Podcasts about MPD

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  • 195PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about MPD

Latest podcast episodes about MPD

KZMU News
Friday October 1, 2021

KZMU News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 29:59


Today we continue Lift Up: LGBTQ+ Visibility. KZMU recognizes the need to share voices and stories from our local LGBTQ+ community members on the airwaves. We hope this project helps deepen understanding and empathy within our community and reinforces a sense of belonging. Sallie Hodges moved to Moab in 2004, from Los Angeles, California. Born in Bristol, England, they gained a Communications BA honors degree in Film, Video and Photographic Arts, which ultimately led to the film industry. Sallie is now a self-declared artist specializing in tintype portraiture and film. They advocate for the acceptance and introduction of non-gendered bias in our institutions and culture in the hopes of a more equitable future for all. Ginger Allen and Serah Mead co-produced today's piece. And later, the Weekly News Reel, where we check in with reporters about their latest stories of the Moab area. Doug McMurdo of The Times-Independent discusses continued criticism of the Moab City Police Department as well as memories of Kylen Schulte and Crystal Turner shared by their friends and family. Alison Hartford of the Moab Sun News has updates about controlling congestion at Arches National Park, and new dark-skies friendly streetlights. Show Notes: Photo: Sallie Hodges is our fourth storyteller in KZMU's Lift Up: LGBTQ+ Visibility project. They advocate for the acceptance and introduction of non-gendered bias in our institutions and culture in the hopes of a more equitable future for all. Courtesy Sallie Hodges Lift Up: LGBTQ+ Visibility https://www.kzmu.org/lift-up/ Music featured in today's newscast includes: Only Knows by Broke For Free Becoming by Ketsa Aced-it by Ketsa Weekly News Reel Mentions – The Times-Independent: May, Morgan implore city council to correct MPD problems https://www.moabtimes.com/articles/may-morgan-implore-city-council-to-correct-mpd-problems/ The Times-Independent: Crystal and Kylen – ‘They were two of the best people I've ever met' https://www.moabtimes.com/articles/crystal-and-kylen-they-were-two-of-the-best-people-ive-ever-met/ Moab Sun News: Arches to trial timed entry, city considers search for new staff – Notes from the regular Sept. 28 City Council meeting https://www.moabsunnews.com/news/article_06da5732-223a-11ec-8737-774fd1507ef3.html Moab Sun News: City Council talks sustainability at Sept. 28 special meeting – The council heard a presentation from the Drawdown Fund and discussed electric-ready building and Dark Sky compliance https://www.moabsunnews.com/news/article_e9ed82f8-2238-11ec-9369-4ff54805f948.html

That Would Be Rad
S2 E4: The Andrew W.K. Conspiracy

That Would Be Rad

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 93:41


Cryptic codes, alter egos, psychological experiments, time travel, eternal life, multiple personality disorder, ingenious marketing, secret identity, alternate reality, time travel… This week on our show we talk about one of the strangest mysteries we never knew existed. One that, on the surface level, initially seems: easy to solve, shallow, and perhaps even non-existent. But, like us, as you delve deeper and deeper into the interesting story that is “Andrew W.K.” - you begin to realize the complexity of this genius (or deranged) mystery. Is Andrew W.K. the result of a corporate creation, a marketing genius, is this the greatest example of performance art in history, a man suffering from MPD, a brilliant mind, or a tortured soul? Find out for yourself, let us know what you think and…and as always: BE RAD! ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- SHOW INFO

Chad Hartman
Mary Moriarty on a change to Minneapolis police traffic stop policy

Chad Hartman

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 22:16


MPD has announced that they'll no longer make traffic stops on low-level offenses. Former Hennepin County Chief Defender Mary Moriarty joined us with her perspective. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Jay's Analysis
How The COOFID Pandemic Comes Out Of MK-Ultra Mind Control

Jay's Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 30:26


Jay Dyer of https://jaysanalysis.com guest hosts The hAlex J0nes Show to break down how the Covid pandemic mindset of fear is straight out of MK-Ultra mind control programming.

Lounge podcasts
Lounge psychological studies podcast (Dissociative identity disorder)

Lounge podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2021 18:11


Dissociative identity disorder (DID), previously known as multiple personality disorder (MPD), is a mental disorder characterized by the maintenance of at least two distinct and relatively enduring personality states. The disorder is accompanied by memory gaps beyond what would be explained by ordinary forgetfulness.

Hey, it's Cory Hepola
Why won't the Minnesota BCA revisit the case of Terrence Franklin

Hey, it's Cory Hepola

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 9:52


The Minnesota BCA was asked to revisit the 2013 MPD shooting of Terrence Franklin but declined to look at the case again. Mike Padden, attorney for Franklin's family, joins Cory to talk about the evidence in the case, seeking justice for the family and what happens next. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Music Pro Daily
The REALITY of Producing Music FULL-TIME w/ John McLucas

Music Pro Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 27:18


MPD is an "almost daily" podcast that gives freelance music producers real insights into building a long term career in the internet-driven music industry. I use this podcast to document my day-to-day running a producer development company with my partner, industry-veteran producer Mike Mani. In this show we discuss everything from landing more projects and selling digital products (sample packs, loops, etc) to developing artists and connecting with the industry. To learn more about what we do... Visit www.DarkLabelMusic.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/musicprodaily/message

