of paragraphs, what would you say are the main challenges? How would you advise people like this? Amy: I love to give advice. I'm solicited in other ways. To retailers, I would say listen to your customers and tune into the social climate. The customers are giving you information you need every time they set foot in your store. Ask them what they like, what they're into. There's an adversarial relationship, almost, between the younger consumers of today and the old-school jewelry retailer, and change is necessary. Try to learn and understand them. If they want a salt and pepper diamond ring and you think it's ugly, that's fine, but you still have to find it for them if you want to retain them as a customer. I think a willingness to change is vital; a willingness to modernize is vital on the part of the retailer. Diversity and inclusion and social justice is very important to the majority of young consumers. You can look at what Zales and Kay Jewelers and these mainstream guys are doing for clues; the same with Tiffany. You can look at what they're doing. That's all informed by serious market research that is telling them that today's younger consumer prioritizes diversity and inclusion, and they're watching companies to see if what they're doing aligns with their values. I'm certainly not the first person to say that, but it is critical; it's essential. To designers, I would say please use whatever discretionary funds you have, again, towards shooting your jewelry with a professional photographer. That is the most important thing. Don't worry about a campaign. Don't worry about hiring models. Literally just still-life photos and giant, big files are what you should be spending your money on. Stay true to your signature and try to be as authentic as possible, but also take advice. Just don't design in a vacuum. Look at what's out in the world and try to see where your point of view fits in. The market is saturated with a lot of same old, same old. How can you break through that? How can you break through the basic and come at it in a different way? It could be as simple as everybody knows alphabet charms are popular and wonderful and a new jewelry wardrobe essential, so what's your thought going to look like? How's your thought going to reflect who you are? What does the alphabet charm reflect for you, and what's the story? Did you see it on a poster for a 1960s Grateful Dead show? Did you go to an exhibit and see an illuminated manuscript? There are so many ways, I think, to get inspired and find your voice. Sharon: That's great. That's very good advice for both sides of the desk. Amy, thank you so much for being here today. Amy: Thank you, Sharon, it's a pleasure. I'm always happy to talk about jewelry and give my opinions. Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.  

You're Gonna Love Me with Katie Maloney
Single Over Settling with Lindsay Hubbard

You're Gonna Love Me with Katie Maloney

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 43:42


This week Katie is joined by friend and cast member of Summer House and Winter House Lindsay Hubbard! Katie and Lindsay go back some years when they met in the Hamptons while filming during season one of Summer House and reminisce about how much life has changed since then. Lindsay never imagined she would end up on a reality show. After spending her adult life dedicated to her work life, building a career in publicity and her own PR firm Hubb House PR. Lindsay being from a small town had huge dreams and from high school was going to make those dreams of going to college and having a successful career a reality so she focused on her education as her ticket out of her town and set her sights on New York City. While she has found plenty of success in her career and in dating both have left her unfulfilled and she is now flipping the script on her approach to both career and dating. Tune into this podcast the hear what her plans are as well as the up coming season of Summer House to see if she has found love with out having to check all the boxes! Visit StoryWorth.com/LoveMe and save $10 on your first purchase. Visit www.Talkspace.com and use code loveme to get #100 off of your first month. Visit papaandbarkleycbd.com/loveme for 20% off your first purchase Download Switchcraft for free and unlock the magical mystery! Produced by Dear Media

The Shrink Next Door
How Georgia Pritchett Filled in the Blanks | 14

The Shrink Next Door

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 22:53


Georgia Pritchett has a track record of bringing humanity into awful, morally compromised characters. She talks with Joe Nocera, about how she brought that same approach to The Shrink Next Door, what she thought when she first heard the podcast and why she sees the whole saga as a love story.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Happening In The Hamptons - Real Estate Podcast
Episode 54 - The Happening In The Hamptons Team

Happening In The Hamptons - Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 10:54


Discussing This Week In Hamptons Real Estate

Anthony On Air
Ghislaine Maxwell's Disturbing Court Exchange, Epstein Cellmate's New Comments, MTA Boss' Blow Up Doll, Meryl Streeps Nephew Gets Off Hamptons Road Rage Case

Anthony On Air

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 86:14


Jeffrey Epstein's cellmate dishes on what his final days were like. Bill Mersey sent Cindy Adams his thoughts and she's held them until now. Plus Ghislaine Maxwells disturbing court room interaction and why it makes me think she'll go free. There's an MTA boss who is driving around with a blow up doll in his car. More thoughts on the Mark Meadows texts. And finally, the girl from 90 Day fiancé is selling her farts online and making a killing! #GhislaineMaxwell #MarkMeadows #JeffreyEpstein Get JumpStart Coffee Here: https://bit.ly/JumpStartAoA15 Subscribe to our Podcast clips channel! - http://bit.ly/AoAClips Support the podcast https://anchor.fm/anthonyonair/support Get Merch here - https://bit.ly/AnthonyMerch Meryl Streep Nephew Video: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10314401/Meryl-Streeps-nephew-gets-250-fine-road-rage-case.html MTA Blow Up Doll Pictures: https://nypost.com/2021/12/15/mta-manager-seen-using-blow-up-doll-in-attempt-to-skirt-hov-laws/ Epstein Cell Pictures: https://nypost.com/2021/12/15/a-look-at-epsteins-final-days-in-jail/amp/ Subscribe to the Anthony On Air Podcast here: Facebook - https://bit.ly/AntOnAirFBYouTube - https://bit.ly/AntOnAirYTApple Podcast - https://bit.ly/AntOnAirAppleGoogle Podcast - https://bit.ly/AntOnAirGooSpotify - https://bit.ly/AntOnAirSpotStitcher - https://bit.ly/AntOnAirStiOvercast - https://bit.ly/AntOnAirOvTwitter - https://bit.ly/AntOnAirTwitterInstagram - https://bit.ly/AntOnAirInsta Get more at https://www.AnthonyOnAir.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/anthonyonair/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/anthonyonair/support

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 141 Part 1: How Emerging Jewelry Designers Can Cut Through the Noise with Writer & Editor, Amy Elliott

