Podcasts about east end

Area of London, England

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Latest podcast episodes about east end

Looped In
Buffalo Bayou East will transform East End. Why affordable housing is the first step.

Looped In

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 32:20


An ambitious $310 million transformation of the eastern side of Buffalo Bayou gets underway this week as Buffalo Bayou Partnership -- which developed the 160-acre Buffalo Bayou Park between Allen Parkway and Memorial Drive -- breaks ground on the first piece of its decade-long plan to transform the stretch of the bayou east of downtown.But the groundbreaking isn't for a project normally associated with parks and trails, for which the Buffalo Bayou Partnership is best known. The partnership on Saturday will begin the construction of an affordable housing development, called Lockwood on Buffalo Bayou. In this episode of Looped In, Rebecca Schuetz interviews Buffalo Bayou Partnership's president Anne Olson about the nonprofit's transformative plan and talks with Marissa Luck about the broader changes taking place in the East End. Read more: Buffalo Bayou East breaks ground with affordable housing project. Kinder Foundation gives $100 million to fast track Buffalo Bayou East. Concept Neighborhood's 17-acre East End project could make cars obsolete with walkable, ‘micro' living Midway's non-fussy take on golf gives Houstonians first glimpse of game-changing East End project. Triten Partners' trendy 6-acre mixed-use project could transform key entrance to East End After years of attempts, redevelopment of former St. Elizabeth's Hospital begins More on Community Land Trusts in Houston Whether Fifth Ward residents want it or not, East River is comingSupport the show: https://offers.houstonchronicle.com/?offerid=125&origin=newsroom&ipid=podcastSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

27Speaks
Key Fobs Left in Vehicles Make Easy Pickings for Luxury Car Thieves

27Speaks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 49:18


Crime is happening here on the East End, especially crimes involving the theft of luxury vehicles. But did you know that these thefts are occurring because owners are leaving their key fobs in the car? Common sense goes a long way in reducing opportunity. This week, police reporter Kitty Merrill and special guests Captain James Kiernan of the Southampton Town Police Department, Chief of Police Christopher Isola and Lt. Daniel Hartman of the Quogue Village Police Department, and (by text message) Det. Sgt. Herman Lamison of the Southampton Village Police Department join the editors to discuss how to avoid being a victim of this and other crimes and scams.

1001 Sherlock Holmes Stories & The Best of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
THE UNFORTUNATE TOBACCONIST and THE PURLOINED RUBY THE NEW ADVENTURES OF SHERLOCK HOLMES

1001 Sherlock Holmes Stories & The Best of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 58:10


The Unfortunate Tobacconist- Three owners are killed in an East End tobacco shop and Holmes is asked to investigate The Purloined Ruby- Holmes and Watson are invited to a London stage play to see themselves portrayed in a play concerning the theft of a ruby by Dr. Moriarty, Holmes long-time rival who Holmes believes is dead. ANDROID USERS- 1001 Radio Days right here at Google Podcasts FREE: https://podcasts.google.com/search/1001%20radio%20days 1001 Classic Short Stories & Tales at Google Podcasts https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5tZWdhcGhvbmUuZm0vQURMNzU3MzM0Mjg0NQ== 1001 Heroes, Legends, Histories & Mysteries at Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/search/1001%20heroes 1001 Sherlock Holmes Stories (& Tales from Arthur Conan Doyle) https://podcasts.google.com/search/1001%20sherlock%20holmes 1001 Ghost Stories & Tales of the Macabre on Spotify: https://podcasts.google.com/search/1001%20ghost%20stories 1001 Stories for the Road on Google Podcasts https://podcasts.google.com/search/1001%20stories%20for%20the%20road Enjoy 1001 Greatest Love Stories on Google Podcasts https://podcasts.google.com/search/1001%20greatest%20love%20stories 1001 History's Best Storytellers: (author interviews) on Stitcher https://www.stitcher.com/show/1001-historys-best-storytellers APPLE USERS Catch 1001 Heroes on any Apple Device here (Free): https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-heroes-legends-histories-mysteries-podcast/id956154836?mt=2  Catch 1001 CLASSIC SHORT STORIES at Apple Podcast App Now: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-classic-short-stories-tales/id1078098622 Catch 1001 Stories for the Road at Apple Podcast now:  https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-stories-for-the-road/id1227478901 NEW Enjoy 1001 Greatest Love Stories on Apple Devices here: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-greatest-love-stories/id1485751552 Catch 1001 RADIO DAYS now at Apple iTunes!  https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-radio-days/id1405045413?mt=2 NEW 1001 Ghost Stories & Tales of the Macabre is now playing at Apple Podcasts! https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-ghost-stories-tales-of-the-macabre/id1516332327 NEW Enjoy 1001 History's Best Storytellers (Interviews) on Apple Devices here: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-historys-best-storytellers/id1483649026 NEW Enjoy 1001 Sherlock Holmes Stories and The Best of Arthur Conan Doyle https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-sherlock-holmes-stories-best-sir-arthur-conan/id1534427618 Get all of our shows at one website: https://.1001storiespodcast.com REVIEWS NEEDED . My email works as well for comments: 1001storiespodcast@gmail.com SUPPORT OUR SHOW BY BECOMING A PATRON! https://.patreon.com/1001storiesnetwork. Its time I started asking for support! Thank you. Its a few dollars a month OR a one time. (Any amount is appreciated). YOUR REVIEWS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS AT APPLE/ITUNES AND ALL ANDROID HOSTS ARE NEEDED AND APPRECIATED! LINKS BELOW.. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Our Hamptons
Watering Holes of the East End.

Our Hamptons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 36:24


Esperanza and Irwin

Middle Class Rock Star
101. Taylor Abrahamse

Middle Class Rock Star

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 55:06


My guest this week is Canadian singer-songwriter, Taylor Abrahamse. Our paths first crossed virtually last year when we were both finalists in the Kerrville New Folk Songwriters Competition (Taylor was a winner!). We had the pleasure of meeting in person when he stayed with me and my wife back in August during his pilgrimage west to see South Park at Red Rocks. Our conversation is filled with an array of topics (such as our mutual love for Randy Newman), but the core of this episode explores the tale of Taylor and his friend, Bryn Scott-Grimes, attempting to save their beloved studio. Silverthorn Studios was a 7-room, 24-track recording space in Toronto that Abrahamse called home. Suddenly faced with losing the space, Taylor and Bryn tried everything they could to keep it going. In those final weeks, Taylor recorded some 120 songs that he is now starting to release (the first track dropped on November 18, 2022). Since our conversation, he has been working with the legendary Toronto venue, Hugh's Room Live, to bring back the studio better than ever! Hugh's Room is working on purchasing an old East-End church that (if successful) will become a non-profit arts & performance community center - an affordable, inclusive & dearly needed creative hub for the next generation of Canadian talent. (Note that half of all proceeds from Taylor's weekly releases as well as his patreon will go towards Hugh's Room Live). If you enjoy the podcast, please let others know, subscribe or write a review. 5 star ratings and reviews on Apple Music as well as subscribing to my YouTube Channel help out the most! IF YOU'D LIKE TO SUPPORT THE PODCAST IN A MONETARY WAY, I'M NOW ON PATREON! www.patreon.com/andysydow Guest Links: Website: https://taylorabrahamse.ca About Silverthorn Studios: https://www.silverthornstudios.ca Taylor's Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/taylorabrahamse Episode Music: Original music by Andy Sydow Sponsors: A huge thanks to our sponsors, PQ Mastering and Narrator RF. For any sponsorship inquiries, shoot me an email at middleclassrockstar@gmail.com pqmastering.com narratorrf.com

3 Point Firefighter
S3 E6 Part 2 of my interview with Kiel Samsing.. More OODA Loop and firehouse pranks!

3 Point Firefighter

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 30:05


 Part 2Kiel Samsing is a Lieutenant with the Newport News Fire Department on Engine 2 in the East End and a part time firefighter for the West Point Volunteer Fire Department. Kiel has been an instructor at Andy Fredericks Training Days, Art of Firemanship, and the Firemanship Conference Portland. He has been an FDIC H.O.T. lead instructor and classroom instructor. He specializes in engine work and decision making using the OODA Loop. 3pointfirefighter@gmail.com 

Radio ITVT
Televisionation: Co-Producer, Gisla, and Director, Walsh, on the ABBA Voyage Concert and its “ABBAtars”

Radio ITVT

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 32:02


LOTS OF VISUALS!This episode features Svana Gisla, Co-Producer, and Baillie Walsh, Director of ABBA Voyage, a hybrid virtual/IRL concert series centered on “ABBAtars,” digital avatars of the Swedish super-group, ABBA, which portray its members as they appeared in 1977, the group's heyday. The concerts take place in the ABBA Arena, a purpose-built facility at the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in London's East End.Gisla and Walsh provide us with an in-depth overview of the ABBA Voyage project, which employed a range of motion-capture and graphics technologies, was “filmed” with 160 cameras, took five years to realize, involved collaboration with ILM and many other partners, and cost $175 million. They also tell us why they think this shared, immersive experience has proven so popular with audiences; describe how those audiences “fall in love” with the ABBAtars, share their thoughts on the project's implications for the future of storytelling, and more.

3 Point Firefighter
S3 E5 Decision Making and the OODA Loop with Kiel Samsing Part 1

3 Point Firefighter

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 31:35


Part 1Kiel Samsing is a Lieutenant with the Newport News Fire Department on Engine 2 in the East End and a part time firefighter for the West Point Volunteer Fire Department. Kiel has been an instructor at Andy Fredericks Training Days, Art of Firemanship, and the Firemanship Conference Portland. He has been an FDIC H.O.T. lead instructor and classroom instructor. He specializes in engine work and decision making using the OODA Loop. 3pointfirefighter@gmail.com

Our Hamptons
A 25 year Retrospective of Ira Rennert's Fair Field, Sagaponack

Our Hamptons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 33:57


Esperanza and Irwin discuss Fair Field from the beginning to present day. The plan to construct a 100,000 square foot compound on 63 oceanfront acres sent shock waves throughout the East End. Fair Field had its own power plant, a 100 car garage and multiple outbuildings. Yet the compound violated no laws, in fact it taking up less than 10% of the property. While its sheer size was staggering, was it really any different than what occurred in the 19th century Gilded Age, or the grandeur estates constructed on Nassau County's Gold Coast in the early 20th century? Did it irrevocably change Sagaponack's character, or has Fair Field actually been a relatively quiet, off radar neighbor? Join as we reflect back, and ponder if Fair Field will remain a private residence long term.

Looped In
A behind-the-scenes look at East River, one of Houston's most highly-anticipated projects now

Looped In

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 34:46


Houston's East End is in the midst of massive change as the neighborhood once dominated by industrial buildings and small bungalows is turning into a hub for mixed-use developments, apartments and adaptive reuse projects. A major catalyst of the East End's transformation was sparked by East River, the 150-acre mixed-use development by Midway rising along Buffalo Bayou waterway. We sit down with Midway vice president Anna Deans to discuss how Midway's game-changing project will start to transform how Houstonians interact with this part of Buffalo Bayou and how the project could spark further changes in the East End. Deans also gives us all the updates and details on what's next for East River, one of the most highly-anticipated real estate developments underway in Houston now.Support the show: https://offers.houstonchronicle.com/?offerid=125&origin=newsroom&ipid=podcastSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

27Speaks
Sandy's Wrath

27Speaks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 42:44


A decade ago, Superstorm Sandy roared through the New York region. This week, the editors share what it was like to ride the storm out on the East End and share some thoughts on how infrastructure has improved in the region in the years since — or not.

London Walks
Jack the Ripper, Part VI – Lost in the Abyss

London Walks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 8:40


Our Hamptons
Bridgehampton Auto Racing: From the Streets to The Bridge. Part 2

Our Hamptons

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 30:47


Esperanza and Irwin pick up in the late 1950's heyday of The Bridge. Can-Am races, The Vanderbilt Cup, Nascar races all were happening in this era, with the world's greatest auto racers. But unfortunately, economic challenges, Southampton Town rezoning, development pressures and changing demographics created problems for The Bridge. An unlikely alliance between The Bridge and environmental groups, particularly The Group for the South Fork (now East End) occurred. The Bridge was championed by Newsday, and found a guardian angel in Robert Rubin. But none of that was enough to save The Bridge. We're excited to bring this compelling story to what is for us, a heartbreaking conclusion.

27Speaks
Gaining Ground: Innovations in the Fight Against Women's Cancers

27Speaks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 69:28


Doctors at some of the region's top health networks offered a promising diagnosis of the state and future of treatment for women's cancers on the East End at the first in a series of discussions about the changing face of health care. The Express News Group's Innovating Health Care on the East End series kicked off this month with "Gaining Ground: The Innovations in the Fight Against Women's Cancers," a Zoom event with Peconic Bay Medical Center Chief of Breast Surgery Dr. Susan Lee, Stony Brook Cancer Center medical oncologist Dr. Jules Cohen, NYU Langone Health medical oncologist Dr. Frances Arena and Coalition for Women's Cancers President Susie Roden. On this week's podcast, the editors share the highlights from the discussion and offer additional context and insights.

Blaze Church
Seven Years of Generosity | Increase Our Faith 3 | Pastor Keith Indovino

Blaze Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 40:16


Today we celebrate the last seven years of Blaze Church! By looking back, we can see incredible moments that led to countless lives changed. All of this happened because of radical generosity. We know there is still more! More people need to be saved. More opportunities for compassion and outreach. More stories need to be written. You can make a difference in someone's life over the next seven years by being generous. Discover four biblical values of generosity and partner with others in seeing the East End of Long Island transformed by the message of Jesus!

