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  • 57mAVG DURATION
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  • Nov 22, 2021LATEST
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Latest podcast episodes about Boulevard

Monster Party
WILLIAM CASTLE!!! With JEFFREY SCHWARZ!

Monster Party

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 103:14


THIS THANKSGIVING, TRADE IN THAT TURKEY FOR A TINGLER, AND CANDY THOSE YAMS WITH LSD! MONSTER PARTY PRESENTS A FRIGHTFUL FEAST THAT IS SURE TO SCARE YOUR PANTS OFF! JAMES GONIS, SHAWN SHERIDAN, LARRY STROTHE, and MATT WEINHOLD, present an episode that is more fun than throwing pumpkin pies at floating inflatable skeleton! MONSTER PARTY is proud to pay tribute to a maverick director/producer/writer/actor, whose filmography includes such genre classics as THE HOUSE ON HAUNTED HILL, THE TINGLER, 13 GHOSTS, HOMICIDAL, and ROSEMARY'S BABY. We're talking about the one and only "Master of Gimmicks"... WILLIAM CASTLE!!! To us up and coming monster kids, William Castle served as our delighfully scary favorite uncle. Sporting a large cigar and armed with playful sense of gallows humor, Castle came off like a more accessible Alfred Hitchcock.  He often introduced his pictures, and thrilled movie-goers with a vast array of inventive and sometimes silly gimmicks. To make things even more tantalizing, Castle liked to brand these gimmicks with catchy names like, EMERGO, PERCEPTO, and ILLUSION-O, just to name a few. I suppose if he had made an Italian western, it would have been filmed in SPAGHETTI-O! Hahahahaha... sigh. Joining us for this creepy cavalcade of Castle comaraderie, is an EMMY AWARD winning director/producer/editor, who makes his MONSTER PARTY debut! He's the man who gave us the critically acclaimed documentary, SPINE TINGLER: THE WILLIAM CASTLE STORY, for which we'll forever be in his debt. Please welcome... JEFFREY SCHWARZ! (WRANGLER: ANATOMY OF AN ICON, VITO, I AM DIVINE, TAB HUNTER CONFIDENTIAL, THE FABULOUS ALLEN CARR, BOULEVARD! A HOLLYWOOD STORY, GODDESS: THE FALL AND RISE OF SHOWGIRLS) LISTEN... IF YOU DARE! OR TAKE THAT LONG WALK TO "COWARD'S CORNER."  BUT IS THAT ANY PLACE TO SPEND THANKSGIVING?

Wednesday Night Drinking Practice
WNDP Steve Tulipana Re-run

Wednesday Night Drinking Practice

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 100:29


We took last week off so this week we present a re-run. We go back to April of 2017 to episode .31 with Steve Tulipana! If you don't know Steve he is a pillar to the music community. As a performer and business owner. Enjoy the chat about his musical career leading up to being an owner in "Record Bar" and "Mini Bar". Since this interview he opened "Lemonade Park" during the pandemic. This is a fun show. We are brought to you this week by "Tacos El Gallo" on the Boulevard! And of course to "The Majestic Restaurant", "Jaykco Guitar Straps", "Found Sound KC" and "Cool Guy Foods". Please check out our "Patreon" page. Every little bit counts. And head over to "Mini Bar" this Friday for an amazing show which has a link below! Did that Rhyme? Keep Practicing! https://www.facebook.com/events/622977285527075 https://www.therecordbar.com/ https://www.minibarkc.com/ https://www.facebook.com/tacoselgallokc/ http://majestickc.com/ https://www.jaykco.com/ https://www.facebook.com/CoolGuyFoodsLlc/ https://www.facebook.com/foundsound.kc/ https://www.patreon.com/wndp  

