Podcasts about Move On

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Best podcasts about Move On

Latest podcast episodes about Move On

Crispy Coated Robots
CRISPY COATED ROBOTS #145 - Best Series Finale and Top 5 Cartoon Animals

Crispy Coated Robots

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 77:32


Episode 145:   “The Joey of Korean War Dramas”The guys discuss the Top 5 series finales that conclude with a satisfying ending, and the best of cartoon animals.·        Marlon Brando as a cat?·        What was the most watched series finale of over 106 million viewers?·        Who auditioned for the role of the dog, Brian Griffin?·        Ted Knight on the Superfirends?·        MoveOn.org makes a petition to a dog back to the small screen?·        Which cartoon inspired the name of a well-known pawnshop worker?·        What was the 1st cartoon to win an Emmy? 

217 Recovery
November 22nd, 2022 - Pick Your Battles Wisely

217 Recovery

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 20:06


Corey warns about situations that can leave you feeling a certain way.

The Dom Giordano Program
If Helen Gym Becomes Mayor, I'm Outta Here!

The Dom Giordano Program

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 2:37


Dom Giordano reveals that, if Councilperson Helen Gym becomes Mayor, he would seriously consider moving out of the City of Philadelphia for the first time in his life... something he wouldn't even consider with a do-nothing Mayor like Kenney. (Photo by Bill McCay/Getty Images for MoveOn.org)

Wu Wei Wisdom Podcast
Why Your Past Does Not Define You

Wu Wei Wisdom Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 15:40


Discover why your past does not define you or your future success and happiness. Learn more about our online consultations, events and shop: https://www.wuweiwisdom.comDo you believe that events from your past have defined who you are as a person today?If you have experienced significant challenges or trauma in your childhood or early years, do you believe this has now damaged you as a person and is now affecting your adult relationships, successes and happiness?In this teaching, we explain why your past experiences do not define who you are or your potential.With your hosts, David James Lees (ordained Taoist monk, emotional and spiritual health teacher) and Alexandra Lees (wellbeing coach and feng shui consultant).**This is a shorter teaching episode than usual, as Alex was struggling with a bad cold!**Other related teachings on our YouTube channel that will help you:OUR SHEN (THE SPIRITUAL SELF) VIDEO PLAYLIST: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL9NQ_PWX4zIBmp50wYcmU7jCBLp1Qvl-jHow to make Peace With Your Past and Move On https://youtu.be/mYe-3lFf8ZgLet Go of Past Hurt and Heal Your Inner Child https://youtu.be/jxmMKS9qyCsThe Secret to Letting Go of Resentment and Bitterness https://youtu.be/6seAqJKiZm0Is there a question you'd like answered on the show? Submit it at: https://bit.ly/askusyourquestion Join our free Wu Wei Wisdom Community Facebook support group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/wuweiwisdomcommunity  If you love our work, you can now make a small donation to help fund the continued production of our weekly teachings by buying us a 'virtual coffee'! https://www.buymeacoffee.com/wuweiwisdom Book an online Golden Thread Process & Inner Child Consultation with David: https://www.wuweiwisdom.com/therapies-for-body-mind/ Book an online Feng Shui Consultation with Alex: https://www.wuweiwisdom.com/feng-shui-with-alex/Follow us on Instagram: @wuweiwisdomSign up to receive a relaxing guided meditation gift, plus our weekly newsletter + offers via email: https://www.wuweiwisdom.com/signup​ -Disclaimer: This podcast and any associated teaching and comments shared are not a substitute for professional therapy, mental health care, crisis support, medical advice, doctor diagnosis, or professional healthcare treatment. Our show episodes provide general information for educational purposes only and are offered as suggestions for you and your professional therapist or healthcare advisor to consider and research.Music by Earth Tree Healing

The Underdog Football Show
Week 11 STATS vs. FILM! 32 Fantasy Football Facts

The Underdog Football Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 109:22


Week 11 Fantasy Football - Fantasy Football Stats versus Film. Is Christian Watson worth a pickup? How much will Kadarius Toney's role grow? Is Jonathan Taylor back on track? Will Trey McBride offer up big points at tight end? Hayden Winks and Josh Norris have watched every game from this past weekend to explain what went right and wrong in your fantasy football lineup and offer fantasy football advice. Use this to help your Week 11 Waiver Wire decisions  

Leader Manager Coach Podcast
The First 100 Days : Episode 9 : Days 66-79 Managing The Manager

Leader Manager Coach Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 19:29


The ninth of a ten part series based on a book by Phil Denton and Micky Mellon, ‘The First 100 Days ; Lessons In Leadership From The Football Bosses.' They will donate all proceeds to the Len Johnrose Trust which will help in the fight against motor neurone disease and that's a good enough reason to buy this book. It is, however, a brilliant book jam packed with wisdom on the art of management and Rob is going to introduce you to it over the next ten episodes.  KEY TAKEAWAYS Episode 9 of The First 100 Days is about looking after yourself as the Manager.   There is nothing so difficult, unnatural and uncomfortable than trying to be something that you are not. Act on and use your strengths and vulnerabilities and create your team to support those.  Keep your life in balance. Do not destroy yourself by achieving your goals. Make sure you have recovery time and do not sacrifice your relationships. B.E.S.T. Breathe, Eat, Sleep, Train. Pay attention and keep yourself healthy. Delegate to others. You cannot control and micromanage everything. Create plans and mechanisms to circumvent and deal with bad outcomes.  Give yourself a limited ‘hippo time' to wallow in the mud, then S.U.M.O, Shut Up and Move On.   BEST MOMENTS‘The stresses and strains of  this particular industry and niche are well documented and if you do not look after yourself there will soon be a downturn in fortune whether that's physical health, mental health, relationship breakdown or something of that nature.' ‘The overriding point here is to know yourself, be yourself. Do not try to be Jose Mourinho, do not try to be Bob Paisley, Bill Shankly, Sir Alex.You have to be yourself.'  ‘Eat well. Eat the correct things. Whatever suits you and whatever you know and whatever you're guided to.'‘Consider a bad outcome. Consider what can go wrong before it happens and put in place plans to make sure it doesn't and have a strategy to deal with it if it does.'  BUY THE BOOK!!The First 100 days ; Lessons in Leadership From the Football Bosseshttps://g.co/kgs/wmX3ucAmazonhttps://www.amazon.co.uk/First-100-Days-Leadership-Football/dp/1911613979Waterstoneshttps://www.waterstones.com/book/the-first-100-days-lessons-in-leadership-from-the-football-bosses/phil-denton/micky-mellon/9781911613978 VALUABLE RESOURCESLeader Manager Coach Podcast    ABOUT THE HOSTRob Ryles is a UEFA A licensed coach with a League Managers Association qualification and a science and medicine background. He has worked in the football industry in Europe, USA and Africa; at International, Premiership, League, Non-League and grassroots levels with both World Cup and European Championship experienceRob Ryles prides himself on having a forward thinking and progressive approach to the game built through his own experience as well as lessons learned from a number of highly successful managers and coaches.The Leader Manager Coach Podcast is where we take a deep dive examining knowledge, philosophies, wisdom and insight to help you lead, manage and coach in football, sport and life. CONTACT METHODhttps://www.robryles.co.uk/https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MMPYDVzZVnAhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/robertryles/?originalSubdomain=ukSupport the show: https://www.patreon.com/robrylesSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Great Battlefield
Growing Progressive Organizations with Robert Fox of Robert Fox Consulting

The Great Battlefield

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 69:43


Robert Fox joins The Great Battlefield podcast to talk about his career as COO of MoveOn and Greenpeace and starting his own firm Robert Fox Consulting where he helps organizations with growth, fundraising and problem solving.

Real Life Church With Pastor Bo Turner
MOVING ON | Pastor Bo Turner

Real Life Church With Pastor Bo Turner

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 35:16


We all have things in our past that we are not proud of. The fact is, we cannot change the past but we can "Move On"! Today we have to decide we are not going to let the past keep us from our destiny that God has for us in our future. Be encouraged by the message today! For more info about us, you can visit www.rlmacon.com or if you would like to support ministry by giving. You can visit www.rlmacon.com/give#moveon #forgetthepast #pressforward

English Digest 實用空中美語
Unit 15-2 綠油油的草坪居然暗藏環境隱憂!

English Digest 實用空中美語

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 28:41


Unit 15-2 Is It Time to Move On from the Culture of Lawns? 無論是私家庭院,或是公園綠地等公共空間的草坪,都會有人精心修剪與維護。然而你知道維護草坪會消耗大量水資源與損害生物多樣性嗎?若是生活在水資源匱乏的乾旱地區,又該如何做呢?跟著本課一起了解草坪文化,以及如何用對環境友善的方式改造你的草坪吧!

English Digest 實用空中美語
Unit 15-1 綠油油的草坪居然暗藏環境隱憂!

English Digest 實用空中美語

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 28:52


Unit 15-1 Is It Time to Move On from the Culture of Lawns? 無論是私家庭院,或是公園綠地等公共空間的草坪,都會有人精心修剪與維護。然而你知道維護草坪會消耗大量水資源與損害生物多樣性嗎?若是生活在水資源匱乏的乾旱地區,又該如何做呢?跟著本課一起了解草坪文化,以及如何用對環境友善的方式改造你的草坪吧!

Feet to the Fire Politics: Conservative Talk Show
Ep. 218 10.20.22 Trump Vindicated AGAIN: National Archives Conspired with Dems and DOJ to Raid Mar-a-Lago

Feet to the Fire Politics: Conservative Talk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 12:41


We're supposed to MOVE ON after citizen & former president's PRIVATE RESIDENCE is lawlessly raided as a partisan political hit to swing the Nov election? Not a chance. National Archives conspired w/ Dems & DOJ to target political enemy w/ ZERO just cause. Trump vindicated: AGAIN!

Feet to the Fire Politics: Conservative Talk Show
Ep. 218 10.20.22 Trump Vindicated AGAIN: National Archives Conspired with Dems and DOJ to Raid Mar-a-Lago

Feet to the Fire Politics: Conservative Talk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 12:41


We're supposed to MOVE ON after citizen & former president's PRIVATE RESIDENCE is lawlessly raided as a partisan political hit to swing the Nov election? Not a chance. National Archives conspired w/ Dems & DOJ to target political enemy w/ ZERO just cause. Trump vindicated: AGAIN!

Democracy in Color
Live With Senator Cory Booker And Steve Phillips

Democracy in Color

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 62:51


To celebrate the release of How We Win the Civil War, Steve joins Senator Cory Booker for a live, national virtual Town Hall, moderated by MoveOn Executive Director Rahna Epting, to discuss how we build majority support for a true multiracial democracy in the U.S. This live recording was co-hosted by our national partners at Community Change Action, Justice Democrats, MoveOn, Netroots Nation, Voto Latino, and Working Families Party. REFERENCES: Purchase your copy of "How We Win the Civil War" today: https://barnesandnoble.com/w/how-we-win-the-civil-war-steve-phillips/1140905279 Sen. Cory Booker, D-New Jersey - @CoryBooker Rahna Epting, Executive Director, MoveOn - @rahnamepting https://front.moveon.org

The Cimorelli Podcast
Christina's Miscarriage, Our Worst Heartbreaks, and How We Moved On - #130

The Cimorelli Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 72:23


This episode is inspired by our newest song "Move On!" Today we will be sharing some of the hardest experiences we have ever been through and how we moved on.

Dear Asian Americans
171 // Frank Chi // 38 at the Garden

Dear Asian Americans

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 65:28


Frank Chi, filmmaker, artist, and storyteller, joins Dear Asian Americans to talk about his new documentary, 38 at the Garden, a story that's both about Jeremy Lin's meteoric rise in the NBA in early 2012 and the impact it had on the Asian American community at large. Frank shares about his own origin story immigrating from China, the impact movies had on his childhood, and how he came to be a filmmaker. Listen in as Jerry and Frank discuss dealing with internalized trauma as Asian Americans, telling stories about people other than ourselves, and why we have to celebrate the folks doing things now so that we can reach a point in time where Asian Americans can just exist.Meet FrankFrank Chi is a filmmaker, artist, and storyteller at the intersection of art and politics.From helping create the “Notorious RBG” phenomenon to his social justice short films which have gained over 50 million views on social media, Frank's work helps lead narratives around justice and inclusion in American life. His latest work, the documentary short “38 at the Garden” about Jeremy Lin's 2012 “Linsanity” run, will premiere at the 2022 Tribeca Film Festival.Frank's work includes the “Langston Hughes in Our Time” series sponsored by MoveOn and Color of Change - which was called “the perfect Black Lives Matter tribute” by HuffPost. His films for the Smithsonian Institution celebrating America's immigrants remain its most popular videos on social media - including “Letters from Camp” – which was called “a heartbreaking resonance of past and present” by ABC News.A native of New Haven, CT, Frank graduated from Bowdoin College. He lives in Brooklyn, NY.// Learn more about Frank: https://frankchi.studio/// Connect with Frank: Instagram // Watch the film: 38 at the Garden// Follow the film: Instagram// Support Dear Asian Americans:Merch: https://www.bonfire.com/store/dearasianamericans/Buy Me a Coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/jerrywonSubscribe to the Newsletter: https://subscribepage.io/daanewsletterLearn more about DAA Creator and Host Jerry Won:LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jerrywon/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jerryjwon/// Listen to Dear Asian Americans on all major platforms:Transistor.fm: http://www.dearasianamericans.comApple: https://apple.dearasianamericans.comSpotify: https://spotify.dearasianamericans.comStitcher: https://stitcher.dearasianamericans.comGoogle: https://google.dearasianamericans.com  Follow us on Instagram:  http://www.instagram.com/dearasianamericans Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/dearasianamericans Subscribe to our YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/dearasianamericans // Join the Asian Podcast Network:Web: https://asianpodcastnetwork.com/Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/asianpodcastnetwork/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/asianpodcastnetwork/Dear Asian Americans is produced by Just Like Media:Web: http://www.justlikemedia.comInstagram: http://www.instagram.com/justlikemedia

How to Scale Commercial Real Estate
The Rewards of Team Building and Collaboration

How to Scale Commercial Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 21:43


