Podcasts about CV

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard
  • 3,998PODCASTS
  • 9,026EPISODES
  • 41mAVG DURATION
  • 3DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • May 23, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about CV

Show all podcasts related to cv

Latest podcast episodes about CV

#itsawildlife
Write a kickass CV in ecology

#itsawildlife

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 7:32


6 tips to consider when writing a kickass CV to land your dream job in wildlife conservation… AND of course we have a free template to use when writing your very own so sink your teeth into this bad boy!Structure your CVTransferable skillsKeep the presentation simple: font, spacing, spellingReferences on requestCollect referees before you need themCall first  #ITSAWILDLIFE #itsawildlife is a podcast and blog, sharing the great work being done for wildlife conservation worldwide and solving problems for ecologists by ecologists. If you're a fellow wildlifer, whether you're just starting out or you've been about the traps for a while, you're in the right place! Tune in each week to talk all things nature: amazing projects, inspiring ecologists, and step-by-step advice to land your dream job in wildlife conservation. Read a transcript of this episode here.FREE RESOURCES:Feel like you've tried everything to land your dream job in wildlife conservation? We got you! Here's a whole bunch of free resources to inspire your next move and hand you some tricks of the trade.·         FREE guide: 10 steps to land your dream job in wildlife conservation·         FREE guide: 3 ways to stay confident whilst “stuck” applying for jobs·         FREE guide: How to get clear on your dream job in 3 easy steps·         FREE template: How to write a kickass CVFor more information, check out our website www.itisawildlife.com for more free resources, blog posts and more. SUPPORT & CONNECT:If you like what you hear, please subscribe, rate and review to support the show and share the love with your network.Check out the website to get on board and subscribe for #itsawildlife updates– we send monthly emails with fresh tips and fun updates! We'd love to hear from ya! Get in touch by email itsawildlife3@gmail.com or connect on Instagram @itisawildlife or Pinterest.

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast
23 May 2022 | Hyundai Motor Group to invest $5.5b in Georgia factory

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 16:15


Show #1476 Good morning, good afternoon and good evening wherever you are in the world, welcome to EV News Daily, your trusted source of EV information. It's Monday 23rd May. I'm Blake Boland, and I've gone through every EV story today so that you don't have to! Lithium giant Tianqi to form JV with NIO's semi-solid-state battery supplier WeLion -Tianqi is one of China's largest lithium producers, with a battery-grade lithium metal capacity of about 2,900 tons in 2020, accounting for almost half of China's total lithium metal capacity. - Lithium metal has a very small density of 0.534 g/cm3 and a capacity of up to 3,860 mA-h/g, ten times that of the current graphite cathode material (372 mA-h/g), with a higher energy density, WeLion said. -Nio unveiled plans to offer 150 kWh semi-solid-state batteries when it unveiled its flagship sedan, the ET7, at the NIO Day 2020 event on January 9, 2021, generating much attention for this new battery. -NIO never disclosed the supplier of the battery, however, on March 27, WeLion chief scientist and founder Li Hong that the company is the supplier of the electric vehicle maker's solid-state battery. Original Source : Lithium giant Tianqi to form JV with NIO's semi-solid-state battery supplier WeLion - CnEVPost BYD Seal gets 22,637 orders in 7 hours of pre-sale - As of 10 pm on May 20, pre-sale orders for the Seal reached 22,637 units, just seven hours after pre-sale officially began at 3 pm, according to information shared by BYD today. - At a time when Chinese car company sales generally plunged in April, BYD saw its NEV sales reach 106,042 units, the second consecutive month of more than 100,000 units. - In a conservative scenario, BYD expects it to sell 1.5 million units in 2022, with sales expected to reach 2 million if supply chain conditions improve, according to the minutes of a previous meeting. Original Source : BYD Seal gets 22,637 orders in 7 hours of pre-sale - CnEVPost Hyundai Motor Group to build $5.54B EV plant and battery factory in Georgia - Hyundai Motor Group (HMG) entered into an agreement with the State of Georgia to build its first dedicated full electric vehicle and battery manufacturing facilities in the US. The new EV plant and battery manufacturing facilities represent an investment of approximately US$5.54 billion. Non-affiliated Hyundai Motor Group suppliers will invest approximately another $1 billion in the project. - The new facility will break ground in early 2023 and is expected to begin commercial production in the first half of 2025 with an annual capacity of 300,000 units. The battery manufacturing facility will be established through a strategic partnership, the details of which will be disclosed later.  - The EV and battery manufacturing plant will be located on a dedicated 2,923-acre site in Bryan County, Georgia (the Bryan County Megasite), with immediate access to I-95 and I-16 highways which creates easy access to 250 major metro areas. It is less than 50 kilometers (31 miles) from the Port of Savannah, the single-largest and fastest-growing container terminal in the US with two Class I rail facilities on-site. Rail service to the site is provided by Georgia Central Railway, a short line railway that connects to CSX in Savannah and Norfolk Southern near Macon in Middle Georgia. Original Source : Hyundai Motor Group to build $5.54B EV plant and battery factory in Georgia - Green Car Congress Nissan & Mitsubishi present compact EV for Japan - Nissan and Mitsubishi have presented a jointly developed electric small car for the Japanese market. It is marketed by Nissan under the name ‘Sakura' and by Mitsubishi as ‘eK X EV' and offers a range of 180 kilometres, according to Japanese WLTP standards.  - The Sakura runs on an electric drive system producing 47 kW and 195 Nm of torque. A 20 kWh Lithium-ion battery allows for the previously mentioned up to 180 km range, while the top speed is set at 130 km/h. Charging takes about 8 hours with a “standard” AC charge, and can be done as quickly as 40 minutes for a “warning light to 80 per cent” charge on a fast charger. A V2H reverse charging capability is also included.  - Kei-cars are popular in Japan, accounting for about 40% of the car market, and are limited to 3.4 meters in length, 1.48 meters in width and 2.0 meters in height.  Original Source : Nissan & Mitsubishi present compact EV for Japan - electrive.com Tesla Is Building a 'hardcore' Litigation Department to Seek Justice - Tesla is building a hardcore litigation department whose main goal will be to seek justice, not victory at any cost. Elon Musk said the department will never seek victory if a company is justly sued, but will never give up if the case is unfair.    - Tesla CEO Elon Musk announced that the company is building a hardcore litigation department that will directly initiate and execute lawsuits. He said the team would report directly to him. The head of the company made two commitments about how the department would work: The department will never seek victory in a just case against the company, even if it will probably win. The department will never surrender/settle an unjust case against the company, even if it will probably lose. - Those wishing to apply should send their CV to justice@tesla.com. A CV should contain 3 to 5 bullet points describing evidence of exceptional ability. In addition, Musk asked to include links to cases that the candidates tried. He is looking for real fighters who are ready to fight in the battles for justice in the courtroom. - ‘There will be blood' Original Source : Tesla Is Building a 'hardcore' Litigation Department to Seek Justice, (tesmanian.com) Sysco Intends To Buy Up To 800 Freightliner eCascadia - According to the Letter of Intent (LOI), the fleet would be deployed gradually between 2022 and 2026, with the first eCascadia delivery expected to arrive at Sysco's Riverside, California site later this year.  - In the case of Sysco, the vehicles will be combined with refrigerated trailers, but the press release does not clarify whether the trailer will be powered from the main battery to fully utilize the EV potential. - In the long-term, Sysco intends to electrify 35% of its fleet by 2030. The site at Riverside, California already is in a process of expansion of charging infrastructure and additional solar capacity installations. Freightliner eCascadia (Class 8 tractor) specs: -          up to 230 miles (370 km) of range -          Tandem drive and 438 kWh battery: typically 220 miles (354 km) -          Single drive and 438 kWh battery: typically 230 miles (370 km) -          Single drive and 291 kWh battery: typically 155 miles (249 km) Original Source : Sysco Intends To Buy Up To 800 Freightliner eCascadia (insideevs.com) EV Surge Likely After Labor Wins In Australia - ‘'Yesterday (Saturday, May 21) witnessed a historic Labor Party win in Australian federal politics. For 10 years, the Liberal federal government has denied climate change science and slow-walked the transition to renewable energy. Yesterday's historic defeat for this coalition will change all that and likely lead to an EV surge.''  - They are not hanging about — Labor's Electric Car Discount will begin on 1 July 2022, the beginning of the new financial year, and only 5 weeks away! - ‘'Australians love their cars. Multiple car ownership is common (I used to own three — one for me, one for the wife, and one as a toy). Because of this, passenger cars make up almost 10 per cent of Australia's CO2 emissions. To move Australians from fossil fuel burning cars to electric vehicles powered by renewable energy, Labor proposes exempting EVs from the 5% import tax and the 47% fringe benefits tax (a similar move to the UK government, which led to a spectacular increase in uptake).'' Original Source : EV Surge Likely After Labor Wins In Australia - CleanTechnica EVs are avoiding about 3% of global oil demand - ‘Plug-in vehicles avoided roughly 1.5 million barrels of oil per day last year, according to new analysis from Bloomberg New Energy Finance. That's about one-fifth of Russia's pre-invasion oil exports, Bloomberg NEF said.' - ‘The oil use avoided by EVs has also doubled since 2015, to about 3% of global demand, according to the analysis.' - While electric cars tend to get most of the attention, the analysis found that other vehicle types accounted for the most oil avoidance. Electric two- and three-wheeled vehicles—which tend to be popular in Asia—accounted for 67% of the oil demand avoided in 2021, according to Bloomberg NEF. - Those vehicles had an outsized impact on oil demand. Next in rank were electric buses, which accounted for 16% of avoided oil demand, followed by passenger vehicles at 13%. The latter were the fastest-growing segment, Bloomberg NEF noted. Original Source : EVs are avoiding about 3% of global oil demand—a fifth of Russia's total exports (greencarreports.com) QUESTION OF THE WEEK WITH EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM What is your dream driveway?  But there are some rules: 2 or 3 vehicles, budget is $150,000 USD or equivalent wherever you are.  Email your answers to Martyn: hello@evnewsdaily.com    It would mean a lot if you could take 2mins to leave a quick review on whichever platform you download the podcast. PREMIUM PARTNERS PHIL ROBERTS / ELECTRIC FUTURE BRAD CROSBY PORSCHE OF THE VILLAGE CINCINNATI AUDI CINCINNATI EAST VOLVO CARS CINCINNATI EAST NATIONAL CAR CHARGING ON THE US MAINLAND AND ALOHA CHARGE IN HAWAII DEREK REILLY FROM THE EV REVIEW IRELAND YOUTUBE CHANNEL RICHARD AT RSEV.CO.UK – FOR BUYING AND SELLING EVS IN THE UK EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM/ OCTOPUS ELECTRIC JUICE - MAKING PUBLIC CHARGING SIMPLE WITH ONE CARD, ONE MAP AND ONE APP MILLBROOKCOTTAGES.CO.UK – 5* LUXURY COTTAGES IN DEVON, JUMP IN THE HOT TUB WHILST YOUR EV CHARGES