I Survived Theatre School
Molly Smith Metzler

I Survived Theatre School

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 62:10


Intro: Gina is co-hostless and doing her best. PLEASE SUBSCRIBE, RATE, and REVIEW you beautiful Survivors!Interview: SUNY Geneseo, Boston University, Tisch, Juilliard, Playwriting MFAs, competition in writing programs, Marsha Norman, Cry It Out, MAID on Netflix, Hollywood sea changes, female-centered shows, domestic violence, emotional abuse, Hulu, theatre is behind, denial, making mistakes, bad reviews.COMPLETE TRANSCRIPT (unedited):1 (10s):And I'm Gina Polizzi. We went to theater school2 (12s):Together. We survived it.1 (14s):We didn't quite understand it. 20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of it all2 (21s):Survived theater school. And you will too. Are we famous yet?1 (34s):Hello? Hello. Hello survivors. This is Gina. This week. We are sons' cohost, just one host today. I'm missing my better half BAAs. His boss is actually attending to a friend who got terrible health news this week. And she is in her very boss like way being there for her friend and being the amazing person and friend that she is, which is why everybody loves buzz. Anyway, she'll be back next week if you're not. But today we have, honestly, you guys, this is the interview I have been waiting for.1 (1m 19s):Molly Smith. Metzler is a writer extraordinaire. You may have heard of her latest project made number three on Netflix entering its 28th day online, which has some very special meaning for Netflix that I hope to know more about one day and previous to me being the showrunner for maid, she also worked on shameless and several other successful television shows. And before that she was a playwright. And actually I got to know her work because I directed a play of hers called cry it out.1 (1m 59s):And it was a fantastic experience. And I started communicating with her over email when I was directing. And I was so impressed with the way that she responded to me. I mean, a that she responded to me at all that she was available to me at all. And not something you always get with a playwright and B that she really took her time with her responses and see that her responses ended up being pretty impactful for me, just not necessarily related to the play, but as a person. And I'm a little embarrassed that when I talked to her and I told her the way that she had impacted me, I just started seriously just crying, crying, crying.1 (2m 45s):And I was having this thought like, I, this is not a moment I want to be crying. And I'm generally in life. I, I welcomed here as, as a person who struggles to access their emotions. I do. I welcome a good cry, but it not want to be crying to Molly Smith Metzler in this great interview. But you know, it is what it is. If I'm going to be honest, I have to be honest. I can't be choicy about when I'm being myself. That's my, that's my mantra. Recently you have to be yourself in all the ways. Some of those ways are ugly and disgusting and you know, unsavory, and some of them are fine and some of them are be even beautiful.1 (3m 31s):So I'm working on embracing the, a mess that I am, but I really think you're going to enjoy this interview with Molly. She's fantastic. Even without the always wonderful presidents, presidents presence, maybe she should be president even without the always wonderful presence of BAAs. We still managed to have a great conversation and actually that whole experience of her at the last minute, not being able to do this and this being the first time we're doing this with one host, turns out to have been a good thing for us to go through, to learn that.1 (4m 14s):Yeah, sometimes we're not both going to be available and sometimes when I'm not available, she'll be doing an episode on her own. So, you know, whatever we're growing, changing learning, Hey, we're in 22 countries. Now, if you have a, not a subscribed to this podcast, please do. If you have not rated this podcast or given it a review, please, please, please, please, please, please do it seriously. Please do it, please. I'm begging you. Please do it, but okay. Anyway, here's Molly Smith message.0 (4m 53s):Well,1 (5m 0s):No problem whatsoever. Fortunately, my partner is Jen. Her very good friend just got diagnosed with cancer yesterday and she's with her right now helping. So she's not going to be able to join us. This is actually the first time we're doing an interview with just me. So we'll see how it goes.3 (5m 23s):Yeah,1 (5m 24s):It is. And she just, she has a lot of experience with, with cancer. So she's sort of like the first people, first person people call, which is like,3 (5m 38s):Yeah,1 (5m 38s):Exactly, exactly. But anyway, congratulations, Molly Smith. Metso you survived theater school and you're going to have to clarify for me because it looks like you went to four schools, but you didn't go to four theater schools. Did you?3 (5m 52s):I went to four schools. I did. They're not all theater schools, but I went to undergrad, SUNY Geneseo in Western New York and I was an English major. And then I went to Boston university and got a master's in creative writing with a concentration in playwriting. And then I went to Tisch and got an MFA in playwriting dramatic writing. And then I went to Juilliard, which is, you don't really get a degree there. It's called an artist diploma, but it's just finishing school basically.1 (6m 20s):Oh, okay. So the decision to, to do the MFA, were you thinking at that time that you, maybe you were going to be a teacher, I'm always curious about MFA's and writing because you know, if you learned what you needed to know and you know, why not just put yourself out there and be a writer?3 (6m 40s):I think it's very scary to take that jump. The thing about school that I got addicted to is that I'm actually way too social to be a writer. I like being around other writers and every, and every time you get a graduate program, you're with a bunch of writers and you have deadlines and you kind of, you know, it's a really public way to study writing versus alone in your apartment while way to say, you know, and I kept getting academic support to attend the programs. And so that was part of it. I'm not sure I would have gone deep into debt to get all those degrees, but I think giving me aid, I kept going. Yeah.1 (7m 16s):Okay, fantastic. And did you always know from day one that you, I mean, since you were in high school anyway, that you wanted to be a writer that you wanted to write dramatically?3 (7m 26s):I always loved writing. I had journals and I'm from a very young age. I love to write, but I had a sort of more academic feeling about it. I thought I was going to get a PhD in English and join the academy and be a professor. And I didn't know, I was creative in the sense of dramatic writing until my senior year of college. When I took a playwriting class, I didn't know I was a playwright. And I also didn't know. I was funny. Those two things emerged at the same time. Wow.1 (7m 54s):Oh, so you didn't have experience with theater before then?3 (7m 58s):Well, I grew up a ballerina, so I had a great sense of the stage and the relationship between an audience and someone onstage. I really like, I understood light and the power of an audience, but I, no, I didn't grow up a theater nerd at all. I grew up a nerd nerd, like an actual,1 (8m 18s):So that must've been like just a whole new, exciting world. Did you decide pretty much right away that you were going to be getting your MFA when you discovered that you liked to play with?3 (8m 27s):Yeah, I did. I took this introduction to play right in class and it was one of those things. People talk about this, like in a romantic relationship where you're just like, it changes your whole life. And I didn't have that in a romantic relationship, but I had that with playwriting. One-on-one where, you know, I just, I, it came, I don't want to say easily to me cause it was really easy to play it, but it came, it was like a big release in my life that I arrived at playwriting and loved doing it. And it's like a big jigsaw and you can stay up all night doing it. And I knew from the very first, basically from the first act of a play that I wrote that it's what I wanted to do. I'm very lucky. It was very clear.1 (9m 5s):Yeah. Yeah. That is really lucky. So we have talked to almost 60 people now, the majority of them have been actors. So we've really delved deep into like everything about being an actor, especially at the age of undergrad and what that's like to be growing up, you know, just growing up and then trying to figure out yourself well enough to be an actor and all the stuff that comes along with that, including, you know, the competitive best with your cohort. But I imagine that's what it, well, I don't want to imagine what it's like, what is it like with your cohort when you're all writers and you're presumably reading each other's work critiquing each other's work, does it get really competitive?3 (9m 55s):I suspect that it can, you know, I feel very lucky cause I have never experienced that directly in a graduate program situation. Part of it is I think I went to really great places where everyone had gotten in was incredibly talented and brought such a unique point of view and voice that none of us were trying to raise the same place. So it was really easy to just support each other. And also it's fun, you know, you're reading it aloud. So if something's in the south, you're trying an accent and it's super bad cause you're a playwright. So I found it, you know, I became close with the other writers and I mean, I'm married. One of them, I call him my husband, he and I were in the same graduate program at Tisch. And there is something beautiful about meeting someone in a writing workshop because you're just sort of naked.3 (10m 41s):It's all, you know, I imagine it's like, I understand my actors fall in love too. It's like, you're just so vulnerable and you know, each other in a deep way. But my experience has been that writers are pretty, pretty darn supportive of each other. And if you're not, you kind of don't fit in, like if you're a jerk, if you're competitive jerk, like you're not meant to be a playwright, playwrights need to love people. Cause that's what we do, you know? Yeah.1 (11m 1s):Yeah. That's a very good point. Actually, we talked to CISA Hutchinson yesterday and basically said, yeah, isn't she awesome?3 (11m 8s):She's in a beautiful inside and out like just, but yeah.1 (11m 12s):Yeah. She, and she echoed the same thing in what you're saying. So I guess we're going to stop asking this question about competition. It's just that it's so much of a part of like the act. And I think it's part of just how the program is structured. I mean, you're literally up for the same parts against each other and they PO posted on a wall and everybody shows up to3 (11m 35s):Absolutely. And you know, I was at Juilliard where they still cut people. You know, that system has changed a little bit, but I was at the, the version of Juilliard that was structured to drop 10% of the class out. And I feel like you don't get, I don't know. I learned a lot about that cause they cut playwrights as well. And I feel like that doesn't, that doesn't bring forth good creative work from anybody that pressure of, you know, is Sally going to get cut instead of me that's that's, that's not good skills. I don't think1 (12m 5s):It's true. And at the same time, like a lot of the people who were cut from our program went on to have better careers than the majority of us. So it's just like not a lot of rhyme or reason to it.3 (12m 15s):It's like SNL. Yeah. I mean, yes. It's not a predictor. You got it. Right.1 (12m 20s):Exactly. Okay. So you graduated or you've finally finished school with Julliard after doing it for, for a number of years then what happened next? You were, you were married or you're in a relationship and w how did, how do two writers figure out what their next steps are going to be when school's over?3 (12m 40s):Well, I don't know how to writers in general would do, but I can tell you how Colin and I did it, which is that we we've never been competitive because we write really different plays. Like I am talking to, you know, especially as a playwright, my, my work tends to, I mean, I've written Boulevard, comedy. It's like, I really like to laugh. My husband's play is everyone's on meth and they're an Appalachian. It's like, we are, we are really young and yang. And, but I think being, I really recommend being married to, or spending your life with another writer, if you are a writer because they get it and they get you in like a deep, deep way. So if you have to stay up to four o'clock in the morning, cause you're inspired and you have to finish the scene, you know, there's, there's just a, there's no jealousy about that.3 (13m 25s):There's an acceptance. And our, it really, I think I often say, I don't think I'd be a playwright. Certainly won't be any of the things that I am a mother, you know, like everything is because it's all. And I, I had someone who believed in me more than I believed in myself and at points that is everything because, you know, your play opens in New York, you get just the worst reviews in the world and you take, you know, you'd take to the bed and you don't think you're ever going to write again. And it's so important who you decided to spend your life with because, you know, con only saw me as a writer first and foremost. And you know, it's like at the same goes for him. So we, yeah, but just technically do we have money? You know, we lived in a apartment in Brooklyn that we got to kind of like a hookup.3 (14m 9s):My husband was, he managed the bar downstairs, so he knew the guy. And so we got this apartment that we could actually afford, but we both worked full time waiting tables and bartending. And then if I get into the O'Neil, for instance, he would do extra bartending support me being at the O'Neil. And you know, he went up to LA for a few months and did a bunch of meetings and screenwriting stuff. And I supported him with the Juilliard money. Like we just have always worked it out. And for the last handful of years, when we finally don't have to, we can both be working in. It's great.1 (14m 39s):Yeah. That's nice that, by the way, that makes so much sense about the difference in your writing because in watching made, you know, I remember getting to the end of the first episode that he wrote and not, not having known throughout the episode that he wrote it and being like, wow, this is really, really different than Molly's writing. And of course it, it was his, and I kind of tend towards that darker stuff too. So yeah. And by the way, the series is fantastic. It is so good. And how you were having such a moment, you're getting great reviews. People are loving. I saw even today, it's number three on Netflix. How are you doing with success? Because people assume that it's all great, but I'm guessing it's not.1 (15m 23s):And I'm guessing it's kind of scary too.3 (15m 27s):Oh, well this is all pretty, just great. You know, like I think there's probably two things that are tricky about it, which I'll tell you in a second, but the fact is, it's just, it's great. Especially because it's made, you know, made is the closest to play writing. I've done for the screen. I see the show as 10 individual plays and it's really just about cleaning and feelings. It's the most character driven thing I've seen on TV in a long time. There's no murder. There's no cool accents. We're not in Hawaii. It's just about one woman's cleaning and feelings. And every time we turned in an episode, I thought Netflix would call and be like, you know, this is too weird.3 (16m 9s):Like the couch can't eat her. That's just too weird, you know, but they let me make this like, you know, artistic, I think like they're beautiful thing. And I didn't really believe that they were going to air it. And then I didn't really believe that people were going, gonna watch it. And so the fact that the fact that it is exactly what I wanted it to be and people love it. It's very, I don't really, I think it's really exciting just as a writer, it's exciting. It's like, oh, maybe we can return to doing harder things on the screen and on the stage again, you know, I think audiences weren't deterred by the fact that it was difficult, you know, they leaned in. And so I feel like it's really, it's mostly just fantastic.3 (16m 49s):I am surprised that people love it this much, but no, I'm just, I'm so proud of it. So it feels great. That's all there is. Do it.1 (16m 57s):What were the, you said there you'll tell me about the two things that have been challenging.3 (17m 1s):Yes, it is challenging. I, and I know you'll relate to this, but coming up in the theater, there are so many of us that, that are just working hard and waiting tables and waiting for a break. And that was me as well. And you want to help every single one of those people and you want to help every single one of those people whose cousin is also in LA. So like, that's the part that's really hard for me is that I can't, I can't do for everyone. And I want to, and especially theater people, like if you, if someone sends me a cold email that the subject is like a MF playwright, like I read it and then I, you know, I, I can't help it.3 (17m 42s):So that's a little hard cause I want to be good to everyone. And, and can't so that's, that's hard for me. And the other thing that's just hard is, you know, I spend my life in sweatpants and now suddenly have to do a bunch of stuff where I look, I have to look very, you know, Like, you know, writers or writers were writers for a reason. And so, so suddenly I have to like I to buy lipstick. And so that part of it is a little being articulate. Like next to Margot, Robbie is very difficult for me, but1 (18m 14s):I didn't realize until just today that she was the producer. So she's, she's the person who optioned the book.3 (18m 20s):So she and John Wells got the book together. John Wells is a very famous producer. He did west wing ER, and shameless, which is how I know him. I worked in my last four seasons of shameless is a writer on the show. So when he and Margo got the book, LA had just done cry it out, it was cried out, was up like, like had just closed when they got the book and it's a play about moms. And I think they were like, oh, we know a person who writes about moms and they handed me the book. It was so kismet.1 (18m 49s):Wow. That's fantastic. And, but you had to, I mean, I read the book too. You had to create a whole narrative. That's not in the book. So how does that, I'm curious about that process and how it works. Is it that you kind of sit down as the show runner and hatch a basic idea that you, that you then have some writers help you with or do you have to outline all of the stories and everybody else just writes them? Or how does it work?3 (19m 20s):Well, it's a, it's a little bit different with every project. Oh, I'm with a story like made, you know, whenever the memoir I learned so much, like it was, it's really an educational tool and I didn't want to sacrifice any of that. On the other hand, when you go and sit down with your husband or wife and Saturday night to watch Netflix, you don't want to lecture and you don't want to like TV, shouldn't taste like TV, shouldn't taste like broccoli, right. It should taste like it should be a sneak attack. Kind of like my plate is like, I like to sneak people into learning something. So I knew kind of off the bat that that made was an incredible engine, the memoir, and that I wanted all the takeaway to be the same. But I also knew that we were going to have to create a lot of story to do that.3 (20m 1s):So to answer your question, when I first said I would do the book and when we were taking out and pitching it to Netflix, pitching it to HBO, you know, all the places I would have to say, this is what I'm going to do. You know, we're gonna, we're going to do 10 episodes. Her mom's going to be a huge character. Her dad's got a huge character. We're going to really build up. Sean. We're going to get to know some of the people in the houses we're going to get to know Regina, she's an invented character, but this is how she'll structure in the plot. And you really have to know the nuts and bolts of what you're going to do. And the tone of it, like it's kinda like giving a 45 minute presentation