Kevin Jenkins sits down with us today to talk about how having the right people in your team and knowing how to work well with others are the keys to achieving business success. Kevin is the Managing Partner at Equity Pledge who helps private investor clients achieve transparency and above-market returns without the volatility experienced with stock investing. At a young age, Kevin has been exposed to how the real estate industry and would like to make opportunity accessible to regular investors. He encourages us to take action to pursue our goals and not be afraid of making mistakes. [00:00 - 07:52] Change Your Trajectory Following his parent's roadmap, building wealth through real estate Becoming an anesthesiologist and paying off his student loan through his rental income  If you're why is big enough, you're going to figure out a way to succeed You have to find a way to make money where you are not actively involved or actively working Helping other physicians achieve financial freedom There are usually two reactions when you tell people what you do; it makes a negative conversation or you educate and inspire   [07:53 - 12:30] Make Your Errors, Move On, and Learn Early The strategies Kevin used to be successful Planning - know your why Surround yourself with like-minded people Take action and start doing Learn from your mistakes Avoid hiring the wrong management company Demographics is important [12:30 - 15:48] How to Build a Team If you're not self-managing, hire the most suitable management company Start with going to the Institute of Real Estate Management (IRAM) to look for accredited management organizations Why you need a backup company Kevin sees his past failures not as failures but as a learning experience   [15:49 - 20:24] Why People Skills Matter You can go faster with a team than going solo The common skill between anesthesiology and real estate investing Problem-solving Developing contingency plans  You have to work well with other people: Learn to work with people who don't work well with other people [20:25 - 21:42] Closing Segment Reach out to Kevin! Links Below   Tweetable Quotes“At some point, you make a great income, but you don't have enough time. Then prior to that, you have a lot of time but not enough income. Whatever you make your priority, that's where you'll put your focus.” - Kevin Jenkins   “You can read all you want in a book about how to write a bicycle, but you don't really learn how to ride a bike until you get on it, right? You just got to take action and just start doing so.” - Kevin Jenkins   “You got to be able to work well with people and deal with some people who don't work well with people.” - Kevin Jenkins ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- Connect with Kevin Jenkins by emailing him at kevin@equitypledge.com and on LinkedIn. Check out his company website at www.equitypledge.com. Connect with me:   I love helping others place money outside of traditional investments that both diversify a strategy and provide solid predictable returns.     Facebook   LinkedIn   Like, subscribe, and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or whatever platform you listen on.  Thank you for tuning in!   Email me → sam@brickeninvestmentgroup.com   Want to read the full show notes of the episode? Check it out below:   [00:00:00] Kevin Jenkins: At some point, you just gotta take action and just start doing. So if you don't take action, you're just adding time to the whole thing. And it's just going to take you longer. And so you really got to just start taking action. You know, you learn from your mistakes. So you must make those mistakes early, instead of waiting for it to be perfect.   [00:00:42] Sam Wilson: Kevin Jenkins is an anesthesiologist that has a goal of offering the average investor opportunities that are often not available to them. Kevin, welcome to the show.   [00:00:51] Kevin Jenkins: Hey, thank you, Sam. Hey, the pleasure is mine.    [00:00:53] Sam Wilson: Kevin, there are three questions I ask every guest who comes on the show in 90 seconds or less, can you tell me where did you start? Where are you now? And how did you get there?   [00:01:00] Kevin Jenkins: So for me, it started off when I was a child, my sister and I were the make-ready team for my parents real estate properties. They had about 33 some odd units as a kid growing up. And I saw the value that it added in our family being that I was the paperboy for our entire neighborhood. And being in and out of people's homes, I knew we were living differently than everyone else was. And so I knew as soon as I got my own money, that I was going to start doing the same thing. My parents kind of created a roadmap for us, I was going to do the same thing. So once I got out of school, about a y unit, and then bigger, that was too small. But I used that the pay off some student loans and then moved into a 79 unit, and then just operated that property and scaled up from there.   [00:01:34] Sam Wilson: That's fantastic. You went ahead it though and went obviously all the way through to become an anesthesiologist. And at the same time, we're building your real estate portfolio.   [00:01:44] Kevin Jenkins: Yes, that's correct.  [00:01:45] Sam Wilson: Wow, that's awesome. That's an unusual dual track. I think most of the physicians and people I've talked to, they wake up, you know, 20 years later and are like, Oh my gosh, we're making great money, but we're killing ourselves doing it, there's got to be a better way. You've got a new out of the gate that hey, I'm going to do these both simultaneously. What was your thinking behind that?   [00:02:05] Kevin Jenkins: Well, you know, my parents were kind of entrepreneurial. And again, I saw the benefit. So like, as a paperboy, I lived on a modest street, and I had over 100 customers. And from second grade all the way up to eighth grade, I was in and out of people's homes. And I knew how they lived. And I knew what they did and did not do, and where and where they struggle. And I knew we weren't having the same issues and same problems. And so I consumed a lot of content, growing up whether it was on TV or in books, and I was kind of a bookworm, also as a computer nerd, but I've consumed a lot of content. And I watched what people said and did. And, you know, for me, I just knew what I wanted. And it was just to emulate what my, what my parents had offered to my sister and I and which was a means to make income outside of your outside of your W-2   [00:02:55] Sam Wilson: Right. Right. Absolutely. Tell me what your business looks like today.   [00:02:56] Kevin Jenkins: So like we said, pre show, my trajectory was 79, was very profitable with 79 unit, because it was also commercial. And that allowed me to scale up. And through collaboration. My we went from 70 924 202, and soon to be 200 units under our general partnership arrangement. And then also from that 79, you know, I was going to have a huge capital gain tax. So I reached out to some friends and got into their deals. And so between the general partnership and the limited partnerships will have over 4000 units.    [00:03:40] Sam Wilson: So that's awesome.    [00:03:42] Kevin Jenkins: About 500 units under the general partnership.   [00:03:44] Sam Wilson:Right. No, that's that's fantastic. I mean, to be able to, you know, pull off owning 500 units as a general partner, and then also be a full time  anesthesiologist, I think, if I'm not mistaken, you said you worked all night long, just before jumping on this call. That's pretty ambitious.    [00:03:59] Kevin Jenkins: If your why is big enough, you'll figure out how to make a way. And my why has always been big enough. And really, my why is, you know, time freedom, right? At some point, tou make great income, but you don't have enough time. Then prior to that, you have a lot of time but not enough income. So, yeah, it's really you know, whatever you make your priority. That's where you'll put your focus.   [00:04:20] Sam Wilson: Without putting numbers to it, what is the roadmap for you? How do you get to that time and money freedom kind of intersection?   [00:04:29] Kevin Jenkins: I'm still kind of working with that in my head, I keep telling a lot of the guys where I work, I say, hey, in five years, I'm cutting out of here. It it actually might be, I might go down to part time, right? In five years, just because you got that first flow, right? First flow of income, and I just want to put something on top, and then maybe another unit on top, and another unit on top. And you know that that's right now, that's my plan. That's my current plan. And if it works, it works. If not, who knows? You can't, you know, once you when you speak to people who have retired, and I'm speaking of older people, you know, they get bored, you can only drink so many umbrella drinks or play so much golf, so you got to find something productive to do with your time. Right. And so, you know, I tried to help a lot of other physicians with that process. And really anyone who would like to listen to me, because the younger person who runs into a lot of a lot of money, you know, they run the risk of running out of money. If it's all from like a W-2 income, right? The older person runs the risk of outliving their money. And so you got to find a way to figure out how to make how to make that money that doesn't always involve you know, clocking in and working. That's where I can come in and kind of offer an opportunity.   [00:05:42] Sam Wilson: Sure. What's that conversation like with your colleagues? I mean, certainly. And I asked this probably to a lot of the physicians that have come on the show, it's always a different answer. But what's that? Like, when they're like, hang on, Kevin? You're buying apartment complexes?   [00:05:56] Kevin Jenkins: Yeah, there are people who get it. And then there are the people who don't get it. So it's two schools of conversations. The first conversation, I'll go with the negative conversation, and which is Oh, how's it you know, how's it being a landlord. And, then, and that's the person that's watching CNBC all day, also complaining about the market and the value of their portfolio going down, right? And they just haven't figured it out. And I have a proof of concept that I show them, and they see it, and then they're kind of shocked. And then that kind of opens the door for some education, and explaining on how I achieved what I achieved. And those people just don't know, right? They just don't know. So you just kind of just got to explain it to them. And then the other group, they get it. And it's really like, there's no education at all. There's like, oh, man, I'm so glad I ran into you. I was wondering how to do it, I was trying to figure out how to do it, or thinking about getting into a REIT. And, you know, then there's the education on that part. And like, say, hey, you know, it's just, it's really a kind of a, like a stock, you can get in and out of it, and you don't have any transparency. And you just don't get all the benefits. So I tell them what I'm doing. And, you know, depending on how it gets presented, I choose which way I'm gonna go.   [00:07:11] Sam Wilson: Right? No, I love that. I love that. I think that's, that's, it's a cool void that you fill. I mean, I was in the doctor's office yesterday. And he asked me that question, like, hey, what do you do? And I'm like, you know, we bought, you know, everything from multifamily assets to self storage. Right now we're buying RV resorts, he's like, Oh, that's cool. My son does that too. And then to come to find out his son, his son, which is fine, you know, it's a great place to start. We're at kind of cut my teeth was wholesaling houses. I'm like, Well, you know, it's close. It's close. And that was kind of the end of the conversation. But it's always where you are, you can obviously get in and really help people understand it in a unique way. What it is you do and how you do it. So I think that's, that's really cool and a valuable need, and problem that you're solving there for your colleagues. What are some strategies that you feel like you've used to take you to where you are today?   [00:07:58] Kevin Jenkins: The one is planning. One is first really developing the why, you know, if you don't have a strong, why it's not going to drive you to get through the tough times. And then the other is surrounding yourself with like minded people. Not that like misery loves company, but it allows you to bounce some things off of peers, right? And so, that's always helpful because you could do it by yourself, and learn as you go. But it may take you longer, you know, I bounce some things off my parents, mostly from an operational standpoint, and but then I'll bounce some things off some peers that are further ahead of head than me. Who have fun far more units. And, you know, they'll just tell me like, Hey, you might want to consider a few things. So a strong ally, and then some peers, where you can collaborate with others, you know, and then just being just being in the moment, what I like to tell people who are just getting started is that, you know, you can read all you want in a book about how to ride a bicycle, but you don't really learn how to ride a bike until you get on it, right. And so, at some point, you just got to take action and just start doing so yeah. So if you don't take action, you're just adding time to the whole thing, and it's just going to take you longer. And so you really got to just start taking action. And you know, you learn from your mistakes. And so you might as well make those mistakes early, instead of waiting for it to be perfect. You know, I tell a lot of people, Microsoft, Apple, all these big companies, they, they put that they put their product out, and it's not completely ready. Right? You know, that's why they had to, you know, do other uploads, it's not ready, it's not perfect. You just can't wait. So just go ahead and make your errors early, and move on and learn early.   [00:09:44] Sam Wilson: I'd love to hear what those are. But before we do, I think I'm probably butchering this comment, but it was something like perfect is the enemy of good enough, or something along those lines, where it's like, it's never going to be completely ready to go. So just go do it. What do you feel like some of those mistakes were that you made early on that you could help our listeners avoid? If possible?   [00:10:06] Kevin Jenkins: Okay, yeah. So for me, my initial, one of my first initial mistakes was hiring the wrong management company, right? One of the management companies I hire ended up being a company of one. So what that really means is, the property was too large for them, they didn't have really good systems or processes in place. And that, you know, I kind of discovered that, I wouldn't say too late, but, you know, I could have done it better. But the other thing that I learned was, demographics matter. You know, on one of the properties, we were trying to change the tenancy, the tenants of the building, right? Just because we wanted to be best in class, in the area and best in class service. And to me, customer service is everything, right? Because even the regardless of your price point, whether you're low middle, or high income, everybody wants something great. And so everybody wants great customer service. And if you can be best in class, regardless of where you are on that demographic line, you will get more tenants or customers or whatever, you'll get them regardless, and you can drive your income up. So I like to call a win, win and win, whether it's I'm creating a win for the residents, a win for my investors or win for me, right? If I can figure out how to get what you want, I can certainly get what I want. And so so that's my goal. So demographics are important. And for us, when when when I bought, I won't say the wrong area, but in an area that had lower median household income, we had to see, to get that to get over that hump. We had to see 60 people just to get one qualified tenant, right. And so that number goes way down, as you consider a higher median income, you just gotta be prepared for it. You know?   [00:11:52] Sam Wilson: And for the right people with the right systems in place, I've got plenty of friends in the business, who own and operate C and D class, even apartment communities, and they're doing great with it. If you're ready for it, absolutely, absolutely. But demographics do matter. It's when he was reviewing a deal yesterday. And it took just a cursory somebody. Actually, my brother sent it to me said, Hey, man, look at this is a cool apartment complex in XYZ down. I'm like, No, I just took a quick look at the rent roll. I looked at who's paying what and where. And I'm just like, No like this. This is outside of my skill set. It's not that I don't that these people don't deserve to be served. It's just not the skills that I possess. Sorry.   [00:12:30] Kevin Jenkins: Yeah. And so that goes back to like having the right people in your team, the right people in your team and then the right seat.    [00:12:37] Sam Wilson: So how have you built that team? What have you done to get the right people in the right seat?   [00:12:42] Kevin Jenkins: So one of the things I like to do, we'll start some of the so you can get the property right. I think the management company is the most important piece. If you're not going to be doing the management yourself, then the management company is the most important piece and you can look what I like to do is I like to go to the IRAM website, the Institute of Real Estate Management website. And I like to look for an accredited management organization. And you know, it is a piece of paper, but for the management The company, but to me, it lets me know that they have all the people and the processes in place. It helps me avoid that one man show. And yeah, they may not be perfect, initially, but at least it's the starting point for me to go explore what other management opportunities might be out there. Now, I'm also going to use the word of mouth. And I'm also going to interview other companies. But for me, that's the starting point. And if there if there aren't any of those types of places, or organizations available in a certain area, me I'm very slow to invest in that particular area. Because if anything, I want one of those to be the backup to what people have suggested, is a good company to go with.    [00:14:02] Sam Wilson: Got it, you'll use that you'll use the industry as a Institute of Real Estate Management website. So you've presented a deal, and other people have said, hey, you know, here's the management companies in the area we should look at you said, alright, well, I'm gonna use this as a backup. To review check the companies, maybe they're suggesting and or bring alternatives to the table, if needed.   [00:14:21] Kevin Jenkins: Yeah, cuz you're gonna need a backup, just if the other company does not work out. You need a backup. But if there's no backup, you know, you might have just lost your capital. [00:14:29] Sam Wilson: Right. Right. Yeah, I think you hit it on the head, because you said the management company is the most important piece of the puzzle if you're not self managing.   [00:14:36] Kevin Jenkins: Yeah. Because you know, as there's no different than saying, Hey, I'm gonna give you I don't know, $5 million in this briefcase. Hold on to it. Oh, yeah. By the way, I wanted to be 80% better than when we started in couple of years.   [00:14:51] Sam Wilson: Yeah, right. Right. That's a great. That's a great way to put it, because that's exactly what's happening. And oftentimes as much bigger numbers even than that, where it's a go take go be a good steward of this. And if they're not prepared, then well, you know what's gonna happen.   [00:15:02] Kevin Jenkins: Well, I was gonna say 20 million, but I think that might be kind of tough to stick in a briefcase.   [00:16:57] Sam Wilson: Never tried Like, do someday. That'd be fun.   [00:15:15] Kevin Jenkins: Hey, it's all part of the planning.   [00:15:18] Sam Wilson: Absolutely. Absolutely. What, tell me about a time and when we talked about this a little bit about mistakes early on. But have there been it? Has there been anything in your real estate journey that you would classify as a failure? And if so, was there anything that you learn from it?   [00:15:34] Kevin Jenkins: No, no failures. They're all even if it was a bad idea, it was a learn time to learn right now. Fell fast, fell quick, get over it, learn and course correct.   [00:15:43] Sam Wilson: Absolutely. Tell me something you feel like you've done really well that other people should emulate?   [00:15:49] Kevin Jenkins: So for me, it's like, okay, everybody wants the rewards of self ownership, like only yourself, right? And it's great. But for me, and my family is through team teams, team building collaboration, you can go faster, quicker, and it's much more enjoyable, because not all of the stresses just on you. And if you want, you can kind of pick a niche where you can kind of operate in, you know, I think, for me, that's it's a better way to go. People often ask like, if we're doing like, if I'm coming together with a team to take down a property, though, as well, hey, what are you good at? What do you want to do? I said, Well, I own 79 units by myself, once I had to do it all by myself, right? I'll do what most people don't want to do. Or I'll just find something to do as a you can pick whatever you want. And then I'll just kind of find something to make to improve. So case in point, I was brought in on a deal late. And so we're, you know, everybody has their responsibilities. And so I just want to find something to do. Well, in my last deal, I negotiated the cable contract. Like the deal by myself as to you know what you guys don't there's a expiring cable contract. Let me explore that. And we just inked the contract a couple of weeks ago, and it's going to be an additional $1.3 million for our investors that wasn't included in the underwriting. No one else knows about it, except for me and the general partners, and I got all like, kind of like, hyped up kind of like getting ready for a football game. And I'm trying to like to restrain myself right now in this video. But I was all I was very amped up to say the least. And you know, it was good.   [00:17:42] Sam Wilson: So that's a huge win. That's a win. Oh my god. We did something like that on a property last year what it was it was about $100,000 deal like that where it wasn't in the in the, in the projections to renegotiate some contracts like that, and I worked on those And it was I felt pretty good about that.    [00:17:59] Kevin Jenkins: Yeah, man, that's it's a win, right? It's a score.    [00:17:59] Sam Wilson: It's a score, right? It's, it's moving the needle in the right direction and you didn't anticipate it. That's absolutely awesome. Good. Well done. And you guys get to add that to the bottom. I mean, the bottom line.   [00:18:13] Kevin Jenkins: Well gonna take like two years, right? Because you can't just be can't just jack everyone's ran up or just didn't just say, Hey, we got to do this is it swallow it? You can't just say that right? So I think it's going to take about two, two years for for us to cycle through it and capture that dollar figure. So...   [00:18:30] Sam Wilson: Crossing maybe three. That's awesome. Well done, by the way, even 1.3 million over three years is still over $400,000 a year. Well done. Question for you is this, common skills. What are some crossover? Or what are some common skills you find between anesthesiology and real estate investing? Did you feel like a really important to what you do for us?   [00:18:51] Kevin Jenkins: Well, the first one is problem solving, and developing contingency plans, because in anesthesia, you know, things can be going smoothly, and then all of a sudden, there's a hiccup, and you got to problem solve quickly, to figure out what the problem is, in real estate. It's a slow moving ball. And so it doesn't happen as quick as things in my daily work environment. So so that's one. And the other one is decline, you know, working with other people, because we are doing anesthesia, or actually, we're just working in an operating room environment, you're working with nurses, you're working with tags, you're working with surgeons, and we all kind of come together to get the patient in and out of the hospital. Right. And so it's a team approach. And you gotta, you gotta know, you gotta be able to work well with people and deal with some people who don't work well with people. And to me, that's the same thing as far as if you're, if you're doing investing in real estate with people as a team. That's important. Right? And so, versus if you're just if you're a solo owner, so working well with others, and having contingency plans, you know? Yeah,   [00:19:55] Sam Wilson: I think what you said there was insightful when you said that you also have to learn to work with other people that don't work well with other people. And that's a soft skill that I can only imagine is extremely necessary in your day to day job or your day job.    [00:20:09] Kevin Jenkins: But yeah, most people are nice. Most people are normal people. And then you have others who are special. say the least. And you know, sometimes you just got like, hey, what's going on in your personal life?   [00:20:25] Sam Wilson: Kevin, this has been awesome. Thank you for taking the time to come on today. And share with us your your journey in you know, growing up in a real estate family. And then of course, launching out on your own and buying 79 units, and then how to scale as your general partnership and then be involved, gosh, between your GP and your LP up to 4000 units. That's absolutely incredible. If our listeners want to get in touch with you or learn more about you, what is the best way to do that?   [00:20:49] Kevin Jenkins: Oh, yeah, I can be reached at kevin@equitypledge.com just out how it sounds like you're pledging some equity. And that's how you can reach me, I guess you can also reach me on LinkedIn as well. So I'm not much of a social media person, but I'm trying to be but yeah, emails the best way.   [00:21:06] Sam Wilson: Fantastic. We'll make sure we include that there in the show notes, kevin@equitypledge.com. Kevin, thank you again for coming the show today. Certainly appreciate it.   [00:21:14] Kevin Jenkins: Hey, thank you, Sam. Nice meeting you.    [00:21:14] Sam Wilson: You as well, sir.

