Podcasts about chief scientist

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Best podcasts about chief scientist

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Latest podcast episodes about chief scientist

The Positive Head Podcast
1630: Soul-Share with Real Magic Scientist, Dean Radin

The Positive Head Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 78:05


Dean is the Chief Scientist at the Institute of Noetic Sciences which is dedicated to unlocking the scientific understanding of intuition, inspiration, and transformation. Dean was originally on Ep. 417 back in 2017 and he is back again to discuss his latest book Real Magic, which has remained on the top 50 bestseller list since its release in 2018. In this episode, he discusses the three types of psychic phenomena he has spent decades rigorously studying: divination, intention, and theurgy. He also shares the results of several of those studies as well as several fascinating stories of real magic. Join The Golden Game Key Masters Group: www.facebook.com/groups/goldengamekeymasters/ Download The Golden Key audio or e-book at GoldenKey.Gift with the Code: POSITIVEHEAD Text Brandon to receive regular golden nuggets of wisdom at 310.564.0750

Building the Open Metaverse
Episode 7: Roblox and Scaling the Metaverse

Building the Open Metaverse

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 47:21


Morgan McGuire, Chief Scientist at Roblox, joins Patrick Cozzi (Cesium) and Marc Petit (Epic Games) to discuss research areas at Roblox, including applied data science, user research, and scaling for the metaverse.

The Cognitive Crucible
#77 Paul Lopata on Quantum

The Cognitive Crucible

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 56:41


The Cognitive Crucible is a forum that presents different perspectives and emerging thought leadership related to the information environment. The opinions expressed by guests are their own, and do not necessarily reflect the views of or endorsement by the Information Professionals Association. During this episode, Dr. Paul Lopata of the Laboratory for Physical Sciences in College Park Maryland discusses the origins of quantum mechanics including philosophical underpinnings and a recap of the famous double-slit experiment which prompted physicists to start thinking about light as having both wave and particle properties. Paul connects quantum theory and cognitive security using words and concepts like trust, probabilistic reasoning, and making decisions with limited information, and in the presence of risk. He also describes advances in quantum computing and cryptography, prime numbers, Shor's algorithm, and NP-hard problems.  Resources: Cognitive Crucible Podcast Episodes Mentioned #74 Tabassi on NIST, Technology Standards, and Trust Laboratory for Physical Sciences YouTube videos: Quantum explainer The Quantum Experiment that Broke Reality Shor's algorithm For information regarding Reviving and Modernizing Automated Celestial Navigation, search for: "USAF-19-PEO-BM-6.G" DHS guidance on mitigation to new cryptographic standards RAND report for preparing for new cryptographic standards NIST website on their new standards competition National Quantum Coordination Office NSA Cybersecurity Directorate Publications NSA Cybersecurity Quantum IEEE Spectrum: PROTECTING GPS FROM SPOOFERS IS CRITICAL TO THE FUTURE OF NAVIGATION Where Time Comes From: The time that ends up on your smartphone—and that synchronizes GPS, military operations, financial transactions, and internet communications—originates in a set of atomic clocks on the grounds of the U.S. Naval Observatory. Dr. Demetrios Matsakis, Chief Scientist for USNO's Time Services, gives a tour. The Worst Journey in the World by Apsley Cherry-Garrard Lincoln in the Telegraph Office: Recollections of the United States Military Telegraph Corps During the Civil War by David Homer Bates Link to full show notes and resources https://information-professionals.org/episode/cognitive-crucible-episode-77 Guest Bio: Dr. Paul Lopata is a quantum research scientist at the Laboratory for Physical Sciences in College Park Maryland. Previously, Paul served as the Principal Director for Quantum Science in the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering where he focused on quantum technology modernization. He was also Executive Secretary for the Defense Science Board's Task Force on Applications of Quantum Technologies. About: The Information Professionals Association (IPA) is a non-profit organization dedicated to exploring the role of information activities, such as influence and cognitive security, within the national security sector and helping to bridge the divide between operations and research. Its goal is to increase interdisciplinary collaboration between scholars and practitioners and policymakers with an interest in this domain. For more information, please contact us at communications@information-professionals.org. Or, connect directly with The Cognitive Crucible podcast host, John Bicknell, on LinkedIn. Disclosure: As an Amazon Associate, 1) IPA earns from qualifying purchases, 2) IPA gets commissions for purchases made through links in this post.

Artificial Intelligence in Industry with Daniel Faggella
Overcoming Hurdles to Making Conversational Interfaces Work - with Joe Bradley of LivePerson

Artificial Intelligence in Industry with Daniel Faggella

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 33:03


Today's guest is Joe Bradley, Chief Scientist, SVP Data Science & ML at LivePerson. Joe was previously the Senior Director for Data and Personalization Science at Nike before joining the team at LivePerson. In this episode, Joe breaks down how LivePerson approaches the conversational interface dynamic with their customers. Joe also discusses some of the challenges in getting to a genuinely conversational level and what's possible today. If you're interested in more NLP use-cases or want to learn more about chatbots or search-and-discovery, be sure to download our free PDF brief “The Executive Guide to NLP” at emerj.com/nlp1.

Follow The Money
Summer Series - Rewiring Australia with Saul Griffith and Lily D'Ambrosio MP [webinar]

Follow The Money

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 61:07


Our summer podcast series brings you some of the best conversations from our webinars in 2021. This episode you'll hear from Saul Griffith, clean tech entrepreneur and founder and Chief Scientist of Otherlab, in conversation with VIC Minister for Energy, Environment and Climate Change and Minister for Solar Homes, Lily D'Ambrosio about how Australians can save thousands of dollars and help reduce emissions by Rewiring Australia - a blueprint for entire clean energy economy in Australia. This episode was recorded live on 6 October 2021 and things may have changed since recording.Host: Ebony Bennett, Deputy Director at the Australia Institute // @ebony_bennettGuests:Saul Griffith, founder Rewiring Australia // @GriffithSaulHon Lily D'Ambrosio, VIC Minister for Environment and Climate Change // @LilyDAmbrosioMP Ben Oquist, Executive Director, The Australia Institute // @BenOquistRichie Merzian, Climate & Energy program director // @RichieMerzianThe Australia Institute // @theausinstituteProducer: Jennifer Macey // @jennifermaceyTheme Music: Pulse and Thrum; additional music by Blue Dot Sessions

The Engineering Entrepreneur Podcast
Artificial Intelligence – Peter Voss – Ep 112

The Engineering Entrepreneur Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 26:37


Artificial Intelligence – Peter Voss – Ep 112 Joining us today is Peter Voss, a pioneer in AI who coined the term ‘Artificial General Intelligence' and the CEO and Chief Scientist at Aigo.ai. For the past 15 years, Voss and his team at Aigo have been perfecting an industry disruptive, highly intelligent, and hyper-personalized Chatbot, with a brain, for large enterprise customers. Peter started as an electronics engineer. He quit that and didn't even finish high school. He taught himself programming and started a company selling accounting software. He grew that company to 400 people and then sold that business. After this company he got into artificial intelligence and a lot of our talk was focused on this subject. We covered areas like chat bots, teaching employees, and an artificial intelligence personal assistant. His number one tip: The thing he regrets the most is he waited to 25 to start his first company. He wishes he started sooner. Contact info: http://www.aigo.ai/ peter@aigo.ai

The Cutting Edge Japan Business Show By Dale Carnegie Training Tokyo, Japan

There are so many competitors for our audience's attention today.  The last thing we need are “own goals” by letting the slide deck or the video steal our thunder.  We must be the dominator on stage not the dominated.    There is no question visuals are super powerful in presentations.  This can range from your eye contact, body language and gestures all the way up to actual live fireworks.  Think about sporting presentations where they make heavy use of visuals to stir emotions.  The half time show is full of music, fireworks, action.  The team scores a goal and the big screens are zeroing in on the action that just occurred.  The boxers are introduced as they enter the arena and fireworks are exploding behind them, like they are modern day messiahs here to save the masses.  You might not think of it this way, but this is what you are competing with today, as the lines get blurred between how events are presented.   There you stand, with just your slide deck advancer in your hand.  You are facing an audience fully tooled up on the most realistic computer games, viral videos, light show events and TikTok quick cut video action.  You are thinking your information quality will carry the day, even though you speak in a monotone, are deadly boring most of the time and embolden us with all the passion of road kill.  Sad to say, but none of this ever worked well and it certainly doesn't work today.    The supreme, unquestionable, highly regarded quality of your information has zero significance if no one is paying attention to what you are saying.  In this Age of Distraction, audiences are leaping on to their phones at the first sign of tedium.  Even when binge watching their favourite television series, they have the implement of destruction - their phone - at the ready to take up and multi task.   The question today is how to integrate all of this cool stuff into our presentations without it overwhelming us, the presenter.  Slide shows are an ever present danger, as the audience loses their connection with us and are absorbed by what is up on the screen.  The worst thing you can do is hand out the slide deck beforehand, because you are on slide two and they are on page eighteen.  The disconnect with what you are saying becomes close to total at this point.    Videos can be very good for presenting things in an attractive manner.  I was watching a video at a presentation recently and the supporting video was very slick.  It managed to capture the action, the drama, the excitement in a way that formed a positive impression.  This is the key word though – impression.  It doesn't last.  We have our attention monopolised for a short period of time and then we are back to Total Distraction HQ.   What I notice with most presenters who are using video is they let the video run wild and they don't attempt to control it.  By this I mean, they just play the video, assuming they can get it to work, which is rarely the case on the  first go.  We should have our verbal intro for the video and our verbal outro for after.  We shouldn't just let our audience watch the video as if every aspect has the same value.  We want to be hitting key messages in that video, in the same way that we hit key words in our sentences to create greater emphasis for our messages.   The video will have one scene or a couple of scenes which help us with our messaging and rather than just running the video, we want to focus our audience's attention right there.  We need to set that up.  For example, “In this video please look for the scene with the interview with our Chief Scientist.  What she has to say is fascinating and may change your perspective entirely”.  When we hear a set up like that, we are now in a heightened state of anticipation.  We are wondering what is she going to say that will change my perspective?   Once the video is over, we need to wrap a bow around the key messages and refer back to the evidence we presented in the video to back up our point of view on the subject.  For example, “What I like about the message in that video is that we can control our future, if we choose to take that route”.   This sentence would be referring back to your key message from your talk, so that the whole thing is congruent.  This is how we control the video, rather than what has become the norm – the video controls the speaker or it is just fluff, that has no lasting impact and everyone has forgotten it within the next thirty seconds.  The ultimate presentation put down – “all style and no substance”!!!   My biggest pet peeve is the company President relinquishing the opportunity to win fans supports and acknowledgement, through presentation skills by squandering the speaking time by playing a corporate propaganda video.  They are not skilled in public speaking, so they are running away, avoiding the speaking role.  If I see a President doing this, I immediately mark them and their company down in my estimation.  The President has to be the chief evangelist for the enterprise, not a miserable coward hiding behind the skirts of the video.   As presenters, we have to ensure the focus is fully on us and that the audience is completely riveted to what we are saying.  The Age of Distraction is also the Age of Destruction for Presenters.  We need to control the visual elements, so that they are always our servant and never our master.  

What Got You There with Sean DeLaney
#277 Dr. Sylvia Earle- Time Magazine's First Hero for the Planet, Oceanographer & Explorer!

What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 36:10


Dr. Sylvia Earle, one  of the world's top experts on ocean science and conservation, shares her inspiring wisdom in NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC OCEAN: A GLOBAL ODYSSEY showcasing how the ocean--with its forces, habitats, creatures, and global influence--has a tremendous impact on our everyday lives. She is long recognized as one of the world's top experts on ocean science and conservation, Sylvia Earle is the president and chairman of Mission Blue and a National Geographic Explorer at Large, and former Chief Scientist of NOAA. Called "Her Deepness" by The New Yorker and the New York Times, a  "Living Legend" by the Library of Congress, and a "First Hero for the Planet" by Time magazine, she is an oceanographer, explorer, author, and field scientist.  Watch on YouTube Get exclusive access to Masterworks by clicking HERE Subscribe to my Momentum Monday Newsletter Connect with us! Whatgotyouthere Sponsors Masterworks NuSkool Snacks Collagen Protein Bars https://nuskoolsnacks.com/

Discovery
The Evidence: When will the pandemic end?