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 26:06


What you'll learn in this episode: Why the most important thing a jewelry designer can invest in is high-quality photography How Amy finds the topics she writes about for JCK's “All That Glitters” blog How designers can find the story that helps them break through the crowded marketplace Who today's most exciting emerging and independent designers are How the jewelry industry changed during the pandemic, and what retailers must do to engage young consumers About Amy Elliott Amy Elliott is a writer, editor and brand storyteller who specializes in fine jewelry and fashion, and is fluent in other lifestyle categories, including food, weddings and travel. As a former staff editor at The Knot, Bridal Guide, Brides Local Magazines + Brides.com and Lucky, Amy is known for delivering high-quality editorial content across a variety of print and digital media. After recently serving as the Engagement Rings Expert for About.com, Amy joined the freelance staff of JCK as its All That Glitters columnist, while contributing articles about jewelry trends, estate and antique jewelry and gemstones to its prestigious print magazine. Amy also serves as the Fine Jewelry Expert for The Bridal Council, an industry organization composed of luxury bridal designers, retailers and media, and her byline has appeared in Gotham, Hamptons, DuJour, Martha Stewart Weddings, GoodHousekeeping.com and more. Additional Resources: Amy's Website Amy's Twitter Amy's Instagram JCK Article: Cicadas Swarm on Sienna Patti Gallery in Lenox, Mass. JCK Article: Christopher Thompson Royds' Flowers Bloom at Sienna Patti Gallery JCK Article: Look What Happens When Annoushka Gives Peridot A Go Examples of posts that reflect the intersection of jewelry with history, culture and current events: Bob Goodman Wants Jewelers To Join Him in Disrupting the Status Quo: https://www.jckonline.com/editorial-article/bob-goodman-jewelers-disrupting/ The Ten Thousand Things x Met Museum Collaboration Is Coming In Hot: https://www.jckonline.com/editorial-article/ten-thousand-things-x-met-museum/ Go “Sea” Some Serious Silver Treasures At Mystic Seaport Museum: https://www.jckonline.com/editorial-article/sea-as-muse-silver-seaport-museum/ New Jewelry From Rafka Koblence, Olympic Wrestler Turned Designer: https://www.jckonline.com/editorial-article/new-jewelry-from-rafka-koblence/ Transcript: As author of the “All That Glitters” blog for JCK, Amy Elliott has a front row seat to the jewelry industry's up-and-coming trends and designers. She's also been lucky enough to work with some of these designers, helping them refine their brands and create stories that resonate with customers. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about what designers and retailers should do to stay relevant with younger consumers, how art jewelry has influenced high jewelry, and what jewelry trends to watch out for in the coming months. Read the episode transcript here.  Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Today, our guest is Amy Elliott, founder of Amy Elliott Creative. She is a writer, editor and thought leader who specializes in fine jewelry and fashion which makes most of us envious. That's a great profession. She is a contributing editor to the industry publication we all know, JCK, and writes the blog “All That Glitters.” We will hear all about her jewelry journey today. Amy, welcome to the program Amy: Thank you very much for having me, Sharon. It's a pleasure to be here. Sharon: So glad to have you. I'm always envious of people who are writing about jewelry or makers and designers. That's fabulous. I have no talent in that area, so when I hear about people writing, I think, “Wow, it's great.” Tell us all about your jewelry journey. Amy: My jewelry journey is a mix of personal and professional. I'm an avid collector of jewelry. My mother is a big collector of jewelry, so from age 12 on, jewelry was always a part of my life and something that I gravitated to. As a professional, jewelry has been central to my career as a journalist and a writer since the very beginning, starting at The Knot in 1999. Sharon: The Knot being the bridal publication. Amy: Yes. At that time, it was just a website. I was there when they moved into magazines. I helped coordinate the gowns and accessories for fashion shoots and got a taste of engagement rings and diamonds, the 4Cs. That was my first introduction to jewelry on a professional level. Then I took a job at Bridal Guide Magazine, which is a leading print publication still around, privately owned. I was a senior editor there. I had many duties, but one of them was to produce a jewelry column, and that is when my education in jewelry really began. I began forming connections within the industry to educate myself on the 4Cs, pearl buying, colored gemstones. I've always been drawn to color, so that's when I became a student, if you will, of gems and jewelry and how jewelry fits into conversations about fashion trends and cultural and social current events. That was when I really got into jewelry as a métier. I was one of the founding editors of Brides local magazines, which was a Condé Nast publication of regional wedding magazines that no longer exists. Because we were short on staff, I would call in all the jewelry for our cover shoots. Even though I had a leadership role there—I was the executive editor—I also made it part of my job to call in jewels for art cover shoots. I kept that connection, and then on the side I would freelance for luxury publications. It became the thing that I liked to do the best. I loved the people in the industry. I would always learn something. No matter what I was doing or writing about, I would learn something new, and that's still true to this day. There's always something for me to learn. I discovered that jewelry is the perfect combination of earth science, history, culture, and straight-up beauty and aesthetics. It's a very gratifying topic to cover. I love the way it intersects with current events and with, as I mentioned, the fashion conversations at large. Sharon: When you went to Vassar, did you study writing? They're not known for their metalsmithing program, so did you study writing with the idea “I just want to write”? Amy: Pretty much. I was always pretty good at writing and facility with language, so I went there knowing I'd be an English major. For my thesis I wrote a creative writing thesis; it was like a little novella. I've always had a love affair with words and expression of thoughts, and I loved reading, so I knew I would do something that had to do with words and writing. I actually graduated thinking I would be a romance novelist. That was what I thought I would do. Then, of course, I started out in book publishing, and I found it really, really slow and boring, just painfully slow, and I decided perhaps that wasn't for me. Then I took a job in public relations. I really loved the marketing aspect of it and the creativity involved. Of course, it involved a lot of writing.  Eventually I decided I wanted to be on the editorial side of things once and for all. I had always written for the high school newspaper. I had done an internship at Metropolitan Home Magazine in the design department in college, so magazines were always lurking there and were always the main goal. I ended up there; it just took a couple of years for me to get there. Once I did, I knew I wanted to work for a women's magazine. I love things that would fall under the heading of a women's magazine, relationships, fashion. The wedding magazines I worked at were a great fit for me because it's pure romance and fantasy and big, beautiful ball gowns and fancy parties. It was a good fit for me, and I was able to take that and home in on jewelry as a particular focus elsewhere in my career after those first years.  I will say Vassar is known for its art history program. I was not a star art history pupil by any means, but I took many classes there. I find myself leaning on those skills the most as a jewelry writer, looking closely at an object, peeling back the layers and trying to understand what the artist or jeweler is trying to say through jewelry, much like you would with a painting from the Renaissance. So, I am grateful for that tutelage because I found myself drawing on it often, even though I was definitely a B- student in art history. Sharon: It seems to me if you're not going to be a maker, if you're not going to be a metalsmith or a goldsmith or if you're not going to be selling behind the counter, it seems like art history is a fabulous foundation for jewelry in terms of the skills you draw on. Amy: Absolutely. Historical narratives and every historical event that's going on in the world can be—you can look at jewelry from the past and tie it into something that was going on, whether it was the discovery of platinum or the discovery of diamonds in South Africa. It all intersects so beautifully. Vassar taught me to think critically; it taught me how to express myself, to develop a style of writing that I think is still present in my writing today. I always try to get a little lyricism in there. A good liberal arts foundation took me into the world of magazines and eventually digital publishing. I stayed with Condé Nast for a long time. Then I went to Lucky Magazine and was on staff there for a little over a year and a half. I was exposed to fine jewelry on a more fashion level, like the kind cool girls would wear, gold and diamond jewelry that wasn't big jewels by Oscar Heyman. It was a different category, but still within that universe. That was a great education, to look at fine jewelry in a fashion context. They had layoffs in 2012 and I was forced to strike out on my own, but I've been freelance ever since, doing a mix of copywriting for fashion brands and writing for various publications. I've been writing for JCK since 2016. Sharon: Wow! Amy, we want to hear more about that, but just a couple of things. First, thank you to our subscribers. I want to thank everybody who's gotten in contact with me with their suggestions. I love to get them, so please email me at Sharon@ArtsandJewelry.com or DM me @ArtsandJewelry. Also a big shoutout to Kimberly Klosterman, whose jewelry is featured in the exhibit “Simply Brilliant: Jewelry of the 60s and 70s” at the Cincinnati Art Museum. It's on now through February 6. You can listen to our interview with Kimberly on podcast number 133. Now, back to our interview with Amy. Amy, what I like about what you said—you expressed it very well—is the intersection of jewelry with current events and history. I know I always have difficulty explaining to people why I'm interested in jewelry or jewelry history. They think, “Oh, you like big diamonds,” and it's hard to explain how it tells you so much about the period. Amy: Yes, I think acknowledging how global our industry is and learning about different cultures has been so critical to becoming fluent in this world and the gemstones that come from Afghanistan or Ethiopia or Mozambique. Just learning about the sapphires from Sri Lanka—it's so global and all-encompassing. I read the Cartier book, and their story is so fascinating. I am interested particularly in World War II and how that impacted the jewelry industry, how Susan Beltran saved the business of her lover, how the events of World War II Germany impacted Paris and the jewelers there, how the Cartiers would do the birds in the cage and all that stuff. I think you can look at historic jewels and see reflected back at you current events and moments in our history. Sharon: Definitely. I imagine when you look at something, it's not just seeing the jewel, but you're seeing the whole background behind it, how it sits within that context, that nest of history with World War II and platinum. It's an eye into the world. Amy: Even someone like Judith Leiber, who fled Hungary during wartime and became this amazing designer of handbags in New York. So many of the jewelers that are leaders and pillars of our industry came here because of the pogroms in Russia and Eastern Europe. It really does intersect with what was happening in the world. The jewelry industry is a microcosm of all those events, even going to back to the Silk Road and Mesopotamia and the Armenians and the Ottoman Empire. It is a rich tapestry of moments. Historic jewels in particular can give you insight, not just into an artist's vision, but into a moment of time. Sharon: I didn't know that about Judith Leiber; that's interesting. You left Lucky Magazine and opened your own shop. You do a lot of writing and editing. How do the graphics also play into it? Do you art direct? If clients come to you and say, “I need a brochure,” I assume you're doing all the copy and editing, but do they bring you the photos? How does that work? Amy: My background in magazines definitely has given me a pretty robust skillset in terms of working with graphic designers and art directors, conveying ideas and working with them to solve problems. You do emerge with a sense of the visuals, and a taste level is part of it when you're covering fashion and jewelry and things related to style. So yes, I think as a copywriter, one of the things I bring to the table is that I will be able to advise you on the quality of your photos and your look book on the crops, on the model even. Also there's the hierarchy of information; that's definitely a form of direction. It's not very glamorous, but I'm good at understanding how things should be stacked and arranged on a page in terms of hierarchy of messaging. I do have a lot of opinions, I guess, about what looks good and what doesn't. If that feedback is welcome, I'm always happy to share it. Sometimes a client will send me an email for review, and I know they just want to get it out, but I'm like, “No, this is spelled wrong, and the headline should be this, and this needs to go there,” and I'll mock it up on the screen as to where things should go. The best editors and writers, especially when you're dealing with jewelry and fashion and beautiful objects, you have to have a strong sense of the visual. Sharon: I know sometimes clients push back, but I assume they come to you because they want your opinion or they'd do it themselves, right? Amy: Yes. My favorite clients to work with are emerging designers who are just getting out there. They have so many ideas, so many stories to tell, and I help them refine their vision, refine their voice. For many of them, it's the first time they're coming to market, and I can help them present themselves in a professional way that will be compelling to buyers and to media. Sharon: What type of issues are potential clients coming to you for? Is there an overarching—problem might not be the right word—but something you see, a common thread through what they're asking? Amy: There are a number of things. One could be a complicated concept that needs to be explained, something technical like the meteorite that's used in a wedding ring. “We have all this raw material from our supplier. How do we make that customer-facing? How do we make that dense language more lively and easier to digest?” Sometimes it's collection naming. “Here's my collection. Here are the pieces. Can you give them a name? Can you help name this product?” Sometimes it's, “We want to craft a story around this,” and I'm able to come at it with, “I know what the story is here. We've got to shape you to be able to present that story to the world, whether it's a buyer or an editor.”  Usually there is some sort of a concept that is involved; it just hasn't been refined and it's not adjustable. They're so focused on the work and the design vocabulary, they need someone to come in and look at it holistically and figure out how they're going to package this as an overarching idea. Sometimes it's as simple as, “I need to write a letter. These are the things I want to get across to buyers or new accounts or an invitation to an event.” I can take these objectives, these imperatives, and spin them into something compelling and customer-facing and fun to read. It's a mix of imaginative work and down-and-dirty, let me take this corporate document and finesse it and make it more lively and more like something a consumer would want to read on a website. Sharon: They must be so appreciative. Their work may be beautiful, but they have to condense it to say what they are trying to express and get that across to somebody who may not know the language, so somebody wants to pick it up and say, “Oh, that's really interesting.” Amy: Storytelling is a big buzzword right now in the industry, but it's so important. The marketplace is so crowded, and it's not enough to be like, “I have a new collection of stacking rings,” or “I've expanded these rings to include a sapphire version.” You have to come up with some sort of a story to draw in an audience, and then you can use that story on all of your touchpoints, from social media to your email blasts to a landing page on your website. There are a host of jewelry professionals out there that can advise in different ways, to help you get into stores, to help you with specific branding, refining your collection from a merchandising standpoint. There are so many professionals out there that specialize in that, but I think what I bring to the table is knowledge of the industry and a facility with language. It's almost like I'm a mouthpiece for the designer or the corporate brand and a conduit to the consumers' headspace. Sharon: It sounds like a real talent in the areas where there are gaps in what a designer and retailer/manufacturer needs. Telling the story may be a buzzword, but it's words, and you have to use the right words. Tell us about the JCK. You write the blog “All That Glitters,” which is very glittery. It's very attractive. Tell us about it. Amy: Thanks. I was JCK's center for style-related content. Obviously, there's no shortage of breaking news and hard business news, because JCK's first and foremost a serious business publication. Sharon: With the jewelry industry. Amy: With the jewelry industry. I've evolved the blog to be—my favorite things to cover are new collections. I like to interview designers about inspirations. I like to show a broad range of photos from the collection. A lot of it is just showing collections that I love. Maybe I've seen them at Fashion Week; maybe I saw them at the JCK shows or at appointments in the city; maybe I saw something on Instagram. I love to cover design collaborations. Those are one of my favorites things to cover: how two minds can come together to create a new product, like when Suzanne Kalan partnered with Jonathan Adler to do a line of trinket trays. I am interested in cultural events. I like to cover museum exhibits. I covered the Beautiful Creatures exhibit at the Natural History Museum. Because I live in Connecticut, I was able to make it up to Mystic Seaport. They have a beautiful collection of silver trophies by all the best makers, from Tiffany to Shreve, Crump & Low and Gorham. I was able to go up there and see that collection.  It's a blog about culture. It's a blog about things I love. I've written about TV shows that have to do with jewelry. I like the title “All That Glitters” because it gives me a lot of leeway in terms of what I can cover. I've written about writing instruments. Fabergé did a collaboration with whiskey brands and I wrote about that. I try to leave it open, but if there's a strong, new, exciting collection, especially from a high jewelry brand—I'm going to be writing something on one from David Webb coming up. They just released a new collection called Asheville, inspired by his hometown. I like to do a deep dive into a designer story or to show a new collection. My colleague, Brittany Siminitz, does beautiful curations. Sometimes I'll do curations, meaning a roundup of beautiful products that correspond to an overarching theme. I love to do those, but I am happiest when designers come to me with a new collection and something that people haven't seen before. I particularly love discovering new voices and emerging designers that haven't been featured in the press before, so I can be that first introduction.

The Solarpreneur
This Coach is Getting Insane Results (without knowing d2d sales) - Mike Szczesniak

The Solarpreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 47:56


DOWNLOAD SOLCIETY APP NOW! BUY YOUR D2DCon Ticket Here Use the code ArmstrongD2D to get a Solarpreneur Exclusive DISCOUNT!Thanks to our friends at Pi Syndicate for sponsoring this episode! -----------------Speaker 1 (00:02):Welcome to the Solarpreneur podcast, where we teach you to take your solar business to the next level. My name is Taylor Armstrong and I went from $50 in my bank account and struggling for groceries to closing 150 deals in a year and cracking the code on why sales reps fail. I teach you to avoid the mistakes I made and bringing the top solar dogs, the industry to let you in on the secrets of generating more leads, falling up like a pro and closing more deals. What is a Solarpreneur you might ask a Solarpreneur is a new breed of solar pro that is willing to do whatever it takes to achieve mastery and you are about to become one.Speaker 2 (00:42):What's going on. So premiers today, we have a very special episode coming. We are here alive with my friend, a high performance coach, Mike and I just double checked his last name before we started the call. It's Mike Szczesniak. Mike, thanks for hopping on the podcast here with us today.Speaker 3 (00:59):Taylor, thanks for having me brother looking forward to this. Yeah.Speaker 2 (01:02):And then yeah, it's been a, a little bit common here. Mike, I know you've been helping out a ton of reps and managers, all types of people in the solar industry, and it's been pretty crazy just hearing your results. You know, we have a mutual friend, Mikey Lucas, I know you've helped him out a ton. He was on the podcast and was just raving about you, how you've been able to just help reps turn it around and achieve, you know, and seen results. And what's even more cool about it is we were just talking before this you've have you even knocked a door yourself, Mike, have you even done door to door yourself?Speaker 3 (01:35):Not to sell anything? Which is like, I, I gotta be really careful. I like M and M eight mile this thing, like, I, I don't claim to be a door to door sales guy. I just claim to know how to help. 'em Make a lot more money than they're currently making . Right. So but yeah, Mikey's the reason that we got into this space, which I'm sure we'll dive into, but yeah. Yeah, I've been in sales my whole life, right. Starting in eighth grade. My first job was selling retail. I built like started my first comp for anyone watching the video, like these duct tape wallets in fifth grade. So like I've been selling my whole life. But yeah, not door to door. So like can't even compare I sell on zoom and on the phone. So my job's way easier than y'all, but our systems sell really expensive problems for our clients. SoSpeaker 2 (02:24):Yeah. Well, that's awesome. I think it just goes to show for me, like you don't have to be like you don't have to be a master door to door guide and be able to coach people. And I know we'll get into that more, but I think a lot of what you do is help guys turn their mindsets around and just really achieve the right kind of mindset they need out on the doors, out closing deals. And that just was the show. I think that's probably, you know, 80% of the game is just getting your mind right. And getting all the thing that's happening above right as you go out there. But no. So we'll dive into all that and excited to kind of hear about your background, Mike, he has a podcast he's been coaching. How long have you had your coaching business going on now? Mike?Speaker 3 (03:04):Geez. Four or five years. And working with door to door specifically. I mean we niche fully into door to door during COVID. So I guess that's like year and a half come on two, two years or so that we've been working with door door though.Speaker 2 (03:23):Okay. Right on. So yeah. Incredible results. You've achieved for people. And I mean, with a last name like that, how could you not be a coach? I keep thinking you know, Duke's coach Micah. Yeah. Chef, coach Kate. I say, yeah. I keep looking at man. Yeah. so you guys must be something in the, in the water there with coaching, but , that's awesome.Speaker 3 (03:45):A hundred percent.Speaker 2 (03:47):Yeah. But so Mike let's get into yeah. I want to hear kind of how you transitioned specifically in the door-to-door space, why you got into coaching. I know you have a cool story with your anxieties and all that. So can you give us some of your background and how you got into whole, all coaching side of things that you're doing? Yeah,Speaker 3 (04:02):Totally. So like I mentioned, like been in sales, my whole life spent about a decade in the retail space from eighth grade through the beginning of my software career, cuz the beginning of my software career was unpaid training. I spent seven years in corporate as a software engineer. Well once I graduated college, I went straight down to wall street and wrote code for a living for seven years. And I used all of that money to pump into myself, my businesses, mentors, masterminds, coaches, whatever I could do, right. Like I wanted to grow. And a large reason that was just the people I had surrounded myself with. Like, you know, I started three companies while I was in corporate. The first was in the network marketing space. Second was in e-com and drop shipping and third was finally coaching and consulting.Speaker 3 (04:48):So I learned a ton in the first two, surrounded myself with badass humans that really preached personal development. They preached investing in yourself and I learned pretty quickly that I needed to deploy the money that I was in software engineering. Cuz you make pretty good money over there from a salaried perspective. It's pretty much like as close to Fu money as you'll get outside of commission sales or business owners or yeah. You know, whatever. So I, I knew that I had to deploy that. And like you mentioned, during that process, I was really quickly figuring out what anxiety and debilitating panic attacks were and wouldn't wish that on my like most mortal enemy. But this is at a time where like in corporate, on the outside, everything looked great, right? Like every year was big pay, raise, big promotion, like very linear climb in corporate America.Speaker 3 (05:41):And I was like the youngest, senior engineer on my team. I had the six figure salary. I had the luxury apartment on the up grease side of Manhattan with the fountains outside the doormen, the fountains inside. Like by the way only did that. Cause my roommate had connections. Right. But like all this stuff that we're supposed to want, right. Like the vanity stuff. Right. And behind closed doors, it was like nothing even close. Like it was completely in shambles. Hmm. Because I was experiencing that and I bring that up because after a year and a half of this journey, right. Like my first panic attack was wow. Right. Which kind of tells you about the mental side of this whole thing. Right. The new year. Granted of course you're a little hung over that day. I was like a single me three year old dude living in Manhattan.Speaker 3 (06:28):Right. Yeah. But you know, from that moment it was a year and a half journey of, you know, going to the doc, getting my chest, x-ray doing breathing tests. Like I legitimately thought it was a physiological issue. I had no idea what any of this stuff was like, never heard of anybody going through it and no one in my personal life could relate to it. Right. So like I thought my lungs straight up didn't work. Wow. And I'm grateful that I found out, like I basically self-diagnosed it afterwards. I'm like this, I started hearing like anxiety and like this kind of sounds like what it is. I started doing research and you know, I say I'm grateful because then they, would've probably just tried to push a bunch of pharmaceuticals into me, which I proved I didn't need with disrespect. That's just not a route.Speaker 3 (07:17):I would've more wanted to go for me personally. And mm-hmm after that year and a half journey being the engineering nerd that I am, I had to like reverse engineer. What was going on? Like what was happening in the attacks? Why was I going through what I was going through? And what I found Taylor was 100% of the attacks happened in a where I felt guilty for not working. Right. Cause back then remember I was doing the whole, I was selling 40 to 60 hours of my week to the corporation that I was working at. And then I would do the whole five to 7:00 AM, seven to 11:00 PM side hustle. Right. Like I very much fell into the toxic hustle mindset and like that, that call and it worked for me until it didn't and I was starting to figure out how and when and why it didn't mm-hmm right.Speaker 3 (08:10):So what that made me realize like, okay, cool. Well, how can I not feel so guilty? And I, I realized if I was able to show up more powerfully when I was working and pair it with a little bit of a healthier mindset, I might not feel so when I wasn't working. Right. And ultimately I realized I had no idea what it meant to be productive. Like no idea. I thought I did, but I was very quickly realizing that like doing things doesn't matter if the things you're doing don't matter. Hmm. So I like to say that that kind of like cracked the door open cuz productivity is just a small subset of the work that we do with our clients. Yeah. Right. For me it will always be my baby. I joked that it was like my gateway drug to high performance. Right.Speaker 3 (08:56):Cause it cracked that door open, but it, it wasn't for, you know, a couple more years I met some of the leading coaches in the world and like really kicked that door through and started coaching on my own. Yeah. But that started it. So you know, this company that is the results engine, it started as a side hustle. So like I, the third company that I had started and built it as a side hustle for a year and a half, then finally got to a point where I was like, screw it. I dove off the clip, figured out how to fly. That was two and a half, like three, I don't even know how many years I feel like time's moving faster now and just like COVID era. But that was probably about three years or so ago. Okay. And we've been running the business for about four or five years, so yeah. Little bit of a ramble, but hopefully that answers your question. Yeah.Speaker 2 (09:44):No, that's cool. Yeah. It's interesting. Cuz most engineers, I know they want nothing to do with that. You know, like personal development stuff, hiring coaches, I've never heard of like an engineer. Usually they, you know, know if they usually, they just think they know everything and , there's like no, no coaching to be at that I've seenSpeaker 3 (10:01):To be honest, it's like the fact that like I could communicate, like I, I don't resonate with engineers as much. Right. Like I think like one, but I definitely did not fit there. right. Yeah. So that almost was like to a benefit because I was like, okay, well I can actually communicate the work we're doing. And I used that. I was pretty average. I was like, I was a good engineer, but yeah. I wasn't like, I wasn't the best I wasn't any of that. I excelled because I could communicate and people liked working with me. Right. So I just used that to get where I wanted to goSpeaker 2 (10:33):To. So you had the skill set though. Prior mosts engineers don't have, you're good. The engineering and the talking part of it and stuff. That's cool. And so, yeah. Were you so it sounds like your anxiety, it was caused by, you were saying it was just caused by not like you felt like you weren't working enough type thing or was that the cause of it or how, what was the cause of all the anxiety? Exactly.Speaker 3 (10:56):I mean, it was just like, I have very high goals and very high expectations for myself, which I'm sure a lot of people listening to this can relate to. Yeah. But I didn't know how to navigate it. I didn't know how to work in alignment with those things. And I didn't know how to manage my thoughts around it. So I kind of had to learn a lot of that. It started with, you know, started with navigating my time effectively showing it powerfully when I was working. Right. Actually being productive, learning what that really meant. Not busy but productive. Yeah. And then it led to a really long journey of, you know, figuring out how to navigate my thoughts, learning what meditation was doing, personal development. It, I hate the word realistic, but like understanding how to like manage that balance between ring being realistic and being completely unrealistic when it came to those really high goals and expectations and like marrying those two together. But it was always work related. It was like, I just want to be more, do more and have more, which I think a lot of high performers can relate to. I just didn't know how to get there effectively. And I had to go on a journey to figure that out.Speaker 2 (12:06):That's awesome. It's cool to hear cuz as I'm sure you've seen too, Mike, a lot of people in this industry struggle with, I think anxiety, it addictions just different stuff going on. You know, a lot of us sells guys. We have a D D and I know there's a lot of like mental disorders in the space, stuff like that. Yeah. So it's cool to hear guys that have gone through this. Yeah. One of my best friends in the industry, he had, had struggled a ton with anxiety and I don't know if he figured out some of this stuff. I remember I went to his wedding and he had so much anxiety that Dave, his wedding, it took him, we sat there for the ceremony. We sat there like two and a half, three hours before he even showed up just cause he was literally in the bathroom just like puking. Cause he he's like so nervous probably. Yeah. Going through a panic attack. So yeah. And yeah, I don't, I don't understand this stuff, but to me at the time I, man, come on, it's not that big of a deal. I'll just get out there. You're making, you're making this sit here for three hours. Yeah. But no, I it's always,Speaker 3 (13:02):It's always tough. Cause if you haven't experienced it, it's like, you can't relate to it. And it's like, what, what triggers my anxiety might have nothing to do with you and vice versa to your buddy. Like what triggers his anxiety might have zero effect on me. Yeah. The part I didn't share about that January 1st, 2014 is while I was in the middle of that attack, I picked up my phone and I called my mom because you like, you want some connection in that moment. And I literally press mute on the phone cuz I was head a toilet, pu my brain's out and I like, I didn't want to freak her out. I pressed mute cuz I didn't wanna freak her out more than my tonality already clearly was freaking her out. Yeah. Right. Cause like my roommate was outta town. It was new year's day.Speaker 3 (13:47):So he always went up to Vermont on a ski trip or whatever. Yeah. And like, you know, I was like chilling on new year's day. Like what do I have to really freak out about like, yeah. I was 23 years old. I was a mid-level engineer already making a ton of money, beautiful apartment, just watching captain Phillips. Like it's supposed to just be lounging. Right. Like on the surface it doesn't make any sense. Right. But your body doesn't agree. And yeah. I wouldn't, I wouldn't wish any on anybody, you know? I don't think you'd cure it either, but like I think you just learned to navigate it a little bit better.Speaker 2 (14:27):Yeah. So no doubt. And so for you, was it working with, like you mentioned, like your schedule, things like that, was it like therapy that helped you or was it like working with coaches or was there any one thing or was a combination of all that that kind of helped you get through all that?Speaker 3 (14:40):Yeah. Combination of all of it. I've never personally done therapy. I'm a huge advocate of it. I've heard. It's amazing. And I believe that it's a great work, a great bit of work. And I, I, I love to see that the stigma's being chipped away yeah. At it. Because it's not a weakness, it's like it's a tool and a lot of my most powerful, like most successful friends, like use it religiously. Yeah. As a tool to continue to grow. For me, it was just like this E like I think it's epic, like per development journey, just consuming everything that I could learning, how I navigated learning, what was most important to me and also just graduating through seasons of my life. And as I did that, as I started getting connected with systems that you are like building out systems that worked for me and then getting connected with the science of why it worked right.Speaker 3 (15:34):Again, being the nerd that I am, I need to understand why, what we do works. That was really, I, I kind of just dumb lucked my way into it. Right. It was just like catching pieces in every, every position. And obviously I had my own coaches and mentors throughout that process, like still have my own coaches, still a member of multiple, you know, high