on what the show will be. And then hopefully someone like Netflix is like, okay, great. Here's, here's a green light and get your writer's room. So then you hire a handful.3 (20m 42s):If you're lucky, you know, I could, I didn't have any, no one told me what to do. I got to hire whoever I wanted. And I hired only four writers, three of whom are playwrights, three of whom. I'm sure. You know, cause it's Colin, Becca bronzer, Marcus Garley so really accomplished playwrights. And then Michelle, Denise Jackson, who is not a playwright, but should be like, she's an honorary playwright, you know? And so w and then the five of us sit down and we take what I've said, you know, about the show, the 45 minute presentation, and we flush it out. What are we doing in every episode? What does this look like? And that, that process in the writer's room is the closest, you'll get to a table read in the theater, you know, where you're just at the table, you're reading that play.3 (21m 24s):And then you talk about it for, you know, nine days. That's a writer's room is that every day. So it's very, very, very cool experience and everyone's sharing secrets and, and we disagree sometimes and we do puzzles and there's a lot of talk about lunch.1 (21m 43s):That's what everybody says.3 (21m 47s):But also what was cool that mean is that these five, these four writers and me, the five of us, we all really connected to different things in the memoir. And we also, all of us come from all of us can relate to the memoir in different ways. And so you get five different perspectives on something. And I think, you know, Becca brown center did so much of the writing of Regina, and I think she could really connect to Regina. And, you know, that character would not feel quite as beautifully drawn if Becca weren't in the writers room. Like, so, so much of it is it's a dinner party. And the result of that dinner party is character. You know? So it's really, it's the most important thing you do is those writers.1 (22m 26s):That is okay. So I also just learned that today that you didn't write that Regina monologue, because, and this is about my own projection that when I'm watching it, I'm going, oh my God, this is so similar to Claire, Claire. Is that the name of the character and cry it out. That lives up high, up on the hill.3 (22m 45s):Oh, Adrian. Adrian.1 (22m 47s):Yeah. Thank you. Sorry. I was thinking, I was thinking, it sounded like an Adrian, my likes. So that's fascinating that, that,3 (22m 53s):Well, let me explain one further thing, which is, so that's how the show gets written. And yes, Becca brown said, I wrote that monologue, but the other thing that the show runner does is it is my job to then go through all 10 episodes and make sure it sounds like one person wrote them. And, and so the showroom, so you kind of divide the writing in the room and then all funnels back to me and I rewrite it or fix things. Or sometimes, you know, sometimes you're doing a major rewrite sometimes you're just like with Regina monologue, it was so beautiful. You know, we, we had to cut a couple of things for production, but like, it's, it's back as work. And, but it's, that's what TV writing is. It's like, there'll be stuff that Becca wrote in episode seven that she didn't write, or, you know, like TV is very collaborative and then it all funnels through the showrunner who does a pass to make sure it's, it's up to the standard that I want.3 (23m 44s):It's totally what I want. You know, it is, it is a writing job as a group, and then it is ultimately one person's writing job it's book. Does that make sense?1 (23m 51s):Yeah, it does. And thank you so much for answering that question because I have always wondered. And also even on television shows that have, have a different director, every episode, I'm always thinking, how are they keeping true to the tone, but not now, now I understand it. Well, I have so many things to ask you. I want to talk to you about just one thing is that you have said that you love writing about class, which is a big part of made and your, and your place. But, so I want to talk a little bit about that, but I also kind of want to talk maybe first about the thing that you said you were surprised that people like to made, and I've heard a lot of female writers express, something like that.1 (24m 36s):I'm surprised. And maybe people just say it in a way as, as you know, not, not trying to try to be humble. Right. Okay. But I believe that you are surprised by it because it does seem like a kind of recent thing that the universe is allowing us to tell women's stories and having them at the forefront. I mean, it seems really pretty recent. And so are you, do you feel like this is you're part of a big sea change in terms of what's being represented on screen?3 (25m 7s):You know, absolutely. I was talking to Netflix yesterday and they said last year it was Bridgford, you know, these are a lot of things, but they were saying last year, people, the surprise was everyone loved Britain and love Queens gambit. And this year one loves squid game and loves made, which cracks me up. But, but they think to be in the same sentence as Queens gambit as the limited series. I mean, I think that's so exciting as a female writer, because she was an alcoholic kind of like piece of crap who was amazing at chess and went on this like beautiful arc that was not traditionally feminine. It was usually that's a man, like that's usually a male going through that and were riveted by his addiction and his dysfunction and made his, you know, I think we're continuing what Queens gambit did as well.3 (25m 50s):Like it's, you know, Alex has a lot of things, but she's not a woman. She is a character going through an arc and she makes a ton of mistakes and she, you know, is a product of where she comes from. And that is enough to carry a show. And I feel like that is it you're right. It's so recent. And I therefore assumed it would be treated like a, you know, like a niche, you know, maybe 500,000 people will watch it kind of like, cause we don't show up for those shows, but all of a sudden we really show up for those shows and we want to see a multidimensional and rich and layered woman at the story of her own dance story. It's really like exciting.3 (26m 31s):It's exciting.1 (26m 33s):That's what I think about stuff like this. I just imagine, you know, the people who are traditionally in charge of these things, I just mentioned it, but I imagine a bunch of guys sitting around being like, can you imagine people really want to hear about these dang? I mean, I feel like it must be a surprise to, to sort of the old guard that, you know, because of course everything does have to be motivated about what's going to be a return on your investment. And that, that that's understandable. It's I'm not saying anybody's bad for that, but it is curious to me that there was just this, there was an assumption that if you made a female centered show, nobody would want to watch it.1 (27m 16s):Except for every time they make a female centered, anything people want to watch it. Why is this keep being a surprise?3 (27m 24s):I think it's going to stopping a surprise pretty soon because this cracked me up. But my friend was doing a pitch yesterday at Hulu. And I guess like the conversation kind of organically came up with like, well, what's our main, you know, like what's the, you know, the producer was in it, but like, you know, people are starting to look for the, the queen scam, but you know, trying to look for the female, you know, the unconventional sort of what's the would be a surprising female story. We're starting to like, not only are we starting to have it at the table, that the market is the, market's starting to recognize that we're going to get eyes on the screen and it's, you know, I shouldn't be so surprised by made.1 (28m 5s):Right. Right. And it helps that we have people like Margot, Robbie and Reese Witherspoon and females who are having more of a say about what gets produced, you know, with what, what books get optioned and then what gets produced.3 (28m 17s):Absolutely. And, and more and more women are taking those jobs and taking those positions. And it's a good, it's a sea change. I also dare say, I think TV and film has ahead of it than theater. I have to say, I think1 (28m 29s):Girl, that's another thing I was going to say. Cause you had a quote in something I read theater is behind theater is so behind and this is, unfortunately it came as a surprise to me. Like when I woke up to the fact that theater is so behind, it was sad and it also doesn't make sense. It also, you know, it should be it's, it was 40 years ago. It was the most progressive part of art, I think.3 (28m 55s):Yeah. Well the theater doesn't treat women as, as minority voices and they have, and like that's, what's so crazy is we've, you know, I think we've carved out space for there's so much equality and, and like, it's exciting to see the programming in theaters change. And like it's not just white men anymore. That's all, that's very, very exciting. But heterosexual women stories that mother's stories about our struggles stories about, you know, me and my friends, there's no space for us on the New York stage. There's no space for my friends and I on the New York stage. And I feel like, and then, you know, you don't go up in New York, then you don't go all across the regions.3 (29m 36s):And I think a great example is actually cried out because that had a huge regional presence because I think people are starved for players like that, that are about women and just, you know, and not women on Mars and not, not necessarily, you know, like it just normal women, women having, you know, the Wendy Wasserstein plays of today are not produced in New York. And it's, it's a, it's a huge issue I think.1 (30m 0s):Yeah, yeah, it is. So, okay. So the other thing is that you love to write about class, which I find fascinating. I love to read about it in any case, what is your personal connection to your fascination with that issue?3 (30m 17s):Well, I think I grew a group of the Hudson valley, the daughter of two teachers. So, you know, I, I, I can't relate to made, for instance, in the sense of, I always had food and I always had a certain amount of like structure and S and security, but I, my parents were incredibly well educated and they kind of like my dad went to Cornell and it was sort of something we heard a lot about, even though we didn't kind of grow up in a moneyed area or money to house, there was a sense of, there was a sense of you could scholarship your way into the next strata. And I think that I find that fascinating because it's just not true. I, it's almost impossible.3 (30m 59s):It's almost impossible to change your class in America. And it's, it's, I feel like those walls are getting higher, not lower. And I watch people through everything they have at, at, at those chances to change, you know, change their stripes. And I just think the way we, we work in this country is we it's, we've made that harder and harder. There is no bootstrap narrative there. It does. There's no bootstraps it doesn't, it's not a thing in this country. So I find that fascinating because I felt very jipped. You know, I felt like I worked very, very hard and like I was always getting A's and being sophisticated and like, I couldn't graduate and get a, you know, a little studio in New York and intern at a publishing house.3 (31m 42s):You know, like a lot of my friends who came from money could, and there's just, it's so ingrained in our culture and it makes me mad and it's not, you know, it's not fair. Especially when I had a child and started thinking about cried out and just the way we treat that money directly affects maternity leave in this country too. And like, I can't compete with somebody who has a trust fund, you know, I had to put queer where I could afford her. And it's just bullshit that you can claw your way out of the class that you're born into. It's it's extremely rare. So I love that1 (32m 16s):It's bullshit and it's really dangerous cause it makes people feel so inadequate when they can't, you know, and that, that's also a great scene. I think it's in the first episode. Yeah. It's in the first episode when she goes and she's talking to the social worker and she's saying, so I can't get a job because I don't have a daycare and I can't get daycare cause I don't have a job. So I have to get a dog to prove that I didn't deserve daycare. I mean, it's, it's also3 (32m 40s):Backwards. Yeah. You're at a humongous disadvantage. If you are born into, you know, if you're born into poverty, you're at a humongous disadvantage in this country and it's like getting worse. That's the other thing is it's not, I mean, I have to leave. That's part of why made is, is touching so many people's sense of justice too. It's like, oh yeah, it's getting worse. Like, why aren't we talking about this? It's you know, Alex and I are, are not facing the same problems. And it's just by where I was born and where she was born and you know, you what family, your brand and who dictates so much of your struggle.1 (33m 17s):Yeah. And, and that, that the sort of historical narratives would have you believe that it's, it's the opposite of that and that, and that everybody left England to get away from that. But then yeah, just creative things I think here. So another thing that I heard or read that you said that really took my breath away is you said that when you became a mother, your, you didn't say your resolve for your career. You, the phrase that I that's sticking out to me, as you said, I went from being the secretary of my own company to the CEO. And it just, that just really like hit me in the center of my chest.1 (33m 58s):Can you just say a little bit more about it? What, what you meant by that?3 (34m 3s):Sure. I think that we'll probably like probably like many women when they become moms. I, I was frustrated that I had, I had this thing that I was good at, that I had studied for so many years that I've given so much time and love to my playwriting career and that it did not love me back in the sense that I could not afford to take core to a music class, you know? And it made me very, it made me very frustrated that, you know, I, I had devoted my, my self to this, this field that I had a passive relationship with. Like I was waiting for someone to call and tell me they were going to do a reading or, you know, or I was waiting for my career to start.3 (34m 50s):And I think what happened when I had, when I had Cora was I, I wanted to provide for her. And I also wanted to, I wanted to show her that you could be tough and you could be an active participant in your career like that. I didn't have to wait for it to happen. And so part of it was, I was, I just kind of said the things we all want to say out loud as a women, but I actually said them, which was like, Hey agents, what the F I am funny and talented. I want to work in TV. I want to take a music class with my daughter. What do I have to do to do that? And I you'd be shocked. I think how freeing and wonderful it is to just stand up for yourself and to make demands. And, you know, and I wanted to, I wanted to take an expensive music class with my daughter and I wanted to have a career.3 (35m 32s):And I was like, I'm not going to wait for it to happen because I know if someone gives me a chance I'm going to do, I'm going to go far in this field. Like, cause I don't know. Does that make sense? So I kind of like, wait, I said, waiting for the phone to ring and started making the calls.1 (35m 45s):Yeah. And also what I'm hearing is you stopped just blindly participating in the myth that everything can only work a certain way, which I feel like is something that we can all relate. I mean, it's something that boss and I talk a lot on this podcast about like just making so many assumptions about what, what we're definitely not entitled to have and what we're, you know, let's definitely for other people and not for us without ever once actually saying that out loud or asking for what we want. And actually yesterday chiefs have said the exact same thing. She said she, she was trying to be humble and say it's because she doesn't know how the system works. So she didn't know, she couldn't ask which you know. Okay. Maybe, but it's very inspiring to hear that.1 (36m 29s):Now you could just decide what you want to do with your life and your career. You could decide that you want to have a work-life balance and then have it.3 (36m 37s):Yeah. And you know, I think actors have this too. We are always waiting for the phone to ring. And at a certain point, I think that's a really tough way to be a mom because you can't count on anything and you're spread so thin. And I'm just kinda like, no, I'm going to generate, I'm going to generate this. And I can't really define the moment, but I will say for me it was emotional. I, I stopped, I stopped letting theater. Tell me how to feel about myself a little bit theater. I mean, it's a little bit like the terrible boyfriend that you just can't leave. Right. Like I would be like, I would be like, here's my new play. Do you love it? And they'd be like, maybe, you know, maybe we'll do a reading of it.3 (37m 19s):And I'd be like, let's my full heart. And I love you. And then, you know, and I finally like kind of broke up with that boyfriend in the sense that like, no, I'm really good at this. And like, I'm going to go where the love is. And I'm going to figure out how to pay my bills doing this and maybe you'll miss me and come back. You know, you know, it's hard as an artist, you can't let someone else tell you what your worth is. And theater is very conducive to that.1 (37m 40s):Yeah. Oh my God. That's so true. And that's, by the way, like a big part of the character of Alex, she does that too. I mean, she, with not that much to leverage did still find a way to just be very active about asking for what she wants. And I can see what you're saying about how, how having a kid makes that very clear. Whereas maybe you don't feel so I'm entitled to ask for what you want when it's just you, but when you know that it's somebody else who's depending on you, then it's that it doesn't feel like you're asking for yourself. It feels like you're asking for your family.3 (38m 15s):Yeah. And you see injustice with fresh eyes when you have a child, you know, because I don't know. I feel, I feel like certainly in my case, I w I would, I was so focused on being a good collaborator, being polite, being like, you know, you know, being grateful for the breadcrumbs that I got, you know, in my life. And I mean, honestly, it was a professional change, but it was primarily an emotional change. I was like, yeah, I don't want breadcrumbs anymore because my daughter deserves better than breadcrumbs. And so it just sort of filtered across all the fields, but yeah, another had does that.1 (38m 50s):Yeah, it does. It does well. So I don't know if I ever told you this, the reason I was looking through our emails earlier, as I wanted to see if I, I was sure I had said this thing to you, that I can not find in my email. So I'm going to say it to you now, which is that when I was directing your play, I wrote to you just about some things that I wondered if we could change. And you gave me the most thoughtful responses, which was, is to say you didn't invalidate that I was asking you, but you still stood up for what you, for the integrity of the play. I feel like I'm going to cry. I never saw anybody do that before.1 (39m 36s):And it was a really great, I wish I wasn't crying as I started to say this to you, but it was a great thing to, it was a, you were a great role model for me in that moment. And I always appreciate that. So thank you.3 (39m 52s):Oh, Tina, thank you. Well, you know what, thank you for wanting to have a conversation with me about it. Cause like I also think that's the sign of a fantastic director that you let me into your process and your thoughts about it. And I know you did a fantastic job with the play cause I had Scouts in that area who saw it and you know, so whatever you were, whatever you were working with, you artistically, you certainly landed that ship for you. You know, landed that plan beautifully.1 (40m 15s):Thank you. I had, and I had so much fun doing it. So tell me about some of your mentors. We had a nice discussion the other day about the power of