Into The Characterverse
Ep 62 - Comic - Jessica Jones Running With A Baby

Into The Characterverse

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 56:40


Join the CV crew as we continue Jessica Jones in The New Avengers! Spoiler: We like it but need more Jessica!   https://linktr.ee/characterversepod Intro: Fearless First by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3742-fearless-first License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Outro: The Descent by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4490-the-descent License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Interlude: Marvel introduction sound

The Non League Football Show
S6 Ep39: 20th May 2022 - Non League Finals, Littlehampton Town & Boston United

The Non League Football Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 80:21


A busy week in non league so we start with the Non League paper round-up. Jon Couch helps go through a vast array of stuff including the FA Trophy final, The FA Vase final and the National League Play-offs which get underway on Monday. Before all that though on Saturday its the National League Step 2 play-off finals as we find out who will join Gateshead and Maidstone United in promotion to the top tier for next season. Plus we chat about some of the many managerial changes and swaps that have happened this week. Phil Annets gives us the stats on the FA Vase final with his @FAVaseFactFile hat on and next up is a Chairman of one of those club's in Sunday's final. Sounding relaxed and ready, Rob McAlees is the kind of Chairman you would think most managers and players would want to work under. They clearly do as his joint management team seem on point and firmly part of the club and the thriving community at Littlehampton Town hoping to make further history this season. Back on the show for the second time, this season is a manager involved in one of those play-off finals on Saturday. He's switched clubs since we last spoke and got his new club into the play-offs making history already and now is one game from leading the club to a return to the top level of non league football. Paul Cox has had the necessary impact on Boston United since his arrival in January and with plenty of success and experience on his CV he is confident of a result but also has his feet firmly grounded. 