level masterminds. So I'm a massive, massive advocate for those things. Yeah. But it was kind of like this eclectic journey, I guess. Like you can't really put a, put your finger on like why something happened. Yeah. You know, at least I've struggled too, so yeah. It's kind of yes. Like all of the above minus therapy, but I'm sure I'll have that at some point in my life too. Speaker 2 (16:22):Yeah. That's awesome. I think that's important for our listeners to hear you guys that, you know, do struggle with that. But yeah, I guess just to kind of transition, I know we don't have a to time here, Mike, so you you've been coaching and I know you talked how you decided to transition in the door to door mm-hmm you tell us, why did you decide to kind of niche down into the solar space and is that, are, are all your clients right now? Are they in solarSpeaker 3 (16:49):Right now? All but one are the short answer. This question is Mike. Okay. But the longer answer is, so when we got into coaching space, I was very passionate about serving millennials. Right. I felt that we were a very misunderstood generation. I was working with a lot of older people in corporate and I felt like we were just misunderstood. So I was really passionate about people serving, serving in my age demo. But I also understood that most people didn't think like me and most people were not willing to invest in themselves at the level that I was, they weren't willing to get that uncomfortable. So I feel like I navigated towards working with commission sales and, and small business owners, because I knew that if I could at least loosely associate dollar sign with the promise, not making income claims, but you know, associate the work we would do to an increase in sales or an increase in revenue, then it would be easier for me to paint that picture and get paid what I was worth.Speaker 3 (17:47):Yeah. So that's where we started. And we, you know, when we were, when I, we started working with Mikey, him and I met through one of these masterminds, he saw me speak and he came up to me afterwards. He had just joined the mastermind. I had been there for, I don't know, a year and a half or so two years mm-hmm and he came up, introduced himself. He was like, dude, I need your help. And apparently this was my introduction to door to door sales. Like I'm from New York. No, one's knocking my door. Right. Like I always joke, like I think vivid has one office in all of my county, in New York. And other than that, it's pest control teams that get sent out to the Hamptons and long island on the summers. Right. So I was very, very foreign to the concept, but you know, Mike, he was like, Hey, I sell solar, I knock doors.Speaker 3 (18:34):I'm like, okay, that's weird. But like, cool. Let's, let's talk about what it would look like to work together. So we got to work. He, he got stupid results and I was like, is this a fluke? Like what's going on here because no other we've worked with sales pros and callous industries and nothing compareds to solar. Right. Nothing from an earning potential and also an opportunity for impact. Right. And like doing really good stuff in the world. And I don't think people outside of sales realize how important that is to sales people. Right. But that's another conversation. So Mikey being Mikey kept trying to get me to fire all my other clients and only work with door-to-door industry, specifically his team. Right. And I told him to kick rocks, I'm like, go away, bro. Like, let's just keep making sure that you keep getting results that you're getting.Speaker 3 (19:24):Right. so slowly but surely he started moving some of his guys into our program and we started working with a bunch of them. They got great results as well, and then COVID hit. And when COVID hit, you know, at that point we had, I don't remember exactly which industries we had staffing and recruiting. We had some consultants, we had some sports coaches, some content creators really like all across the gamut and people were doing well up until that, that point. But when COVID hit, they were all impacted in such different ways. Right. some of their industries were, we had one client who was one of the top sales guys, his entire company, and his whole team was let go. Right. He wasn't affected outside of the fact that all of their work went on his plate. So our work shifted a lot.Speaker 3 (20:11):The, and thankfully he wasn't, you know, he didn't lose his position, but like some industries were decimated dude. Yeah. And at the same time, our door-to-door clients were going through the roof. I'm like, I, I was so perplexed by this. Right. But that was ultimately the moment where we're like, screw it. Maybe I should have listened to this crazy dude from Vegas. And all of our messaging went straight to door to door. Nice. Now we have one client who's not door to door. And that's because I went to high school with him and he is a great dude and he just has seen our journeys. Like I know you can help me. Nice. But of that 99.9% that is door to door, I'd say probably like 87% of it or so is solar. Wow. So that's really where we've like kind of built a name for ourself, but we have clients, we've had clients in roofing, pest control, alarms, water filtration, windows. Yeah. Yeah. ASpeaker 2 (21:05):Lot of stuff. That's awesome. Yeah. No, I know you've had some CRA I mean, just before this, I was watching some of your testimonials and it's crazy to hear almost everyone, you know, doubled their, their sales, their commissions. Yeah. Just crazy stories. So you're obviously doing something that works for all your clients. But yeah. Can you tell us, I don't know, do you have any like stories of maybe one, one or two students that were super successful, maybe you got crazy results for 'em or maybe they're in a terrible situation. You helped turn them around, turn them around, get some massive results. Maybe just so some of listeners that haven't heard much about, you can hear what you've done for some of your students.Speaker 3 (21:43):Yeah. We, we, our clients are badass students. So, so let me start with this. Like our clients win because they're very good at what they do. Right. we just help them do more of it without burning out and while making their life super freaking dope. So that, that's the most important piece. If our clients didn't already know how to close deals, I can't help. 'em Close more of it. We're not sales training, we're not sales coaching, none of that. So that's, that's the insert disclaimer here. Right. Okay. But you know, we spoke about Mikey. I think when we started working with him, I think he added like 14 extra personal deals a month. So in Vegas for him, that was like an extra 50 grand a month in commissions. We've had clients go from, you know, two to eight deals a month.Speaker 3 (22:33):We've had go from three to nine. Earlier this year we had a client that was making about 50 grand a month. He graduated the, the year he, the month he graduated, he made a hundred, two grand. And I think this quarter we're recording this in Q4 of 2021 is 2021 or right. Yeah. I always forget the year. I just like stop caring about it. And then I say it out loud. I'm like, is that right? he stands to earn depending on how the installs line up, obviously, but he stands to earn close to half a million dollars in Q4. Oh gosh. Which is just wild. Right. 26 year old sales guy. Like what? Like that since pain. Yeah. So you know, really all across the gamut, but what we're helping all these guys with is really adding structure into their days.Speaker 3 (23:21):Right. Treating it like a business, knowing how to navigate that and execute consistently consistency is the number one word we hear in this industry street, consistency of output, consistency of income, consistency of energy management. Right. If we can't execute consistently, we're constantly chasing the wheel. We're constantly rebuilding the snowball and we're burning way too much energy to do it. Right. so it usually boils down to a lot of those things. But when we get those things dialed in the floodgates open, because when we execute consistently, that leads to all the discipline, all the self confidence, all the momentum that we're striving for. And when that's going, the energy manager just gets so much easier. Right. Like you, you know what I mean, when you're in flow state. Right. And it feels like every, any kitchen table that you sit down with is going solar.Speaker 3 (24:14):Yeah. Right. Like that's the, that's the, the holy grail. That's where we want to get to. And it takes high performance to get there. So we just work on those pillars. Things will like the productivity, right. Things like energy. How do we create it? How do we manage it effectively? Right. Because sales is a transfer of emotion and emotion is just energy and motion. Right. Right. So we might say, everyone's always like, oh, I just need more customers. Well, cool. What gets to that? Do you need to talk to more people like what's happening when you get a ton of no on the door? Or how do you manage it effectively? Mm-Hmm right. All these are the, these are the types of things that we're working with our clients. So it's great to talk about dollar amounts and deal value, but you know, most people get on the phone and they think they're just not saying the right thing.Speaker 3 (24:59):And I'll tell you what, like 99% of the time that's wrong. , it's not that we're saying wrong things. It's that our energy behind it is off. Right. Or, or we're not navigating it confidently when we can do those things half the time. It doesn't matter. Like, I, I look back at some of my sales and I'm like, wow, that was the worst question I could have asked to answer that object, handle that objection. Yeah. But it freaking closed because I came from the right space. My energy was on point. I came at that, the objection confidently and they knew I was coming to serve. Right. Yeah. So there's a lot going on behind the scenes. But that's kind of what we do and how we're serving our clients.Speaker 2 (25:43):Okay. No, that's awesome. Yeah. And I mean, it's crazy cuz most people, I think you probably agree. Most people get tons of sales training in their meetings. You know, most companies have their correlations, they're doing sales trainings, but I don't think very many people are focused on the mindset and the consistency and you know, the structure like you're talking about. So I think that is a big key that a lot of guys are missing is just having that extra piece like you're and about. And so for you, when you're coaching your clients, Mike, do you notice that like, are some people in different stages, do you coach 'em differently or do you pretty much have the same set framework for almost everyone? They all need help with like, I don't know their routine and stuff like that. Or how does that work when you first start coaching someone? What's what do you put 'em through? And what's the structure with all the,Speaker 3 (26:28):Yeah. So the, the structure, like the skeleton of what we take our clients through is pretty much well it there's two programs that we have, like our launch program is where we're taking pretty much all reps to build that foundation. And then we have our accelerator, which is, you know, guys and girls that are company owners, VP of sales, right. Regionals people striving for golden door, that type of stuff. That's like really intimate support. But everyone that goes through either those programs, the structures are the same. Okay. Right. Well, launch structure is always gonna be launch structure. Accelerators are, is gonna be accelerator structure. But what fills those structures? When I say structure, think of it as like a skeleton, right? We have a skeleton of what works, but what populates that skeleton is gonna be unique to their journey. Right. So that will vary slightly depending on where the clients are at.Speaker 3 (27:20):Right. And what they need to focus on. But we, we need data to get there. Right. So the short answer is yes and no. Like everyone has the same structure, but the action items that plot that fill that in or like how we navigate it will be different depending on where they're at. But that just to target, right? Like what you're struggling with right now, Taylor might be completely different than what Mikey's struggling with. Yeah. Now we leverage the same exact mechanisms to get the generate the growth mm-hmm . But the action items that populate that structure is gonna be completely different. Cause we're trying to solve different problems. Okay. Right. We just go up STR and solve the problems behind it, not the symptoms of the problems, if that makes sense. So yeah. It's tough to talk about it like specifically and abstractly, but like I guess the answer is yes. Ultimately you know, it's like, we we'd be stupid not to follow the structure. Everything is customized for our clients to make sure that we're working intentionally. Right. We're very data driven, obviously creating engineering nerd. So like, you know, we just, men lie, women lie numbers don't lie. So we just gotta gather the right numbers. Yeah.Speaker 2 (28:41):Okay. So say, for example, I know you've worked with a lot of people this, but so say you have a rep, maybe it's closing $5 a month, which is pretty decent in solar. That's pretty great. Money can pretty much every market. So what do you, I don't know if there's like pretty common things that you would notice with a rep that's trying to go to from five deals to 10 a month, but there's, is there some pretty common things that you notice that you like can help change right off the bat? It's like, okay, let's get this right. Let's do this. And this is gonna, these are gonna be the things that take you to tens. What are some common things or like, I dunno, factors or maybe it's energy. I dunno. What do you, what do you change with this rep to gets?Speaker 3 (29:21):So the, the first piece is obviously like sales is obviously numbers, right? Like it, but that's a blessing and a curse because everyone's gonna be like, oh, just go knock more doors, bro. Like you just knock more doors and the deals are gonna come. Yeah. That's not how it works. And you know that so like if you were to spend, if your energy's completely off and you just go spend another hour knocking, you're wasting that hour because those clients, those prospects are gonna feel that. Yeah. Right. So yeah, sales is numbers. So we gotta work the numbers, but we need to know how to make the numbers work for us. So the first thing is we have to figure out what does the volume look like right now? Right. That client who went from 50 to a hundred thousand dollars a month, he was knocking 20 doors a day when we started wow, just 20.Speaker 3 (30:13):He was hyper selective about what doors he knocked. He was literally only knocking a door that he knew someone was home. Like see someone through a window, saw them, just pull the, the driveway, whatever. Right. Wow. By the end of it, we got him to 30 doors a day. That's it? That's it. And cause he knocked so effectively. He was just like, even adding five doors a day. He was like, how on earth are we gonna do that? So that's where we have to start. Right. We have to understand what does that volume look like on a day to day basis? And what is the consistent since see, look like, okay. Because unfortunately a lot of people will just be like, oh, well, you know, they, they call the day short. They don't knock the doors that they say that they're knocking or they're like, not that they're lying, but they think they're knocking way more.Speaker 3 (30:55):So we track all that data because we need to look like, look at what the trends are. Right. Okay. Once we dial the mindset piece in, then we can slowly increase, increase that volume. But we need to do it effectively because we're not trying to just do it once and then burn out. Right. Because I think that's what happens far too often in the space because we hear so often just go knock more doors. You go and you knock a hundred doors one day, but you're used to knocking like 35. Yeah. Right. And then you don't knock for another four days. Right. If you're lucky and you get back that fast. Yeah. Right. Or you go and close three deals in a week and you make more in seven days that you've made in six months working your, you know, hourly paid paying job. And you're like, you allow complacency to kick in.Speaker 3 (31:46):Right. We need to, we need to build the consistency. That's the number one piece. Right. That's what it all boils down to. So what that looks like is going to change from client to client obviously. Right? Yeah. But those are a couple examples of like what we have to do to gather that data. Then the question becomes, how do we increase that volume? Not just going to knock more doors for the sake of knocking more doors, but how do we do it sustainably? Okay. Right. Cause that's the