How To Love Yourself No Matter What

How do you move on?  How do you know if it's time to move on?  Too often we're in too much of a rush to get over things. Listen in to find out what really works.  Book a Strategy Session with Amanda: amandahess.ca/bookacall 

JAMODI Podcast
Mess Up, Fess Up, Get Up and Move On | Jeremy McFerrin - JAMODI Clips

JAMODI Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 15:39


Jeremy McFerrin - Head Boys Basketball Coach of Plano West High School

angel coaches
Forgiveness. How important is it to forgive someone and MoveOn?

angel coaches

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 31:00


Today Lisa and I are going to talk about forgiveness. How important is it to forgive someone or more than one person? What's the benefit if you forgive and what is the harm when you don't.?  Find out more today on our show all about forgiveness.

Matthew Kelly
The #1 Reason People Don't Break Up When They Should! - Matthew Kelly

Matthew Kelly

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 1:32


Is It Time to Move On?The #1 Reason People Don't Break Up When They Should! - Matthew KellyGet Matthew's 60 Second Wisdom delivered to your inbox: https://www.matthewkelly.com/subscribeVideo Transcript:“The #1 reason people don't break up with the person they are dating when they should can be best understood through an economic theory. Have you ever heard the saying, don't throw good money after bad? This is called the Sunk Cost Fallacy. The Sunk Cost Fallacy describes the human tendency to continue with an endeavor we have invested time, effort, money, and energy into, even if all the evidence suggests that our investment is a bad investment.Have you ever heard someone say, “I already started, so I might as well keep going!” Or perhaps you have said it to yourself. The problem is, if you are going the wrong way, it doesn't matter how far you go, or how much you persevere, or wish, hope, dream or pray, the wrong way never leads to the right destination. It's a psychological bias that results in irrational choices. Human beings are rational, but we don't always behave rationally, and it's important to remember that about ourselves and other people. Deciding to continue to date someone when you are unhappy, when you have plenty of evidence that things are not going to change, because you've invested months or years of your life with them is a mistake. It's time to move on. Don't think of it as wasted time, think of it as preparation for the best relationship of your life.”If you have not read LIFE IS MESSY, order your copy today: https://amzn.to/2TTgZKn Subscribe to Matthew's YouTube Channel today! https://www.youtube.com/c/MatthewKellyAuthor/featured?sub_confirmation=1https://www.matthewkelly.comGet Matthew's 60 Second Wisdom delivered to your inbox: https://www.matthewkelly.com/subscribe The Best Version of Yourself and 60 Second Wisdom are registered trademarks.#MatthewKelly #BestVersionOfYourself #BestVersion #ThoughtLeader

Sage Spirituality
Journey through the Gospels #19 Mark 6:7-13. Shaking off failures without quitting

Sage Spirituality

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 34:29


What exactly did Jesus mean when he told his disciples to “shake off the dust of their feet” when they had been rejected?  Are you currently hanging onto something that Jesus is asking you to let go of so you can move on to your next assignment?  In this episode, we will dig deep into the first commission of the disciples as we lean in and reach back. 

the only one in the room podcast
SUNDAY EDITION: Bridget Todd Is The Only One Who Really Gets Elon Musk

the only one in the room podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 42:13


Digital activist and veteran podcaster, Bridget Todd, who is the CEO of Unbossed Creative and host of the iHeart radio smash hit podcast, There Are No GIrls On The Internet. Bridget got her start teaching courses on writing and social change at Howard University. Since then, she's trained human rights activists in Australia, coordinated digital strategy for organizations like Planned Parenthood, the Women's March, and MSNBC, and ran a training program for political operatives that the Washington Post called the Democratic Party's “Hogwarts for digital wizardry.” She got her start in the podcast world as a producer for MoveOn.org's flagship podcast in 2012. She cohosted iHeartMedia's hit podcast Stuff Mom Never Told You bringing feminist issues and activism to 2 million ears a month. She's teamed up with culture and arts brand AfroPunk to host a global salon where she's talked to high-profile activists and creatives like Ava Duvernay and #MeToo creator Tarana Burke. She's the founder and CEO of Unbossed Creative, a mission driven creative studio that makes podcasts and other digital content to push the needle on social change and public good. Listen to There Are No Girls on the Internet Podcast Instagram: @bridgetmarieindc Twitter: @BridgetMarie LinkedIn: @Bridget Todd PATREON SHOUT OUTS: Mercedes Cusick LMFT, Website: www.mercedescusick.com, IG: @recoverhealbloom Check Out How To Do The Pot Thanks to Kathleen Hahn Cute Booty Lounge is made right here in the USA, by women and for women. The company is incredible, female, and minority-owned and all of their leggings make makes your booty look amazing. Go to https://cutebooty.com/ today! Embrace your body, love your booty! The Student Performance Podcast In these episodes we dive deep into the science of concepts that you never knew had such a big impact on your wellbeing as a student. Things like exercise, meditation, sleep, nutrition, cold-exposure all of which will not only transform your life in the classroom but will help you live a more fulfilled life outside of it as well. Join our Patreon: Become an Only One In The Room patron by joining us on Patreon! Starting at only $5.00 per month, you'll get bonus content, access to outtakes that the general public will NEVER see, extremely cool merch, and depending on what tier you get, monthly hang time with Scott and Laura. Join our Patreon today at https://www.patreon.com/theonlyonepodcast Be sure not to miss our weekly full episodes on Tuesdays, Scott Talks on Wednesdays and our brand new series On My Nightstand on Fridays by subscribing to the show wherever you listen to podcasts.  Join our Only One In The Room Facebook Group if you'd like to ask a question of any of our upcoming guests for this series.  Also visit the website www.theonlyonepod.com for the latest from our host Laura Cathcart Robbins like featured articles and more. We love hearing from you in the comments on iTunes and while you're there don't forget to rate us, subscribe and share the show! All of us at The Only One In The Room wish you safety and wellness during this challenging time. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Thinks Out Loud: E-commerce and Digital Strategy
Is It Time for Digital Marketers to Move On to The Next Big Thing? (Thinks Out Loud Episode 360)

Thinks Out Loud: E-commerce and Digital Strategy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 24:23


What is the "Next Big Thing" for digital marketers? Is it web3? Virtual reality and the metaverse? Or something else altogether? More importantly, is it time for digital marketers to move on to the "next big thing"? Well… maybe, but probably not in the way that you think. We're living through a period of continual… The post Is It Time for Digital Marketers to Move On to The Next Big Thing? (Thinks Out Loud Episode 360) appeared first on Tim Peter & Associates.

A Man's Journey Through Divorce
Ep 55 What Are You Learning?

A Man's Journey Through Divorce

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 9:57


Divorce presents many areas that create stress, frustration, and discomfort. What are you learning? In this episode, Steve shares a simple process that allows you to face challenges with a curious eye and find where you can personally grow. Take the Divorce “Suckiness” Assessment:https://youtreecoaching.com/divorce-assessment/The You Tree Support Toolshttps://youtreecoaching.com/support-tools/

The Flower Power Hour with Ken & MJ
The Flower Power Hour with Ken & MJ

The Flower Power Hour with Ken & MJ

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 58:20


We tried to Share The Land with the Universal Soldier. But, In Spite of Ourselves, his Powder Finger made us Move On to Higher Ground. You said I'm so Tired and I said well, Lively Up Yourself! So then you went back Home Again. Do You Miss Me Darlin? Well, Three More Days and I'll be there. I'm a Bus Rider!

Podcast Awal Minggu
12 September 2022 dengan Firda Indira

Podcast Awal Minggu

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 41:59


@adrianoqalbi ngobrolin tentang bullying, standup comedy, dan series The Story of Move On

Independent's Day Radio
Episode 224: ID FFWD with Freedy Johnston

Independent's Day Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 76:58


Freedy Johnston's Can You Fly album landed on a number of 1992 best-of lists, with legendary music critic Robert Christgau calling it "a perfect album” and penning the following about the record: “Contained, mature, realistic in philosophy and aesthetic, its every song a model of open-ended lyrical detail and lithe, sly melodicism, it's a flat-out monument of singer-songwriterdom--up there with Randy Newman's 12 Songs, Joni Mitchell's For the Roses, and other such prepunk artifacts.” Not too shabby. But the peak of Johnston's fame came with the 1995 single “Bad Reputation” from the follow-album, This Perfect World, produced by Butch Vig (Nirvana, Garbage, Smashing Pumpkins, Sonic Youth, et al). Johnston has been out there slogging it out ever since, releasing an ongoing career's worth of albums filled with incisive songs delivered in his trademark reedy tenor voice. Johnston first joined us on Independent's Day for episode #62 in December of 2012, and he was kind enough to return just in time for the release of his brand-new album, Back On the Road to You (Forty Below Records - 9/9/22). Joe and Freedy had a wide-ranging discussion that ranged from the making his new album, the perils of social media in a divided society, and how eager he is to get back on the road to play shows after being sidelined by the Covid-19 pandemic. He also treated us to three exclusive live performances of “There Goes a Brooklyn Girl,” “Somewhere Love,” and “Tryin' to Move On” - three new gems from Back On the Road to You.