Congressional Dish
CD236: January 6: The Capitol Riot

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 130:58


Congress has conducted at least eleven bipartisan hearings to investigate the security failures that permitted a mob of American citizens to riot inside the Capitol Building and successfully disrupt Congress while they certified the 2020 election results on January 6, 2021. In this episode, hear key highlights pulled from over 30 hours of testimony to understand exactly what happened that day. Executive Producer: Forrest Pttman Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Click here to contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Click here to support Congressional Dish for each episode via Patreon Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536 Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Recommended Congressional Dish Episodes Q: Into the Storm, HBO CD226: Lame Duck Bills H.R.1090 - District of Columbia National Guard Home Rule Act S.964 - Domestic Terrorism Prevention Act of 2021 H.R.4192 - Confronting the Threat of Domestic Terrorism Act S.2043 - Jabara-Heyer NO HATE Act H.R.4187 - Domestic Terrorism Penalties Act of 2019 Section 311 of the USA PATRIOT Act U.S. Department of the Treasury Articles/Documents Article: 587 people have been charged in the Capitol insurrection so far. This searchable table shows them all. by Madison Hall, Skye Gould, Rebecca Harrington, Jacob Shamsian, Azmi Haroun, Taylor Ardrey, and Erin Snodgrass, Insider, July 23, 2021 Article: Tampa man, 20, admits intending to block Congress with Oath Keepers in new Capitol riot guilty plea by The Washington Post, July 20, 2021 Article: Tampa man, 20, admits intending to block Congress with Oath Keepers in new Capitol riot guilty plea by The Washington Post, July 19, 2021 Article: What were the Capitol rioters thinking on Jan. 6? by The Washington Post, July 19, 2021 Article: “You're Gonna Have a Fucking War”: Mark Milley's Fight to Stop Trump from Striking Iran by Susan B. Glasser, The New Yorker, July 15, 2021 Article: To Trump's hard-core supporters, his rallies weren't politics. They were life. by The Washington Post, July 15, 2021 Article: Michael Flynn posts video featuring QAnon slogans By Marshall Cohen, CNN, July 7, 2021 Article: Latest alleged Oath Keeper arrested in Capitol riot turned over body armor and firearm by The Washington Post, July 2, 2021 Article: ‘Zip Tie Guy' and His Mother Plead Not Guilty to New Charges in U.S. Capitol Siege by Aaron Keller, Law & Crime, June 23, 2021 Article: Man charged with bringing molotov cocktails to Capitol on Jan. 6 has Texas militia ties, contacted Ted Cruz's office, court papers allege by The Washington Post, May 24, 2021 Article: Maryland man, indicted for bringing gun to Capitol riot, could face decades in prison by Jordan Fischer, Eric Flack, Stephanie Wilson, WUSA9, May 18, 2021 Article: DC medical examiner confirms causes of death of 4 who died in Jan. 6 Capitol riot By Kelli Dugan, Cox Media Group National Content Desk, 11NEWS, April 7, 2021 Article: The lawyer for the 'QAnon Shaman' wants to use Trump's speech before the insurrection as part of his defense by Jacob Shamsian, Insider, March 1, 2021 Two Members of the Proud Boys Indicted for Conspiracy, Other Charges Related to the Jan. 6 Riots By United States Department of Justice, January 29, 2021 Article: Former Army captain arrested after live-streaming Capitol riot By Kyle Rempfer, AirForceTimes, January 22, 2021 Article: 'Trump said I could': One possible legal defense for accused rioters. By Teri Kanefield and Mark Reichel, The Washington Post, January 11, 2021 Article: Did 5 People Die During Jan. 6 Capitol Riot? by Alex Kasprak, Snopes, January 7, 2021 Article: FBI focuses on whether some Capitol rioters intended to harm lawmakers or take hostages by The Washington Post, January 7, 2021 Article: Trump's supporters think they're being patriotic. And that's the problem. by Christine Adams, The Washington Post, January 7, 2021 Article: Capitol riot: Army vet who tended bar accused by FBI of conspiring in insurrection  by AMSNBS, 2021 Article: All 10 living former defense secretaries: Involving the military in election disputes would cross into dangerous territory by The Washington Post, January 3, 2021 Article: 'I just want to find 11,780 votes': In extraordinary hour-long call, Trump pressures Georgia secretary of state to recalculate the vote in his favor by The Washington Post, January 3, 2021 Article: Capitol riots by The Washington Post, 2021 Article: Another MAGA Rally To Take Place In D.C. On The Day Congress Declares Election Results by Matt Blitz, WAMU 88.5, November 27, 2020 Article: Trump's Election Attack Ends December 14—Whether He Knows It or Not by Lily Hay Newman, Wired, November 27, 2020 Additional Resources U.S.A. v. Mark Grods U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, June 28, 2021 Defense Timeline for January 6th Examining the U.S. Capitol Attack: A Review of the Security, Planning and Response Failures on January 6 Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, Committee on Rules and Administration U.S.A. v. Christopher Alberts U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, January 27, 2021 U.S.A. v. Lonnie Leroy Coffman U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, January 11, 2021 U.S.A. v. Ethan Nordean, Joseph Biggs, Zachary Rehl and Charles Donohue U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, January 8, 2021 Video: Seeking Information: Pipe Bombs in Washington, D.C. F.B.I., January 5, 2021 Sound Clip Sources Hearing: USCP OVERSIGHT FOLLOWING JANUARY 6 ATTACK, Senate Committee on Rules and Administration, June 16, 2021 Watch on C-SPAN Witnesses: Michael Bolton Inspector General of the US Capitol Police Transcript: 36:40 Michael Bolton: To me the biggest failure is that because we have allowed certain elements within the Capitol Police to be autonomous, they conduct their own training, okay? That's the issue. Whereas you if you have a Training Services Bureau and let's call it an office of training that is fully incorporated, they handle all the training they conducted. They make sure you get the training, they hold your officials accountable, your people doing your training, guess what, we're sending a letter to the chief and they can no longer work until they get required or what have you. Hearing: The Capitol Insurrection: Unexplained Delays and Unanswered Questions (Part II), House Committee on Oversight and Reform, June 15, 2021 Watch on Youtube Witnesses: Lt. General Walter Piatt Director of the Army Staff General Charles Flynn Commanding General of the US Army Pacific Chris Wray FBI Director Transcript: 30:41 Lt. General Walter Piatt: My involvement with our response to this emergency began shortly after entering the Secretary of the Army's office at 2:20pm to provide a report of a suspicious package. While I was there, a panic call came in reporting several explosions in the city. To understand the situation, to indentify, what was needed from the army Secretary McCarthy convened a conference call. During this call DC and Capitol authorities frantically requested urgent and immediate support to the Capitol. We all immediately understood the gravity of the situation. Secretary McCarthy went down the hall to seek approval from the Acting Secretary of Defense. Before departing, she directed me to have the staff prepare a response. I communicated this on the conference call. But those are more and more convinced that I was denying their request, which I did not have the authority to do. Despite clearly stating three times that we are not denying your request, we need to prepare a plan for when the Secretary of the Army gains approval. 1:46:02 General Charles Flynn: There's four things in planning that we could have done. And we should have done. The first one there should have been clearly a lead federal agency designated. The second one is we should have had an integrated security plan. The third one is and much of this has been talked about already is information and intelligence sharing on criminal activities before the sixth of January. And then the fourth one would have been, we should have pre-federalized certain National Guard forces so that they could have immediately been moved to the Capitol and had those authorities in place before this happened. 2:09:30 Rep. Kweisi Mfume (MD): So that's what we are trying to do, keep our republic and to keep it from those who tried to overthrow this government who wanted to kill members of Congress, who wanted to hang Mike Pence. 2:43:37 Rep. Michael Cloud (TX): You mentioned domestic terrorism that this would qualify as that, would the riots that we saw across the cities for nights and nights and weeks and weeks on even months on end, qualify as domestic terrorism as well? Chris Wray: We've been treating both as domestic terrorism and investigating both through our Joint Terrorism Task Force. 2:51:19 Chris Wray: Among the things that we've taken away from this experience are a few. One, as you heard me say in response to an earlier question, we need to develop better human sources, right, because if we can get better human sources, then we can better separate the wheat from the chaff in social media. Two, we need better data analytics. The volume, as you said, the volume of this stuff is, is just massive, and the ability to have the right tools to get through it and sift through it in a way that is, again, separating the wheat from the chaff is key. And then the third point that I would make is we are rapidly having to contend with the issue of encryption. So what I mean by that is, yes, there might be chatter on social media. But then what we have found and this is true in relation to January 6th, in spades, but it was also true over the summer in some of the violence that occurred there. Individuals will switch over to encrypted platforms for the really significant, really revealing communications. And so we've got to figure out a way to get into those communications or we're going to be constantly playing catch up in our effort to separate as I said, the wheat from the chaff on social media. 3:01:00 Chris Wray: We consider the attack on capital on January 6 to be a form of domestic terrorism. 3:16:00 Chris Wray: As for social media, I think there's, there's it's understandable that there's a lot of confusion on this subject we do not we have very specific policies that Ben at the Department for a long time that govern our ability to use social media and when we have an authorized purpose and proper predication, there's a lot of things we can do on social media. And we do do and we aggressively do but what we can't do, what we can't do on social media is without proper predication, and an authorized purpose, just monitor, just in case on social media. Now, if the policies should be changed to reflect that, that might be one of the important lessons learned coming out of this whole experience. But that's not something that that currently the FBI has the either the authority or certainly the resources frankly, to do. 4:06:00 Rep. Pat Fallon (TX): Has anyone been charged with inciting an insurrection? Chris Wray: I think I responded to an earlier question. I don't believe that that has been one of the charges us so far. But again, with that many cases, I want to build a little room for the fact that I might not know all the cases. Rep. Pat Fallon (TX): So right as of right now, the answer would be no, fair to say? Chris Wray: That's my understanding. Rep. Pat Fallon (TX): Okay. Has anybody been charged with sedition to your knowledge? Chris Wray: Same answer. Rep. Pat Fallon (TX): Okay. No, again, Has anybody been charged with treason? Chris Wray: I don't believe so. Rep. Pat Fallon (TX): Okay, has anyone been charged with illegal possession of a firearm inside the Capitol? On that day? Chris Wray: I believe there has been at least one instance of someone arrested with a firearm in the Capitol. And there have been a number of arrests of individuals either en route to the Capitol or near the Capitol for the for the siege. 4:11:00 Rep. James Comer (KY): On December 31, Mayor browser requested DC National Guard assistance with the planned protest for January fifth and sixth, correct? Lt. General Walter Piatt: Correct, sir. Rep. James Comer (KY):And was that request for assistant ultimately approved by the Secretary of Army? Lt. General Walter Piatt: It was approved by the Acting Secretary of Defense as well. Rep. James Comer (KY):Were restrictions placed on that authority upon the request of Mayor browser and if so, what were those restrictions? Lt. General Walter Piatt: She had requested that they be unarmed and it did not take a place in any law enforcement activities. Hearing: The Capitol Insurrection: Unexplained Delays and Unanswered Questions, Committee on Oversight and Reform, May 12, 2021 Watch on Youtube Witnesses: Chris Miller Former Acting Secretary of Defense Robert Contee Chief of the Metropolitan Police Department Transcript: 00:22 Rep. Carolyn Maloney (NY): Today the committee will examine one of the darkest days in our nation's history. The January 6th insurrection at the United States Capitol. On that day, a violent mob incited by shameless lies told by a defeated president launched the worst attack on our republic since the Civil War. 00:42 Rep. Carolyn Maloney (NY): We watched as the temple of our democracy, a building whereas familiar with as our own homes, was overrun by a mob bent on murdering the Vice President and members of Congress. 21:21 Chris Miller: I want to remind you and the American public that during that time, there was irresponsible commentary by the media about a possible military coup or that advisors the president were advocating the declaration of martial law. I was also very cognizant of the fears and concerns about the prior use of the military in June 2020 response to protests in the White House. And just before the electoral college certification 10 former Secretaries of Defense signed an op-ed published in The Washington Post warning of the dangers of politicizing inappropriately using the military. No such thing was going to occur and my watch, but these concerns and hysteria about them nonetheless factored into my decisions regarding the appropriate and limited use of our armed forces to support civilian law enforcement during the electoral college certification. My obligation to the nation was to prevent a constitutional crisis. Historically, military responses to domestic protests have resulted in violations of American civil rights and even in the case the Kent State protests of the Vietnam War, tragic deaths. In short, I fervently believe the military should not be utilized in such scenarios, other than as a last resort, and only when all other assets had been expended. 26:02 Chris Miller: I stand by every decision I made on January 6th and the following days. I want to emphasize that our nation's armed forces are to be deployed for domestic law enforcement only when all civilian assets are expended and only as the absolute last resort. To use them for domestic law enforcement in any other manner is contrary to the constitution and a threat to the Republic. I ask you this consider what the response in Congress in the media had been if I had unilaterally deployed 1000s of troops into Washington DC that morning against the Express wishes of the Mayor and the Capitol Police who indicated they were prepared. 40:52 Rep. Carolyn Maloney (NY): Mr. Miller, you were the Acting Secretary of Defense on January 6th, did President Trump as the commander in chief of the US Armed Forces call you during the January 6 attack to ensure the capital was being secured? Mr. Miller? Chris Miller: No, I had all the authority I needed from the president to fulfill my constitutional duties. Rep. Carolyn Maloney (NY): Did you speak with President Trump at all as the attack was unfolding? Chris Miller: On January 6th? yes. Chris Miller: No, I did not. I didn't need to I had all the authority I needed and knew what had to happen. I knew what had to happen. Rep. Carolyn Maloney (NY): Did you speak with Vice President Pence during the attack? Yes or no? Chris Miller: Yes. Rep. Carolyn Maloney (NY): According to a defense department timeline, it was Vice President Pence and not President Trump, who called during the siege to say the Capitol was not secure. And to give you the direction to quote, 'clear the Capitol.' What specifically did Vice President Pence say to you that day? Chris Miller: Vice President's not in the chain of command, he did not direct me to clear the capital. I discussed very briefly with him the situation. He provided insights based on his presence there, and I notified him or I informed him that by that point, the District of Columbia National Guard was being fully mobilized and was in coordination with local and federal law enforcement to assist in clearing the Capitol. 1:05:28 Chris Miller: I think I'd like to modify my original assessment. Rep. Stephen Lynch (MA): Why am I not surprised about that? Chris Miller: Based on as Chief Contee said, we are getting more information by the day by the minute about what happened and the highlight some other observations that were made. It's clear now that there were organized... Although we're going to find out through the Department of Justice process in the law, and the legal system, it seems clear that there was some sort of conspiracy where there were organized assault elements that intended to assault the Capitol that day. Rep. Stephen Lynch (MA): Reclaiming my time, I'm just asking you the same question you've answered before. Did did the President's remarks incite members to march, the people in the crowd to march on the Capitol, or did they not? Chris Miller: Well, he clearly said offered that they should march on the Capitol. So it goes without saying that his statement resulted in that... Rep. Stephen Lynch (MA): Reclaiming my time. Let me just share with the committee what you have said before. This is your quote. This is your quote. What anyone? Would anybody have marched on the Capitol and tried to overrun the Capitol without the president speech? I think it's pretty much definitive. That would not have happened. Rep. Stephen Lynch (MA): I think now, I would say that this is not the unitary factor at all. What's that? Chris Miller: I would like to offer I have reassessed. It was not the unitary factor at all. There was no...it's seems clear there was an organized conspiracy with assault elements. Rep. Stephen Lynch (MA): In your testimony for today. Reclaiming my time again, for your written testimony for today. For today, this morning, you stated the following about the President's quote, I personally believe his comments encouraged the protesters that day. So this is that this is that there's a very recent reversal of your of your testimony. Chris Miller: Absolutely not. That's ridiculous. Rep. Stephen Lynch (MA): You're ridiculous. Chris Miller: Thank you for your, your thoughts. I also want to highlight... Rep. Stephen Lynch (MA): No wait a minute, reclaiming my time, reclaiming my time. 2:06:30 Rep. Glenn Grothman (WI): Has there been any progress made it all on on? Who would have put these bombs there? Robert Contee: No arrests have been made no suspects identified, working without partners on the federal side. There's been surveillance videos that have been released publicly showing that individual placing the pipe bombs, but no arrests have been made at this point. 3:01:05 Rep. Andrew Clyde (GA): Watching the TV footage of those who entered the Capitol and walked through Statuary Hall showed people in an orderly fashion staying between the stanchions and ropes, taking videos and pictures. You know, if you didn't know the TV footage was a video from January the sixth, you would actually think it was a normal tourist visit. 3:12:18 Sen. Hank Johnson (GA): Were you ordered to delay deployment of troops? Chris Miller: 110% Absolutely not. No, that is not the case. 4:41:42 Chris Miller: If we had a valid request and a necessary requests from your body, I guarantee you that the Department of Defense would have been there in strength as required. Rep. Mike Quigley (IL): So when you would acknowledge we lost the battle we lost for the first time since 1814... Chris Miller: Horrifying. Rep. Mike Quigley (IL): And it was everybody else's fault but DoD. Chris Miller: I absolutely disagree with the statement that it was... Rep. Mike Quigley (IL) I'm paraphrasing you the only way that makes sense when you say 'you wouldn't do anything differently, you wouldn't do anything differently.' Okay, that implies what I'm saying that it was everybody else's fault in your mind, because it was a catastrophic failure. Chris Miller: And I just had an obligation to protect and defend the Constitution and guarantee that the armed forces were used appropriately, and not in a manner that would be seen as extraconstitutional. Rep. Mike Quigley (IL) Look, the Constitution is not a treaty of surrender. It affords you the opportunity to do what's necessary to defend the people in the democracy of the United States. I mean, if looked upon the destruction afterwards, looking back, you say, 'well, at least I defended the Constitution' is another perverse way of looking at this. Nothing was DoDs fault. And at least you did, in your own mind, defend what you thought was right for the Constitution. Never mind how many people got hurt and how much damage was done to our government in the meantime. Chris Miller: I will absolutely take that on and take that as a compliment. Because the armed forces of the United States was completely prepared and ready to respond to any valid request from any department or agency or local or federal law enforcement office. Rep. Mike Quigley (IL) You lost and you don't have the Intellectual fortitude to own up to your part of the responsibility. And I get it, a lot of people screwed up, you're one of them. I yield scaled back. Madam Chairman. Chris Miller: I respectfully disagree in that. Rep. Mike Quigley (IL) I was in the room, you weren't. Hearing: State and Local Responses to Domestic Terrorism: The Attack on the U.S. Capitol and Beyond, House Committee on Homeland Security: Subcommittee on Intelligence and Counterterrorism, March 24, 2021 Watch on Youtube Witnesses: Dana Nessel Attorney General, Michigan Aaron Ford Attorney General, Nevada John Chisholm District Attorney, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin. Transcript: 07:19 Rep. Elissa Slotkin (MI): The post 9/11 era of security where the threats come from abroad is over. In the 20 years of the post 9/11 era, they came to an end on January 6th, the new reality is that we have to come to terms with is that it's our extremists here at home, seeking to explain internal divisions that pose the greatest threat. Hearing: JANUARY 6 ATTACK ON THE CAPITOL, Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs and Committee on Rules and Administration, March 3, 2021 Day 2 (March 3, 2021) Day 2, Part 2 (March 3, 2021) Witnesses: Robert Salesses Senior Official Performing the Duties of the Assistant Secretary for Homeland Defense and Global Security at the U.S. Department of Defense Major General William Walker Commanding General of the DC National Guard Jill Sanborn Assistant Director, Counterterrorism Division Federal Bureau of Investigation U.S. Department of Justice Transcript: 06:42 Sen. Gary Peters (MI): But the January 6 attack must mark a turning point. There can be no question that the domestic terrorist threat and cluding violence driven by white supremacy and anti government groups is the gravest terrorist threat to our homeland security. Moving forward, the FBI, which is tasked with leading our counterterrorism efforts, and the Department of Homeland Security, which ensures that state and local law enforcement understands the threats that American communities face must address this deadly threat with the same focus and resources and analytical rigor that they apply to foreign threats such as ISIS and Al Qaeda. 30:19 Robert Salesses: Over the weekend of January 2nd and third, my staff contacted the Secret Service, the Park Police, the marshal service, the FBI, the Capitol Police to determine if they planned to request DoD assistance. None of these law enforcement agencies indicated a need for DoD or DC National Guard Support. 30:45 Robert Salesses: After consultation with the Department of Justice, the Acting Secretary of Defense approved the DC government request for National Guard personnel to support 30 traffic control points and six metro stations from January 5th to the sixth. The Acting Secretary also authorized a 40 person quick reaction force to be readied at Joint Base Andrews. 31:17 Robert Salesses: On January 5, the Acting Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of the Army received a letter from the mayor of DC, stating MPD is prepared and coordinated with its federal partners, namely the Park Police, the Capitol Police and the Secret Service. Based on these communications with federal and local civilian authorities DoD determined that no additional military support was required on January 5th, and 6th. 32:20 Robert Salesses: At approximately 2:30pm, the Secretary of the Army met with the Acting Secretary of Defense and other senior leaders of the Defense Department. After this meeting, the Acting Secretary of Defense determined that all available forces of the DC National Guard were required to reinforce the DC Metropolitan Police and the US Capitol Police and ordered the full mobilization of the DC National Guard at 3:04pm. 33:08 Robert Salesses: After reviewing the DC National Guard's missions, equipping and responsibilities to be performed at the Capitol Complex and supported the Metropolitan Police and Capitol Police, and conferring with the DC Metropolitan Police at their headquarters, at 4:10pm, the Secretary of the Army received the Acting Secretary of Defense's approval at 4:32 and ordered the DC National Guard forces to depart the armory for the Capitol Complex 49:59 Major General William Walker: The District of Columbia National Guard provides support to the Metropolitan Police Department, the United States Park Police, the United States Secret Service, and other federal and district law enforcement agencies in response to planned rallies, marches, protest, and other large scale first amendment activity on a routine basis. The standard component of such support is the stand up of a off site quick reaction for us, an element of guardsmen held in reserve with civil disturbance response equipment, helmets, shields, battons, etc. They are postured to quickly respond to an urgent and immediate need for assistance by civil authorities. The Secretary of the Army's January 5th letter to me withheld that authority for me to employ a quick reaction force. Additionally, the Secretary of the Army's memorandum to me required that a concept of operation be submitted to him before the employment of a quick reaction force. I found that requirement to be unusual, as was the requirement to seek approval to move guardsmen supporting the Metropolitan Police Department to move from one traffic control point to another. 54:50 Major General William Walker: So the memo was unusual in that it required me to seek authorization from the Secretary of the Army and the Secretary of Defense, to essentially even protect my guardsmen. So no civil disturbance equipment could be authorized, unless it was came from the Secretary of Defense, now the Secretary of the Army, to his credit, did tell me that I could have force protection equipment with the guardsmen. So we do have helmets. shin guards, vest, we did have that with us. But that came from the Secretary of the Army. The Secretary of Defense told me I needed his permission to to escalate to have that kind of protection. 55:50 Major General William Walker: What it says, without my personal authorization, the District of Columbia National Guard has not authorized the following to be issued weapons, ammunition bayonets, batons or ballistic protection equipment such as helmets and body armor. Now, again, to be clear, the Secretary of the Army told me to go ahead and issue that equipment. So we never were going to have weapons or ammunition and we no longer have bayonets. But we do have ballistic protection equipment, helmets body armor, and so I did have that with each guardsmen. 57:02 Major General William Walker: And at that time, Chief Conte and Chief Soon passionately pleaded for District of Columbia National Guard to get to the Capitol with all deliberate speed. So the Army senior leaders did not think that it'd look good. It would be a good optic, they further stated that it could incite the crowd. So their best military advice would be to the Secretary of the Army who could not get on the call. So we wanted the Secretary of the Army to join the call, but he was not available. We were told that he was with the Secretary of Defense and not available. But the Army Senior leadership, expressed to Chief Conte, Chief Sohn, Dr. Mitchell, the deputy mayor and others on the call, that it would not be their best military advice to have uniform guardsmen on the Capitol. 58:26 Sen. Gary Peters (MI): General Walker was the issue of optics ever brought up by army leadership when the DC National Guard was deployed during the summer of 2020. Was that discussed? Major General William Walker: It was never discussed. The week of June it was never discussed July 4, when we were supporting the city was never discussed August 28th when we supported the city. Sen. Gary Peters (MI): Did you think that was unusual? Major General William Walker: I did. 1:00:32 Major General William Walker: So I had them ready to go shortly after the phone call. So I brought, at 1500, I directed that the quick reaction for us that was based at Andrews Air Force Base, leave the base, get to the armory at all deliberate speed. I had a police escort bring them to the armory. They returned to the Armory in about 20 minutes. So we had them sitting there waiting. And then, in anticipation of a green light, a go, we put guardsmen on buses, we brought them inside the armory, so nobody would see them putting on the equipment and getting on the buses, and then we just waited to get the approval. And that's why we were able to get to the Capitol in about 18 minutes. Sen. Gary Peters (MI): What time were they on the buses Ready to go? Do you recall? Major General William Walker: By five o'clock, but at five o'clock, I decided, hey, you know, there's got to be an approval coming. So get on the buses, get the equipment on, get on the buses and just wait. And then a few minutes after that we did get the approval. I was on a secure video conference when the army leadership conveyed to me that the Secretary of Defense had authorized the employment of the National Guard at the Capitol. So my timeline has 1708, 5:08pm is when is when we wrote down that we had approval and read was about eight people in the office with me when I got that. Sen. Gary Peters (MI): How many guardsmen were ready. You said write a video earlier and they have gotten 155. So you could have sent 155 much, much earlier, what would have been the impact of sending those 155 right around that two o'clock timeframe? Major General William Walker: Well, based on my experience with the summer and I have 19 years, I have 39 years in the National Guard, and I was in the Florida guard Hurricane Andrew I've been involved in civil disturbances. So I believe that number could have made a difference. We could have helped extend the perimeter and help push back the crowd. 1:13:49 Robert Salesses: The only decision makers on the sixth of January were the Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of the Army Ryan McCarthy. There was a chain of command from the Secretary of Defense, to Secretary McCarthy to General Walker. That was the chain of command. 1:15:39 Sen. Rob Portman (OH): This morning, you have testified that you received this letter from our secretary McCarthy on January 5, so just the day before the attack on the Capitol. In that letter, did Secretary McCarthy prohibit you from employing the National Guard's quick reaction force without his authorization? Major General William Walker: So I have the letter in front of me, and his letter does not but it is the Secretary of Defense says that I have to use it as a last resort. But the Secretary of the Army told me and it's, I have the letter that I couldn't not use the quick reaction force. It would it would he with I'll just read it. Yeah, 'I withhold authority to approve employment of the District of Columbia National Guard quick reaction force, and will do so only as a last resort, in response to a request from an appropriate civil authority. I will require a concept of operation prior to authorizing employment of a civil- of a quick reaction for it. 1:16:05 *Major General William Walker:** Now a quick reaction force normally is a command was tool to go help either a civilian agency, but more typically to help the National Guardsmen who are out there in need, need assistance. 1:16:58 Major General William Walker: Just to be clear, the Secretary of Defense said I could use it as a last resort, right. But the Secretary of the Army says that I could only use it after he gave me permission. And only then after a concept of operation. Sen. Rob Portman (OH): Right, and we talked about the chain of command earlier, so your chain of command is both of these gentlemen. In other words, you you didn't have the authority to deploy that quick reaction force based on either the letter or the earlier memo that went from the Secretary of Defense, Acting Secretary defense to the Secretary of the Army. Is that correct? Major General William Walker: Yes, sir. 1:17:23 Sen. Rob Portman (OH): Yeah, I also thought it was odd and I think you said was unusual and very prescriptive that the January 5th letter required the Secretary of the Army to approve the movement of deployed guardsmen from one traffic control point to another. Did you find that unusual? Major General William Walker: In 19 years I never had that before happened. So on that day, the Metropolitan Police as they would any other day requested that a traffic control point move one block, one block over. No traffic was where they were. So they wanted the traffic control point to move one block. I had to get permission. I told him, I'll get back to you. I contacted Lieutenant General Piatt, who contacted Secretary of the Army, I had to explain where that contractor control point was in relationship to the Capitol. And only then did I get permission to move the three national guardsmen supporting the Metropolitan... Sen. Rob Portman (OH): These are three unarmed National Guardsmen who are helping with traffic control in parts of that Metropolitan Police can do other things. And they were not permitted to move a block away without getting permission from the Secretary of the Army. Is that true? Major General William Walker: That's correct. Yeah. 1:18:52 Sen. Rob Portman (OH): That January 4th memorandum from Acting Secretary Miller to the Army Secretary required the personal approval of the Secretary of Defense for the National Guard to be issued riot gear. Is that correct? Major General William Walker: That's correct. But but the secretary army told me to go ahead and put it into vehicles. So I give him credit for that. 1:19:08 Major General William Walker: Normally for a safety and force protection matter, a commander would would be able to authorize his guardsmen to protect themselves with helmet and protective equipment. 1:25:57 Sen. Roy Blunt (MO): General Walker if the restrictions on your authorities hadn't been put in place by DoD, what would you have done when Chief Sund called you at 1:49 on January 6, with an urgent request for National Guards assistance? Major General William Walker: I would have immediately pulled all the guardsmen that were supporting the Metropolitan Police Department. They had the gear in the vehicles, I would have had them assemble in the armory, and then get on buses and go straight to the armory and report to the most ranking Capitol Police Officer they saw and take direction. And just let me add this, so one of my Lieutenant Colonel's on his own initiative, went to the Capitol, anticipating that we were going to be called, so he would have been there and he met with Deputy Chief Carroll of the Metropolitan Police Department who asked them, where is the National Guard? How come they're not here? And this Colonel said, Well, I'm sure they're coming. And I'm here to scout out where they're going to be when they get here. So that was the plan. I would have sent them there immediately. As soon as I hung up, my next call would have been to my subordinate commanders, get every single guardsman in this building, and everybody that's helping the Metropolitan Police. We mission them to the Capitol without delay. 1:32:11 Robert Salesses: That's when the Secretary of Defense made the decision at 4:32. As general Walker has pointed out, because I've seen all the timelines, he was not told that till 5:08 that's what Sen. Roy Blunt (MO): How's that possible? Mr. Salesses, do you think that the decision in the moment we were in was made at 4:32 and the person that had to be told, wasn't told for more than half an hour after the decision was made? Robert Salesses: Senator, I think that's that's an issue. 1:37:13 Sen. Maggie Hassann (NH): Looking back now, what might have made a difference in being able to move against some of those individuals sooner? Jill Sanborn: Yeah, I think that's great question. I think it's twofold. So it's the complexity of trying to gather the right intelligence that helps us predict indicators and warnings. And I spoke earlier about while there's a volume out there of rhetoric, trying to figure out that intent is very challenging for us in the intel community because it happens on private comms and encryption. So that's one aspect. And then the other aspect is of the people that we were investigating. So predicated investigations, we don't necessarily have the ability to mitigate the threat they might pose by travel if we don't have a charge. And so I think you're tracking that we were aware of some of our subjects that intended to come here. We took over action by going and talking them and trying to get them to not come and that worked in the majority of our already predicated cases. 1:49:46 To review the timeline at 1:49 Chief Sund contacted you. At 2:15 the capital was breached. I think in your testimony you said you had available 340 DC National Guard troops Is that correct? Major General William Walker: Sir, it was actually half of that. So, so half were on the streets helping the Metropolitan Police Department. The other half would have came in to relieve them, but we would have called them in to come in. 1:50:33 Sen. Ron Johnson (WI): How quickly could have you gotten? How many people to the Capitol? Major General William Walker: 20 minutes? Sen. Ron Johnson (WI): How many people? Major General William Walker: 150 1:56:47 Jill Sanborn: We're seeing people that got caught up in the moment got caught up in the sort of the energy etc. and made their way into the captain on those are probably the ones that you're seeing the charges simply of trespassing and then we're definitely seeing that portion that you're pointing out which is small groups and cells now being charged with conspiracy that coalesced either on site or even days or weeks prior and had sort of an intent that day and they to probably caught people up in the energy. PART 2 23:00 Jill Sanborn: The piece of information we received, again, was a non attributable posting to a message board. And so very raw, very unvetted, we actually didn't receive that information until late, very late in the afternoon on the fifth and almost into the evening. And because of our emphasis on we need any intelligence, even though it was raw and attributed, and unvetted, the Norfolk office quickly wrote that up specifically in a document following our processes to disseminate that. So a situation information report is for the intentional purpose of sharing that with state and local partners. Not only did they write that up, because they knew how important that was to get that information out into the hands of folks that might need it, our state and local partners, within 40 minutes, they sent an email to the Washington field office with that information and Washington Field Office also then followed up with an email to all Task Force officers. And so several different mechanisms were happened here. And you know, we'd like to use the phrase 'belt and suspenders' we didn't want to make sure that one method of communication failed. So we wrote it up in the document for dissemination. We sent it in an email to all taskforce officers in the National Capitol Region, and that does include Washington Metro as well as Capitol. But again, not wanting to rely on those two mechanisms only it was then briefed verbally in a command post and interagency command post that we were doing briefings every couple of hours, though, that every agency in that command post have what we call a common operating picture. Knowing what all of us knew at any given time, it was briefed at 8pm on the evening of the fifth, and then taking it one step further, because we didn't want to limit our aperture to just the National Capital Region, because there's collection opportunity out there for all state and local partners and federal partners to help us, we loaded that suspicious information report into what we call the Leap Portal. And that is accessible by all state and local partners. So we really tried in various ways to make sure that we did not rely on one communication mechanism and really tried to rely on several so that the information would get to the right people. 34:46 Sen. Rand Paul (KY): We can talk all we want about January sixth, but really it's the decision making leading up to that. Someone made a bad judgment call and we need to be better prepared. If we're gonna fix this in the future, it isn't about calling the National Guard out quicker. It's about having 1000 people standing there before the riot happens to the riot doesn't happen. Hearing: U.S. Capitol Police and House Sergeant at Arms, Security Failures on January 6, House Committee on Appropriations: Subcommittee on Legislative Branch, February 25, 2021 Watch on YouTube Witnesses: Timothy Blodgett Acting Sergeant at Arms; U.S. House of Representatives Yogananda D. Pittman, Acting Chief of Police, U.S. Capitol Police. Transcript: 09:11 ** Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler (CA):** The United States Capitol Police Force is not meant to be an army, expecting 1600 officers to hold back an unruly mob of eight to 10,000 people, many of whom were armed and had their own homemade explosive devices or had came with or weaponized, everyday items. It's not a position we should ever have to be in. 20:51 Yogananda D. Pittman: There's evidence that some of those who stormed the Capitol were organized. But there's also evidence that a large number were everyday Americans who took on a mob mentality because they were angry and desperate. It is the conduct of this latter group that the department was not prepared for. Hearing: Dollars Against Democracy: Domestic Terrorist Financing in the Aftermath of Insurrection, Committee on Financial Services, February 25, 2021 Watch on YouTube Witnesses Iman Boukadoum Senior Manager, The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights Lecia Brooks Executive Director of the Southern Poverty Law Center Daniel Glaser Global Head Jurisdictional Services and Head of Washington, DC Office at K2 Integrity Senior Advisor at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies Board member at the Qatar Financial Centre Regulatory Authority Former Assistant Secretary for Terrorist Financing and Financial Crimes, U.S. Department of the Treasury Daniel Rogers Co-Founder and Chief Technical Officer at Global Disinformation Index Daveed Gertenstein-Ross CEO of Valens Global Transcript: 03:28 Rep. Jim Himes (CT): In the wake of the attacks of September 11th, we recast the entire federal government and worked feverishly to defund terrorist streams. To effectively disrupt domestic extremist groups, we need to better understand their financing. 03:54 Rep. Jim Himes (CT): Unlike ISIS, for example, these organizations are not pyramid shaped where funding comes from a handful of easily disruptable areas. An online fundraising drive for a legitimate charity, and one that helps support an extremist group can look very similar. 04:57 Rep. Jim Himes (CT): We need to conscientiously be mindful of the civil liberties concerns at play here. Unlike international extremist groups, law enforcement is constrained by the Constitution when dealing with domestic extremists, balancing the desire to give law enforcement the tools necessary to disrupt these groups with the need to respect the rights of all Americans and the Constitution to which we have all pledged an oath is essential. 05:36 Rep. Jim Himes (CT): While we all live through a brutal event on January 6th, undertaken by right wing extremists, no location on the political spectrum has a monopoly on extremism or violence. 10:08 Rep. Maxine Waters (CA): We're here against the backdrop of the January 6th insurrection. A deplorable yet predictable display of white supremacists such as the Proud Boys, the oathkeepers QAnon and others and nationalist violence incited by President Trump against the members of this body and against democracy itself. 12:51 Iman Boukadoum: Last month violent insurrection heavily fueled by white supremacy and white nationalism shocked the world. 13:52 Iman Boukadoum: We know, however, that even well intentioned national security laws are invariably weaponized against black, brown and Muslim communities. And that white nationalist violence is not prioritized making that policy failure the fundamental reason for what transpired on January 6th, not lack of legal authority. For this reason we oppose any legislation that would create new charges for domestic terrorism or any enhanced or additional criminal penalties. The federal government, including the Treasury Department, has many tools at its disposal to investigate. And also the FBI and DOJ have 50 statutes, at least 50 statutes and over a dozen criminal statutes, 50 terrorism related statutes, excuse me and over a dozen criminal statutes that they can use. They just need to use them to target white nationalist violence. 19:33 Lecia Brooks: Today, some white nationalist groups and personalities are raising funds through the distribution of propaganda itself. In November SPLC researchers reported that dozens of extremist groups were earning 1000s of dollars per month on a popular live streaming platform called D-Live. 20:21 Lecia Brooks: Crowdfunding is also being exploited by hate groups to earn money in this new decentralized landscape. Crowdfunding sites played a critical role in the capital insurrection, providing monetary support that allowed people to travel to Washington DC. They've also played a crucial role in raising hundreds of 1000s of dollars in legal fees for extremists. 20:43 Lecia Brooks: The violent insurrection at the US Capitol on January 6 should serve as a wake up call for Congress, the Biden administration, Internet companies, law enforcement and public officials at every level. 23:11 Daniel Glaser: Thank you for the opportunity to appear before you today to talk about how the US government can employ similar tools and strategies against white nationalists and other domestic terrorist groups as it has employed against global jihadist groups over the past two decades. 23:33 Daniel Glaser: During my time at the Treasury Department, I fought to cut off funding to terrorist groups such as Al Qaeda, the Islamic State and Hezbollah, as a Deputy Assistant Secretary in the Bush Administration, and eventually as the Assistant Secretary for Terrorist Financing in the Obama Administration. My primary responsibility was to lead the design and implementation of strategies to attack the financial networks of these groups and other threats to our country's national security. And while we should never let down our guard with respect to those still potent terrorist organizations, it has become tragically clear that there are domestic extremist groups that in some ways present an even greater threat to our ideals and our democracy. We have the responsibility to target those groups with the same determination, creativity and sense of purpose that we displayed in the years following 9/11. 27:42 Daniel Glaser: Potential measures in Treasury's toolbox include the issuance of guidance to financial institutions on financial type policies, methodologies and red flags, the establishment of public private partnerships the use of information sharing authorities and the use of geographic targeting orders. Taken together these measures will strengthen the ability of financial institutions to identify, report and impede the financial activity of domestic extremist groups and will ensure that the US financial system is a hostile environment for these groups. 30:10 Daniel Rogers: These groups leverage the Internet as a primary means of disseminating their toxic ideologies and soliciting funds. One only needs to search Amazon or Etsy for the term q anon to uncover shirts, hats, mugs, books and other paraphernalia that both monetize and further popular popularized the domestic violent extremist threat. Images from that fateful day last month are rife with sweatshirts that say, Camp outfits that until recently were for sale on websites like Teespring and cafe press. As we speak at least 24 individuals indicted for their role in the January 6 insurrection, including eight members of the proud boys have used crowdfunding site gifts and go to raise nearly a quarter million dollars in donations. And it's not just about the money. This merchandise acts as a sort of team jersey that helps these groups recruit new members and form further hatred towards their targets. We analyze the digital footprints of 73 groups across 60 websites, and 225 social media accounts and their use of 54 different online fundraising mechanisms, including 47 payment platforms and five different cryptocurrencies, ultimately finding 191 instances of hate groups using online fundraising services to support their activities. The funding mechanisms including included both primary platforms like Amazon, intermediary platforms, such as Stripe or Shopify crowdfunding sites like GoFundMe, payments facilitators like PayPal, monetized content streaming services, such as YouTube, super chats, and cryptocurrencies, such as Bitcoin. All of these payment mechanisms were linked to websites or social media accounts on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, telegram, LinkedIn, Pinterest, gab, picshoot and others. The sheer number of companies I just mentioned, is the first clue to the scale and the scope of the problem. 31:40 Daniel Rogers: We also found that a large fraction of the groups we studied have a tax exempt status with the IRS, a full 100% of anti muslim groups. 75% of anti-immigrant groups, and 70% of anti LGBTQ groups have 501-C-3 or 501-C-4 status. Over 1/3 of the militia groups that we identified, including the oathkeepers, whose leadership was recently indicted on charges related to January 6, have tax exempt status. This status gives them access to a whole spectrum of charity fundraising tools, from Facebook donations to amazon smile, to the point where most of the most common fundraising platform we identified across all of our data was Charity Navigator. 32:30 Daniel Glaser: I think it's important to remember that if you want to be able to use a cryptocurrency in the real economy, to any scale, it at some point doesn't need to be converted into actual fiat currency into dollars. That's the place where the Treasury Department does regulate cryptocurrencies. 42:10 Daniel Glaser: Cryptocurrency exchanges are regarded as money service businesses. They have full customer due diligence requirements. They have full money laundering program requirements, they have reporting requirements. The US Treasury Department just last month, issued a proposed rule relating to unhosted wallets of cryptocurrencies. And that's out for notice and comment. Right now. It addresses the particular issue of, of wallets that are not hosted on a particular exchange. And I think it's an important rule that's out there and I do encourage people to take a look at it, the comment period closes in May, and then hopefully, Treasury will be able to take regulatory action to close that particular vulnerability. 42:46 Rep. Jim Himes (CT): Mr. Glaser, you you, though suggested something new that I'd like to give you a maybe 30 seconds, 42 seconds I have left to elaborate on you said you were taught you were hopeful for sanctions like authorities against domestic actors. You did not to constitutional civil liberties concerns. But give us another 30 seconds on exactly what you mean. And perhaps most importantly, what sort of fourth amendment overlay should accompany such authority? Daniel Glaser: Well, thank you, thank you for the question. The fact is, the Treasury Department really does not have a lot of authority to go after purely domestic groups in the way that it goes after global terrorist organizations that simply doesn't have that authority. You could imagine an authority that does allow for the designation of domestic organizations, it would have to take into account that, the constitutional restrictions. When you look when you read the a lot of the court decisions, there's concerns could be addressed in the statute, there's concerns. A lot of the scrutiny is heightened because sanctions are usually accompanied with acid freezes. But you could imagine sanctions that don't involve asset freezes that involve transaction bounds that involve regulatory type of requirements that you see in Section 311 of the Patriot Act. So there's a variety of ways that both the due process standards could be raised from what we see in the global context. 44:37 Daniel Rogers: The days leading up to the insurrection, the oathkeepers founder Stuart Rhodes appeared on a podcast and solicited charitable donations to the oathkeepers Educational Fund. It can only be presumed that these funds which listeners were notably able to deduct from their federal taxes, went to transporting and lodging members of the group slated to participate in the ensuing riots. 46:06 Rep. French Hill (AZ): Daveed Gertenstein-Ross: In looking at the draft legislation that the majority noticed with this hearing, one bill stuck out to me and I think it's a good follow up for your from your most recent exchange. It seeks to amend title 31 to require the Secretary of the Treasury to establish a program to allow designated employees of financial institutions to access classified information related to terrorism, sedition, and insurrection. Now, over the past three congresses, we've talked about the concept of a fusion center, not unlike we do in monitoring cyber risk and cyber crimes for this terror finance arena. We've never been able to come ashore on it legislatively. So I found that interesting. However, I'm concerned that when you deputize bank employees without any oversight, as to how the information would be protected or if there's really even a need for that. 46:53 Rep. French Hill (AZ): Could you describe how banks share information with law enforcement today and how they provide feedback on how we might change these protocols or if they're if that protocol change is necessary. Daveed Gertenstein-Ross: Thank you ranking member, there are four primary ways that banks share information now. The first is suspicious activity reports or the SAR. Financial institutions have to file these documents with the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network or FinCEN. When there's a suspected case of money laundering or fraud, the star is designed to monitor activity and finance related industries that are out of the ordinary are a precursor to illegal activity, or can threaten public safety. Second, there's law enforcement's 314 a power under the Patriot Act, in which obtains potential lead information from financial institutions via fincen. Third, law enforcement can use its subpoena power, if a court issues a subpoena pursuant to an investigation, or to an administrative proceeding and forth where there are blocked assets pursuant to OFAC authorities, sanctions or otherwise, banks are required to report block assets back to OFAC. The information sharing in my view is currently quite effective. Treasury in particular has a very strong relationship with the US financial institutions. 48:24 Rep. French Hill (AZ): On 314 in the Patriot Act, is that a place where we could, in a protected appropriate way make a change that relates to this domestic issue? Or is that, in your view, too challenging? Daveed Gertenstein-Ross: No, I think it's a place where you could definitely make a change. The 314-A process allows an investigator to canvass financial institutions for potential lead information that might otherwise never be uncovered. It's designed to allow disparate pieces of information to be identified, centralized and evaluated. So when law enforcement submits a request to Finicen, to get information from financial institutions, it has to submit a written certification that each individual or entity about which the information is sought is engaged in or reasonably suspected of engaging in terrorist activity or money laundering. I think that in some cases 314-A, may already be usable, but I think it's worth looking at the 314-A process to see if in this particular context, when you're looking at domestic violent extremism, as opposed to foreign terrorist organizations, there are some tweaks that would provide ability to get leads in this manner. 1:15:15 Iman Boukadoum: What we submit is that the material support for terrorism statute, as we know, there are two of them. There's one with an international Nexus that is required. And there's one that allows for investigating material support for terrorism, domestic terrorism, in particular, as defined in the patriot act with underlying statutes that allows for any crimes that take place within the United States that have no international nexus. And we believe that that second piece of material support for terrorism statute has been neglected and can be nicely used with the domestic terrorism definition as laid out in the Patriot Act. And we hope that statutory framework will be used to actually go after violent white nationalists and others. 1:50:25 Daniel Rogers: I think there are a number of regulatory fronts that all kind of go to the general problem of disinformation as a whole. And I don't know that we have the time to get into all of them here, but I think they, they certainly fall into three three big categories, with the one most relevant to today's discussion being this idea of platform government and platform liability, that, you know, our data is showing how what a key role, these sorts of platforms play in facilitating the activities of these groups. And the fact that the liability is so nebulous or non existent through things like Section 230 and whatnot, which what we found is that there's there's already policies in place against all of these hate and extremist groups, but they're just simply not enforced. And so updating that kind of platform liability to help drive enforcement I think is one of the key areas that that that we can focus on. Hearing: JANUARY 6 ATTACK ON THE CAPITOL, Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs and Committee on Rules and Administration, February 23, 2021 Day 1 C-SPAN Witnesses Captain Carneysha Mendoza Field Commander of the United States Capitol Police Special Operations Division Robert Contee Acting Chief of Police for the Metropolitan Police Department Paul Irving Former Sergeant at Arms of the House of Representatives Michael Stenger Former Sergeant at Arms and Doorkeeper of the Senate Transcript: 27:11 Captain Carneysha Mendoza: On January 6th, we anticipated an event similar to the million MAGA March that took place on November 14th, where we would likely face groups fighting among one another. 39:21 Robert Contee: MPD is prohibited by federal law from entering the Capitol or its grounds to patrol, make arrests or served warrants without the consent request of the Capitol Police board. 39:32 Robert Contee: The President of the United States not the Mayor of the District of Columbia controls the DC National Guard. 39:57 Robert Contee: Since Mayor Bowser declared a public health emergency last March, the district has not issued permits for any large gatherings. Although the district and MPD take pride in facilitating the exercise of first amendment rights by all groups, regardless of their beliefs. None of the public gatherings on January 5th and sixth were issued permits by the city. 47:13 Steven Sund: The intelligence that we based our planning on indicated that the January six protests were expected to be similar to the previous MAGA rallies in 2020, which drew 10s of 1000s of participants. 55:33 Paul Irving: We began planning for the protests of January 6th in December 2020. The planning relied on what we understood to be credible intelligence provided by various state and federal agencies, including a special event assessment issued by the Capitol Police on January 3rd. The January 3rd assessment forecast at the pros tests were ‘expected to be similar to the previous million MAGA March rallies that had taken place in November and December 2020.' Every Capitol Police daily intelligence report between January 4 and January 6, including on January 6th forecast the chance of civil disobedience or arrest during the protests as remote to improbable. 56:29 Paul Irving: The Chiefs plan took on an all hands on deck approach whereby every available sworn Capitol Police employee with police powers was assigned to work on January 6th. That meant approximately 1200 Capitol Police officers were on site, including civil disturbance units and other tactical teams. I also understood that 125 National Guard troops were on notice to be standing by for a quick response. The Metropolitan Police Department was also on 12 hour shifts, with no officers on day off or leave. And they staged officers just north of the Capitol to provide immediate assistance if required. The plan was brief to multiple law enforcement partners. Based on the intelligence we all believed that the plan met the threat. 1:00:57 Steven Sund: I actually just in the last 24 hours, was informed by the department that they actually had received that report. It was received by what we call, it's one of our sworn members that's assigned to the Joint Terrorism Task Force, which is a task force with the FBI. They received it the evening of the fifth, reviewed it and then forwarded over to an official at the Intelligence Division over at the US Capitol Police Headquarters. Sen. Amy Klobuchar (MN): And so you hadn't seen it yourself? Steven Sund: No, ma'am. It did not go any further than that. Sen. Amy Klobuchar (MN): Okay. And then was it sent to the House and Senate Sergeant in Arms? I don't believe that went any farther than from over to the sergeant at the intelligence. Sen. Amy Klobuchar (MN): And Mr. Irving. Mr. Stanger, Do you did you get that report beforehand? Mr. Stanger, Did you get the report? Michael Stenger: No. Sen. Amy Klobuchar (MN): Okay, Mr. Irving? Paul Irving: I did not Sen. Amy Klobuchar (MN): Okay. 1:05:36 Sen. Klobuchar: Mr. Sund, you stated in your written testimony that you first made a request for the Capitol Police board to declare an emergency and authorized National Guard support on Monday January 4th, and that request was not granted. Steven Sund: That is correct, ma'am. 1:05:47 Sen. Klobuchar: Your testimony makes clear that the current structure of the Capitol Police corps resulted in delays in bringing in assistance from the National Guard. Would you agree with that? That's one of the things we want to look at. Steven Sund: Yes, ma'am. 1:06:02 Sen. Klobuchar: Do you think that changes are needed to make clear that the Capitol Police Chief has the authority to call in the National Guard? Steven Sund: I certainly do. I think in an exigent circumstances, there needs to be a streamlined process for the Capitol Chief of Police for the Capitol Police to have authority. 1:07:23 Sen. Klobuchar: Mr. Sund your written testimony states that you had no authority to request t