key. If it's not simple, it's not sustainable. And if it's not sustainable, what the hell are we doing this for? Yeah. Right. Otherwise you fall victim to the solar coaster because the complacency kicks in. You go really hard. You make a, your money and then you allow yourself to completely obliterate all the momentum that you've built. Yeah. And you have to build that snowball over again. That's not what we're about. So we're striving for that consistency. We have to poke around to figure out what's lacking and then we know what to solve. Right. You hit on energy management before. That's one of the most important pieces that we need to do to maintain that consistency. But we gotta know what it looks like first before we can spot treat. If that makes sense.Speaker 2 (32:52):Okay. So kind of like, I don't know, maybe similar to someone that's trying to go to the gym for the first time, instead of saying, Hey, you need to go to the, the gym seven times this week. Just like make it to the gym and do one pushup stuff like that. 700%,Speaker 3 (33:04):One extra. That, that client, when I was, you asked me for some numbers, I said, we took a client from two to eight deals a month. Literally he hit eight deals a month when we dropped his daily door volume down to one door a day. Right. because for him, the hardest was, and a lot of people experiences it's that first door it's his own door. Right. Like he couldn't get out and go and knock. Like that was a big barrier for him. So we dropped it to one door. But what happens then? It's like, I know Michael, O'Donnell's a massive advocate of mini habits. He's talking about it on his Instagram stories every other day. It seems. Yeah. Right? Yeah. Well, no matter who you follow, right. Whether it's the author of mini habits or, you know, John ASRA calls it, reducing it to the ridiculous right.Speaker 3 (33:48):Making it so ridiculous that it would be silly not to execute or, you know, Jim quick calls it small, simple steps. It's all the same thing. We chunk something down such that it's so simple that it would, would be absolutely ridiculous for us not to execute on it now for, for that client. What happened there? Well, like literally I think there was one day that he actually only knocked one door, right. Where he went out, he was just not feeling it. He knocked that one door. He is like, screw this. I'm going to Chipotle. I don't think it was actually Chipotle, but I love Chipotle. So I just used that in the story. But you know, every other day he went out and he is like, you know, maybe he'll do five. Maybe he'll do 20 some days he'll do 50. And he closed eight deals that month. Wow. Coming from an average of two. And the other part that we didn't talk about is the month before the eight, he did HED for the entire month. Wow. But we dropped that number down. So simply that, and we reduced it to the ridiculous, such that he could execute and we got the execution up. And what happens is, you know, every time you keep your word to yourself, those micro promises you're stacking wins, which builds them momentum. And that momentum leads to all the results that we want.Speaker 2 (35:05):Hmm. Right. That's crazy. So, but yeah, no, it's, and it's so easy as you've seen for guys to be lazy and the solar industry, cuz yeah. I mean it's the curse commissions are through the roof. So couple deals a month is great money. And so it happens to me too. I'll close I'll the other day I got, you know, first door I knocked same day, closed them. And then I had family in town. You know, we just had our kid, this was last Monday actually. So I guess I kind of had a couple good excuses, but I'm like, all right, I closed this till I'm done for the day. this one took off. So it's like, it's so easy. Get in that mindset. And I think if guys can conquer that and yeah, just do the minimum whatever the minimum exert at least do that minimum thing. And then it's gonna be a lot easier to do the next thing. Yeah.Speaker 3 (35:51):So I think the problem is like you, you had solid reasons to call that a short, like I think most people would understand family and Tom for holidays just had a kid. Right? Like those are good reasons. The problem is most of us have excuses that we mask as reasons. Right. Right. Like that's a huge difference. And I mentioned, consistency is the number one word complacency is the number two. It's those dirty sea words when it comes to solar space and really all commission sales. Right. But solar specifically, because the deals are so fat. So you know, it it's we need to make sure to navigate that properly.Speaker 2 (36:29):So yeah. That's awesome. Well, Mike, I know we're running short on time here, but I had kind of two more things I wanted to get to the first. Yeah. And the first was so with the clients you work with I mean, I've worked with coaches you know, many times as I've, as I've been selling, but something that I try to fight is like the day after I stop working with that coach, maybe they work. I don't know how long you usually work with someone three months, maybe whatever it is, what do you do or what tell people to not let their results dip after they're done working with you. Cause I think that's something that I've noticed. I'll work with a coach I'll be super dialed in, but then it's one part of my brain. It's almost like a relief after I'm done working with a coach, I'm like, oh sweet. I don't have to be as accountable. I'm gonna kinda let myself you know, drop down. So what do you tell people as you're done working with them? Maybe I know you probably, I don't know, maybe keep working with them, but if someone's done working with you, how do you kind of like hopefully inspire them to keep those results high in, not let it dip after you're done working with them. Yeah.Speaker 3 (37:31):I love the question and I love like the openness and transparency because I think a lot of people feel that way, but no one has the balls to actually say it. right. So here's, here's what I would say. We talked about sustainability, right? And we talked about consistency. Those, those are the keys, right? Because if we're doing something sustainably, we don't need the motivation of the accountability from someone else to allow us to continue to execute and our goal. And this is obviously not sustainable business practice for us cuz we're like not creating recurring revenue, but like our goal is to make it to the point where like our clients can walk. And you know, one of the clients that I mentioned, the guy went from 50 to a hundred K he's gonna do 500 K in this quarter. And he graduated in March.Speaker 3 (38:18):Wow. Like it just, it, he, he got what he needed and that was it. Like, that was cool. And now we have a working relationship. We're gonna partner on some stuff moving forward. Like that's amazing. Yeah. But notice that everything kept growing because we did it sustainably. Right. So when we do that properly, we have the discipline dialed in. That's all that matters. And you know, we just build it in a way that's in alignment with how we wanna operate our lives. You know, when you do that properly, you, you shouldn't need the external accountability. Right. And, and this is what I say, whenever clients are enrolling there's I believe there's two types of accountability. Right? There's the external accountability, which is what most people think of accountability partners, how much people rely on their coaches. Right. Whatever. It might be reverse pets, anything like that, or we're dependent on something externally to incentivize us to act.Speaker 3 (39:13):Right. And then there's the end accountability, are we accountable to ourselves? And for me that's the holy grail and bridging the gap from one to the other is what we help our clients do. Right. So I dunno if that answers your question, but our goal is to the point where our clients don't feel that way, because they know cool. If they need continued support and they want to continue growing, cuz they there's always another level awesome. We're here to support them. Yeah. But they don't need that if they don't like they don't have to go that route if they don't need that and the results aren't gonna go to if they don't continue to invest. Right. Yeah. Which unfortunately I think is something that gets sold in this space a little too often. But but yeah, hopefully that answers your questions really about the consistency and the inability when you do that and you have your non-negotiables dialed in the game changes. Right. And we just make sure that those are things that we can hit even on our worst days. Right. Then we don't need to be dependent externally and we don't have to invest in something that we don't necessarily need because people don't pay high ticket to get a babysitter. Like accountability. Coaching is a thing in the past. If there's not more baked into the coaching and the growth, then you're frankly wasting your money. yeah.Speaker 2 (40:24):Yeah. That's BA I'm sure that's something you help guys with as they're, you know, working through your coaching. But I like that what you're saying, you know, external internal cuz. Yeah. I, I think about a lot of these competitions I've won. I've had to like just get myself an insane, you know, external accountability. I dunno if you use that like stick app where you like, you know, bet money to charities, you don't likeSpeaker 3 (40:47):We do, we do something similar with our clients in some of the phases of our launch program. It's a powerful tactic man. Reverse bets are a crazy little little trick.Speaker 2 (40:56):Yeah. So it's good. But no, I think it's even more powerful if you can do that internally and not have to rely on all these, you know, gimmicks and external things sometimes. Bingo. That's awesome. So Mike, last question, and then we'll talk about where people can connect with you more, but what advice would you give to like we, we got a lot of managers in the space. Lot of we talked before the recording here just to how it's see how much turnover there is in the solar industry, guys quitting. So for maybe managers or just guys bringing in recruits, what advice can you give to those people on coaching them to, you know, stick, stick in the industry and start achieving success. And I don't know what advice can we giveSpeaker 3 (41:34):To those people? Yeah. I freaking love this question because it's so important. I, I was sharing with you Taylor, like one of my, one of my missions, which is weird, cause I'm like a transplant in this space, right? Like I'm not a, I'm not a door knocker. So I feel like in a foster at times, but like I see what's happening. And like for one of my missions is to help chip away at that turnover because we see like, you know, young guys and girls getting sold this pipe dream in these sunshine and rainbows and then sometimes like not given the support to really bring it to fruition. And obviously there's the, the agency of those people. Like they need to take advantage of the opportunity, but you know, it's our job as leaders to grow into the person that can support them to take your advantage of this opportunity.Speaker 3 (42:18):So I encourage every leader listening to this, whether you're really managing a team or you're just someone that gets looked up to because you're a stud in your company, you need to keep growing and you need to pour into the people around you, whether there are overrides involved or not, right. If you're a killer, you were able to take advantage and harness this opportunity and really allow it to change your life. And it's our duty to make sure that other people can do the same thing. And especially when they're overrides involved, like if your people don't win, then obviously your income is heavily impacted. So whatever your incentivization is, you know, I think we need to continue to pour into ourselves. Whether that's being in masterminds, hiring coaches, reading books, listening to podcasts, doing whatever you need to do to stay tapped in and growing.Speaker 3 (43:10):Because if you don't build those assets, you're not gonna be able to pour into your people. Yeah. And unfortunately I think it gets overlooked because the, usually a lot of the way that you grow in a sales organization is based on your sales volume. Yeah. Right. So if we don't all of a sudden then if we're not conscious of this and we're not really intentional around this, we have a bunch of sales studs that are now in leadership that might have no idea how to lead. Right. Other than leading a prospect into a transaction. Yeah. Right. So we need to focus on those leadership skills. Right. Go to the conferences. It doesn't matter what it is. Just keep doing it because I've heard it far too many times. Success of a new rep often is entirely dependent, not entirely, but it's very dependent on what regional they're working under.Speaker 3 (44:03):Mm. Like we gotta make sure that we are that regional or we are that leader. Or we are that person that inspires them to show up powerfully that helps guide them along this process. And not just throws them out to the wolves because you're are trying to play the numbers game too. And you're throwing at the wall to see what sticks. Yeah. Like if we're selling people a pipe dream, we better be sure to give them the resources and the support to bring it to life for them. Yeah. So end rant take for what it's worth. But like you gotta keep growing because you gotta keep pouring into people. Yeah.Speaker 2 (44:34):Love that a hundred percent. That's so true. Cause so many people, maybe they're good at sales, but they've never been in leadership roles. And I think that's a mistake. Some people MIS make just, cuz you're really good at selling doesn't necessarily mean you can teach it or you can lead. So yeah. I think, especially for guys like that, some important to go develop those leadership skills, invest in yourself, invest in the coach like Mike or we've got programs over here at solar and that's gonna keep things fresh I think. And help guys lead. So Mike, we appreciate your time and I know you gotta hop on another call here in a minute, but before we let you go work and guys potentially I don't know, apply to have you as a coach or connect more with you or find your podcast, give us your your plugs for where people connect with you a little bit more.Speaker 3 (45:19):Yeah. First of all, Taylor, appreciate you having me brother. This is this is super fun. I honestly, man, the best places is Instagram at Mike says yak on Instagram probably got a link back. Cause all the Polish is like really hard to spell. Wow. And be aware of the freaking crypto scammers everyone's getting fake profiles made. I'm never gonna DMU pitching crypto. I will DMU pitching high performance coaching, but never crypto . Right. so just sliding the DMS. If anyone has questions around anything, we talked about once like to go a little bit deeper on stuff, slide in there. Either my team we'll answer or if they don't know the answer, they'll flag it for me and I'll get you an answer. But yeah, that that's literally like the inside of our funnel anyway. So don't worry. You're not gonna follow and just get relentlessly pitched if you don't want to be, we will open conversation cuz it's social media. Right. But yeah. DMS are already, oh, always open. Feel free to reach out with any questions.Speaker 2 (46:15):Love it. Well Mike, thanks for coming on the show today. Today. Shoot Mike at DM. Let him know you appreciated the knowledge bombs he drops for our solarpreneurs here today and Mike, I'm sure we'll people connecting with you soon. Thanks again for coming on the show with us today.Speaker 3 (46:29):Thank you brother. Appreciate it. Okay.Speaker 2 (46:31):Talk soon. Hey, Solarpreneurs quick question. What if you could surround yourself with the industry's top performing sales pros, marketers, and CEOs, and learn from their experience and wisdom in less than 20 minutes a day. For the last three years, I've been placed in the fortunate position to interview dozens of elite level solar professionals and learn exactly what they do behind closed doors to build their solar careers to an all-star level. That's why I want to make a truly special announcement about the new learning community, exclusively for solar professionals to learn, compete, and win with top performers in the industry. And it's called the Solciety, this learning community with designed from the ground up to level the playing field to give solar pros access to proven members who want to give back to this community and help you or your team to be held accountable by the industry. Brightest minds four, are you ready for it? Less than $3 and 45 cents a day currently Solciety is open, launched, and ready to be enrolled. So go to Solciety.co To learn more and join the learning experience. Now this is exclusively for Solarpreneur listeners. So be sure to go to solciety.co and join. We'll see you on the inside. 