Who’s Here in the Hamptons
Dan Rattiner Speaks with Artist April Gornik About Author John Steinbeck’s House

Who’s Here in the Hamptons

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 20:14


Episode 101: This week on the “Dan's Talks” podcast, Dan speaks with return guest April Gornik, a renowned East End artist, about legendary author … Read More

The Good Guy Podcast
Ep 143 - Jeff Innocent is Pre-Woke

The Good Guy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 59:46


Jeff is a legend of the comedy world, if you haven't heard of him, which many of you won't have, check out this stand up clip.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NdzFzg_YvGQ One of the very very best to ever do it.Born in East London during the mid 1950's, Jeff Innocent grew up in a family whose entrepreneurial spirit and activities were not always considered acceptable by the police. He managed to avoid going in to the family business however by taking a keen interest in youth theatre and Jamaican music. He took part in many productions as a teenager, primarily with the East End Soapbox Theatre, a collective which also spawned performance poet John Hegley. But it took over twenty years before he was to tread the boards again as a comedian.After leaving school his first job was as a windowdresser in the mens fashion trade working in London's trendy Kings Road and Carnaby Street during the early 1970's until the early 1980's when he became a mature student at the University of East London studying philosophy and history, achieving a BA Hons and an MA. He maintained his interest in Jamaican music by DJ'ing and contributing to fanzines during this period. His post graduate dissertation topic being, The History of Jamaican Music. He financed his studying by working in the fashion industry at Camden Market and High Street Kensington.It was after his experience at University that he decided to try stand up comedy, something that he had wanted to do for some years. His initiation was at a workshop in Stratford East London run by the God Father of Alternative Comedy, Tony Allen. Although being a stand up comedian and actor dominates much of Jeff's time he still maintains an interest in music and popular culture. He still lives in the East End with his partner of 23 years, the youngest of his four children and his two whippets. But not necessarily in that order.“In short, he's one funny man .” Chortle “Extremely talented cockney philosopher” Time Out“Terrific, thought-through comedy with a big warm heart” The Scotsman“Clever, honest, funny. Not only hugely likable comedy but fabulously subversive” The Scotsman“It should be made law that every British citizen go and see Jeff Innocent” Evening StandardThanks for watching! Like, subscribe, drop a comment, all the good stuff.Subscribe to Patreon for early access to episodes PLUS a bonus solo episode every week

This Cultural Life
Es Devlin

This Cultural Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 44:00


Es Devlin is the world's foremost set designer, having conceived stage sets for superstar musicians including Beyoncé, Stormzy, Kanye West, U2 and Adele. She has also created sets for opera houses around the world, and for productions at the National Theatre, the Royal Shakespeare Company and many more. Es also works as an artist in her own right, designing sculptural installation pieces that address issues of social justice and sustainability. For This Cultural Life, Es Devlin remembers a scale model of her home town, Rye in Sussex, that fired her imagination and encouraged her interest in storytelling. She chooses the sleeve of Kate Bush's 1978 debut album The Kick Inside, which she tried to recreate as a collage in her teenage bedroom. She recalls a career breakthrough when, in 1998, she designed a National Theatre production of Harold Pinter's play Betrayal, a set which was inspired by Rachel Whiteread's artwork House, a concrete cast of the interior of a Victorian terraced house in London's East End, which was demolished in 1994. Her final choice of cultural inspiration is her work with the hip hop artist and producer Kanye West, with whom she collaborated on several spectacular stadium shows. Producer: Edwina Pitman Audio of 'The Story of Rye' with kind permission from The Rye Heritage Centre

Talk Art
Maureen Paley

Talk Art

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 77:42 Very Popular


Season 14 continues with VERY special episode with one of our all-time ART WORLD ICONS!!!! We meet the legendary gallerist MAUREEN PALEY. Inspiration to many of today's international contemporary galleries, Maureen was in fact the reason our co-host Robert Diament became inspired to change careers to work full-time in a gallery!We discover how she began her gallery programme in 1984 in a Victorian terraced house in London's East End. Initially named Interim Art, the gallery changed its name to Maureen Paley in 2004 as a celebration of its 20th anniversary. Since September 1999 the gallery has been situated in Bethnal Green, and in September 2020 relocated to Three Colts Lane. In July 2017 Maureen Paley opened a second space in Hove called Morena di Luna. In October 2020 a third space was opened in Shoreditch, London called Studio M. From its inception, the gallery's aim has remained consistent: to promote great and innovative artists in all media.-Maureen Paley was one of the first to present contemporary art in London's East End and has been a pioneer of the current scene, promoting and showing a diverse range of international artists. Gallery artists include Turner Prize winners Lawrence Abu Hamdan, 2019; Wolfgang Tillmans, 2000 and Gillian Wearing, 1997 as well as Turner Prize nominees Rebecca Warren, 2006; Liam Gillick, 2002; Jane and Louise Wilson, 1999 and Hannah Collins, 1993. Represented artists also include AA Bronson, Felipe Baeza, Tom Burr, Michaela Eichwald, Morgan Fisher, General Idea, Anne Hardy, Peter Hujar, Michael Krebber, Paulo Nimer Pjota, Olivia Plender, Stephen Prina, Maaike Schoorel, Hannah Starkey, Chioma Ebinama, Oscar Tuazon, and James Welling.Maureen Paley, the gallery's founder and director, was born in New York, studied at Sarah Lawrence College, and graduated from Brown University before coming to the UK in 1977 where she completed her Masters at The Royal College of Art from 1978–80.Together with running the gallery, Maureen Paley has also curated a number of large-scale public exhibitions. In 1994 she organised an exhibition of works by Felix Gonzales Torres, Joseph Kosuth and Ad Reinhardt at the Camden Arts Centre. In 1995 Wall to Wall was presented for the Arts Council GB National Touring Exhibitions and appeared at the Serpentine Gallery, London, Southampton City Art Gallery and Leeds City Art Gallery showing wall drawings by international artists including Daniel Buren, Michael Craig-Martin, Douglas Gordon, Barbara Kruger, Sol Lewitt, and Lawrence Weiner. Maureen Paley also selected an exhibition of work by young British artists in 1996 called The Cauldron featuring Christine Borland, Angela Bulloch, Jake & Dinos Chapman, Steven Pippin, Georgina Starr and Gillian Wearing for the Henry Moore Sculpture Trust which was installed in their Studio space in Dean Clough, Halifax.Follow @MaureenPaley on Instagram. Visit the gallery's official website at https://www.maureenpaley.com/Maureen Paley are exhibiting at Frieze London art fair next week in Regent's Park, Stand C9, 12th-16th October 2022. See works from her booth at Frieze's website: https://viewingroom.frieze.com/viewing-room/1750 Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

27Speaks
Will It Rise Again?

27Speaks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 57:08


The massive 185-foot steeple of the First Presbyterian (Old Whalers') Church in Sag Harbor was the tallest structure on Long Island when built in 1844. But the steeple came down in the Hurricane of 1938 — the victim of a well-intentioned but ill-fated attempt in the early 1900s to shore it up. Now, there's a vision to rebuild the steeple, this time, with cell towers within that would help pay for its reconstruction and improve communication networks for miles around. Architect Randy Croxton, a member of the church's Session, joins editors and reporter Stephen J. Kotz to talk about the church's history, the need for improved cellular service on the East End and the vision for rebuilding the iconic steeple.

Behind The Headlines
October 1st, 2022 - Riverhead housing project, emergency dispatchers, East End farmers, and trees in East Hampton Village

Behind The Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 53:46


This week on Behind The Headlines, the panel discusses a proposed housing project in Riverhead; unsung heroes, our emergency dispatchers; projects for East End farmers; and a discussion about planting trees in East Hampton Village. https://www.facebook.com/shaw11946 (Joseph P. Shaw), Executive Editor, The Express News Group https://www.facebook.com/wpsutton (Bill Sutton), Managing Editor, The Express News Group https://www.facebook.com/beth.young.777 (Beth Young), Editor/Publisher at East End Beacon Christopher Gangemi, Staff Writer, The East Hampton Star https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011167262732 (Alek Lewis), Staff Writer, RiverheadLocal.com

What Goes Around?
S3E11 with Jah Wobble

What Goes Around?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 75:54


Once again What Goes Around is back with a brilliant guest, Jah Wobble. Wobble was the bass player in the original line up of Public Image Ltd with John Lydon and Keith Levine. He has written some of the all time classic basslines including PiL's 'Poptones' and Primal Scream's 'Higher than the sun'. Jah came up through the punk revolution and set the style for Post-Punk before moving off into World Music and becoming an ambassador for mental health. A true East End geezer Wobble shares his memories and wisdom with us. Before all that though we get a classic rant from Deb about her vinyl loving neighbour and Eamon bemoans those music lovers that simply stop listening to new music and instead spend their timing moaning about the line ups for festivals they are only ever going to watch on TV. It's all good WGA fun and should pass an hour and a bit of anyones time without incident. Please like, review, subscribe... its all we ask of you for this tip top content.If you want to talk to us then hit us up on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram @whatgoespod or write to us whatgoespod@gmail.com Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Behind The Headlines
September 24th, 2022 - festivals, puppy mill law, air cargo hub, and the Surf Lodge

Behind The Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 53:15


This week on Behind The Headlines, the panel discusses festivals on the East End this weekend; the proposed state Puppy Mill law; a proposed air cargo hub in Calverton; and violations at the Surf Lodge. https://www.facebook.com/wpsutton (Bill Sutton), Managing Editor, The Express News Group https://www.facebook.com/annette.hinkle (Annette Hinkle), Arts and Living Editor, The Express News Group https://www.facebook.com/civiletti (Denise Civiletti), Editor/Publisher,  Riverhead Local Brian Cosgrove, Host of The Afternoon Ramble, WLIW-FM 88.3 Jessica Mackin, co-publisher and editor of the James Lane Post

The Long Island Sound
A Magical Montage of Music Crafted "Out East" Inspired by Art & Music

The Long Island Sound

Play Episode Play 23 sec Highlight Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 75:55 Transcription Available


Who is Out East - A Magical Montage of Music Crafted "Out East" inspired by Art & MusicJohn Jinks is the guitarist, multi-instrumentalist, lead singer and main composer of the music for OUT EAST. He also brings a varied skillset to his music making and performance with the band. Before being in Out East he had a very successful career in NYC as a commercial artist.  You can see this work at: http://www.ftcstudio.comCarlos Barrios plays the Bass in the band Out East but has other skills that he brings to making music with the band. He is also a Master Luthier ( Master Instrument builder).He makes basses and guitars and does repairs on all makes of instruments. His skill is unmatched on the East End of Long Island. He has done repairs for local famous artists such as G.E. Smith and Nancy Atlas among others.Here is a link to an article in the Sag Harbor Express on Carlos and his work as a Master Builder of Musical Instruments,https://sagharborexpress.com/express-magazine/home-and-garden-articles/guitar-hero-carlos-barrios-crafts-instruments-worthy-of-being-called-art/Later in the fall in 2022 Carlos will be doing a presentation at The Church ( Eric Fischel's Art Gallery) in Sag Harbor of his Master Skill in Guitar Building.Gerry GilibertiBesides his musical work, Gerry Giliberti is a print-based photographic artist who uses graphics, photography, sculpture and digital imagery to create abstract, surrealistic images and constructions that bring the viewer into a new visual world. Having a classical bachelor of fine arts education including printmaking, photography, sculpture, oil and watercolor painting, illustration, etching, silk-screening and other specialized printmaking processes, including archival photographic processing techniques, he has laid the foundation for his unique ability to see simple images among complex textures. Connect with The Long Island Sound Podcast Intro/Outro song in this episode: “Fading out Fast” from Mike Nugent's album, Mike Nugent and the Blue Moon Band . Opening Narration by Faith YuskoAll songs in this podcast episode have been used with prior permission by the artists. Call the Listener Line & leave your comments: (631) 800-3579Remember to Rate & Review the show! Help us keep the conversation going with your donation - Click Right Here or go to GigDestiny.com The growth of The Long Island Sound Podcast has been exponential. Help us grow the show!Subscribe to the GigDestiny.com Site here for bonus contentSubscribe to our YouTube ChannelCall the Listener Line & leave your comments: (631) 800-3579 Remember to Rate & Review the show! Help us keep the conversation going with your donation - Click Right Here or go to GigDestiny.com Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE

WESA's Good Question! Podcast
The history of Squirrel Hill, Frick Park fire hydrants & the first Black and female City Councilors

WESA's Good Question! Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 14:00


Pittsburgh's East End has some of the city's largest parks, historic buildings and has long been home to trailblazers in city government. We'll visit Squirrel Hill and answer some of your questions about the community's past; we'll hear the stories of two firsts in Pittsburgh City Council: Paul Jones, the first Black councilor, and Irma D'Ascenzo, the first female councilor; and we'll walk through Frick Park, where old fire hydrants pop out of the woods.(The Good Question! Podcast is sponsored by Eisler Landscapes, the CPA firm Sisterson and Company and Baum Boulevard Automotive.)

New York Fishing Podcast
Our Changing Waters - The Peconic Bay Scallop

New York Fishing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 46:00


In this episode your host, and favorite angler :) George Scocca does a deep dive so to speak into the issues we're seeing with the Jewel of the East End the Peconic Bay Scallop. Did you know that the Peconic Bay Scallop is the New York State shell?  Did you know that this amazing creature can live for over 20 years? Did you know that these tasty little morsels are filter feeders and play an important role in the eco system of our bays?George interviews Dr. Stephen Tettelbach Shellfish Ecologist/Professor Emeritus of Biology about the current state of the Peconic Bay Scallop and what is believed to be causing the die-off.There is a lot of history behind the Peconic Bay Scallop and it is part of the overall fabric of the beautiful body of water. In the 20's mostly women would become "openers" and "earn $3 a day and still have time to get home to cook dinner."They also get into the collapse of the Long Island Lobster fishery as well as the effects of the taking over of the Asian crab.This is one of a series we will be doing over the coming months on Our Changing Waters.Please join us for an interesting and informative show. Send any questions you may have to george@nyangler.com or stop by newyorkfishingpodcast.com and leave a voice message that will be played on a future show.

Clowning Around Podcast
Unstoppable Workforce with Jeff Dewing

Clowning Around Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 46:15


How can you create a team that is truly Unstoppable?  What does it take for a leader to allow everyone to fly and be their best selves so that everything is possible?  How important are values and purpose to make brilliant teams?  Join Em Stroud and her Clown Barbara as they chat this and so much more with Jeff. Follow Jeff: Instagram: jeff.dewing LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/jeffdewing Twitter: @JPDewing About Jeff Dewing: As someone who has experienced the highs and lows of success and failure, Jeff knows what it means to persevere through the hard times. Growing up in the East End, Jeff was exposed to the raw entrepreneurial spirit of local business owners. This was an early influence and partly why he decided to found his own maintenance company, Essex Air Conditioning (EAC).Following the financial success of EAC, it seemed to Jeff that continued business prosperity was guaranteed. He celebrated his early victory by buying his beloved football club, Clacton FC, to help it grow and succeed just like his first business. As time went on, Jeff became increasingly distracted by his passion project on the pitch instead of the day to day at EAC. With the last of his funds, he created a new business from his garden shed, one that would grow to become his largest holding – Cloud Facilities Management. Jeff learned from the mistakes that he'd made, and changed his approach to one that focused on people – and within a year, Cloudfm was producing a turnover of £1 million; and within four years, £70 million. Had it not been for the lessons learned following the failure of EAC, it is doubtful that Jeff could have enjoyed such levels of success – lessons that he is now dedicated to sharing with as many fellow entrepreneurs as possible. A massive part of Jeff's personality and success is his optimism, vision and bottomless sense of humour. He definitely enjoys clowning around.

TechVibe Radio
TEQ One Mic Stand: Todd Medema and Maker House

TechVibe Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 17:50


Todd Medema is the man behind Pittsburgh's Maker House. Built from the ground up to be a brand-new energy-efficient home with a state-of-the-art workshop, theater, automation and kitchen, Medema rents living spaces out to fellow makers. He's building a true community in Pittsburgh's East End. Learn more about his inspiration to build and share the space and what it's like to live there. And, there's a vacancy beginning January 1, 2023. Listen and learn about Pittsburgh's coolest home for makers.