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Chad Hartman
Sondra Samuels

Chad Hartman

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 17:31


More violence over the weekend in Minneapolis. One of the people working to do something about it, including winning a suit against the City to force them to staff the MPD appropriately, is Sondra Samuels. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hey, it's Cory Hepola
What aren't we talking about the other guy?

Hey, it's Cory Hepola

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021 7:48


An MPD police chase ended tragically as a police vehicle crashed into and kill an innocent man not involved in the chase. Cory discusses the MPD policy on chases and asks, 'Why aren't we talking about the suspect that was being chased?' See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Stop Child Abuse Now
Stop Child Abuse Now (SCAN) - 2693

Stop Child Abuse Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 90:00


Tonight's special guest is Victoria Kelly from Minneapolis, Minnesota, a returning guest. She's a child abuse survivor and long-time NAASCA family member / volunteer. Victoria was abused almost from birth in nearly every way imaginable. She was sexually assaulted starting as a baby .. an experience that was repeated by numerous predators and perpetrators and went on and on. In addition her alcoholic father beat both Victoria and her mother. But Victoria thought that was simply what happened to a child and a woman when they happened to be living on the wrong side of the tracks. She became reclusive and withdrawn, and there was little justice meted out to any of Victoria's predators. Early on she began to disassociate, a condition that was later in life diagnosed as MPD (Multiple Personality Disorder), now known as DID (Dissociative Identity Disorder). Victoria eventually spent years going in and out of mental hospitals, where she actually was grateful. At least the staff was kind and helpful. "I went to a wonderful psychiatrist and she help me for 13 years with MPD / the ID." She began drinking at an early age but sobered up with help from a 12 step group. Her sexual promiscuity led her to numerous bad adult relationships. It took a long time to find the right therapist and path to recovery but now she's integrated and years ago things finally started to come together. Life's still not perfect but now she's active helping the struggling. Among other things, Victoria works to end domestic and sexual violence. She attends support groups, speaks out at rallies and conferences, supports police, volunteers at shelters, and works directly with women and children to get their basic needs filled: food shelter and clothing.