mentors and some people go kind of through their whole training and never really feel like they connect with a mentor. Did you have mentors along the way?3 (40m 35s):Yes. I'm very lucky. Actually. I'm very lucky. I'm sure most people who go to Julliard and say this, but I, in my case, it's, it's really, really true that Marsha Norman was a wonderful mentor to me. I met her at Tisch and Tisha's a funny place because it's a larger program. You know, you don't have that. One-on-one with your professors that you do with Juilliard where there's just a handful of you, but, and I didn't stand out at Tisch. I sort of, my husband was, you know, my husband's sort of the star over player at, in class and I hadn't found my voice and I was sort of, I just wasn't like the star student and she was, she saw something in me and I don't think she saw like a Polish playwright yet, but she saw, I think there's just, she saw a way to help me find my voice.3 (41m 18s):And she hired me as her assistant coming out of that MFA program. And I always think like it was sort of charity work because she didn't need an assistant. She was so on top of her life. But I think she wanted to let me hang out with her and see how she conducted her business. So she was working on law and criminal intent. Yeah. Yeah. And so I was on set with her. I get to do research with her, for the scripts. She was doing the color purple and I got to go to rehearsal usually just to bring a coffee that I could watch. And it was, you know, she's also a mother and I don't know it was really, it, it was so generous of her because I got, I just got to see that you, what a woman in power looks like and, and a woman on her voice.3 (41m 59s):And she also says no a lot. And I grew to really respect that. Especially later when I became a mom, but you don't F with Marsha. I mean, she'll shut stuff down. She's really, I mean, she's such a generous person here. She did this thing for me, I'm a total stranger, but she's also like she knows her worth. So I was very grateful. It's been those years with her. And then, and then she invited me to Julliard. And then when I was ready really gave me, I mean, Juilliard is so much pressure. And the thing about Julia is you have to know what your voice is to go there. And so it's almost like she was helping me find my voice. And then when I found it gave me this incredible opportunity to go to Julliard. So sh honestly like very, very good to me in such a mentor in a very lucky.3 (42m 41s):And then on the west coast, I've had a wonderful mentor in John Wells because he, he's just one of the most terrific showrunners and producers, but it's funny cause I, everybody knows that that's not a secret in LA, but to work for him as a writer and to be in his writer's room. I learned so much from him about how to empower the people around you. How did it become like, you know, there's so many toxic writing rooms and toxic jobs with my friends, tell me, and it sounds terrible, but everyone at a John Wells show is thrilled to be there and very lucky to have that job. And they know it and like just that there's a way to do things gracefully. So he, and, and then he got this book and handed it to me and gave me my first chance to be a show runner.3 (43m 23s):So I had a, I've been very lucky to have him as a mentor on this coast1 (43m 28s):And the toxic. I've heard a lot of stories too, about toxic writers' rooms. And maybe that's also something that's going to get phased out because like so many of these things, you just, you just need more samples. You need, you know, you need more samples in your dataset so that, you know, I mean, if 99% of everything is run in one certain way, then there's little, there's little chance that it's going to change. But when, when the tide starts to shift, maybe there's a little, few more samples in your dataset that show, well, you can just be a regular nice person and still get the same, you know, get the same job done. That's that's nice to hear.3 (44m 9s):Yeah. Yeah.1 (44m 12s):So dah, dah, dah, oh, one, another favorite line from made is when Alex is talking to her dad about, I think this is, might be at the last episode or near then. And she says, she's trying to tell him that her or her, whatever boyfriend abused her and her, father's not taking it in. And she says, do you hear the words that are coming out of my mouth right now? That was another thing that really hit me because, you know, denial is really not a passive thing. Like you have to work pretty hard at defending your denial on something.1 (44m 56s):And I'm really familiar with saying something that feels, you know, that's a truth for me to people who, I mean, act as if you're, you know, like you're invisible and that turns out to be a really shaping force in a lot of people's lives. And you know, so anyway, I'm just curious about your own relationship and experience with denial.3 (45m 22s):Well, I love that you love that moment because I remember with that scene feeling like something was missing. And I remember, you know, I know a lot of it denial, but what I really know a lot about is gaslighting and denial is a form of gaslighting where you're just like, I'm, I'm not going to acknowledge a reality. And you know, I learned this tool a few years ago from a fantastic therapist that like, it's okay to just pause and be like, but you actually are hearing me, right? Like this is English. And you understand these words like, and I've, I've actually tried that tool in my life and steal at someone, not, not like, not be able to confirm that they're hearing the words.3 (46m 3s):And so it was when I, and then when I put it in the scene that it felt like, oh, that's what was missing is just this, like, how far are you going to take this denial? And he still can't write. I mean, I think Billy might nod, but he doesn't say anything. Like, I think gaslighting in denial and emotional abuse, I mean, I could write 40 Marsha was about this. I am fascinated by it. And the thing we don't talk about it as a form of abuse. And we should, it's like weirdly I think as well as violent, if not more violent than physical abuse, because you don't realize it's happening like Alex in the pilot, she doesn't know she's a victim of abuse and she is such an, a victim of abuse, which I hope we demonstrate in the show that you have to go on that ride with her, but you know, it's so corrosive and there's nothing worse than having someone tell you what what's real is not real day after day, year after year.3 (46m 56s):Like this is an area that I know a lot about I sent you do to1 (47m 1s):Yes. And actually my kind of where I put my energy in terms of recovery is with codependency and denial and codependency, or just, I mean, that's, that's the it's denial is the perfume of codependency. It's just, it's everywhere. And what I think really gets triggered for people who want to keep pretending, like they hear the words you're saying is because I find this in my family, like the way that denial really shows up in my family is if I acknowledge a truth, that's too true. I think what happens to other people is they feel that if they even just validate that that's my truth, that that somehow means that they have to acknowledge it for their own selves and their own lives.1 (47m 51s):And that's really like the forbidden thing that, you know, that people who don't want to go there can't do, they can't, it's like the Pandora's box. If I start to look at, you know, if I acknowledge that, what you're saying about this is true, then I can't help, but start to acknowledge all of the other things as well.3 (48m 9s):I think what you just said is, is brilliant because I think people think denial is just inactive, but it's aggressive. It's so aggressive. It's really violent, you know, intense denial that gaslighting of like, I will not even acknowledge. I hear the words you're saying it's, it's, it's so active. It's I mean, it's so aggressive. What you said was really, really smart really. Right. Yeah. And I love the people. I love the people are flipping out about Hank with me. Like how does he just sit there and let Sean treat her like that? And like, you know, and that's what I mean, I think she's mistreated throughout the show, but I think what Hank does to her in that moment with the denial is, is I think a lot of us recognize that.1 (48m 49s):Yeah. And I really appreciate the w the way you rolled out this whole concept of emotional abuse, because even I who feel like I've spent so much time working on this stuff, and I was a therapist, even I was found myself being like, oh, he didn't hit her. You know, she left, he didn't hit her. Hmm. I really had to check that in myself. And I was because one of the things that denial, I mean, in the absence of act, you know, saying you're wrong or whatever, and it's just, I don't hear you. You just assume that what you're saying, isn't valid, it's it becomes this thing that you do to yourself where you, you know, if somebody invalidates you enough, you start to invalidate yourself.1 (49m 38s):So I loved how you rolled that out in the series that are people talking to you a lot about that.3 (49m 45s):Yes they are. And how about in episode eight, where you are like, oh, Sean's changed and he's turned around and he's going to be a carpenter, you know? And like you it's in you, you find yourself. Or at least I did. And I assume it seems like audiences to just kind of like, oh, maybe this is a happy, love story. Like maybe he like, you know, and, and that, you know, that is all by calculated manipulative writing that I like my secret agenda with me. It was, you know, and I claimed 10 hours cause I wanted, I wanted the audience to go on the actual experience of that cycle and to get thrown off by it and caught up in it like, oh my gosh, I'm back, I'm back. And I'm in the pit, how did this happen?3 (50m 26s):And I wanted to show you how it happened. I also was like, I dare you to wash made and tell me that that's not domestic violence because it is emotional abuse is violent. It, what happens to her is violent. So that was like my secret mustache totally goal with the show.1 (50m 43s):Yeah, no, it, it hit, it totally played. And, and I think the other thing that's great about that is that when we have seen depictions of violence against women in film, I mean the best we could entail television, the best we could have hoped for is some woman who's abused who isn't a total idiot, because mostly what it is, how it's portrayed is some dumb person who doesn't, who's too dumb to know she's being abused. So therefore she goes back and also the various, the subtle, wow. I don't know if it's settled, but the, the subplot with the first roommate that she has when she goes to the, not roommate, but you know, the woman who lives in the shelter with her who introduces her to, you know, how, how to do life there.1 (51m 31s):I love I, that was heartbreaking her story of, because it is that you, you, you, yes, in the audience were saying, yeah, maybe sh maybe Sean is a good guy. Maybe, maybe all he really needed was to sober up and become the good person he was meant to team.3 (51m 50s):Yep. I mean, it's funny. I did an interview yesterday where this gentleman was like, is Sean okay? Like, does he end up okay. In life? And, and I, and I found myself sort of being like, I've never really thought of that cause he, you know, he's fictional, but I, I don't know. I'm not sure that that guy is ever going to make it out of that trailer, you know? And I'm not sure that he's going to get sober and be a great dad. I'm not. But I do feel like when he says at the end, I'm going to get sober and come see her all the time. I don't believe him. And, and I think that's his TV show, right? That's his cycle that he has to break. But my goal was to show that he's caught in his own cycle too.3 (52m 29s):Like, we are all kind of caught in our own cycles and it's so hard to break, you know, an Alex barely makes it out. And most women and men in her situation, the show ends in episode eight under the, in the pit. Most people don't get out of the pit and she is so smart and driven that she can, but she's the exception and not, she's a great exception. Yeah.1 (52m 53s):Yeah. Yeah. So we're, I want to be honoring your time. I told you we're only going to talk for an hour, but, but before we begin to wrap up, I just want to ask you, so since we've spent a lot of time talking about your success, let's hear about some of your failures. What have been some mistakes that you've made, maybe, maybe you maybe even like when you, when you made first, the transition from playwriting to writing and Hollywood, what were some of the mistakes that you made along the way?3 (53m 23s):Well, I, I think the, one of the great learning opportunities I've had as a human being, not just as a writer, was my first big production as a playwright in New York. And it was, you know, I was barely out of school and I felt I'm just so grateful for the opportunity. You know, it was a big production with stars in it and fancy director and everyone there was fancy except me and the process I have to say kind of went that way, like, like, huh, there's this element of it's actually, it's when I play close up space is about a dad and a daughter. It's about grief and pain and there's a lot of magical realism and I'm sure it's far from the perfect play, but it got obliterated by the press and squarely blamed on me the most inexperienced person in the production.3 (54m 11s):But what I learned from it is that I knew things about it were wrong. I knew immediately things about the production were wrong and I didn't use my voice. I didn't, you know, what happened with the play is my fault. I didn't, I didn't ring the bell. I didn't say, well, I didn't refuse the rewrites. Like I, you know, and everybody there had good intentions. Everybody wants to have a hit play, but people saw it a different way than I did. And, and it was wonderful people. There was no reason why I couldn't have said, Hey, yo, this isn't what I wrote. And I really, it was a crushing blow to have that play go so badly and to, to get such her, I mean, if you went for that and just Google it, it's the worst reviews. It's like, one of the, one of the reviews was like, is she sleeping with the director?3 (54m 53s):Like, why did she even get this product? You know, it's just straight on misogyny. I mean, it was, it was so mean, but what it taught me was I, since that moment I've really listened to my gut. And if my gut says this isn't right, I say it, and I don't worry about how it's going to come across. It sounds like I did that with you, but I have my sense of like, no, and, and it, and I learned the hard way in that moment that nothing is more important than your own gut. And so, and, you know, kind of re I had like a, kind of, a lot of momentum as a playwright really stop that momentum. It sent me into a deep depression. I mean, the, I lost so much because I didn't listen to my voice.3 (55m 36s):So that was my big theater lesson, which is applied to everything. But the big mistake I've made in TV to film, I've actually been really, really, really lucky and worked with fantastic people. But I think that stuff can go sideways here. It's a, it's a funny town, you know, and I've worked with wonderful people, but once in a while, you know, something's happening and then it just disappears. And so, you know, like that, you're gonna, you know, I, right before me and I came so close to having another job that I really wanted and was passionate about, it would have been my first time kosher running something, show running something, and, you know, we were all but celebrating.3 (56m 21s):And then the whole thing fell apart because the actress wanted her friend to write it and like bull, bull, crap. Like that happens all the time in LA. And so it's a hard time. It's a hard lesson the first time, you know, where I was like, oh, people don't, you know, like my agent sent me champagne. Like it was, it was happening. And then it very suddenly wasn't. And so I think it made me realize that don't pop the champagne until the contract is signed1 (56m 51s):And put that on a t-shirt.3 (56m 57s):That was a tough lesson to learn though, because I was like, wait, oh my God. Like, I went from like sky high to, and you know, nobody really, nobody apart, it was just very sobering. So,1 (57m 7s):And writing is so personal that it's really hard not to take both the criticisms to heart and then the, the opposite of the criticisms. And, you know, it's, it's hard not to make it. It's hard to stop making it about personal validation. You know, when, when somebody likes or doesn't like your stuff. Yeah. That's the journey I'm on right now. Not making it about, you know, like if somebody didn't like my play doesn't mean they don't, it doesn't have anything to do with whether or not they like me.3 (57m 40s):Yeah. You know, that's, I'm glad you're learning that because I also can tell you, I just staffed a writing room for the first time. And so that experience was really opening because I read unbelievably fantastic things and I didn't meet with them because, you know, you're designing a dinner party with five people and you kind of have to, and like you, the truth is, like I said, I passed on a lot of wonderful writers whose work I freaking loved. And like, can't wait to read for the next thing and have mentioned and recommended to other people. And that's part of it is like, you don't know how people are experiencing your work and the fans that you're building along the way. And I think we quickly assume the worst. Right? I know I do. But like, but the fact is like, you don't, you don't know how close you got it.3 (58m 24s):My guess is you're getting close to stuff and you don't know. And aren't able to know that1 (58m 29s):At the end of the day, the only thing you have control over is whether or not you go back to your computer later that day and just keep writing.3 (58m 36s):Yeah. You got to run, run your own race, which is so hard to do. I mean, listen, it really, really is. But yeah. The only thing you, the only thing you can control is your output true. Which is horrible. I mean, I, I, for the first time, in two years that don't have anyone calling me today to be like, where are the pages? You know? Like, I mean, part of it too is it's, it's helpful when you have deadlines and pressure. That's why I love to grad school because I'm the second Monday of October, I was reading my play out loud. And so I had to go right. You know, make sure I write it. So I also feel like that's, without that, it's also, that's a hard thing about feeling like you're not moving forward too, is that lack of deadlines.3 (59m 19s):But again, you don't, you don't, you don't know how far your work is going and how who's reading it and what it will lead to the next time. And I mean, I've gotten, I've gotten rejected on so many things that have led to a meeting later, you know, like so many things that, so many jobs I wanted that I didn't get, but then later someone's like, oh, we read her for that. We should meet her for this. And I didn't get that job either, but, but it's like, it's just funny. So yeah,1 (59m 48s):Like leaving a whole blanket of your career and you never know, you know, w where this, where the threads are going to end up.3 (59m 55s):Absolutely. And every time I get bummed out, which is a lot, because I'm a writer, all writers gets on debt. I, I try to think about and visualize the stack of things. I'm going to write in my life. And when I get terrible notes or when I get clobbered with notes and I feel depressed, I also think about the stack of work that I'm going to do in my life and how this piece that I'm writing right now is just one of them, you know? And that, that's my, that's my real tombstone like that pile, you know?1 (1h 0m 22s):Oh, I love that. What a great image and what a great note to end on.4 (1h 0m 37s):If you liked what you heard today, please give us a positive five star review and subscribe and tell your friends. I survived. Theater school is an undeniable Inc production. Jen Bosworth, Ramirez, and Gina plegia are the co-hosts. This episode was produced, edited, and sound mixed by Gina for more information about this podcast or other goings on of undeniable, Inc. Please visit our website@undeniablewriters.com. You can also follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Thank you.