Discovery

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 50:09


Everybody hopes that the new super-charged Omicron variant of coronavirus will be less severe, but even if it is, it's spreading so fast and infecting so many people, health services around the world could still buckle under the strain. Two years into the pandemic, Claudia Hammond is joined by two world-leading scientists to discuss the impact of Omicron and to review what the world has got right in its response to coronavirus, and what it has got very, very wrong. As many countries roll out and plan for booster campaigns in the face of this new variant, concerns are raised that enhancing vaccine coverage in richer countries will again monopolise scarce supplies, and leave the millions of unvaccinated in poorer countries – including three quarters of healthcare workers in Africa – exposed yet again. Dr Soumya Swaminathan, the Chief Scientist of the World Health Organisation, acknowledges the need to boost the elderly and vulnerable, but says it's good science to make sure everyone around the world gets their first vaccine doses. Only then will further deaths be prevented and new variants stalled. Director of the Wellcome Trust, Sir Jeremy Farrar agrees. Booster vaccines in rich countries, maybe even a fourth dose, are unsustainable he says, when so many people have yet to receive their first jab. It's not just a moral and ethical argument to vaccinate the world, he says, but it makes sound scientific sense too. Produced by: Fiona Hill, Anna Buckley, Maria Simons and Emily Bird Studio Engineer: Tim Heffer and Giles Aspen

Inspirational Women
12/19/21: Dr. Sylvia Earle - Ocean: A Global Odyssey, a guided tour with Her Deepness

Inspirational Women

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 31:43


on Inspirational Women: Dr. Sylvia Earle has long been recognized as one of the world's top experts on ocean science and conservation. Dr. Earle is the president and chairman of Mission Blue and a National Geographic Explorer at Large, and former Chief Scientist of NOAA. She has been called "Her Deepness" by The New Yorker and the New York Times, a "Living Legend" by the Library of Congress, and a "First Hero for the Planet" by Time magazine. Her life has been about the ocean and collaborating with National Geographic has a stunning new book: NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC OCEAN: A GLOBAL ODYSSEY. It's filled with amazing photographs and information about our planet's oceans and could be a great gift for anyone, even ourselves. https://mission-blue.org/about/

Betterism
#80: Dr. Matt Dorsey, chief scientist and formulator at Choq

Betterism

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 67:14


Glen and Matt discuss the value of balance, finding the right supplements, and how to let research guide you. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/betterism/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/betterism/support

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids
Why do seasons change?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 31:01


Why do seasons change? Why does it get darker earlier in the winter and why is there more daylight in the summer? Why are some seasons warm and some are cold and icy? Why do some places not have seasonal changes at all? We're learning about solstices, equinoxes and seasons in this episode of But Why. Our guide is John O'Meara, Chief Scientist at Hawaii's Keck Observatory. And kids around the world tell us what they like best about their favorite season.  Download our learning guides: PDF | Google Slide | Transcript The solstices are on December 21 and 22 and June 20 or 21, those are when the earth is leaning as far away from the sun or as close to the sun as it gets. Whether the solstice is your winter or summer solstice depends on whether you are in the northern or southern hemisphere. The two equinoxes - when both hemispheres are getting about the same amount of solar energy are on March 21 or 22 or September 22 or 23.  If you want to visualize the solstice, John O'Meara has an experiment. Find a ball and a flashlight. Have someone hold the flashlight; you hold the ball. Spin the ball around and around, the way the earth would rotate in a day. You can even draw a dot on the ball to mark where you are. Now lean the ball a little bit away from the light and keep spinning. Remember the earth is tilted on its axis (23.5 degrees to be exact!). Observe how the light falls differently on the dot. It forces the sunlight to be brighter on some spots and darker in others even during the day because of the way the light falls on the earth.  In some parts of the world there aren't big seasonal changes. Those places are near the equator. The equator is a line around the middle of the earth, where the sphere is at its fattest or widest. While the poles get more or less light because of the tilt of the earth, the middle stays centered, so people near the equator have about the same length of daylight all year and don't have as many seasonal shifts in light and temperature. The amount of sunlight in any given location makes a big impact on how cold or hot it is. But there are other factors that determine the climate (long-term weather trends) where you live, too. Differences in the landscape, global wind systems, proximity (how close or far you are) from the ocean, and precipitation patterns also determine what the seasons will feel like where you live. 

Cleaning Up. Leadership in an age of climate change.
Ep68: Amory Lovins 'The Einstein of Energy Efficiency'

Cleaning Up. Leadership in an age of climate change.

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 63:35


Amory Lovins is Cofounder and Chairman Emeritus of the Rocky Mountain Institute. Apart from co-founding the Institute in 1982 he served as its Chief Scientist between 2007 and 2019. Amory is a an author of 31 books and more than 700 papers, he has advised major firms and governments on energy in over 70 countries for more than 45 years.He has taught at ten universities, most recently the Naval Postgraduate School (Professor of Practice 2011–17) and Stanford University, where he's currently Adjunct Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and a Scholar of the Precourt Institute for Energy—but only teaching topics he's never formally studied, so as to retain beginner's mind. He served in 2011–18 on the National Petroleum Council and has advised the US Departments of Energy and Defense.He has received the Blue Planet, Volvo, Zayed, Onassis, Nissan, Shingo, and Mitchell Prizes, the MacArthur and Ashoka Fellowships, the Happold, Benjamin Franklin, and Spencer Hutchens Medals, 12 honorary doctorates, and the Heinz, Lindbergh, Right Livelihood (“alternative Nobel”), National Design, and World Technology Awards. In 2016, the President of Germany awarded him the Officer's Cross of the Order of Merit (Bundesverdienstkreuz 1. Klasse).Further reading:IEA Energy Efficiency 2021 report:https://www.iea.org/reports/energy-efficiency-2021Official bio:https://rmi.org/people/amory-lovins/How Big Is the Energy Efficiency Resource?    (a half-hour summary talk is at https://energy.stanford.edu/events/special-energy-seminar-amory-lovins-holmes-hummel)https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/aad965Recalibrating Climate Prospectshttps://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/ab55abCan a Virus and Viral Ideas Speed the World's Journey Beyond Fossil Fuels? (with Kingsmill Bond)https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/abc3f2SAE: Reframing Automotive Fuel Efficiencyhttps://doi.org/10.4271/13-01-01-0004

Supporting I.T. Support: A tabGeeks Podcast
S2E8: Dr. Eric Cole - Cybersecurity Consultant and Virtual CISO

Supporting I.T. Support: A tabGeeks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 58:13


Dr. Eric Cole has a life story that sounds like it should be a movie. He starts out cutting his teeth on cybersecurity for the CIA, when he, get this, decides Cyber Offense is boring since there is always a way to break in. He goes on to become Sr VP and CTO of McAfee, Chief Scientist at Lockheed Martin and even consults on Cyber Security for Bill and Melinda Gates and family as well as many fortune 500 companies. Join us as we discuss his amazing career, when is the right time to make a move professionally, cyber hygiene, his experience in the CIA, and of course what it's like working with Bill and Melinda Gates. He has a new book out called Cyber Crisis, which is all about protecting your business from Real Threats in the Virtual World. I greatly enjoyed reading it, as well as hosting him on this episode of Supporting IT Support. Continue the conversation and join our online experts community of IT professionals at www.tabgeeks.com You can also find me on Twitter @MrJNowlin Subscribe to our other amazing tabGeeks podcast discussing and analyzing Google Workspace updates at workspacerecap.com and stay tuned for other amazing tech content from the tabGeeks Network coming soon! Learn more at tabgeeks.com Thank you to our sponsor for this episode Paladin Tech Solutions. Thank you for helping us keep these shows free and available to all! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/tabgeeks/message

It's a Material World | Materials Science Podcast
40: The Deep Intersection of Materials Science and Art (ft. Dr. Jane Cook)

It's a Material World | Materials Science Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 55:48


Although not initially obvious, there is a significant overlap between what an artist does and what a “traditional” materials engineer does. Both experiment with different materials or iterations of the same material to identify the best fit, making continuous adjustments and using our creativity until the final product is just right. This episode uncovers the vast overlap between materials science and art as well as the importance of using art to develop your creativity and problem solving mindset. Before we introduce our guest, check out our free professional development guide for materials scientists and engineers! Today's guest is Dr. Jane Cook, an artist and educator in MSE and art, with experiences as a Museum Director at Penn State and Chief Scientist at the Corning Museum of Glass. In this episode, she dives into the evolution of materials selection in different phases of art, from paintings to glassblowing to statues. In this conversation, we discuss the following topics: The deep intersection of materials science and art Similarities between traditional materials engineers and artists Polymer vehicles as vehicles for pigments in paintings The materials science behind glassblowing and stained glass Metals processing for the Statue of Liberty and the Charging Bull on Wall Street How carbon nanotubes make up the darkest pigment in the world (Vantablack) Why it's important for all MSEs to incorporate art into their lifestyle Learn more about our MSE Career Development Online Course, which includes more industry-specific information and advice.  Also, check out our MSE-themed merchandise if you want to support us or simply show off your love of materials science! Thank you Joao Morgado for editing this episode! Join our Discord community! You can meet other passionate materials scientists and engineers from around the world, discuss the latest breakthroughs in MSE, share materials-related memes, and get career advice from experts in the field. For shorter segments and full video podcasts, subscribe to our channel on YouTube. For bloopers, audiograms, and interesting materials science articles, follow us on Instagram, LinkedIn, and Twitter. Feel free to message us on our social media platforms if you have any feedback or recommendations for future episodes, or email us directly at itsamaterialworldpodcast@gmail.com. Finally, reach out to David Yeh and Punith Upadhya on LinkedIn if you'd like to chat about the latest breakthroughs in MSE! Disclaimer: Any opinions expressed by either guests or hosts in this show are their own, and do not represent the opinions of the companies or organizations for which they are affiliated.  

CommsCast
KEYNOTE: Professor Katharine Hayhoe: Communicating About Climate Change

CommsCast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 16:20


Friday, October 8 at 2pm EST Dr. Katharine Hayhoe, Climate Scientist and Chief Scientist, The Nature Conservancy Katharine is an atmospheric scientist. She studies climate change, one of the most pressing issues we face today. “We need to make climate change personal.” Saving Us: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Healing in a Divided World - https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/Saving-Us/Katharine-Hayhoe/9781982143831

CTO Connection
Short Byte: Joe Bradley - Leveraging conversational AI

CTO Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 28:46


Conversational AI has come a long way from simple rules based chatbots, but it's still a complex and quickly evolving space. Join me as I chat with Joe Bradley, Chief Scientist at LivePerson, about the use cases, tooling, team structures and gotchas if you're considering implementing a conversational AI system for your company.