Devils in the Dark
23: The infamous Kray Twins

Devils in the Dark

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 53:15


Helen Anderson and Danni Howard turn back the clock to 1960s London to visit the East End and Britain's infamous crime boss twins, The Kray Twins. It seemed almost inevitable that Ronnie and Reggie Kray would grow up to be the heads of one of the most famous crime rackets of all time, after all, they did spend their childhood beating eachother up and having brick fights with the local neighbourhood kids. Join Helen and Danni as they hear what being an East End Gangster was really like from real life members of The Firm, and learn about their epic downfall after the murders of George Cornell and Jack ‘The Hat' McVitie. Expect some serious East End accents, grisly torture techniques, and first hand accounts about the inner workings of the famous Firm. Devils in The Dark contains graphic details of violence and mentions of suicide, and is not intended for all audiences. Listener discretion is strongly advised.   00:00 - Introduction 05:30 - Where Ronnie and Reggie's story begins 13:08 - Ronnie and Reggie's boxing careers 15:30 - The Double R Club 17:30 - The Kray Twins' famous friends (Barbara Windsor and Judy Garland) 22:30 - The marriage of Reginald Kray and Frances Shea 23:10 - Billy Donovan and Lenny Hamilton argue over Frances' untimely death 27:45 - The Krays v The Richardsons 32:40 - The murder of George Cornell 35:27 - The murder of Jack ‘The Hat' McVitie 39:00 - What the Kray twins *allegedly* did with the bodies of their victims…  42:05 - Ronnie and Reggie Kray are arrested 44:30 - Gangster Bobby Cummins talks about life at Parkhurst Prison 49:15 - The death Ronnie and Reggie Kray 50:50 - Outro This episode is sponsored by… BetterHelp…visit www.betterhelp.com/ditd for 10% of your first month. StitchFix… visit www.stitchfix.com/devils20 and get 20% off when you keep all 5 of your fixes.  Beer52… visit www.beer52.com/DARK22 to claim your free case of beer. For updates on Devils in The Dark and all things true crime, head to @devilsinthedark on Instagram! You can also follow Helen Anderson at @helenanderz and Danni Howard at @thatdannihoward.  Special thanks to Woodcut Media.  Produced by Alexandra Jueno at Audioboom Studios.  If you have been affected by any of the themes in this week's episode please consider contacting the following resources: The Samaritans helpline: 116 123 Confidential Emotional Support Line: 01708 765200 Rape Crisis Helpline: 0808 802 9999 (help is also available at live chat at https://rapecrisis.org.uk/get-help/live-chat-helpline/ *times apply) Sexual Assault Support Line: 01708 765200 Refuge domestic abuse helpline: 0808 2000 247 (live chat is also available at https://www.nationaldahelpline.org.uk/Contact-us *times apply) Safeline domestic abuse helpline: 01926 402 498  Safeline national male survivor helpline: 0808 800 5005 See audioboom.com/about/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. 

Duluth News Tribune Minute
Listen to this: Superior Telegram's Archive Dive discusses how Edith Carlson almost built a Frank Lloyd Wright House

Duluth News Tribune Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 29:29


Today the Superior Telegram released its eighth episode of Archive Dive, the monthly history podcast hosted by Telegram reporter Maria Lockwood. Every month, Maria and a local historian dip into the archives of historic events, people and places in Superior and Douglas County. Did you know Superior has the honor of having the first and the last Carnegie Libraries? During this month's episode, local historian and retired librarian Teddie Meronek joins us to take us back in time and share the details of how this came to be. It started with the library on Hammond Avenue for 120 years, opening in 1902, before closing in the 1990's, and has been vacant for many decades. It has been the focus of big dreams, but none of them have panned out.  But recently, the Superior City Council voted to purchase the time-worn building to repair it to a viable state. It was the first of 63 libraries to be built in Wisconsin with funding from industrialist Andrew Carnegie. Just three employees were on staff when the three-story sandstone library opened its doors. The main floor featured chandeliers and nice furniture and the majority of the attractions, such as the children's room. The public meeting rooms were located in the basement and the board room and art room were located upstairs. As Meronek pointed out, they started running out of space early. A mezzanine was added in the 1930s to help with space issues.  Before the Hammond Avenue location added the mezzanine, Superior would get money from Carnegie again in 1917 for a branch library in East End. Meronek grew up visiting both locations and would eventually go on to work at both sites, calling her career a “dream job.” Both locations closed their doors at the end of 1991, making way for the current Superior Public Library building on Tower Avenue.  The East End branch was turned into a private residence, but the library on Hammond sits empty. Meronek has also been involved in historical preservation and hopes the building is part of Superior's future. “I said this at the city council meeting, not every old building can be saved, nor should it be saved, but this one needs to be saved. We have the first Carnegie library in Wisconsin. There are other cities that would kill to have a Carnegie library, we have two of them, the first and the last, and I think that we owe that building, just for the fact that it survived 120 years and has been mishandled and abused for the last 30 years of it, we owe it to that library to do what we can to save it.” Other discussion topics include how the library benefited from the Works Progress Administration, sacrifices during the Great Depression and the role the library played in the life of Esther Bubley, an award-winner photographer. You can find that full episode at superiortelegram.com or whatever streaming service you listen to this podcast.   Today, we are re-sharing Archive Dive's seventh episode, which was released in August. It is titled "How a Superior woman almost built a Frank Lloyd Wright house." Enjoy!

Somebody Knows
E43 - The Murder of Gemma McCluskie

Somebody Knows

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 24:20


March the 3rd, 2012, had started like any other Saturday for the police officer on duty in London's East End. But when two men, Tony and Danny McCluskie, and their friend Nicole stepped into the station, that evening instantly turned into one of those that the officers would never forget. As soon as Tony and Danny explained that nobody had seen their sister for two days, then mentioned her name, the officers knew this was not going to be a typical missing person's case. And yet, they never imagined how horrifying and shocking the investigation into Gemma McCluskie's disappearance would be.If you are affected by any of the issue's featured in today's show, you can access a range of services below:National Domestic Abuse Helpline – 0808 2000 247 – www.nationaldahelpline.org.uk/ (run by Refuge)The Men's Advice Line, for male domestic abuse survivors – 0808 801 0327 (run by Respect)The Mix, free information and support for under 25s in the UK – 0808 808 4994National LGBT+ Domestic Abuse Helpline – 0800 999 5428 (run by Galop)Samaritans (24/7 service) – 116 123The Murder of Gemma McCluskie | Crime Documentary |The Eastenders Murders: True Crime, Real TragedyBrother jailed for life for murdering ex-EastEnders actress Gemma McCluskie before dumping body in canalBrother accused of killing ex-EastEnder Gemma McCluskieSevered head recovered from Regent's Canal where decapitated remains of former EastEnders actress Gemma McCluskie were foundGemma McCluskie: Friend of EastEnders actress says she wanted brother Tony to move outEastEnders' Gemma McCluskie death: Brother faces murder trialGemma McCluskie Missing: Police Divers Search Canal For Body PartsGemma McCluskie's brother charged with her murderEastEnders' Gemma McCluskie 'killed after sink row'Gemma McCluskie Missing: Body Pulled From Regents Canal In Hunt For Former EastEnders StarEastEnders' Gemma McCluskie murder: BrotheThe New Arab VoiceA podcast from The New Arab, a leading English-language website based in London...Listen on: Apple Podcasts SpotifySupport the show

Make Maine Your Home
Reaction New York Post Maine Review

Make Maine Your Home

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 5:03


In this week's episode, Doug is going to react to the Cindy Adams review of Maine in the New York Post. We love Maine and everything about this great state and we think that this opinion piece was not accurate. She says that all Mainers are fat, and you know what - we think all bodies are great! There is no need to body shame, anyone. She goes on to criticize Maine fashion. While we may not be home to couturières, Maine has many amazing boutiques and fashion brands that started in this great state. Also, being against comfort and sportswear may be for some but give us a plaid shirt any day! She may not like beer - but the amazing breweries and local companies that are built on it help Portland's thriving economy! While she may not want to check out the Portland Observatory, Portlanders know it is housed in the amazing East End neighborhood, filled with restaurants, shops, and amazing houses! Now, this is just one person's opinion.  If you want to see how amazing Maine is check out our other videos. What do you think about this article? If you love Maine let us know in the comments below and remember if you Make Maine Your Home, you don't have to do it alone!   View the blog post on my website...  XXXXX To checkout listings all over southern Maine visit: https://www.makemaineyourhome.realestate/ Check out our Facebook: www.Facebook.com/MakeMaineYourHome You can listen to the audio podcast on any podcast app.  Just search for Make Maine Your Home. Be sure to subscribe, like, share and tell your friends.   To contact Doug you can call or text to 207-838-5593, email to doug@makemaineyourhome.com or check out http://www.MakeMaineYourHome.com.  00:00 - 00:30 - Cindy Adams New York Post  00:30 - 00:35 - Doug Puts on His Glasses  00:35 - 01:09 - Criticizing Mainer's bodies  01:09 - 02:38- Clothing in Maine and Maine Businesses02:38 - 02:46 - Beer in Portland Maine02:47 - 03:23 - Portland Maine Observatory  03:23 - 03:39 - Downeast03:39 - 04:03 - Maine Celebrities04:03 - 05:03 - We love Maine

RealAgriculture's Podcasts
RealAg Radio, September 1: Farmer perspective on StatsCan, harvest check-in, and preventing green lock

RealAgriculture's Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 55:03


Well, hello September! Thanks for tuning in to this week's edition of the Farmer Rapid Fire. On today's show, brought to you by Pioneer Seeds Canada, we will hear from: Philip Shaw, of Dresden, Ont.; Nic Dubuc, of Montreal, Que.; Jocelyn Wasko of Eastend, Sask.; and Kevin Porter, of Stoney Plain, Alta. We will also hear... Read More

RealAg Radio
RealAg Radio, September 1: Farmer perspective on StatsCan, harvest check-in, and preventing green lock

RealAg Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 55:03


Well, hello September! Thanks for tuning in to this week's edition of the Farmer Rapid Fire. On today's show, brought to you by Pioneer Seeds Canada, we will hear from: Philip Shaw, of Dresden, Ont.; Nic Dubuc, of Montreal, Que.; Jocelyn Wasko of Eastend, Sask.; and Kevin Porter, of Stoney Plain, Alta. We will also hear... Read More

Midnight Train Podcast
The Servant Girl Annihilator (Your Jack the Ripper is Showing)