AD Voetbal podcast
S4E203: 'De mensen van NAC, PEC, Cambuur hebben Feyenoord in gang getrokken'

AD Voetbal podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 27:57


Feyenoord bereidt zich in Lagos voor de finale van de Conference League. Ondertussen strijden Heerenveen, AZ, Vitesse en FC Utrecht om een plek in dat toernooi komend seizoen en een Nederlander maakt WK-debuut. In de AD Voetbalpodcast bespreekt Etienne Verhoeff het met Mikos Gouka die in Portugal zit. 'Het is veel lachen en ontspannen', omschrijft Gouka de eerste trainingsdagen van de Rotterdammers in Lagos, 'Alles is met het idee dat die finale eraan komt. Niet veel spelers van Nederlandse clubs maken een Europese finale mee. Dat nemen ze toch mee op hun CV. Maar hoeveel mensen in de huidige organisatie hebben ervaring met het spelen van een Europese finale? Bijna niemand. Het zijn, zonder cynisch te doen, mensen van NAC, PEC en Cambuur die Feyenoord in gang hebben gekregen.' Verder bespreken ze blessuregevallen van de laatste weken. Zoals Bijlow en Malacia en hoe zou Mourinho Feyenoord kunnen aanpakken. En het gaat over de nederlaag van AZ bij Heerenveen en de zege van Utrecht tegen Vitesse. 'Twee goals in blessuretijd weggeven verandert het perspectief voor AZ in die thuiswedstrijd tegen Heerenveen. Het is voor coëfficiëntenpolonaise wel het beste dat AZ in Europa speelt komend seizoen. Ik wil niemand boos maken in Friesland, Arnhem of Utrecht.' Al zou de nieuwe trainer van Heerenveen, Kees van Wonderen, volgend seizoen zomaar met Europees voetbal kunnen beginnen. ‘Tot voor kort dat ik dat je als beginnende trainer er niet aan moest denken gelijk Europa in te gaan. Naar Estland of Letland en als je verliest heb je gelijk morrende supporters. Bij Slot zijn het juist de wedstrijden waarin hij heeft kunnen schaven aan zijn ploeg. Steeds een niveau hoger in tegenstanders. Dus voor Fraser bij FC Utrecht of Van Wonderen bij Heerenveen kan het ook gunstig zijn.' Beluister de hele podcast via AD.nl, de AD app en jouw favoriete podcastplatform. Support the show: https://krant.nl See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Healthed Australia
Male preconception health

Healthed Australia

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 32:21


GPs need to assess the patient's overall health status paying particular attention to lifestyle issues such as smoking, excessive alcohol use and CV risk factors Paternal obesity increases the CV risk of the offspring Evidence does not support the use of any particular dietary supplement Assess the patient's mental health status and ask specifically about erectile dysfunction and problems with ejaculation Host: Dr David Lim | Total time: 32 mins Guest: Dr Sarah Catford, Endocrinologist and Andrologist; Expert Advisor for Healthy Male Register for our fortnightly FREE WEBCASTS Every second Tuesday | 7:00pm-9:00pm AEST Click here to register for the next one See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dave, Sam & Ash
657: TOM GLEISNER

Dave, Sam & Ash

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 4:29


Have You Been Paying Attention is one of Australia's most loved TV shows... but what else has Tom Gleisner done, this veteran of Aussie film and TV has one hell of a CV, check out his chat with Sam & Ash and find out what else he has done over his 40+ year career....

InSecurity
Mike Fraser: Developers... Adapt or DIE!

InSecurity

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 72:59


    How can we make a better mousetrap if the designers of and the materials that go into the contemporary mousetraps aren't good enough to keep pace with the current mouse?   Adapt or perish… now as ever, is nature's inexorable imperative  --HG Wells   It is not the strongest species that survie, nor the most intelligent… but the ones most responsive to change  --Charles Darwin   You improvise! You adapt! You overcome!  -- Gunnery Sgt Tom Highway; Heartbreak Ridge   All due respect to the United States Air Force   Do you know what SecDevOps is? Do you know how when or why the concept applies to cybersecurity and the world at large? What if I told you that there are people out there who personify the definition of what we identify as SecDevOps.   Well… I gotta guy…   On today's episode, Matt Stephenson welcomes Mike Fraser, VP of DevSecOps at Sophos. We take a look at the role that developers can and must play in the world of cybersecurity. These aren't the folks building the security building... the are the ones making the bricks and hammers used to construct that building. How important are the materials used to construct the very infrastructure of an entire industry? Tune in and find out...   About Mike Fraser Mike Fraser is Vice President of DevSecOps at Sophos. Previously, he was co-founder, CEO and chief architect at Refactr (acquired by Sophos in 2021) where he spearheaded the creation of a DevSecOps automation platform that bridges the gap between DevOps and cybersecurity.   Mike is a regular speaker at numerous industry events, including Hashiconf, Hashitalks, KubeSec, various Microsoft events, RedHat AnsibleFest, DevOps Days, and All Day DevOps.   He has also published several feature articles including on TechCrunch, RSA 365, and DevOps.com.   In addition to his Sophos role, Mike helps advise other veteran-led software startups. While leading Refactr, Mike earned a bachelor's degree in application development from North Seattle College and has a master's degree in computer science from Seattle University.   He is also, and it is clearly stated on his CV, the World's Coolest Dad   About Matt Stephenson My name is Matt Stephenson (@packmatt73) and I have hosted podcasts, videos and live events all over the world which put me with experts on every corner of the cybersecurity landscape. pm73media is my first solo endeavor. On this platform and others to come, I will continue to expand upon the tradition we started with the Insecurity podcast as I seek out the leading minds in the tech industry and beyond. I am always looking for fun people who may break things every now and again.   In 20 years in the ecosystem of Data Protection and Cybersecurity I have toured the world extolling the virtues of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning and how, when applied to information security, these technologies can wrong-foot the bad guys.   Whether in person, live virtual events or podcasting, I get to interview interesting people doing interesting things all over the world of technology and the extended world of hacking. Sometimes, that means hacking elections or the coffee supply chain... other times that means social manipulation or the sovereign wealth fund of a national economy.   Wherever I go, my job is all about talking with the people who build, manage or wreck the systems that we have put in place to make the world go round...   If you tuned in to any of my previous podcasts, there's great news…! pm73media is here! I will be bringing the same kind of energy and array of guests you know and love. Best part? We're still at the same spot. You can find it at Spotify, Apple, Amazon Music & Audible as well as GooglePlay, Gaana, Himalaya, I Heart Radio and wherever you get your podcasts!   Make sure you Subscribe, Rate and Review!