Radio Boston
Checking in at the intersection of Massachusetts Avenue and Melnea Cass Boulevard

Radio Boston

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 47:38


Treating brain diseases like crime scenes. That's the argument from the new book, "The Brain Under Siege." We'll hear from author Dr. Howard Weiner.

Kansas City's Northeast Newscast
209: Independence Boulevard Christian Church

Kansas City's Northeast Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 32:41


For this week's episode of the Northeast Newscast, we're at Independence Boulevard Christian Church hearing from Reverend Mindy Fugarino. She shares updates on the church, their Monday night Micah Ministry, expanding services this month, and exciting holiday plans. Thanks for joining us!More info on Independence Boulevard Christian Church can be found at ibcckc.org.

Classical Music Discoveries
Episode 18029: 18029 Webber - Symphonic Suites

Classical Music Discoveries

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 76:38


The music featured has a unique, enduring appeal to audiences worldwide. The Phantom of the Opera reopened on Broadway this week and this year it celebrated its 35th anniversary on London's West End. The filmed production of Sunset Boulevard, which first opened in London in 1993 at Leicester Curve, was re-released for audiences to view this summer, and Evita has been in performance in London for 43 years.Andrew Lloyd Webber: Symphonic Suites Tracklist1. Andrew Lloyd Webber – Evita Symphonic Suite [24:11]2. Andrew Lloyd Webber – Sunset Boulevard Symphonic Suite [23:54]3. Andrew Lloyd Webber – The Phantom of the Opera Symphonic Suite [21:23]Purchase the music (without talk) at:Webber: 3 Symphonic Suites (classicalsavings.com)Your purchase helps to support our show! Classical Music Discoveries is sponsored by La Musica International Chamber Music Festival and Uber. @khedgecock#ClassicalMusicDiscoveries #KeepClassicalMusicAlive#LaMusicaFestival #CMDGrandOperaCompanyofVenice #CMDParisPhilharmonicinOrléans#CMDGermanOperaCompanyofBerlin#CMDGrandOperaCompanyofBarcelonaSpain#ClassicalMusicLivesOn#Uber Please consider supporting our show, thank you!http://www.classicalsavings.com/donate.html staff@classicalmusicdiscoveries.com This album is broadcasted with the permission of Katy Solomon from Morahana Arts and Media.

Debates on Tap
And Another Thing! - 94 - Drunk Rioter Universe

Debates on Tap

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 38:52


This week the boys drink some Stuff of Legend from Boulevard while Brendon tells us what happens to the alcohol after we drink it. Brian asks what the deal with connected media universes is, and Vargas talks about an HBO Max doc.

Next Best Bet Podcast
Ep. 172 - First November Bets w/ Monday Night Football, MACtion & More

Next Best Bet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 28:06


Jake and Brett are back with episode 172 of Next Best Bet. November 1st means a fresh start, and it happens to fall on a Monday night with the NBA, NHL, and Monday night football all in action. November also means the start of weekday Maction, which long-time listeners know is a staple of the podcast. Our guys get you set for the week ahead, plus you won't want to miss our Beginner's Boulevard, Moneyline Magic, Levy Lock, and Higgins P.O.P. Make sure to follow us on our social media to get all our picks on non-podcast days! Follow us on Social Media for more content in between episodes! Twitter: twitter.com/NBBPod Instagram: instagram.com/nextbestbet Facebook: facebook.com/NextBestBet/

Smashin' Transistors
Smashin‘ Tranistors 85: Boulevard Of Broken Dream Books

Smashin' Transistors

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 77:45


There were a couple of super duper lottery jackpots recently. I admit to throwing a couple of bucks down here and there on the "big ones" a time of two a month. I kinda got outta hand this October as I drop a total ten bucks over the month on playing the numbers.  I'd rather be not out of the ten bucks but what's two bucks a shot on a dream, right?  Often on time or two a week I am at the Circle K down the road from my house, I end up being behind a lady in her eighties who likes to read off her numbers to who is ever behind the counter. Since we seem to be in the store at the same time, we've come to this agreement. She knows I am on my way to work, so she often lets me go in front of her so I can be on my way.   I was behind her the other day and she turned to me, waving a 3x5in spiral notebooks and looking into my eyes. "Do you know what this is?" "You keep notes in it, right?" "Yes." she darted back in a much exasperated tone. "What kind of notebook?"   "A dream book?"   I've seen my share of them. My grandma kept one. All her friends at the plant where they made luggage racks for GM all kept one. The Dream book is pretty much where you write down combinations of numbers that may feel lucky. the come in different forms, sizes and schemes.  Most prosperity churches run some sort of elaborate and convoluted merchandising racket based on the dream book model. They're just keeping in the tradition of the old radio barkers of "the lord". It's an easier, flashier swindle nowadays but snake oil is still a same formula. We were both masked but her eyes gave away a friendly smile. She knew I understood. In a confiding tone, she said "Don't ever keep one of these. It's a bad, bad habit. It's made grow old and I gotta plan for my funeral."   "M'am, you are far too feisty to worry about that for quite a long time."  "Your funeral is the last time the people alive you still like will still be around" she pointed her finger at me and looked me straight and sternly into my eyes. "Give them AND only them good last memories. Remember that."   Duly noted, mam. duly noted What you'll hear. The Fall – Don't Call Me Darling Worm Reducer – I Don't Let You Down GG King – Melt On You BANGZZ – I'm Fine Thank You and You -words from your host- Smirk – Minuscule Amounts Bob – Thomas Edison Rolltreppe – Kuhltransporter Fashion Pimps and the Glamazons – LA County Critters -words from your host- Hue Blanc's Joyless Ones – Breakfast In The Afternoon Drag Sounds – Blessed Style Shop Regulars – Put Those Things Away Terminal Babilonia – Thundra Is Coming -words from your host- Meatbodies – Reach For The Sunn Obnox – Molecule Hawkwind – Brainbox Pollution Strapping Fieldhands – The Hand That Plays Calliope  -words from your host- Men & Health – Planet Made Of You The Ruins – Take My Love and Shove It Up Your Heart Doms – Model Head Chubby Checker – My Mind Comes  -words from your host-   We glady accept tips! Get even more Smashin' Transistors action at    Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and Tumblr. 

Next Best Bet Podcast
Ep. 171 - NBA, NHL, NFL, UFC & College Football Bets For The Last Weekend of October

Next Best Bet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 54:01


Jake and Brett are back with episode 171 of Next Best Bet. We're getting you set for Week 7 in the NFL, plus a big College Football Saturday, and some Thursday night NBA, and NHL action. Jake's got some early picks for Saturday Morning's UFC fights, that you won't want to wager on without getting all the latest news and info. Plus, you won't want to miss our Beginner's Boulevard, Moneyline Magic, Levy Lock, and Higgins P.O.P. Make sure to follow us on our social media to get all our picks on non-podcast days! Follow us on Social Media for more content in between episodes! Twitter: twitter.com/NBBPod Instagram: instagram.com/nextbestbet Facebook: facebook.com/NextBestBet/

KentOnline
Podcast: Arrests as Insulate Britain block roundabouts on Crossways Boulevard and Dartford Crossing

KentOnline

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 22:31


More than a dozen people have been arrested following another Insulate Britain protest. The group said yesterday they would stage action despite another injunction aimed at trying to stop them. They gathered not far from the Dartford Crossing this morning - hear from a man who was caught up in the traffic. Also in today's podcast, find out what chancellor Rishi Sunak had to say in today's budget. We've also spoken to the Kent Invicta Chamber of Commerce. Women are being urged to avoid pubs, clubs and bars in Kent tonight as part of the Girl's Night In protest. They want to raise awareness of drink spiking and say they're worried about the number of cases. The president of the Kent Union has spoken out and we'll hear from the owner of Club Chemistry in Canterbury which is shutting tonight in solidarity. In sport, Gillingham are out of the EFL Trophy - we have reaction from their assistant boss following last night's defeat to West Ham under 21s.

It's Baton Rouge: Out to Lunch
The Stars of Silicon Bayou

It's Baton Rouge: Out to Lunch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 27:00


There aren't enough bad things we could say about the COVID-19 pandemic. It's cut a path of death, destruction and suffering around the globe since early 2020. But, like any major disaster, it has also disrupted the old way of doing things and forced us to come up with new alternatives that will live on after the pandemic has passed - like telehealth consultations and working from home. This long-running crisis has also created opportunities - for entrepreneurs and innovators. Some of them in Baton Rouge. Calvin Fabre is President and CEO of Envoc, a software development and services firm he founded in 2003. Calvin is the creator of LA Wallet app, one of many but far and away Envoc's most visible product. In 2018, before anyone had ever heard of Covid, Calvin created the digital drivers license, which slid into your digital LA Wallet, making Louisiana the first state in the nation to offer such a product. The Louisiana State Legislature even passed specific legislation to make a digital driver's license on LA Wallet legal everywhere - from being pulled over by the police to getting into a bar. Then the pandemic hit. What seemed like the most negative event of recent times became an extremely positive development for Envoc. The State of Louisiana expanded the digital driver's license on LA Wallet to include a digital proof of Covid vaccination. Today, prompted largely by the need to show proof of current vaccination to get into many bars, restaurants, or a Saints game, more than 1 million people in Louisiana have downloaded LA Wallet. It's the biggest digital ID platform in the US. And it's poised to spread beyond state lines.   Cody Louviere is founder of King Crow Studios, a local digital media company that specializes in virtual reality and, specifically, using VR tools to train some pretty important clients – like the US Air Force and the US. Space Force. Though the pandemic didn't force Cody and his company to create any new products or services per se, it created opportunities for its existing clients to accelerate their training so that when their employees returned to the office they were able to train them faster and more efficiently, and achieve better outcomes. In addition to running his own tech company, Cody works with the Louisiana Technology Park to develop and retain the digital media workforce available in our area.  Cody and Calvin are undoubtedly two of the brightest stars in the local tech galaxy collectively referred to as Silicon Bayou. Out to Lunch is recorded live over lunch at Mansurs on the Boulevard. You can see photos from this show by Erik Otts at our website. And check out Calvin Fabre's earlier to visit to Out to Lunch in a pre-Covid world.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

NFL frei Schnauze! - Footballerei Podcast Deutschland
Das Frühstücksei: NFL Boulevard über Troy Polamalu

NFL frei Schnauze! - Footballerei Podcast Deutschland

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 39:32


In der neuen Folge des „NFL Boulevard” spricht Kucze mit Flo über die schönste Mähne in der Geschichte der NFL: Troy Polamalu. Troy Polamalu gehört zu den besten NFL-Verteidigern aller Zeiten. Der Safety spielte während seiner NFL-Karriere von 2003 bis 2014 ausschließlich für die Pittsburgh Steelers, mit denen er in den Spielzeiten 2005 und 2008 auch den Super Bowl gewann. Was zeichnete ihn sportlich aus? Wie ist sein Leben bislang verlaufen? Was hat Head & Shoulders mit ihm zu tun? Über all das und vieles mehr quatschen wir in dieser Episode.