Social Capital
323: The Importance of Advocating For Second Chance Employment - with Shannon Ross and Adam Procell

Social Capital

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 35:46


Meet Shannon Shannon is the Executive Director of The Community, a nonprofit he founded while incarcerated to foster the successes, humanity, and agency of people with criminal records. He is also Co-Owner of Paradigm Shyft, a new Second Chance employment consulting agency that trains incarcerated people prior to release and helps employers benefit from this untapped pool both while incarcerated and post-release.  Meet Adam Three days after turning 15 years old, Adam was involved in a gang-related homicide and received a life sentence. He would become the youngest inmate within the walls of Wisconsin's most violent adult prison. But over the following 23 years of incarceration, he would renounce his gang membership and work tirelessly to keep teenagers from joining gangs. Today, Adam is dedicated to providing those released with the resources needed to succeed and making our community a safer place. What exactly does Second Chance employment mean and why should people care about it? Shannon: So second chance employment basically just refers to helping people who have gone through the justice system get employed after that experience. So it can be anyone who was sentenced to probation, sentenced to some years in prison, or as in Adam's case life in prison. One statistic that, to me, is the only conversation that needs to really be had when it comes to, what do we do when it comes to people coming out of prison and people that have criminal records, is that 95% of people who go to prison, come back. So who do we want them to be when they return to our communities, because they're going to be coming, regardless of what a person thinks, or what anyone believes in terms of their political ideology, they're going to return. So we should at least have a process set up to incorporate the value they have as human beings and as employers and as citizens as much as possible. So second chance employment is all about how do we best do that? Adam: Just to expound a little bit on what Shannon said, If 95% of the people that are going to prison come home, we should care about it. Because eventually, at some point, 95% of the people that have been incarcerated might be your neighbor. So do we want that neighbor to be somebody who can contribute successfully to society or do we want that somebody to be someone that feels ostracized has to go back to what they used to do because nobody will hire them? A lot of people who have gotten out of prison have children, and in no way is it an excuse to commit crimes if you can't provide food for your family, but we have to look at it realistically and understand that okay, if John Doe has served his time or her time, and they want to contribute to society, but nobody will hire them, what are they going to do? Again, no justification, but we have to really start looking at things logically. What has been the experience of companies and people in general who have hired from the justice impacted community? Shannon: So one thing I want to point out with that is that term is really interesting because there's a lot of debate within the advocacy groups and justice reform groups and abolition groups and all the other terms that go around this kind of word and really just comes down to people that have gone through the carceral side of the system, you've got justice impacted, system impacted justice-involved, there's a number of terms. That's one thing, I would definitely want to encourage anyone who's looking at it to not get too scared by what terms do I use or what language is appropriate? I think people would generally be very open to somebody just asking, "How do I refer to this population?" The heart is usually the most important thing. So that's one thing I want to touch on is the language can sometimes be a barrier for people when it comes to getting involved in a lot of things and the way the world is operating now with a lot of areas opening up for groups that have traditionally been disadvantaged to some degree. The numbers kind of speak for themselves, and you have the second chance business coalition has been put together and they have a number of companies, big-time companies, Kroger, Walmart, MasterCard, McDonald's, Amazon, they've all signed on as supporting this, and showing that they are really behind the value this population brings, and really trying to incorporate them. 82% of managers report that the value of Second Chance employees brings to the organization is as high as or higher than that of workers without records bring. It's something that we hear a lot too from organizations that get people jobs, and they get out. Even on work release, which we both experienced inside before we were currently in prison working at free jobs, is that there's a hunger, there's a humility, there's a desire to really show and get our life back that you get from workers that are formerly incarcerated that you don't always get from people who have been out in the world and kind of take a lot of things for granted. So both the numbers and our experience that we've seen personally and from groups that we work with, who get people jobs, shows that there's a significant value behind this population being hired not just as charity, but to help everyone grown and help out their bottom lines. What happens if there's still discrimination based on criminal history if that's the way companies are looking at things? Adam: I think it kind of goes back to what I was referencing earlier. What happens if that's the case? Let's say somebody with a criminal background applied for a job, they turn them down, and or continue to get turned down, what does that look like for them? So what does going dark look like? What does somebody do? So I think when you ask what happens, I feel and this is truly unfortunate, in my opinion, but I feel another victim is going to be creative because what other options are there? If they cannot work to provide that food or shelter for their family what does that look like? And so many times people just disregard that. They just kind of say, well, they shouldn't have made that mistake. But I'm a firm believer in whatever sentence you have shouldn't necessarily be deemed as a life sentence. If you're sentenced to five years in prison for whatever crime and you get out, if you can't get a job because of that record it becomes a de facto life sentence and that's unacceptable. How can companies approach finding second chance employees? Adam: They approach one of the many re-entry organizations that are in Milwaukee currently. Us, for instance, Partners and Hope, we are constantly bombarded by employers saying, "Look, we need workers, we just need somebody that's going to show up, day in and day out and work hard, we're willing to pay them well." One of the biggest myths I think people who have been incarcerated are told is that nobody's gonna hire them when they get out. Right now, at least in Milwaukee, in this jobs boom, it's the exact opposite. We can pretty much store our rock and find an employer willing to hire somebody. For a lot of people, whether they're in work release status, or Huber status, those are people that they know, for a fact are going to show up, unlike a lot of the other employees. So right now it's the best time in recent memory, in my opinion, for those who are with criminal records can get employed. I would imagine on a national level, that there are resources available for that? Shannon: There's a variety of resources. The things that I've seen, that I've encountered, that I find reliable, are kind of reaching out to some of those that can connect you to others. So Adam's organization, Partners in Hope, and mine in The Community, we very much are hubs where you can come to us we have a variety of partners. We're very deep into this space, in the city, and statewide and even nationally. The https://secondchancebusinesscoalition.org/ have a lot of little resources, a lot of advice, things for you to go to and organizations can then kind of have more of a boutique approach. So if you are trying to just get information on maybe an organization to contact or some stuff to read and get a better understanding of things. That's what stuff like Second Chance business coalition will help with or some of the other state entities, there's a lot of resource directories and so forth. But then if you really want to understand how to deal with individuals, the micro-level, that's where we would come in and be able to help incorporate and even attract, retain and train and retain talent. We have a whole pipeline of people coming out that we're connecting with to get them trained so that they will be really prepared to enter job fields and have connections with organizations and industries before they get out. So there's that loyalty concept as well. Honestly, you can reach out to us, and we probably can connect anybody in the state with where they're trying to go and what they need help with in this regard for hiring for this population. Can you share with our listeners one of your favorite networking experiences that you've had?  Shannon: I have a number of them because when I was inside, I was immensely blessed to just have people who would allow me to make three-way phone calls. So the organization itself began because of a small donation we had from an executive director of an organization called Hudson Link in New York, and they were one of the preeminent higher education prison programs in the country at that time. So just doing that reaching out to him and staying in touch with him and then he donated to help the organization get going and donated along the way. He's just been a really powerful advocate and resource since 2013 back when I first connected with him. So that was one when I was in and when I got out, clubhouse. A friend of mine who I knew in high school, I just was talking to him about a trucking company that I had set up with a friend. At the time I didn't know what I was gonna do and he was like, "Let me connect you on clubhouse, there's this trucking guru." I didn't know what I was doing, I just got on there and right away from that, I made so many connections nationally, in the work that we do that is really just borne fruit. It's just been really cool how the craziest things are just you go down an alley and find yourself in a palace sometimes. Adam: For me, if I had to describe my life, and success so far be at the results of networking. For me, one of the sessions that we run here is called Building Bridges with Law Enforcement, where we invite officers all the way up from rookie to inspector within the MPD to come to humanize the badge. We give our guys that have gotten out of prison, a chance to humanize the tattoo, so to speak. We create a safe space for conversation to be held so we can look at each other as human beings. One of these sessions there was at the time, a Captain that attended and she has since been promoted to inspector. She now is the supervisor of the police academy and last year with all the George Floyd and Blake situations, there's definitely a need for better relationships between the community and the police department. So that connection led me to meet the captain at the police academy and we came to a decision on how to best combine those who have gotten out of prison with those just entering the police department. So we came up with this idea where I was introduced and went undercover at the police academy. My name was Lieutenant Smith from Detroit and I kind of just gave myself a chance to humanize myself without the preconceived biases of incarceration. It was one of the most powerful experiences of my life and it all came from a session that we did here that led to one step further and one step further beyond that. How do you stay in front of and best nurture your network? Shannon: For me, it's just been a matter of always trying to make sure that I'm connecting people to other people or resources that I see they need. Because then that fuels them to in turn, remember me when something comes about that they would find to be valuable to the work I'm doing or any projects I have or even like in my career in general. So it's always about putting myself out there for them first, and then trusting the process that it will come back around. Even if it doesn't you're still helping people that you've, for whatever reason found a connection to, and by then helping their work, it's just helping you still, because that's the whole goal is to have a macro view of the way we're operating instead of the transactional way which is a terrible way to operate the world. It'll come back to me, even if it doesn't because you directly offer something to me, you're just doing your work and doing good by the connection I made, the resource I provided or the help I gave you is going to help us in general, because I believe in what you're doing. Adam: For me, I would say, given the job title that I have now, community outreach specialist, networking and keeping those relationships active is paramount to the success of my role within this organization. I think it boils down to little things, just being a human being and accepting others as human beings as well. So as crazy and as simple as it sounds like I go back to those lessons I learned in the sandbox of just play nice with others, seem interested, be interested, and it might be off the topic of whatever current meeting you might be in, but I feel relationship building is a pivotal part of network building. Nobody's going to remember someone that just looks at you as a means to an end, I think you really have to look at the person as a person, which seems like an odd thing to say. I feel it's extremely important to humanize one another because I think that sticks in people's minds in the end. We've all heard of the six degrees of separation. Who would be the one person that you'd love to connect with and do you think you can do it within the sixth degree? Shannon: It's an interesting question because, for me, I feel that anyone that I look at it and they give me a sense of, "I wish I could talk to that person," just in my experience. Also, I'm kind of a baby, I've only been out now for eight months. But my degree is in business and I've read countless pieces of literature about how the world operates in this sense. So I feel like I'm versed enough to say this, that on the way to meeting that person through the six degrees, one of those degrees is going to be more interesting and more valuable in the person I felt like I was trying to get to. So it would be more so that I'd be wanting to reach that person with the intent of finding out who really is going to be more intriguing and more connected to or aligned with what I'm trying to do in life along the way. Again, just trusting that process. I like to explore, I think I'm just gonna find the thread and pull on it and I don't think that going for the ultimate specific person that I think is going to be who I want to talk to, is the best way to go. Adam: To answer that, I kind of have to help you understand what it feels like to have served 23 years in prison. Prison is a very dehumanizing place so I find that even today, I sometimes struggle with anything is possible. Even though I know that consciously, sometimes I feel not, actually, I'll take a step back before I answer my own thought. Inside everything kind of looks like it's a movie so when you watch the news, or you watch a movie or TV show, it all seems foreign, you don't necessarily feel as though you're a part of society. So now that I'm out, sometimes I have to tell myself you can contact whomever you want to. There is that avenue for that and I've realized in the two and a half years that I've been released, that the six degrees of separation concept are very accurate. I can only speak to really Milwaukee at this point, but I feel that there are very few people in Milwaukee that I couldn't contact within someone in my social circle. Then taking that nationally, I feel depending on the circumstance, the same would probably apply. I feel you have to have a give or a reason to reach out to some of these individuals. But I think at the end of the day, it's possible. I don't know if I put a name on the person I want to meet, but it would definitely be a large investor because I feel if we had the funds to do what we needed to do, we could truly save some lives. So rather than approaching a person for a reason, there will probably be a foundation that has the means to help us financially and make our community a safer place. Do either of you have any final word or advice to offer our listeners with regards to growing and supporting your network? Shannon: I think really just if you have any interest in the field that we're in, and in hiring from this population, and connecting to the pipeline of people we are working on right now, just contact us. We have a lot of experience and connections in this space to be of value to a person if this sparked their interest. Adam: I guess the last thing I would suggest is we get that people who have been incarcerated at the end of the day, they've heard somebody and you can't uncry those tears of that pain caused. So we get it, but at the end of the day, knowing that 95% of the people that come out, are going to in some way need to make the society a better place and so we just want to ask people, for those of you who are thinking about are contemplating hiring somebody with a criminal background, would you want to be held responsible for the worst mistake you ever made in your life, and have that held against you forever? Again, not taking away from the pain and harm that people have caused, we get it. But at some point, if we're truly invested in making our community a safer place, we have to start looking at things a little bit differently. Hopefully, at some point, everyone can give those who have made a mistake, a second chance.   Connect with Shannon & Adam   Emails: adam@paradigmshyft.org and shannon@paradigmshyft.org  The Community: https://thecommunitynow.us/  Community Warehouse: https://www.thecommunitywarehouse.org/

Smith & Nelson In The Morning
What is #9PM Routine?

Smith & Nelson In The Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2021 39:04


Montana is one of the worst states for a road trip. Seinfeld is making a Pop Tart movie. MPD has a new plan to battle crime.

Justice & Drew
Hour 1: Sam's Top 5

Justice & Drew

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2021 31:12


Justice & Drew are presented with Sam's Top 5 Stories of the Day, including details on MPD losing 25% of it's full-time work force since 2020.

Twin Trouble
Episode 7 - No Back to Normal

Twin Trouble

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2021 63:46


This is a special episode we're recording for June 11th International Day of Solidarity with Marius Mason & All Long-Term Anarchist Prisoners. The twins share reflections on prisoner support in general but also in the context of the recent anniversary of the George Floyd uprising, where thousands are facing repression for fighting back against racist cops. Also plenty of thoughts on recent hacks and leaks, and the political ramifications of these high-profile ransomware attacks against Colonial Pipeline, the MPD, Citizen App, and Jones Day leaks. Featuring music by Sacral, raw-ish black metal dipping its toes in punk, post-black, DSBM, and crust. Seeker of gnarly riffs Shownotes: GF Uprising - 2 miinutes, 12 seconds June 11. - 11 minutes , 50 seconds Jones Day leaks - 18 minutes, 10 seconds Colonial Pipeline, JBS, MPD leaks - 26 minutes, 20 seconds Citizen app leaks - 35 minutes, 21 seconds Jan. 6 updates - 45 minutes, 45 seconds SMASH Maga! updates - 49 minutes, 20 seconds

Pilsners and Politics
Episode 23: Connecting the Dots

Pilsners and Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2021 30:36


On this episode of Pilsners & Politics, Benjamin and Vinny open the show by thanking their listeners for helping them achieve a very special milestone!  They go on to discuss several issues that Americans are currently facing and explain what it might mean for the left's future goals.Whether it's the border crisis, defund the police, or intersectionality, one thing is for certain; they are all connected.  Benjamin and Vinny take to the mic to connect the dots for the listeners and give their opinion on what the bigger picture really looks like.  Benjamin predicted that once the Biden Administration was inaugurated on January 20th, Americans would be inundated with far-left ideology.  And that is exactly what we've seen, even if it's dressed up or repackaged as something else.  The far-left is in control of the White House and they are unilaterally crafting American policy.While things seem out of our control, rest assured the pendulum always swings back in the opposite direction.  Benjamin and Vinny will continue to speak their truth and inspire freedom loving Americans.  They ask you to dig deep, find your truth, find your courage and help take back the America we love. 

Moving Arizona
Interview with Greg Byres, Director of ADOT's Multimodal Planning Division

Moving Arizona

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2021 48:52


In this episode Greg Byres explains all things MPD. The Arizona Department of Transportation's (ADOT) Multimodal Transportation Department is responsible for stewardship for everything from Federal Transit Administration grant oversight for hundreds of subrecipients to developing our long-range and five-year statewide transportation plans. Learn directly from Greg all that MPD is responsible for and how they managed to not only successfully transition to work-from-home but actually got more efficient and created new tools to streamline the development process.

Redemption with James Arthur Ray
Effectively Lead your Life

Redemption with James Arthur Ray

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2021 4:15


Your Personality wants to Express. Your SOUL longs to Experience and Expand. Now I know this is not your typical Leadership and Business topic, yet it should be. For what IS Leadership after all except effectively and powerfully leading your own LIFE? The fact, is that you have Multiple Personality Disorder. And this MPD is both your greatest nemesis as well as your greatest opportunity. You are NOT your personality. The term "personality" from "persona" originates in Latin meaning: "mask or character" played by an actor...

Wake Up Memphis Podcast
Wake Up Memphis- Sherrie Hopper

Wake Up Memphis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2021 12:25


Dr. Sherrie Hopper from the Chett and Sherrie show joins Tim to discuss the death of Officer Triplett. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Chad Hartman
Former Minneapolis Officer Tony Adams on safety in the city

Chad Hartman

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2021 14:41


Tony Adams was a part of the MPD for 30 years and how is in charge of security for the Minnesota Timberwolves. So what does he notice with the surge in violence in his city and what can be done to address it? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Great Morning!
The Great Morning 2 Year Anniversary Spectacular!

Great Morning!

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2021 96:04


Welcome everyone to the long awaited 2 Year Anniversary Spectacular! In this slightly special episode the gang attempts to celebrate two years together, but Jimi unfortunately falls into an MPD episode, just as erotic novelist Brenden Taylor, split girl Chupita/Chanel, and Diego show up! Just as Murms attempts to settle a money dispute, Pimp Fuscia, Uncle Easy, and Becca arrive to talk about a Swedish Fish incident! Happy 2 years everyone! Stay tuned to the end credits to hear, "Turn Bagz Up," by OSHEA IV!

By Any Means Necessary
US Gov't Sabotages Ceasefire Efforts As Israel Kills Hundreds In Gaza

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2021 114:17


In this episode of By Any Means Necessary, host Jacquie Luqman and producer Wyatt Reed are joined by Asa Winstanley, investigative journalist and Associate editor with The Electronic Intifada, to discuss the ongoing refusal by the US government to pressure Israel to cease its air assault on Gaza, the destruction by Israeli forces of the office housing AP and Al Jazeera facilities, and the extent to which the public reaction in the Global North has shifted since Israel's last attack on the ‘open-air prison' of Gaza.In the second segment, Jacquie is joined by Thapelo Mohapi of the South African social movement Abashlali baseMjondolo to discuss their recent statement in support with Palestine and why their history of militant struggle against apartheid makes showing solidarity with Palestinians a moral imperative.In the third segment, Jacquie is joined by Michelle Witte, co-host of Political Misfits here on Radio Sputnik, to discuss Neera Tanden's recent appointment as advisor to the Biden administration, as well as the White House's rejection of Symone Sanders as press secretary even after her vociferous public defense of Joe Biden during the primaries. Later in the show, Jacquie and Wyatt are joined by Jamal "DJ One Luv" Muhammad, host of the "Love Lounge" radio show on digitalanalgoradio.com and Twitch.TV, to discuss the pretrial hearing of former Brooklyn Center, MN officer Kim Potter in the police killing of Daunte Wright, DC Mayor Muriel Bowser's push to expand the ranks of Metropolitan Police Department despite the hiring freeze imposed by City Council, and the campaign to reduce the concentration of liquors stores in working-class and predominantly-Black DC neighborhoods.