Screaming in the Cloud
Keeping the Chaos Searchable with Thomas Hazel

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 44:43


About ThomasThomas Hazel is Founder, CTO, and Chief Scientist of ChaosSearch. He is a serial entrepreneur at the forefront of communication, virtualization, and database technology and the inventor of ChaosSearch's patented IP. Thomas has also patented several other technologies in the areas of distributed algorithms, virtualization and database science. He holds a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science from University of New Hampshire, Hall of Fame Alumni Inductee, and founded both student & professional chapters of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).Links:ChaosSearch: https://www.chaossearch.io TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by my friends at ThinkstCanary. Most companies find out way too late that they've been breached. ThinksCanary changes this and I love how they do it. Deploy canaries and canary tokens in minutes and then forget about them. What's great is the attackers tip their hand by touching them, giving you one alert, when it matters. I use it myself and I only remember this when I get the weekly update with a “we're still here, so you're aware” from them. It's glorious! There is zero admin overhead  to this, there are effectively no false positives unless I do something foolish. Canaries are deployed and loved on all seven continents. You can check out what people are saying at canary.love. And, their Kub config canary token is new and completely free as well. You can do an awful lot without paying them a dime, which is one of the things I love about them. It is useful stuff and not an, “ohh, I wish I had money.” It is speculator! Take a look; that's canary.love because it's genuinely rare to find a security product that people talk about in terms of love. It really is a unique thing to see. Canary.love. Thank you to ThinkstCanary for their support of my ridiculous, ridiculous non-sense.   Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Spelled V-U-L-T-R because they're all about helping save money, including on things like, you know, vowels. So, what they do is they are a cloud provider that provides surprisingly high performance cloud compute at a price that—while sure they claim its better than AWS pricing—and when they say that they mean it is less money. Sure, I don't dispute that but what I find interesting is that it's predictable. They tell you in advance on a monthly basis what it's going to going to cost. They have a bunch of advanced networking features. They have nineteen global locations and scale things elastically. Not to be confused with openly, because apparently elastic and open can mean the same thing sometimes. They have had over a million users. Deployments take less that sixty seconds across twelve pre-selected operating systems. Or, if you're one of those nutters like me, you can bring your own ISO and install basically any operating system you want. Starting with pricing as low as $2.50 a month for Vultr cloud compute they have plans for developers and businesses of all sizes, except maybe Amazon, who stubbornly insists on having something to scale all on their own. Try Vultr today for free by visiting: vultr.com/screaming, and you'll receive a $100 in credit. Thats v-u-l-t-r.com slash screaming.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. This promoted episode is brought to us by our friends at ChaosSearch.We've been working with them for a long time; they've sponsored a bunch of our nonsense, and it turns out that we've been talking about them to our clients since long before they were a sponsor because it actually does what it says on the tin. Here to talk to us about that in a few minutes is Thomas Hazel, ChaosSearch's CTO and founder. First, Thomas, nice to talk to you again, and as always, thanks for humoring me.Thomas: [laugh]. Hi, Corey. Always great to talk to you. And I enjoy these conversations that sometimes go up and down, left and right, but I look forward to all the fun we're going to have.Corey: So, my understanding of ChaosSearch is probably a few years old because it turns out, I don't spend a whole lot of time meticulously studying your company's roadmap in the same way that you presumably do. When last we checked in with what the service did-slash-does, you are effectively solving the problem of data movement and querying that data. The idea behind data warehouses is generally something that's shoved onto us by cloud providers where, “Hey, this data is going to be valuable to you someday.” Data science teams are big proponents of this because when you're storing that much data, their salaries look relatively reasonable by comparison. And the ChaosSearch vision was, instead of copying all this data out of an object store and storing it on expensive disks, and replicating it, et cetera, what if we queried it in place in a somewhat intelligent manner?So, you take the data and you store it, in this case, in S3 or equivalent, and then just query it there, rather than having to move it around all over the place, which of course, then incurs data transfer fees, you're storing it multiple times, and it's never in quite the format that you want it. That was the breakthrough revelation, you were Elasticsearch—now OpenSearch—API compatible, which was great. And that was, sort of, a state of the art a year or two ago. Is that generally correct?Thomas: No, you nailed our mission statement. No, you're exactly right. You know, the value of cloud object stores, S3, the elasticity, the durability, all these wonderful things, the problem was you couldn't get any value out of it, and you had to move it out to these siloed solutions, as you indicated. So, you know, our mission was exactly that, transformed customers' cloud storage into an analytical database, a multi-model analytical database, where our first use case was search and log analytics, replacing the ELK stack and also replacing the data pipeline, the schema management, et cetera. We automate the entire step, raw data to insights.Corey: It's funny we're having this conversation today. Earlier, today, I was trying to get rid of a relatively paltry 200 gigs or so of small files on an EFS volume—you know, Amazon's version of NFS; it's like an NFS volume except you're paying Amazon for the privilege—great. And it turns out that it's a whole bunch of operations across a network on a whole bunch of tiny files, so I had to spin up other instances that were not getting backed by spot terminations, and just firing up a whole bunch of threads. So, now the load average on that box is approaching 300, but it's plowing through, getting rid of that data finally.And I'm looking at this saying this is a quarter of a terabyte. Data warehouses are in the petabyte range. Oh, I begin to see aspects of the problem. Even searching that kind of data using traditional tooling starts to break down, which is sort of the revelation that Google had 20-some-odd years ago, and other folks have since solved for, but this is the first time I've had significant data that wasn't just easily searched with a grep. For those of you in the Unix world who understand what that means, condolences. We're having a support group meeting at the bar.Thomas: Yeah. And you know, I always thought, what if you could make cloud object storage like S3 high performance and really transform it into a database? And so that warehouse capability, that's great. We like that. However to manage it, to scale it, to configure it, to get the data into that, was the problem.That was the promise of a data lake, right? This simple in, and then this arbitrary schema on read generic out. The problem next came, it became swampy, it was really hard, and that promise was not delivered. And so what we're trying to do is get all the benefits of the data lake: simple in, so many services naturally stream to cloud storage. Shoot, I would say every one of our customers are putting their data in cloud storage because their data pipeline to their warehousing solution or Elasticsearch may go down and they're worried they'll lose the data.So, what we say is what if you just said activate that data lake and get that ELK use case, get that BI use case without that data movement, as you indicated, without that ETL-ing, without that data pipeline that you're worried is going to fall over. So, that vision has been Chaos. Now, we haven't talked in, you know, a few years, but this idea that we're growing beyond what we are just going after logs, we're going into new use cases, new opportunities, and I'm looking forward to discussing with you.Corey: It's a great answer that—though I have to call out that I am right there with you as far as inappropriately using things as databases. I know that someone is going to come back and say, “Oh, S3 is a database. You're dancing around it. Isn't that what Athena is?” Which is named, of course, after the Greek Goddess of spending money on AWS? And that is a fair question, but to my understanding, there's a schema story behind that does not apply to what you're doing.Thomas: Yeah, and that is so crucial is that we like the relational access. The time-cost complexity to get it into that, as you mentioned, scaled access, I mean, it could take weeks, months to test it, to configure it, to provision it, and imagine if you got it wrong; you got to redo it again. And so our unique service removes all that data pipeline schema management. And because of our innovation because of our service, you do all schema definition, on the fly, virtually, what we call views on your index data, that you can publish an elastic index pattern for that consumption, or a relational table for that consumption. And that's kind of leading the witness into things that we're coming out with this quarter into 2022.Corey: I have to deal with a little bit of, I guess, a shame here because yeah, I'm doing exactly what you just described. I'm using Athena to wind up querying our customers' Cost and Usage Reports, and we spend a couple hundred bucks a month on AWS Glue to wind up massaging those into the way that they expect it to be. And it's great. Ish. We hook it up to Tableau and can make those queries from it, and all right, it's great.It just, burrr goes the money printer, and we somehow get access and insight to a lot of valuable data. But even that is knowing exactly what the format is going to look like. Ish. I mean, Cost and Usage Reports from Amazon are sort of aspirational when it comes to schema sometimes, but here we are. And that's been all well and good.But now the idea of log files, even looking at the base case of sending logs from an application, great. Nginx, or Apache, or [unintelligible 00:07:24], or any of the various web servers out there all tend to use different logging formats just to describe the same exact things, start spreading that across custom in-house applications and getting signal from that is almost impossible. “Oh,” people say, “So, we'll use a structured data format.” Now, you're putting log and structuring requirements on application developers who don't care in the first place, and now you have a mess on your hands.Thomas: And it really is a mess. And that challenge is, it's so problematic. And schemas changing. You know, we have customers and one reasons why they go with us is their log data is changing; they didn't expect it. Well, in your data pipeline, and your Athena database, that breaks. That brings the system down.And so our system uniquely detects that and manages that for you and then you can pick and choose how you want to export in these views dynamically. So, you know, it's really not rocket science, but the problem is, a lot of the technology that we're using is designed for static, fixed thinking. And then to scale it is problematic and time-consuming. So, you know, Glue is a great idea, but it has a lot of sharp [pebbles 00:08:26]. Athena is a great idea but also has a lot of problems.And so that data pipeline, you know, it's not for digitally native, active, new use cases, new workloads coming up hourly, daily. You think about this long-term; so a lot of that data prep pipelining is something we address so uniquely, but really where the customer cares is the value of that data, right? And so if you're spending toils trying to get the data into a database, you're not answering the questions, whether it's for security, for performance, for your business needs. That's the problem. And you know, that agility, that time-to-value is where we're very uniquely coming in because we start where your data is raw and we automate the process all the way through.Corey: So, when I look at the things that I have stuffed into S3, they generally fall into a couple of categories. There are a bunch of logs for things I never asked for nor particularly wanted, but AWS is aggressive about that, first routing through CloudTrail so you can get charged 50-cent per gigabyte ingested. Awesome. And of course, large static assets, images I have done something to enter colloquially now known as shitposts, which is great. Other than logs, what could you possibly be storing in S3 that lends itself to, effectively, the type of analysis that you built around this?Thomas: Well, our first use case was the classic log use cases, app logs, web service logs. I mean, CloudTrail, it's famous; we had customers that gave up on elastic, and definitely gave up on relational where you can do a couple changes and your permutation of attributes for CloudTrail is going to put you to your knees. And people just say, “I give up.” Same thing with Kubernetes logs. And so it's the classic—whether it's CSV, where it's JSON, where it's log types, we auto-discover all that.We also allow you, if you want to override that and change the parsing capabilities through a UI wizard, we do discover what's in your buckets. That term data swamp, and not knowing what's in your bucket, we do a facility that will index that data, actually create a report for you for knowing what's in. Now, if you have text data, if you have log data, if you have BI data, we can bring it all together, but the real pain is at the scale. So classically, app logs, system logs, many devices sending IoT-type streams is where we really come in—Kubernetes—where they're dealing with terabytes of data per day, and managing an ELK cluster at that scale. Particularly on a Black Friday.Shoot, some of our customers like—Klarna is one of them; credit card payment—they're ramping up for Black Friday, and one of the reasons why they chose us is our ability to scale when maybe you're doing a terabyte or two a day and then it goes up to twenty, twenty-five. How do you test that scale? How do you manage that scale? And so for us, the data streams are, traditionally with our customers, the well-known log types, at least in the log use cases. And the challenge is scaling it, is getting access to it, and that's where we come in.Corey: I will say the last time you were on the show a couple of years ago, you were talking about the initial logging use case and you were speaking, in many cases aspirationally, about where things were going. What a difference a couple years is made. Instead of talking about what hypothetical customers might want, or what—might be able to do, you're just able to name-drop them off the top of your head, you have scaled to approximately ten times the number of employees you had back then. You've—Thomas: Yep. Yep.Corey: —raised, I think, a total of—what, 50 million?