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 108:18


Become a producer of the show and get your bonuses! Sign up for our Patreon! www.themidnighttrainpodcast.com    We've all heard the story of Jack the Ripper, right? Hell, we did a two-parter on the case not too long ago. You know the story. Some crazy person, running around hacking up people, disemboweling them, and nobody knows who it was. You know, that old chestnut. There were other cases similar to the Jack the Ripper case, like the Vallisca ax murders, the Hinterkaifeck Murders, and quite a few more that we've covered right here on the Midnight Train.    Well, this story is right in line with those unsolved atrocities and… it happened before Jack the Ripper decided to go all willy nilly and mutilate a bunch of poor women.   The Servant Girl Annihilator, also known as the Austin Axe Murderer and the Midnight Assassin (which is my favorite for obvious reasons), was a still, as of yet, unidentified serial killer who preyed upon the city of Austin, Texas, between 1884 and 1885. The murderer's nickname originated with the writer O. Henry. Apparently he had mentioned the murderer in a letter he had written, coining the dipshit murderers name.   The brutal killings in Austin occurred three years before Jack the Ripper terrorized London's East End (and there are some who believe the Servant Girl Annihilator and Jack the Ripper were the same person and we'll touch on that later). Although these murders happened 75 years before the term serial killer was coined, it still sealed Austin's reputation as the first city in America to have a serial killer — and the peice of crap responsible to be known as the first serial murderer in the country. Not exactly someone sane is running to be the first, but someone has to be the first something, right?   First, let's talk about Austin, Texas and a smidge of its history.   As per Wikipedia: Evidence of habitation of the Balcones Escarpment region of Texas can be traced to at least 11,000 years ago. Two of the oldest Paleolithic archeological sites in Texas, the Levi Rock Shelter and Smith Rock Shelter, are located southwest and southeast of present-day Austin respectively. Several hundred years before the arrival of European settlers, the area was inhabited by a variety of nomadic Native American tribes. These indigenous peoples fished and hunted along the creeks, including present-day Barton Springs, which proved to be a reliable campsite. At the time of the first permanent settlement of the area, the Tonkawa tribe was the most common, with the Comanches and Lipan Apaches also frequenting the area. The first European settlers in the present-day Austin were a group of Spanish friars who arrived from East Texas in July 1730. They established three temporary missions, La Purísima Concepción, San Francisco de los Neches and San José de los Nazonis, on a site by the Colorado River, near Barton Springs. The friars found conditions undesirable and relocated to the San Antonio River within a year of their arrival. Following Mexico's Independence from Spain, Anglo-American settlers began to populate Texas and reached present-day Central Texas by the 1830s. The first documented permanent settlement in the area dates to 1837 when the village of Waterloo was founded near the confluence of the Colorado River and Shoal Creek.   Got all that? Good… maybe you can explain it to me later. Just kidding… kind of. The victims   The first unfortunate victim was Mollie Smith, a 25-year-old cook working for the Walter Hall residence on Sixth Street (then named Pecan Street). She was killed on December 30, 1884, in a grisly killing filled with an extreme amount of blood due to the ax wounds to her head, abdomen, chest, legs, and arms. Her body was found outside and placed in the snow next to the family outhouse. She was attacked with an axe in her sleep, dragged into the backyard, raped and murdered. Walter Spencer, 30 yrs. old, also attacked and wounded.   The second poor victim was Eliza Shelly, a young woman who worked as a cook for the family of Dr. Lucian Johnson. Killed a few months after Mollie Smith, Shelly had been brutally murdered on Cypress Street on May 7, 1885, and her head left almost completely split from the blows of an axe. She was the mother of three children.   Because of the killer's apparent weapon of choice — an axe — the murders were first known as the Austin Axe Murders until a well-known resident, William Sydney Porter (that writer guy with the pen name, O. Henry) wrote in a letter to a friend: "Town is fearfully dull, except for the frequent raids of the Servant Girl Annihilators, who make things lively during the dead of night." After his letter became public, locals and reporters began referring to the murderer as the Servant Girl Annihilator.    On May 23, 1885, a third hapless woman, also a young servant person, became the next victim. Her name was Irene Cross and she lived on East Linden Street, just across from Scholz Garten. A reporter on the scene after her vicious attack stated that she looked as if she had been scalped. This victim was killed with a knife, as opposed to the aforementioned ax. Was this attack the work of the Annihilator or a different lunatic?    As summer dwindled down, August brought forth the arrival of a horrendous attack on Clara Dick. Later that month, another servant named Rebecca Ramey was wounded and her 11-year-old daughter Mary was killed.   At this time, the citizens of Austin were scared as shit and began protecting their homes with extra measures. Other cautions, such as increased patrols in neighborhoods, going home before sunset, and 24-hour saloons closing at midnight, we all also put into place. (It's worth noting that despite the legend, Austin's famous moontowers were not constructed during this time. They came later in the 1890s.)   Next victims were 20 year old Gracie Vance and her 25 year old boyfriend Orange Washington. They were sleeping in a shack behind the home of Vance's boss when the couple was brutally attacked with an ax. According to the local paper, Vance's "head was almost beaten into a jelly." Gracie was also dragged into the backyard, raped and murdered. Lucinda Boddy and Patsy Gibson, both only 17 yrs. old, were also attacked and wounded.    Weird note here, up to this point all the victims were African-American, but they were not all servant girls. And many noted that white residents had not been attacked. At least not yet.   The final two murders occurred on Christmas Eve (or possibly December 28th), 1885. First, 41 year old Sue Hancock, the mother of two, described as "one of the most refined ladies in Austin," was found in her backyard (now the Four Seasons Austin) by her husband. She had been dragged there while sleeping and succumbed to her wounds.   Hours later, 17 year old Eula Phillips, "one of the prettiest women in Austin," was found dead in her in-laws backyard (where the Austin Central Library is now located) she was also dragged into the back yard, raped and murdered. Her 24 year old husband, Jimmy Phillips Jr, sustained severe wounds in the attack. Ultimately, both spouses of Sue Hancock and Eula Phillips were accused, but found not guilty of the murders.   After the Christmas Eve murders in 1885, the killings stopped, but the fear was still palpable. At the time of the murders, Austin had been changing from a small frontier town to a cosmopolitan city, but the reputation it acquired because of the crimes put a halt to the city's growth.   The suspects Although approximately 400 men were eventually rounded up by authorities and questioned in the killings, all suspects were released and the murders remain unsolved. However, there are a few names from history that stand out as possible murder suspects.   Nathan Elgin was native of Austin and a young African-American domestic servant who knew the streets of his hometown.    The majority of this next part was taken from the website servantgirlmurders.com   Late one night in February 1886 a saloon in Masontown in east Austin was the scene of a violent and disturbing incident. The surrounding neighborhood was in an uproar because a drunken, raging man had dragged a girl from the saloon to a nearby house where he could be heard beating and cursing her while she screamed for help. The entire neighborhood had come out in the streets and the commotion caught the attention of a nearby police officer. Police officer John Bracken arrived on the scene and the saloon keeper, Dick Rogers and a neighbor, Claibe Hawkins, went with Bracken to stop the man from beating the girl to death.   Rogers and Hawkins went into the house and pulled the man away from the girl and into the front yard. As Rogers and Hawkins grappled with the man, Officer Bracken got out the handcuffs. The man would not be subdued – he threw off Rogers and Hawkins and knocked Bracken off his feet. The man turned on them and brandished a knife. As Bracken tried to recover a shot rang out. Bracken drew his pistol and fired. The shot brought down the raging man. The man's name was Nathan Elgin. There was no explanation for Elgin's rage at the girl, named Julia. Bracken's shot did not kill Elgin instantly but it did leave him paralyzed and mortally wounded; he died the following day. A subsequent autopsy revealed that Bracken's bullet had lodged in Elgin's spine which accounted for the paralysis. The doctors had also noticed another detail – Elgin was missing a toe from his right foot. During the investigations of the crimes the authorities had carefully noted the footprints which were often bloodstained and had made distinct impressions in the soil as the perpetrator carried the weight of the victim. Apart from general measurements of size and shape, footprints in most instances are not especially distinctive and they would not have been much use to the authorities had they not possessed some unusual feature. But the footprints left behind at the Servant Girl Murder crime scenes did share a very distinct feature – one of the footprints had only four toes. The authorities never shared this fact with the press or the general public during the course of 1885. The press frequently complained about the secrecy surrounding the murder inquests and argued that making all the details of the crimes public would facilitate the capture of the responsible parties more quickly. The authorities disagreed and kept certain details of the cases to themselves – details that they hoped would eventually identify the perpetrator and link him to the crime scenes. After Nathan Elgin's death the authorities unexpectedly had the direct physical evidence they had been waiting for – a foot that matched the distinctive footprints of the killer. But the foot belonged to a dead man. What were they to do with that information? What could they do with it? To imagine the state of mind of the authorities at that time one has to understand the heightened state of fear and suspicion that was present in Austin at the beginning of 1886. In the month since the last murders in December 1885, the city's police force had been tripled in size. A curfew had been enacted and private citizens had organized into patrols to guard the neighborhoods after dark. Strangers were forced to identify themselves or be evicted from the city. Saloons and other raucous downtown establishments, usually open twenty-four hours a day, were forced to close at midnight. A new era of law and order had begun. Would there have been any advantage in revealing that perhaps the midnight assassin was dead? And what if Elgin was not the mysterious murderer of servant girls? It was in the authorities' best interest to wait and see if the murders continued. Maybe the authorities believed they had gotten lucky – they couldn't arrest, prosecute of convict Elgin, but perhaps the problem had been solved. But in February 1886 it was still too early to be sure. It is important to remember that at the beginning of 1886, the Christmas Eve murders were not the last murders, simply the latest, and the investigations into the murders continued, notably with detectives still shadowing other suspects. While the authorities were not able to make use of the evidence against Elgin, the defense attorneys for James Phillips and Moses Hancock certainly were. Eula Phillips, wife of James Phillips, and Susan Hancock, wife of Moses Hancock, had both been murdered on December 24, 1885 and both husbands were subsequently charged with murdering their wives. In May 1886, during the trial of James Phillips, defense attorneys introduced into evidence floorboards marked with bloody footprints that had been removed from the Phillips house after the murder. They were compared to the footprints of the defendant, who removed his shoes and had his feet inked and printed in an elaborate demonstration in the courtroom. Even though Phillip's footprints were substantially different in size than the bloody footprints on the floorboards, the jury was unconvinced. The motives of jealousy and drunkenness as argued by the prosecution convinced the jury and they found Phillips guilty of second degree murder. When the case against Moses Hancock was finally brought to trial, the Hancock received some substantial legal help in the form of pro bono representation by John Hancock (no relation) a former U.S. Congressman, one of the state's most prominent political figures and one of Austin's most astute legal practitioners. Also providing assistance for the defense rather than the prosecution, was Sheriff Malcolm Hornsby, who during his testimony, described making a cast of Elgin's foot after his death, the significance of the missing toe, the similarities between Elgin's footprint and the footprints left at the Phillips and Ramey murders, and that fact that there had been no further servant girl murders committed since Elgin's death. Even so, the jury was not completely persuaded and after two days of deliberation, a hung jury was declared and the case was discharged without a verdict. The verdicts in the Phillips and Hancock trials illustrated the consensus on the Servant Girl Murders and the motives behind them – that the murders had been committed by different persons with conventional motives. Was Nathan Elgin the Servant Girl Annihilator? In my opinion, he most likely was based on 1) direct physical evidence linking Elgin to the crimes, 2) testimony of Sheriff Malcolm Hornsby as to Elgin's ostensible guilt, 3) the fact that there were no further Servant Girl Murders after his death, and 4) Elgin fits the criminal profile of such a killer. *** Nathan Elgin – A Criminology The Servant Girl Murders were over 130 years ago and few official records pertaining to them have survived. Likewise, there is little surviving biographical information about Nathan Elgin, however the information that is available strongly correlates to traits associated with a Disorganized/Anger-Retaliatory (D/AR) serial killer profile, and the crime scenes of the Servant Girl Murders correspond exactly to that of anger-retaliatory crime scenes: In the anger-retaliatory rape-murder, the rape is planned and the initial murder involves overkill. It is an anger-venting act that expresses symbolic revenge on a female victim. Nettled by poor relationships with women, the aggressor distills his anguish and contempt into explosive revenge on the victim… the aggressive killer will either direct his anger at that woman or redirect his anger to a substitute woman. Because the latter type of scapegoating retaliation does not eliminate the direct source of hate, it is likely that it will be episodically repeated to relieve internal stresses. Dynamically, the rape-homicide is committed in a stylized violent burst attack for purposes of retaliation, getting even, and revenge on women. The perpetrator tends to choose victims from familiar areas… and may use weapons of opportunity in percussive assaults with fists, blunt objects or a knife. The subject tends to leave a disorganized crime scene, and the improvised murder weapon may be found within 15 feet of the body. The following traits are common to the D/AR serial killer profile and I would argue that they are present in the historical record specifically in connection to Nathan Elgin: childhood abuse or neglect early violent episodes violent fantasy resentment of authority escalation stressors Additionally, Nathan Elgin would have possessed the locational expertise critical to successfully enacting the murders and eluding the authorities, culminating in a distinctive signature killing style – the attack on sleeping female victim using blunt force to the head, carrying the body away from the house into the yard where the victim was then raped. Childhood Abuse Suspicions All of the murderers were subjected to serious emotional abuse during their childhoods. And all of them developed into what psychiatrists label as sexually dysfunctional adults.  From birth to age six or seven, studies have shown, the most important adult figure in a child's life is the mother, and it is in this time period that the child learns what love is. Relationships between our subjects and their mothers were uniformly cool, unloving and neglectful. (4) The disorganized offender grows up in a household where the father's work is often unstable, where childhood discipline is harsh, and where the family is subject to serious strain brought on by alcohol, mental illness, and the like. (5) One of the primary components in the creation of the D/AR serial killer profile is a dysfunctional, abusive relationship within the family and especially between the mother and the subject. The mothers often have psychological disorders or they have been victims of emotional and sexual abuse themselves and are then subsequently abusive with their own children. At best the mothers are emotionally distant and at worst they are physically and psychologically abusive. Nathan Elgin was born in 1866, the fourth of five children in his family. The Elgin family had moved to Austin from Arkansas after the war, to the freedman's community that came to be known as Wheatville. Nathan had three older siblings that had already married, started their own families and evidently lived normal lives while Nathan was still a child growing up in Austin. However the older siblings' mother, Angeline, had been a different woman than Nathan's mother, Susan. (6) There is no record of what happened to Angeline, she presumably died or separated from her husband, Richard Elgin, but after she left, a woman named Susan Pearce appeared in her place to raise Nathan – whether she was his biological mother is unknown. I think this substitution in the maternal line is significant and I would speculate that Susan Pearce was an abusive catalyst in Nathan's emotional development. The 1880 census listed 14-year-old Nathan Elgin as still living with his parents; it noted his ability to read and write, and his occupation as “servant.” He was likely placed into service by his mother. For Nathan, being a domestic servant at that period in time would have entailed working in an environment with Victorian strictures and discipline, submitting to the authority of women, both black and white, carrying out whatever tasks were ordered without argument.  Habitual abuse or humiliation of young Nathan could have been facilitated by such conditions and it is easy to imagine him having suffered abuse in such a position considering the rage directed at this particular class of women only a few years later. Any abuse Nathan experienced as a child without having the physical ability to stop it, would in the meantime have fueled an inner world of revenge fantasy and anger waiting to be unleashed. Not until he was a teenager would he finally gain the physical ability to express that anger, except toward whomever was the source. The source or its memory, the humiliation and shame they had used to define him, would retain the ability to make him feel helpless and impotent. The result, once he had gained maturity, would be not just fantasies of rage, but their physical expression, enacted again and again upon victims who were substitute for its source. Early Violent Episodes – Resentment of Authority – Violent Fantasy These adolescents overcompensated for the aggression in their early lives by repeating the abuse in fantasy – but, this time, with themselves as the aggressors. He is seen as an explosive personality who is impulsive, quick-tempered, and self-centered. In the summer of 1881, Nathan Elgin was arrested for carrying a pistol and getting into a confrontation with another young man near the Governor's mansion, “they cursed each other for some time and aroused the neighborhood.” Such incidents were not particularly remarkable for that time period and the newspaper frequently reported similar skirmishes between young “bloods,” however it does demonstrate that Elgin already had a violent disposition at a young age.   More remarkable was an incident in 1882, when Elgin sent a threatening letter to a deputy sheriff promising to “whip destroy and kill” the deputy the next time they met. The written expression of violent threats and fantasies, especially toward the police or other authorities, is one of the classic serial killer tells. Nathan's letter was described “reckless and bloodthirsty” in the newspaper, a description that would later be more fittingly applied to the murders of 1885.  Locational Expertise Apart from committing the murders in the middle of the night and using the cover of darkness for concealment, an intimate knowledge of the city would have been key to the killer's ability to elude the authorities. Nathan Elgin had locational expertise – he had grown up in Austin as it was being built. As a child in the 1870s he would have seen the wood-framed buildings that lined Congress Avenue and Pecan Street replaced by brick and mortar storefronts. He would have seen the streets graded and the wooded hills cleared for elegant neighborhoods, schools and churches. By 1885 he would have been intimately familiar with how the city worked and moved. He would have known all the shortcuts, the hiding places, which yards had dogs, which doors were left unlocked. He would have known how to go unnoticed and he would have known what was around every corner. Escalation The disorganized killer has no idea of, or interest in, the personalities of the victims. He does not want to know who they are, and many times takes steps to obliterate their personalities by quickly knocking them unconscious or covering their faces or otherwise disfiguring them.  [The victim] will often have horrendous wounds. [The killer] does not move the body or conceal it. The offender is usually somewhat younger than his victims.  In July 1884, there were two instances of women, both African American, being stabbed in the face as they slept. The women survived; the authorities investigated them as separate incidents. In August 1884, an African American woman was struck in the head with a smoothing iron as she slept. These nocturnal attacks, though not fatal, were so idiosyncratic in style that they must have been a fledgling attempt by an anger-retaliatory killer who would later escalate with gruesome results.  In November 1884, police reports mentioned a non-fatal nocturnal assault on a domestic servant as she slept in her bed. This incident never appeared in the newspaper.  A little over a month later, an African American woman named Mollie Smith was struck in the head with an axe as she slept; she was dragged into the backyard and raped. Her body was hacked to pieces by the killer and left at the scene.  Mollie Smith's murder set the pattern for all that followed. Locational Expertise and Escalation and Signature in the Vance/Washington and Hancock/Phillips Murders The disorganized killer doesn't choose victims logically, and so often takes a victim at high risk to himself, one not selected because he or she can be easily controlled…  …the assault continues until the subject is emotionally satisfied  The killer's personal expression takes the form of his unique signature, an imprint left by him at the scene, an imprint the killer is psychologically compelled to leave to satisfy himself sexually. After four murders the killer had become very adept and perhaps overly confident and by the time he entered the cabin of Gracie Vance he was confident enough to attack four persons simultaneously. Gracie Vance was a domestic servant employed by William Dunham and she lived, along with Orange Washington, in a cabin in the rear of his property. When the killer entered Gracie's cabin, instead of finding a solitary sleeping woman, he found three women and one man. Undeterred he proceeded to incapacitate all four as quickly as possible; however, one of the women was only briefly insensible and she went for help while the crime was still in progress. Neighbors were awakened by the disturbance and the police were called. Dunham and the neighbors went to investigate and a man was seen fleeing the scene. They fired their pistols at him as he made his escape in the darkness. As with the other victims, Gracie Vance was found in the backyard; her face had been pulverized with a rock. The suspect had fled in the direction of Wheatville, just to the west — the neighborhood Nathan Elgin had grown up in.  The Christmas Eve murders were in many ways the skeleton key to all the murders in that they demonstrated all the specific facets of the killer's MO and signature — his locational expertise, his ability to improvise and adjust at the scene as well as his emotional escalation which demonstrated the extent to which he would go to enact a very specific sex murder scenario – an attack in the bedroom upon a sleeping victim, then rape and murder in the backyard – even when the completion of that scenario was problematic.  Susan Hancock, unlike the other victims, was white, but other than that, the murder was carried out identically to the previous murders. It is unlikely the killer had the specific intent to select a white victim; rather something about the location, the house, and the fact that there was an axe in the backyard attuned to the killer's preferences. As with the other victims, Susan Hancock was struck in the head with an axe while she slept and then carried into the backyard. Susan's husband was asleep in another room but was awakened by the disturbance. He went into the backyard, saw a figure standing over his wife and threw a brick at him. Even though the perpetrator was armed with an axe he didn't retaliate against Hancock – instead he fled the scene by jumping over a fence into the alley. Hancock then ran to the east side of the house to cut him off but he wasn't there.  Instead of fleeing into the darkness, the perpetrator ran west, back toward Congress Avenue, the city's main thoroughfare. This peculiar evasion demonstrated that the perpetrator was very confident about where he was going — that he expected he could hide in plain sight. It is interesting to note that had Hancock gone west to cut off the fleeing perpetrator he might have been able to stop him, which could have brought a definitive resolution to the murderous events of that year. However, seeing the perpetrator had escaped he went back to his wife and called for help. Heading toward Congress Avenue, the perpetrator cut through the yard of the residence of May Tobin where his sudden appearance out of the darkness startled a young woman and her male companion – in his haste he could have literally run into the young woman. A confrontation occurs – the man threatens and insults him in demeaning and racist terms, perhaps the woman does too. The perpetrator has to retreat again and this would have been too much. The urge to kill had not been satisfied and would only have intensified after a humiliating confrontation. He follows the couple's cab across town to the residence of James Phillips. The cab arrives, the young woman, Eula Phillips, discreetly makes her way into the quiet house. Less than an hour later she is found in the backyard, raped and murdered. The killer could have dispatched Mr. Hancock and completed the crime at the Hancock residence but he did not. Likewise, he could have attempted to kill Eula and her companion in the relative seclusion of May Tobin's premises. Instead, the killer's primary motivation was the realization of a very specific violent sexual murder scenario. I believe a confrontation must have occurred at May Tobin's residence between Eula Phillips, her imperious companion, John Dickinson, and a very volatile Nathan Elgin. The confrontation had to have made him angry enough to pursue her across town — even though he had no idea where they were going or what he would find when he got there. I believe he was so angry that he pursued her at his own peril, when other, easier opportunities for a kill were in closer proximity. The bloody footprints left at the Phillips house would subsequently be affirmatively compared to the footprints of the deceased Elgin.  Austin Daily Statesman 3 June 1887 Stressors …by the very nature of their childhood, serial killers are most likely to lead lives full of stressful events. As children and adolescents they lack self-esteem, are isolated and maladjusted, and are therefore poorly prepared for coping with life as adults.  Historically, the retaliatory killer's marriage will have been ill-fated and he will usually be in some phase of estrangement. …If he has a relationship, there will have generally been a history of long-term spousal abuse, which will not likely have been covered by criminal complaints.  In the study of serial sexual homicides, a “stressor” is defined as an event, interaction or conflict in which the killer is reminded of past humiliations and abuses. To purge his feelings of shame, inadequacy or powerlessness the killer will endeavor to enact a murderous scene in which he is powerful and in total control. In the case of Nathan Elgin, there is a remarkable example of a pre-crime stressor in the instance of his wife, Sallie, giving birth to a child the same night two women were being murdered on Christmas Eve. I believe that this was more than a coincidence and whatever stressors Elgin was susceptible to were triggered by this event. While the birth of a child would not normally seem to be cause for a murderous rampage, in the case of a D/AR profile it very well could. Nathan had married Sallie Wheat in 1882. She was a year older than him. They did not live together. It is not unusual for serial killers to be married, however it is rare in the case of the D/AR killer profile because of their volatile temperament towards women. Sallie could have held the power in the relationship; conversely she could have been subjected to abuse herself. There is an indication that Sallie was aware, at least subsequently, of Nathan's responsibility for the murders – as a means of disassociation she raised Nathan's son under the surname Davis rather than Elgin.  Post Mortem We read a great deal of theorizing about the series of murders in Austin, that all the assassinations were the work of a cunning lunatic — a monomaniac on the subject of murder.  From what I can learn, I don't believe anything of the kind, and it is my deliberate opinion that these murders can not only be unearthed, but when probed to the bottom, it will be found that they were committed by different individuals and that in each case they were prompted by lust, jealousy, or hatred. (27) A Monomaniac On the Subject of Murder would be an apt title for a 19th century dime novel. The quote above by Waco Marshal Luke Moore was closer to the truth than he realized but the ideas he articulated were not exclusive; Nathan Elgin was indeed a monomaniac on the subject of murder and he was motivated by lust, hatred and revenge. In contemporary criminal investigations of serial sexual homicides, law enforcement will have decades of criminal profiles at their disposal which have been painstakingly created as a resource to match types of murders to specific types of offenders. In other words, they know who they're looking for. And the more unusual the murders, the easier it is to focus the investigation toward a specific type of offender. If the Servant Girl Murders were committed in this day and age and the perpetrator had left behind similar evidence, contemporary forensic resources and methods would create a criminal profile and evidence collected could confirm or eliminate potential suspects. The perpetrator would most likely be apprehended very quickly. Serial killers who are apprehended and convicted are later questioned extensively by the authorities and they are usually quiet happy to talk about themselves because they frequently have an inherent superiority complex and are eager to expound upon their mastery and superiority even though they are behind bars. It is interesting to note that the wounded Elgin was not interviewed by reporters, which was unusual – almost everyone involved in a shooting at that period in time had a reporter waiting for them after being attended to by a physician. Nor did the police make any statement regarding Elgin. The inquest of his death was held in secret. Elgin most likely spent his last hours delirious as doctors made a futile attempt at finding and removing the bullet that entered his side and lodged in his spine. If Elgin's murder spree had followed the trajectory of most disorganized serial killers, he would have continued to escalate until his confidence overcame his self-restraint and he would have eventually been caught or killed fleeing the scene. Hypothetically, if he had been arrested for a murder, unless he specifically admitted to it, I doubt the authorities would have connected him to all the murders. Had he been arrested and interrogated I think Elgin would have baffled the police, but they wouldn't have spent much time contemplating him; he would have undoubtedly been indicted, tried and hung in short order. The newspaper account of him would have been a typically villainous caricature from that time period, and people today would still wonder if he was responsible. So now, another suspect and a possible connection to Jack The Ripper.   The next suspect was Maurice (no last name given), a Malaysian cook who worked at the Pearl House in downtown Austin. The Pearl House had connections to a majority of the victims of the Annihilator, therefore this theory took off like a mother fucker..   Allegedly, once Maurice left Austin only 3 weeks after the last murder, bound for New Orleans and ultimately London, the murders ended. And although the killings by Jack the Ripper were arguably more brutal in nature, many believe the Austin and London killers were actually the same person — a murderer that began to escalate his killings. Something that has been studied and noted by psychologists and other people smarter than us. Maurice apparently told acquaintances at the hotel that he was going to work aboard ships as a cook to earn his passage to London for a fresh start. A little known fact: the cook Maurice was actually suspected after the last murder and put under surveillance   According to Reddit author Sciencebzzt:   So many people who follow the Ripper case seem to want him to be a suave, elegant dude. A surgeon or a royal or a tormented upper class freak of some kind. But the facts don't suggest that. People say whoever killed the girls must have been skilled with a blade, that may be true, but the "brutality" suggests they were cut up like animals, skinned and gutted almost. The way a butcher... or a cook... might. Anyway, back to Austin in 1886. Most experts on serial killers will tell you it's unlikely that the murders will just stop, unless the murderer is dead, in prison, or has moved elsewhere. In fact, most will say that the serial killers M.O. usually evolves, and changes... while the main motivation doesn't. This would explain the difference in the Ripper murders 3 years later... and also why they seem to have the same extremely brutal motivations. Jack the Ripper didn't use an axe the way the Servant Girl Annihilator did, however, this may have been because an axe was not a common thing to carry around in 1888 London, the largest city in the world at the time. In 1884 Austin, a town of 10,000 at the westernmost terminus of a railroad line, an axe was likely less conspicuous. The scariest part though... is what happened after 1888. Whoever "he" was, he was obviously a highly driven, aggressive murderer, and he already had success (probably) in leaving Austin and getting away with murder. Well, consider this: After 1888, similar serial murders of women started happening in port towns along major trade routes, like Nicaragua, Tunis, and Jamaica. If the Servant Girl Annihilator and Jack the Ripper were the same man, given the highly aggressive style, brutality and rapid succession of the murders, one quickly after the other... it's likely he killed far, far more girls than we know about, all over the world.   Did Maurice leave to avoid the authorities and escalate his murders or did her simply leave because his reputation was tarnished?    The Jack the ripper murders were allegedly from april 3 1888 to 1891.    The Vallisca ax murders were on June 10th, 1912   New orleans ax murders May 1918 to October 1919   I spent countless hours looking up ship records from 1886 and there is one record of a “Maurice” that went to England from the US. The funny thing is, his name was Maurice Kelly. The Ripper's last known and documented victim was Mary Jane Kelly. It's probably just a coincidence but what if it isn't?   TOP 10 MOVIES BASED ON REAL UNSOLVED MYSTERIES https://www.watchmojo.com/video/id/44882