Hey, it's Cory Hepola
Mike Padden on the trial of 3 former MPD officers being pushed back

Hey, it's Cory Hepola

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2021 9:59


Judge Peter Cahill ruled today that the trial of the other 3 former MPD officers involved in the death of George Floyd will be moved to next year. Attorney Mike Padden joined Cory to react. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hey, it's Cory Hepola
Today's Top 3: Vikings schedule, Ohio vaccination lotto, MPD payouts

Hey, it's Cory Hepola

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2021 5:44


Cory starts with a tribute to former Vikings coach Jerry Burns before diving into his Top 3 talking about the newly released Vikings schedule for 2021, a great idea out of Ohio as they push for more people to get vaccinated, and MPD paying a lot of money to former officers who have left the department. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

THE RAGGED EDGE RADIO ....with Russ Dizdar
Episode 1676: SRA UPDATE PART 24 QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS A

THE RAGGED EDGE RADIO ....with Russ Dizdar

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2021 64:11


UESTIONS THAT MUST BE ASKED AND ANSWERED PART 24 OF DEEPER THAN THE DEEP STATE THE UNDERWORLD, POWER, AND INFLUENCE OF THOSE BEHIND THE SRA/SATANIC RITUAL ABUSE PROJECT Quote from GH Estabrook’s Book/Hypnotism/ch. On weaponizing “….to create a 5th column of super soldiers and place them into every department of US military so we can have a hidden super soldier army waiting to be called up…..(paraphrased) ‘’A traumatic experience such as repeated abuse as a child, sex trafficking, acts of war, viewing something particularly horrific like a murder or suicide and any number of things can cause dissociation. When one has been a victim of a cult or has experienced SRA, there can be added complications and torment due to demonization. When it comes to mind control programming, the plot thickens even more because of the complexity of the process and the way the mind is purposefully manipulated, oftentimes from a very early age. Most dissociation is a by-product of trauma. In the case of mind control, particularly with Monarch programming, the goal is to cause the subject to dissociate. No, that wasn't a typo. The GOAL is to cause the person to dissociate so that they may be controlled’’. Moss, Melodie. Life After Brokenness: A Ministry Guide for Trauma Victims that Dissociate DID - SRA - PTSD - Mind Control Programming (p. 91). Davand Publishing. Kindle Edition. and slaves and souls of men…………. “Rejoice over her, O heaven and saints and apostles and prophets, for God has avenged you against her.” 21 Then a mighty angel took up a stone like a great millstone and threw it into the sea, saying: “With such violence shall that great city Babylon be thrown down, and shall be found no more. Revelation 1827 From THE LIVE RAGGED EDGE RADIO BROADCAST/SHATTER LIVE TV WEBINAR RUSS DIZDAR © Screams filled the spaces between the comma’s and dots in our sentences of thought. Sleep deprivation along with dehydration and starvation had sucked away our will and strength. Our smiles left when we heard about our parent’s death, and the memories of laughter were the secrets we kept. Orlando was a monster and mom didn’t have much to offer; but Loretta and Faye were Beelzebub and the Devil. Like baby mice in the arms of ferocious cats, they rallied in our pain. Everything was being stripped away to the bare bone and skeleton. The days of October fell slowly Shortridge, Eric; Shortridge, Eric. Landon's Cry: a true story of Satanic Ritual Abuse (p. 40). Kindle Edition. NEWS Intro*1. THE QUESTIONS THAT MUST BE ASKED …AND ANSWERED 1) When did SRA,MPD,DID start showing up? • 2) What is the only why anyone could become SRA? • 3) How many victims of SRA are there? • 4) Where did they come from? • 5) What do you really call them? • 6) Who did this to them? • 7) Why are there so many? https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=Healing+Gospel+Songs&ru=%2fvideos%2fsearch%3fq%3dHealing%2bGospel%2bSongs%26FORM%3dVDMHRS&view=detail&mid=ABF48EDEA49E058C38E3ABF48EDEA49E058C38E3&&FORM=VDRVRV

Chad Hartman
Civil rights indictments against ex-MPD officers

Chad Hartman

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2021 8:34


Federal indictments against the ex-MPD officers involved in George Floyd's death were announced this morning. We discussed. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
Sick Laptop? Uber and Lyft out of Self Driving, DC Police Department Ransomed