—since then.Thomas: Uh, 60 now. Yeah.Corey: Oh, 60? Fantastic.Thomas: Yeah, yeah.Corey: Congrats. And of course, how do you do it? By sponsoring Last Week in AWS, as everyone should. I'm taking clear credit for that every time someone announces around, that's the game. But no, there is validity to it because telling fun stories and sponsoring exciting things like this only carry you so far. At some point, customers have to say, yeah, this is solving a pain that I have; I'm willing to pay you money to solve it.And you've clearly gotten to a point where you are addressing the needs of those customers at a pretty fascinating clip. It's bittersweet from my perspective because it seems like the majority of your customers have not come from my nonsense anymore. They're finding you through word of mouth, they're finding through more traditional—read as boring—ad campaigns, et cetera, et cetera. But you've built a brand that extends beyond just me. I'm no longer viewed as the de facto ombudsperson for any issue someone might have with ChaosSearch on Twitters. It's kind of, “Aww, the company grew up. What happened there?”Thomas: No, [laugh] listen, this you were great. We reached out to you to tell our story, and I got to be honest. A lot of people came by, said, “I heard something on Corey Quinn's podcasts,” or et cetera. And it came a long way now. Now, we have, you know, companies like Equifax, multi-cloud—Amazon and Google.They love the data lake philosophy, the centralized, where use cases are now available within days, not weeks and months. Whether it's logs and BI. Correlating across all those data streams, it's huge. We mentioned Klarna, [APM Performance 00:13:19], and, you know, we have Armor for SIEM, and Blackboard for [Observers 00:13:24].So, it's funny—yeah, it's funny, when I first was talking to you, I was like, “What if? What if we had this customer, that customer?” And we were building the capabilities, but now that we have it, now that we have customers, yeah, I guess, maybe we've grown up a little bit. But hey, listen to you're always near and dear to our heart because we remember, you know, when you stop[ed by our booth at re:Invent several times. And we're coming to re:Invent this year, and I believe you are as well.Corey: Oh, yeah. But people listening to this, it's if they're listening the day it's released, this will be during re:Invent. So, by all means, come by the ChaosSearch booth, and see what they have to say. For once they have people who aren't me who are going to be telling stories about these things. And it's fun. Like, I joke, it's nothing but positive here.It's interesting from where I sit seeing the parallels here. For example, we have both had—how we say—adult supervision come in. You have a CEO, Ed, who came over from IBM Storage. I have Mike Julian, whose first love language is of course spreadsheets. And it's great, on some level, realizing that, wow, this company has eclipsed my ability to manage these things myself and put my hands-on everything. And eventually, you have to start letting go. It's a weird growth stage, and it's a heck of a transition. But—Thomas: No, I love it. You know, I mean, I think when we were talking, we were maybe 15 employees. Now, we're pushing 100. We brought on Ed Walsh, who's an amazing CEO. It's funny, I told him about this idea, I invented this technology roughly eight years ago, and he's like, “I love it. Let's do it.” And I wasn't ready to do it.So, you know, five, six years ago, I started the company always knowing that, you know, I'd give him a call once we got the plane up in the air. And it's been great to have him here because the next level up, right, of execution and growth and business development and sales and marketing. So, you're exactly right. I mean, we were a young pup several years ago, when we were talking to you and, you know, we're a little bit older, a little bit wiser. But no, it's great to have Ed here. And just the leadership in general; we've grown immensely.Corey: Now, we are recording this in advance of re:Invent, so there's always the question of, “Wow, are we going to look really silly based upon what is being announced when this airs?” Because it's very hard to predict some things that AWS does. And let's be clear, I always stay away from predictions, just because first, I have a bit of a knack for being right. But also, when I'm right, people will think, “Oh, Corey must have known about that and is leaking,” whereas if I get it wrong, I just look like a fool. There's no win for me if I start doing the predictive dance on stuff like that.But I have to level with you, I have been somewhat surprised that, at least as of this recording, AWS has not moved more in your direction because storing data in S3 is kind of their whole thing, and querying that data through something that isn't Athena has been a bit of a reach for them that they're slowly starting to wrap their heads around. But their UltraWarm nonsense—which is just, okay, great naming there—what is the point of continually having a model where oh, yeah, we're going to just age it out, the stuff that isn't actively being used into S3, rather than coming up with a way to query it there. Because you've done exactly that, and please don't take this as anything other than a statement of fact, they have better access to what S3 is doing than you do. You're forced to deal with this thing entirely from a public API standpoint, which is fine. They can theoretically change the behavior of aspects of S3 to unlock these use cases if they chose to do so. And they haven't. Why is it that you're the only folks that are doing this?Thomas: No, it's a great question, and I'll give them props for continuing to push the data lake [unintelligible 00:17:09] to the cloud providers' S3 because it was really where I saw the world. Lakes, I believe in. I love them. They love them. However, they promote the move the data out to get access, and it seems so counterintuitive on why wouldn't you leave it in and put these services, make them more intelligent? So, it's funny, I've trademark ‘Smart Object Storage,' I actually trademarked—I think you [laugh] were a part of this—‘UltraHot,' right? Because why would you want UltraWarm when you can have UltraHot?And the reason, I feel, is that if you're using Parquet for Athena [unintelligible 00:17:40] store, or Lucene for Elasticsearch, these two index technologies were not designed for cloud storage, for real-time streaming off of cloud storage. So, the trick is, you have to build UltraWarm, get it off of what they consider cold S3 into a more warmer memory or SSD type access. What we did, what the invention I created was, that first read is hot. That first read is fast.Snowflake is a good example. They give you a ten terabyte demo example, and if you have a big instance and you do that first query, maybe several orders or groups, it could take an hour to warm up. The second query is fast. Well, what if the first query is in seconds as well? And that's where we really spent the last five, six years building out the tech and the vision behind this because I like to say you go to a doctor and say, “Hey, Doc, every single time I move my arm, it hurts.” And the doctor says, “Well, don't move your arm.”It's things like that, to your point, it's like, why wouldn't they? I would argue, one, you have to believe it's possible—we're proving that it is—and two, you have to have the technology to do it. Not just the index, but the architecture. So, I believe they will go this direction. You know, little birdies always say that all these companies understand this need.Shoot, Snowflake is trying to be lake-y; Databricks is trying to really bring this warehouse lake concept. But you still do all the pipelining; you still have to do all the data management the way that you don't want to do. It's not a lake. And so my argument is that it's innovation on why. Now, they have money; they have time, but, you know, we have a big head start.Corey: I remembered last year at re:Invent they released a, shall we say, significant change to S3 that it enabled read after write consistency, which is awesome, for again, those of us in the business of misusing things as databases. But for some folks, the majority of folks I would say, it was a, “I don't know what that means and therefore I don't care.” And that's fine. I have no issue with that. There are other folks, some of my customers for example, who are suddenly, “Wait a minute. This means I can sunset this entire janky sidecar metadata system that is designed to make sure that we are consistent in our use of S3 because it now does it automatically under the hood?” And that's awesome. Does that change mean anything for ChaosSearch?Thomas: It doesn't because of our architecture. We're append-only, write-once scenario, so a lot of update-in-place viewpoints. My viewpoint is that if you're seeing S3 as the database and you need that type of consistency, it make sense of why you'd want it, but because of our distributive fabric, our stateless architecture, our append-only nature, it really doesn't affect us.Now, I talked to the S3 team, I said, “Please if you're coming up with this feature, it better not be slower.” I want S3 to be fast, right? And they said, “No, no. It won't affect performance.” I'm like, “Okay. Let's keep that up.”And so to us, any type of S3 capability, we'll take advantage of it if benefits us, whether it's consistency as you indicated, performance, functionality. But we really keep the constructs of S3 access to really limited features: list, put, get. [roll-on 00:20:49] policies to give us read-only access to your data, and a location to write our indices into your account, and then are distributed fabric, our service, acts as those indices and query them or searches them to resolve whatever analytics you need. So, we made it pretty simple, and that is allowed us to make it high performance.Corey: I'll take it a step further because you want to talk about changes since the last time we spoke, it used to be that this was on top of S3, you can store your data anywhere you want, as long as it's S3 in the customer's account. Now, you're also supporting one-click integration with Google Cloud's object storage, which, great. That does mean though, that you're not dependent upon provider-specific implementations of things like a consistency model for how you've built things. It really does use the lowest common denominator—to my understanding—of object stores. Is that something that you're seeing broad adoption of, or is this one of those areas where, well, you have one customer on a different provider, but almost everything lives on the primary? I'm curious what you're seeing for adoption models across multiple providers?Thomas: It's a great question. We built an architecture purposely to be cloud-agnostic. I mean, we use compute in a containerized way, we use object storage in a very simple construct—put, get, list—and we went over to Google because that made sense, right? We have customers on both sides. I would say Amazon is the gorilla, but Google's trying to get there and growing.We had a big customer, Equifax, that's on both Amazon and Google, but we offer the same service. To be frank, it looks like the exact same product. And it should, right? Whether it's Amazon Cloud, or Google Cloud, multi-select and I want to choose either one and get the other one. I would say that different business types are using each one, but our bulk of the business isn't Amazon, but we just this summer released our SaaS offerings, so it's growing.And you know, it's funny, you never know where it comes from. So, we have one customer—actually DigitalRiver—as one of our customers on Amazon for logs, but we're growing in working together to do a BI on GCP or on Google. And so it's kind of funny; they have two departments on two different clouds with two different use cases. And so do they want unification? I'm not sure, but they definitely have their BI on Google and their operations in Amazon. It's interesting.Corey: You know its important to me that people learn how to use the cloud effectively. Thats why I'm so glad that Cloud Academy is sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense. They're a great way to build in demand tech skills the way that, well personally, I learn best which I learn by doing not by reading. They have live cloud labs that you can run in real environments that aren't going to blow up your own bill—I can't stress how important that is. Visit cloudacademy.com/corey. Thats C-O-R-E-Y, don't drop the “E.” Use Corey as a promo-code as well. You're going to get a bunch of discounts on it with a lifetime deal—the price will not go up. It is limited time, they assured me this is not one of those things that is going to wind up being a rug pull scenario, oh no no. Talk to them, tell me what you think. Visit: cloudacademy.com/corey,  C-O-R-E-Y and tell them that I sent you!Corey: I know that I'm going to get letters for this. So, let me just call it out right now. Because I've been a big advocate of pick a provider—I care not which one—and go all-in on it. And I'm sitting here congratulating you on extending to another provider, and people are going to say, “Ah, you're being inconsistent.”No. I'm suggesting that you as a provider have to meet your customers where they are because if someone is sitting in GCP and your entire approach is, “Step one, migrate those four petabytes of data right on over here to AWS,” they're going to call you that jackhole that you would be by making that suggestion and go immediately for option B, which is literally anything that is not ChaosSearch, just based upon that core misunderstanding of their business constraints. That is the way to think about these things. For a vendor position that you are in as an ISV—Independent Software Vendor for those not up on the lingo of this ridiculous industry—you have to meet customers where they are. And it's the right move.Thomas: Well, you just said it. Imagine moving terabytes and petabytes of data.Corey: It sounds terrific if I'm a salesperson for one of these companies working on commission, but for the rest of us, it sounds awful.Thomas: We really are a data fabric across clouds, within clouds. We're going to go where the data is and we're going to provide access to where that data lives. Our whole philosophy is the no-movement movement, right? Don't move your data. Leave it where it is and provide access at scale.And so you may have services in Google that naturally stream to GCS; let's do it there. Imagine moving that amount of data over to Amazon to analyze it, and vice versa. 2020, we're going to be in Azure. They're a totally different type of business, users, and personas, but you're getting asked, “Can you support Azure?” And the answer is, “Yes,” and, “We will in 2022.”So, to us, if you have cloud storage, if you have compute, and it's a big enough business opportunity in the market, we're there. We're going there. When we first started, we were talking to MinIO—remember that open-source, object storage platform?