The Third Story Podcast with Leo Sidran

Long before singer Cyrille Aimée spent any time on the road she was already a citizen of the world. She grew up in a small French town, Samois-sur-Seine, but says that she never felt fully French. She never felt fully any one thing. Her mother is Dominican, her father is French, and she says that “when you're a mixed culture, you're kind of your own thing.” Samois-sur-Seine is very small but in the 1990s of Cyrille's childhood it did have one claim to fame: it was the town where the legendary french gypsy jazz guitar player Django Reinhardt retired, and hosts an annual jazz festival in his honor. Musicians and fans alike descend on the town for the festival, and because of the ties to Django, some of them are Gypsies (Manouche in French). Riding her bike through town one summer day, Cyrille had a chance encounter with some young Gypsy kids that would lead to a friendship that ultimately changed her life. The Manouche taught her to sing, taught her to perform, taught her to improvise and see improvisation as not only a musical pursuit but also a kind of life goal. To watch Cyrille perform is to watch a kind of ecstatic manifestation. She's very physically engaged, her whole body gets involved when she sings. She says that music was originally an extension of dance for her and that since her instrument is her body, dance is still a vital part of her singing. That physicality is part of her charm. She's a natural performer. But she's also an accomplished singer, dance or no dance. She is naturally in tune with the language of jazz, bebop, funk, and soul. She's a precise and fluent scat singer, technical and soulful at the same time. Cyrille won awards and accolades along the way - she won the Montreux Jazz Festival Competition in 2007,was a finalist in the Thelonious Monk International Jazz Competition in 2010, and she won the Sarah Vaughan International Jazz Competition in 2012. Her 2019 album Move On featured cover versions of songs by Stephen Sondheim. The album was praised by Sondheim himself and one of its songs, "Marry Me a Little", was nominated for a Grammy Award. And a live stream video of Cyrille on Emmet Cohen's YouTube channel has racked up millions of views.   Aimée released two albums in 2021,  Petit Fleur recorded with Adonis Rose and the New Orleans Jazz Orchestra, and I'll Be Seeing You, a collection of duets with her long time friend the guitarist Michael Valeanu. When she's not on the road, Cyrille has been living between New Orleans and Costa Rica. We spoke about growing up in Samois-sur-Seine, what she learned from the Gypsies, moving to America, how to learn new languages, the importance of confronting and overcoming fear for creativity, how to be honest with the audience, and where to find good cheese.

The Dom Giordano Program
Mayor Kenney Calls PA Republicans 'Backwards'

The Dom Giordano Program

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 2:08


Dom Giordano responds to Mayor Jim Kenney after the reporter called the State 'backwards' due to Republican lawmakers' stance on the spike in gun violence. (Photo by Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for MoveOn)

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Dr Victor Ray on Race in American and Activist and Organizer Melissa Byrne on College Loan Debt Forgiveness Episode 672

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 112:47


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more Dr Victor Ray is the author of On Critical Race Theory WHY IT MATTERS & WHY YOU SHOULD CARE Professor Ray was born in Pittsburgh and raised in western Pennsylvania. After receiving his bachelor of arts in urban studies at Vassar, he earned his PhD from Duke University in 2014. His work has been published in a number of peer-reviewed journals, including American Sociological Review and The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. Dr. Ray is a nonresident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and his research has been funded by the Ford Foundation. As an active public scholar, his social and critical commentary has appeared in outlets such as The Washington Post, Newsweek, Harvard Business Review, and Boston Review. Victor Ray currently resides in Iowa City. An alum of 2016 Bernie Sanders presidential campaign, Melissa Byrne is a national campaigner for various progressive organizations. She served on the Democratic National Committee's transition committee and as a former state director for MoveOn.org in Pennsylvania and New Hampshire. Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page  

Ready To Lose
77. When your plan goes out the window...

Ready To Lose

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 20:46


Hey Ready Babes! Welcome back to the podcast. This week we are talking about what do to in the UNEXPECTED moments. Those times where your plan ends up out the window. I walk you through 3 steps to help you show up in the best way possible and MOVE ON so you can keep making awesome choices and get to your goal.  -Grab your FREE "4 Habits to Next Level YOU" Workbook here: https://mailchi.mp/0acfd2b0675e/4-habits-to-next-level-you-workbook  -Follow me on Instagram  @bb.risboskin for daily health and mindset tips. 

Brunch with Desb Podcast
TBT: SaD GuRL HoUr / advice from desb (Ep. 134)

Brunch with Desb Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 49:51 Very Popular


Throwback Alert! It's been a week guys. I'm not going to come on here and pretend everything is sunshine and rainbows and I don't think you'd enjoy if I was being a fake ass hoe. I want to keep it real with you along with answering a few of your questions/giving you some advice.   Time Stamps:   (0:07) The B Stands for… Let's Move On (1:50) Sad Girl Hour (3:30) Sunscreen and Sarcasm Account (10:45) Reading and Books (13:20) Writing a Book (19:30) below the infleunceR episode (22:05) Q&A (25:38) Pet Peeves Episode (36:10) Hoe Phase   Latest below the influenceR episode - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/below-the-influence-r/id1546669847?i=1000548332573   Latest Pregnancy Update: https://www.instagram.com/p/CY16aM2Fqps/?utm_medium=copy_link   Buy a kindle: https://rstyle.me/cz-n/f6s8f2cgwdp Here's the cover I have: https://rstyle.me/cz-n/f6s8krcgwdp   Join betterhelp today - www.betterhelp.com/desb code “desb” for 10% off your first month! #ad #sponsored   OPEN FACEBOOK FITNESS COMMUNITY: www.facebook.com/groups/dbftcommunity  Purchase a program (bride guide now with at home and pregnancy modifications!): https://www.desbfittraining.com/   Shop merch: https://www.desbfittraining.com/collections/shop-merch   Apply to work with me 1-1: https://dbft.typeform.com/desbcoaching    Follow @brunchwithdesb on insta: www.instagram.com/brunchwithdesb  Hit me up: https://shor.by/DESB    Be sure to join my email list for our new challenges, merch, and weekly motivation from me: http://eepurl.com/dy2JLz OR join my app here: https://train.desbfittraining.com/trainers/312078/landing   PARAGON FITWEAR: code “desb” to save 11% PTULA ACTIVE: code “desb” to support me HYDROJUG: code “desb” to save 10% and stay hydrated af TULA SKINCARE: code “desb” to glow off with your skin and save 15% ALANI NUTRITION: code “desb” for free shipping over $50 and support me BUFFBUNNY COLLECTION: code “desb” to support   instagram ➭ https://www.instagram.com/desb___ twitter ➭ https://twitter.com/desbfit youtube ➭ https://www.youtube.com/desireescogginfitness  facebook ➭ https://www.facebook.com/desbfittraining official website  ➭ https://www.desbfittraining.com   ---------------------------------------------------

90 Day Thots
TELL ALL PART 2 | 90 Day Fiancé Season 9.. Last Recap EVER For This Annoying AF Season!

90 Day Thots

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 17:21


WE DID IT Y'ALL!! We finished 90 Day Fiancé Season 9! This will be my last recap ever for this annoying season and I'm so happy we can MOVE ON. Good-bye Jibri and Miona, good-bye Yve and Mohamed, good-bye Emily and Kobe, good-bye Kara and Guillermo, good-bye Bini and Ari, and unfortunately we'll be seeing Bilal and Shaeeda again next week on Happy Ever After. Youtube ➔ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzzcUSzMuDO2LakLRJYHRqA Patreon ➔ https://www.patreon.com/mythots Podcast Contact ➔ hellomythots@gmail.com Instagram ➔ https://www.instagram.com/90day_th0ts Thank you sooooo much for your support!! #90dayfiance #90dayfianceuk --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mythots/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mythots/support

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 151: “San Francisco” by Scott McKenzie