Dark and Devious
Episode 62: The Servant Girl Annihilator of Austin, TX.

Dark and Devious

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 71:09


A series of horrifying events in the late 1880s — better known as the Servant Girl Annihilator or Servant Girl Murders — that first left local citizens of Austin, Texas, paralyzed with fear. The brutal killings in Austin occurred three years before Jack the Ripper terrorized London's East End (and there are some who believe the Servant Girl Annihilator and Jack the Ripper were the same person). Although these murders happened 75 years before the term serial killer was coined, it still sealed Austin's reputation as the first city in America to have a serial killer. Listen now for details on this fascinating cold case that has many potential leads for an answer. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/patrick-conn/support

Let Fear Bounce
Passing an alley full of addicts on the way to work each day; a novel is born - Author Robert French S2 EPS 34

Let Fear Bounce

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 30:51


Passing an alley full of addicts on the way to work each day gave way to the beginning of a novel. "I often used to walk past an alley that was always teeming with addicts and I got obsessed with the idea of how awful it would be to wake up one morning in that alley." Robert is passionate about the beauty of having the right words on the page and with every new book, his goal is to make it better than the previous one. BIO Robert P French is a thriller and mystery author best known for the “Cal Rogan Mysteries Series.” French began writing in 2003 when he resigned from his job as Chief Technology Officer at a company he had invested his heart and soul into. He is a software developer, turned actor, turned author who was born in Oxford, England, and brought up in the East End of London. At age 26, he emigrated from the UK to Canada “for a couple of years”; he has been there ever since. He is the writer of the seven (so far) Cal Rogan crime thrillers about a drug-addicted ex-cop who fights his way from living rough on the streets to being a much-sought-after PI. Get the Cal Rogan Mysteries on Amazon https://www.amazon.com/Cal-Rogan-Mysteries-7-book-series/dp/B08FWYMM37 Learn more about Robert by visiting his website https://www.robertpfrench.com/ This episode is brought to you by Creative Edge Publicity To learn more about your host, Kim Lenging, visit www.kimlenglingauthor.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/kim-lengling1/support

The Steven Sulley Study Podcast
Diamonds In The Rough - with Bobby White

The Steven Sulley Study Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 39:35


Bobby White is a London based creative jewellery power house founded by designer Bobby in 2004. Specialists in diamond jewellery designed and created in house from the BW London studio and sold via the Bobby White flagship London store. Bobby grew up in London's East End in the 80's and 90's and set up his jewellery brand at the age of 21 after completing five years of training under a master craftsman in the timeless art of fine jewellery making by hand. Bobby joins Steven today to talk about his creative process, how he is reinventing the way the world interacts with jewellery and high-end design, and how he has leveraged social media in order to take jewels and innovation to the masses.  KEY TAKEAWAYS People love a story, especially about the products they buy. This has inspired Bobby to create an all-new way of working, where people can view the high-end designs and products being made. You have to take the opportunities that move you towards your dreams. Sometimes, the world offers you a shortcut, and it's up to you to spot it. Jewellery is generally purchased to mark a special event in life, but those who buy continuously are seeking to mark even the smaller moments in life as special. BEST MOMENTS 'We have such a creative vision, going forward' 'My goal was always to start my own thing' 'I've always tried to give it that extra bit - to become the best I can' 'Everything is super high-end' VALUABLE RESOURCES The Steven Sulley Study        Bobby White - https://www.bobbywhite.com/pages/about ABOUT THE HOST The Steven Sulley Study is my take on success. My view is you should have multiple focuses to be a well-rounded individual. Success shouldn't be just one thing like money, for example, it should also consist of a healthy fit lifestyle and thriving relationships. As a person who has made a success in life and also made huge cock-ups I feel I can offer suggestions and tips on how to become successful or at least start your pursuit. My 'Study' has taken resources from reading and education plus being around, my perception, of successful people and I, know a lot of successful people from all walks of life. My 'Study' coming from my experiences in business, investing, sales (my core background), training, boxing and education has enabled me to become well rounded and successful and I will help you in these key areas too. CONTACT METHOD InstagramSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

EnCrypted: The Classic Horror Podcast
"The Hands of Mr. Ottermole" by Thomas Burke

EnCrypted: The Classic Horror Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 51:47


An East End community is terrorised by a serial killer with a seemingly supernatural ability to disappear. When the local police fail to apprehend the murderer, a plucky journalist steps in to solve the mystery This original recording is an audio presentation by Jasper L'Estrange for EnCrypted: The Classic Horror Podcast. "The Hands of Mr. Ottermole" was written by Thomas Burke (1931). Coming soon: "The Mainz Psalter" by Jean Ray.

Real Outlaws
The Krays Part 1: The East End

Real Outlaws

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 43:24 Very Popular


For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+. Now available for Apple and Android users. Go to noiser.com/subscriptions to get started with a 7-day free trial. It's the swinging sixties and London is home of fashion, pop music, and celebrity scandal. But beneath the glitz and glamour is a dark underbelly of gangland crime.  Emerging from the ashes of a war-torn city; two brothers would forge a criminal empire from the snooker halls and pubs of the East End, to the jazz bars and clubs of the fashionable West End - these two young men would come to rule it all.  This is the rise of Ronnie and Reggie Kray.   A Noiser production, written by Robert Parker. With thanks to Kate Beal Blyth, writer, documentary film-maker, and the author of ‘The Krays: Prison Years'. This is Part 1 of 3. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Hello APGD
Ashley Coggins of East End Market

Hello APGD

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 26:38


Meet Ashley Coggins, General Manager of East End Market--Audubon Park's landmark food hall and neighborhood hub with locally-made gifts, treats, and provisions. East End is a community collective of talented purveyors, makers, food entrepreneurs, and chefs that have helped generate an elevated culinary scene in Central Florida.

27Speaks
OLA: Serving the East End's Latino Community, And Others, For 20 Years

27Speaks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 54:54


Organización Latino Americana (OLA) of Eastern Long Island is celebrating its 20th anniversary. Founded in 2002, the nonprofit organization offers advocacy and crisis management to Latino residents across the East End, as well as health and wellness education in English and Spanish, and art and cultural events — all in the name of inspiring systemic change. Joining the editors on the podcast this week is OLA's associate director, Sandra Dunn, who talks about OLA's history, the strides that have been made in the past two decades and the challenges that remain for all East End residents.

London Walks
Today (August 11) in London History – “icons of a very British form of criminality”

London Walks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 13:00


“Kray brothers, criminals, became icons of a very British form of criminality inextricably linked with memories of the 1960s."