—We've run on our laptops, we run—this [unintelligible 00:25:04] Dr. Seuss thing—“We run over here; we run over there; we run everywhere.”But the honest truth is, you're going to go with the big cloud providers where the business opportunity is, and offer the same solution because the same solution is valued everywhere: simple in; value out; cost-effective; long retention; flexibility. That sounds so basic, but you mentioned this all the time with our Rube Goldberg, Amazon diagrams we see time and time again. It's like, if you looked at that and you were from an alien planet, you'd be like, “These people don't know what they're doing. Why is it so complicated?” And the simple answer is, I don't know why people think it's complicated.To your point about Amazon, why won't they do it? I don't know, but if they did, things would be different. And being honest, I think people are catching on. We do talk to Amazon and others. They see the need, but they also have to build it; they have to invent technology to address it. And using Parquet and Lucene are not the answer.Corey: Yeah, it's too much of a demand on the producers of that data rather than the consumer. And yeah, I would love to be able to go upstream to application developers and demand they do things in certain ways. It turns out as a consultant, you have zero authority to do that. As a DevOps team member, you have limited ability to influence it, but it turns out that being the ‘department of no' quickly turns into being the ‘department of unemployment insurance' because no one wants to work with you. And collaboration—contrary to what people wish to believe—is a key part of working in a modern workplace.Thomas: Absolutely. And it's funny, the demands of IT are getting harder; the actual getting the employees to build out the solutions are getting harder. And so a lot of that time is in the pipeline, is the prep, is the schema, the sharding, and et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. My viewpoint is that should be automated away. More and more databases are being autotune, right?This whole knobs and this and that, to me, Glue is a means to an end. I mean, let's get rid of it. Why can't Athena know what to do? Why can't object storage be Athena and vice versa? I mean, to me, it seems like all this moving through all these services, the classic Amazon viewpoint, even their diagrams of having this centralized repository of S3, move it all out to your services, get results, put it back in, then take it back out again, move it around, it just doesn't make much sense. And so to us, I love S3, love the service. I think it's brilliant—Amazon's first service, right?—but from there get a little smarter. That's where ChaosSearch comes in.Corey: I would argue that S3 is in fact, a modern miracle. And one of those companies saying, “Oh, we have an object store; it's S3 compatible.” It's like, “Yeah. We have S3 at home.” Look at S3 at home, and it's just basically a series of failing Raspberry Pis.But you have this whole ecosystem of things that have built up and sprung up around S3. It is wildly understated just how scalable and massive it is. There was an academic paper recently that won an award on how they use automated reasoning to validate what is going on in the S3 environment, and they talked about hundreds of petabytes in some cases. And folks are saying, ah, S3 is hundreds of petabytes. Yeah, I have clients storing hundreds of petabytes.There are larger companies out there. Steve Schmidt, Amazon's CISO, was recently at a Splunk keynote where he mentioned that in security info alone, AWS itself generates 500 petabytes a day that then gets reduced down to a bunch of stuff, and some of it gets loaded into Splunk. I think. I couldn't really hear the second half of that sentence because of the sound of all of the Splunk salespeople in that room becoming excited so quickly you could hear it.Thomas: [laugh]. I love it. If I could be so bold, those S3 team, they're gods. They are amazing. They created such an amazing service, and when I started playing with S3 now, I guess, 2006 or 7, I mean, we were using for a repository, URL access to get images, I was doing a virtualization [unintelligible 00:29:05] at the time—Corey: Oh, the first time I played with it, “This seems ridiculous and kind of dumb. Why would anyone use this?” Yeah, yeah. It turns out I'm really bad at predicting the future. Another reason I don't do the prediction thing.Thomas: Yeah. And when I started this company officially, five, six years ago, I was thinking about S3 and I was thinking about HDFS not being a good answer. And I said, “I think S3 will actually achieve the goals and performance we need.” It's a distributed file system. You can run parallel puts and parallel gets. And the performance that I was seeing when the data was a certain way, certain size, “Wait, you can get high performance.”And you know, when I first turned on the engine, now four or five years ago, I was like, “Wow. This is going to work. We're off to the races.” And now obviously, we're more than just an idea when we first talked to you. We're a service.We deliver benefits to our customers both in logs. And shoot, this quarter alone we're coming out with new features not just in the logs, which I'll talk about second, but in a direct SQL access. But you know, one thing that you hear time and time again, we talked about it—JSON, CloudTrail, and Kubernetes; this is a real nightmare, and so one thing that we've come out with this quarter is the ability to virtually flatten. Now, you heard time and time again, where, “Okay. I'm going to pick and choose my data because my database can't handle whether it's elastic, or say, relational.” And all of a sudden, “Shoot, I don't have that. I got to reindex that.”And so what we've done is we've created a index technology that we're always planning to come out with that indexes the JSON raw blob, but in the data refinery have, post-index you can select how to unflatten it. Why is that important? Because all that tooling, whether it's elastic or SQL, is now available. You don't have to change anything. Why is Snowflake and BigQuery has these proprietary JSON APIs that none of these tools know how to use to get access to the data?Or you pick and choose. And so when you have a CloudTrail, and you need to know what's going on, if you picked wrong, you're in trouble. So, this new feature we're calling ‘Virtual Flattening'—or I don't know what we're—we have to work with the marketing team on it. And we're also bringing—this is where I get kind of excited where the elastic world, the ELK world, we're bringing correlations into Elasticsearch. And like, how do you do that? They don't have the APIs?Well, our data refinery, again, has the ability to correlate index patterns into one view. A view is an index pattern, so all those same constructs that you had in Kibana, or Grafana, or Elastic API still work. And so, no more denormalizing, no more trying to hodgepodge query over here, query over there. You're actually going to have correlations in Elastic, natively. And we're excited about that.And one more push on the future, Q4 into 2022; we have been given early access to S3 SQL access. And, you know, as I mentioned, correlations in Elastic, but we're going full in on publishing our [TPCH 00:31:56] report, we're excited about publishing those numbers, as well as not just giving early access, but going GA in the first of the year, next year.Corey: I look forward to it. This is also, I guess, it's impossible to have a conversation with you, even now, where you're not still forward-looking about what comes next. Which is natural; that is how we get excited about the things that we're building. But so much less of what you're doing now in our conversations have focused around what's coming, as opposed to the neat stuff you're already doing. I had to double-check when we were talking just now about oh, yeah, is that Google cloud object store support still something that is roadmapped, or is that out in the real world?No, it's very much here in the real world, available today. You can use it. Go click the button, have fun. It's neat to see at least some evidence that not all roadmaps are wishes and pixie dust. The things that you were talking to me about years ago are established parts of ChaosSearch now. It hasn't been just, sort of, frozen in amber for years, or months, or these giant periods of time. Because, again, there's—yeah, don't sell me vaporware; I know how this works. The things you have promised have come to fruition. It's nice to see that.Thomas: No, I appreciate it. We talked a little while ago, now a few years ago, and it was a bit of aspirational, right? We had a lot to do, we had more to do. But now when we have big customers using our product, solving their problems, whether it's security, performance, operation, again—at scale, right? The real pain is, sure you have a small ELK cluster or small Athena use case, but when you're dealing with terabytes to petabytes, trillions of rows, right—billions—when you were dealing trillions, billions are now small. Millions don't even exist, right?And you're graduating from computer science in college and you say the word, “Trillion,” they're like, “Nah. No one does that.” And like you were saying, people do petabytes and exabytes. That's the world we're living in, and that's something that we really went hard at because these are challenging data problems and this is where we feel we uniquely sit. And again, we don't have to break the bank while doing it.Corey: Oh, yeah. Or at least as of this recording, there's a meme going around, again, from an old internal Google Video, of, “I just want to serve five terabytes of traffic,” and it's an internal Google discussion of, “I don't know how to count that low.” And, yeah.Thomas: [laugh].Corey: But there's also value in being able to address things at much larger volume. I would love to see better responsiveness options around things like Deep Archive because the idea of being able to query that—even if you can wait a day or two—becomes really interesting just from the perspective of, at that point, current cost for one petabyte of data in Glacier Deep Archive is 1000 bucks a month. That is ‘why would I ever delete data again?' Pricing.Thomas: Yeah. You said it. And what's interesting about our technology is unlike, let's say Lucene, when you index it, it could be 3, 4, or 5x the raw size, our representation is smaller than gzip. So, it is a full representation, so why don't you store it efficiently long-term in S3? Oh, by the way, with the Glacier; we support Glacier too.And so, I mean, it's amazing the cost of data with cloud storage is dramatic, and if you can make it hot and activated, that's the real promise of a data lake. And, you know, it's funny, we use our own service to run our SaaS—we log our own data, we monitor, we alert, have dashboards—and I can't tell you how cheap our service is to ourselves, right? Because it's so cost-effective for long-tail, not just, oh, a few weeks; we store a whole year's worth of our operational data so we can go back in time to debug something or figure something out. And a lot of that's savings. Actually, huge savings is cloud storage with a distributed elastic compute fabric that is serverless. These are things that seem so obvious now, but if you have SSDs, and you're moving things around, you know, a team of IT professionals trying to manage it, it's not cheap.Corey: Oh, yeah, that's the story. It's like, “Step one, start paying for using things in cloud.” “Okay, great. When do I stop paying?” “That's the neat part. You don't.” And it continues to grow and build.And again, this is the thing I learned running a business that focuses on this, the people working on this, in almost every case, are more expensive than the infrastructure they're working on. And that's fine. I'd rather pay people than technologies. And it does help reaffirm, on some level, that—people don't like this reminder—but you have to generate more value than you cost. So, when you're sitting there spending all your time trying to avoid saving money on, “Oh, I've listened to ChaosSearch talk about what they do a few times. I can probably build my own and roll it at home.”It's, I've seen the kind of work that you folks have put into this—again, you have something like 100 employees now; it is not just you building this—my belief has always been that if you can buy something that gets you 90, 95% of where you are, great. Buy it, and then yell at whoever selling it to you for the rest of it, and that'll get you a lot further than, “We're going to do this ourselves from first principles.” Which is great for a weekend project for just something that you have a passion for, but in production mistakes show. I've always been a big proponent of buying wherever you can. It's cheaper, which sounds weird, but it's true.Thomas: And we do the same thing. We have single-sign-on support; we didn't build that ourselves, we use a service now. Auth0 is one of our providers now that owns that [crosstalk 00:37:12]—Corey: Oh, you didn't roll your own authentication layer? Why ever not? Next, you're going to tell me that you didn't roll your own payment gateway when you wound up charging people on your website to sign up?Thomas: You got it. And so, I mean, do what you do well. Focus on what you do well. If you're repeating what everyone seems to do over and over again, time, costs, complexity, and… service, it makes sense. You know, I'm not trying to build storage; I'm using storage. I'm using a great, wonderful service, cloud object storage.Use whats works, whats works well, and do what you do well. And what we do well is make cloud object storage analytical and fast. So, call us up and we'll take away that 2 a.m. call you have when your cluster falls down, or you have a new workload that you are going to go to the—I don't know, the beach house, and now the weekend shot, right? Spin it up, stream it in. We'll take over.Corey: Yeah. So, if you're listening to this and you happen to be at re:Invent, which is sort of an open question: why would you be at re:Invent while listening to a podcast? And then I remember how long the shuttle lines are likely to be, and yeah. So, if you're at re:Invent, make it on down to the show floor, visit the ChaosSearch booth, tell them I sent you, watch for the wince, that's always worth doing. Thomas, if people have better decision-making capability than the two of us do, where can they find you if they're not in Las Vegas this week?Thomas: So, you find us online chaossearch.io. We have so much material, videos, use cases, testimonials. You can reach out to us, get a free trial. We have a self-service experience where connect to your S3 bucket and you're up and running within five minutes.So, definitely chaossearch.io. Reach out if you want a hand-held, white-glove experience POV. If you have those type of needs, we can do that with you as well. But we booth on re:Invent and I don't know the booth number, but I'm sure either we've assigned it or we'll find it out.Corey: Don't worry. This year, it is a low enough attendance rate that I'm projecting that you will not be as hard to find in recent years. For example, there's only one expo hall this year. What a concept. If only it hadn't taken a deadly pandemic to get us here.Thomas: Yeah. But you know, we'll have the ability to demonstrate Chaos at the booth, and really, within a few minutes, you'll say, “Wow. How come I never heard of doing it this way?” Because it just makes so much sense on why you do it this way versus the merry-go-round of data movement, and transformation, and schema management, let alone all the sharding that I know is a nightmare, more often than not.Corey: And we'll, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:39:40]. Thomas, thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. As always, it's appreciated.Thomas: Corey, thank you. Let's do this again.Corey: We absolutely will. Thomas Hazel, CTO and Founder of ChaosSearch. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast episode, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this episode, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment because I have dared to besmirch the honor of your homebrewed object store, running on top of some trusty and reliable Raspberries Pie.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The Community Cats Podcast
Dr. Jacquie Rand, Executive Director and Chief Scientist, Australian Pet Welfare Foundation