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022


We start season four of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs with an extra-long look at "San Francisco" by Scott McKenzie, and at the Monterey Pop Festival, and the careers of the Mamas and the Papas and P.F. Sloan. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on "Up, Up, and Away" by the 5th Dimension. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources As usual, all the songs excerpted in the podcast can be heard in full at Mixcloud. Scott McKenzie's first album is available here. There are many compilations of the Mamas and the Papas' music, but sadly none that are in print in the UK have the original mono mixes. This set is about as good as you're going to find, though, for the stereo versions. Information on the Mamas and the Papas came from Go Where You Wanna Go: The Oral History of The Mamas and the Papas by Matthew Greenwald, California Dreamin': The True Story Of The Mamas and Papas by Michelle Phillips, and Papa John by John Phillips and Jim Jerome. Information on P.F. Sloan came from PF - TRAVELLING BAREFOOT ON A ROCKY ROAD by Stephen McParland and What's Exactly the Matter With Me? by P.F. Sloan and S.E. Feinberg. The film of the Monterey Pop Festival is available on this Criterion Blu-Ray set. Sadly the CD of the performances seems to be deleted. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript Welcome to season four of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs. It's good to be back. Before we start this episode, I just want to say one thing. I get a lot of credit at times for the way I don't shy away from dealing with the more unsavoury elements of the people being covered in my podcast -- particularly the more awful men. But as I said very early on, I only cover those aspects of their life when they're relevant to the music, because this is a music podcast and not a true crime podcast. But also I worry that in some cases this might mean I'm giving a false impression of some people. In the case of this episode, one of the central figures is John Phillips of the Mamas and the Papas. Now, Phillips has posthumously been accused of some truly monstrous acts, the kind of thing that is truly unforgivable, and I believe those accusations. But those acts didn't take place during the time period covered by most of this episode, so I won't be covering them here -- but they're easily googlable if you want to know. I thought it best to get that out of the way at the start, so no-one's either anxiously waiting for the penny to drop or upset that I didn't acknowledge the elephant in the room. Separately, this episode will have some discussion of fatphobia and diet culture, and of a death that is at least in part attributable to those things. Those of you affected by that may want to skip this one or read the transcript. There are also some mentions of drug addiction and alcoholism. Anyway, on with the show. One of the things that causes problems with rock history is the tendency of people to have selective memories, and that's never more true than when it comes to the Summer of Love, summer of 1967. In the mythology that's built up around it, that was a golden time, the greatest time ever, a period of peace and love where everything was possible, and the world looked like it was going to just keep on getting better. But what that means, of course, is that the people remembering it that way do so because it was the best time of their lives. And what happens when the best time of your life is over in one summer? When you have one hit and never have a second, or when your band splits up after only eighteen months, and you have to cope with the reality that your best years are not only behind you, but they weren't even best years, but just best months? What stories would you tell about that time? Would you remember it as the eve of destruction, the last great moment before everything went to hell, or would you remember it as a golden summer, full of people with flowers in their hair? And would either really be true? [Excerpt: Scott McKenzie, "San Francisco"] Other than the city in which they worked, there are a few things that seem to characterise almost all the important figures on the LA music scene in the middle part of the 1960s. They almost all seem to be incredibly ambitious, as one might imagine. There seem to be a huge number of fantasists among them -- people who will not only choose the legend over reality when it suits them, but who will choose the legend over reality even when it doesn't suit them. And they almost all seem to have a story about being turned down in a rude and arrogant manner by Lou Adler, usually more or less the same story. To give an example, I'm going to read out a bit of Ray Manzarek's autobiography here. Now, Manzarek uses a few words that I can't use on this podcast and keep a clean rating, so I'm just going to do slight pauses when I get to them, but I'll leave the words in the transcript for those who aren't offended by them: "Sometimes Jim and Dorothy and I went alone. The three of us tried Dunhill Records. Lou Adler was the head man. He was shrewd and he was hip. He had the Mamas and the Papas and a big single with Barry McGuire's 'Eve of Destruction.' He was flush. We were ushered into his office. He looked cool. He was California casually disheveled and had the look of a stoner, but his eyes were as cold as a shark's. He took the twelve-inch acetate demo from me and we all sat down. He put the disc on his turntable and played each cut…for ten seconds. Ten seconds! You can't tell jack [shit] from ten seconds. At least listen to one of the songs all the way through. I wanted to rage at him. 'How dare you! We're the Doors! This is [fucking] Jim Morrison! He's going to be a [fucking] star! Can't you see that? Can't you see how [fucking] handsome he is? Can't you hear how groovy the music is? Don't you [fucking] get it? Listen to the words, man!' My brain was a boiling, lava-filled Jell-O mold of rage. I wanted to eviscerate that shark. The songs he so casually dismissed were 'Moonlight Drive,' 'Hello, I Love You,' 'Summer's Almost Gone,' 'End of the Night,' 'I Looked at You,' 'Go Insane.' He rejected the whole demo. Ten seconds on each song—maybe twenty seconds on 'Hello, I Love You' (I took that as an omen of potential airplay)—and we were dismissed out of hand. Just like that. He took the demo off the turntable and handed it back to me with an obsequious smile and said, 'Nothing here I can use.' We were shocked. We stood up, the three of us, and Jim, with a wry and knowing smile on his lips, cuttingly and coolly shot back at him, 'That's okay, man. We don't want to be *used*, anyway.'" Now, as you may have gathered from the episode on the Doors, Ray Manzarek was one of those print-the-legend types, and that's true of everyone who tells similar stories about Lou Alder. But... there are a *lot* of people who tell similar stories about Lou Adler. One of those was Phil Sloan. You can get an idea of Sloan's attitude to storytelling from a story he always used to tell. Shortly after he and his family moved to LA from New York, he got a job selling newspapers on a street corner on Hollywood Boulevard, just across from Schwab's Drug Store. One day James Dean drove up in his Porsche and made an unusual request. He wanted to buy every copy of the newspaper that Sloan had -- around a hundred and fifty copies in total. But he only wanted one article, something in the entertainment section. Sloan didn't remember what the article was, but he did remember that one of the headlines was on the final illness of Oliver Hardy, who died shortly afterwards, and thought it might have been something to do with that. Dean was going to just clip that article from every copy he bought, and then he was going to give all the newspapers back to Sloan to sell again, so Sloan ended up making a lot of extra money that day. There is one rather big problem with that story. Oliver Hardy died in August 1957, just after the Sloan family moved to LA. But James Dean died in September 1955, two years earlier. Sloan admitted that, and said he couldn't explain it, but he was insistent. He sold a hundred and fifty newspapers to James Dean two years after Dean's death. When not selling newspapers to dead celebrities, Sloan went to Fairfax High School, and developed an interest in music which was mostly oriented around the kind of white pop vocal groups that were popular at the time, groups like the Kingston Trio, the Four Lads, and the Four Aces. But the record that made Sloan decide he wanted to make music himself was "Just Goofed" by the Teen Queens: [Excerpt: The Teen Queens, "Just Goofed"] In 1959, when he was fourteen, he saw an advert for an open audition with Aladdin Records, a label he liked because of Thurston Harris. He went along to the audition, and was successful. His first single, released as by Flip Sloan -- Flip was a nickname, a corruption of "Philip" -- was produced by Bumps Blackwell and featured several of the musicians who played with Sam Cooke, plus Larry Knechtel on piano and Mike Deasey on guitar, but Aladdin shut down shortly after releasing it, and it may not even have had a general release, just promo copies. I've not been able to find a copy online anywhere. After that, he tried Arwin Records, the label that Jan and Arnie recorded for, which was owned by Marty Melcher (Doris Day's husband and Terry Melcher's stepfather). Melcher signed him, and put out a single, "She's My Girl", on Mart Records, a subsidiary of Arwin, on which Sloan was backed by a group of session players including Sandy Nelson and Bruce Johnston: [Excerpt: Philip Sloan, "She's My Girl"] That record didn't have any success, and Sloan was soon dropped by Mart Records. He went on to sign with Blue Bird Records, which was as far as can be ascertained essentially a scam organisation that would record demos for songwriters, but tell the performers that they were making a real record, so that they would record it for the royalties they would never get, rather than for a decent fee as a professional demo singer would get. But Steve Venet -- the brother of Nik Venet, and occasional songwriting collaborator with Tommy Boyce -- happened to come to Blue Bird one day, and hear one of Sloan's original songs. He thought Sloan would make a good songwriter, and took him to see Lou Adler at Columbia-Screen Gems music publishing. This was shortly after the merger between Columbia-Screen Gems and Aldon Music, and Adler was at this point the West Coast head of operations, subservient to Don Kirshner and Al Nevins, but largely left to do what he wanted. The way Sloan always told the story, Venet tried to get Adler to sign Sloan, but Adler said his songs stunk and had no commercial potential. But Sloan persisted in trying to get a contract there, and eventually Al Nevins happened to be in the office and overruled Adler, much to Adler's disgust. Sloan was signed to Columbia-Screen Gems as a songwriter, though he wasn't put on a salary like the Brill Building songwriters, just told that he could bring in songs and they would publish them. Shortly after this, Adler suggested to Sloan that he might want to form a writing team with another songwriter, Steve Barri, who had had a similar non-career non-trajectory, but was very slightly further ahead in his career, having done some work with Carol Connors, the former lead singer of the Teddy Bears. Barri had co-written a couple of flop singles for Connors, before the two of them had formed a vocal group, the Storytellers, with Connors' sister. The Storytellers had released a single, "When Two People (Are in Love)" , which was put out on a local independent label and which Adler had licensed to be released on Dimension Records, the label associated with Aldon Music: [Excerpt: The Storytellers "When Two People (Are in Love)"] That record didn't sell, but it was enough to get Barri into the Columbia-Screen Gems circle, and Adler set him and Sloan up as a songwriting team -- although the way Sloan told it, it wasn't so much a songwriting team as Sloan writing songs while Barri was also there. Sloan would later claim "it was mostly a collaboration of spirit, and it seemed that I was writing most of the music and the lyric, but it couldn't possibly have ever happened unless both of us were present at the same time". One suspects that Barri might have a different recollection of how it went... Sloan and Barri's first collaboration was a song that Sloan had half-written before they met, called "Kick That Little Foot Sally Ann", which was recorded by a West Coast Chubby Checker knockoff who went under the name Round Robin, and who had his own dance craze, the Slauson, which was much less successful than the Twist: [Excerpt: Round Robin, "Kick that Little Foot Sally Ann"] That track was produced and arranged by Jack Nitzsche, and Nitzsche asked Sloan to be one of the rhythm guitarists on the track, apparently liking Sloan's feel. Sloan would end up playing rhythm guitar or singing backing vocals on many of the records made of songs he and Barri wrote together. "Kick That Little Foot Sally Ann" only made number sixty-one nationally, but it was a regional hit, and it meant that Sloan and Barri soon became what Sloan later described as "the Goffin and King of the West Coast follow-ups." According to Sloan "We'd be given a list on Monday morning by Lou Adler with thirty names on it of the groups who needed follow-ups to their hit." They'd then write the songs to order, and they started to specialise in dance craze songs. For example, when the Swim looked like it might be the next big dance, they wrote "Swim Swim Swim", "She Only Wants to Swim", "Let's Swim Baby", "Big Boss Swimmer", "Swim Party" and "My Swimmin' Girl" (the last a collaboration with Jan Berry and Roger Christian). These songs were exactly as good as they needed to be, in order to provide album filler for mid-tier artists, and while Sloan and Barri weren't writing any massive hits, they were doing very well as mid-tier writers. According to Sloan's biographer Stephen McParland, there was a three-year period in the mid-sixties where at least one song written or co-written by Sloan was on the national charts at any given time. Most of these songs weren't for Columbia-Screen Gems though. In early 1964 Lou Adler had a falling out with Don Kirshner, and decided to start up his own company, Dunhill, which was equal parts production company, music publishers, and management -- doing for West Coast pop singers what Motown was doing for Detroit soul singers, and putting everything into one basket. Dunhill's early clients included Jan and Dean and the rockabilly singer Johnny Rivers, and Dunhill also signed Sloan and Barri as songwriters. Because of this connection, Sloan and Barri soon became an important part of Jan and Dean's hit-making process. The Matadors, the vocal group that had provided most of the backing vocals on the duo's hits, had started asking for more money than Jan Berry was willing to pay, and Jan and Dean couldn't do the vocals themselves -- as Bones Howe put it "As a singer, Dean is a wonderful graphic artist" -- and so Sloan and Barri stepped in, doing session vocals without payment in the hope that Jan and Dean would record a few of their songs. For example, on the big hit "The Little Old Lady From Pasadena", Dean Torrence is not present at all on the record -- Jan Berry sings the lead vocal, with Sloan doubling him for much of it, Sloan sings "Dean"'s falsetto, with the engineer Bones Howe helping out, and the rest of the backing vocals are sung by Sloan, Barri, and Howe: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "The Little Old Lady From Pasadena"] For these recordings, Sloan and Barri were known as The Fantastic Baggys, a name which came from the Rolling Stones' manager Andrew Oldham and Mick Jagger, when the two were visiting California. Oldham had been commenting on baggys, the kind of shorts worn by surfers, and had asked Jagger what he thought of The Baggys as a group name. Jagger had replied "Fantastic!" and so the Fantastic Baggys had been born. As part of this, Sloan and Barri moved hard into surf and hot-rod music from the dance songs they had been writing previously. The Fantastic Baggys recorded their own album, Tell 'Em I'm Surfin', as a quickie album suggested by Adler: [Excerpt: The Fantastic Baggys, "Tell 'Em I'm Surfin'"] And under the name The Rally Packs they recorded a version of Jan and Dean's "Move Out Little Mustang" which featured Berry's girlfriend Jill Gibson doing a spoken section: [Excerpt: The Rally Packs, "Move Out Little Mustang"] They also wrote several album tracks for Jan and Dean, and wrote "Summer Means Fun" for Bruce and Terry -- Bruce Johnston, later of the Beach Boys, and Terry Melcher: [Excerpt: Bruce and Terry, "Summer Means Fun"] And they wrote the very surf-flavoured "Secret Agent Man" for fellow Dunhill artist Johnny Rivers: [Excerpt: Johnny Rivers, "Secret Agent Man"] But of course, when you're chasing trends, you're chasing trends, and soon the craze for twangy guitars and falsetto harmonies had ended, replaced by a craze for jangly twelve-string guitars and closer harmonies. According to Sloan, he was in at the very beginning of the folk-rock trend -- the way he told the story, he was involved in the mastering of the Byrds' version of "Mr. Tambourine Man". He later talked about Terry Melcher getting him to help out, saying "He had produced a record called 'Mr. Tambourine Man', and had sent it into the head office, and it had been rejected. He called me up and said 'I've got three more hours in the studio before I'm being kicked out of Columbia. Can you come over and help me with this new record?' I did. I went over there. It was under lock and key. There were two guards outside the door. Terry asked me something about 'Summer Means Fun'. "He said 'Do you remember the guitar that we worked on with that? How we put in that double reverb?' "And I said 'yes' "And he said 'What do you think if we did something like that with the Byrds?' "And I said 'That sounds good. Let's see what it sounds like.' So we patched into all the reverb centres in Columbia Music, and mastered the record in three hours." Whether Sloan really was there at the birth of folk rock, he and Barri jumped on the folk-rock craze just as they had the surf and hot-rod craze, and wrote a string of jangly hits including "You Baby" for the Turtles: [Excerpt: The Turtles, "You Baby"] and "I Found a Girl" for Jan and Dean: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "I Found a Girl"] That song was later included on Jan and Dean's Folk 'n' Roll album, which also included... a song I'm not even going to name, but long-time listeners will know the one I mean. It was also notable in that "I Found a Girl" was the first song on which Sloan was credited not as Phil Sloan, but as P.F. Sloan -- he didn't have a middle name beginning with F, but rather the F stood for his nickname "Flip". Sloan would later talk of Phil Sloan and P.F. Sloan as almost being two different people, with P.F. being a far more serious, intense, songwriter. Folk 'n' Roll also contained another Sloan song, this one credited solely to Sloan. And that song is the one for which he became best known. There are two very different stories about how "Eve of Destruction" came to be written. To tell Sloan's version, I'm going to read a few paragraphs from his autobiography: "By late 1964, I had already written ‘Eve Of Destruction,' ‘The Sins Of A Family,' ‘This Mornin',' ‘Ain't No Way I'm Gonna Change My Mind,' and ‘What's Exactly The Matter With Me?' They all arrived on one cataclysmic evening, and nearly at the same time, as I worked on the lyrics almost simultaneously. ‘Eve Of Destruction' came about from hearing a voice, perhaps an angel's. The voice instructed me to place five pieces of paper and spread them out on my bed. I obeyed the voice. The voice told me that the first song would be called ‘Eve Of Destruction,' so I wrote the title at the top of the page. For the next few hours, the voice came and went as I was writing the lyric, as if this spirit—or whatever it was—stood over me like a teacher: ‘No, no … not think of all the hate there is in Red Russia … Red China!' I didn't understand. I thought the Soviet Union was the mortal threat to America, but the voice went on to reveal to me the future of the world until 2024. I was told the Soviet Union would fall, and that Red China would continue to be communist far into the future, but that communism was not going to be allowed to take over this Divine Planet—therefore, think of all the hate there is in Red China. I argued and wrestled with the voice for hours, until I was exhausted but satisfied inside with my plea to God to either take me out of the world, as I could not live in such a hypocritical society, or to show me a way to make things better. When I was writing ‘Eve,' I was on my hands and knees, pleading for an answer." Lou Adler's story is that he gave Phil Sloan a copy of Bob Dylan's Bringing it All Back Home album and told him to write a bunch of songs that sounded like that, and Sloan came back a week later as instructed with ten Dylan knock-offs. Adler said "It was a natural feel for him. He's a great mimic." As one other data point, both Steve Barri and Bones Howe, the engineer who worked on most of the sessions we're looking at today, have often talked in interviews about "Eve of Destruction" as being a Sloan/Barri collaboration, as if to them it's common knowledge that it wasn't written alone, although Sloan's is the only name on the credits. The song was given to a new signing to Dunhill