Daily Arxiv Radiostation
[May 18, 2022] Your Daily CV

Daily Arxiv Radiostation

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 15:46


Date: May 18, 2022Series: Your Daily CVThe daily episode of everything new in Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (cs.CV).List of papers:-1. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.08508-2. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.08515-3. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.08303-4. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.08525-5. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.08090-6. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.08094-7. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.08534-8. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.08166

Sparks of Marketing
3 spring cleaning tips for your content

Sparks of Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 35:51


When's the last time you dusted off your old content and repurposed it all shiny and new? There's something about opening the windows in spring makes us all more inclined to clean. As long as we're in the mood, how about spring cleaning your content? Here's what spring cleaning looks like for your content: Much of our marketing in 2022 is digital, which means it's meant to be dynamic. But most small to medium size businesses set it and forget it. These days especially, the world is changing, we change and our businesses change rapidly. Cleaning up your content in the following three ways can make your marketing easier and keep your content up to date. But even if your people aren't scrubbing every nook and cranny for the sake of God, something about opening the windows in spring makes us all more inclined to clean. As long as we're in the mood, how about spring cleaning your content? Here's what spring cleaning looks like for your content: Much of our marketing in 2022 is digital, which means it's meant to be dynamic. But most small to medium size businesses set it and forget it. These days especially, the world is changing, we change and our businesses change rapidly. Cleaning up your content in the following three ways can make your marketing easier and keep your content up to date. 1. Recycle your old content. My recycling bin is filled a mile high as I write this. Your recyclable content should be too. Here's how to recycle your content to save you time and make sure more people see it. Take stock of what you've got by creating a spreadsheet of existing content. Scroll through old social media posts. Can you reuse the photos in a different context? Recycle the caption and update the photo so it's good as new? Go back through old blogs. Can you update them with new examples and new tips and repurpose them as new ones? Identify videos and podcast episodes that you can turn into a blog It's gratifying to constantly produce new work. But your audience isn't following you as closely as you think. Repurpose your old content to save on effort now and maximize on effort you made before. 2. Clean up your website The hardest part of spending loads of money and time on a new website is that when you're finally done…you're not done. Consider these 3 ways to clean up your website. Run any updates and makes sure everything still displays properly on desktop and mobile. Fix any broken links simply by entering your url into this website. Trust me, it feels like magic. Revisit your About page. It's the second most visited page on your site, and it's likely a boring digital CV/backstory/mission statement. Instead, make it about your audience. Let them know how your particular approach solves their problem. Include calls to action so they can work with you. Add testimonials on why they should. Take a look at your homepage and see what needs updating. With fresh eyes, you'll likely see better ways to present your company. 3. Clean up your email list Cleaning up your email list is the spring cleaning equivalent of finding coins in the couch cushions

#PirateBroadcast
Did You Say Strategy_

#PirateBroadcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 32:25


Craig is known as THE BLACK KNIGHTSTRATEGY is great, but business CULTURE is way more powerfulCORE VALUES are your company's CV to the worldToo much time is wasted, writing unused strategiesWhen your team know you've got their back, it will transform your business

Daily Arxiv Radiostation
[May 17, 2022] Your Daily CV

Daily Arxiv Radiostation

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 24:19


Date: May 17, 2022Series: Your Daily CVThe daily episode of everything new in Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (cs.CV).List of papers:-1. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.07399-2. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.06975-3. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.07230-4. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.07073-5. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.07019-6. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.07058-7. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.07139-8. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.07404-9. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.06934-10. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.07134-11. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.07466

The Treasury Career Corner
Important Treasury Career Lessons with Karen Molloy

The Treasury Career Corner

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 43:58


There's a lot to be learned from books, from mentors, and your peers, but the best teacher of all is experience. That's why this episode from way back in January 2020 is just as relevant today as it was when we first aired it. Yes, we've dug back into our archives once again to revisit a knowledge-packed episode with Karen Molloy, Vice President & Treasurer at Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company. Karen delves into the numerous lessons she's garnered over the span of her 30-year treasury career. She highlights a can-do attitude and the ability to embrace new opportunities as one of the many things that have helped her get ahead. We're interested to see what's changed for Karen in the past couple of years, especially considering recent global developments such as the COVID-19 pandemic. Founded in 1857, Northwestern Mutual was founded as the Mutual Life Insurance Company. Headquartered in Milwaukee, the financial security company provides consultation on wealth and asset income protection, education planning, retirement planning, investment advisory services, trust, and private client services, estate planning, and business planning. The company holds more than $125 billion of client assets as a part of its wealth management company and investment services. On the podcast, we discussed… Why working in a mutual company is beneficial The upside of taking a holistic approach to treasury How accommodating a broad perspective helped Karen advance her career How treasury has evolved over the space of 30 years Why treasurers should never slack on development The role of technology in the advancement of treasury Karen's leadership style and advice for recruiting great team members You can connect with Karen on https://www.linkedin.com/in/karen-molloy-ctp-ab84452/ (LinkedIn). Are you interested in pursuing a career within Treasury? Whether you've recently graduated, or you want to search for new job opportunities to help develop your treasury career, The Treasury Recruitment Company can help you in your search for the perfect job. https://treasuryrecruitment.com/jobs (Find out more here). Or, send us your CV and let us help you in your next career move! If you're enjoying the show please rate and review us on whatever podcast app you listen to us on, for Apple Podcasts https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/the-treasury-career-corner/id1436647162#see-all/reviews (click here)!

The Genius of Thomas Sowell
Mediocracy and Affirmative Action • Part 5

The Genius of Thomas Sowell

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 120:44


In this episode, we continue to explore the subject of Affirmative Action which was inspired by reading Chapter 6 of Thomas Sowell's 1993 classic "Inside American Education."You can read Chapter 6 HERE. We touch on the following subjects:• A case now before the US Supreme Court about affirmative action•  MIT bringing back the SAT exam• Elite high schools turning away from academic admissions exams• Will law schools no longer require that applicants take the LSAT?• Why students can now get 100 extra points on their SAT for living in a rough neighborhood• Affirmative action in TV commercials?• Should casting TV commercials be the same as casting university students?• Social EngineeringToday's episode features two separate interviews with scholars who study Affirmative Action:1) Peter Arcidiacono: Professor of Economics at Duke University.You can find Peter's CV and articles HERE.2) Zachary Bleemer: Soon to be Assistant Professor of Economics at Yale University.You can find Zach's CV and articles HERE.Notes:• Our updated listener statistics to the podcast can be found HERE.There are 3 ways to support the show:1) Rate and review the podcast on Apple Podcasts2) Purchase our Thomas Sowell Post It Note pads:  You can find all 50 digital images of the post it notes HERE, feel free to download them and use them however you like. To purchase pads of printed post it notes, please  Paypal $3/pad to wolanalan@gmail.com or Venmo to @Alan-Wolan.  Please put your mailing address as well as your email address in the notes of the payment. International orders will cost more, please ask.3) Support the show financially by subscribing with a monthly contribution on Patreon, link HERE.You can email Alan at: TheGeniusOfThomasSowell@gmail.com

Daily Arxiv Radiostation
[May 16, 2022] Your Daily CV

Daily Arxiv Radiostation

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 20:02


Date: May 16, 2022Series: Your Daily CVThe daily episode of everything new in Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (cs.CV).List of papers:-1. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.06688-2. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.06305-3. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.06416-4. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.06407-5. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.06549-6. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.06803-7. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.06597-8. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.06551

Snacka Snyggt
Digitala spelregler! Proffsiga digitala möten från ditt hem.