The Community Cats Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 38:19


This episode is sponsored in part by Humane Network and Doobert.com. Dr. Jaquie Rand is currently using research to tackle issues around community cats and the criminalization of Trap, Neuter, Release practices in Australia. After navigating significant resistance for over a year and a half, she was able to launch a research project to negate arguments about disease spread by cats, the impact of cat predation on native wildlife, and the benefits of sterilization. In the midst of COVID, data collection turned to neighborhood surveys which revealed paradigm-shifting data that challenged notions about the human element in the community cat equation. Stacy and Dr. Rand discuss barriers that are faced by cats' owners⸺especially those with limited financial resources⸺to access spay and neuter procedures. They chat about the value of research in finding possible solutions, prioritizing municipal support based on need, and educating stakeholders to make TNR a more viable option. To learn more, visit the Australian Pet Welfare Foundation's website or email them at: info@petwelfare.org.au. To see the impact that Dr. Jacquie Rand's work is making, follow the APWF's Facebook, Instagram, or connect with them on Linked In.

The Business of Government Hour
Business of Government Hour: A conversation with Dr. Timothy M. Persons

The Business of Government Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 55:58


What is the purpose of the U.S. Government Accountability Office's (GAO) Science, Technology Assessment, and Analytics team? How is GAO innovating the way it does business? What emerging technologies offer the most promise and require the most oversight? Join host Michael Keegan as he explores these questions and more with Dr. Timothy Persons, Chief Scientist and Managing Director, Science, Technology Assessment, and Analytics team at GAO.

The Business of Government Hour
Dr. Timothy Persons, Chief Scientist and Managing Director, Science, Technology Assessment, and Analytics team, U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO)

The Business of Government Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021


What is the purpose of the U.S. Government Accountability Office's (GAO) Science, Technology Assessment, and Analytics team? How is GAO innovating the way it does business? What emerging technologies offer the most promise and require the most oversight? Join host Michael Keegan as he explores these questions and more with Dr. Timothy Persons, Chief Scientist […]

The Climate Question
What can we learn from the fight to fix the Ozone hole?

The Climate Question

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 27:30


In 1985 British scientist Jonathan Shanklin and colleagues published a study that shocked the world. The study revealed a hole in the Earth's atmosphere right over Antarctica. It had been caused over time by chemicals known as CFCs, used in things like fridges, air conditioning units and aerosol cans. These were destroying the layer of ozone in the stratosphere which protects us from most of the sun's ultraviolet radiation - without it, cases of skin cancer would soar. Less than two years after the discovery, world leaders signed an agreement called the Montreal Protocol, committing to phase out CFCs. It's been described as the most successful international treaty of all time - every UN country has signed up, and ozone is expected to return to its previous levels around the middle of the century. So what can we learn from how we tackled the ozone hole in how we address climate change? Presenters Neal Razzell and Kate Lamble are joined by: Jonathan Shanklin, Meterologist at the British Antarctic Survey Dr Paul Newman, Chief Scientist for Earth Science at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Centre Tina Birmpili, former Executive Secretary of the Ozone Secretariat Dr Anita Ganesan, Associate Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry at the University of Bristol Producer: Sophie Eastaugh Researcher: Natasha Fernandes Series producer: Alex Lewis Editor: Emma Rippon Sound engineer: Tom Brignell

Political Misfits
Arkansas Anti-BDS Law; NASA DART Mission; UK Citizenship Bill

Political Misfits

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 111:36


Richard Becker, author of "Palestine, Israel and the U.S. Empire" joins us to discuss the ongoing campaign against the Boycott Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement, which saw a local newspaper in Arkansas threatened with a withdrawal of advertising from a local company due to a state law that asks businesses to pledge not to support any boycotts of Israel. We talk about the pervasiveness of such laws, with 30 states having laws similar to the one Arkansas passed in 2017, and whether we are starting to see some resistance to knee-jerk support for Israel. Katherine Rahill, Senior Scientist for the Office of the Chief Scientist of NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) at Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, joins us to talk about the news of NASA's DART mission attempting to manually alter the course of an asteroid by smashing a spacecraft into it at high speeds to test a defense mechanism against wayward asteroids that may threaten Earth. We also discuss the prospects of the mission's success and whether we will see a planetary defense system in the future.Mohamed Elmaazi, journalist and contributor to numerous outlets including Jacobin, The Canary, The Grayzone, and The Real News, talks to us about the dangerous implications of a new Nationality and Borders bill currently moving through the British House of Commons, which would allow the government to remove a person's citizenship without having to give them notice so long as it is deemed in the public interest or the interests of national security. We discuss the impact this bill could have not only on naturalized immigrants, but citizens born in the UK as well. Esther Iverem, multidisciplinary author and independent journalist, host of "On The Ground: Voices of Resistance From the Nation's Capital" on Pacifica Radio, and founding member of DC Poets Against the War, joins hosts Michelle Witte and Bob Schlehuber to talk about a jury awarding $26 million in the Charlottesville "Unite the Right" rally civil case, the latest developments in Ethiopia, and two examples of how American society and our judicial system are not designed to rehabilitate people.

The Work From Home Show
S2Ep47: How Working From Home Can Impact Our Ocean's Fate with Dr. Sylvia A. Earle

The Work From Home Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 20:29


For a long time we thought of the oceans as expendable. As places we could dump trash and other items and not have to worry about them ever again. But then we became more educated and realized that, as Dr. Sylvia Earle put so well in her first book, our fate and the ocean's are one. The pandemic causing us to shift so hard toward working from home has definitely impacted our world, and our oceans. Adam and Naresh are joined by Dr. Earle to discuss what's happening today, whether we're doing enough to save our planet moving forward, and whether the work from home movement is helping the cause. Sylvia is the Founder of Deep Ocean Exploration and the Sylvia Earle Alliance (S.E.A.) & Mission Blue Research; National Geographic Society Explorer in Residence; First female Chief Scientist of the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Time Magazine's Hero for the Planet in 1998; subject of the Emmy® Award Winning Netflix documentary, Mission Blue and Seaspiracy, and bestselling author of The World Is Blue: How Our Fate and the Ocean's Are One and the new book NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC OCEAN: A Global Odyssey. Website: www.Mission-Blue.org www.Patreon.com/WorkFromHomeShow www.WorkFromHomeShow.com

Cognitive Revolution
#73: Tara Thiagarajan on Brains—All 7 Billion of Them

Cognitive Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 33:56


Tara Thiagarajan is the Founder and Chief Scientist of Sapien Labs. Based in Washington, DC, Sapien Labs is a non-profit organization whose mission is to take brain diversity seriously. Most research in psychology and neuroscience treats the brain as a kind of monolithic entity, as if every brain were the same. But we know that's not true: there are important differences in the brain not only between individuals, but within the same individual from day-to-day. We also know that psychology and neuroscience have historically focused on a skewed sample of mostly white, mostly American, mostly undergraduate participants. Tara's goal with Sapien Labs is to truly account for what it means to look at differences in brains among all people on the planet. One of their in-progress projects is the Human Brain Diversity Project. Over the next five years, this project will "build an open database of 40,000 individuals across 4 countries and continents consisting of EEG recordings along with extensive information about demographics, lifestyle, technology use, diet and cognitive and mental health aspects." One of their papers, published this year in Nature Scientific Reports, showed the effect of "stimulus poverty" on brain physiology. They showed that the different stimuli people encounter on an average day—from phone use, to travel, to reading, and beyond—correlate with different physiological signatures in the brain, as measured by EEG. I found Tara's projects, as well as her overall story, very fascinating. I'm excited to see how those projects continue to develop in the coming years. More info: codykommers.com/post/73-tara-thiagarajan

Duck Season Somewhere
Abundant Waterfowl, Endless Hunter Opportunities and Delta Waterfowl, with Dr. Frank Rohwer

Duck Season Somewhere

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 67:54


Dr. Frank Rohwer grew up duck hunting the Chesapeake Bay, pursued a career in waterfowl-related applied sciences, and is currently President and Chief Scientist for Delta Waterfowl. After spending time together in a North Dakota duck blind, Rohwer and Ramsey Russell discuss Delta Waterfowl's origins and pertinent North American waterfowl management issues, to include a new proposed management scenario for northern pintails. How'd Rohwer's earlier hunting experiences influence career direction? What are Delta Waterfowl's origins? Why are pintail populations struggling? Is the restrictive US pintail bag limit working? Why might increased bag limits be beneficial, and what are the hurdles? How's the drought going to affect future US bag limits? Does hunter harvest harm duck populations? How does pintail management differ from canvasbacks or mallards? Delta Waterfowl's vision is abundant waterfowl and endless opportunities for hunters. Never has it been more obvious than in today's enlightening discussion.    Podcast Sponsors: BOSS Shotshells Benelli Shotguns Kanati Waterfowl Taxidermy Mojo Outdoors Tom Beckbe Flash Back Decoys GetDucks USHuntList   It's really duck season somewhere for 365 days per year. Follow Ramsey Russell's worldwide duck hunting adventures as he chases real duck hunting experiences all year long: Instagram @ramseyrussellgetducks YouTube @GetDucks Facebook @GetDucks.com   Please subscribe, rate and review Duck Season Somewhere podcast. Share your favorite episodes with friends! Business inquiries and comments contact Ramsey Russell ramsey@getducks.com  

Management Matters Podcast
Improving End-User Outcomes through Artificial Intelligence with Tim Persons

Management Matters Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 32:55


On this episode, we welcome Tim Persons, Chief Scientist and Managing Director at the U.S. Government Accountability Office and Academy Fellow, to discuss recruiting the next generation of the AI workforce, oversight and accountability frameworks for AI, and how public administrators can adapt to a rapidly changing technologic environment.  Music Credits: Sea Breeze by Vlad Gluschenko | https://soundcloud.com/vgl9Music promoted by https://www.free-stock-music.comCreative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported Licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en_US

Your Superior Self
Real Magic- Dean Radin, Ph.D.

Your Superior Self

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 61:31


Dean Radin is Chief Scientist at the Institute of Noetic Sciences (IONS) and Associated Distinguished Professor at the California Institute of Integral Studies. He earned a BS (electrical engineering), and then an MS (electrical engineering), and a Ph.D. (psychology) from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Before joining the IONS research staff in 2001, Radin worked at AT&T Bell Labs, Princeton University, University of Edinburgh, and SRI International. He has given over 600 talks and interviews worldwide, and he is author or co-author of over 300 scientific and popular articles, four dozen book chapters and forewords, two technical books, and four popular books translated into 15 foreign languages: The Conscious Universe (1997, HarperCollins), Entangled Minds (2006, Simon & Schuster), Supernormal (2013, RandomHouse), and Real Magic (2018, PenguinRandomHouse).  

Harvard Data Science Review Podcast
Government Data: How Do They Serve Us but Also Concern Us

Harvard Data Science Review Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 35:15


On this episode we examine how the U.S. government collects data to serve the public and how to ensure such a process does not hurt the people it aims to serve. We discuss the good, the bad, and the ugly sides of this topic including privacy issues, the 2020 U.S. Census, how well-intended methods may adversely affect minority populations, and why it's important for local communities to collect and report their own data. We also ask how transparent should the federal government be about its data collection and who should the public be most worried about when it comes to data privacy? Our guests are Tim Persons, Chief Scientist for the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) and Managing Director of its Science, Technology Assessment, and Analytics team and Julia Lane, New York University professor and co-founder of the Coleridge Initiative, a not-for-profit organization that is working with governments to ensure that data are more effectively used for public decision-making.

CTO Connection
Short Byte: Labhesh Patel - Diversity, Inclusion and Bias in AI Systems

CTO Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 30:48


Most companies are increasingly trying to leverage data science to achieve their business goals, but it's easy to create biased models that disadvantage underrepresented groups. In this episode I get to chat with Labhesh Patel, CTO and Chief Scientist at Jumio.We start by looking at common types of data bias around representation and features that may be highly correlated with protected features (zip codes that are highly correlated with race, for example) and the challenges of supervised learning where the team tagging your data can also introduce bias into models.We then discuss the benefits of increasing the diversity and inclusiveness of both your tagging and modeling teams and questions you can ask as an engineering leader to make sure your data science team is being thoughtful about the potential impact of the models they're building.