Records, Barry McGuire. McGuire was someone who had been part of the folk scene for years, He'd been playing folk clubs in LA while also acting in a TV show from 1961. When the TV show had finished, he'd formed a duo, Barry and Barry, with Barry Kane, and they performed much the same repertoire as all the other early-sixties folkies: [Excerpt: Barry and Barry, "If I Had a Hammer"] After recording their one album, both Barrys joined the New Christy Minstrels. We've talked about the Christys before, but they were -- and are to this day -- an ultra-commercial folk group, led by Randy Sparks, with a revolving membership of usually eight or nine singers which included several other people who've come up in this podcast, like Gene Clark and Jerry Yester. McGuire became one of the principal lead singers of the Christys, singing lead on their version of the novelty cowboy song "Three Wheels on My Wagon", which was later released as a single in the UK and became a perennial children's favourite (though it has a problematic attitude towards Native Americans): [Excerpt: The New Christy Minstrels, "Three Wheels on My Wagon"] And he also sang lead on their big hit "Green Green", which he co-wrote with Randy Sparks: [Excerpt: The New Christy Minstrels, "Green Green"] But by 1965 McGuire had left the New Christy Minstrels. As he said later "I'd sung 'Green Green' a thousand times and I didn't want to sing it again. This is January of 1965. I went back to LA to meet some producers, and I was broke. Nobody had the time of day for me. I was walking down street one time to see Dr. Strangelove and I walked by the music store, and I heard "Green Green" comin' out of the store, ya know, on Hollywood Boulevard. And I heard my voice, and I thought, 'I got four dollars in my pocket!' I couldn't believe it, my voice is comin' out on Hollywood Boulevard, and I'm broke. And right at that moment, a car pulls up, and the radio is playing 'Chim Chim Cherie" also by the Minstrels. So I got my voice comin' at me in stereo, standin' on the sidewalk there, and I'm broke, and I can't get anyone to sign me!" But McGuire had a lot of friends who he'd met on the folk scene, some of whom were now in the new folk-rock scene that was just starting to spring up. One of them was Roger McGuinn, who told him that his band, the Byrds, were just about to put out a new single, "Mr. Tambourine Man", and that they were about to start a residency at Ciro's on Sunset Strip. McGuinn invited McGuire to the opening night of that residency, where a lot of other people from the scene were there to see the new group. Bob Dylan was there, as was Phil Sloan, and the actor Jack Nicholson, who was still at the time a minor bit-part player in low-budget films made by people like American International Pictures (the cinematographer on many of Nicholson's early films was Floyd Crosby, David Crosby's father, which may be why he was there). Someone else who was there was Lou Adler, who according to McGuire recognised him instantly. According to Adler, he actually asked Terry Melcher who the long-haired dancer wearing furs was, because "he looked like the leader of a movement", and Melcher told him that he was the former lead singer of the New Christy Minstrels. Either way, Adler approached McGuire and asked if he was currently signed -- Dunhill Records was just starting up, and getting someone like McGuire, who had a proven ability to sing lead on hit records, would be a good start for the label. As McGuire didn't have a contract, he was signed to Dunhill, and he was given some of Sloan's new songs to pick from, and chose "What's Exactly the Matter With Me?" as his single: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "What's Exactly the Matter With Me?"] McGuire described what happened next: "It was like, a three-hour session. We did two songs, and then the third one wasn't turning out. We only had about a half hour left in the session, so I said 'Let's do this tune', and I pulled 'Eve of Destruction' out of my pocket, and it just had Phil's words scrawled on a piece of paper, all wrinkled up. Phil worked the chords out with the musicians, who were Hal Blaine on drums and Larry Knechtel on bass." There were actually more musicians than that at the session -- apparently both Knechtel and Joe Osborn were there, so I'm not entirely sure who's playing bass -- Knechtel was a keyboard player as well as a bass player, but I don't hear any keyboards on the track. And Tommy Tedesco was playing lead guitar, and Steve Barri added percussion, along with Sloan on rhythm guitar and harmonica. The chords were apparently scribbled down for the musicians on bits of greasy paper that had been used to wrap some takeaway chicken, and they got through the track in a single take. According to McGuire "I'm reading the words off this piece of wrinkled paper, and I'm singing 'My blood's so mad, feels like coagulatin'", that part that goes 'Ahhh you can't twist the truth', and the reason I'm going 'Ahhh' is because I lost my place on the page. People said 'Man, you really sounded frustrated when you were singing.' I was. I couldn't see the words!" [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "Eve of Destruction"] With a few overdubs -- the female backing singers in the chorus, and possibly the kettledrums, which I've seen differing claims about, with some saying that Hal Blaine played them during the basic track and others saying that Lou Adler suggested them as an overdub, the track was complete. McGuire wasn't happy with his vocal, and a session was scheduled for him to redo it, but then a record promoter working with Adler was DJing a birthday party for the head of programming at KFWB, the big top forty radio station in LA at the time, and he played a few acetates he'd picked up from Adler. Most went down OK with the crowd, but when he played "Eve of Destruction", the crowd went wild and insisted he play it three times in a row. The head of programming called Adler up and told him that "Eve of Destruction" was going to be put into rotation on the station from Monday, so he'd better get the record out. As McGuire was away for the weekend, Adler just released the track as it was, and what had been intended to be a B-side became Barry McGuire's first and only number one record: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "Eve of Destruction"] Sloan would later claim that that song was a major reason why the twenty-sixth amendment to the US Constitution was passed six years later, because the line "you're old enough to kill but not for votin'" shamed Congress into changing the constitution to allow eighteen-year-olds to vote. If so, that would make "Eve of Destruction" arguably the single most impactful rock record in history, though Sloan is the only person I've ever seen saying that As well as going to number one in McGuire's version, the song was also covered by the other artists who regularly performed Sloan and Barri songs, like the Turtles: [Excerpt: The Turtles, "Eve of Destruction"] And Jan and Dean, whose version on Folk & Roll used the same backing track as McGuire, but had a few lyrical changes to make it fit with Jan Berry's right-wing politics, most notably changing "Selma, Alabama" to "Watts, California", thus changing a reference to peaceful civil rights protestors being brutally attacked and murdered by white supremacist state troopers to a reference to what was seen, in the popular imaginary, as Black people rioting for no reason: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "Eve of Destruction"] According to Sloan, he worked on the Folk & Roll album as a favour to Berry, even though he thought Berry was being cynical and exploitative in making the record, but those changes caused a rift in their friendship. Sloan said in his autobiography "Where I was completely wrong was in helping him capitalize on something in which he didn't believe. Jan wanted the public to perceive him as a person who was deeply concerned and who embraced the values of the progressive politics of the day. But he wasn't that person. That's how I was being pulled. It was when he recorded my actual song ‘Eve Of Destruction' and changed a number of lines to reflect his own ideals that my principles demanded that I leave Folk City and never return." It's true that Sloan gave no more songs to Jan and Dean after that point -- but it's also true that the duo would record only one more album, the comedy concept album Jan and Dean Meet Batman, before Jan's accident. Incidentally, the reference to Selma, Alabama in the lyric might help people decide on which story about the writing of "Eve of Destruction" they think is more plausible. Remember that Lou Adler said that it was written after Adler gave Sloan a copy of Bringing it All Back Home and told him to write a bunch of knock-offs, while Sloan said it was written after a supernatural force gave him access to all the events that would happen in the world for the next sixty years. Sloan claimed the song was written in late 1964. Selma, Alabama, became national news in late February and early March 1965. Bringing it All Back Home was released in late March 1965. So either Adler was telling the truth, or Sloan really *was* given a supernatural insight into the events of the future. Now, as it turned out, while "Eve of Destruction" went to number one, that would be McGuire's only hit as a solo artist. His next couple of singles would reach the very low end of the Hot One Hundred, and that would be it -- he'd release several more albums, before appearing in the Broadway musical Hair, most famous for its nude scenes, and getting a small part in the cinematic masterpiece Werewolves on Wheels: [Excerpt: Werewolves on Wheels trailer] P.F. Sloan would later tell various stories about why McGuire never had another hit. Sometimes he would say that Dunhill Records had received death threats because of "Eve of Destruction" and so deliberately tried to bury McGuire's career, other times he would say that Lou Adler had told him that Billboard had said they were never going to put McGuire's records on the charts no matter how well they sold, because "Eve of Destruction" had just been too powerful and upset the advertisers. But of course at this time Dunhill were still trying for a follow-up to "Eve of Destruction", and they thought they might have one when Barry McGuire brought in a few friends of his to sing backing vocals on his second album. Now, we've covered some of the history of the Mamas and the Papas already, because they were intimately tied up with other groups like the Byrds and the Lovin' Spoonful, and with the folk scene that led to songs like "Hey Joe", so some of this will be more like a recap than a totally new story, but I'm going to recap those parts of the story anyway, so it's fresh in everyone's heads. John Phillips, Scott McKenzie, and Cass Elliot all grew up in Alexandria, Virginia, just a few miles south of Washington DC. Elliot was a few years younger than Phillips and McKenzie, and so as is the way with young men they never really noticed her, and as McKenzie later said "She lived like a quarter of a mile from me and I never met her until New York". While they didn't know who Elliot was, though, she was aware who they were, as Phillips and McKenzie sang together in a vocal group called The Smoothies. The Smoothies were a modern jazz harmony group, influenced by groups like the Modernaires, the Hi-Los, and the Four Freshmen. John Phillips later said "We were drawn to jazz, because we were sort of beatniks, really, rather than hippies, or whatever, flower children. So we used to sing modern harmonies, like Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross. Dave Lambert did a lot of our arrangements for us as a matter of fact." Now, I've not seen any evidence other than Phillips' claim that Dave Lambert ever arranged for the Smoothies, but that does tell you a lot about the kind of music that they were doing. Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross were a vocalese trio whose main star was Annie Ross, who had a career worthy of an episode in itself -- she sang with Paul Whiteman, appeared in a Little Rascals film when she was seven, had an affair with Lenny Bruce, dubbed Britt Ekland's voice in The Wicker Man, played the villain's sister in Superman III, and much more. Vocalese, you'll remember, was a style of jazz vocal where a singer would take a jazz instrumental, often an improvised one, and add lyrics which they would sing, like Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross' version of "Cloudburst": [Excerpt: Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross, "Cloudburst"] Whether Dave Lambert ever really did arrange for the Smoothies or not, it's very clear that the trio had a huge influence on John Phillips' ideas about vocal arrangement, as you can hear on Mamas and Papas records like "Once Was a Time I Thought": [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "Once Was a Time I Thought"] While the Smoothies thought of themselves as a jazz group, when they signed to Decca they started out making the standard teen pop of the era, with songs like "Softly": [Excerpt, The Smoothies, "Softly"] When the folk boom started, Phillips realised that this was music that he could do easily, because the level of musicianship among the pop-folk musicians was so much lower than in the jazz world. The Smoothies made some recordings in the style of the Kingston Trio, like "Ride Ride Ride": [Excerpt: The Smoothies, "Ride Ride Ride"] Then when the Smoothies split, Phillips and McKenzie formed a trio with a banjo player, Dick Weissman, who they met through Izzy Young's Folklore Centre in Greenwich Village after Phillips asked Young to name some musicians who could make a folk record with him. Weissman was often considered the best banjo player on the scene, and was a friend of Pete Seeger's, to whom Seeger sometimes turned for banjo tips. The trio, who called themselves the Journeymen, quickly established themselves on the folk scene. Weissman later said "we had this interesting balance. John had all of this charisma -- they didn't know about the writing thing yet -- John had the personality, Scott had the voice, and I could play. If you think about it, all of those bands like the Kingston Trio, the Brothers Four, nobody could really *sing* and nobody could really *play*, relatively speaking." This is the take that most people seemed to have about John Phillips, in any band he was ever in. Nobody thought he was a particularly good singer or instrumentalist -- he could sing on key and play adequate rhythm guitar, but nobody would actually pay money to listen to him do those things. Mark Volman of the Turtles, for example, said of him "John wasn't the kind of guy who was going to be able to go up on stage and sing his songs as a singer-songwriter. He had to put himself in the context of a group." But he was charismatic, he had presence, and he also had a great musical mind. He would surround himself with the best players and best singers he could, and then he would organise and arrange them in ways that made the most of their talents. He would work out the arrangements, in a manner that was far more professional than the quick head arrangements that other folk groups used, and he instigated a level of professionalism in his groups that was not at all common on the scene. Phillips' friend Jim Mason talked about the first time he saw the Journeymen -- "They were warming up backstage, and John had all of them doing vocal exercises; one thing in particular that's pretty famous called 'Seiber Syllables' -- it's a series of vocal exercises where you enunciate different vowel and consonant sounds. It had the effect of clearing your head, and it's something that really good operetta singers do." The group were soon signed by Frank Werber, the manager of the Kingston Trio, who signed them as an insurance policy. Dave Guard, the Kingston Trio's banjo player, was increasingly having trouble with the other members, and Werber knew it was only a matter of time before he left the group. Werber wanted the Journeymen as a sort of farm team -- he had the idea that when Guard left, Phillips would join the Kingston Trio in his place as the third singer. Weissman would become the Trio's accompanist on banjo, and Scott McKenzie, who everyone agreed had a remarkable voice, would be spun off as a solo artist. But until that happened, they might as well make records by themselves. The Journeymen signed to MGM records, but were dropped before they recorded anything. They instead signed to Capitol, for whom they recorded their first album: [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "500 Miles"] After recording that album, the Journeymen moved out to California, with Phillips' wife and children. But soon Phillips' marriage was to collapse, as he met and fell in love with Michelle Gilliam. Gilliam was nine years younger than him -- he was twenty-six and she was seventeen -- and she had the kind of appearance which meant that in every interview with an older heterosexual man who knew her, that man will spend half the interview talking about how attractive he found her. Phillips soon left his wife and children, but before he did, the group had a turntable hit with "River Come Down", the B-side to "500 Miles": [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "River Come Down"] Around the same time, Dave Guard *did* leave the Kingston Trio, but the plan to split the Journeymen never happened. Instead Phillips' friend John Stewart replaced Guard -- and this soon became a new source of income for Phillips. Both Phillips and Stewart were aspiring songwriters, and they collaborated together on several songs for the Trio, including "Chilly Winds": [Excerpt: The Kingston Trio, "Chilly Winds"] Phillips became particularly good at writing songs that sounded like they could be old traditional folk songs, sometimes taking odd lines from older songs to jump-start new ones, as in "Oh Miss Mary", which he and Stewart wrote after hearing someone sing the first line of a song she couldn't remember the rest of: [Excerpt: The Kingston Trio, "Oh Miss Mary"] Phillips and Stewart became so close that Phillips actually suggested to Stewart that he quit the Kingston Trio and replace Dick Weissman in the Journeymen. Stewart did quit the Trio -- but then the next day Phillips suggested that maybe it was a bad idea and he should stay where he was. Stewart went back to the Trio, claimed he had only pretended to quit because he wanted a pay-rise, and got his raise, so everyone ended up happy. The Journeymen moved back to New York with Michelle in place of Phillips' first wife (and Michelle's sister Russell also coming along, as she was dating Scott McKenzie) and on New Year's Eve 1962 John and Michelle married -- so from this point on I will refer to them by their first names, because they both had the surname Phillips. The group continued having success through 1963, including making appearances on "Hootenanny": [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "Stack O'Lee (live on Hootenanny)"] By the time of the Journeymen's third album, though, John and Scott McKenzie were on bad terms. Weissman said "They had been the closest of friends and now they were the worst of enemies. They talked through me like I was a medium. It got to the point where we'd be standing in the dressing room and John would say to me 'Tell Scott that his right sock doesn't match his left sock...' Things like that, when they were standing five feet away from each other." Eventually, the group split up. Weissman was always going to be able to find employment given his banjo ability, and he was about to get married and didn't need the hassle of dealing with the other two. McKenzie was planning on a solo career -- everyone was agreed that he had the vocal ability. But John was another matter. He needed to be in a group. And not only that, the Journeymen had bookings they needed to complete. He quickly pulled together a group he called the New Journeymen. The core of the lineup was himself, Michelle on vocals, and banjo player Marshall Brickman. Brickman had previously been a member of a folk group called the Tarriers, who had had a revolving lineup, and had played on most of their early-sixties recordings: [Excerpt: The Tarriers, "Quinto (My Little Pony)"] We've met the Tarriers before in the podcast -- they had been formed by Erik Darling, who later replaced Pete Seeger in the Weavers after Seeger's socialist principles wouldn't let him do advertising, and Alan Arkin, later to go on to be a film star, and had had hits with "Cindy, O Cindy", with lead vocals from Vince Martin, who would later go on to be a major performer in the Greenwich Village scene, and with "The Banana Boat Song". By the time Brickman had joined, though, Darling, Arkin, and Martin had all left the group to go on to bigger things, and while he played with them for several years, it was after their commercial peak. Brickman would, though, also go on to a surprising amount of success, but as a writer rather than a musician -- he had a successful collaboration with Woody Allen in the 1970s, co-writing four of Allen's most highly regarded films -- Sleeper, Annie Hall, Manhattan, and Manhattan Murder Mystery -- and with another collaborator he later co-wrote the books for the stage musicals Jersey Boys and The Addams Family. Both John and Michelle were decent singers, and both have their admirers as vocalists -- P.F. Sloan always said that Michelle was the best singer in the group they eventually formed, and that it was her voice that gave the group its sound -- but for the most part they were not considered as particularly