Art · The Creative Process
(Highlights) CHRISTINA MOSSAIDES STRASSFIELD

Art · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 11:22


Christina Mossaides Strassfield is the Museum Director/Chief Curator of Guild Hall Museum in East Hampton, New York. She oversees the artistic leadership and overall management of the Museum and its exhibition schedule, curating or overseeing as program manager. The mission of the museum is to showcase artists who have an affiliation with Eastern Suffolk County. The Hamptons is the summer home for most of the New York Art world. This has allowed Strassfield to forge close relationships with leading artists, dealers and collectors. She has been instrumental in coordinating biannual group invitationals. At Guild Hall she is charge of curating the collection of over 2000 objects, works of art by artists associated with the Eastern Long Island, as well as organizing the traveling exhibition of works from the collection, managing education programs, design, conservation and other exhibition related work. · www.guildhall.org · www.creativeprocess.info

Art · The Creative Process
CHRISTINA MOSSAIDES STRASSFIELD

Art · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 79:31


Christina Mossaides Strassfield is the Museum Director/Chief Curator of Guild Hall Museum in East Hampton, New York. She oversees the artistic leadership and overall management of the Museum and its exhibition schedule, curating or overseeing as program manager. The mission of the museum is to showcase artists who have an affiliation with Eastern Suffolk County. The Hamptons is the summer home for most of the New York Art world. This has allowed Strassfield to forge close relationships with leading artists, dealers and collectors. She has been instrumental in coordinating biannual group invitationals. At Guild Hall she is charge of curating the collection of over 2000 objects, works of art by artists associated with the Eastern Long Island, as well as organizing the traveling exhibition of works from the collection, managing education programs, design, conservation and other exhibition related work.· www.guildhall.org · www.creativeprocess.info

ISD
Greatness

ISD

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 83:41


This week on ISD, we jump right in giving our birthday wishes to Jay Z while also recognizing and honoring the late great Fred Hampton. For those who don't know, Hampton was the leader of the Illinois chapter of the Black Panther party. Recently, their is a movie that describes his life in detail called Judas and the Black Messiah. The movie does a great job depicting his life from his powerful journey of empowerment through Chicago, all the way up until his tragic murder at the hands of the government. He founded the Rainbow Coalition: a political party that broke down borders between race and strived for social change. Being only 21 at the time of his death, One of Hamptons most remarkable feats was the sheer amount of things he was able to accomplish. Musically, we dive in talking about Kaytranada, Isiah Rashad, Project Pat, Kanye west, Jay Z and more! From that point we dive into a conversation about capitalism, and we rap up with the BULLS!!!! In School Detention is a weekly podcast hosted by Devonn Overstreet and Pierce Anderson. We believe in the 3 E's. Educate, Entertain, and Empower. Come sit down with us and listen to our views of life through the eyes of 20 somethings trying to figure out life as we go. Thank you! Devonn: Facebook- Devonn Overstreet Twitter- @Dstreetz815 IG-devonnalan Pierce: Facebook- Pierce Anderson Twitter- JUSTDIDIT2345 IG-pb00gs

27Speaks
27Speaks: Hop On The Holiday Express!

27Speaks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 26:55


Welcome to the latest edition of The Express News Group's podcast, 27Speaks. The Express News Group editors Kathryn Menu, Annette Hinkle, Joseph P. Shaw, Brendan O'Reilly, and Bill Sutton discuss the week's news on the South Fork of Long Island. In this week's edition of 27Speaks, the editors talk about the newspaper group's holiday fundraising effort, the Holiday Express, which will help to support four local organizations, Heart of the Hamptons, Help for Local Families Fund, Sag Harbor Helpers and the Springs Food Pantry.

I Said What I Said
ISWIS 12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS (DAY 3) FOOD COMA

I Said What I Said

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 23:26


Over 12 days, FK and Jollz with the help of some amazing sponsors will be giving away incredible gifts to lucky winners. To stand a chance at winning, all you need to do is buy daily raffles for gifts you are interested in here - https://isaidwhatisaidpodcast.com/raffle/Today is day 3, and one lucky winner will be getting a stocked fridge or freezer for the Christmas holidays From Hamptons catering, you will be getting 3.5 liters of - Jollof Rice - Assorted meat stew- Efo Riro - Egusi - Seafood Okra - Ayamase - Ofada Rice - Pepper Chicken From the AJ's you will get 3 trays from their Christmas menu And finally, 2 cases of Bachus Red Wine to have a Merry Christmas indeed! This is only valid for Lagos based listeners. Please check out Hamptons catering here - https://www.instagram.com/hamptonscatering/Check out the AJ's here - https://www.instagram.com/theajsgourmet/Buy your day 3 tickets here - https://isaidwhatisaidpodcast.com/raffle/FK & Jollz are dressed by x, you can check them out here -www.soulorange.com

Line Drunk
White Chicks

Line Drunk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 36:14


"I Know You Hookers Don't Think This Is Over With." I love White Chicks, it is easily in my top ten films. If you haven't watched it yet, where have you been? It is fantastic and so well written. Maybe one day I will have the honor and privilege of having on the Wayan's brothers. You can stream the film on HBOMax but you should just buy the DVD on Amazon or somewhere, it' one worth having. Slow Comfortable Screw (tipsybartender.com): Ingredients 1 oz Sloe Gin 1 oz Southern Comfort 1 oz Vodka Top with Orange Juice Directions Fill a collins glass with ice and pour over slow gin, southern comfort, and vodka. Top with orange juice. Drinking Game (reeldrinkinginggames.com): Drink every time: The words "FBI", "Wilson Sisters" and "Hamptons" are said The detectives ask a "Would you rather" question Latrell makes a pass at Marcus Kevin hit's on someone as a woman The Vandergeld sisters feud The boys struggle with something feminine The boys do something "black" while white They change in or out of costume Finish your drink: Kevin is purchased at the auction Kevin and Marcus are revealed to be... Black (the deception) As always, drink responsibly and with others, share the podcast with your friends. Follow me on Twitter and Instagram at @Line_Drunk, check out linedrunk.wordpress.com, and for watch-a-long episodes join the Patreon at patreon.com/linedrunk. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/linedrunk/support

The Shrink Next Door
How Michael Showalter Translated the Podcast to the TV Screen | 13

The Shrink Next Door

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 29:37


Between a global pandemic and filming the entire TV series in Los Angeles, Michael Showalter talks about the challenges he faced in bringing the podcast to the television screen and how his own experience in therapy sparked his initial interest in Marty and Ike's story.The Shrink Next Door is now an Apple Original series, starring Will Ferrell and Paul Rudd. Watch now only on Apple TV+http://apple.co/-TheShrinkNextDoorSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

SLG Meetups
SLG Meetup E107: Grand James Bates

SLG Meetups

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 15:06


Connecting with Grant James Bates (@grantjbates), London Luxury Real Estate Agent

The Ryan Kelley Morning After
11-29-21 Segment 1 NFL/STL Settlement and Life Above the Sex Shop

The Ryan Kelley Morning After

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 52:54


Tim back from the Hamptons. SLU Soccer. Naturally, we transition from soccer to Prod Joe's sexual history. Sadie Hawkins for the listeners. What should we talk about? A lot of votes come in for Doug's rear. Tim's take on the NFL settlement. Doug has a take as well. Chris has a question. 

The Ryan Kelley Morning After
11-29-21 Segment 1 NFL/STL Settlement and Life Above the Sex Shop

The Ryan Kelley Morning After

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 52:54


Tim back from the Hamptons. SLU Soccer. Naturally, we transition from soccer to Prod Joe's sexual history. Sadie Hawkins for the listeners. What should we talk about? A lot of votes come in for Doug's rear. Tim's take on the NFL settlement. Doug has a take as well. Chris has a question. 

No Hugging, No Learning
The Wizard (S9E15)

No Hugging, No Learning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 72:25


"Kramer "retires" in Florida. Jerry buys Morty a gadget. George lies about a house in the Hamptons. Elaine wonders if her boyfriend is black." -Original Air Date: 2/26/1998- This week we're talking about The Wizard, Kramer's questionable campaigning pose, interracial couples and being bad at math. This is No Hugging, No Learning, the show about one thing...watching Seinfeld for the first time. We're on Patreon now! Support the show by checking out http://www.patreon.com/nohugging. We (finally) wrapped up Halloween Month with our new review of Transylvania 6-5000 with Michael Richards! Listening for the first time and just looking for the episode discussion? Skip to 28:16! Get a FREE No Hugging, No Learning sticker by giving us a 5 star rating and a written review wherever you listen to this! Just be sure to send us your address! Email us: nohuggingnolearningshow@gmail.com Follow us: @nohugging on Twitter Music: Kevin Bewersdorf - "The Last Seinfeld"

The Team House
From Misadventures in The Coast Guard to The CIA | Caroline Walsh | Ep. 122

The Team House

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 99:37


"When people ask why I joined the Coast Guard, I respond that I was twenty-two, blond, and fit. In most military services that is guaranteed sexual harassment. Why not join the one with the ocean breeze?" Caroline's journey from enlisted Coast Guard member to CIA analyst includes boot camp, Hamptons yachters named Gary, meaning making in Guantanamo Bay, and a session with a Veterans Affairs-assigned therapist who has fourteen cats, one of which cures migraines. She takes you from serious topics of sexual harassment and suicide to laughing about how her predator's moment to make her prey was oddly interrupted. You are a fly on the wall during her botched FBI polygraph and will be scratching your head about her CIA classmate who U-turns during their surveillance-detection training like she just saw a sign for a sale at Macy's. Caroline is the author of Fairly Smooth Operator: My Life Occasionally at the Tip of the Spear found at https://www.amazon.com/Fairly-Smooth-Operator-Occasionally-Spear/dp/1646635205/ Today's Sponsors:

BEHIND THE VELVET ROPE
Introducing: The Shrink Next Door

BEHIND THE VELVET ROPE

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 8:27


Veteran journalist Joe Nocera's neighbor in the Hamptons was a therapist named Ike. Ike counted celebrities and Manhattan elites as his patients. He'd host star-studded parties at his eccentric vacation house. But one summer, Joe discovered that Ike was gone and everything he'd thought he'd known about his neighbor -- and the house next door -- was wrong. From Wondery, the company behind Dirty John and Dr. Death, and Bloomberg, “The Shrink Next Door” is a story about power, control and turning to the wrong person for help for three decades. Written and hosted by Joe Nocera, a columnist for Bloomberg. The Shrink Next Door is now an Apple Original series, starring Will Ferrell and Paul Rudd. Watch now only on Apple TV+.  Listen to the Shrink Next Door now!  https://link.chtbl.com/shrink_next_door?sid=Audio-Shrink_Next_Door_2021-Behind_The_Velvet_Rope  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Murder In My Family
Wondery Presents; The Shrink Next Door

The Murder In My Family

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 8:15


Wondery presents; The Shrink Next DoorVeteran journalist Joe Nocera's neighbor in the Hamptons was a therapist named Ike. Ike countedcelebrities and Manhattan elites as his patients. He'd host star-studded parties at his eccentric vacation house. But one summer, Joe discovered that Ike was gone and everything he'd thought he'd known about his neighbor -- and the house next door -- was wrong. From Wondery, the company behind Dirty John and Dr. Death, and Bloomberg, “The Shrink Next Door” is a story about power, control and turning to the wrong person for help for three decades. Written and hosted by Joe Nocera, a columnist for Bloomberg. The Shrink Next Door is now an Apple Original series, starring Will Ferrell and Paul Rudd. Watch now only on Apple TV+.Listen to the Shrink Next Door now!https://link.chtbl.com/shrink_next_door?sid=Audio-Shrink_Next_Door_2021-The_Murder_In_My_Family

Southern Fried True Crime
Introducing Wondery's: The Shrink Next Door

Southern Fried True Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 8:05


Veteran journalist Joe Nocera's neighbor in the Hamptons was a therapist named Ike. Ike counted celebrities and Manhattan elites as his patients. He'd host star-studded parties at his eccentric vacation house. But one summer, Joe discovered that Ike was gone and everything he'd thought he'd known about his neighbor -- and the house next door -- was wrong. From Wondery, the company behind Dirty John and Dr. Death, and Bloomberg, “The Shrink Next Door” is a story about power, control and turning to the wrong person for help for three decades. Written and hosted by Joe Nocera, a columnist for Bloomberg. The Shrink Next Door is now an Apple Original series, starring Will Ferrell and Paul Rudd. Watch now only on Apple TV+. Listen to the Shrink Next Door now! https://link.chtbl.com/shrink_next_door?sid=Audio-Shrink_Next_Door_2021-Southern_Fried_True_Crime

A Date With Dateline
Wondery Preview: THE SHRINK NEXT DOOR

A Date With Dateline

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 8:49


Veteran journalist Joe Nocera's neighbor in the Hamptons was a therapist named Ike. Ike counted celebrities and Manhattan elites as his patients. He'd host star-studded parties at his eccentric vacation house. But one summer, Joe discovered that Ike was gone and everything he'd thought he'd known about his neighbor -- and the house next door -- was wrong. From Wondery, the company behind Dirty John and Dr. Death, and Bloomberg, “The Shrink Next Door” is a story about power, control and turning to the wrong person for help for three decades. Written and hosted by Joe Nocera, a columnist for Bloomberg. The Shrink Next Door is now an Apple Original series, starring Will Ferrell and Paul Rudd. Watch now only on Apple TV+.  Listen to the Shrink Next Door now! https://link.chtbl.com/shrink_next_door?sid=Audio-Shrink_Next_Door_2021-A_Date_with_Dateline Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

True Crime Fan Club Podcast
Wondery Presents: The Shrink Next Door

True Crime Fan Club Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 8:23


Veteran journalist Joe Nocera's neighbor in the Hamptons was a therapist named Ike. Ike counted celebrities and Manhattan elites as his patients. He'd host star-studded parties at his eccentric vacation house. But one summer, Joe discovered that Ike was gone and everything he'd thought he'd known about his neighbor — and the house next door […]

Missing Maura Murray
Introducing The Shrink Next Door

Missing Maura Murray

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 8:23


Veteran journalist Joe Nocera's neighbor in the Hamptons was a therapist named Ike. Ike counted celebrities and Manhattan elites as his patients. He'd host star-studded parties at his eccentric vacation house. But one summer, Joe discovered that Ike was gone and everything he'd thought he'd known about his neighbor -- and the house next door -- was wrong. From Wondery, the company behind Dirty John and Dr. Death, and Bloomberg, “The Shrink Next Door” is a story about power, control and turning to the wrong person for help for three decades. Written and hosted by Joe Nocera, a columnist for Bloomberg. The Shrink Next Door is now an Apple Original series, starring Will Ferrell and Paul Rudd. Watch now only on Apple TV+. Listen to the Shrink Next Door now! https://link.chtbl.com/shrink_next_door?sid=Audio-Shrink_Next_Door_2021-Missing  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Crawlspace: True Crime & Mysteries
Introducing The Shrink Next Door

Crawlspace: True Crime & Mysteries

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 8:16


Veteran journalist Joe Nocera's neighbor in the Hamptons was a therapist named Ike. Ike counted celebrities and Manhattan elites as his patients. He'd host star-studded parties at his eccentric vacation house. But one summer, Joe discovered that Ike was gone and everything he'd thought he'd known about his neighbor -- and the house next door -- was wrong. From Wondery, the company behind Dirty John and Dr. Death, and Bloomberg, “The Shrink Next Door” is a story about power, control and turning to the wrong person for help for three decades. Written and hosted by Joe Nocera, a columnist for Bloomberg. The Shrink Next Door is now an Apple Original series, starring Will Ferrell and Paul Rudd. Watch now only on Apple TV+. Listen to the Shrink Next Door now! https://link.chtbl.com/shrink_next_door?sid=Audio-Shrink_Next_Door_2021-Crawlspace:_True_Crime_&_ Mysteries  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Moms and Murder
Wondery Presents: The Shrink Next Door

Moms and Murder

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 8:10


Veteran journalist Joe Nocera's neighbor in the Hamptons was a therapist named Ike. Ike counted celebrities and Manhattan elites as his patients. He'd host star-studded parties at his eccentric vacation house. But one summer, Joe discovered that Ike was gone and everything he'd thought he'd known about his neighbor -- and the house next door -- was wrong. From Wondery, the company behind Dirty John and Dr. Death, and Bloomberg, “The Shrink Next Door” is a story about power, control and turning to the wrong person for help for three decades. Written and hosted by Joe Nocera, a columnist for Bloomberg. The Shrink Next Door is now an Apple Original series, starring Will Ferrell and Paul Rudd. Watch now only on Apple TV+. Listen to the Shrink Next Door now! https://link.chtbl.com/shrink_next_door?sid=Audio-Shrink_Next_Door_2021-Moms_and_Murder Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Mens Rea:  A true crime podcast
Wondery Presents: The Shrink Next Door

Mens Rea: A true crime podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 7:46


Veteran journalist Joe Nocera's neighbour in the Hamptons was a therapist named Ike. Ike counted celebrities and Manhattan elites as his patients. He'd host star-studded parties at his eccentric vacation house. But one summer, Joe discovered that Ike was gone and everything he'd thought he'd known about his neighbour -- and the house next door -- was wrong.  From Wondery, the company behind Dirty John and Dr. Death, and Bloomberg, “The Shrink Next Door” is a story about power, control and turning to the wrong person for help for three decades. Written and hosted by Joe Nocera, a columnist for Bloomberg. The Shrink Next Door is now an Apple Original series, starring Will Ferrell and Paul Rudd. Watch now only on Apple TV+.  Listen to the Shrink Next Door now!  https://link.chtbl.com/shrink_next_door?sid=Audio-Shrink_Next_Door_2021-Mens_Rea:_A_True_Crime_ Podcast

Killer Queens: A True Crime Podcast
Introducing: The Shrink Next Door by Wondery

Killer Queens: A True Crime Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 9:44


Veteran journalist Joe Nocera's neighbor in the Hamptons was a therapist named Ike. Ike counted celebrities and Manhattan elites as his patients. He'd host star-studded parties at his eccentric vacation house. But one summer, Joe discovered that Ike was gone and everything he'd thought he'd known about his neighbor -- and the house next door -- was wrong. From Wondery, the company behind Dirty John and Dr. Death, and Bloomberg, “The Shrink Next Door” is a story about power, control and turning to the wrong person for help for three decades. Written and hosted by Joe Nocera, a columnist for Bloomberg. The Shrink Next Door is now an Apple Original series, starring Will Ferrell and Paul Rudd. Watch now only on Apple TV+.  Click Here to Listen to the Shrink Next Door now! 

Without Warning The Lauren Agee Case

Veteran journalist Joe Nocera's neighbor in the Hamptons was a therapist named Ike. Ike counted celebrities and Manhattan elites as his patients. He'd host star-studded parties at his eccentric vacation house. But one summer, Joe discovered that Ike was gone and everything he'd thought he'd known about his neighbor -- and the house next door -- was wrong. From Wondery, the company behind Dirty John and Dr. Death, and Bloomberg, “The Shrink Next Door” is a story about power, control and turning to the wrong person for help for three decades. Written and hosted by Joe Nocera, a columnist for Bloomberg. The Shrink Next Door is now an Apple Original series, starring Will Ferrell and Paul Rudd. Watch now only on Apple TV+.  https://link.chtbl.com/shrink_next_door?sid=Audio-Shrink_Next_Door_2021-Without_Warning_Podcast  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

gone cold podcast - texas true crime
Introducing The Shrink Next Door

gone cold podcast - texas true crime

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 8:26


Veteran journalist Joe Nocera's neighbor in the Hamptons was a therapist named Ike. Ike counted celebrities and Manhattan elites as his patients. He'd host star-studded parties at his eccentric vacation house. But one summer, Joe discovered that Ike was gone and everything he'd thought he'd known about his neighbor -- and the house next door -- was wrong. From Wondery, the company behind Dirty John and Dr. Death, and Bloomberg, “The Shrink Next Door” is a story about power, control and turning to the wrong person for help for three decades. Written and hosted by Joe Nocera, a columnist for Bloomberg. The Shrink Next Door is now an Apple Original series, starring Will Ferrell and Paul Rudd. Watch now only on Apple TV+. Listen to the Shrink Next Door now at https://link.chtbl.com/shrink_next_door?sid+Audio-Shrink_Next_Door_2021_Gone_Cold_Podcast

Conspiracy Theories & Unpopular Culture

Veteran journalist Joe Nocera's neighbor in the Hamptons was a therapist named Ike. Ike counted celebrities and Manhattan elites as his patients. He'd host star-studded parties at his eccentric vacation house. But one summer, Joe discovered that Ike was gone and everything he'd thought he'd known about his neighbor -- and the house next door -- was wrong. From Wondery, the company behind Dirty John and Dr. Death, and Bloomberg, “The Shrink Next Door” is a story about power, control and turning to the wrong person for help for three decades. Written and hosted by Joe Nocera, a columnist for Bloomberg. The Shrink Next Door is now an Apple Original series, starring Will Ferrell and Paul Rudd. Watch now only on Apple TV+. Listen to the Shrink Next Door now! https://link.chtbl.com/shrink_next_door?sid=Audio-Shrink_Next_Door_2021-Conspiracy_Theories_&_Unpopular_Culture

Unresolved
Introducing: The Shrink Next Door

Unresolved

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 8:11


Veteran journalist Joe Nocera's neighbor in the Hamptons was a therapist named Ike. Ike counted celebrities and Manhattan elites as his patients. He'd host star-studded parties at his eccentric vacation house. But one summer, Joe discovered that Ike was gone and everything he'd thought he'd known about his neighbor -- and the house next door -- was wrong. From Wondery, the company behind Dirty John and Dr. Death, and Bloomberg, “The Shrink Next Door” is a story about power, control and turning to the wrong person for help for three decades. Written and hosted by Joe Nocera, a columnist for Bloomberg. The Shrink Next Door is now an Apple Original series, starring Will Ferrell and Paul Rudd. Watch now only on Apple TV+. Listen to the Shrink Next Door now at https://link.chtbl.com/shrink_next_door?sid=Audio-Shrink_Next_Door_2021-Unresolved