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 47 – Entropy with Robert French

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 60:00


Robert P. French was born in Oxford England in 1944. Early on he developed a love of working with computers. As you will learn, he lived within 40 miles of the first 5 computers in the world.   He obtained his first software job in 1963 and never looked back. Well, not back, but as you will learn, he did find new directions along the way that greatly advanced his career and took him along different life paths.   Today he is the author of, thus far, seven books in the acclaimed Cal Rogan series. Robert's life story is fascinating and by any standard unstoppable.     About the Guest: Robert French is a software developer, turned actor, turned author. He is the writer of the seven (so far) Cal Rogan Mysteries, crime thrillers about a drug-addicted ex-cop who fights his way from living rough on the streets to being a much-sought-after PI. The series, set in Vancouver, Canada, reflects the best and worst of the city. He is passionate about having the right words on the page and with every new book, his goal is to make it better than the previous one. Robert was born in Oxford, England and was brought up in the East End of London. His fascination with computers was born from his love of science fiction, especially Asimov's I Robot books. At age 26 he emigrated from the UK to Canada “for a couple of years” and his been here ever since. At age sixty, he started a transition to writing and after many false starts he published his first book seven years later. His loves are his family, science, language, certain elements of philosophy and craft beer       About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes UM Intro/Outro  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:22  Welcome to unstoppable mindset. And today. Wow, this is a fascinating way to introduce someone we have a software developer turned actor turned author. I don't know what to say to that except Robert French. Welcome to unstoppable mindset.   Robert French  01:38 Thank you very much, Michael, I'm delighted to be here.   Michael Hingson  01:42 We're going to have to get into this software developer and all of that. Robert and I have had some interesting discussions, among other things, talking about computers. Robert was born in 1944. I was born in 1950. But when Robert was was born, and for a while there were a total of five computers in the world. And they were all within 40 miles of where you were born in England, right?   Robert French  02:07 That's correct. Yeah. Yeah, they were to Bletchley Park,   Michael Hingson  02:12 ah, probably used for decoding or something.   Robert French  02:16 That's right. Yes, they were under the care of the famous Alan Turing.   Michael Hingson  02:21 Right. And, of course, we've got a few more computers in the world than that today. But I remember when Robert and I were talking, I pointed out how both of us grew up in a time when a disk crash was really a disk crash. This were these large 16 inch platters that you would place into a disk drive and the heads would flow over the disks a tiny, microscopic amount above the disk. But if something messed up, and the head dropped onto the disk drive, it tore it up, and it made a wretched noise.   Robert French  03:02 Yes, and all your data was lost?   Michael Hingson  03:07 was immediately and totally lost. Absolutely. It's, it's pretty amazing. Well, tell me a little bit about about you and growing up and so on and how you got into the whole business of software development and such.   Robert French  03:23 Well, yeah, it was interesting. I was born in the East End of London, which is like the dodgy End of London. I was born actually in Oxford, but brought up in the East End of London, which is the kind of dodgy End of London. And my parents sacrificed quite a lot to send me to a good school, where I became fascinated with mathematics and wanted to become a mathematician. Then I started reading science fiction. And the idea of computers came up and I got fascinated with the whole idea of computers. I made a decision. That's where I wanted to place my career. Rather than being a mathematic mathematician and working in kind of esoteric arts. I thought I'd rather do something practical with computers. And so I became a computer programmer and did that for for a lot of years, almost 50   Michael Hingson  04:30 I remember Isaac Asimov's UNIVAC   Robert French  04:35 I actually worked for the company UNIVAC at one point in my career. Yes, I do.   Michael Hingson  04:42 It's one of my favorite Isaac Asimov stories. And I heard about it long before I actually was able to read it because it finally got put in a in a readable form for me, was the ultimate question. You're familiar with that?   Robert French  04:55 Yes, yeah.   Michael Hingson  04:56 And and of course It was it was, what was well, what was the question? I was trying to remember. Oh, it had to do with entropy. When entropy doesn't expand anymore, or when does it? Yeah, first, when does entropy reversing think it was. And, and the story goes that there was the UNIVAC and it progressed and became more powerful. And eventually it lived in hyperspace, and was an all encompassing computer. And every time anyone asked the question about whether entropy could be reversed, the computer always answered, I don't know, I don't need insufficient data to know the answer to the question. And finally, at the very end, the computer said, I have the answer. And the answer to the question was let there be light.   Robert French  05:51 Yes, that's the nice a great story. A couple of other as in life stories have inspired me. But one is his robot series. Yeah, the AI robot. That was one of the things that made it made me want to be a programmer. He vastly underestimated the time it would take for artificial intelligence to emerge. He missed it by about 50 years, but still pretty good. But another one that really interested me and inspired me was I forgotten the name of the the actual book, but it was about the planet Aurora, where people didn't ever didn't meet in person. But they projected images of each other holographic images of each other. So if you wanted to go for a walk in the woods with a friend, they would walk in their words, you would walk in yours, and each of you would have a holographic image of the other one walking with you. And in some ways, that was the precursor of the internet.   Michael Hingson  07:02 Sure. Yeah. Sure, well, and in with iRobot, and the series, of course, the three laws of robotics, he is very, very creative and clever about what robots could do and couldn't do. And then of course, there were a few times that the laws got circumvented. And it turns out it was human error and turn instructions to the computers or to the robots and so on.   Robert French  07:28 Yeah, the the three laws of robotics, it's interesting that there are lots of discussions these days in the world of artificial intelligence, about the whole issue of how do you control artificial intelligence, and how you might put the three laws of robotics into into effect. So a lot of people are concerned about artificial intelligent intelligence running amok.   Michael Hingson  07:55 Right. Well, and, and just the whole lack of discipline and a lot of what we do today, of course, today, yeah, everyone wants everything immediately. And they want everything and they want their so called freedom, and they don't recognize, which is what the laws of robotics at least addressed. They don't recognize their own responsibility to freedom.   Robert French  08:14 Mm hmm. Yes. So there's the old adage, you have no rights without duties.   Michael Hingson  08:23 Correct. So you got into software development, love to learn a little bit more about that.   Robert French  08:28 When I started on, obviously, mainframe computers, it was this was in my first job was, I started my first job on January the 11th 1963. And the first computer I worked on was, of course, a mainframe because they were all mainframes. And I worked for years on mainframes, I emigrated from England, to Canada in 1971. The original plan is I'd go to Canada for a couple of years and work and then maybe go back to England and now 51 years later, I haven't gone back to England, or not to live anyway. And, you know, I graduated through the mainframes worked on many computers, then worked on PCs and I had one of the early luggable computers, which was an Osborn computer. And I just worked on mainly I did some, I had during my career I had some jobs in marketing and in in product management, but and in but mainly I still my love was always developing software. I just I loved working on the development of piece of software and then what seeing people use it being happy with it. That was that was a great motivator for me?   Michael Hingson  10:01 Well, of course, you've seen so many different kinds of advances much, not just the whole physical issue of computers and so on, going from the big huge things that were programmed by patch boards that you would just plug into slots and systems that we talked about. Well, I, I was a student in Palmdale High School, and was a lab assistant for our physics professor. And one day, he asked me to take some time. And he had these big patch boards, he said, Just take all the wires out of the patch board, which was a major struggle into themselves. Because there was a lot of fun. But, but computers have progressed physically. So now of course, one of those patch boards wouldn't even be of small fraction of what goes on a chip.   Robert French  10:56 Oh, no. When I think back to the mainframe days IBM's I think last large commercial computer was the 371 58. Yeah, I believe my iPhone is orders of magnitude more powerful than that machine, which cost $2 million, or there abouts.   Michael Hingson  11:22 I remember at UC Irvine, we had an IBM 360. And we had a PDP 10.   Robert French  11:29 Yeah, they were great machines, those PDP 10 machines, as long as you didn't cut your fingers on the paper tapes. Yes.   Michael Hingson  11:38 And as long as you were careful about putting the duct tape in the right way, yes. Well, so now of course, the other part about computers is how software has advanced. And as you said, the iPhone is magnitudes more powerful than the 370. And we we started hearing even in the mid 70s, about computers learning what we now call artificial intelligence, I worked with Ray Kurzweil, as he was developing the original Kurzweil breathing machine. And the thing about the breathing machine was that it also did learn and you could start scanning a page with the computer, of course, scanning was totally different than you have to build up a page of text, line by line with a camera, literally scanning each line then moving down a little bit and scanning the next part until you got a whole page as opposed to just taking a shot. But as it scanned and as you read, the machine really did learn something about the text and the print and re had done the what at that time, were probably very simple, but still steps to allow the machine to learn to read better is the more you read a book.   Robert French  13:04 Hmm, yeah, he because while he's a genius, you're lucky to have worked with   Michael Hingson  13:09 him. And of course, he went on and did other things after he sold Kurzweil Computer Products. But it still was very creative and clever to be able to have a machine, even then, that learned and as a user of the machine and then helping with the original testing and evaluation. As I read books with it, it was clearly obvious that it learned as it went along, it literally would read pages better the more I read, when I could go back and read a page that I had read and just see how much better it was after reading several pages.   Robert French  13:41 Yeah, it's amazing, isn't it? And now, of course,   Michael Hingson  13:44 it's a whole different ballgame in terms of what artificial intelligence does and can do, and its availability. But it's interesting to see how things are improving and getting better over time. And it will be fun to to really see what happens as machines learn and so on. I'm not a fan of Ray Kurzweil singularity necessarily. I'm not sure that we're going to marry the brain and artificial intelligence together, although problem will try but I don't know whether that will be a good thing or not. But I guess we'll see.   Robert French  14:19 Yeah, yeah. Well, certainly, even if one can't map the brain and download it to a computer, I could still see a possibility of a brain being connected to a directly connected to a computer and living inside a robot. Sure. So which is a pretty scary thought.   Michael Hingson  14:49 What were some of the last projects you did in terms of software development?   Robert French  14:54 The last the last major project that I did was a A system that would create would put all of an organization's manuals, online and searchable. So the basic idea was, hospitals were a target market for us. The basic idea was that you could take all of your manuals as PDFs, and word documents, and JPEGs, and whatever you really wanted. And you put them all into our system, you just upload them to our system and create a structure for a set of for all of the manuals of your organization. And you could search all of the manuals in very sophisticated ways more flexible, even than Google searching. Yes, you could say things like, I want to find a document that has the word, heart, and catheter within five words of each other. And it would instantly present that document or documents to you. And it had all sorts of built in security. So you were only allowed to search for what you needed. But it meant that anyone in our hospital had access to all the documents that exists all the manuals that existed in that hospital. At that time, it was I it was a problem finding manuals, you know, people would spend an hour searching for a particular manual to do a procedure. So that was the last big project that I worked on.   Michael Hingson  16:42 And you said that the manuals typically were in like JPEG format or something like that.   Robert French  16:47 Usually they will Word or PDF. But you know, sometimes they would have JPEGs that were associated with the Word documents or the PDF documents. Of course, they couldn't search the JPEGs.   Michael Hingson  17:03 Well, I was wondering about that, of course, today. Now, even more people are demanding that the documents are accessible. The Google, of course, had the large library of millions of books that didn't inherit it, and they would put them up as pictures. And it took a court fight to get Google to agree and slash be compelled to put the documents up as accessible documents.   Robert French  17:31 Hmm. Yeah, that's I didn't know about that. That's, I'm glad that I'm glad the court said that.   Michael Hingson  17:38 It's all about inclusion, of course. And well, they are and, and other organizations are beginning to work on that. Now, of course, in this country, it's not quite as stringent in Canada yet. But in this country of within the last month, the government has said that the Americans with Disabilities Act does apply to websites, because a lot of times lawyers have been making the case or trying to make the case while the ADA was passed before the internet. So how can websites be held accountable and responsible for being accessible? Clearly, the ADEA doesn't apply. And a number of us have said, well, of course it does. Now, of course, the government has finally said, Yes, it does. But Congress still needs to stiffen the laws. And that will be another story.   Robert French  18:24 Yeah, yeah. Well, first getting Congress to move is not always easy.   Michael Hingson  18:31 Yeah, well, it says bad is will can entropy be reversed? And maybe the ultimate question will be the same, will have the same answer. So you worked with that until you were 60. So what was that? 2003 years or so?   Robert French  18:54 Yeah, yeah, it was about the company fails to get its last. Its last financing because of the burst of the tech bubble in 2003. And that's when that's when I started to think about other options.   Michael Hingson  19:13 So what other option Did you decide upon to reverse your entropy? Difficult? Or maybe to see entropy and larger growth? Yes. I don't think that most people probably understand that that whole joke and it's a physical basically, the laws that entropy can't be reversed. And things are constantly expanding like the universe is constantly expanding. And you know, it's like Murphy's Law, which is if anything can go wrong, it will route around and then there's no tools commentary on Murphy's Law which was Murphy was an optimist. But But then the other one, which is the commentary on Murphy's law that says once you open a can of worms, you can only put the words back in a bigger can. So yeah. So maybe it should be continued to expand for?   Robert French  20:07 Well, just on this subject of entropy, it's probably one of the worst understood words by the general public. But what? Well, it was interesting. You know, whenever a company folds, the first thing that you do is start looking for contracting work, which is what I did, I got on the phone and started calling people. And this particular day, it was in March of 2003, I had finished talking to a bunch of people and I put down the phone. And I opened a Word document, because I'd had this idea in my head for quite a while. And it was about a strange plague hitting the Earth. It was kind of an apocalyptic sort of tale. And I started writing, this was about three in the afternoon, I started writing, and I just kept on writing. And suddenly, it was no one in the morning or something. And I just written for eight hours. And I'd written 1000s of words. And I thought, wow, this is the most fun I've had for a such a long time. And that's how it all started. That book, I kind of ran out of steam on. So I started a different book. And the second book was going nowhere. So I started a book about an assassin. And it just wasn't that book became boring. Though, I did use the opening chapters in another book that in one of my Cal Rogen books. Then finally I got an idea for a kind of a business thriller. But I had said in an area in which I had some experience, I were somebody I know was was conned by a, a venture capital company, or will they call themselves a venture capital company somewhere to novel based on that. And I actually finished it, it was the first thing I actually finished completely. And I was I was quite happy with it. I thought it was pretty good. So I sent out query letters to I think it was 70 Publish literary literary agents, and a bunch of publishers and got back 70 rejection letters and other things. Yes, exactly. And this was before the day that you could submit submit via the Internet. The publishing was really quick, I was really slow to adopt technology. So as luck would have it, I booked myself into a Writers Conference. And I thought, well, this book is good. I mean, it's just I don't know how to market it. That's the problem. So I went to the Writers Conference. And the first day was the all the all the all the sessions were about the art of the art of writing. And   Robert French  23:27 I went, took those those courses, and realized the marketing wasn't the problem. The book was the problem. And I it was just that I didn't really understand how to write a book. I, I assumed because I was an avid reader, that I would be a natural writer. But as luck would have it at that conference, I met an editor who gave me a 37 page report on the book. And I decided that the book was a non starter. But through that, through that editor, she she was wonderful. And she mentored me through my first real book. And it all started because I was doing it contract in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, which is the dodgy area of town. And every day I'd walked past this alley to get to the to the the office I was working in. And this alley was full of drug addicts. And I remember saying to my editor whose name was Lisa. I said, Gosh, I go past this alley every day. And I keep thinking, how awful would it be to wake up in that alley, which was just awful, just terrible place? And she said, Well, who would wake up in an alley like that? And I said, Well, if it were a lawyer, yeah, that would be kind of ironic. And if it were a businessman, we interesting but then I thought well if you're a cop That would be great. And so I have this idea of a cop waking up in a alley full of drug addicts covered in blood. And Lisa asked me a bunch of questions. And the first my first novel, which is called junkie, started to come together in my head. And she mentored me through that novel and the second one, and that's grown into a series of seven books now,   Michael Hingson  25:26 are they self published, or traditionally published,   Robert French  25:29 this self published, I tried going the traditional publishing route, I got some interest, but I think my age was working against me, because publishers are more interested in people who are younger than I am. And who will have lots of books in them. So anyway, I, I learned about self publishing and took a bunch of courses and went that route. And now I think if a publisher came to me, and made me an offer, unless it was a really good offer, I don't think I'd be interested.   Michael Hingson  26:06 But you, you now have seven books. So you've clearly established a track record, in the fact that you keep writing them. I'm sure it's in part because you want to, but I would also suspect that you had success with   Robert French  26:19 them. Yeah, yeah. I've had some success with them. And, you know, somebody asked me, When are you going to stop writing? I'm 77. Now. So they asked me, When are you going to stop writing? And I paraphrase Charlton Heston and said, when they prize the computer out of my cold, dead hands, so I'm just gonna keep doing it. And one of the main reasons I do it is, over the years, I have established a mailing list of people who are fans of my my books, and the feedback I get from those people is just wonderful. It's this, I've met so many wonderful people through this mailing list. And they are the people that that keep me going. When I have bad times. It's those people who make me feel that I can still do this.   Michael Hingson  27:20 Do you publish through Amazon? Or where do you how do you publish?   Robert French  27:24 Amazon? Yeah, I went, I decided to go exclusive with Amazon. Because when I when I was publishing through Amazon, and Kobo, and Apple and Google, Barnes and Noble, I did an experiment with a couple of books and made them exclusive to Amazon. And they just did so much better. So I decided to go exclusive with Amazon on all the books. Can you   Michael Hingson  27:55 answer those when you're publishing through Amazon? I assume it's Kindle Direct Publishing? Yeah. Can't Can't you also make the books available from Amazon through other distribution channels and so on?   Robert French  28:09 Yes, you can. Yes. And Amazon will do that, too. Also, Amazon. Another reason for being with Amazon is that they also do the books in paperback, and in hardcover now. So I've got all of my books are in paperback and in large print. So that's, that's one of the things that Amazon does, which I like.   Michael Hingson  28:36 So have any of them been also produced in audio?   