astonishing lead vocalists. Certainly, neither had a voice that stood out the way that Scott McKenzie's had. They needed a strong lead singer, and they found one in Denny Doherty. Now, we covered Denny Doherty's early career in the episode on the Lovin' Spoonful, because he was intimately involved in the formation of that group, so I won't go into too much detail here, but I'll give a very abbreviated version of what I said there. Doherty was a Canadian performer who had been a member of the Halifax Three with Zal Yanovsky: [Excerpt: The Halifax Three, "When I First Came to This Land"] After the Halifax Three had split up, Doherty and Yanovsky had performed as a duo for a while, before joining up with Cass Elliot and her husband Jim Hendricks, who both had previously been in the Big Three with Tim Rose: [Excerpt: Cass Elliot and the Big 3, "The Banjo Song"] Elliot, Hendricks, Yanovsky, and Doherty had formed The Mugwumps, sometimes joined by John Sebastian, and had tried to go in more of a rock direction after seeing the Beatles on Ed Sullivan. They recorded one album together before splitting up: [Excerpt: The Mugwumps, "Searchin'"] Part of the reason they split up was that interpersonal relationships within the group were put under some strain -- Elliot and Hendricks split up, though they would remain friends and remain married for several years even though they were living apart, and Elliot had an unrequited crush on Doherty. But since they'd split up, and Yanovsky and Sebastian had gone off to form the Lovin' Spoonful, that meant that Doherty was free, and he was regarded as possibly the best male lead vocalist on the circuit, so the group snapped him up. The only problem was that the Journeymen still had gigs booked that needed to be played, one of them was in just three days, and Doherty didn't know the repertoire. This was a problem with an easy solution for people in their twenties though -- they took a huge amount of amphetamines, and stayed awake for three days straight rehearsing. They made the gig, and Doherty was now the lead singer of the New Journeymen: [Excerpt: The New Journeymen, "The Last Thing on My Mind"] But the New Journeymen didn't last in that form for very long, because even before joining the group, Denny Doherty had been going in a more folk-rock direction with the Mugwumps. At the time, John Phillips thought rock and roll was kids' music, and he was far more interested in folk and jazz, but he was also very interested in making money, and he soon decided it was an idea to start listening to the Beatles. There's some dispute as to who first played the Beatles for John in early 1965 -- some claim it was Doherty, others claim it was Cass Elliot, but everyone agrees it was after Denny Doherty had introduced Phillips to something else -- he brought round some LSD for John and Michelle, and Michelle's sister Rusty, to try. And then he told them he'd invited round a friend. Michelle Phillips later remembered, "I remember saying to the guys "I don't know about you guys, but this drug does nothing for me." At that point there was a knock on the door, and as I opened the door and saw Cass, the acid hit me *over the head*. I saw her standing there in a pleated skirt, a pink Angora sweater with great big eyelashes on and her hair in a flip. And all of a sudden I thought 'This is really *quite* a drug!' It was an image I will have securely fixed in my brain for the rest of my life. I said 'Hi, I'm Michelle. We just took some LSD-25, do you wanna join us?' And she said 'Sure...'" Rusty Gilliam's description matches this -- "It was mind-boggling. She had on a white pleated skirt, false eyelashes. These were the kind of eyelashes that when you put them on you were supposed to trim them to an appropriate length, which she didn't, and when she blinked she looked like a cow, or those dolls you get when you're little and the eyes open and close. And we're on acid. Oh my God! It was a sight! And everything she was wearing were things that you weren't supposed to be wearing if you were heavy -- white pleated skirt, mohair sweater. You know, until she became famous, she suffered so much, and was poked fun at." This gets to an important point about Elliot, and one which sadly affected everything about her life. Elliot was *very* fat -- I've seen her weight listed at about three hundred pounds, and she was only five foot five tall -- and she also didn't have the kind of face that gets thought of as conventionally attractive. Her appearance would be cruelly mocked by pretty much everyone for the rest of her life, in ways that it's genuinely hurtful to read about, and which I will avoid discussing in detail in order to avoid hurting fat listeners. But the two *other* things that defined Elliot in the minds of those who knew her were her voice -- every single person who knew her talks about what a wonderful singer she was -- and her personality. I've read a lot of things about Cass Elliot, and I have never read a single negative word about her as a person, but have read many people going into raptures about what a charming, loving, friendly, understanding person she was. Michelle later said of her "From the time I left Los Angeles, I hadn't had a friend, a buddy. I was married, and John and I did not hang out with women, we just hung out with men, and especially not with women my age. John was nine years older than I was. And here was a fun-loving, intelligent woman. She captivated me. I was as close to in love with Cass as I could be to any woman in my life at that point. She also represented something to me: freedom. Everything she did was because she wanted to do it. She was completely independent and I admired her and was in awe of her. And later on, Cass would be the one to tell me not to let John run my life. And John hated her for that." Either Elliot had brought round Meet The Beatles, the Beatles' first Capitol album, for everyone to listen to, or Denny Doherty already had it, but either way Elliot and Doherty were by this time already Beatles fans. Michelle, being younger than the rest and not part of the folk scene until she met John, was much more interested in rock and roll than any of them, but because she'd been married to John for a couple of years and been part of his musical world she hadn't really encountered the Beatles music, though she had a vague memory that she might have heard a track or two on the radio. John was hesitant -- he didn't want to listen to any rock and roll, but eventually he was persuaded, and the record was put on while he was on his first acid trip: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I Want to Hold Your Hand"] Within a month, John Phillips had written thirty songs that he thought of as inspired by the Beatles. The New Journeymen were going to go rock and roll. By this time Marshall Brickman was out of the band, and instead John, Michelle, and Denny recruited a new lead guitarist, Eric Hord. Denny started playing bass, with John on rhythm guitar, and a violinist friend of theirs, Peter Pilafian, knew a bit of drums and took on that role. The new lineup of the group used the Journeymen's credit card, which hadn't been stopped even though the Journeymen were no more, to go down to St. Thomas in the Caribbean, along with Michelle's sister, John's daughter Mackenzie (from whose name Scott McKenzie had taken his stage name, as he was born Philip Blondheim), a pet dog, and sundry band members' girlfriends. They stayed there for several months, living in tents on the beach, taking acid, and rehearsing. While they were there, Michelle and Denny started an affair which would have important ramifications for the group later. They got a gig playing at a club called Duffy's, whose address was on Creeque Alley, and soon after they started playing there Cass Elliot travelled down as well -- she was in love with Denny, and wanted to be around him. She wasn't in the group, but she got a job working at Duffy's as a waitress, and she would often sing harmony with the group while waiting at tables. Depending on who was telling the story, either she didn't want to be in the group because she didn't want her appearance to be compared to Michelle's, or John wouldn't *let* her be in the group because she was so fat. Later a story would be made up to cover for this, saying that she hadn't been in the group at first because she couldn't sing the highest notes that were needed, until she got hit on the head with a metal pipe and discovered that it had increased her range by three notes, but that seems to be a lie. One of the songs the New Journeymen were performing at this time was "Mr. Tambourine Man". They'd heard that their old friend Roger McGuinn had recorded it with his new band, but they hadn't yet heard his version, and they'd come up with their own arrangement: [Excerpt: The New Journeymen, "Mr. Tambourine Man"] Denny later said "We were doing three-part harmony on 'Mr Tambourine Man', but a lot slower... like a polka or something! And I tell John, 'No John, we gotta slow it down and give it a backbeat.' Finally we get the Byrds 45 down here, and we put it on and turn it up to ten, and John says 'Oh, like that?' Well, as you can tell, it had already been done. So John goes 'Oh, ah... that's it...' a light went on. So we started doing Beatles stuff. We dropped 'Mr Tambourine Man' after hearing the Byrds version, because there was no point." Eventually they had to leave the island -- they had completely run out of money, and were down to fifty dollars. The credit card had been cut up, and the governor of the island had a personal vendetta against them because they gave his son acid, and they were likely to get arrested if they didn't leave the island. Elliot and her then-partner had round-trip tickets, so they just left, but the rest of them were in trouble. By this point they were unwashed, they were homeless, and they'd spent their last money on stage costumes. They got to the airport, and John Phillips tried to write a cheque for eight air fares back to the mainland, which the person at the check-in desk just laughed at. So they took their last fifty dollars and went to a casino. There Michelle played craps, and she rolled seventeen straight passes, something which should be statistically impossible. She turned their fifty dollars into six thousand dollars, which they scooped up, took to the airport, and paid for their flights out in cash. The New Journeymen arrived back in New York, but quickly decided that they were going to try their luck in California. They rented a car, using Scott McKenzie's credit card, and drove out to LA. There they met up with Hoyt Axton, who you may remember as the son of Mae Axton, the writer of "Heartbreak Hotel", and as the performer who had inspired Michael Nesmith to go into folk music: [Excerpt: Hoyt Axton, "Greenback Dollar"] Axton knew the group, and fed them and put them up for a night, but they needed somewhere else to stay. They went to stay with one of Michelle's friends, but after one night their rented car was stolen, with all their possessions in it. They needed somewhere else to stay, so they went to ask Jim Hendricks if they could crash at his place -- and they were surprised to find that Cass Elliot was there already. Hendricks had another partner -- though he and Elliot wouldn't have their marriage annulled until 1968 and were still technically married -- but he'd happily invited her to stay with them. And now all her friends had turned up, he invited them to stay as well, taking apart the beds in his one-bedroom apartment so he could put down a load of mattresses in the space for everyone to sleep on. The next part becomes difficult, because pretty much everyone in the LA music scene of the sixties was a liar who liked to embellish their own roles in things, so it's quite difficult to unpick what actually happened. What seems to have happened though is that first this new rock-oriented version of the New Journeymen went to see Frank Werber, on the recommendation of John Stewart. Werber was the manager of the Kingston Trio, and had also managed the Journeymen. He, however, was not interested -- not because he didn't think they had talent, but because he had experience of working with John Phillips previously. When Phillips came into his office Werber picked up a tape that he'd been given of the group, and said "I have not had a chance to listen to this tape. I believe that you are a most talented individual, and that's why we took you on in the first place. But I also believe that you're also a drag to work with. A pain in the ass. So I'll tell you what, before whatever you have on here sways me, I'm gonna give it back to you and say that we're not interested." Meanwhile -- and this part of the story comes from Kim Fowley, who was never one to let the truth get in the way of him taking claim for everything, but parts of it at least are corroborated by other people -- Cass Elliot had called Fowley, and told him that her friends' new group sounded pretty good and he should sign them. Fowley was at that time working as a talent scout for a label, but according to him the label wouldn't give the group the money they wanted. So instead, Fowley got in touch with Nik Venet, who had just produced the Leaves' hit version of "Hey Joe" on Mira Records: [Excerpt: The Leaves, "Hey Joe"] Fowley suggested to Venet that Venet should sign the group to Mira Records, and Fowley would sign them to a publishing contract, and they could both get rich. The trio went to audition for Venet, and Elliot drove them over -- and Venet thought the group had a great look as a quartet. He wanted to sign them to a record contract, but only if Elliot was in the group as well. They agreed, he gave them a one hundred and fifty dollar advance, and told them to come back the next day to see his boss at Mira. But Barry McGuire was also hanging round with Elliot and Hendricks, and decided that he wanted to have Lou Adler hear the four of them. He thought they might be useful both as backing vocalists on his second album and as a source of new songs. He got them to go and see Lou Adler, and according to McGuire Phillips didn't want Elliot to go with them, but as Elliot was the one who was friends with McGuire, Phillips worried that they'd lose the chance with Adler if she didn't. Adler was amazed, and decided to sign the group right then and there -- both Bones Howe and P.F. Sloan claimed to have been there when the group auditioned for him and have said "if you won't sign them, I will", though exactly what Sloan would have signed them to I'm not sure. Adler paid them three thousand dollars in cash and told them not to bother with Nik Venet, so they just didn't turn up for the Mira Records audition the next day. Instead, they went into the studio with McGuire and cut backing vocals on about half of his new album: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire with the Mamas and the Papas, "Hide Your Love Away"] While the group were excellent vocalists, there were two main reasons that Adler wanted to sign them. The first was that he found Michelle Phillips extremely attractive, and the second is a song that John and Michelle had written which he thought might be very suitable for McGuire's album. Most people who knew John Phillips think of "California Dreamin'" as a solo composition, and he would later claim that he gave Michelle fifty percent just for transcribing his lyric, saying he got inspired in the middle of the night, woke her up, and got her to write the song down as he came up with it. But Michelle, who is a credited co-writer on the song, has been very insistent that she wrote the lyrics to the second verse, and that it's about her own real experiences, saying that she would often go into churches and light candles even though she was "at best an agnostic, and possibly an atheist" in her words, and this would annoy John, who had also been raised Catholic, but who had become aggressively opposed to expressions of religion, rather than still having nostalgia for the aesthetics of the church as Michelle did. They were out walking on a particularly cold winter's day in 1963, and Michelle wanted to go into St Patrick's Cathedral and John very much did not want to. A couple of nights later, John woke her up, having written the first verse of the song, starting "All the leaves are brown and the sky is grey/I went for a walk on a winter's day", and insisting she collaborate with him. She liked the song, and came up with the lines "Stopped into a church, I passed along the way/I got down on my knees and I pretend to pray/The preacher likes the cold, he knows I'm going to stay", which John would later apparently dislike, but which stayed in the song. Most sources I've seen for the recording of "California Dreamin'" say that the lineup of musicians was the standard set of players who had played on McGuire's other records, with the addition of John Phillips on twelve-string guitar -- P.F. Sloan on guitar and harmonica, Joe Osborn on bass, Larry Knechtel on keyboards, and Hal Blaine on drums, but for some reason Stephen McParland's book on Sloan has Bones Howe down as playing drums on the track while engineering -- a detail so weird, and from such a respectable researcher, that I have to wonder if it might be true. In his autobiography, Sloan claims to have rewritten the chord sequence to "California Dreamin'". He says "Barry Mann had unintentionally showed me a suspended chord back at Screen Gems. I was so impressed by this beautiful, simple chord that I called Brian Wilson and played it for him over the phone. The next thing I knew, Brian had written ‘Don't Worry Baby,' which had within it a number suspended chords. And then the chord heard 'round the world, two months later, was the opening suspended chord of ‘A Hard Day's Night.' I used these chords throughout ‘California Dreamin',' and more specifically as a bridge to get back and forth from the verse to the chorus." Now, nobody else corroborates this story, and both Brian Wilson and John Phillips had the kind of background in modern harmony that means they would have been very aware of suspended chords before either ever encountered Sloan, but I thought I should mention it. Rather more plausible is Sloan's other claim, that he came up with the intro to the song. According to Sloan, he was inspired by "Walk Don't Run" by the Ventures: [Excerpt: The Ventures, "Walk Don't Run"] And you can easily see how this: [plays "Walk Don't Run"] Can lead to this: [plays "California Dreamin'"] And I'm fairly certain that if that was the inspiration, it was Sloan who was the one who thought it up. John Phillips had been paying no attention to the world of surf music when "Walk Don't Run" had been a hit -- that had been at the point when he was very firmly in the folk world, while Sloan of course had been recording "Tell 'Em I'm Surfin'", and it had been his job to know surf music intimately. So Sloan's intro became the start of what was intended to be Barry McGuire's next single: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "California Dreamin'"] Sloan also provided the harmonica solo on the track: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "California Dreamin'"] The Mamas and the Papas -- the new name that was now given to the former New Journeymen, now they were a quartet -- were also signed to Dunhill as an act on their own, and recorded their own first single, "Go Where You Wanna Go", a song apparently written by John about Michelle, in late 1963, after she had briefly left him to have an affair with Russ Titelman, the record producer and songwriter, before coming back to him: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "Go Where You Wanna Go"] But while that was put out, they quickly decided to scrap it and go with another song. The "Go Where You Wanna Go" single was pulled after only selling a handful of copies, though its commercial potential was later proved when in 1967 a new vocal group, the 5th Dimension, released a soundalike version as their second single. The track was produced by Lou Adler's client Johnny Rivers, and used the exact same musicians as the Mamas and the Papas version, with the exception of Phillips. It became their first hit, reaching number sixteen on the charts: [Excerpt: The 5th Dimension, "Go Where You Wanna Go"] The reason the Mamas and the Papas version of "Go Where You Wanna Go" was pulled was because everyone became convinced that their first single should instead be their own version of "California Dreamin'". This is the exact same track as McGuire's track, with just two changes. The first is that McGuire's lead vocal was replaced with Denny Doherty: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "California Dreamin'"] Though if you listen to the stereo mix of the song and isolate the left channel, you can hear McGuire singing the lead on the first line, and occasional leakage from him elsewhere on the backing vocal track: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "California Dreamin'"] The other change made was to replace Sloan's harmonica solo with an alto flute solo by Bud Shank, a jazz musician who we heard about in the episode on "Light My Fire", when he collaborated with Ravi Shankar on "Improvisations on the Theme From Pather Panchali": [Excerpt: Ravi Shankar, "Improvisation on the Theme From Pather Panchali"] Shank was working on another session in Western Studios, where they were recording the Mamas and Papas track, and Bones Howe approached him while he was packing his instrument and asked if he'd be interested in doing another session. Shank agreed, though the track caused problems for him. According to Shank "What had happened was that whe