A Moment of Your Time
311 - “Fall” by A.J. Bermudez

A Moment of Your Time

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 4:02


A.J. Bermudez is the 2021 winner of the Alpine Fellowship Writing Prize, a PAGE Award finalist, winner of the Diverse Voices Award, and host of The American Playbook. Her work has appeared in McSweeney's, The Masters Review, Boulevard, Story, Chicago Review, and elsewhere. You can find her online at AmandaJBermudez.com. Based in LA/NY. Find more of A.J.: Instagram @a.j.bermudez Twitter @AmandaJBermudez Website: http://amandajbermudez.com A Statement from A.J.: "This piece was initially written on the occasion of a death in the family the day after the 2020 election results were announced, during a national (and personal) confluence of celebration and mourning." "Fall" was originally published in the Winter 2021 issue of The Baltimore Review. Recorded at the Bethany Arts Community Studio, October 2021. Edited by Daniel Easler. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Created during a time of quarantine in the global Coronavirus pandemic, A Moment Of Your Time's mission is to provide a space for expression, collaboration, community and solidarity. In this time of isolation, we may have to be apart but let's create together.  Follow Us: Instagram | Twitter Created by CurtCo Media Concept by Jenny Curtis Theme music by Chris Porter A CurtCo Media Production See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The One Way Ticket Show
DouxMatok Co-Founder & Chairman of the Board - Eran Baniel

The One Way Ticket Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 72:31


Eran Baniel is Co-Founder and Chairman of the Board of DouxMatok, the company that has developed a patented method of reducing the sugar content of natural cane sugar, rather than inventing sugar substitutes and among other attributes allows a reduction of 30%-50% in the amount of sugar needed to produce the same level of sweetness. Time Magazine named it one of the best inventions of 2020 and the company was featured in episode 1 of Season 3 of the series Explained on Netflix. Eran brings to DouxMatok many years of management experience in a number of disciplines: He was the Co-Founder & CEO of HCL CleanTech, which raised over $50 million, from a number of US venture funds as well as US government grants, and was eventually sold to Stora Enso; CEO of LifeWave (which did an IPO in Israel); Co-Founder & CEO of Desk-Trainer; and Co-Founder & CEO of U.L.A., where he led major lighting projects, including lighting the walls of the old city of Jerusalem and Nazareth plus key financial districts in Israel. Eran's management positions were always characterized by intensive international collaborations both in the US and Europe. His activities led to considerable investments in a large number of public and private projects as well as in his entrepreneurial activities. Co-founding DouxMatok, bringing proprietary improved nutrition, such as sugar-based sugar-reduction, enabling tastier and healthier consumption of technologies for efficient delivery of flavors and sweet foods is for him the most exciting and ground-breaking mission he's ever led. On this episode, we explore Eran's one way ticket to 1816 to the Théâtre des Funambules on Paris' Boulevard du Crime to witness the creativity of Jean-Gaspard Deburau's Pierrot character. Additionally, Eran highlights why artists are not regarded highly enough as a source of leadership. Plus, we switch gears and talk about sugar, the game-changing venture that is DouxMatok, and where the food technology industry is headed.   Eran is just one of the engaging personalities featured on The One Way Ticket Show, where Host Steven Shalowitz explores with his guests where they would go if given a one way ticket, no coming back. Their destinations may be in the past, present, future, real, imaginary or a state of mind. Steven's guests have included: Nobel Peace Prize Winner, President Jose Ramos-Horta; Legendary Talk Show Host, Dick Cavett; Law Professor, Alan Dershowitz; Fashion Expert, Tim Gunn; Broadcast Legend, Charles Osgood; International Rescue Committee President & CEO, David Miliband; Former Senator, Joe Lieberman; Playwright, David Henry Hwang; Journalist-Humorist-Actor, Mo Rocca; SkyBridge Capital Founder & Co-Managing Partner, Anthony Scaramucci; Abercrombie & Kent Founder, Geoffrey Kent; Travel Expert, Pauline Frommer, as well as leading photographers, artists, chefs, writers, intellectuals and more.

W2M Network
TV Party Tonight: WWE Crown Jewel 2021

W2M Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 63:31


Chris BaileyX3 and Mark Radulich present their WWE Crown Jewel 2021 Review! WWE Crown Jewel 2021 Review! Crown Jewel 2021 was a professional wrestling pay-per-view (PPV) and WWE Network event produced by WWE for their Raw and SmackDown brand divisions. The event took place on October 21, 2021, at Mohammed Abdu Arena on the Boulevard in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. It was the third event promoted under the Crown Jewel chronology and the sixth event that WWE held in Saudi Arabia under WWE's 10-year partnership in support of Saudi Vision 2030. It was WWE's first PPV event to be held outside the United States since the last Saudi Arabian event, Super ShowDown in February 2020, due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The event also saw the finals of both the 2021 King of the Ring tournament and the inaugural Queen's Crown tournament. Grammarly Ad: 49:40 Amazon Music Ad: 57:20 For a 30 Day Free Trial of Amazon Music Unlimited head to http://getamazonmusic.com/w2mnetwork. Amazon Music is free. Amazon Music Unlimited is not. And for the Grammarly special offer, go to http://getgrammarly.com/w2mnetwork. Check us out on the player of your choice https://linktr.ee/markkind76

Next Best Bet Podcast
Ep. 170 - World Series Predictions, Saints @ Seahawks on MNF, & More NBA and NHL Picks

Next Best Bet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 27:31


Jake and Brett are back with episode 170 of Next Best Bet. We ended last week hot and now our guys are hoping to start this week out the same way, giving out our best bets for Monday night in the NFL, NBA, and NHL. Our guys are also previewing Tuesday Night's Game 1 of the World Series between the Astros and Braves. Plus, you won't want to miss our Beginner's Boulevard, Moneyline Magic, Levy Lock, and Higgins P.O.P. Make sure to follow us on our social media to get all our picks on non-podcast days! Follow us on Social Media for more content in between episodes! Twitter: twitter.com/NBBPod Instagram: instagram.com/nextbestbet Facebook: facebook.com/NextBestBet/

Classical Music Discoveries
Episode 5: 18005 Gounod: Faust

Classical Music Discoveries

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 185:40


Faust is an opera in five acts by Charles Gounod to a French libretto by Jules Barbier and Michel Carré from Carré's play Faust et Marguerite, in turn loosely based on Johann Wolfgang von Goethe's Faust, Part One. It debuted at the Théâtre Lyrique on the Boulevard du Temple in Paris on 19 March 1859, with influential sets designed by Charles-Antoine Cambon and Joseph Thierry, Jean Émile Daran, Édouard Desplechin, and Philippe Chaperon.Purchase the music (without talk) at:Gounod: Faust (classicalsavings.com)Your purchase helps to support our show! Classical Music Discoveries is sponsored by La Musica International Chamber Music Festival and Uber. @khedgecock#ClassicalMusicDiscoveries #KeepClassicalMusicAlive#LaMusicaFestival #CMDGrandOperaCompanyofVenice #CMDParisPhilharmonicinOrléans#CMDGermanOperaCompanyofBerlin#CMDGrandOperaCompanyofBarcelonaSpain#ClassicalMusicLivesOn#Uber Please consider supporting our show, thank you!http://www.classicalsavings.com/donate.html staff@classicalmusicdiscoveries.com

Better on Draft  | A Craft Beer Podcast
Better on Draft 270 - Boulevard Brewing w/ Adam Hall

Better on Draft | A Craft Beer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 60:31


CRAFT BEER PODCAST INFO: Adam from Boulevard Brewery in Missouri sits down to talk to us about Tank 7 (and how everyone in KC has a Tank 7 Story), we review some amazing beers including Space Camper and 7 Percent, Adam takes the time to break down the timeline with Boulevard and takes the opportunity to explain what the did, what they're doing, and what they will do to be better and more inclusive in the community, and we end the show with a donation competition where Adam needs to guess what beers match the Untappd Reviews. Sponsors: North Center Brewing - https://northcenterbrewing.com/ Zetouna Liquor - https://www.facebook.com/Zetouna-Liquor-Fine-Wine-Cigars-146021445420374/ PCI BrandCraft - https://www.facebook.com/PCIBrandCraft Baffin Brewing - https://www.baffinbrewing.com/ Join The Michigan Beer Discord - https://discord.gg/vEEDyzwdjT Download the MI Beer Map - http://www.mibeermap.com Subscribe to Better on Draft - https://plnk.to/BOD Spotify - https://open.spotify.com/show/6AlzP1BH0iykayF856bGRc?si=xXZzdd3CTPqgUq_KYTnBKg iTunes - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/better-on-draft-a-craft-beer-podcast/id1091124740 Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/betterondraft Untappd - https://www.untappd.com/bodpodcast YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/c/betterondraft Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/betterondraft Twitter - https://www.twitter.com/betterondraft

Hair Of The Werewolf
52: Move-In Ready (Appliances and Psycho Included) & Ye Olde UFOeths

Hair Of The Werewolf

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 73:31


Every new house has its fair share of quirks, and apparently including a creepy psychopath is one of them. Lily conjures buyer's remorse when she discusses the infamous 657 Boulevard house in Westfield, New Jersey that found new home owners harassed by sinister letters. Then, Chase tells of the 1639 sighting of strange lights and possible UFOs in the skies above what would one day become Boston.

It's All Beer
It's All Beer With Drew and Liquid Intrusion

It's All Beer

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 77:17


It's a special episode of It's All Beer. Drew, the resident beer expert of the Diapers and Haircutz podcast is with us. We talk about the fallout from Hofbrau Haus, Founders and Boulevard, the craft beer industry's work toward greater inclusion, the East Coast beer landscape and, of course, geek the hell out over some beers.

Next Best Bet Podcast
Ep. 169 - One Nice... A Packed Weekend of Sports Betting

Next Best Bet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 42:31


Jake and Brett are back with episode 169 of Next Best Bet. Our guys are getting you set for this weekend's NFL and College Football action. But don't worry we've got you covered for the rest of the workweek, as our guys are talking about the NBA & NHL regular seasons, and MLB postseason too. Plus, you won't want to miss our Beginner's Boulevard, Moneyline Magic, Levy Lock, and Higgins P.O.P. Make sure to follow us on our social media to get all our picks on non-podcast days! Follow us on Social Media for more content in between episodes! Twitter: twitter.com/NBBPod Instagram: instagram.com/nextbestbet Facebook: facebook.com/NextBestBet/

It's Baton Rouge: Out to Lunch

As we were reminded during hurricane Ida, Louisiana is home to critical infrastructure that serves not only the region but the entire country. Ports and petrochemical plants line the Mississippi River from the Gulf past Baton Rouge. They are vital assets that keep life humming along, and in this digital age they are increasingly interconnected - and reliant on technology to function. Which means they – and we – are vulnerable to threats from cyber attacks. Very few people within a 500mile radius of downtown Baton Rouge know this more than Jeff Moulton. Jeff is President and CEO of Stephenson Technologies Corporation, a nonprofit applied research and development corporation that does cyber research and development, and also provides cybersecurity services for clients in the federal government, commercial and energy sectors. Jeff is also President and Chairman of the Board of a related entity, Stephenson Stellar Corporation, which helps provide next generation cybersecurity solutions for space systems. Jeff is doing a lot of cutting edge and highly classified work for some very impressive clients. He has in-depth experience within the intelligence communities assessing and defining corporate-level and globally deployable network security solutions. He also participates in numerous national and international cyber forums. For a bit of contextual background: Jeff is a native of Pennsylvania, who spent 24 years in the Air Force, before moving into his career in cybersecurity.  Jay Hardman is Executive Director of the Port of Greater Baton Rouge. The port is located in Port Allen on the west side of the Mississippi River and sits at the junction of the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway at its northernmost point. The Port of Greater Baton Rouge is the 8th largest in the world in terms of annual tonnage, and handles a variety of bulk and breakbulk cargoes for domestic and international markets in, primarily, the agricultural, forestry and petrochemical sectors. Jay has been with the port since 1999 and was named Executive Director in 2006. In his years at the helm he has overseen $45 million in infrastructure improvements, has been involved in enhancing port security measures, and designing and developing new economic development projects.  Out to Lunch Baton Rouge is recorded live over lunch at Mansurs on the Boulevard. You can see photos this show by Erick Otts at our website. And check out this lunchtime conversation about Baton Rouge's little known link to space and the mission to Mars. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Tulsa Real Estate Podcast with The Wolek Group
What the Tulsa Dream Center Provides Our Community

Tulsa Real Estate Podcast with The Wolek Group

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021


Pastor Tim talks about the amazing work they do at the Tulsa Dream Center. Tulsa looks good on you, and Tulsa also looks so good on Pastor Tim. I am so excited to speak with him today. He just gave us an amazing tour of his facility and talked about all of the great stuff he does for our community, so I wanted him to share with everyone who he is and what he does here: “It's so great to be here and be a part of this. I'm Pastor Tim, and I'm the executive director of the Tulsa Dream Center. The Tulsa Dream Center is really simple; we're about giving hope and changing lives. We do it through five things: food, clothing, medical, education and recreation, and character development. We're right out here on 46th and Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, and our goal is to be able to serve our community all over the city, not just North Tulsa but all of Tulsa. I'd love to invite you to come out and be a part of it. We have Super Saturday every second and fourth Saturday from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. We rally at 9:15 a.m. Come out and serve our community! Whether we're going out and doing adopt-a-block where we clean up in the neighborhood, making food boxes in the back, folding clothes, or whatever task we may have at the Tulsa Dream Center, we need your help.” It's been so fun getting to know Pastor Tim and this amazing organization. We talk to a lot of local nonprofits. I love our community that loves to give back. Pastor Tim helps not just our youth but also all the people in the community. He mentioned that they serve meals, and there's basketball, other sports, and so much engagement in classrooms. I feel his energy and love; what is the stuff that fires him up and gets him pumped every day? “Our goal is to be able to serve our community all over the city, not just North Tulsa but all of Tulsa.” “The people are what gets me going, but honestly, it's what we're able to do with our young people. With our after-school programs, we serve over 400 boys and girls every single day in three locations, whether it's here at the Dream Center or in our remote locations. We're also doing something new; when I was a kid, my baseball coach was an LAPD police officer, and he made a great impact on my life. We've started this new program called Badges where we bring our boys and girls and the police force together in a mentorship relationship. Kind of like Big Brother Big Sister but police edition—police Dream Center edition. So it's exciting to be able to facilitate the coming together of those two communities, especially when as those kids get older, historically there has been a wedge drawn between them and the police. So if we can bring them together by creating great relationships now, when they get older, that won't be able to be severed.” “We'd love for you to come on over to 200 West 46th Street N. You can also reach out to us on our website, TulsaDreamCenter.org. We're also on social media; follow us on Instagram. We always post videos on Instagram and Facebook, and you can see all of the different things going on at the Tulsa Dream Center.” We appreciate all they're doing for our community. Let me know if you have questions about the Tulsa Dream Center or anything else related to real estate. I'd love to hear from you.