Robert French  28:41 Not yet, I really want to do them in audio. But I have a particular problem in doing them in audio, because the books are written in first person, present tense, from the point of view of multiple characters. So some chapters will be written from the point of view of a woman's, for example, and some even from a child. And then they'll say, there'll be saying, man standing here waiting for cow, and he's late again. So I need a woman actress to voice those, those chapters. So it means that in order to do audiobooks, I need to put together a team. Well, I did have a stint of acting. So I do know a bunch of actors. So I will do that at some point. But and hopefully soon, but right now, I'm just so busy that I can't devote the time to it.   Michael Hingson  29:41 I'm thinking though that with the fact that you're going through Amazon, it would be interesting to see if you could raise a discussion within Bada bing published through audible which is owned by Amazon because ANA has has produced they have done what they call audible originals, and they're very capable and Do oftentimes use more than one person to deal with a   Robert French  30:05 book. Oh, I didn't know that.   Michael Hingson  30:08 Oh, there's a lot of that.   Robert French  30:11 So because my thought was that I would know how to edit audio and video, I thought of assembling the actors and getting them to read the chapters and then editing it into an audible book, which, you know, Amazon will let you do that. So they're called Amazon, audible originals. Did you say, well,   Michael Hingson  30:36 audible originals are books that are not traditionally published elsewhere, but published through audible. Do you use Audible at all?   Robert French  30:46 No, I don't. I'm not a I'm not an audio book.   Michael Hingson  30:49 That's fine. We want to and it doesn't violate the laws of robotics. But But in your case, I'm sure it would be called an audible original because it's not published anywhere through traditional publishing, although the your books are so either way, though, they they do produce audio books, and oftentimes have at least two people reading it, if not more. I remember one that I read last year, you've seen the movie Alien? Yes. Yeah. Okay. So there's a book called Alien shadows, which is another one where, oh, what's the Gorny weavers character's name? Yeah. And the cat? Yeah. Are, are they actually they were in suspended animation. And they're brought out of suspended animation for something and they ended up fighting aliens again. And there are like about 10 different actors that are dealing with all the different characters. So I really think that it would be interesting to explore whether audio audible could do it and would do yeah, I'll certainly look into that. Thank you. I would, I would think that would make a lot of sense to do. I do a lot of audio reading on airplanes. But nowadays, mostly not opposed to Braille. Because I believe that Braille is still the basic means of reading and writing that I have. My wife and I read books together. So we pipe them through the house. So whatever we're doing, there's a book going, usually TV, but a book. She's learned how to listen to audio, and not fall asleep. So she That's great. Yeah, it's it's really wonderful when a number of actors do it. And there are some actors that can do a number of voices. But I understand what you're saying for your book. But I would definitely explore audio through audible and see what you could do.   Robert French  32:52 Yeah, I will definitely do that. Thank you,   Michael Hingson  32:55 it would make a lot of sense to do. Well, so you, you were an actor, while software developer, actor and then reader tell me more about that. Yeah,   Robert French  33:05 I, my first one, my first job when I was five, I wanted to be a cowboy. But my first job that I wanted to do is I wanted to be an actor. And my father probably quite rightly, taught me out and said, you know, with your mathematical ability, you should do something else. And actually, to some extent, he was instrumental in pointing me towards computers, or encouraging me towards computers should I say, but I always liked acting. I was in every school, my every play my school ever produced. And after school, I did a few acting, few plays and musicals. So in my 50s, I thought I'd like to try acting. So I took a tour course and went for auditions and found myself getting lead roles pretty quickly in local theater. And then I kind of realized I needed a better acting, a better acting coach. So I took lessons from Larry Silverberg, who was a wonderful, wonderful teacher, and he was in Seattle, and twice a week I would drive down to Seattle and do courses with Larry, and then I'd started doing a few movie things. Then, I just kind of realized that acting no matter how good an actor you are, in in the world of movies, it's they're always looking for a look. And I didn't have one plus or didn't have the one they wanted. Plus the the The movies that are made in Vancouver are all three American audiences almost all, and they needed people with American accents. And although I can do an American accent, it's just not very good. So that so I decided that pursuing that as a profession was not a good idea. So I continued acting in local theater for a while. But once I started writing that just completely overtook, took all my spare time. So that's when I stopped acting.   Michael Hingson  35:36 It's always radio for the BBC or the CPC.   Robert French  35:39 Yeah. I wouldn't mind doing radio. Yeah.   Michael Hingson  35:45 So you, so what's your next book,   Robert French  35:48 The next book is was in inspired by a podcast that I listened to, I'm a bit of a podcast addict. And it was about a, an amazing, but quite evil woman who ran this cryptocurrency scam. And I thought that would be an interesting part of a book. And so that's, that's the next book in the Cal Rogen series that I'm starting to write. Plus, I've got another series of books on the on the development stage. And my protagonist has a 12 year old daughter. And so the next series of books will be her as a detective in the year 2040 2045, when she's grown up, because in the current series, she's got five years old. So I'm very interested in what the near future holds for us with robotics and artificial intelligence and the social issues that we're facing and social media and cryptocurrencies and all of those things. So I'm very excited about writing books set credit, five years in the future.   Michael Hingson  37:10 Have you ever read any of the books by JD Robb the in depth series?   Robert French  37:14 I haven't No, no.   Michael Hingson  37:17 So JD Robb, who is nor Roger, yeah, Roberts, has written a whole series there, the Eve Dallas series, and I think they're now 54 or 55 books. And they start out in like 2058, I think, or 2057. And are very, they're fun to read. There are some steamy parts, but that's okay. They have absolutely captured what both me and my wife's attention. So she doesn't even want to read those piped through the house. She wants to read those on her own, but she wants the audio version. So we're both now on book number 20 in that series, but they're fun. And I'm sure that your take will be different. And that's a good thing. So it's a wonderful series to write. But she has been very successful with that.   Robert French  38:05 Oh, that's great. Oh, definitely. I knew I knew that Nora had started writing books under the JD Robert, I didn't know anything about them. So I will check out to the Eve Dallas series.   Michael Hingson  38:20 They're all they're all something in depth. And they're fascinating the characters evolve and grow. And the whole series has been very fascinating to observe character, character development, and because she's done with them, but I'm anxious to read yours as well now, so definitely get them out there and also get them out in audio, that'll be a lot of fun for a lot of people, for sure. Actually, something that you might think about is there is a the Library of Congress has the National Library Service for the Blind and print impaired. And I'm sure there is an equivalent in Canada. They also use their own readers to record books, and it might be worth reaching out to them to see if they might be interested. I've not seen any that they individually record that have several actors, but nevertheless, it's a fascinating thing, but I would still think audible would be the best way.   Robert French  39:19 Hmm, yeah, I will definitely look into that audible originals idea. That'd be great.   Michael Hingson  39:26 Well, tell me more about sort of your view about self publishing as opposed to traditional publishing and the differences in the values and so on.   Robert French  39:34 Well, I'm not a huge expert in traditional publishing. There. I know people who are both traditionally published and self published and generally prefer the self publishing side of, of their, their work. traditional publishing is going through some huge upheaval Almost, and they're very, they've been very slow to react to the ebook market. And they, they just don't seem to have got it. Their books, the one of the key things about the ebook market is books should be cheaper when they're ebooks than in on paper. But frequently, the traditional publishers will have the ebook and the paper book at the same price. And it seems like they're trying to grab all the money they can out of the marketplace before it's lost to them. So now, they might well be wrong. But that's, that's a bit how I see it. If somebody came to me and said, I wanted to be an author, which way should I go, I would say if you're going to choose go with self publishing, you have more control you make you make more money and midlist author with with a publishing house, doesn't make a heck of a lot of money. But a midlist author, on KDP, with Amazon can make a very nice living. So I would I have become a big fan of self publishing.   Michael Hingson  41:27 And the more you learn how to market, the better you will be and the more successful you will be in it is true that with self publishing, you have to do more of your marketing. But even in the regular publishing world today, authors aren't usually selected that can't bring their own marketing skills and marketing presence to a book. They want you to have significant social media presence, newsletters, blogs, Facebook, and social media outreach and so on, that you again, bring yourself much less what they might do,   Robert French  42:10 huh? Yeah, gone are the days when you signed a deal with a publisher, went back home and started writing the next book. And they did everything?   Michael Hingson  42:20 Yeah, very much. So. So tell me about your writing process, your style, and so on.   Robert French  42:25 Yeah, it'sa bit weird,   Michael Hingson  42:27 which you talked a little bit about it, but   Robert French  42:30 goes with goes with my personality. I don't do a lot of planning of a book, I tend to write by the seat of my pants as a pantser, as they say, so I'll get an idea for a book. And I'll kind of do a mind map of where I think it's going and what it's going to what it's going to be like, and who's going to be in it. And just, I don't even always know how it's going to end. But once I've kind of got got it settled in my gut, I just start writing. And I write and things happen. And now of course, I have a cast of characters who are in most of the books, and when they show up, they know, I know what to do with them. And it's it's a lot, it's a it's a lot of fun. And I frequently surprised myself, you know, I'll be writing thinking that this chapter is going to end a certain way. And then somebody will say something, and it will trigger something in my mind, and the chapter will go in a quite different direction. Now this can be difficult, because you can write yourself, it's write itself into a corner. And sometimes it takes a while to get out of it. But I always think if I can surprise myself, I can surprise my readers. So it seems to work for me. And I really like working this way. I did one time just for fun. Think about planning out of book, The wet. Some people know they know how many chapters it's going to be what's going to happen in each chapter. And I started to do that and my head exploded. I just couldn't to couldn't do it. So sorry.   Michael Hingson  44:24 Your characters are beginning to tell the story.   Robert French  44:28 That's right. That's absolutely right. Yeah, yeah. Sometimes you ask a question. And I'll think, hey, what would be an interesting answer to that question that I just wrote down? And that might send something in a completely different direction. The other thing is sorry, gone. No, go ahead. But the other thing is that one of the things that I learned from the literary agent and author Don Masse is With every book should have tension on every page. And so when I'm not fixed in what has to happen in the chapter, I can make tension appear on a page by somebody giving a an odd answer or asking a question that nobody's got the answer to. And all those things create tension, but they're sometimes drive the story in a different direction. So that that works really works for me.   Michael Hingson  45:35 Does it sometimes surprise you when that happens? Oh, yeah. Oh,   Robert French  45:38 yeah. I'm constantly surprised. Sometimes, you know, at the end of a day of writing, I'll, I'll look at what I've written and say, Wow, that was good. But different.   Michael Hingson  45:52     Robert French  45:57 Oh, yes. Yes. Oh, yeah. Yeah,   Michael Hingson  46:01 probably must be depressing. After a while   Robert French  46:03 it is. I'm subject to depression as well. And sometimes writer's block will be one of the triggers. But I usually get writer's block, because I've let the storyline go in a really interesting direction. And have a really unexpected, you know, I've been working towards an expected result. And I thought, No, this unexpected result with much better, and then sometimes takes me a long time to re gather the strands of the story with this new element in it. And, you know, that can take, you know, a couple of days to work out. But yeah, it's except when I'm in a long period of depression, writer's block may last a day or so how do you get over it? What happens? Well, in the, in the short term writer's block, eventually, something will click, you know, at some, you know, sometimes I'll wake up in the morning and think something, wow, that might work in the book. And so that will happen. When I get into, you know, a long, longer period of depression, that writer's block becomes semi permanent. And what gets me out of that is, I'll end up going to my doctor, and he'll getting some medication. So   Michael Hingson  47:31 until you allow yourself to relax and start to just really think about it again. Yeah, listen to your characters.   Robert French  47:39 Yeah, yeah. In a recent depression, something happened that helps quite a lot, is I woke up in the morning, and I was still half asleep. And I had this image of two women standing over looking down over the dead body. And I built a whole chapter in my mind about it. And as soon as I got up, I actually wrote down first 500 words of the chapter. And it was indicative of being in a depression because it was very, very dark. But I thought, you know, if I didn't make it quite so dark, it could actually be an interesting start to a story. So things like that help stuff pops into your mind. And you think, Wow.   Michael Hingson  48:30 Well, I'm looking forward to checking out some of the books certainly, and I can't end this without asking you, what kinds of thoughts and observations and advice you might have for people who want to write. Yeah, it's   Robert French  48:45 interesting that you're out, you should ask that I've just finished a guest blog post for a blogger in United Kingdom. And the title is what to do for an aspiring writer. And my advice would be that if you're don't think that you just you're just going to be a writer, the chances are, you're going to be a publisher too, and you're going to need to be good at it and good at marketing too. But the thing that will distinguish you over the long term is good writing. So if you don't have experience in writing don't do what I did. Don't assume because you're an avid reader that you're going to be a good writer. I spent I didn't waste but I used up quite a few years writing when I could have done a lot better. So make sure you're good. Writers Conference is a great thing to go to for aspiring writer, because they have courses which are given by actual published successful authors on how to write. You can meet agents, you can meet editors, you can meet publishers. But take as many courses as you can, on the craft of writing, read as many books as you can on the craft of writing, and just become a very, very good writer. Because at the moment, self publishing is what is the Wild West, but that's not going to last forever. And the good writers will be the ones who stay in and, and rise to the top, they've still got to be a good marketer and publisher. But I think the key is to become a very, very good writer. And if you if you can go to somebody I know went to a conference, they met one of their favorite authors, and asked me author if they would become their mentor. And they say, yes. So that's, that's something that is always worth doing. Because if you have a mentor, I was lucky that Lisa, my editor became my mentor. And, you know, I could call her anytime and ask her any question about writing? And she would, she would tell me, so a mentor is really good if you can get one. Do you work with an agent today? I don't work with an agent. Now. Now, it's all self publishing. It's all self publish. Yeah, but I do use Edison's   Michael Hingson  51:29 and there's a lot of value in editors, good editors are going to help you really bring out what is important and relevant about not just telling you how to rewrite something or whatever, I remember when we did thunder dog, we had a wonderful editor. And Chad said up front, I'm not going to try to rewrite this book, this has to be you and your story and your style. But what I need to do is to help you enhance it, to make it something that people will want to read and will connect with them. And he had some great suggestions about transitions and so on in the book. I don't know whether you if you read thunderdog, or not.   Robert French  52:13  Yeah, it's no, it's on my list.   Michael Hingson  52:15 Well, one of the things that we do in Thunder dog is we start off with something that happened on September 11. And then we transition back to things in my life that that are relevant to that and taught me something that I could then use to that event. And then at the end of the chapter, we go back to that event, finish it and then go to the next chapter and do the same thing. And Chad said, Well, the problem is, I get lost with the transitions. I don't know where I am, I'm suddenly somewhere else. The transitions are not very good. That's a fair comment, as opposed to, well, you got to you got to rewrite all of this and all that. He said, The transitions aren't good. So we we I actually spent a weekend working on the transitions. Once he taught me what that meant. And the transitions became, I think one of the better parts of the book, and others have said the same thing. And that's, that's one of the things that an editor should do is really help good writers become even better writers?   Robert French  53:14 Mm hmm. Absolutely. I had a, I had an experience with an editor. On my third book, Lisa, was involved in a couple of other projects. And she couldn't be my editor for that book. And so I found another editor who was really, really wonderful. And the book I mentioned about the assassin that never went anywhere, the first chapter of that book was great. And I used it in the new book. And it was a long, long chapter. And it was a it was a flash forward. So you know, after that chapter, it flashed back 14 days to see how one got to that situation. And the editor said that chapter is way too long. And so I broke it up into three different chapters, and flashed, flashed back after each chapter. And it really, really worked. And just, you know, but just to know that the chapter was too long, that's all she had to say, to make me fix it, which was really great and actually had a lot of other really good comments as well, where somebody was acting out of character, you know, would that person really do that? And I thought they probably wouldn't. So,   Michael Hingson  54:48 yeah, that's that's the sign of a good editor. Oh, she was great. Yeah, yeah. Well, if people want to reach out to you and learn about the books and other things like that, how do they do that?   Robert French  54:59 They thing to do is to go to Robert P French.com. That's my website. And if you first page is a list of my books, the book junkie is the first book in the series. And if you click on that, I'll send you a free copy of the first book. So so if anyone's interested in following up, that's the way to do it.   Michael Hingson  55:28 And is that that's the best way then to contact you, as opposed to email or something like that.   Robert French  55:33 But yeah, on my website, just click contact, and then then my email addresses, then people can email me,   Michael Hingson  55:40 and they can learn all about any social media that you happen. So   Robert French  55:43 yeah, I've got Facebook. So Robert P French offer?   Michael Hingson  55:49 Well, I really appreciate you coming on and giving us your insights and demonstrating that you, you took up challenges that came in your life, and you work through them, and even with depression, and so on that comes up, you're able to, to eventually get past it. So don't don't stop doing that. You don't want to depressed, Robert around.   Robert French  56:11 No one does.   Michael Hingson  56:13 But we're really glad that you you came here and you're talking with us. And I appreciate it very much. And so people can go to Robert P french.com. And get all the information and I hope they buy your books. Well,   Robert French  56:25 thank you very much. And thank you very much for inviting me onto the podcast. I really appreciate it. And just as an aside, I didn't after our first conversation I did have I did go to accessibe.com. And it was really very interesting. So I'm glad you made that connection for me.   Michael Hingson  56:49 Well, I hope that you'll use it to to get to work on your website, if you haven't yet. I certainly will. Yes, it works. Well. Yeah, I was very impressed with the demo. Well, thanks for being here. And I want to thank all of you who listened today, I learned a lot and enjoy talking with authors. It's fun to compare notes. And it's also fun to talk about the good old days of computers and such things. So thanks very much for for doing that, Robert. And again, thank all of you for listening. If you'd like to reach out to me, it's easy. You can go to www dot Michael hingson.com/podcast Michael Hingson is M I C H A E L H I N G S O N .com/podcast. Or you can email me and you're welcome to do so at Michael M I C H  A E L H I at accessibe A C C E S S I B E.com. And wherever you're listening to this, please give us a five star rating. We really appreciate your ratings. And thank you very much for do that. So again, thanks for being here. And Robert, thank you for being here as well. Thank you.   UM Intro/Outro  58:02   You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