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The Papaya Podcast
The One About Grief And Moving Forward With The Ones We Lost with @NoraBorealis

The Papaya Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 47:19


Years ago I saw this viral video by this woman named Nora, aka @NoraBorealis, aka Nora McInerny. It was a 14 minute Ted Talk about grief, delivered with honesty, humour, and the notion that we don't “Move On” from those we lose, we move forward WITH them and because of them. Nora is an expert in loss. She lost in a span of weeks her husband, her unborn child and her father. Yet today we share this insightful and beautiful message of grief and the journey through it, in ways beyond the loss of a person - this episode is not to be missed. Follow Nora @NoraBorealis on Instagram and Listen to her Podcast “Terrible, Thanks For Asking”   Produced by Dear Media 

NICE FOR WHAT?
Ep #41 Let's Talk!! " Are These Men Looking For A Address? "

NICE FOR WHAT?

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 11:47


Ep #41 Let's Talk!! " Are These Men Looking For A Address? " ** DISCLAIMER I AM NOT A THERAPIST** Anger and Love cannot grow in the same garden .. A man's hands are made to cup your face and his arms are to hold you. The day they become weapons to terrorize you, please know that love no longer lives in that man's heart anymore. Ladies, know your worth learn who you are. Don't allow a man to abuse you mentally, physically, IF SO it's time to go. MOVE ON a man that beats you doesn't love you sweetie. - Podcast Instagram @theniceforwhatpodcast - My Instagram: @therealdanyellej_ - My Twitter: @therealdanyelle ** DISCLAIMER I AM NOT A THERAPIST** --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/danyelle-berry/support

The Susan Winter Show
How do you truly ‘let go and move on?'

The Susan Winter Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2022 7:11


https://youtu.be/VdPTBVVMEcE You've tried to ‘let go and move on' but your mind is still holding a space (and hope) for their love. How do you advance yet keep a spot for their return? #lettinggo #movingon #obsession #waiting For more information please visit my website at http://www.susanwinter.net/

The Real Estate Sales Podcast
TRES 196: Jimmy Burgess - How to Overcome a "Gut Punch" Contract Cancellation

The Real Estate Sales Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 9:56


Every agent has felt it; the gut-wrenching sense of negativity when a deal you expect to move forward just doesn't come through. In today's episode of The Real Estate Sales Podcast, Jimmy explains how to overcome and push through those obstacles by using his MOVE ON strategy. Be (M)indful of the mistakes or opportunities you might have missed. If you're going to fall, fall forward and learn something from it to prepare you for the future. Are there any learnings or takeaways you can apply to future transactions to help avoid it happening again? (O)pen or close communication with your client. Decide whether you should continue communicating with the client in this transaction or in later opportunities. If the relationship can be built deeper for long-term gain, continue. (V)isit with past clients. After a difficult conversation or experience with a contract cancellation, visiting people you know support and like you help you move past that past situation. (E)ffectuate a plan of action. After evaluating that failed transaction, devise a plan of action that will help you move forward. Then, put that plan into action.  O)verwhelm the market with activity.  Regroup and refocus on the activities you know will help you bring success. (N)ever let one transaction keep you from everything you are supposed to have. Don't let one situation get in your way of accomplishing your dreams.  Remember, you are so much more than just one difficult situation. Do you have a video or content idea perfect for your business? Share it with Jimmy! Connect with Jimmy Burgess on LinkedIn and Facebook and his YouTube channel.  If you like what you heard today, we'd love it if you'd share a rating or review and then subscribe to the podcast and tell others about it. You can find The Real Estate Sales Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Audible, and our website, The Real Estate Sales Podcast.

The Dom Giordano Program
The Importance of Authenticity in Elected Officials

The Dom Giordano Program

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 44:41


Full Hour | Today, Dom Giordano led off the Dom Giordano Program with a theme, authenticity. Dom tells that he was having an off-air conversation with midday host Dawn Stensland about the value of authenticity in political candidates, telling why he believes gubernatorial candidate Doug Mastriano as genuine although he disagrees with some of his standpoints. Then, Giordano swings this over into a conversation of Mayor Jim Kenney's authenticity, playing back clips from a press conference held today by city officials after the homicide rate eclipsed 300, which puts it on pace to match last year's record homicide rate. Then, Giordano offers an update on the Pennsylvania gubernatorial race, telling of comments made by Philadelphia political activist Matthew Wolfe, who said that Mastriano has some things he needs to do better if he'd like to win the State. Then, Giordano spends some time lambasting bike lines, telling of a new initiative proposed by Republicans that will, in Dom's opinion, make things safer for both bikers and drivers. (Photo by Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for MoveOn)

Mission to the Moon Podcast
10 ข้อคิดที่จะทำให้ชีวิต “Move On” | 5M EP.1245

Mission to the Moon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 5:25


หลายครั้งที่เราต้องเจ็บปวด ผิดหวังและจมอยู่กับความรู้สึกแย่ๆ เรื่อยมา จนทำให้หมดเรี่ยวแรงที่จะก้าวต่อไป ราวกับมีโซ่ตรวนที่ตรึงรั้งชีวิตของเราไว้อย่างไรอย่างนั้น แล้วจะหาทางออกและผ่านช่วงเวลาแย่ๆ แบบนี้ได้อย่างไร ในพอดแคสต์ 5M EP. นี้ ชวนไปรับฟัง 10 ข้อคิดที่ทำให้ชีวิต Move On กัน

Bread Radio: Cuddle Drama
Episode 22: The Ultimatum - Marry or Move on: The Reunion

Bread Radio: Cuddle Drama

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 65:30


Season 1, Episode 10  - The Ultimatum - Marry or Move on: The Reunion Welcome to Cuddle Drama, a podcast brought to you by the Bread Radio network! In Cuddle Drama, your hosts Haley and August (Bread) run through recaps of your favorite reality TV shows.  Our second show is comes to us from the creators of Love is Blind. It's The Ultimatum - Marry or Move on. Each episode will cover 1 episode of the season. In Episode 10, the couples reunite for the first time in 7 months. In that amount of time, they were able to live life beyond the ultimatum, gain perspective, watch the show back, gain some insight, and now they're coming together to hash it all out one last time.    Episode: 10 of 10 Show: The Ultimatum - Marry or Move on Original recording date: 06/28/2022 www.breadradioshow.com

5 Minute Mayberry Devotional
MD 86 - Move On and Get A New Dryer

5 Minute Mayberry Devotional

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 8:10


Welcome to episode 86 of the Mayberry Devotional entitled “Move On and Get A New Dryer.”   Today I'll be looking at season three, episode nineteen of The Andy Griffith Show, “Class Reunion”.  And I'll also be looking at Scripture from Philippians 3:13-14.

In Omnia Paratus
77. Will Jae be on season 3 of Love Is Blind?

In Omnia Paratus

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 60:04


Today's episode is all about Netflix Nick & Jessica Lachey-hosted reality dating shows! Love Is Blind and The Ultimatum: Marry or Move On have taken up a significant portion of time following the girls trip to LA, so they are ready to talk about all of the craziness that has ensued! This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

The Dom Giordano Program
Are You A ‘Chump' If You're Currently Paying For College?

The Dom Giordano Program

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 43:09


In today's second hour, Giordano leads off by playing back a clip from the interview with Congressman Scott Perry, in which the Representative alleges that Cheney's suggestion that he sought a presidential pardon is a ‘shameless lie.' Then, Giordano discusses an opinion piece in the Wall Street Journal in which the author writes about his Grandson who is paying his way through college while involved in extracurriculars, telling how the student loan debate has turned his incredibly active Grandson doing the right thing into what society considers a ‘chump.' Then, Neal Zoren returns to the Dom Giordano Program to discuss what's worth watching on television this week. First, Zoren offers a review of Under the Banner of Heaven, highlighting a great performance by Andrew Garfield as he questions his faith while investigating a murder. Then, Zoren gives his review of the newest season of Stranger Things, telling why he has never been able to fully invest in the series. Also, Zoren gives his thoughts on Adam Sandler's Philadelphia film Hustle, and tells why he's never been able to get into the Apple TV series For All Mankind which returns tonight. (Photo by Paul Morigi/Getty Images for MoveOn)

The DJ Sessions
Ayokay on the Virtual Sessions presented by The DJ Sessions 6/7/22

The DJ Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 53:18


Ayokay on the Virtual Sessions presented by The DJ Sessions 6/7/22   About Ayokay -   Alex O'Neill, aka Ayokay, is a Los Angeles-based DJ/producer known for his effusive pop, hip-hop, and R&B-influenced EDM. He scored two Billboard Hot Dance/Electronic Songs hits, including 2016's "Kings of Summer" with Quinn XCII and 2017's "The Shine" with Chelsea Cutler before releasing his debut album, 2018's In the Shape of a Dream. An EP, We Come Alive, arrived in 2019, followed by the 2021 single "I Still Need You."   A native of Grosse Pointe, Michigan, Ayokay first began making music in his senior year of high school, collaborating with longtime friend Mike Temrowski (aka Quinn XCII). The duo continued to develop their sound after high school, with O'Neill attending the University of Michigan and Temrowski Michigan State University.    In 2016 they released the single "Kings of Summer," which was quickly adopted as Texas Rangers outfielder Ian Desmond's "walk-up" song. The track took off (reaching number 16 on the Billboard Hot Dance/Electronic Songs Chart), and helped land the duo a deal with Columbia Records. Around this time, Ayokay relocated to Los Angeles to focus on his career.    A year later he delivered the solo single "Shine," featuring singer Chelsea Cutler. It cracked the Top 50 of Billboard's Hot Dance/Electronic Songs Chart. In 2018, he issued his full-length debut, In the Shape of a Dream, which included the singles "Sleepless Nights" featuring Nightly, and "Stay with Me" featuring Jeremy Zucker.    More tracks followed, including "Things Fall Apart," "Move On," and "Sleeping Next to You," all of which arrived in 2019. Also that year, he released the EP, We Come Alive. The single "I Still Need You" arrived in September 2021. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi   About The DJ Sessions -   “The DJ Sessions” is a Twitch/Mixcloud "Featured Partner” live streaming/podcast series featuring electronic music DJ's/Producers via live mixes/interviews and streamed/distributed to a global audience. TheDJSessions.com   The series constantly places in the “Top Ten” on Twitch Music and the “Top Five” in the “Electronic Music", “DJ", "Dance Music" categories. TDJS is rated in the Top 0.11% of live streaming shows on Twitch out of millions of live streamers.   It has also been recognized by Apple twice as a "New and Noteworthy” podcast and featured three times in the Apple Music Store video podcast section. UStream and Livestream have also listed the series as a "Featured" stream on their platforms since its inception.    The series is also streamed live to multiple other platforms and hosted on several podcast sites. It has a combined live streaming/podcast audience is over 125,000 viewers per week.   With over 2,300 episodes produced over the last 12 years "The DJ Sessions" has featured international artists such as: BT, Youngr, Sevenn, Miri Ben-Ari, Plastik Funk, Arty, Party Shirt, Superstar DJ Keoki, Robert Babicz, Jens Lissat, Alex Bau, Elohim, Hausman, Ayokay, Leandro Da Silva, Jerry Davila, Shlomi Aber, The Space Brothers, Dave Winnel, Cuebrick, Protoculture, Jarod Glawe, Camo & Crooked, ANG, Amon Tobin, Voicians, Bingo Players, Coke Beats, Mimosa, Yves LaRock, Ray Okpara, Lindsey Stirling, Mako, Still Life, Saint Kidyaki, Distinct, Sarah Main, Piem, Tocadisco, Nakadia, Sebastian Bronk, Toronto is Broken, Teddy Cream, Mizeyesis, Simon Patterson, Morgan Page, Jes, Cut Chemist, The Him, Judge Jules, Patricia Baloge, DubFX, Thievery Corporation, SNBRN, Bjorn Akesson, Alchimyst, Sander Van Dorn, Rudosa, Hollaphonic, DJs From Mars, GAWP, Somna, David Morales, Roxanne, JB & Scooba, Kissy Sell Out, Khag3, Massimo Vivona, Moullinex, Futuristic Polar Bears, ManyFew, Joe Stone, Reboot, Truncate, Scotty Boy, Doctor Nieman, DJ Ruby, Jody Wisternoff, Thousand Fingers, Benny Bennasi, Dance Loud, Christopher Lawrence, Oliver Twizt, Ricardo Torres, Alex Harrington, 4 Strings, Sunshine Jones, Elite Force, Revolvr, Kenneth Thomas, Paul Oakenfold, George Acosta, Reid Speed, TyDi, Donald Glaude, Jimbo, Ricardo Torres, Hotel Garuda, Bryn Liedl, Rodg, Kems, Mr. Sam, Steve Aoki, Funtcase, Dirtyloud, Marco Bailey, Dirtmonkey, The Crystal Method, Beltek, Dyro, Andy Caldwell, Darin Epsilon, Kyau & Albert, Kutski, Vaski, Moguai, Blackliquid, Sunny Lax, Matt Darey, and many more.   In addition to featuring international artists TDJS focuses on local talent based on the US West Coast. Hundreds of local DJ's have been featured on the show along with top industry professionals.   We have recently launched v3.1 our website that now features our current live streams/past episodes in a much more user-friendly mobile/social environment. In addition to the new site, there is a mobile app (Apple/Android) and VR Nightclubs (Oculus).   About The DJ Sessions Event Services -   TDJSES is a WA State Non-profit charitable organization that's main purpose is to provide music, art, fashion, dance, and entertainment to local and regional communities via events and video production programming distributed via live and archival viewing.   For all press inquiries regarding “The DJ Sessions”, or to schedule an interview with Darran Bruce, please contact us at info@thedjsessions.