Snacka Snyggt

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 27:39


Har du alldeles för långa, tråkiga och oengagerande digitala möten på ditt jobb? Idag får du verktygen för digitala spelregler! För färre, mindre tidskrävande och professionella engagerande möten. Dessutom, vad gör du om du skickat CV men aldrig blir kallad på intervju? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

El Garaje Hermético de Máximo Sant
Los coches de la Guardia Civil

El Garaje Hermético de Máximo Sant

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 18:55


Dicen por ahí que algunos conductores, cuando ven a los coches de la Guardia Civil, se sienten seguros y protegidos… eso dicen por ahí. Creo que la mayoría nos ponemos tiesos como un palo y miramos el velocímetro. Pero, en cualquier caso, los coches de la Guardia Civil española tienen su encanto… os hemos traído unos cuantos. Ese sentimiento de “amor y odio” por las fuerzas del orden creo que es algo que sucede en todas partes. Seguramente cuando les necesitamos los vemos con unos ojos, pero en otras, nos sentimos perseguidos. Pero eso ni pone ni quita para que los coches de policía en general y de las fuerzas de seguridad del estado tengan su encanto particular. Hoy nos centramos en los coches de la Guardia Civil que en España es el cuerpo encargado de vigilar el tráfico y de vigilar a los conductores. En resumen, son los que nos denuncian y los que ponen radares… pero también los que nos ayudan en caso de problemas, averías o, peor aún, en caso de accidente… Contra el “bandolerismo”. La Guardia Civil nace en 1844 en España como un cuerpo muy estrechamente ligado al medio rural, sobre todo a vigilar caminos y sendas y evitar el bandolerismo. Obviamente sus funciones y ámbitos de actuación han variado a lo largo de los años aunque su relación con el medio rural siempre ha sido y sigue siendo muy fuerte. También se le llama la “Benemérita” porque desde el 1929 y a través de un Real decreto se le concedió este honor de ser un cuerpo “benemérito”; honor, por cierto, que tiene en exclusiva la Guardia Civil. Además, a partir de 1959 se hacen cargo de la regulación del tráfico, trabajo que hoy día sigue haciendo la Guardia Civil de Tráfico. Desde entonces muchos han sido los modelos utilizados y muchos de ellos forman ya parte del imaginario colectivo. 1. Seat 1.400 B. El primero. Lógicamente la GC siempre ha dado prioridad a los coches de fabricación nacional ya desde el principio y fue el primer coche de Seat, el 1400 aunque en su versión B el primer coche con el que patrullaron pueblos y caminos. Estamos hablando de un coche grande, de 4,2 metros, con un motor 1.4 que daba entre 50 y 58 CV… un buen coche en su momento. 2. Land Rover Santana: El emblemático. Para un cuerpo de seguridad con vocación rural, en las España de los 60 no había nada mejor que el Land Rover fabricado por Santana en Linares, sin duda el coche más emblemático de la Guardia Civil. Contaba con tracción total y un motor de gasolina de 2,3 litros y 68 CV. En su versión corta, la más habitual, media 3,6 metros, pero tenía mucho espacio interior y era un coche muy práctico, robusto y versátil. 3. Citroën 2 CV Sahara. 4x4. Desde 1960 se fabricaron en España siempre como serie limitada alrededor de 700 unidades y de ellas 85 fueron para la Agrupación de Tráfico de la Guardia Civil. Pesaba algo más que el 2CV convencional, porque tenía dos motores, pero poco más de 700 kg y como cada motor tenía unos 24 CV, pues con casi 50 se movía con bastante agilidad. 4. Renault 4. Más campo que carretera. Otro modelo que ha quedado en el imaginario de una generación.. o de más de una. Este modelo comenzó a prestar servicio en los años 60, pero incluso en el año 1981 la agrupación de la GC de Tráfico compró 334 unidades del conocido como “cuatro latas”. Para zonas rurales era ideal, pero con sus 30 CV no era el modelo ideal para perseguir a los malos. 5. R10: Berlina… ¿de lujo? Más o menos sobre el año 1966/1967 llega el Renault 10. Con 6 o 7 añitos que yo tenía, ya lo recuerdo, porque ha sido uno de los coches que fue que más impronta dejó. Y eso que este coche, no triunfó ni en España ni menos aún en Francia. Era una evolución del Renault 8, con el motor de 1.108 cm3, 44 CV, 20 cm más grande y con ciertas pretensiones de berlina de lujo en su momento. No triunfó en el mercado, pero sí como coche de la GC. 6. Seat 124: Con radar incorporado. Otro modelo muy emblemático de la GC fue el Seat 124, que contaba con una novedad premonitoria: Un radar incorporado oculto en el interior, con un sistema de control de velocidad muy parecido a los que se siguen utilizando hoy en día. El detector, modelo Mesta 104D, se colocaba en el parachoques delantero junto con un flash. 7. Seat Ritmo: Demasiado moderno. El modelo que en la “Benemérita” marcó impronta fue el Seat Ritmo que en los años 80 llegó para sustituir al Seat 124. En su momento hubo quien dijo que un coche tan “Moderno” no encaja para la GC y hubo de hecho muchos GC que seguían prefiriendo el clásico 124, a pesar de que, por estabilidad y potencia, en torno a los 75 CV, el Ritmo era muy superior. 8. Seat 131. La “lechera”. Aunque el Seat 131 llegó a la GC muy poco después de su presentación en España en 1975 pero no dejó tanta huella como el “cuatro latas” o el “Patrol”. Y eso que, en ese momento, el Seat 131 era verdaderamente un cochazo, amplio, cómodo y rápido con versiones de 75 y 90 CV según fuesen de 1,4 litros o 1,6 litros biárbol. En este coche tanto la GC como la policía nacional usaron el color blanco lo que le valió el nombre de “lechera”, un nombre que se mantiene a día de hoy para los furgones de la Policía Nacional. 9. Talbot Horizon: Golf a la española. En los primeros 80 llega el Horizon, que era lo más parecido a un Golf que en esos momentos teníamos en España. Y fue también un coche que usó la GC con profusión… aunque justo es reconocer que este coche no era tan fiable y robusto como otros y, quizás por eso, su vida no fue tan larga como la de otros modelos.Las versiones más usadas fueron las de 1.3 litros y 75 optimistas CV, que nunca daban, a los de 1.5 y 83 CV, más realistas en este caso. 10. Nissan Patrol: “EL COCHE”, con mayúsculas. Si tuviésemos que elegir uno y solo un coche como representante de la GC sería este, el Nissan Patrol “made in Spain”. Era un coche que iba bien en campo y en carretera, amplio, razonablemente rápido, muy práctico y, sobre todo y por encima de todo, muy robusto. Comenzó sus servicios, casi recién presentado en sociedad en España, en 1983 e incluso hoy día se puede ver alguno. ¿Y ahora? Por supuesto que en todos estos años ha habido muchos coches que han prestado servicio a la GC… pero ninguno tan polémico como el último, el Alfa Romeo Stelvio, del que hicimos un podcast titulado “Nadie quiere vender coches a la GC”. Yo me pregunto, ¿de verdad necesitan estos cochazos las Guardia Civil de Tráfico? ¡Qué tiempos cuando la GC iba en coches populares como el R4!