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2021 79:53


Thanks for downloading Podcast 1111 - May 1, 2021. Uber and Lyft have both sold their self-driving car divisions.  Washington DC Police are in a lot of trouble due to Ransomware.  The latest trend in Cloud Computing is hazardous. How to tell if your laptop is sick and how to fix it. Costs of Ransomware have doubled in 12 months. Why I think China is threatening Taiwan. Finally, Emotet has been taken down. SpaceX is winning the Satellite-Internet war. For more tech tips, news, and updates, visit - CraigPeterson.com. Articles for this week: An ambitious plan to tackle ransomware faces long odds Tile bashes Apple’s new AirTag as unfair competition More US agencies potentially hacked, this time with Pulse Secure exploits The saga of McDonald’s ice cream machines and why they’re out of order all the time - Right-to-Repair Apple agrees to let Parler back on the App Store, citing improved moderation Hacker hacks the Police hacking tool - and leaves a “bomb” in place How to Secure Employees' Home Wi-Fi Networks The Google Offices of the Future Has Privacy Robots, Meeting Tents, and Your Very Own Balloon Wall --- Automated Machine-Generated Transcript:   Podcast 1111 - May 01, 2021 Craig Peterson: Self-driving cars have been all the rage. Well, at least talking about them for what are the last four or five years. Well, Lyft and Uber both had big projects when it came to self-driving cars, and both of them have changed their minds. We're going to talk about that. [00:00:21] Good afternoon, everybody. Craig Peterson, here  I've been out for the last couple of weeks. Sorry.  I've been here on the weekend, and I'm here again today. We're going to talk about a lot of very interesting stuff that's going on. Hopefully, I can explain to you a little bit about the why that helps you understand the how of what's going on.  It's just become so crazy complex. [00:00:48]That also gets into Lyft, this whole self-driving car thing. Uber, you've got every major player kind of in the world getting into this whole game, including, of course, Apple and Google. They both have big projects going on. GM, Ford, and every major manufacturer, Fiat, has an electric car, and of course, they've got aspirations. Hey, by the way, if you really want to cause some problems with Fiat-Chrysler's finances, buy one of their little electric cars, a little E 500. I don't know if you've seen these little Fiats driving around. They're cool little cars, the type of thing you'd expect in a big city or maybe in Europe somewhere. Just these tiny things. Like the smart cars only slightly bigger. Fiat loses $20,000 for every one of these $33,000 little cars you buy. Electric cars. It only goes 87 miles on a charge. That's the killer, right? 87 miles. Are you kidding me? [00:01:52] We'll talk more about this later on because there's some study information out now that talks about people that bought electric cars. How many went back to gas engines, and why? It's interesting when you get into the numbers, the people that are switching back, by the way. Tend to be women more than men, but anyway, so we'll get into that in a few minutes here. [00:02:16] Lyft and Uber, both saw themselves as companies that should be in the self-driving car business. I have learned over the years that you have to focus your business on your business. So what is it? Make your business very narrow don't run after every little opportunity that comes up, don't take every potential customer that comes your way because you probably can't deal with it. It requires a focus, a real focus, in order to be very successful. Otherwise, you can't make your business grow. So because of every customer's different, if everything about the customer's different, you're going to have true experts. [00:03:01] That's the problem I've had over the years because I've always enjoyed a little bit of a change, a little bit of a difference. So, we've helped all kinds of companies from multinationals with their cybersecurity all the way on, down through little guys. [00:03:15] Now, when you think about that, I've been crazy. For all of these years, to quote Paul Simon and my craziness has to do with the fact that they're entirely different beasts. [00:03:26]So, now we're putting together some standardized packages based on what we've been using and selling for more than 20 years now, just to make my life a little bit simpler so, we can handle more clients cause there's more and more them that need it. [00:03:40] So, when we're looking at Uber and Lyft, how does it fit? What is Uber doing? What is Lyft doing? Really? What's the bottom line here. They're getting you from point A to point B. It's really that simple. Isn't it? You want to get to a place. Now, they've added some of these other features like the Uber eats, where you can get Uber to go to a restaurant, pick up a meal, deliver the meal for you. Then you're off and running. That's not bad, but it's still effectively the same business. [00:04:15] When we're talking about autonomous vehicles, it's a completely different business. You're talking about major software development. Lyft looks like it's been spending about a hundred million dollars a year in order to try and develop self-driving cars. [00:04:35] That's expensive. It sure is a lot different than managing people coming from point A to point B. I was out of state. I was down in Florida. Down in Florida, it's difficult to find a Lyft or an Uber driver because so many people are staying home. Why would I bother working when I'm making so much money on unemployment right now? Why would they? [00:05:00]I'm not sure I could particularly blame them for not wanting to work. So Uber and Lyft are now saying, wait a minute. I got go find drivers. I'm going to have people that are going to deliver food that is going to take passengers from point A to point B. That's what they should be focusing on. Isn't it. Making sure the drivers safe. Making sure the passenger safe. I'm not talking about these lockdown-type restrictions. I'm talking about physically safe because we've seen people attacked before. What happens if they're in a car accident? Do we have contact information for the passenger? Do we know they're in a car accident? Can we reasonably get an ambulance there, get treatment, get the police, whatever needs to happen. There's a lot of things you have to worry about—background checks for the drivers. Maybe background checks for the passengers. You've got to collect the money. Maybe you want to put in an override system where people who refer another Lyft driver are going to be able to get a bit of an override on them, make a few extra bucks, make it worth their while to refer driver. [00:06:04]Then you've got all of the streets, the street maps in every city, in every town. How far should you be going as a business like Uber or Lyft? Is your business mapping. Is your business autonomous vehicles? No, of course not. So I think they're smart in getting out of this business, but I want to mention a couple of things about why I think they got in the business in the first place. [00:06:31] GM and Ford probably Chryslers have said that they are thinking the vehicle of the future isn't going to be something you buy. You're not going to go out and buy a car because they're looking at it and saying, let me see, what do you want? I want to get to the train station in the morning, or I want to get to work in the morning, or I might want to have some food delivered to me, or I might want to run to the grocery store. First of all, grocery stores and food delivery can both be done by Uber or Lyft, but getting you from A to B. [00:07:08] They're looking and saying we make the cars, we make the autonomous systems. Why don't we provide vehicles when people need them? So it can take your kid to school in the morning. It can go in five different directions. Cause you're going to have five different cars. Maybe you need five cars this morning cause you've got four kids, and you and your wife and you're all going different places. Here come the cars. They're all scheduled the day before, the week before. However you do it. On Tuesday, all of the cars show up. They take you to where you want to go. That's the business model that the major car manufacturers are looking at. I think it makes a lot of sense. [00:07:51] You don't necessarily need a pickup truck all the time, but I sure need one when I gotta get those sheets of plywood and go here, go there, do things.  Frankly, Home Depot and Lowe's are both looking at it, saying we have rental trucks. Maybe they will have some of these in their fleet. Maybe autonomous, maybe not autonomous, but that's how they're looking at it. They don't think you're going to buy a car. [00:08:15] I don't know if you saw the test Cadillac did down in New York City, of course, this was before the lockdown as well.  Cadillac had put together this plan, where for now, what was it? $1,500 a month. I think give or take. You could drive a brand new Cadillac, and you'd have that Cadillac for a month. You could, of course keep it for longer, or you could just pay them more. But the idea was why Cadillac buy? Why even go through all of the trouble leasing. Effectively, what you're doing is renting it like you might rent a car from Hertz. [00:08:51]In the future, they don't even think you're going to do that. It's Hey, I want a black car to pick me up from one, two, three wall street and take me to park Avenue, that I think makes a lot of sense. [00:09:03] So Uber and Lyft are both looking at this plan and saying, Whoa, Wait a minute here. What's going to happen when GM and Ford both decide that they are actually in the getting people from point A to point B business. Now, they are stepping on Lyft and Uber's toes in a very big way. I think that's why they decided to get into the autonomous vehicle business. Both of them have gotten. Out of it now. [00:09:37] Lyft sold as a self-driving division to a subsidiary of Toyota called Woven Planet for half a billion dollars. Part of the reason for that, I'm sure, is it takes a lot of money to compete in the self-driving area. [00:09:53]Frankly, if Uber and Lyft can really focus on their core business, not mess around with all this other stuff. They might be able to beat GM Ford, Chrysler, et cetera at this game. [00:10:07] Uber, who was Lyft's main competitor, sold its self-driving business to a startup called Aurora back in December last year. Both of them had been working on these projects for four or five, six years; obviously things are going to change. [00:10:28] The self-driving vehicles are going to be on the roads starting next year. Ish. Ford's made some announcements, so has GM. We'll see ultimately what happens. Waymo, which is Google, of course, alphabet has a small taxi service in the Phoenix area. Nobody else is operating full driverless taxi services in the US yet. [00:10:54]Congratulations to Lyft and Uber for getting out of the self-driving business that not their business. [00:11:01] We see that more and more ransomware, not only is it way up but some police departments have gotten hit with it. [00:11:09] So, we'll tell you what's happening there. You're listening to Craig Peterson. It has been going up and up and hurting more and more people. In this case, we're going to talk about a police department. There's a briefing that the Boston field office of the FBI's giving on ransomware. If you are an infra guard member, FBI Infragard, I ran their training for a couple of years. [00:11:34] They've got another training. Coming up on ransomware and what's been happening out of the Boston field office, which covers all of New England. And I discovered and disclosed a huge hack. And it was the biggest one that the Boston field office said that they'd seen it. It was just absolutely incredible. [00:11:57] What had happened and businesses are just not. Paying attention. They're not paying attention; it isn't just businesses. It's also municipalities. It's counties, its state government, and it's the federal government of all of those. I got to say the federal government is trying the hardest, I think, to pay attention to the problem besides cybersecurity; of course, they take more money from us. [00:12:22] So they and Lee should have a better budget to do it with right. But there's a great little article this week in the newsletter. We usually get that on hold on Sunday morning, but this is by Dan Gordon. Over at ARS Technica. They will always have some great stuff, but some ransomware, bad guys have sand What they're calling stunning ultimatum to Washington. [00:12:50] DC's Metro Politan police department. The police department that handled the massive insurrection on January 6th. He said with his tongue firmly in his cheek, the guys that really know what they're doing down there, Washington DC. Ah, boy. So here's the ultimatum. Pay these ransomware guys $50 million, or they'll leak the identities of confidential informants to street gangs though, this group is called Bulk Locker, at least that's what they call themselves. [00:13:29] And they said on Monday that it had obtained 250 gigabytes worth of sensitive data after hacking. The metropolitan police department. Yeah, Washington DCS, metropolitan police department network. And this Babych site over on the dark web. When you go, there has dozens of images of what appeared to be legitimate, sensitive MPD. [00:13:58] Documents now these have been slightly blocked out so that people don't know what's going on. Exactly. So they've been It's anonymized. Let me put it that way, but it looks like these legit. I'm looking at some of them right now on the ARS Technica site. One screenshot shows a windows directory called disciplinary files. [00:14:24] Each of the 28 files shown lists a name and a check of four of the name shows. They all belong to Washington DC, metropolitan police department, officer's disciplinary actions, and looking at the dates on these files, they are from, they've all been modified anyways, within less well about the last year. [00:14:50] Give or take a little bit less. So that was just the first page of them, by the way. It looks like kids, the officers whose names start with a through E and a few apps, other images that are on, again, this Babych ransomware group's website on the dark web seemed to show persons of interests, names, and photos. [00:15:16] So they, these bad guys put up a screenshot of a folder named gang database, another chief's report lists of arrest and a document listing the name and address of at least one confidential informant. So it's got the date. It was entered, closed. The persons name, position, sex raised. Date of birth, social security number, mailing address, email phone number. [00:15:46] Yeah, the informant. Okay. So they said we advise now there's spelling errors in this. There are grammatical errors in this, which is expected. We advise you to contact us as soon as possible to prevent leakage. This is again on their dark web website. Quote, if no response is received within three days, we will start to contact gangs in order to drain the informant. [00:16:16] In other words, still let the gangs know who the squealers are. Her the informant within the gangs. Now this is classic. This next one. Just absolutely classic Washington. DC's. Public. This is again, metropolitan police departments, public information. Officer Hugh Carreyrou wrote in an email. We are aware of unauthorized access on our server while we determine the full impact and continue to review activity. [00:16:51] We have engaged the FBI to fully investigate this matter. So he didn't answer specific questions about what details, but here's the classic part of this. I bet you dollars per four donuts that they don't have the proper security in place. If you are a city or a County, you have rules which are called CJIS, which is the criminal justice. [00:17:18] I think information system rules for your securing. Of data and it has to do with the networks, how were they cannot be connected and can only be connected in certain ways and what you have to do. And you have to included in all of this log, everything. What do you want to bet they didn't log everything. [00:17:40] So they're calling in the FBI and we've done that too. We've done that when, again, we're not mandated reporters. If we see something suspicious, we call up the client, whether it's a city, a County, a state, a business, a DOD contractor or dentist's office. And we say, we found an indication or multiple usually indications of compromise, which means. [00:18:04] These things make it look like someone got into your systems. We then say this is not what we do here. This is a law enforcement issue, and we think that you should bring in the FBI and then they can talk to the FBI. We can work with the FBI to really figure things out. So the FBI can do the forensic work and make sure they capture everything needed to capture and how needed to be captured, et cetera, et cetera. [00:18:31]It's amazing. What's happening. But they are looking into this. I'm sure the FBI is involved most recently when we've had. Reports where we brought in law enforcement. We worked directly with the FBI, with their data security information, security team, James, and it's just amazing. People were not maintaining good cyber hygiene in this case, Washington DC, metropolitan police department. [00:19:03] Almost certainly. Was hacked by these hackers. They admit the MPD that they, something happened. I bet you, they don't know what happened. They probably broke these CJIS rules that every city, state and town and County has to comply with. It's absolutely amazing. And of course you remember now they've got this dual revenue model when it comes to ransomware. [00:19:32] Pay up now or pay up later, we will extort money from you either way. It's a, it's amazing. Amazing. Apparently this is a Russian group who knows who exactly it is. It's sponsored by the Russian government or not. We really don't know. [00:19:50]Cloud is a sensitive topic with me and it always has been it's hold, it holds a lot. Of promise. And the biggest promise to most businesses was, Hey, use cloud services, it'll save you money. And of course they have used cloud services and in some cases it's saved the money, frankly. [00:20:14] It's rare that it saves them money. It really depends on a lot of things, but if you using a service like Amazon's cloud services, and I'm speaking in generalities here, but it's probably going to cost you more than running your own server. Why do a lot of companies use cloud services? When it comes to general computing. [00:20:35] Now I understand. Why would you use Microsoft's? What does calls Microsoft three 60? It's because Microsoft is going to maintain it. They're going to patch it. I don't have to run a server. I don't have to worry about any of that stuff. Okay. I get that one. How about salesforce.com? I don't use Salesforce. [00:20:54] I use an alternative, but I can see why you'd want to use that. Unfortunately. In both cases, those services have been hacked and the company's data has been stolen. And you got to remember too, that you still bear responsibility for that lost or stolen data, even though you didn't lose or steal it. So keep that in mind, if you are a business now, when you are moving on to what are called containers, the whole world shifts. [00:21:25] Here's what's happening and been happening in computers over the last few years. There's something called containers. When I first heard about containers. I was thinking about these data centers that they put into shipping containers. And so you get a 20 foot or 40 foot shipping container, and all you do is plug in power and internet, and it's often running. [00:21:50] It has racks of computers inside that has all the cooling systems, all the power regulation systems, like while UPS's et cetera, it's got that fans in there to keep the air moving. It's got the tape drives to do the backups, all of this stuff. It's right there. So I that's how I always thought of containers. [00:22:11] That's not the case so much anymore. Those containers still exist. Some of them are used by Microsoft and Amazon still they'll throw containers into different areas, depending on usage. For instance, with the Olympics coming up, you can bet that there will be shipping containers. With huge data centers in them in order to record all of the video and move it around the world, broadcast it, et cetera, that's going to happen. [00:22:41] There's another type of container. And this container has changed the way a lot of businesses do computing. It is just absolutely an amazing technology for someone that's been in this business. Now, since the mid seventies, I got to tell you, this is something that just really came to me out of a little bit out of the left. [00:23:05] Field, because I'd been working with virtual machines since the seventies IBM has had VMs for what, 50 years now that it's not new that concept, but there's something called Kubernetes that is used in the container world. In the idea here. Is rather than having a big machine and that machine has its own operating system. [00:23:30] And on top of that, you're running multiple programs. We've moved into more of a virtual world. So now even Microsoft has gotten into this game instead of having a Microsoft. Server and people trying to run everything on that one server, which Microsoft advises you not to do. If you have an active directory server, it should only be running active directory. [00:23:55] Nothing else. If you have an exchange server, it should only. Be running exchange and nothing else. And the same, thing's true for the other major Microsoft servers. But what a lot of companies have done is they have one piece of hardware. And on that, they've got the one Microsoft server operating system. [00:24:16] And inside that the running exchange and active directory and who knows what else? A whole bunch of other stuff, right? People put QuickBooks on these things, et cetera. Now, nowadays you can get. A virtual machine infrastructure. And this is what we've been using with our clients for 20 years now, more maybe, and there, of course it's advanced over the years. [00:24:42] Now we use a virtual machine infrastructure called VMware. That's absolutely fantastic. Believe me. We've used them. All, and this is what we've settled on for our client, but the idea here is, okay, you buy one piece of hardware and that piece of hardware has a lot of memory, a lot of disc IO available. And you put on the very bottom of this, right on the machine, you run a virtual machine controller, basically. [00:25:10] So something like VMware and then that VMware can run multiple operating systems simultaneously. So on that one piece of hardware, you could be running an exchange server, a whole thing. So you've got Microsoft server running and then on top of that, you've got exchange and then you have another. [00:25:29] Microsoft server running. And on top of that, you have active directory and then you have another Microsoft server and you have something else around top of that one. And maybe you have a Linux server with something else on it. And another Linux server was something else on it. And with VMware, you can also set up virtual networks inside this machine. [00:25:47] It's just absolutely incredible. So that's something I think most people understand. And if you're an it professional, you've probably worked with that before. Coobernetti's. Brings it to an entirely different level. And what's happening here. Is that again, we're using a virtual machine infrastructure, but the idea is each one of these machines, instead of running this huge Microsoft server software. [00:26:17] So you got server version, whatever. And that server is software from Microsoft is using up a ton of resources because it's Microsoft and it's not very efficient. And might be causing you some headaches and some problems. There's all kinds of things we could talk about here, but the incentive doing all of that, maybe what you want is a web server. [00:26:40] And maybe you want to tie the web server into some sort of a database. And that database is taking information from your front-end ordering system, which could be, who knows what, again, it could be a API to salesforce.com. It could be something else that you're using. You, again, name it. There's so many business management systems that could be tied into a lot of ERP stuff, et cetera. [00:27:06] So instead of having running a big pig line, Microsoft exchange or Microsoft server, and then exchange on top of it or heaven forbid, you're running a Microsoft, a web server, which is in incredibly I would never do that personally. But you want to run a patch, et cetera. What you do is you use Kubernetes and it creates a small machine that does one thing and does one thing. [00:27:34]And it's well tuned to do that one thing. And then you can tie these together. So on one machine, you can even do this on a workstation on that one workstation, you could have 20, 30, 40 machines, right? Each one of which is dedicated to one task. So one might be doing the web service and another one might be handling your database. [00:27:57] Another one might be handling the API calls and it's all pushing data back and forth whole new world. Unfortunately there are security problems. So if you are using this stuff, make sure you spend some time considering the security, because Kubernetes is entirely API driven, which means application programming interface. [00:28:19]I keep an eye open for that. Use a virtual private cloud instead of on the open internet. [00:28:24]If you have a laptop and you've probably noticed a few things, first of all, that battery life. [00:28:31] Okay. It's not like it was when it was new, his head, somehow those batteries do wear down. It's much better than it used to be. The nightcap ads and the nickel metal hydride ads. And now we've got various types of lithium batteries based on a few different technologies. There's going to be more stuff coming out. [00:28:53] And I had a laptop, it was an Apple laptop, a Mac book pro. And on the bottom of it, it had four little legs, just little ones, a little rubber things. So it's a standoff. And one day I noticed that my laptop was teetering. Balanced in the middle. And I had a bit of a closer look and I could tell, wait a minute, and how this laptop is swollen in the middle. [00:29:17] Now I knew exactly what had happened that battery inside had gone bad. So number one, I've got a one you guys with a lithium ion battery, if it starts to swell, and this is true for most batteries, but it's. Particularly nasty with lithium ion. If that battery begins to swell, what can end up happening is it will short itself out internally. [00:29:48] Have you ever had that happen? You might be working on a car and you're right there and buy the battery and you put a wrench across the terminal somehow or between the starter. Hot side on the cars engine and the block, and, off it goes, there's a lot of power in that car battery, and there is a lot of power in these lithium-ion batteries. [00:30:11] They make these hacks now that you can use to jumpstart cars, even small trucks with a little lithium-ion pack. So what happens is. As the swell up in your laptop or your phone, et cetera, we've seen this problem with every manufacturer of cell phones. As they start to swell up, they can and do short out. [00:30:36] So think about how much power is in that battery, even an older battery, because it can provide your laptop with as much power as it needs. Four hours. And if you're lucky enough to have a brand new laptop with one of these great Apple chips in them that uses very little power, man, you can go better than a day on one charge easily. [00:31:02] Unless you're like doing heavy graphics, et cetera, et cetera, but that's always been true. So I took my Mac book in and they replaced the battery, no charge. It was still under AppleCare, which I suggest people get. It's just makes life easy. You can always get the support you need and they'll fix things, replace them. [00:31:23]That's the first step I had to mention that right out of the shoot, because it is very common with laptops to have that happen. I even had it happen with my little what's it called a little, my fi device, which hooks up. To the cell phone data network and then provides wifi to my laptop or other devices. [00:31:46] And I noticed the battery pack compartment cover was swollen. So I took it off and sure enough, the battery was swollen. I just ordered a new one and. Properly disposed of the old lithium-ion battery. Cause again, it can cause fires right now. I think there's a recall out on some of those mi-fi devices because of the battery. [00:32:09] So that's a serious problem. You can start your laptop on fire or you phone could start on fire with any of these newer devices. If it starts to swell, if it warps the case warps, then it's not because you're sitting on it. You can indeed cause of fire so we can have, and if you are sitting on it, you might cause of fire because if you bend that battery in the wrong place, you're in trouble. [00:32:32] There was an episode of MythBusters where they took a lithium-ion battery. And they put it in a trash truck. Now they made this a worst case scenario. They actually built a wedge into the back of the trash truck that compresses all of the trash. It's got that big hydraulic Jack and pulls it and compresses it. [00:32:53] So they put the battery with this wedge right in the center of the battery so that when the truck compressed it. The battery would get bent. So they bent that battery. Fair enough. The whole trash truck caught on fire, and we've seen that happen in the real world, too, where the whole trash talk truck catches on fire and it can be caused by lithium-ion battery. [00:33:16] So be very careful with them and be careful of how you dispose of them. So let's get into some. Other things that you probably want to pay some attention to. First of all, there are a couple of programs you might want to have. Look at first off is Microsoft safety scanner, and they've got a. Page online, you can find it out@docs.microsoft.com. [00:33:45] As in documents, docs.microsoft.com. It's called Microsoft safety scan, or they have a 32 bit version on a 64 bit version, depending on which version of windows you have, what you're running, but it goes all the way back to windows seven. It handles the windows servers versions, and all you have to do is download it and open it. [00:34:09] Tell it, what kind of scan you want to have run and it will go. It has just the one executable file that you can delete if you want to. It writes out its own little log file that you can look at. So that's the things you might want to look at. Microsoft safety. Scanner. And you can find that a docs doc s.microsoft.com. [00:34:32] The next thing you might want to look at, either on a Mac or on a PC windows is Malwarebytes. And I've used this many times. Neither one of these by the way, is a panacea. Neither one of these is going to find everything or fix any everything. But malware bikes is. Quite good. And it's something you should consider. [00:34:56] Now we have packages of software. We do not include Malwarebytes because we have some better stuff, but it's a very quick and easy way to do a light scan. Very fast and you can do a few things. So that's the first thing you might, I want to look at. If your computer is sluggish and unresponsive, it's slowing down, it doesn't necessarily mean it's old. [00:35:22] It might mean you have too much software that you've installed on it. So check your system. To see what is running on it and see if the stuff in the background, see if the stuff that you might want to remove, but it could also be a sign that a hacker has broken into your machine. And they're doing things like mining for crypto currency or using your machine as a launch pad for attacks against other people. [00:35:51] Okay. So start with a thorough malware scan again on windows. They do have a pretty good little program that you can use that comes with windows, but first off, open the task manager. So you get that by clicking. Right down in the bottom left and the task bar and just type task manager, run it. See what happens, Mac Oh, S you're going to search for it with spotlight and it's called the activity monitor and you'll see all of these active programs next up. [00:36:23] Persistent error messages. And this is something you can find over at popular science, this little article, obviously I'm adding my own little tips as we go through, but you might find it interesting in you'll also find it in this week's newsletter. That'll come out tomorrow. So make sure in order to get the newsletter, you sign up at Craig peterson.com/subscribe. [00:36:45] So you'll get a link to this article that goes through all of these things. Computers, they often get error messages. Some of them are really hard to figure out. Many of them are just related to one program and the that's usually pretty easy just remove or uninstalled that program. And re-install it again. [00:37:07] Some of these error messages are hard to figure out you can go and search for them. Now, I do not recommend Google for most searches, but and I use duck go, but what you might want to do here is use Google type in the exact error message that you're getting and see if they've got a result now. [00:37:30] Macko Wes. Aye. Aye. Aye, man. It's so rare that you have to re-install Mac last, but you might have to, but windows, the default is Hey or back up and re-install okay. That should fix most of the error messages right there. Cause windows is a mess. If you've got pop-ups on your screen asking, let's say to make changes to settings, make changes for things. [00:37:57] Be careful. These different types of infections can disable features. They might change your homepage on your browser reset your default search engine. I got an email from a listener this week, talking about that, and it just keeps to keep getting reset back to Google. Tumbled check your extensions in your browser. [00:38:18] It might just be the browser itself can also be viruses can also be a hack, but roll back the changes, any changes that you've made, puts your browsers homepage back to the original one. Make sure you run again. The built-in tools. They're on windows. Web pop-ups same type of thing. Find a list of browser extensions you've installed. [00:38:45] So if you're using Chrome, they sit under the more tools entry, have a look at those. See if there's any that it re recommends that you remove and then do it, or just go ahead and remove them all and see if your pop-up problem goes away. There's also the problem of strange noises. And this can be a problem that only the owner of the computer really notices because you're used to what the computer should sound like. [00:39:16] If you start getting strange noises, have a checked out right away because those noises could be a fan and that fan could be keeping your central processing unit. Cool. And if that CPU fan. Goes, you could have a very expensive repair on your hand. So keep an eye out. It could be your hard desk. It could be a fan. [00:39:40] There's a few different moving components in, but keep an ear out for those types of sounds that you're not used to hearing from your computer. [00:39:51]Ransomware has been a huge problem for years now. [00:39:56] And of course now we've got the whole double whammy where if you don't pay the ransom, then they come after you threatening to release your data. Just like what happened with that police department? I was talking about in the last hour. We've seen according to some statistics I've been reading, including some FBI stuff about a 300% increase in ransomware in just the last year. [00:40:24] And we have. Also seen a doubling of how much it costs. If you do get hit with ransomware. Now, this is a pretty big deal. And of course these are big numbers and the doubling in cost has nothing to do with inflation. Okay, guys, this is not the sign of inflation. But it is driving up. The value of Bitcoin is people are fleeing to it concerned about the dollar and other currencies. [00:40:53] We now have a tripling of ransomware payments and ransomware payments are almost always made in Bitcoin. What does it do when you have a scarce, commodity and money chasing it while the value, the price of something goes up. And so just like it, wasn't near the beginning. Ransomware has really been driving the price of Bitcoin. [00:41:19] I'm not going to say value just because I'm not sure it's value that we're really talking about here, but certainly the price. According to Sofos the. Average total cost to recover from a ransomware attack has more than doubled. Now this is what we're talking about here, businesses. So over the last year, it was on average, about $760,000 for a business to recover from ransomware. [00:41:48] Now, Nancy, if you could afford the $760,000 loss and we'll get into what. Numbers compose. You add them all up to get that $760,000. But if you are a small enough business that's not something you can even consider doing, odds are good. You will be out of business within months and most smaller businesses just close their door within a week of getting ransomware. [00:42:19] It's really that bad because there's a lot involved. So last year, about a year ago, it was $761,106 on average. Okay. So now the average cost total for recovering from a ransomware attack is about $1.85 million. Now we're talking about the total cost of recovery. We're not talking about the ransom paid right now on average is about $170,000. [00:42:56] Again. Can you afford a $170,000 payout? I would say of the small businesses in the world, basically under 20 employees. The answer to that is probably not, but wait, there's more. All right. This is from, Sofo says new survey, the state of ransom 2021, apparently only 8% of organizations managed to get back all of their data. [00:43:28] After paying a ransom 8%, about five years ago, it was about 50% of organizations that got ransomware. Got, got it back. But now. 8%, only 8% managed to get all the data back. Now that's going to cover not just businesses, but that's going to cover you as an individual as well. If you're a small dentist office, this is going to nail you. [00:43:52] And I got to say, just having a backup.  Most cases is not good enough because of the double whammy, but also because of the fact that most businesses are not doing backups properly. And we could talk about that. I'm going to include that in one of the courses coming up about backups, a three, two, one method, and the best ways to make sure you do have a good backup. [00:44:18] So 8% got all of their data back after paying the ransom and 29% received no more than half of their data. So it has gotten a lot worse. So these were 5,400. It. Decision makers in the information technology, business mid-size organizations, hence the amount of money involved or right. All the way across Europe, the America is everywhere really worldwide. [00:44:50] And it found also that the number of organizations that experienced a ransomware attack fell. Now that was interesting at one from 51% of organizations that had knitted in 2020 that they had a ransomware attack. And I added the word admitted in there, right? That wasn't in the original survey results, but admitted because I know most businesses don't admit it and they say it fell from 51% of these organizations had a ransomware attack in 20, 20 and 37% in 2021. [00:45:28] And few organizations suffered data encryption because of a significant attack. Now that's interesting because interesting when we're talking about significant attacks versus non-significant attacks, do you draw the line? But this Sofo study was focused on the moment, significant attack. [00:45:49] These various organizations had. So folks researchers are saying that the impact of a ransomware attack is now more damaging and costly, even though there is a decline in overall attacks. We've talked about that before here on the show where we mentioned quite clearly that the ransomware guys are getting more laser focused on their targets. [00:46:17] They're going after mostly targets with money. Now, there's still those ransomware people out there that are just opportunist. So you made the mistake of downloading some software of installing something and they just took advantage of you. So that's still going to be happening, but. When we're talking about bigger organizations, when we're talking about government agencies, County offices, city offices, and look at what's happened to Atlanta. [00:46:43] What three times now, I think they've been knocked off the air with ransomware, Washington DC. In the last hour, we were just talking about their metropolitan police department. They're attacking these organizations that can't afford to pay, and they know that they can pay. And if they don't, then they hold it over their heads. [00:47:05] So I've got this article in this week's newsletter comes out Sunday morning, usually. And it depends on when Karen and I can get it all together. So apologize for the last couple of weeks. Cause I was off at a retreat and just really couldn't handle any of that stuff. But. It really is an increase in these complex targeted attacks much higher. [00:47:31] And you'll find this article as well as all of the others. Of course, in my newsletter. If you don't get the newsletter right now, make sure you just take a minute and sign up because there's information for you as an employee in a business for you as a business owner, there's information in there for. [00:47:49] Home users as well, because almost everything we talk about when it comes to businesses also applies to home users. Now I'm going to be doing something different in the weeks to come. I'm hoping to start this next week. We'll see how the week kind of fleshes out. But the idea for this next week is I am going to start doing real releasing soon, but putting together the short training segments. [00:48:18] And each one of them is going to be on a very narrow topic because most people, they want five to seven minutes worth of content. So I'm going to get very narrow. So for instance, if we're talking about backups, I'm going to get really narrow on one part of backups and I'm going to post them everywhere because we've got to get more people following the podcast. [00:48:42] I am also, you might've noticed. Putting the podcast together as a one hour, we'll access closer to about 80 minutes podcast every week. And it is going up on my YouTube channel. So you'll find it on YouTube. You'll find it on my Facebook page. I have a Craig Peterson group over there on Facebook. I'm also putting up on LinkedIn. [00:49:04] It's going in my Craig Peters on Twitter channel. It's going up all over the place. And the idea here is to help you guys understand things better. This is for everyone and everyone, then I'm going to start doing something else as well. And that is all of these little. Classes, I guess you might call them that I've been holding. [00:49:28] And really, I haven't done anything since March of last year for some of these classes. I've done courses, trainings, but these classes, what I want to do for you guys is if you're online email list, I'll tell you what the next class is about. So for instance, backups, I'd say, and then if you give me a great question, something. [00:49:51] That you want to learn about backups, then I'm going to give you access to that class for absolutely nothing. All right. So I'll use your questions to help put it together. So I'm coming from the right angle. I will then record it. I'm going to put it up on my navigating cybersecurity website for you guys. [00:50:12] I'll send you a link to it and you can, at that time, Point watch it, which is really cool. So you'll have access to that class for a few weeks, couple of weeks. I'm not sure how we're going to work that out yet, but yeah. [00:50:26]One of the big pieces of news that's been out there lately has been the migration away from Intel. We've seen. Our friends at Microsoft move away from Intel with some of their surface tablets. And for years they've been having various versions of windows that run on non-Intel hardware. I helped to way back in the day. [00:50:51] Get windows running on a DEC alpha chip. You might, if you're a total geek, you might remember that. And I was in the team that was working on some of the kernel stuff for it. And what we ended up with is a 64 bit very fast chip that deck had created. And I think. That Oracle ended up with some of that technology and then they also bought sun for some of their hard work technology. [00:51:20] But anyhow, it was an incredibly fast chip. I have one, if you look closely on, in my background on the videos, you might see it sitting on when one of the little cubbies behind me, one of these little outfit, chips, they were just absolutely amazing. Great job. Anyhow, DEC digital equipment corporation is no more. [00:51:42] However, some of the technology that I worked on back then, some of these, what we call risk architectures, where I worked on the kernel, various types of Unix kernels back then. B, this is before Linux. Even these chip sets were designed to be inexpensive, to manufacture and very fast and very easy to use and integrate as well from a hardware standpoint. [00:52:09] And when Apple came out with its iPhone, they of course used a non-Intel chip for the main processor. And it's a, an Apple chip quote, unquote, based on one of these more or less generic designed. So Apple licensed the core design of the chip and was able to take it and continually improve it. Apple has now released various devices. [00:52:38] There's an iMac, which they, these things are so cool that you can't buy the latest ones. You all, you might be able to about time you're listening, but they're all different colors. It's a flash back to the old days before Johnny Ives took over in some of the hardware designs, but they've got the new IMAX. [00:52:57] They've got the Mac box. They have a Mac mini like I have right in front of me right here. It is based on apples am one chip and it is a screamer. It is very fast. And it's, I think it was about 100 bucks, maybe a little bit less then the Intel box. So you can get a Mac mini Intel for a hundred and change dollars more than an Apple based chip set. [00:53:29] And it's faster, which is just amazing. So it has the main chorusy beause. It has also of course, a GPU's that are built into it. It's very neat. Apparently this Japanese publication called the Nikkei claims that the next generation of Apple's custom designed silicone chips for Mac that are dubbed the M two. [00:53:53] Entered production this month and how that is fast. They barely released the . So what that might suggest is the new max could be announced at Apple's developer conference on. June seven, at least that's when that conference start. And the sources are saying that this new chip will eventually be used in other Macs and Apple products, besides the Mac books, that M one is also destined to end up in various types of eye pads, et cetera. [00:54:26] And it's bringing more and more rumors to the front. Then the, I F our iOS apps will run natively on all of these Macs and vice versa. You can run Mac software on the iPad. You can't do all of this yet. Okay. But some of it is almost certainly going to be coming. Now, I had a conversation. With an Intel exec. [00:54:54] This was a number of years ago and I was teasing her because she worked for Intel. And she was all puffing up about how great Intel was. And I pointed out, Hey, I remember the early days in Intel, Intel was a memory company. And if it hadn't been for IBM looking for cheap, not particularly good processor, Intel probably wouldn't be where they are. [00:55:19] Today. Oh, certainly they wouldn't be. And I also pointed out how Intel was now AMD compatible MD of course, advanced micro devices and historically AMD and other chip makers made sure their chips were completely compatible with the Intel chip sets. But what we ha, what we ended up with is Intel lagging behind on 64 bit technology. [00:55:48] And because of that AMD one up them AMD came up with some really great 64 bit extensions to this Intel instruction set and. Intel came out with AMT compatible instructions. I thought that was just hilarious. And she was pretty happy about it, but she admitted. Yeah, you're right. Now we've got a very interesting problem. [00:56:16] We've had China growing its presence in the South China sea, the South China sea is not part of China. There are various countries, the border that are in it, et cetera. And China has been building islands in the South China sea. So they can then claim up 200 mile territorial limit around those islands as well. [00:56:43] They want control of it, but I can tell you what they're really after. And this is what's very scary. And there have been a lot of military analysis, people who have been looking at this and trying to decide what to do, and that is Taiwan. Taiwan is according to mainland China. And of course the communist party of China, which is more fascist than communists, socialist party in China it is a part of China. [00:57:12] And it's just one of these, you have a state that kind of rebels. And so they're going to pull them back in and they've been flying over. China has been flying over time when these air space to make their point. Unfortunately, I don't know how this government's going to respond, that the current administration has been challenged, left, and center by some of these more major powers around the world. And the president Trump was hardly challenged at all. And I think that says something, but here's why they really want Taiwan. It's the technology. And China's had a very hard time with trying to get their chip fabs. In other words, these fabrication plants that make the silicone that make the chips that we use in our devices. [00:58:05] We have some ability to do it still here in the U S but not much. And the goal then. W, what do you want to call it? The centerpiece the prize of right now of all manufacturing is five nanometre design. You might have heard of that before Intel is having troubles with some of this, but it's incredible. [00:58:27] And Apple's doing a good job with it. While Taiwan semiconductor manufacturing provides. This five nanometre design technology for making chips to Apple and many others. So if China can get its hands on Taiwan, which are really wants, they are going to be able to manufacture. Chips that we don't want them to have and have a real leg up. [00:58:56] So man, we may get into a Kinnetic war over Taiwan. And now, you know why, Hey, if you're not on my email list, make sure you get on that newsletter right away. [00:59:08]Emotet is a huge problem. At least. It was a huge problem. It turns out that this bot was able to harvest 4.3 million email addresses. Now that's not a ton of email addresses in today's language because there are billions of email addresses floating around there in the dark web. [00:59:34] But Emotet was used. As a basis for ransomware and spreading ransomware. And it was really nasty stuff. AML tech would get onto your machine. And once it was on the machine, it would start trying to brute force, crack your passwords on your machine. It would try and spread to other machines on your network. [00:59:57] So in a. Business, of course, that means all of the other machines in the business might well get attacked by maybe even compromised by a motet. Same thing is true in your home and the machines that you had at home you're using for the office while they could get cross infected from your kid's machine and all your kid had to do, or you had to do is open a piece of email because amyloid pet also distributed the ransomware via. [01:00:27] Email fishing. It was sending malware field spam to all of the email addresses. They could get their hands on. This is what your all Paul said was the world most dangerous bot met and been plaguing. The internet, as I mentioned is 2014. A bot net is where someone typically a bad guy has taken control of a number of computers. [01:00:57] So they took control of your your home computer, right? Some windows, computer, whatever it might be. And now they installed a command and control system on it so that they could command your computer to do things for them. Nowadays, you might see botnets being used to mine cryptocurrency. So your machine gets really slow. [01:01:21] Like I mentioned, in the first time or today about problems you might be having with your laptop, much the same applies guys to your mobile devices, to your smartphones as well. And particularly the Android has been hit very hard by some of this stuff. Again, Apple's able to keep up on it and we've discussed this enough times in the past. [01:01:41] But what's happened here now is they have been able to stop it. Yeah. In January, this year, law enforcement in the Netherlands was able to take control of  key domains. Again, ammo tat is a bot net among other things. And as a bot net, it had command and control. So it has servers. So it needed to contact the servers to see what to do. [01:02:12] Hey, do you want me to send email? Who do you want me to send it to? Oh, here's this stuff that I've discovered on this machine. And it sends it all to those servers. So the Netherlands were able to get them. And Germany's federal police agency, the BK, a did some very clever reverse engineering. They looked at the emo type software. [01:02:35] And they found some interesting things. One of them by the way, was that there was an uninstaller routine built right into AMETEK, which kind of surprised me and many other people, but the German please went through and looked at it thoroughly. If a machine had ammo tat on it, how could we get rid of it now that we have control of the command and control servers? [01:03:05] So they found this remove routine and that this command that was built into it. And they also found that. Ammo Ted software could self update. I wish most programs would do a self update. Nowadays you see some of the Microsoft software or we'll go ahead and update itself. Firefox does that Google opera? [01:03:30] Most of the, all of the chromium based browsers will say update, but this is malware that would self update. Okay. They found that since they had control of the command and control servers, and because Emotet could self update, they made a version of Emotet that would be pushed out to any infected machine, any machine that called home. [01:03:58] And once it called home, they would send this version out. Now they, of course they muted it to you might a virus for a vaccine, but they muted that AMETEK virus. And it was no longer sending out the phishing attacks, et cetera, but it was still setting on everyone's machines because the thinking was, we want to get rid of this Trojan software everywhere at once. [01:04:25] Just. Bam all at once. And so they put a date into the code that they pushed out saying on this day, at this time course, UTC. Go ahead and remove yourself from the machines. That is incredible. They were able to figure this out or what was happening get emo tap from its base, which is to conduct brute force attacks on accounts, trying to crack passwords, gain access to secure data, send all of that information. [01:05:01] Out use it as a botnet to also attack other machines and send emails. It just incredible as well, of course has encrypt files and demand ransoms to something that just last week removed itself from any machines, it was on. Absolutely amazing. The FBI collected the email addresses from these AMETEK servers, following this takedown in January, where again, the Netherlands had control of the servers and it's just absolutely amazing here because they were able to take it down worldwide. [01:05:44] Very dangerous botnet, but once they had those email addresses, they gave them to our friend Troy hunt. Do you remember him? We've talked about him before and it's something I emphasize in most of my courses because Troy hunt has a website called have I been poned. And they gave these email addresses the 4.3 million that they got from Emma and to Troy hunt. [01:06:14] And he has included them in. Have I been poned now, if you were part of this breach by Emotet and do you registered on, have I been poned.com you now should have already received an email from Troy. So it's important that you do a couple of things. One, make sure you check your email addresses at, have I been poned.com? [01:06:42] Poned dispelled P w N E D. It's. P O w N E D I, he might actually have it both ways. Let me just have a quick look as we're talking. How have I being, if I say P O w N E d.com, will it no. Okay. There is no such thing which makes sense. It's have I been poned as in P w N E d.com. Check your. Email addresses. [01:07:10] See if they're there and register for this service. This is a free service. There are a lot of companies that are using it. Mozilla uses it with Firefox to see if your passwords might have been compromised. They've got 11 billion poned accounts. There at, have I been poned this guy knows the stuff. Okay. [01:07:31] And it's been, this particular one has been tagged sensitive. You can find out more about that@havebeenponedbot.com, but make sure you do that right now, as you're sitting here listening to me because it's very. Very sensitive information important for you to know. And if you have been powned and it's a business email address, make sure you let your it people know. [01:07:58]I was fascinated to chat with this guy from Ireland. He had course of pretty heavy accent. He's been living in San Francisco for years, but about the only word that he said that was Americanized was for, he didn't say it like you'd expect someone with a heavy Irish accent to say it quite that way. Then, I am really into accents and placing them. [01:08:24] And I've pretty much gotten rid of my accent. Some people still pick up a little bit of it, but I was educated in French schools up in Quebec. So there's bound to be a little bit of it left. So I like to listen for those things. And in talking to him, he said that Ireland changed because of wifi. And I had to think about that. [01:08:48] And he said, yeah, my, my parents, because of what they're just always on the news. And they're just totally freaked out about everything all of the time. And they're always were talking about how horrific Donald Trump was, because that's what CNN was telling them. And these other sites that they were going to. [01:09:09] And of course, we've talked many times about. The literal censorship that is happening in much of our media. And these all are arcs out in Silicon Valley and how they're controlling the discussions. But that's not what I want to talk about. He was referring to wifi. He was saying, why is what's changed Ireland, wifi? [01:09:31] And I'm trying to figure out what does he mean? And then I remembered another friend of mine. Who's from Ireland, his name's Dez. And. There's also was continually talking about wifi. And then I finally put two and two together, sometimes a little dense, and tuned to equaled wifi as the internet. So when he was talking about why fi he wasn't really talking about wifi, when I'm thinking about wifi, I'm thinking about why five, five wifi, six, the older protocols, right? G a, some of them, man, it goes way back a, B, G. Anyhow. That's what I think of. I think of the literal in the air, why that choosing radio waves in order to connect right. Beacons and everything else. And maybe that comes from my, having a ham radio background, having an advanced class ham radio license. [01:10:26] I don't know at any rate, why fine is the intranet, at least in his mind. And also apparently the minds of his parents. I sat all of that because I want to talk about space X space. X has already won a battle. You may not even be aware of. You and I, when we have internet, where are we getting it? Most of us get it from the cable company or from the phone company, almost everybody with five G we're hoping mom, maybe the cost will go down and the speeds are going up and we'll be able to get our internet from the phone company. [01:11:12] Just like we have cell service. And that is going to happen in some areas, some communities, but how about all of our rural communities and in Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wyoming, Montana, Idaho. And then all the way down South. Yeah. There is a lot of territory that is not covered well by 5g. [01:11:38] Yeah. Yeah. You see the maps from T-Mobile and from Verizon, but remember maybe you don't know. So I'm like I say, remember, but you have to know that those maps are just based on a mathematical formula. So just because an area is red does not mean that you have coverage there, 5g or otherwise. And you've probably found that before, too. [01:12:04] I know I did. I looked at a coverage map and sure enough, bam right there in the middle of all of that red was my house. And yet I had no cell signal really upset me and the FCC was trying to fix that out. Pitt who the head of the FCC he had he was appointed by president Trump and he had put some rules in place that made those maps are a lot more reasonable. [01:12:36] But we're still talking about the majority of the landmass of the United States, vast majority, not being able to get good 5g signals. So my good, in any, in many cases, so space X has been going after those people. I announced it months ago when it was first available, this beta test they were doing for. [01:13:01] What they call their startling satellite service. Now this is a satellite service, unlike any you've seen before. It isn't putting up a dish for your television and you got to make sure it's aimed in the right direction. And hopefully it's not raining or snowing heavily. Cause you're going to lose your television. [01:13:22]You guys had those types of problems before they happen. All of the time. And then of course you have summer summertime with the green attenuators, those leaves on the trees and other green things that are absorbed some of those radio frequencies. So your satellite dish works better in the winter than it does a summer. [01:13:41]That's why you probably have some leaves or other greenery that's in the way space X has already launched a small, pretty large, frankly a whole set of satellites, broadband satellites, and they call these constellations when you have a whole bunch of them together. And then in 2018 space X got FCC approval to launch. [01:14:06] 4,400 satellites and that permission and that license specifies. Okay. You have to be so far from the earth. It was about 1100 kilometers to 1300 kilometers above the earth. And then the FCC gave space X permission to use a lower altitude for more than 50. 1800 of those satellites. Now the idea behind this is the closer the satellites can be to the ground. [01:14:37] The last distance, the signal has to travel. So some of the problems people have been having not enough bandwidth, maybe although the majority of them are reporting a hundred megabits down, which is just incredible and also the delay. And that gets to be a problem. When you're speaking to someone, you got a hundred milliseconds up a hundred milliseconds down that is noticeable when you're in the middle of a conversation. [01:15:06] So the space X guys went ahead and petition the FCC again, and they got an order that granted space X is additional license change requests. So the altitude for all 3000 ish of the satellites. Can now drop their orbit basically in half in about the 550 kilometer range that is going to be. Huge. [01:15:37] Absolutely huge. And obviously opposition from all of their the companies competing against them via S sat, Hughes, dish network, one web, and Amazon has another one called  and they are all saying you can't do that. It's just not fair. But this is fantastic here because it corner the FCC statement. [01:16:01] They said, based on our review, we agree with space X, that the modification will improve the experience for users of the space X service, including in often underserved polar regions. We conclude that the lower elevation angle of its earth station antennas and lower altitude of its satellites enables a better user experience by improving speeds. [01:16:26] And latency not, I don't want to go into a whole lot of detail, but man, Oh man, this is huge. Now you may not be aware of it, but part of your telephone bill, some of those fees and taxes that are in that bill have been going into a pot. As though the federal government ever actually saves money, it's a lockbox that doesn't really exist. And there are about, I think it was 16. Billion dollars sitting there in this lockbox. So space X has gone after that money as well. And they've received the majority of that money. I can't