True Crimecast
Introducing: The Shrink Next Door

True Crimecast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 8:17


Veteran journalist Joe Nocera's neighbor in the Hamptons was a therapist named Ike. Ike counted celebrities and Manhattan elites as his patients. He'd host star-studded parties at his eccentric vacation house. But one summer, Joe discovered that Ike was gone and everything he'd thought he'd known about his neighbor -- and the house next door -- was wrong. From Wondery, the company behind Dirty John and Dr. Death, and Bloomberg, “The Shrink Next Door” is a story about power, control and turning to the wrong person for help for three decades. Written and hosted by Joe Nocera, a columnist for Bloomberg. The Shrink Next Door is now an Apple Original series, starring Will Ferrell and Paul Rudd. Watch now only on Apple TV+.Listen to the Shrink Next Door now! https://link.chtbl.com/shrink_next_door?sid=Audio-Shrink_Next_Door_2021-True_Crimecast

True Murder: The Most Shocking Killers

Veteran journalist Joe Nocera's neighbor in the Hamptons was a therapist named Ike. Ike counted celebrities and Manhattan elites as his patients. He'd host star-studded parties at his eccentric vacation house. But one summer, Joe discovered that Ike was gone and everything he'd thought he'd known about his neighbor -- and the house next door -- was wrong. From Wondery, the company behind Dirty John and Dr. Death, and Bloomberg, “The Shrink Next Door” is a story about power, control and turning to the wrong person for help for three decades. Written and hosted by Joe Nocera, a columnist for Bloomberg. The Shrink Next Door is now an Apple Original series, starring Will Ferrell and Paul Rudd. Watch now only on Apple TV+. Listen to the Shrink Next Door now! https://link.chtbl.com/shrink_next_door?sid=Audio-Shrink_Next_Door_2021-True_Murder

Our True Crime Podcast
Wondery and Bloomberg's The Shrink Next Door

Our True Crime Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 8:15


Veteran journalist Joe Nocera's neighbor in the Hamptons was a therapist named Ike. Ike counted celebrities and Manhattan elites as his patients. He'd host star-studded parties at his eccentric vacation house. But one summer, Joe discovered that Ike was gone and everything he'd thought he'd known about his neighbor -- and the house next door -- was wrong. From Wondery, the company behind Dirty John and Dr. Death, and Bloomberg, “The Shrink Next Door” is a story about power, control and turning to the wrong person for help for three decades. Written and hosted by Joe Nocera, a columnist for Bloomberg. The Shrink Next Door is now an Apple Original series, starring Will Ferrell and Paul Rudd. Watch now only on Apple TV+. Listen to the Shrink Next Door now! https://link.chtbl.com/shrink_next_door?sid=Audio-Shrink_Next_Door_2021-Our_True_Crime_Podcast

Infamous America
Introducing "The Shrink Next Door" from Wondery and Bloomberg

Infamous America

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 8:27


Veteran journalist Joe Nocera's neighbor in the Hamptons was a therapist named Ike. Ike counted celebrities and Manhattan elites as his patients. He'd host star-studded parties at his eccentric vacation house. But one summer, Joe discovered that Ike was gone and everything he'd thought he'd known about his neighbor -- and the house next door -- was wrong. From Wondery, the company behind Dirty John and Dr. Death, and Bloomberg, “The Shrink Next Door” is a story about power, control and turning to the wrong person for help for three decades. Written and hosted by Joe Nocera, a columnist for Bloomberg. The Shrink Next Door is now an Apple Original series, starring Will Ferrell and Paul Rudd. Watch now only on Apple TV+. Listen to the Shrink Next Door now! https://link.chtbl.com/shrink_next_door?sid=Audio-Shrink_Next_Door_2021-Infamous_America  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Mugshot
Introducing: The Shrink Next Door

Mugshot

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 8:34


"Veteran journalist Joe Nocera's neighbor in the Hamptons was a therapist named Ike. Ike counted celebrities and Manhattan elites as his patients. He'd host star-studded parties at his eccentric vacation house. But one summer, Joe discovered that Ike was gone and everything he'd thought he'd known about his neighbor -- and the house next door -- was wrong. From Wondery, the company behind Dirty John and Dr. Death, and Bloomberg, “The Shrink Next Door” is a story about power, control and turning to the wrong person for help for three decades. Written and hosted by Joe Nocera, a columnist for Bloomberg. The Shrink Next Door is now an Apple Original series, starring Will Ferrell and Paul Rudd. Watch now only on Apple TV+. Listen to the Shrink Next Door now! https://link.chtbl.com/shrink_next_door?sid=Audio-Shrink_Next_Door_2021-Corpus_&_Mugshot

Corpus Delicti
Introducing: The Shrink Next Door

Corpus Delicti

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 8:26


Veteran journalist Joe Nocera's neighbor in the Hamptons was a therapist named Ike. Ike counted celebrities and Manhattan elites as his patients. He'd host star-studded parties at his eccentric vacation house. But one summer, Joe discovered that Ike was gone and everything he'd thought he'd known about his neighbor -- and the house next door -- was wrong. From Wondery, the company behind Dirty John and Dr. Death, and Bloomberg, “The Shrink Next Door” is a story about power, control and turning to the wrong person for help for three decades. Written and hosted by Joe Nocera, a columnist for Bloomberg. The Shrink Next Door is now an Apple Original series, starring Will Ferrell and Paul Rudd. Watch now only on Apple TV+. https://link.chtbl.com/shrink_next_door?sid=Audio-Shrink_Next_Door_2021-Corpus_&_Mugshot

Murderous Minors: killer kids
The Shrink Next Door

Murderous Minors: killer kids

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 8:12


Veteran journalist Joe Nocera's neighbor in the Hamptons was a therapist named Ike. Ike counted celebrities and Manhattan elites as his patients. He'd host star-studded parties at his eccentric vacation house. But one summer, Joe discovered that Ike was gone and everything he'd thought he'd known about his neighbor -- and the house next door -- was wrong. From Wondery, the company behind Dirty John and Dr. Death, and Bloomberg, “The Shrink Next Door” is a story about power, control and turning to the wrong person for help for three decades. Written and hosted by Joe Nocera, a columnist for Bloomberg. The Shrink Next Door is now an Apple Original series, starring Will Ferrell and Paul Rudd. Watch now only on Apple TV+.Listen to the Shrink Next Door now! https://link.chtbl.com/shrink_next_door?sid=Audio-Shrink_Next_Door_2021-Murderous_Minors

True Crime Brewery
Introducing: The Shrink Next Door

True Crime Brewery

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 8:22


Veteran journalist Joe Nocera's neighbor in the Hamptons was a therapist named Ike. Ike counted celebrities and Manhattan elites as his patients. He'd host star-studded parties at his eccentric vacation house. But one summer, Joe discovered that Ike was gone and everything he'd thought he'd known about his neighbor -- and the house next door -- was wrong. From Wondery, the company behind Dirty John and Dr. Death, and Bloomberg, “The Shrink Next Door” is a story about power, control and turning to the wrong person for help for three decades. Written and hosted by Joe Nocera, a columnist for Bloomberg. The Shrink Next Door is now an Apple Original series, starring Will Ferrell and Paul Rudd. Watch now only on Apple TV+. Listen to the Shrink Next Door now! https://link.chtbl.com/shrink_next_door?sid=Audio-Shrink_Next_Door_2021-True_Crime_Brewery

The Shrink Next Door
Interview with Kathryn Hahn and Casey Wilson | 12

The Shrink Next Door

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 20:13


For Kathryn Hahn and Casey Wilson, it was a new challenge to play roles that were based on real-life people: Marty's sister and Ike's wife. Both actresses spoke to Joe Nocera about the acting choices they made as women who love two very different, but troubled men.The Shrink Next Door is now an Apple Original series, starring Will Ferrell and Paul Rudd. Watch now only on Apple TV+http://apple.co/-TheShrinkNextDoorSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

BEHIND THE VELVET ROPE
Kristen Taekman (on RHONY Past, Present, Future & BFF Brandi Glanville!)

BEHIND THE VELVET ROPE

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 92:55


With all this talk about an “off season” of RHONY and all the cries to bring back the good ‘ole days, we figured it was the perfect Flashback Friday to share another one of our favs, this chat with Kristen Taekman about the good ole days of RHONY! Everyone loved our chat with Carole Radziwill earlier this week, so we figured it was time to re-share this one. The Real Housewives of New York City's Kristen Taekman steps Behind The Rope. Checking in from beautiful Connecticut, Kristen is here to tell it all. First we catch up with Kirsten on the current status of her Fashion Blogging and fashion trends we can all expect in the world as it exists today. Ok, now onto what everyone wants to talk about, RHONY. We discuss Kristen's thoughts on RHONY before being cast, what her casting process was like and how she feels she was edited for the two seasons she was on the hit Bravo show. Kristen discusses Bethenny and what watching the show without her is like. Speaking of Bethenny, Kristen's children go to the same school as Bryn and she tells us about several Bethenny, and Jason Hoppy (whaaaat?), sightings during school events. We also discuss her friendship with RHONY Housewives past such as Jill Zarin and Heather Thomson. Kristen also shares her thoughts on current RHONY cast members, her being a huge Leah McSweeney fan, and, having both seen her cabaret, Kristen and David discuss the joy that is Countess and Friends. Also, let us not forget that both Kristen and David were at the Hamptons party last summer that Ramona pushed Gizelle out of the picture at so they recount that fateful day, the before, during and shocking after. Speaking of Ramona. Kristen responds to Ramona's statements several weeks back about her and former RHONY Cindy Barshop being “nobodies”. Do tell!!! On a larger scale, we discuss the growing presence of alcohol on RHONY and whether it is time for a cast shake up. Let us not forget one of Kristen's IRL BFFS is Brandi Glanville!! We discuss what Kristen was told first hand from Brandi and how she feels watching it all unfold each week on The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills. Talk about an episode not to be missed. This is a must listen!!! @kristentaekman @behindvelvetrope @davidyontef Bonus Episodes Available at - https://www.patreon.com/behindthevelvetrope Brought to you by TENTREE - https://www.tentree.com (15% Off First Order - Use Code “Velvet”) Brought to you by CANVA - https://www.canva.com/affiliates/VELVETROPE (Free 45 Day Extended Trial ) Brought to you by RAYCON - https://www.buyraycon.com/velvet (Up To 20% Off) Brought to you by ROTHY'S - https://www.rothys.com/velvet ($20 Off Your First Purchase) Merch Available at - https://www.teepublic.com/stores/behind-the-velvet-rope?ref_id=13198 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Clip Out
233: Peloton Announces Its Next Product plus our interview with Teresa Diggs

The Clip Out

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 124:13


Peloton stock takes a post-earnings call hit. John Mills joins us to discuss Peloton's newest product - The Peloton Guide. Dr. Jenn - How to use competition for good instead of bad. Dancing With The Stars recap. The Pause Button is finally here. Peloton institutes a hiring freeze. John Foley is no longer a billionaire. John Foley sells his house in the Hamptons. Peloton mandate vaccines for employees. Peloton releases a new holiday ad. The Adidas/Ivy Park/Peloton collection has dropped. Shape Magazine reviews the Peloton Guide. Windows Central writes about how Microsoft helped Peloton add closed captioning. Are Apple's privacy changes harming Peloton? Gizmodo reviews the Peloton Tread. Shape reviews the Bike+. Angelo has Top 5 Metabolism Tips. Cody almost quit DWTS. Tunde has a new partnership with Nike. Pure Wow writes about the trend of Peloton instructor groupies. Runners World spotlights Robin Arzon at the NYC Marathon. Shape Magazine talks to Mariana Fernandez and Becs Gentry about marathon training. Peloton reminds everyone of its special offer for Veterans. Swerve launches virtual group cycling competitions for gyms. Birthdays - Mayla Wedekind (11/9), Aditi Shah (11/10) All this plus our interview with Teresa Diggs! Love the show? Subscribe, rate, review, and share! Here's How » Join The Clip Out community today: theclipout.com The Clip Out Facebook The Clip Out Twitter The Clip Out Instagram