Mile High Endurance Podcast
Testing To Get Faster

Mile High Endurance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 46:37


Welcome to Episode #336 of the 303 Endurance Podcast. You are listening to your weekly connection to coaches, experts, and pro athletes to help you reach your endurance goals. We're your hosts coach Rich Soares and 303 Chief Bill Plock. Thanks for joining us for another week of endurance interviews and discussion.   Show Sponsor: UCAN Take your performance to the next level with UCAN Energy and Bars made with SuperStarch®  UCAN uses SuperStarch instead of simple sugars to fuel athletes.  UCAN keeps blood sugar steady compared to the energy spikes and crashes of sugar-based products.  Steady energy equals sustained performance!       Use UCAN in your training and racing to fuel the healthy way, finish stronger and recover more quickly!  Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co     In Today's Show Feature Coaching Topic How Testing Makes You Faster Endurance News IRONMAN World Championship Results Utah Sports Commission Expected To Create Total Economic Impact Of More Than $35m Dollars PTO Pro Am, to be held this Sunday 15 May at the Herbalife24 Triathlon Los Angeles What's new in the 303 Triathlon Races in Colorado this Season Video of the Week TBD   Our News is sponsored by Buddy Insurance. Buddy Insurance gives you peace of mind to enjoy your training and racing to the fullest. Buddy's mission is simple, to help people fearlessly enjoy an active and outdoor lifestyle.    Get on-demand accident insurance just in case the unexpected happens. Buddy ensures you have cash for bills fast.  This is accident insurance not health and life insurance.  Go to buddyinsurance.com and create an account.  There's no commitment or charge to create one.  Once you have an account created, it's a snap to open your phone and in a couple clicks have coverage for the day.  Check it out!   Training Discussion: Regular Testing   Regular testing to determine your threshold intensities in each discipline is an important (arguably essential) practice to getting faster. This works for new and experienced athletes. Newer athletes may find this a bit demanding, but it will help you get faster, faster. Testing regularly is particularly helpful for athletes who have some experience and find themselves plateauing in their performance.   Here's how the cycle works. Take bike power for example. You want to take a baseline FTP test to determine your  Functional Threshold Power. FTP is theoretically the power in Watts you can average for 45-60 minutes. This FTP becomes an anchor point for determining your training zones. Having accurately determined training zones is important for making sure you do prescribed training in the right zones.   For example, if you want to increase your threshold power you need to train at that Z4 Threshold zone to train your body to process muscle lactate efficiently. The more time you spend in that zone, the more adaptation you get. Without the FTP number or accurate substitute, you may be training in the wrong zone (eg Z3 or Z5), neither of which create the same adaptation of teaching your body to improve lactate processing and increasing your capacity to do work. Training regularly and progressively overloading the correct training zones over the course of 3 weeks on the 4th week you retest. If things are working, the next FTP test is at a higher average power than the one 4 weeks earlier. You then adjust the training zones. In this case increasing the power ranges for each zone. Another 3 weeks of training at the new (accurate) zones causes another adaptation, another test, another increase, another adjustment to training zones, etc.   Swim: Perform a 400 time trial effort from a push (not dive). Recover for 10 to 15 minutes with easy swimming and rest. Perform a 200 time trial effort from a push. Looking to calculate CSS or CV as Meters or Yards Per Minute. The higher the number the faster your are. If you go real fast on the 200 and real slow on the 400 - that counts against you. Your 200 should be about 6% faster than the 400.   Bike Power on a trainer is best 20 or 45 minute Or 15 miles without power   Run: 5k Time Trial as if racing Do on a track or flat course Always repeat on the same track or course if possible   How to execute a perfectly paced test. Consider how big of an improvement over the last two tests in that discipline. Consider how well the athlete is training at Z4 and Z5. Start with the average pace or power from the previous test and set a reasonable increase as the target pace or power. Execute at that power or pace start to finish. Don't start faster.   Excerpt from Swim Test Pacing: For the 200 target 58 seconds per lap which will put you close to 1:56/100 pace or 3:51 200. For the 400 target 59 seconds per lap for the first 4 and 60 seconds per lap for the last 4. If you feel you have some gas increase the stroke rate on the last lap.   If you want to talk further about how to test regularly to get better results, reach out at Rich@303colorado.com or message @tripodcasterrich   Check out the TriDot Free Trial https://app.tridot.com/onboard/sign-up/richsoares   Endurance News:   Ironman World Championships St. George results Utah Sports Commission Expected To Create Total Economic Impact Of More Than $35m Dollars   PTO Pro Am, to be held this Sunday 15 May at the Herbalife24 Triathlon Los Angeles and streamed live for free around the world The event will see six of the world's top professional athletes race an Olympic-distance course alongside Challenged Athletes Foundation (CAF) athletes and special guests including former UFC star Paul Felder and Olympic silver medallist Heather Fell. CAF athletes will kick-start the day with a 1500m swim in the beautiful pearlescent sea off Venice Beach. Once out of the water, they'll tag in a highly-ranked PTO professional who'll rip up the road over a 40km bike course finishing in downtown LA between the Crypto.com Arena and Microsoft Square, outside the Herbalife Nutrition HQ. From here, another CAF superstar, or one of our special guests, will complete a 10km run to close out this first-ever PTO Pro Am event.   TEAMS REVEALED The PTO is proud to work alongside the Challenged Athletes Foundation to celebrate life through sport at the first PTO Pro Am. The six teams taking on the challenge of the PTO Pro Am in LA are:   Swimming and track runner Haven Shepherd, PTO World #3 Lionel Sanders and former UFC star Paul Felder. Swimmer and para climber Emily Gray, PTO World #8 Sam Long and swimmer and para-triathlete Rudy Garcia-Tolson. Para-triathlete Allysa Seely, PTO World #4 Daniel Baekkegard and GTN presenter and Olympic silver medallist Heather Fell. Swimmer Ahalya Lettenberger, PTO World #11 Holly Lawrence and swimmer and para-triathlete Roderick Sewell. Para-triathlete and hand cyclist Andre Kajlich, PTO World #7 Skye Moench and influencer and Herbalife ambassador Shirley Alvarez. Para-triathlete Chris Hammer, PTO World #14 Heather Jackson and para-triathlete, cyclist and marathoner Willie Stewart.     What's New in the 303: Upcoming Multisport Events in Colorado (runningintheusa.com) Upcoming Classic Races in Colorado (runningintheusa.com) Colfax Marathon   Video of the Week: Ironman World Championship St.George 2022 | Race Movie     Closing: Thanks again for listening in this week.  Please be sure to follow us @303endurance and of course go to iTunes and give us a rating and a comment.  We'd really appreciate it! Stay tuned, train informed, and enjoy the endurance journey!