Your Angry Neighborhood Feminist
Episode 165- The Life of George Floyd & the Trial of Derek Chauvin

Your Angry Neighborhood Feminist

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2021 93:22


In this episode Keegan and Madigan discuss the history of policing in Minneapolis, George Floyd's life, and the trial of Derek Chauvin.Do you have a news story or topic that you want our take on?     Email us at neighborhoodfeminist@gmail.comFind us on social media:      Instagram: @angryneighborhoodfeminist      Twitter: @YANFPodcast      Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/angryneighborhoodfeminist **Don't forget toREVIEW and SUBSCRIBE on iTunes!**SOURCES:https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/01/us/minneapolis-racism-minnesota.html https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/State_v._Chauvin#Arrest,_charges,_and_bail https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minneapolis_Police_Department#:~:text=The%20Minneapolis%20Police%20Department%20(MPD,Department%20that%20formed%20in%201854. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Derek_Chauvin#:~:text=Derek%20Michael%20Chauvin%20(%2F%CB%88%CA%83,%2C%20on%20May%2025%2C%202020.&text=He%20is%20charged%20with%20second%2Ddegree%20murder%20and%20lesser%20included%20offenses. https://www.refinery29.com/en-us/2020/05/9846650/minneapolis-police-derek-chauvin-history-force https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/State_v._Chauvin#Family,_legal_team,_and_supporters https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder_of_George_Floyd https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/live-blog/2021-03-31-derek-chauvin-trial-n1262576/ncrd1262651#liveBlogHeader https://www.rev.com/blog/transcripts/prosecution-opening-statement-transcript-derek-chauvin-trial-for-murder-of-george-floyd#:~:text=He%20is%20presumed%20to%20be,on%20May%2025th%20of%202020.&text=And%20our%20second%20objective%20ladies,trying%20to%20preview%20this%20morning. https://www.nytimes.com/2021/03/30/us/darnella-frazier-video-george-floyd.html SCREWED UP CLICK- BIG FLOYD RAP YouTube.com/watch?v=B-DqkvSNhjM

Chad Hartman
Former US Attorney Tom Heffelfinger - DOJ investigating MPD

Chad Hartman

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2021 12:42


Today AG Merrick Garland announced an investigation in to the practices of the MPD following the verdict against Derek Chauvin. Former US Attorney Tom Heffelfinger joined the show with his insight. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

DW em Português para África | Deutsche Welle
19 de Abril de 2021- Manhã

DW em Português para África | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2021 19:54


Em Cabo Verde, o Movimento para a Democracia (MpD) lidera a contagem dos votos, nas eleições legislativas deste domingo (18.04). África muito longe das expetativas na campanha global de vacinação contra Covid-19. E mais um episódio da radionovela Learning by Ear.

The Daily Memphian Politics Podcast
S3E21: Adkins says violent crime makes new police director decision urgent

The Daily Memphian Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2021 33:18


On The Daily Memphian Politics Podcast, Greater Imani pastor Bill Adkins says the case can be made for a new director from the MPD ranks or for someone from the outside. Adkins also said he sees a new indifference to violent crime that calls for new solutions as well as new ways of policing the city.

KVOM NewsWatch Podcast
KVOM NewsWatch, Wednesday, April 14, 2021

KVOM NewsWatch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2021 21:18


In our local news today: MPD officers were recognized for lifesaving efforts; the City Council approves alcohol permit for Blackwood's Landing among other items; a parade was held for Tyler Charlton's return home; local high school students will be offered a COVID-19 vaccine; the Medicaid expansion bill fails with election law changes approved; and we'll check sports.