Next Best Bet Podcast
Ep. 168 - Bills @ Titans on MNF, ALCS Game 3, & The NBA Begins

Next Best Bet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 50:25


Jake and Brett are back with episode 168 of Next Best Bet. Our guys are getting you ready for a jam-packed Monday night featuring the Bills @ Titans, Game 3 of the ALCS, and NHL hockey. Then we're getting you set for an Opening Night in the NBA, and look ahead to Wednesday night's action and even give out our favorite NBA futures bets. Plus, you won't want to miss our Beginner's Boulevard, Moneyline Magic, Levy Lock, and Higgins P.O.P. Make sure to follow us on our social media to get all our picks on non-podcast days! Follow us on Social Media for more content in between episodes! Twitter: twitter.com/NBBPod Instagram: instagram.com/nextbestbet Facebook: facebook.com/NextBestBet/

Beach Talk Radio
Ep. #186 - Carol Mathai, Inna Malostouker, Mary Rose Spalletta

Beach Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 79:05


Carol Mathai and Inna Malostouker brought some of their best photographs and told us about their photography classes at Lovers Key. Marine Resources Task Force Committee member and beach resident Mary Rose Spalletta covers everything from turtles to Boulevard lighting to her turtle tattoo.

Delco Nerd Network
HALO 3 ODST #20: Kizingo Boulevard & ONI Alpha Site | DNN Re3

Delco Nerd Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 37:43


We talk the Kizingo Boulevard & ONI Alpha Site levels of Halo 3 ODST. Hosts: Anthony Ragucci & Chris Trio Guest Host: Chris Geddes Join our community! https://discord.gg/JwK9RDXXFm Check us out on your favorite podcast app! Apple Podcasts- https://apple.co/356utFa Spotify- https://spoti.fi/2XcfDZd Watch us live on twitch at twitch.tv/delconerdnetwork! Follow Us! https://www.flow.page/delconerds Intro and Outro Music by F1NG3RS http://F1NG3RS.com https://youtube.com/user/F1NG3RSMUSIC https://twitter.com/F1NG3RSMUSIC https://facebook.com/f1ng3rsmusic

Square Mile of Murder
87: The Watcher

Square Mile of Murder

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 62:36


This week we're bringing you the creepy story of The Watcher. When a family bought their dream house in a New Jersey suburb, they weren't expecting to receive threatening letters from someone claiming to be watching the house. Come listen to us tell this creepy tale and go through all the theories in the case. FURTHER READING: https://www.thecut.com/2018/11/the-haunting-of-657-boulevard-in-westfield-new-jersey.html (The Haunting of 657 Boulevard in Westfield, New Jersey) https://allthatsinteresting.com/the-watcher-house (Inside 'The Watcher' House, Haunted By A Mysterious Letter Writer) https://www.ranker.com/list/new-jersey-watcher-human-explanations/orrin-grey (The Scary True Story Behind The New Jersey Watcher) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xBoKesAQFHU (The Eerie Case Of The Watcher) ----------------------------------------------- https://square-mile-of-murder.captivate.fm/listen (Like the show? Give us a rating and review!) Join our Patreon: https://patreon.com/squaremileofmurder (Patreon) Check out our merch store: https://squaremileofmurder.store/ (Square Mile of Murder Merch) Get our newsletter: https://squaremileofmurder.com/newsletter (Newsletter) Send us an email: info@squaremileofmurder.com Follow us on social media: https://www.facebook.com/pg/squaremilepod/ (Facebook) https://www.instagram.com/squaremileofmurder/ (Instagram) https://twitter.com/squaremilepod (Twitter) https://squaremileofmurder.com/ (Squaremileofmurder.com) Music provided by https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary?feature=blog (YouTube Audio Library) and https://artlist.io/Taylor-2050697 (Artlist.io) Support this podcast

Next Best Bet Podcast
Ep. 167 - Hockey Bets Begin, And Postseason Baseball & Football Bets Heat Up

Next Best Bet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 48:18


Jake and Brett are back with episode 167 of Next Best Bet brought to you by Db! For 10% off Db products, check out the following link https://bit.ly/37cP8YP. Our guys are getting you set for the NHL season, plus this NLDS Game 5 between the Dodgers and Giants, and ALCS Game 1 Between the Astros and Red Sox. Plus our guys are giving out their best bets for this weekend's NFL and College Football action. You won't want to miss our Beginner's Boulevard, Moneyline Magic, Levy Lock, and Higgins P.O.P. Make sure to follow us on our social media to get all our picks on non-podcast days! Follow us on Social Media for more content in between episodes! Twitter: twitter.com/NBBPod Instagram: instagram.com/nextbestbet Facebook: facebook.com/NextBestBet/

It's Baton Rouge: Out to Lunch
From Baton Rouge to Mars

It's Baton Rouge: Out to Lunch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 27:00


How many kids have gazed up into the sky and pondered what it's like to be an astronaut or space traveler? How many adults, for that matter? There's something about outer space, which we get a glimpse of through the night sky, that excites the 10 year old watching Star Wars in all of us. But, deep space doesn't have any connection to Baton Rouge, does it? Yes, Luke, it does! Bob Fudickar is Executive Director of the LSU National Center for Advanced Manufacturing, which, among other things, is building the rocket NASA is sending astronauts to Mars. The center is located at the NASA Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, and is home to  partnership between NASA, the state of Louisiana, LSU, UNO and the UNO Research and Technology Foundation. It was originally formed in 1999, and is a state of the art research and production center focused on applying advanced manufacturing technologies to lightweight composite and metallic materials in support of the NASA space program and adjacent industries. Bob Fudickar has spent his career in business and technology in south Louisiana, including stints at Arthur Andersen, General Electrics and NASA. Serena Pandos is Executive Director of the Louisiana Art and Science Museum, which among other things, gets a lot of kids thinking about going to Mars, and elsewhere in space. That's because the LASM is home to the Irene Pennington Planetarium, a 60-foot domed theater that is one of the most sophisticated multimedia presentation venues in the country.    And the LASM is about more than just the planetarium. It is has a permanent collection of American and European art, Louisiana modern and contemporary art, photography and exhibitions on ancient Egypt, the solar system and the universe. It's not unusual for people living in small Louisiana towns to think they're the center of the universe. Think for example of Crowley that bills itself as "The Rice Capital of the World" or Ville Platte's self-bestowed title as "The Smoked Meat Capital of the World."  Here in Baton Rouge, with our contribution to conquering space and going to Mars, we have a legitimate claim to our place as the actual center of the universe! Out to Lunch Baton Rouge is recorded over lunch at Mansurs on the Boulevard. You can see photos from this show by Erik Otts at our website. And, believe it or not, there are other companies in Baton Rouge in the space industry. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Write On, Mississippi!
Write On, Mississippi: Season 4, Chapter 3: All About Hub City Press

Write On, Mississippi!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 44:38


Hear all about the Southern indie publisher, Hub City Press, and their larger-than-life authors. Panelists:Anjali Enjeti is a former attorney, award-winning journalist, and activist. She writes a political column for ZORA magazine and teaches creative writing in the MFA program at Reinhardt University. Her recent essays and articles have appeared in the Washington Post, Newsday, The Nation, Longreads, The Georgia Review, Guernica, Al Jazeera, and The Paris Review. She lives with her family near Atlanta.Ashleigh Bryant Phillips is from rural Woodland, North Carolina. She's a graduate of Meredith College and earned an MFA from the University of North Carolina, Wilmington. Her stories have appeared in The Oxford American, The Paris Review and others. Sleepovers is her first book.Gordy Sauer is a native Texan and transplant Missourian. He holds an MFA from Columbia University and an MA from Clemson University. His writing has appeared in Narrative Magazine and Boulevard, among other places, and he received a 2013 artist's grant for residency at the Vermont Studio Center. A lifelong educator, he has taught snowboarding, fly fishing, middle school math and science, and now works as a speechwriter at Mizzou. This is his first novel.Moderator:Meg Reid is the Director of Hub City Press in Spartanburg, South Carolina. A book designer and editor, she also writes extensively about all areas of design. She holds an MFA in Nonfiction from University of North Carolina Wilmington and moved to Spartanburg in 2013. She lives in a bungalow with her husband, two cats, and a short-legged terrier mix. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Write On, Mississippi!
Write On, Mississippi: Season 4, Chapter 13: Memoir

Write On, Mississippi!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 54:38


Panelists:Allison Moorer is a singer/songwriter, producer, and author who has released ten critically acclaimed albums. Her first memoir, Blood, was released in October 2019 to high praise and received starred reviews in Publisher's Weekly, Kirkus, and Booklist. She has been nominated for Academy, Grammy, Americana Music Association, and Academy of Country Music Awards. Allison holds an MFA in Creative Writing from The New School; her work has been published in The Wall Street Journal, American Songwriter, Guernica, No Depression, Literary Hub, and The Bitter Southerner. She received the Hall-Waters Prize for Excellence in Southern Writing in 2020. Her second memoir will be released in October 2021. She lives in Nashville.BRIAN BROOME is an award-winning writer, poet, and screenwriter, and K. Leroy Irvis Fellow and instructor in the Writing Program at the University of Pittsburgh, where he is pursuing an MFA. He has been a finalist in The Moth storytelling competition and won the grand prize in Carnegie Mellon University's Martin Luther King Writing Awards. He lives in Pittsburgh.ELIZABETH MIKI BRINA is the recipient of a Rona Jaffe Bread Loaf Scholarship and a New York State Summer Writers Institute Scholarship. She currently lives and teaches in New Orleans.Margaret McMullan is the author of nine award-winning books including the novel, In My Mother's House, the story collection Aftermath Lounge, and the anthology, Every Father's Daughter. Her young adult novels How I Found the Strong, When I Crossed No-Bob, and Sources of Light have received best book awards from Parents' Choice, School Library Journal, the American Library Association, and Booklist among other educational organizations. Margaret received an NEA Fellowship and a Fulbright professorship in Hungary to research her memoir Where the Angels Lived.Margaret's work has appeared in USA Today, The Washington Post, The Huffington Post, The Los Angeles Times, The Chicago Tribune, The Boston Herald, Glamour, The Millions, The Morning Consult, Teachers & Writers Magazine, National Geographic for Kids, Southern Accents, Ploughshares, StorySouth, TriQuarterly, Michigan Quarterly Review, The Greensboro Review, Other Voices, Boulevard, The Arkansas Review, Southern California Anthology, and The Sun among others. She served on the faculty at Stony Brook Southampton's MFA Program in New York and she was the Melvin Peterson Endowed Chair in Literature and Creative Writing at the University of Evansville in Indiana. She writes full time in Pass Christian, Mississippi. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Pinter Politik
Green Day dan Narasi Politik Punk Rock

Pinter Politik

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 8:41


Lagu berjudul Boulevard of Broken Dreams merupakan karya band punk rock asal Amerika Serikat, Green Day. Lagu tersebut berasal dari album American Idiot yang nyatanya merupakan album yang sangat politis. Ini terkait kritik-kritik yang ditampilkan Green Day di dalam lagu-lagu di album tersebut. Tapi bicara soal kritik politik sebetulnya bukan hal yang asing untuk Green Day. Banyak lagu yang mereka buat memang menjadi media mereka menampilkan kritik sosial dan politik. Lalu seperti apa keseluruhan narasi politik dalam lagu-lagu Green Day ini harus dimaknai?