303Endurance Podcast
Testing To Get Faster

303Endurance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 46:37


Welcome to Episode #336 of the 303 Endurance Podcast. You are listening to your weekly connection to coaches, experts, and pro athletes to help you reach your endurance goals. We're your hosts coach Rich Soares and 303 Chief Bill Plock. Thanks for joining us for another week of endurance interviews and discussion.   Show Sponsor: UCAN Take your performance to the next level with UCAN Energy and Bars made with SuperStarch®  UCAN uses SuperStarch instead of simple sugars to fuel athletes.  UCAN keeps blood sugar steady compared to the energy spikes and crashes of sugar-based products.  Steady energy equals sustained performance!       Use UCAN in your training and racing to fuel the healthy way, finish stronger and recover more quickly!  Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co     In Today's Show Feature Coaching Topic How Testing Makes You Faster Endurance News IRONMAN World Championship Results Utah Sports Commission Expected To Create Total Economic Impact Of More Than $35m Dollars PTO Pro Am, to be held this Sunday 15 May at the Herbalife24 Triathlon Los Angeles What's new in the 303 Triathlon Races in Colorado this Season Video of the Week TBD   Our News is sponsored by Buddy Insurance. Buddy Insurance gives you peace of mind to enjoy your training and racing to the fullest. Buddy's mission is simple, to help people fearlessly enjoy an active and outdoor lifestyle.    Get on-demand accident insurance just in case the unexpected happens. Buddy ensures you have cash for bills fast.  This is accident insurance not health and life insurance.  Go to buddyinsurance.com and create an account.  There's no commitment or charge to create one.  Once you have an account created, it's a snap to open your phone and in a couple clicks have coverage for the day.  Check it out!   Training Discussion: Regular Testing   Regular testing to determine your threshold intensities in each discipline is an important (arguably essential) practice to getting faster. This works for new and experienced athletes. Newer athletes may find this a bit demanding, but it will help you get faster, faster. Testing regularly is particularly helpful for athletes who have some experience and find themselves plateauing in their performance.   Here's how the cycle works. Take bike power for example. You want to take a baseline FTP test to determine your  Functional Threshold Power. FTP is theoretically the power in Watts you can average for 45-60 minutes. This FTP becomes an anchor point for determining your training zones. Having accurately determined training zones is important for making sure you do prescribed training in the right zones.   For example, if you want to increase your threshold power you need to train at that Z4 Threshold zone to train your body to process muscle lactate efficiently. The more time you spend in that zone, the more adaptation you get. Without the FTP number or accurate substitute, you may be training in the wrong zone (eg Z3 or Z5), neither of which create the same adaptation of teaching your body to improve lactate processing and increasing your capacity to do work. Training regularly and progressively overloading the correct training zones over the course of 3 weeks on the 4th week you retest. If things are working, the next FTP test is at a higher average power than the one 4 weeks earlier. You then adjust the training zones. In this case increasing the power ranges for each zone. Another 3 weeks of training at the new (accurate) zones causes another adaptation, another test, another increase, another adjustment to training zones, etc.   Swim: Perform a 400 time trial effort from a push (not dive). Recover for 10 to 15 minutes with easy swimming and rest. Perform a 200 time trial effort from a push. Looking to calculate CSS or CV as Meters or Yards Per Minute. The higher the number the faster your are. If you go real fast on the 200 and real slow on the 400 - that counts against you. Your 200 should be about 6% faster than the 400.   Bike Power on a trainer is best 20 or 45 minute Or 15 miles without power   Run: 5k Time Trial as if racing Do on a track or flat course Always repeat on the same track or course if possible   How to execute a perfectly paced test. Consider how big of an improvement over the last two tests in that discipline. Consider how well the athlete is training at Z4 and Z5. Start with the average pace or power from the previous test and set a reasonable increase as the target pace or power. Execute at that power or pace start to finish. Don't start faster.   Excerpt from Swim Test Pacing: For the 200 target 58 seconds per lap which will put you close to 1:56/100 pace or 3:51 200. For the 400 target 59 seconds per lap for the first 4 and 60 seconds per lap for the last 4. If you feel you have some gas increase the stroke rate on the last lap.   If you want to talk further about how to test regularly to get better results, reach out at Rich@303colorado.com or message @tripodcasterrich   Check out the TriDot Free Trial https://app.tridot.com/onboard/sign-up/richsoares   Endurance News:   Ironman World Championships St. George results Utah Sports Commission Expected To Create Total Economic Impact Of More Than $35m Dollars   PTO Pro Am, to be held this Sunday 15 May at the Herbalife24 Triathlon Los Angeles and streamed live for free around the world The event will see six of the world's top professional athletes race an Olympic-distance course alongside Challenged Athletes Foundation (CAF) athletes and special guests including former UFC star Paul Felder and Olympic silver medallist Heather Fell. CAF athletes will kick-start the day with a 1500m swim in the beautiful pearlescent sea off Venice Beach. Once out of the water, they'll tag in a highly-ranked PTO professional who'll rip up the road over a 40km bike course finishing in downtown LA between the Crypto.com Arena and Microsoft Square, outside the Herbalife Nutrition HQ. From here, another CAF superstar, or one of our special guests, will complete a 10km run to close out this first-ever PTO Pro Am event.   TEAMS REVEALED The PTO is proud to work alongside the Challenged Athletes Foundation to celebrate life through sport at the first PTO Pro Am. The six teams taking on the challenge of the PTO Pro Am in LA are:   Swimming and track runner Haven Shepherd, PTO World #3 Lionel Sanders and former UFC star Paul Felder. Swimmer and para climber Emily Gray, PTO World #8 Sam Long and swimmer and para-triathlete Rudy Garcia-Tolson. Para-triathlete Allysa Seely, PTO World #4 Daniel Baekkegard and GTN presenter and Olympic silver medallist Heather Fell. Swimmer Ahalya Lettenberger, PTO World #11 Holly Lawrence and swimmer and para-triathlete Roderick Sewell. Para-triathlete and hand cyclist Andre Kajlich, PTO World #7 Skye Moench and influencer and Herbalife ambassador Shirley Alvarez. Para-triathlete Chris Hammer, PTO World #14 Heather Jackson and para-triathlete, cyclist and marathoner Willie Stewart.     What's New in the 303: Upcoming Multisport Events in Colorado (runningintheusa.com) Upcoming Classic Races in Colorado (runningintheusa.com) Colfax Marathon   Video of the Week: Ironman World Championship St.George 2022 | Race Movie   Closing: Thanks again for listening in this week.  Please be sure to follow us @303endurance and of course go to iTunes and give us a rating and a comment.  We'd really appreciate it! Stay tuned, train informed, and enjoy the endurance journey!