Citizens' Climate Lobby
Closing Keynote & Plenary: #CCL2021 November Conference

Citizens' Climate Lobby

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 20:56


Dr. Katharine Hayhoe, The Nature Conservancy's Chief Scientist and Atmospheric Scientist and Professor, Texas Tech University, shares her takeaways from COP26 and reviews her latest book, "Saving Us." In SAVING US: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Healing in a Divided World Dr. Hayhoe draws upon interdisciplinary research and personal stories to demonstrate that whether you're a parent or a person of faith, a beachgoer or a sports fan, a foodie or a travel junkie, climate change affects someone or something you care about, which means you already have power to act for change. While other books in this space offer doomsday scenarios, Hayhoe ‘s approach is optimistic and inclusive. She argues that climate action isn't about being a certain type of person or voting a certain way. It's about connecting with our communities based on the values we already have, to inspire collective action. Order your copy of the book here: https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/Saving-Us/Katharine-Hayhoe/9781982143831  Dr. Hayhoe's TIME Essay: https://time.com/6089999/climate-change-hope/  Global Weirding on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCi6RkdaEqgRVKi3AzidF4ow  Hear about CCL's vision forward and how we'll get there. w/ Mark Reynolds CCL Executive Director and Madeleine Para CCL President Share your ideas for CCL's future focus: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdR7E9kfAcvF_3uNzaxmqzoNeuElWjTv9JcPOgnSofv_t9Huw/viewform  #SavingUs #KatharineHayhoe #Climate #ClimateSolutions

The Decision Corner
Why your HR practices might not be as inclusive as you think with Sonia Kang

The Decision Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 41:53


In this episode of the podcast, Brooke speaks to Sonia Kang, Associate Professor at the University of Toronto, Chief Scientist at the Behavioural Economics in Action Research Center at Rotman School of Management, and Canada Research Chair in Identity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Their conversation addresses some of the major diversity and inclusion pain points that job candidates, employees, and employers encounter throughout the HR cycle, from recruitment to onboarding and training. Sonia shares fascinating insights from her research, and offers practical advice for organizations seeking to improve the processes they use to attract talent, and ensure their employees feel as though they belong and are valued in their workplace. Some of the things discussed include: Recruitment barriers, from gender stereotypes to biased application systems. Zooming out to the wider picture when searching for the right candidates, and how hiring in sets can help identify the best people for your existing teams. Making employees feel like they belong through onboarding co-creation. The use of defaults to encourage promotion competition. Practical steps organizations can immediately take to address gaps in their inclusion and diversity strategies.

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas
173 | Sylvia Earle on the Oceans, the Planet, and People

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 73:50


It's a well-worn cliché that oceans cover seventy percent of the surface of Earth, but we tend to give them secondary consideration when thinking about the environment. But climate change is wreaking havoc on the oceans, not to mention pollution and overfishing — 90% of the world's marine fish stocks are fully exploited or depleted. Today's guest, Sylvia Earle, is a well-known ocean scientist, a celebrated underwater explorer, and a tireless advocate for the world's oceans. We talk about the current state of our oceans, what we know and have yet to learn about them, and what we can do individually and collectively to make things better.Support Mindscape on Patreon.Sylvia Earle received her Ph.D. in phycology from Duke University. She is currently National Geographic's Rosemary and Roger Enrico Chair for Ocean Exploration, as well as founder of Mission Blue, SEAlliance and Deep Ocean Exploration and Research. She formerly served as Chief Scientist for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Among her awards are the TED Prize, the National Women's Hall of Fame, and the inaugural Lifetime Achievement Award from the Seattle Aquarium. She is the author of several books, the most recent of which is National Geographic Ocean: A Global Odyssey.Mission BlueNational Geographic profile pageNational Women's Hall of FameWikipediaIMDb pageAmazon author pageTwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
NOIRLab - Resolving A Discrepancy In The Hubble Constant

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 20:34


The Hubble Constant tells us how fast the universe is expanding. However, different methods of measuring the Hubble Constant give different results. In this podcast, NOIRLab's John Blakeslee describes data his team has collected to help resolve this discrepancy.  Bio: Rob Sparks is in the Communications, Education and Engagement group at NSF's NOIRLab. John Blakeslee is an Astronomer at NSF's NOIRLab studying galaxies, galaxy clusters, and the expansion of the universe. He completed his PhD at MIT, followed by a postdoctoral fellowship at the CalTech. Dr Blakeslee has worked as a Research Scientist with the Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera project at Johns Hopkins University, a faculty member at Washington State University, a Staff Astronomer with the Canadian National Research Council in Victoria, British Columbia, and the Chief Scientist of Gemini Observatory. In addition to doing research, he now serves as the Head of Science Staff for Observatory Support at NOIRLab.   Links: https://noirlab.edu/public/news/noirlab2123/ https://noirlab.edu/public/blog/hubble-constant-result/ NOIRLab social media channels can be found at: https://www.facebook.com/NOIRLabAstro https://twitter.com/NOIRLabAstro https://www.instagram.com/noirlabastro/ https://www.youtube.com/noirlabastro   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

3Degrees Discussions
3Degrees Discussions #67 - Brent Stucker - Chief Scientist - 3D Systems

3Degrees Discussions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 47:50


Brent Stucker, PhD is the Senior Vice President & Chief Scientist at 3D Systems. Prior to joining 3D Systems, Brent was a Distinguished Engineer and Director of Additive Manufacturing at Ansys. 3DSIM, the company Brent Co-Founded & led as CEO, was acquired by ANSYS in November 2017. https://www.linkedin.com/in/brent-stucker/ Brent led the establishment of ASTM Int'l Committee F42 on Additive Manufacturing Technologies (and its partnership with ISO TC261), was the first Chair from 2009-2014, and was elected to the ASTM Int'l Board of Directors from 2015-2017. Brent has been a leading researcher in AM for more than 25 years, with projects ranging from new materials development for biomedical implants and aerospace/defense structures to multi-scale modeling and control of AM machines. He was a professor from 1997-2015, with appointments at Univ. of Louisville, Utah State Univ., Univ. of Rhode Island and VTT Technical Research Center, Finland. Head over to www.3degreescompany.com and subscribe to the podcast. Remember you can listen to the show anywhere you download your podcasts including Spotify, Apple, Amazon, or Stitcher

V-Next: The Future is Now
Driving Industry Innovation at Microsoft Research

V-Next: The Future is Now

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 60:49


Ever wonder how the worlds leading innovators think, spend their time, and the projects they are working on? If you do, you're in luck!  Mike J. Walker speaks to Ranveer Chandra , Managing Director Research for Industry at Microsoft. Listen in to hear advise and perspectives from Ranveer. He is truly a leader in the innovation industry.About FarmBeatsRanveer started the FarmBeats project at Microsoft in 2015, and has been leading it since then. He is also leading the battery research project, and the white space networking project at Microsoft Research. He was invited to the USDA to present his work on FarmBeats, and this work was featured by Bill Gates in GatesNotes, and was selected by Satya Nadella as one of 10 projects that inspired him in 2017. Ranveer has also been invited to the FCC to present his work on TV white spaces, and spectrum regulators from India, China, Brazil, Singapore and US (including the FCC chairman) have visited the Microsoft campus to see his deployment of the world's first urban white space network. As part of his doctoral dissertation, Ranveer developed VirtualWiFi. The software has over a million downloads and is among the top 5 downloaded software released by Microsoft Research. It is shipping as a feature in Windows since 2009.About Ranveer ChandraRanveer Chandra is the Chief Scientist of Microsoft Azure Global, where he is leading a team driving innovations across different industries on Azure. Ranveer's research has shipped as part of multiple Microsoft products, including VirtualWiFi and low-power algorithms in Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10, Energy Profiler in Visual Studio, and the Wireless Controller Protocol in XBOX One. Ranveer started the FarmBeats project at Microsoft Research in 2015, and has been leading it since then. He is also leading the battery research project, and the white space networking project at Microsoft Research. He was invited to the USDA to present his work on FarmBeats, including to the Secretary, this work was featured by Bill Gates in GatesNotes, and was selected by Satya Nadella as one of 10 projects that inspired him in 2017. Ranveer has also been invited to the FCC to present his work on TV white spaces, and spectrum regulators from India, China, Brazil, Singapore and US (including the FCC chairman) have visited the Microsoft campus to see his deployment of the world's first urban white space network. As part of his doctoral dissertation, Ranveer developed VirtualWiFi. The software has been downloaded more than 750,000 times and is among the top 5 downloaded software released by Microsoft Research. It is shipping as a feature in Windows since 2009.Ranveer has published more than 85 papers, and filed over 100 patents, more than 80 of which have been granted. His research has been cited by the popular press, such as MIT Technology Review, The Economist, New York Times, WSJ, among others. He has won several awards, including best paper awards, and the MIT Technology Review's Top Innovators Under 35, TR35. Ranveer has an undergraduate degree from IIT Kharagpur, India and a PhD from Cornell University. 

Roblox Tech Talks
Roblox Research

Roblox Tech Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 50:41


Morgan McGuire, Chief Scientist at Roblox, joins CEO and host Dave Baszucki to chat about all things research at Roblox. The Research Team helps to accelerate innovation by combining computer science with social science and academic ideas with industry know-how. Tune in to learn more about how we're shaping the forefront of metaverse research.

Columbia Energy Exchange
How We Talk About Climate Change

Columbia Energy Exchange

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 35:55


The COP26 UN climate negotiations are well underway in Glasgow, Scotland.  With that in mind, we wanted to rerun an episode we did a few years back with Dr. Katharine Hayhoe about how to understand and listen to each other when it comes to climate change.  Dr. Hayhoe is an expert climate scientist and communicator. She is currently the Chief Scientist for The Nature Conservancy and is also a Distinguished Professor of Political Science and Public Law in the Department of Political Science at Texas Tech University.  Dr. Hayhoe has precious insights into how we effectively shift public opinion on the side of climate science, especially among members of her own evangelical Christian religion.  Over the course of the conversation, she and Host Jason Bordoff discuss how she merges her faith and her scientific work to communicate the urgency of addressing climate change in an ever-polarized political landscape.

Your Stories Don’t Define You, How You Tell Them Will
202: Becoming a Scientist: Why Do Stories Matter?

Your Stories Don’t Define You, How You Tell Them Will

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 40:25


What do you want to be remembered for when you leave this world? What legacy will follow when you're gone? Indulge in this engaging conversation with Sarah Elkins and Scott Hanton, Editorial Director for Lab Manager Magazine and former Industrial Chemist and business leader for 30 years. They explore the beginning of his interest in becoming a chemist, as a young 13-year-old listening to a random man share his work stories, a moment that would instill a life-long passion for him. This "lollipop moment" was only the start - flash forward to Scott's career today as he and Sarah discuss how managers treat their employees, as well as how our work and stories change others' perceptions of us.  Don't miss this great TED talk, where Drew Dudley talks about "lollipop moments" in the context of everyday leadership. This was a game-changer for Scott. “I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”- Maya Angelou  --- About Scott:  Scott attended Michigan State University and received his Bachelor's of Science in Chemistry, before earning his PhD in Physical Chemistry from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Scott was an industrial chemist and business leader for 30 years. His titles included General Manager, Laboratory Operations Manager, and Chief Scientist for Intertek Allentown. Scott also held the roles of research scientist, laboratory supervisor, and section manager. Currently, Scott is the Editorial Director for Lab Manager Magazine. Due to these positions, Scott has developed expertise in analytical characterization, people leadership, and business management. Scott is an active member of ACS, ASMS, and ALMA. Visit Scott's page on Lab Manager Magazine and follow him on LinkedIn. *podcast show notes contributed by Tracy Ackeret --- ABOUT SARAH: "Uncovering the right stories for the right audiences so executives, leaders, public speakers, and job seekers can clearly and actively demonstrate their character, values, and vision." In my work with coaching clients, I guide people to improve their communication using storytelling as the foundation of our work together. What I've realized over years of coaching and podcasting is that the majority of people don't realize the impact of the stories they share - on their internal messages, and on the people they're sharing them with. My work with leaders and people who aspire to be leaders follows a similar path to the interviews on my podcast, uncovering pivotal moments in their lives and learning how to share them to connect more authentically with others, to make their presentations and speaking more engaging, to reveal patterns that have kept them stuck or moved them forward, and to improve their relationships at work and at home. The audiobook, Your Stories Don't Define You, How You Tell Them Will is now available! Included with your purchase are two bonus tracks, songs recorded by Sarah's band, Spare Change, in her living room in Montana.