Branching Out with The Acorn Newspapers

Recorded in front of a live audience Oct. 7, 2021, at Oak & Iron, Branching Out host Kyle Jorrey speaks to four Thousand Oaks entrepreneurs about what can be done to improve nightlife in the city and boost efforts to make T.O. Boulevard a shopping/dining/drinking destination. Our guests: Drew Pletcher of Oak & Iron, Amber and Sean of of Five07 Coffee Bar and Eatery and Brittany Brouhard of Naughty Pine Brewery.  Branching OutFind us on TwitterEmail us at branchingout@theacorn.comSUPPORT OUR SPONSORS!Oak & Iron craft cocktail barOn Twitter and Instagram2967 E. Thousand Oaks Blvd., Thousand Oaks(805) 630-1638Maid in America HousecleaningCall for a free estimate! (805) 499-7259MaidInAmericaOnline.comSupport the show (https://www.theacorn.com/subscribe/)

Debates on Tap
Episode 88 - Not Just a Snack, The Whole Damn Meal

Debates on Tap

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 39:25


This week the boys drink some Apple Raddler from Boulevard while wrapping up the N64 debate, before moving on to Brian's perfect snack trio. What drink, salty snack, and candy combo will win and will there be any survivors? Come find out!

It's Baton Rouge: Out to Lunch
Primo Cajun Crate

It's Baton Rouge: Out to Lunch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 26:00


Our Cajun Creole heritage in south Louisiana is famous all over the world. People come here for food, music, and historic architecture they can t get anywhere else. And for those who can't get here, or who want a taste of Louisiana once they get back home, we have some crafty entrepreneurs who have figured out how to capture our local culture, bottle it or box it and export it to folks outside Louisiana. Primo Troy Primeaux is the co owner of Primo's Peppers. It's a company that grows several varieties of organic hot peppers which it then sells to specialty food manufacturers not only in south Louisiana but across the country for use in products like hot sauces, spice blends and even coffees. Primo also uses its peppers in its own line, Farmer's Daughter pepper jellies, made by Troy s wife and business partner, Kara Farmer. If you're a part of the international cult of pepper-heads, which is quite a sizeable group, you will recognize Troy, or at least his name, as the grower of The Primo, the world's hottest pepper. A pepper's heat is measured in "Scovilles." A jalapeno pepper is around 5,000 Scovilles. Troy's Primo Pepper is  a mind-blowing, record-busting1.5m Scovilles. Yes, that's right, 300 times hotter than a jalapeno, Cajun Crate Tara Guidry is another entrepreneur who is turning up the Cajun heat and has figured out how to capitalize on Louisiana culture. Tara Guidry is owner of Cajun Crate. Cajun Crate is a monthly subscription that delivers specially curated boxes filled with Louisiana made products. Each box contains a different array of homegrown Cajun products like coffee, beignet mix, jambalaya, etouffe sauce, and much more. (And go ahead and click on these links: even if you're born and raised in Louisiana you're going to discover some gems you didn't know about.) Cajun Crate partners with chefs and tastemakers from Louisiana to find the best products from around the state that to deliver to subscribers. There are hyper-local gems known only to inhabitants of small Louisiana towns who are getting a break into a national market thanks to being included in Tara's Cajun Crate. Out to Lunch Baton Rouge is recorded live over lunch at Mansurs on the Boulevard. You  can see photos from this show by Ken Stewart at our website. And meet another Lafayette entrepreneur who's making waves, Lauren Bercier. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

South Bend Beat Podcast
Ali Patel - Ali On The Boulevard

South Bend Beat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 42:03


Kyle is joined by Ali Patel. They discuss Ali's background and early days with the boutique, along with her new pop up and how she goes about buying for her boutique. They wrap up with a round of Answer The Internet.   Show Links South Bend Beat Alpha Dog Agency   Links Follow Kyle on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram Follow Alpha Dog Agency on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram Follow South Bend Beat on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram

Debates on Tap
And Another Thing! - 93 - Enter the Matrix

Debates on Tap

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 40:11


This week the boys welcome fall with some ice cold Bob's 47 from Boulevard. Brendon reminds everyone that the Matrix is very good, Brian talks about Star Wars and the universe it built, and Vargas talks about a fancy coffee mug. Make sure to check out @DebatesonTap on twitter for our ongoing spooky recommendations for the month of October!

PowerMizzou
Boulevard Post-Game Drink:Tennessee

PowerMizzou

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 97:49


Gabe DeArmond takes calls from fans and tries to find an explanation for Missouri's 62-24 loss to Tennessee.

Good Morning, RVA!
Good morning, RVA: Get involved in ARPA, Brookland Park Boulevard meeting, and saving history

Good Morning, RVA!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021


On this Thursday morning, I'm thinking a lot about the D&D alignment chart as applied to the members of City Council.

Starlight Radio Dreams
SRD Shorts: Bustier Boulevard

Starlight Radio Dreams

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021


This one goes out to all the people out there who wear bustiers whether it makes your assets unreal or surreal Bustier Boulevard might just be the place to go for your next lifty squeezy garment for both business and pleasure. Written and directed by Kat Evans. Featuring the vocal talents of: Hanna Blazer as Hippolyta.Kat Evans as Dulcinea. Ansel Burch as Mousie. Jared McDaris as Skippy. Audio edited by Ansel Burch. The SRD Theme was written and performed by Arne Parrott.

Good Morning, RVA!
Good morning, RVA: Boosters, Brookland Park Boulevard, and a good spreadsheet

Good Morning, RVA!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021


I'm too busy/old to spend time defending projects that already got approved, dangit!

True Crime All The Time Unsolved
The Watcher of Westfield

True Crime All The Time Unsolved

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 68:43


The house at 657 Boulevard in Westfield, New Jersey has had a strange history in its over 100 years of existence. It has sold over the years a number of times for the price of just a dollar. In 2014, the Broaddus family bought the house for 1.3 million dollars. After they bought the house, the Broaddus family discovered that they had a watcher. Join Mike and Gibby as they discuss the strange twists and turns surrounding this case of The Watcher of Westfield. Derek and Maria Broaddus, along with their three children, thought they had purchased their dream home. But, it turned into a nightmare when they began receiving ominous letters from someone who called themselves "The Watcher." You can support the show at patreon.com/truecrimeallthetime Visit the show's website at truecrimeallthetime.com for contact, merchandise, and donation information An Emash Digital production

PowerMizzou
Boulevard Post-Game Drink: SEMO

PowerMizzou

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 61:44


Gabe DeArmond takes your calls and breaks down Mizzou's 59-28 win over Southeast Missouri State

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

Karl Ravech joins Buster to discuss Steve Cohen getting wild on social media (again), the AL MVP, Bryce Harper and the Phillies, the Yankees' regretful record against the Orioles, and Karl's landing spots for the class of free agent shortstops. Later, Todd Radom stops by with the Forgotten Franchise and the weekly quiz. 

Witches, Magic, Murder, & Mystery
71. MYSTERY: Who is The Watcher of 657 Boulevard?

Witches, Magic, Murder, & Mystery

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 46:31


When the Broaddus family bought their dream home, they were so excited to complete some renovations and move in. And then, the first letter arrived. Want more from us? There's bonus content and other perks on our Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/witchesmagicmurdermystery Looking for merchandise? Check out our store! https://witches-magic-murder-mystery-podcast-store.myshopify.com If you're watching us on YouTube, our channel is filled with the unedited video of our podcast recording process for each full episode starting at episode 26. To hear a more polished presentation, look us up on your favorite podcast listening app! Sources: https://www.thecut.com/2018/11/the-haunting-of-657-boulevard-in-westfield-new-jersey.html https://www.cnn.com/2019/08/12/us/the-watcher-house-stalker-trnd/index.html https://medium.com/the-mystery-box/the-unsolved-case-of-the-watcher-910f44c266c5 https://allthatsinteresting.com/the-watcher-house All Witches, Magic, Murder, & Mystery episodes are a mix of Kara and Megan's personal thoughts and opinions in response to the information that is publicly available at the time of recording, as well as, in some cases, personal accounts provided by listeners. In regard to these self-reported personal accounts, there can be no assurance that the information provided is 100% accurate. If you love the Trash Witch art (see our Patreon or the Podcast store), Tiffini Scherbing of Scherbing Arts created her. Find her art page on Facebook! She can create anything you need. Check out @witchesmagicmurdermystery on Instagram, or find our Facebook group by searching “Witches, Magic, Murder, & Mystery Podcast Discussion Group.” Email your personal or local stories related to witches, magic, murder, or mystery to witchesmagicmurdermystery@gmail.com. Get to know us better: Kara: @atoakandmain Megan: @megan_whitmer or www.meganwhitmer.com Theme music: Chloe's Lullaby by Robert Austin. Available on Spotify, Google Play, YouTube, Bandcamp, and Patreon!

The North-South Connection
Extreme Three Way Dance #49: Massacre on Queens Boulevard 1996

The North-South Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 66:37


From the eagle's nest, high above the ECW arena, this is the Extreme Three Way Dance! In this episode, JT, Jenny and Matt review Massacre on Queens Boulevard 1996! The troublesome trio discuss a new paisan for JT Smith, the glow up of the Eliminators, a strong title defense for Raven, a hidden gem between Whipwreck and Sabu, the arrival of Team Taz, the Italian Lesson of the Week and so much more! So jump on board, grab a chair and get ready to join this threesome for an extreme journey through time!

Book Dreams
Ep. 71 - “We Were Outsiders. Now We're Not. What Do We Do With That?” with Sanjena Sathian

Book Dreams

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 34:21


What does it say about the American Dream if immigrants achieve financial success but their children, and their children's children, still experience a lack of belonging? What does it mean to be part of groups that are both privileged and treated as outsiders? What are the flaws in the stories we tell ourselves about our parents' generation, and what are their consequences? What are the forces, internal and external, that shape our ambition? And when might ambition become our downfall? This week on Book Dreams, Sanjena Sathian--using the particular stories of two Indian American families in her debut novel Gold Diggers to access a universal story--shares thoughts on these questions and more. Sanjena Sathian is a graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop, an alumna of the Clarion Writers' Workshop and a former Paul & Daisy Soros Fellow. She's worked as a journalist in San Francisco and in Mumbai, and she has written nonfiction for The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Vox, Time, Food & Wine, and more. Her award-winning short fiction appears in Conjunctions, Boulevard, Joyland, Salt Hill, and The Masters Review. Booksellers named Gold Diggers an “Indie Next” pick, and Mindy Kaling's production company is adapting it for a TV series, with Sanjena co-writing the adaptation and Mindy Kaling herself set to executive produce. Find us on Twitter (@bookdreamspod) and Instagram (@bookdreamspodcast), or email us at contact@bookdreamspodcast.com. We encourage you to visit our website and sign up for our newsletter for information about our episodes, guests, and more. Book Dreams is a part of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate network, a company that produces, distributes, and monetizes podcasts. For more information on how The Podglomerate treats data, please see our Privacy Policy. Since you're listening to Book Dreams, we'd like to suggest you also try other Podglomerate shows about literature, writing, and storytelling like Storybound and The History of Literature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Inhuman: A True Crime Podcast
Episode 27: The Watcher House

Inhuman: A True Crime Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 52:44


Three days after Nick and Maria Broaddus purchased 657 Boulevard in Westfield, New Jersey, they received a mysterious letter. "The Watcher" claimed to be watching the couple and their kids and threatened that he'd always see them. Who is The Watcher? What is his intention? Those are the questions the Broaddus family is dying to know. If you enjoy our podcast, please leave us a rating and review! Follow us on Instagram and Twitter @inhuman_podcast and TikTok @inhumanpodcast. If you have questions or case suggestions, send us an email at inhumanmonsterpod@gmail.com! Sources for this episode are: https://www.thecut.com/2018/11/the-haunting-of-657-boulevard-in-westfield-new-jersey.html https://www.today.com/home/watcher-house-new-jersey-finally-sold-new-owners-t160504 https://www.nj.com/entertainment/2021/06/the-watcher-house-naomi-watts-bobby-cannavale-star-in-series-about-nj-mystery.html

PowerMizzou
The Boulevard Post-Game Drink: Kentucky

PowerMizzou

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 84:45


We take calls and wrap up Mizzou's 35-28 loss to Kentucky.