Stream On with Jim Williams
Executive Producer Patrick Harbinson talks about the Britbox hit The Tower

Stream On with Jim Williams

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 25:07


Our guest is Patrick Harbinson who serves as an executive producer of The Tower now playing on Britbox. Harbinson also worked with author Kate London to adapt her novel into this three-part drama. Harbinson is one of the top crime writers in the business having been a producer on such hit series as Homeland, 24 and Law and Order SVU.The Tower is grounded in the terrifying realities of life on the beat, this limited run mystery revolves around a shocking event at a tower in London's East End where a veteran cop and teenage girl have fallen to their deaths and a rookie cop is now missing. Charged with figuring out what happened is DSI Sarah Collins (Gemma Whelan, Game of Thrones, Killing Eve) whose investigation takes her into the dark heart of policing in a complex and diverse city.Based on the novel by Kate London, a former detective who spent eight years in the Metropolitan Police's homicide squad, the series co-stars Jimmy Akingbola, (Arrow, upcoming Bel-Air) Emmett J Scanlan (Peaky Blinders, Gangs of London) and Tahirah Sharif (Casualty, The Haunting of Bly Manor). Patrick Harbinson (Homeland, 24) serves as an executive producer in addition to adapting London's novel into this three-part drama.NOW PLAYING ON BRITBOXhttps://www.britbox.com/us/Promotional consideration for Stream On with Jim Williams comes from Sling TV. They are far and away; the best live streaming service on the planet.Cord cutters and cord nevers want a place to keep up with live TV with sports or news? Well, we have the best possible option at the best cost in the business.Check them out at https://www.sling.com/It doesn't matter if you like sports, or news, or entertainment they have it all in one place at a price that will have you cutting the cord today! Have questions or comments?We at Stream On welcome your interaction so stay tell us what is on your mind?No problem just ask away on social media Twitter @JWMediaDCInstagram: @jimwilliams200Email- jimwilliamsmedia@gmail.com

Ingredient Insiders: Where Chefs Talk
Italian Olive Oil: Albert DeAngelis & Monini

Ingredient Insiders: Where Chefs Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 38:32


Extra virgin olive oil is cultivated in a handful of different countries throughout the Mediterranean, but Italian olive oil reigns as the gem of all. More than just a simple pantry staple, it's the cornerstone of Italian cooking and at the heart of nearly every Italian dish. Chef Albert DeAngelis of Connecticut's Z Hospitality Group – Terra, Mediterraneo, Eastend, Sole – explains why Monini's superior quality products are consistent flavors in his kitchen for decades and what dishes he prepares with the variety of oils from sautéing to finishing. Monini products from the region of Umbria, Italy have been a foundational partner of The Chefs' Warehouse for over 35 years. Marco Petrini, President of Monini North America, shares the secrets to the family-owned, third-generation business – from harvesting and blending to aging and cooking – and educates on the very different qualities in extra virgin olive oils. Follow @monini_usa @@wherechefesshop @ingredientinsidersIn partnership with The Chefs' Warehouse, a specialty food distributor that has been purveying high-quality artisan ingredients to chefs for over 30 years @wherechefsshop https://www.chefswarehouse.com/Check out Monini's collaboration with the Van Gogh Museum. Limited edition 100% EVOO. The tins portrait some olive tree themed painting that Vincent Van Gogh painted during his late life years in Arles. If you are curious about this, you can find more info here:https://www.monini.com/en/n/monini-and-van-goghProduced by Haynow Media @haynowmedia http://haynowmedia.com

Curious Creatures
Miles and MGT: The Road of Happy Destiny Pt. 1

Curious Creatures

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 40:47 Very Popular


Miles wanted to be a trucker, zooming around the world.Budgie and Lol always Up front with the bus driver. Miles was a drummer!All drummers are friends and everyone that works on Curious Creatures is a drummerMark Gemini Thwaite aka MGT jams with Tricky and The Creatures and also played with Lol and The Curse for charityMiles three favorite drummers Lol, Budgie and Pete de Freitas !Miles stopped playing drums like Budgie and Lol - too exhausting !Steve and his blog likes the violin  Miles says F*&K every sentencePop bullshit and fisticuffs.Calvin and Budgie bashing the beats. Grey hair! Lol says we won't tour in Steve CityLol loved Pistols TV show Malcolm McLaren was spot on.Band security tales: Nigel Welsh, bare knuckle boxer, kept the band apartMGT, Tricky and “Uncle Tony” British gangsters from the East End. Gentle German Micheal for the CureMotörhead lovely to to the Cure at the Reading Festival "here you go lads have some vodka!"Hey, didn't your bass player torch Sarah ?Lol has writerly admiration for Miles and his 100,000 wordsMiles inhabits the words right back in the day.  Budgie  & Lol can relate .Absolutely Cathartic. Helps Miles go to a better space. Martin,  Rob and Miles The kids that had each others backs, back in the day.You run so fast at the the start you need to explain it all  to yourself The primary purpose is taking care of each other a little more experience of life would be good thing Lol was on the fast road to nowhere. So he got off the train.The Covid bench-MGT played for two!! Milos last record?Budgie would be minted with Spellbound ! Get the vinyl soundtrack for Stranger Things!Did you play Bomber ?The Ace Of Spades:Dedicated to Lemmy24 December 1945 - 28 December 2015CONNECT WITH US:Curious Creatures:Website: https://curiouscreaturespodcast.comFacebook: @CuriousCreaturesOfficialTwitter: @curecreaturesInstagram: @CuriousCreaturesOfficialLol Tolhurst: Website: https://loltolhurst.comFacebook: @officialloltolhurst Twitter: @LolTolhurst Instagram: @lol.tolhurst Budgie: Facebook: @budgieofficial Twitter: @TuWhit2whooInstagram: @budgie646Curious Creatures is a partner of the Double Elvis podcast network. For more of the best music storytelling follow @DoubleElvis on Instagram or search Double Elvis in your podcast app.

What's Eric Eating
Episode 250 - Ryan Lachaine and Derek Brown of Riel

What's Eric Eating

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 48:23


On this week's edition of the podcast Eric is joined by Matt to discuss the latest from the Houston restaurant and bar scene including the huge shocker that Chris Shepherd is leaving Underbelly Hospitality, Goode Co. announces it's bringing it's Tex-Mex concept Kitchen & Cantina to the Heights, and Blossom Hotel's announces some new details regarding their dining program. In the Restaurants of the Week portion eculent is featured. In the Guest of the Week section Eric is joined by Ryan Lachaine and Derek Brown of Riel. Eric catches up with the duo from Riel about a multitude of things including how things are at Riel, the challenges they've run into, how Derek got started in bartending, what brought Derek to Houston, what Derek's approach is with the bar program at Riel, working with executive chef Peter Nguyen, what on the menu has them excited nowadays, the customer base, building your bar regulars, what the future holds, Ryan's upcoming pop up with Brandon Silva, and much more! Follow Eric on Instagram and Twitter, plus check out some of his latest articles at Culturemap.com: Restaurant Shocker: Chris Shepherd Departs Company He Founded to Focus on Nonprofit Endeavors Goode Co. Finally Confirms Tex-Mex Concept Coming to Familiar Heights Location Posh Med Center Hotel Recruits Michelin-Worthy Chefs for Four New Restaurants Bun B's Trill Burgers Topple Houston Cult-Favorite in Epic Good Morning America Showdown Fresh New Popsicle and Gelato Shop Chills Out in East End with Fruity Flavors and Tantalizing Treats Hot New Italian Eatery from Successful Houston Restaurateur Headed to Washington Avenue

I'M THAT
Lisa Coleman, Musician

I'M THAT

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 71:41


Lisa Coleman is a musician and composer who plays piano and keyboards and she was a member of Prince's band 'The Revolution' from 1980 to 1986. She is one half of the incredible musical duo Wendy and Lisa, formed with Wendy Melvoin.She was 19 years old when she auditioned and was hired as a part of Prince's backing group in 1980, for his Dirty Mind album and tour. Lisa played keyboards for Prince on his Controversy and 1999 albums and the three albums as a member of The Revolution, which were Purple Rain, Around The World In a Day, and Parade.Shortly after the completion of Prince and The Revolution's Parade project, Lisa and Wendy started their own journey and under the Wendy and Lisa musical partnership. They released five full-length albums.Today, Lisa and Wendy continue to work together as film and television composers and have provided the musical scores for television shows including Crossing Jordan, Heroes, Nurse Jackie (which won them an Emmy for Outstanding main title theme), Prime Suspect, No Tomorrow, Witches of East End, Shades of Blue, and Touch which they were nominated for an Emmy. She is currently working on a new show called The Hospital, an adult animated sci-fi comedy from Maya Rudolph and Natasha Lyonne's Animal Pictures.Lisa, along with Wendy also shares the honor of winning a Grammy and Oscar for being part of The Revolution as Purple Rain won two Grammys and the Oscar for Best Original Score. She also received the inaugural ASCAP Shirley Walker award with Wendy in 2014, which honors those whose achievements have contributed to the diversity of Film and Television Music.She recently self-released her first solo instrumental album titled Collage. And incidentally, she also created the theme music for this, the music on my podcast.

Humanize
S4E8: The Wisdom of Community w/Imran Rehman

Humanize

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 56:25


How do we create dialogue when there are such huge power differences in the room? How do we make sure we have different voices at the table and still work together?  Today we sit down with Imran Rehman, CEO of Kokoro, a web based company striving to effect change by building better environments for teams to thrive in.  Imran reaches to his childhood in London's East End and his upbringing of many communities joining together to inform his work.   We're Exploring   The aspect of Imran's childhood that helped form who he is now Recognizing what is the other side of praise and how it is detrimental to progress Using language of encouragement and learning to ask questions in place of praise What education really is The differences between a challenge, a problem, and a crisis, and how belonging is the key to all three Imran's simple starting point for psychological safety in the workplace  The importance of community and holding space Why temporal comparison is best way to help humans grow and improve The “Great Man Theory” and why we need to turn away from individual greatness Learn more about Imran Rehman:  https://bekokoro.com/, https://www.linkedin.com/in/imranrehman/, https://twitter.com/ImsRehman,  https://www.instagram.com/bekokoronow/    If you'd like to support us in continuing this work, we'd be honored if you'd consider donating here: https://www.patreon.com/thehumanizepodcast    Let's talk about it! Connect with us to continue the conversation:   Instagram: https://instagram.com/thehumanizepodcast Facebook: https://facebook.com/thehumanizepodcast  Email: info@thehumanizepodcast.com