Music Pro Daily
144: SSVSE Branding For Music Producers

Music Pro Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2021 10:51


MPD is an "almost daily" podcast that gives freelance music producers real insights into building a long term career in the internet-driven music industry. I use this podcast to document my day-to-day running a producer development company with my partner, industry-veteran producer Mike Mani. In this show we discuss everything from landing more projects and selling digital products (sample packs, loops, etc) to developing artists and connecting with the industry. To learn more about what we do... Visit www.DarkLabelMusic.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/musicprodaily/message

Chief Koval's Podcast
Chief's Corner - Episode 1 - Chief Barnes Update

Chief Koval's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2021 6:23


In this previously recorded first episode of Chief's Corner, Chief Barnes sits down with Public Information Officer Tyler Grigg to share recent updates on his focus for community engagement, crime prevention and officer wellness. Did you know nearly 85% of MPD is now vaccinated? Chief Barnes says that the community groups he's met with are excited to "get to know our officers again" after a year without any face-to-face interaction. And as a North Carolina native, he also reveals who he rooted for in the Badger's first round NCAA March Madness matchup against the North Carolina Tar Heels. "Crime prevention is everyone's responsibility and we can make our community better, but only together." - Chief Shon Barnes

Axios Today
Second week of Chauvin trial wraps up

Axios Today

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2021 10:51


The second week of the trial over George Floyd's death. The Minneapolis Police Chief stated Derek Chauvin did not act according to MPD policy. Plus, U.S. Senator Tammy Duckworth own family’s brush with AAPI hate. And, how accurate is the movie Contagion? Guests: Axios' Nick Halter and Bryan Walsh. Illinois Senator Tammy Duckworth. Credits: Axios Today is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Dan Bobkoff, Justin Kaufmann, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Sabeena Singhani, Amy Pedulla, Naomi Shavin, and Alex Sugiura. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com. Go deeper: ER doctor: George Floyd's cause of death most likely oxygen deficiency Infectious diseases expert: U.S. is "at the beginning" of a fourth COVID-19 surge Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Music Pro Daily
143: These Artists Will Move Your Career Forward

Music Pro Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2021 10:56


MPD is an "almost daily" podcast that gives freelance music producers real insights into building a long term career in the internet-driven music industry. I use this podcast to document my day-to-day running a producer development company with my partner, industry-veteran producer Mike Mani. In this show we discuss everything from landing more projects and selling digital products (sample packs, loops, etc) to developing artists and connecting with the industry. To learn more about what we do... Visit www.DarkLabelMusic.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/musicprodaily/message

3News Now with Stephanie Haney
Dr. Amy Acton won’t run for Senate, changes to Ohio health orders, NFL Draft stage starts to go up

3News Now with Stephanie Haney

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2021 13:45


April 6, 2021: Dr. Amy Acton will not run for US Senate and urges Ohioans to set a high bar for lawmakers, early voting underway for Ohio’s May 4 primary election, ‘Stand Your Ground’ law now in effect in Ohio, changes to public health orders, NFL Draft stage construction begins, where to see live music and get great food this summer, and more on 3News Now with Stephanie Haney. Like this show? Check out the 3 Things to Know with Stephanie Haney podcast: http://wkyc.com/3thingstoknow Connect with Stephanie here: http://twitter.com/_StephanieHaney http://instagram.com/_StephanieHaney http://facebook.com/thestephaniehaney Read more here: (0:10) Former Ohio Department of Health Director Dr. Amy Acton announces she won't enter U.S. Senate race. https://www.wkyc.com/article/news/politics/dr-amy-acton-not-running-us-senate/95-839c40f7-b842-4578-82fa-3fd32dde1d77 (1:15) Early voting now underway for Ohio's Primary Election on May 4 https://www.wkyc.com/article/news/local/vote/early-voting-now-underway-ohio-primary-election-may-4/95-94bdcf76-6640-42d8-9061-694c6655e4eb (2:09) Ohio's 'Stand Your Ground' gun law now in effect. https://www.wkyc.com/article/news/local/ohio/ohios-stand-your-ground-gun-law-in-effect-tuesday/95-18928f6d-43b0-4f76-995e-e665de8287f4 (3:32) Day 7 of Derek Chauvin trial: MPD lieutenant in charge of use-of-force training takes stand. https://www.wkyc.com/article/news/local/george-floyd/derek-chauvin-trial-day-7-george-floyd-death/89-abf236ce-0321-43fb-aace-0d3e568e06fb (5:06) Study: Moderna COVID-19 vaccine lasts at least 6 months. https://www.wkyc.com/article/news/health/coronavirus/vaccine/moderna-covid-19-vaccine-lasts-at-least-6-months/507-16f89ac7-4c30-4e61-be70-0b40cded5b94 (7:02) The latest on the number of COVID-19 cases in Ohio. https://www.wkyc.com/article/news/health/coronavirus/coronavirus-ohio-updates/95-e2faeb56-d02a-443a-bcdb-141f2c7fafe8 https://www.wkyc.com/article/news/health/coronavirus/timeline-of-coronavirus-cases-ohio/95-c97c228d-c6c7-4949-b12b-4324d7ed8bb5 (8:15) Big, outdoor events will be permitted as Gov. Mike DeWine, state health officials consolidate Ohio health orders amid ongoing pandemic. https://www.wkyc.com/article/news/local/ohio/consolidate-health-orders-amid-ongoing-pandemic/95-6b760e54-7311-4594-945d-a628c8eab0c4 (9:08) Construction in Cleveland begins on 2021 NFL Draft stage. https://www.wkyc.com/article/sports/nfl/nfl-draft/construction-in-cleveland-begins-for-2021-nfl-draft/95-8c314abd-c804-4d81-8b6c-e92172fd23b1 (9:32) Cleveland's University Circle currently #1 in USA Today 'Best Arts District' poll; voting open until April 26. https://www.wkyc.com/article/news/local/cleveland/clevelands-university-circle-nominees-usa-today-10-best-art-districts/95-3d870ef9-4c49-4ff3-94bb-89001ec2bf8b (10:33) 'Wonderstruck' two-day outdoor music festival coming to Northeast Ohio this summer. https://www.wkyc.com/article/entertainment/wonderstruck-cleveland-northeast-ohio-summer-2021/95-d83f1c9b-a676-4cd6-8d01-260df72205d1 (11:11) Try these 10 restaurants in Akron from Luigi's to Ken Stewart's: Save Our Sauce roundup. https://www.wkyc.com/article/entertainment/dining/save-our-sauce/top-akron-ohio-restaurants-luigis-ken-stewarts-crave/95-a3cd2e4d-39e7-4375-941d-322b51cedeb4 (12:04) LIVE | Eagle watch: Waiting on third egg to hatch in Avon Lake nest at Redwood Elementary School. https://www.wkyc.com/article/life/animals/bald-eagle-egg-avon-lake-nest-redwood-elementary-school/95-fc5e7f2b-c052-408b-b31b-6bd6c561aee8

Video Game Grooves
Episode 78 :: Paradise Killer, Pepsiman

Video Game Grooves

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2021 103:25


Blog Link: http://videogamegrooves.com/2021/04/01/episode-78-paradise-killer-pepsiman/ Welcome to this refreshing AND tasteful episode of Video Game Grooves! This week we throw it back to chrome, shuttered lighting, palm trees, smooth jazz saxophones, and a horrific faceless nightmare-fuel running facehole fizzer who will compel you with the power of cola. This is just how we do it. This week, Paul leads us to the beautiful and bizarre world of Paradise Killer from Black Screen Records. The game is exceptional and captivating, not least of which due to the musical score by Barry Topping. The nostalgia-nouveau fusion jazz soundtrack keeps us enthralled even if we have no idea what's going on in the game (although we try to explore that too). We then move on to Jeremy's feature of an unofficial Pepsiman release and we ask "Is Pepsi(man) okay?" We take a slice of the original music by James & Gang (James Shimoji) for the inscrutable sugar-water Japanese ad campaign of the 90s, and we appreciate the amazing saxophone and keyboard work, exploring topics such as improvisation, animal attraction, and corporeal miming. We flow into a discussion about soloists and performers in video game music, who seem often to go under the radar and we shout out several that we know (and a few we didn't) and invite you to seek their work on vinyl and off. And we wrap it all up with new releases and announcements that you can pay for right now! And isn't that just what you want? Of course it is. Outro: "Idle Lands" - Paradise Killer, by Barry Topping Twitter – @vg_grooves, @jeremy_lamont, @ajohnagnello https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ikMwQxaSRjU Mizucat Illustration, Art, & Design https://www.mizucat.com/ Kristin Naigus http://www.field-of-reeds.net/credits.html Reven Music https://revenmusic.com/ Julie Elven https://www.julieelven.com/about Links: Tales of Symphonia (Ship to Shore) https://shiptoshoremedia.com/collections/featured/products/tales-of-symphonia The King of Fighters 2002 (Limited Run Games) (Bigwax)    https://bigwax.io/collections/brave-wave-productions/products/the-king-of-fighters-2002-the-definitive-soundtrack    https://limitedrungames.com/collections/neo-frontpage/products/the-king-of-fighters-2002-soundtrack-vinyl-or-cd The King of Fighters 94/95 (Limited Run Games) (Bigwax)    https://limitedrungames.com/collections/neo-frontpage/products/the-king-of-fighters-94-95-soundtrack-bundle    https://bigwax.io/collections/brave-wave-productions/products/the-king-of-fighters-94-95-the-definitive-soundtrack Blaseball (iam8bit)    https://www.iam8bit.com/products/blaseball-vinyl-soundtrack Simian Symphony (Donkey Kong 64 arrange) (Respawn Records)    https://respawnedrecords.com/collections/featured/products/dk64-simian-symphony-vinyl-record Murder by Numbers (Black Screen Records)    https://blackscreenrecords.com/collections/all-releases/products/murder-by-numbers-original-soundtrack-by-masakazu-sugimori Noby Noby Boy (Fangamer)    https://www.fangamer.com/products/noby-noby-boy-vinyl-soundtrack Watch Dogs Legion (Laced Records)    https://www.lacedrecords.co/collections/watch-dogs Donkey Kong Country Recreated (Mental Groove Records) (Forced Exposure, USA)    https://www.forcedexposure.com/Catalog/jammin-sam-miller-donkey-kong-country-ost-recreated-2lp/MPD.036LP.html    https://shop.mentalgroove.ch/album/donkey-kong-country-ost-recreated-2 Street Fighter II cover album (Retroleaf Records)    https://retroleafrecords.com/products/street-fighter-ii Post Void 7" (Diggers Factory)    https://www.diggersfactory.com/vinyl/240060/ycjy-x-karlflodin-post-void Image Gallery

Pilsners and Politics
Americas Courage Crisis

Pilsners and Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2021 29:58


Benjamin and Vinny sit down with our special guest Chris to discuss the blatant disregard for our God given rights, specifically, the second amendment. Did you know the Biden Administration has asked the SCOTUS to allow the government to enter your home without a warrant to seize your weapons? If Americans don't find their courage, our Republic will be no different than any other country. There will be a ruling class (the political elite) and a working class, (the rest of us). Chris also touches on a very concerning topic that many Americans might not know about; the Smith-Mundt Act (Modernization Act).  Chris breaks this down and provides a common sense understanding of the act for our listeners.  Should 45 have done something more about this when he had the chance?Follow Chris on Instagram @Defund_Politics

Music Pro Daily
142: Why Producers Shouldn't Use Clubhouse

Music Pro Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 27, 2021 5:55


MPD is an "almost daily" podcast that gives freelance music producers real insights into building a long term career in the internet-driven music industry. I use this podcast to document my day-to-day running a producer development company with my partner, industry-veteran producer Mike Mani. In this show we discuss everything from landing more projects and selling digital products (sample packs, loops, etc) to developing artists and connecting with the industry. To learn more about what we do... Visit www.DarkLabelMusic.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/musicprodaily/message

Music Pro Daily
141: How To Get Artists To Actually See Your Content

Music Pro Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2021 6:05


MPD is an "almost daily" podcast that gives freelance music producers real insights into building a long term career in the internet-driven music industry. I use this podcast to document my day-to-day running a producer development company with my partner, industry-veteran producer Mike Mani. In this show we discuss everything from landing more projects and selling digital products (sample packs, loops, etc) to developing artists and connecting with the industry. To learn more about what we do... Visit www.DarkLabelMusic.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/musicprodaily/message

HR Trends
Employers' critical role with COVID-19 vaccinations

HR Trends

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2021 16:43


The ongoing pandemic has put a spotlight on people's physical and mental health – and on the critical role employers have in safeguarding their employees' overall well-being. As the vaccine efforts continue across the U.S., we discuss the role employers should play in terms of the vaccination roll out. Dr. Dora Anne Mills, Chief Health Improvement Officer at MaineHealth, and Rob Hecker from Unum discuss how employers – of all sizes – can help with vaccination efforts to end the COVID-19 pandemic. It's a race against time. Vaccinations are the single most important thing we can do for the health our communities right now. COVID-19 variants are emerging – some which are more contagious and sometimes more fatal. [02:00]Why employers should play a role. Vaccines are the fastest way for employees to return to some sort of normalcy and return to the office, and employers can play a critical role. Early in the pandemic, employers emerged as a trusted source of information. Encourage employees to get vaccinated when it's available to them, as part of your organization's commitment to employee physical and emotional wellbeing. [03:17]Make it easy. It can be difficult for some people to get vaccinated, especially if the facility doesn't allow children or if there are long lines. Employers can make it easier by allowing time during work hours to get vaccinated. [05:14]Develop a strategic plan. Talk to experts, be flexible and rethink what you're doing based upon what you learn. Most importantly, be transparent with everything – even what you don't know. It's really just about communicating, staying close to the experts, and tapping into the resources that are readily available. [07:37]It's all hands on deck. This is the largest vaccine campaign in history. Local businesses can provide trusted nonmedical volunteers to help local clinics and healthcare facilities. Employees find it fulfilling, and it accomplishes a similar goal to end the pandemic. [14:18]Dora Anne Mills, MD, MPD, FAAPChief Health Improvement Officer, MaineHealthSince 2018, Dr. Dora Anne Mills has served as the chief health improvement officer for MaineHealth, Maine's largest health system. She previously served as the Maine CDC Director for 15 years, overseeing many efforts, including the development of a statewide public health infrastructure, Maine's response to the H1N1 influenza pandemic, and the implementation of a system for chronic disease prevention, and addressing a number of environmental health issues. Rob Hecker Vice President, Global Total Rewards, UnumRob Hecker is currently the Vice President of Global Total Rewards, responsible for Unum's health, medical and retirement plans, well-being strategies and compensation and rewards programs. Prior to moving into his current role, Rob was the Vice President of National Client Group Services, responsible for developing client service delivery strategies for Unum's 2000+ employees customer segment. His areas of responsibility included client management strategy, new customer implementation, premium collections, contract services and administrative management services. Rob's previous business experience includes Vice President of Unum's Leave Management Center, Vice President Voluntary Claims Operations and Vice President LTD Benefits. Prior to joining Unum, Rob was employed by Holiday Inn Corporations as a labor relations specialist and Director of Human Resources. An active community leader, Rob has served on the boards of the Unum Charitable Foundation, The Chattanooga Y-ME Breast Cancer organization, Chattanooga Humane Educational Society and Unum's United Way leadership council.]https://www.mainehealth.org/

Oh No, Ross and Carrie
Ross and Carrie Meet Dr. Jenny Rice: Faulty Interventions Edition

Oh No, Ross and Carrie

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2021 101:12


In a touching and at times wrenching interview, Carrie and Ross talk to Dr. Jenny Rice, an archivist and rhetoric professor who studies the intersection of evidence and persuasion… and who happens to be a former patient of Dr. Jerry Mungadze. She shares how his methods impacted her mental health, what a questionable diagnosis did to her and others, and how her journey out brought her to the important work she does now.For pics and videos, follow us on Facebook!

Music Pro Daily
140: How To Meet Talented Artists On Tik Tok

Music Pro Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 19, 2021 7:16


MPD is an "almost daily" podcast that gives freelance music producers real insights into building a long term career in the internet-driven music industry. I use this podcast to document my day-to-day running a producer development company with my partner, industry-veteran producer Mike Mani. In this show we discuss everything from landing more projects and selling digital products (sample packs, loops, etc) to developing artists and connecting with the industry. To learn more about what we do... Visit www.DarkLabelMusic.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/musicprodaily/message

Music Pro Daily
139: A Trick For Minimizing Revisions

Music Pro Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2021 6:19


MPD is an "almost daily" podcast that gives freelance music producers real insights into building a long term career in the internet-driven music industry. I use this podcast to document my day-to-day running a producer development company with my partner, industry-veteran producer Mike Mani. In this show we discuss everything from landing more projects and selling digital products (sample packs, loops, etc) to developing artists and connecting with the industry. To learn more about what we do... Visit www.DarkLabelMusic.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/musicprodaily/message

Music Pro Daily
138: Are Your Projects Dragging On For Too Long? (Solution)

Music Pro Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2021 15:45


MPD is an "almost daily" podcast that gives freelance music producers real insights into building a long term career in the internet-driven music industry. I use this podcast to document my day-to-day running a producer development company with my partner, industry-veteran producer Mike Mani. In this show we discuss everything from landing more projects and selling digital products (sample packs, loops, etc) to developing artists and connecting with the industry. To learn more about what we do... Visit www.DarkLabelMusic.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/musicprodaily/message

Music Pro Daily
137: Should I Give Out My Rates In The DMs?

Music Pro Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2021 11:25


MPD is an "almost daily" podcast that gives freelance music producers real insights into building a long term career in the internet-driven music industry. I use this podcast to document my day-to-day running a producer development company with my partner, industry-veteran producer Mike Mani. In this show we discuss everything from landing more projects and selling digital products (sample packs, loops, etc) to developing artists and connecting with the industry. To learn more about what we do... Visit www.DarkLabelMusic.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/musicprodaily/message

Haymarket Books Live
The Struggle for Police-Free Schools and an Equitable, Safe Re-Opening (7-9-20)

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 3, 2021 85:16


Join us for a conversation with education activists about the current struggles in public education for safe and equitable schools for all. Sponsored by: Baltimore Teachers Union, Boston Teachers Union, Chicago Teachers Union, Journey for Justice, Little Rock Education Association, Massachusetts Teachers Association, National Educators United, and United Teachers Los Angeles. ————————————————— A conversation with some of most dynamic teacher union leaders, community and student organizers in the country, will invite dialogue on pressing issues impacting public education in this unprecedented moment. They will discuss the importance of a burgeoning Black Lives Matter movement to defund police and the need to replace them with counselors, social workers, nurses and restorative practices in our schools. Intimately connected to this question is how we can ensure that our students and communities are provided with the schools they deserve if and when they reopen in the Fall. ————————————————— Speakers: Priyana Cabraal is a Leaders Igniting Transformation fellow and an incoming junior at Milwaukee School of Languages in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. She recently led the fight to get MPD out of MPS and is determined to do more for other Black and Brown youth in her city. She is passionate about creating a significant shift in leadership that results in the dismantling of all systematic discrepancies. She hopes to become a defense attorney after high school to defend those unlawfully prosecuted due to factors such as race, sex, economic status, and immigration status. Eventually, Priyana hopes to run for Congress and advocate for her community. Cabral is of Black and Asian heritage and enjoys visiting her family in Sri Lanka every year. Moira Casados Cassidy is a teacher and activist in Denver, Colorado. She has worked to advance social justice and liberation in Denver schools as a member of the Caucus of Today's Teachers. Cecily Myart-Cruz is a teacher, activist and the United Teachers Los Angeles President. The first woman of color in the union's 50-year history – having previously served as NEA Vice President for six years. Cecily has taught for 26 years, at both elementary and middle school levels, most recently at Angeles Mesa Elementary. As a UTLA Area leader, she has worked with schools, parents, students and the community to oust 23 “bully principals”. Cecily has collaborated with school communities in initiating the year-long boycott of district periodic assessments in protest of excessive testing of our students. She is no stranger in taking direct action, whether it is fighting against co-locations, demanding Ethnic Studies for our students, declaring the end the criminalization of youth, local and statewide lobbying efforts and much more. Jonathan Stith is a founding member and National Coordinator for the Alliance for Educational Justice, a national network of intergenerational and youth-led organizations working to end the school-to-prison pipeline. He has 20 years of experience working with youth and community organizations to address social inequities. As the former Executive Director of the Youth Education Alliance (YEA), he was a critical leader in the School Modernization Campaign that won 3.2 billion dollars for school renovation and repair in the District. He was also a steering committee member of the Justice for DC Youth Coalition that successfully organized youth and their families to win critical juvenile justice reforms in the District. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/KJilE6uOFEw Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

The Successful Screenwriter with Geoffrey D Calhoun: Screenwriting Podcast
Ep38 - Jonathan - Film Analysis with Geoffrey D. Calhoun and Kristy Leigh Lussier

The Successful Screenwriter with Geoffrey D Calhoun: Screenwriting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2021 27:33


Logline: Jonathan leaves the office every day at noon. When he gets home, he goes to sleep. Every morning he wakes up and there is a breakfast prepared for him along with a video telling him about the second part of his day.Available on Netflix.Geoffrey D. Calhoun and Story Analyst Kristy Leigh Lussier discuss this thriller about multiple personality disorder.

The Benjamin Dixon Show
Like It Or Not: Nabilah Islam on Organizing & GA Politics | Chuck Modiano's DC Protests Coverage

The Benjamin Dixon Show

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2021 74:23


Support the show by becoming a patron: Patreon.com/thebpdshowOn today's edition of Like It Or Not w/ Benjamin Dixon and Rebecca Azor: We speak with Nabilah Islam about her organizing efforts in Georgia, as well as Chuck Modiano about his coverage of BLM protests over the past year.