Future of Tech
The Future of A.I-Based Conversations

Future of Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 55:44


Many of us have probably caught ourselves talking to the computer; perhaps, sometimes, even yelling at it. Now the computer can talk back. At first, that may seem daunting or even worrisome. But overall, it's a good thing because it's going to make our lives easier. Conversational A.I. has made great strides over the last ten years. As proof, look no further than the applications in commerce where many companies are already using chatbots. Despite these advancements, though, there's still a long way to go to really get computers and people communicating effectively.     On this episode of Future of Tech, Joe Bradley, Chief Scientist at LivePerson, discusses the current state of conversational A.I., where the technology is heading, and the steps that need to be taken to get there. Joe explains how advances are being made in A.I. understanding language as well as in dialogue management. He also shares how there's a lot of work to be done on the goal-oriented dialogue side of the technology and making sure bias is checked as systems are built. So what's the future of computers and people communicating? Find out on this episode!  Main Takeaways: Conversational A.I. Right Now: Conversational A.I. involves both understanding natural language and dialogue management. In terms of A.I., or machine learning, understanding language has come very far. Developing dialogue that supports effective communication between computers and people still has a ways to go. The Future of Conversational A.I.: Conversational A.I. has to improve between computers and people. The computer, of course, needs to get better at understanding complex aspects of human language. It also needs to be able to learn if its dialogue is achieving the desired goal. The other component to good communication is that people need to be educated on how to speak to computers. Language at Play: In our digital world, language is still very important. Perhaps it's more important than ever to communicate effectively because of all available information at our fingertips. We don't need to fear emojis taking over language. They are shorthand symbols that can augment language. Language evolves, and that's how it's supposed to be. Being Well-Rounded Pays Off: Being someone who is very specific and focused comes with creating technology. But having diverse interests is only an asset. Passion in areas outside a person's primary work demonstrates a mental fluidity and a posture of openness. --- Future of Tech is brought to you by Amdocs Tech. Amdocs Tech is Amdocs's R&D and technology center, paving the way to a better-connected future by creating open, innovative, best-in-class products and continuously evolving the way we work, learn and live. To learn more about Amdocs Tech, visit the Amdocs Technology page on LinkedIn.

Innovating with Scott Amyx
Astor Perkins QC Panel Oct 27th 2021

Innovating with Scott Amyx

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 28:12


Quantum computing panel with Robert Hays, CEO & President of Atom Computing, Dr. Jonathan King, Chief Scientist at Atom Computing and Yuval Bogar, Chief Marketing Officer at Classiq.

Better Than Yesterday, with Osher Günsberg
409: Electrify Everything. Saul Griffith's simple plan to save humanity

Better Than Yesterday, with Osher Günsberg

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 63:52


Saul Griffith is an inventor, entrepreneur, founder and Chief Scientist of Otherlab and Rewiring America, and the author of "Electrify: An Optimist's Playbook for Our Clean Energy Future". See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Pharma Intelligence Podcasts
Pink Sheet Podcast: Drug Price Negotiations, Kids COVID Vaccine Deployed, FDA Chief Scientist Leaves

Pharma Intelligence Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 34:11


Pink Sheet reporters and editors discuss the congressional agreement to allow Medicare drug pricing negotiations, the authorization of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine for children age 5 to 11, and the departure of the US FDA's Chief Scientist.

How Do We Fix It?
Climate: Changing the Conversation. Katharine Hayhoe

How Do We Fix It?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 29:33


As world leaders discuss the planet's future at COP26 in Glasgow, climate change remains a massive challenge and a source of fierce debate. While two-thirds of Americans think that the government should be doing more, it's tempting to throw our hands up in despair and think: "There's nothing I can do."Climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe begs to differ. She says the most important thing is to talk about it—and she wants to teach us how. In this episode, we discuss her hopeful, passionate case for enacting positive change from the ground up, and the finding of her new book, "Saving Us: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Healing in a Divided World."Katharine shares the science of climate change, how to talk about it across the political divide, and personal stories about engaging highly skeptical audiences, such as when she spoke to a crowd of conservative business leaders in West Texas at a meeting of Rotarians. The outcome was remarkable! "If we want to change the system, the most important thing any of us can do is to use our voice to influence others to talk about why it matters, and what we can do together to fix it," Katharine tells us. "Wherever we are, we have a shadow not just a footprint, and our shadow can influence people to do things themselves too."Katharine Hayhoe is the Chief Scientist for The Nature Conservancy and a professor of political science and public law at Texas Tech University. She is also a well-known science communicator, principal investigator for the Department of Interior's South-Central Climate Adaptation Science Center and the National Science Foundation's Global Infrastructure Climate Network. Her research currently focuses on establishing a scientific basis for assessing the regional to local-scale impacts of climate change on human systems and the natural environment.Recommendation: Jim listens frequently to "The National Review" podcast. The latest episode, "An Astonishing Night in Va." is a conservative take on the 2021 election results. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Citizens' Climate Lobby
A CCL Conversation with Dr. Katharine Hayhoe About ”Saving Us”

Citizens' Climate Lobby

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 56:54


Join world renowned climate scientist and CCL Advisory Board Member Dr. Katharine Hayhoe for a CCL-exclusive one hour conversation with our favorite climate communicator about her new book! In SAVING US: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Healing in a Divided World Dr. Hayhoe draws upon interdisciplinary research and personal stories to demonstrate that whether you're a parent or a person of faith, a beachgoer or a sports fan, a foodie or a travel junkie, climate change affects someone or something you care about, which means you already have power to act for change. While other books in this space offer doomsday scenarios, Hayhoe ‘s approach is optimistic and inclusive. She argues that climate action isn't about being a certain type of person or voting a certain way. It's about connecting with our communities based on the values we already have, to inspire collective action. Order your book here: https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/Saving-Us/Katharine-Hayhoe/9781982143831  Dr. Hayhoe's TIME Essay: https://time.com/6089999/climate-change-hope/  Global Weirding on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCi6RkdaEqgRVKi3AzidF4ow   Yale's Research on Shifting Republican Views: https://climatecommunication.yale.edu/publications/shifting-republican-views-on-climate-change-through-targeted-advertising/  More about Dr. Hayhoe: Katharine Hayhoe is an atmospheric scientist whose research focuses on understanding what climate change means for people and the places where we live. She is the Chief Scientist for The Nature Conservancy and a Horn Distinguished Professor and Endowed Professor of Public Policy and Public Law in the Dept. of Political Science at Texas Tech University. Her book, “Saving Us: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Healing in a Divided World,” will be released in Sept 2021 and she also hosts the PBS digital series Global Weirding, currently in its fifth season. Katharine has been named one of TIME's 100 Most Influential People, the UnitedNations Champion of the Environment, and the World Evangelical Alliance's Climate Ambassador

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers
628: Investigating Plant-Based Medicines to Battle Infectious Disease and Antibiotic Resistance - Dr. Cassandra Quave

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 52:17


Dr. Cassandra Quave holds a joint appointment as Associate Professor of Dermatology in the Emory University School of Medicine and Emory Center for the Study of Human Health. She is also Director/Curator of the Emory University Herbarium, CEO of CLQ Botanicals (a company providing consulting services on botanicals for personal care, skin health, and cosmetics), CEO and Chief Scientist of PhytoTEK LLC (a start-up biotech company dedicated to R&D and commercialization of novel anti-infective technologies), host of the Foodie Pharmacology Podcast, and author of the recently released book The Plant Hunter: A Scientist's Quest for Nature's Next Medicines. As a medical ethnobotanist, Cassandra studies how people relate to plants, and how they use plants as medicine. Her research takes her around the world to document traditional medicinal practices and collect plant samples. In her lab, Cassandra and her team analyze plant samples to assess their pharmacological activity against infectious disease targets. When she's not working in the lab or out in the field, Cassandra loves spending time with her husband and their four kids, going to sporting events, hiking, canoeing, swimming, and relaxing with a good book. Cassandra received B.S. degrees in Biology as well as Anthropology and Human Biology from Emory University, and she was awarded her PhD in Biology with a focus in ethnobotany and ethnopharmacology from Florida International University. Next, Cassandra conducted postdoctoral research at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, followed by a postdoctoral fellowship at Emory University. She joined the faculty at Emory University in 2013, and she has been awarded the Emory Williams Distinguished Undergraduate Teaching Award for her excellence in teaching. In our interview, Cassandra shares more about her life and science.

On Being with Krista Tippett
Katharine Hayhoe – "Our future is still in our hands"

On Being with Krista Tippett

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 50:58


Katharine Hayhoe is one of the most esteemed atmospheric scientists in the world. She's made her mark by connecting dots between climate systems and weather patterns and the lived experience of human beings in their neighborhoods and communities. She's also an ambassador, if you will, between the science of climate change and the world of evangelical Christian faith and practice, which she also inhabits. To delve into that with her is to learn a great deal that refreshingly complicates the picture of what is possible and what is already happening, even across what feel like cultural fault lines. If you want to speak and walk differently on this frontier, this is a conversation for you.Katharine Hayhoe is a professor of political science at Texas Tech University, and since 2021 Chief Scientist of the Nature Conservancy. She founded the Atmos Research and Consulting Firm, has been named one of Time 's 100 Most Influential People (2014), and serves as the climate ambassador for the World Evangelical Alliance. Her new book is Saving Us: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Healing in a Divided World.Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

On Being with Krista Tippett
[Unedited] Katharine Hayhoe with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 69:14


Katharine Hayhoe is one of the most esteemed atmospheric scientists in the world. She's made her mark by connecting dots between climate systems and weather patterns and the lived experience of human beings in their neighborhoods and communities. She's also an ambassador, if you will, between the science of climate change and the world of evangelical Christian faith and practice, which she also inhabits. To delve into that with her is to learn a great deal that refreshingly complicates the picture of what is possible and what is already happening, even across what feel like cultural fault lines. If you want to speak and walk differently on this frontier, this is a conversation for you.Katharine Hayhoe is a professor of political science at Texas Tech University, and since 2021 Chief Scientist of the Nature Conservancy. She founded the Atmos Research and Consulting Firm, has been named one of Time 's 100 Most Influential People (2014), and serves as the climate ambassador for the World Evangelical Alliance. Her new book is Saving Us: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Healing in a Divided World.This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Katharine Hayhoe — “Our future is still in our hands" Find the transcript for that show at onbeing.org.

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed
Day Two Cloud 120: Web Assembly, K8s Rivals, And Other Cloud Computing Trends

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 45:55


On today's Day Two Cloud we talk trends and predictions in cloud computing, including emerging technologies such as Web assembly, rivals to Kubernetes, and the role of GitOps in infrastructure as code. Our guest is Adrian Mouat, Chief Scientist at Container Solutions. His blog post "10 Predictions for the Future of Computing or; the Inane Ramblings of our Chief Scientist" inspired this episode. The post Day Two Cloud 120: Web Assembly, K8s Rivals, And Other Cloud Computing Trends appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe
Day Two Cloud 120: Web Assembly, K8s Rivals, And Other Cloud Computing Trends

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 45:55


On today's Day Two Cloud we talk trends and predictions in cloud computing, including emerging technologies such as Web assembly, rivals to Kubernetes, and the role of GitOps in infrastructure as code. Our guest is Adrian Mouat, Chief Scientist at Container Solutions. His blog post "10 Predictions for the Future of Computing or; the Inane Ramblings of our Chief Scientist" inspired this episode. The post Day Two Cloud 120: Web Assembly, K8s Rivals, And Other Cloud Computing Trends appeared first on Packet Pushers.