Into The Characterverse
Ep 61 - Movie - Doctor Strange 2 Who Is Mordo

Into The Characterverse

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 95:27


Join the CV crew as we talk about Doctor Strange 2 Multiverse of Madness! Spoiler: The crew likes it!   https://linktr.ee/characterversepod Intro: Fearless First by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3742-fearless-first License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Outro: The Descent by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4490-the-descent License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Interlude: Marvel introduction sound

Daily Arxiv Radiostation
[May 13, 2022] Your Daily CV

Daily Arxiv Radiostation

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 17:54


Date: May 13, 2022Series: Your Daily CVThe daily episode of everything new in Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (cs.CV).List of papers:-1. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.05831-2. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.05844-3. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.06160-4. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.05920-5. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.05869-6. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.05703-7. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.05725-8. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.05927-9. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.06218

El Garaje Hermético de Máximo Sant
¡Miles de CV! ¡Motores de muy bestias!

El Garaje Hermético de Máximo Sant

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 16:40


¿Te perecen mucho los 700 de los F1 o los 1.500 CV de los tanques? ¡Pero si eso no es nada! Hoy vamos a hablar de motores con decenas de miles de caballos, muchos cilindros y cilindros muy grandes… en los que dentro caben varias personas. Incluso hablaremos de motores de…¡millones de CV! Te digo una cosa: Después de ver este vídeo, 1000 CV te van a parecer poca cosa. Nos vamos a centrar en motores alternativos… Un nombre que se presta a confusión, porque no son motores que sean alternativos a los convencionales, al contrario, son motores térmicos alternativos porque tienen pistones que suben y bajan… o sea, motores de los que nos gustan. Así que dejamos a un lado turbinas y cohetes… ¿Las dejamos a un lado?... no del todo… Cifras astronómicas. Y lo de astronómicas, nunca mejor dicho. Soy un ferviente apasionado de la carrera espacial y la conquista de la Luna tuvo un protagonista destacado: El motor-cohete Saturno V, el que propulsó entre otros al Apolo 11. Este cohete pesaba unas 3.800 toneladas de las cuales 3.500 eran de combustible. Medía 110 m de altura y conseguía que ese peso superase la fuerza de la gravedad y alcanzase cerca de 9.000 km/h… Este motor-cohete tenía… ¡160 MILLONES DE CABALLOS! Y consumía… ¡1,5 toneladas de combustible por segundo! Una ruina. Pero dejemos los cohetes y hablemos de motores térmicos alternativos de muchos caballos y muchos pensaréis que vamos a hablar solo de barcos y aviones, pero no de coches… os equivocáis. A casi 550 km/h. ¿Te parecen muchos 544 km/h? Pues sí, pero, ¿y si te digo que alcanzas esta velocidad saliendo desde parado en solo 3,6 segundos? ¡Has acertado!, estamos hablando de los Dragster, carreras de aceleración sobre 400 m. Para acelerar de 0 a 544 km/h en 3,6 segundos, ¿cuánta potencia es necesaria?. Pues nos vale con “solo” 10.000 CV… no está nada mal, ¿verdad? Aviones y turbo. En el video titulado “¿Cómo funciona un turbo?” contamos porque el turbo nació en la aviación porque permitía que los aviones pudiesen ganar altura sin perder potencia… os invito a verlo, aunque lo hayáis visto ya, porque estamos en 950.000 vistas… ¡y queremos llegar al millón! Os doy un dato: Ya en 1937 el motor Juno del famoso caza alemán Messerschmitt ofrecía 720 CV… no está mal, pero en el vídeo de hoy no “hay vida” si tienes menos de unos pocos miles de caballos. ¡Dame pistones! ¡Muchos! Se considera el motor de aviación de pistones más potente de la historia al Pratt & Whitney R-4360-51 VDT, ¡ojo! los últimos de una serie que arrancó en 1944 y acabó en 1955… las turbinas se llevaron por delante estos motores… una pena. Este motor en estrella tenía 4 filas de 7 cilindros, 28 cilindros en total cada uno de 2,5 litros y con 2 bujías, en total 71.500 cm3… por cierto, que son 4.360 pulgadas cúbicas, de ahí el nombre. ¿Qué potencia crees que daba este motor? Pues “solamente” 4.300 CV. ¿Te parecen pocos? Pues eso lo solucionamos ya mismo. 2.500.000 de cm3. ¡Empezamos a lo grande! Te voy a hablar del motor Wärtsilä RT-flex96C de casi 3 millones de cm3… no, no es un error, 25.480 litros de cilindrada. Y eso que solo tiene 14 cilindros en línea… ni 10 ni 12, 14… y es que es un dos tiempos. En cada cilindro cabrían unas cuantas personas. Y, de hecho, para limpiar la carbonilla, los operarios se meten dentro. Y es que en un barco mercante el tamaño y el peso, comparado con un avión, no importa nada o casi nada. Por eso este motor pesa 2.300 toneladas mide 27 metros de largo y casi 27 m de alto, como una casa de 4 o 5 plantas. La potencia máxima es de 107.400 CV a un régimen de … ¡105 rpm! Y consume unos 13.000 litros a los 100 km. Y una curiosidad: Con estos motores los barcos no tienen marcha atrás, para ir marcha atrás se para el motor… ¡y se arranca al revés! En este operación se tardan bastantes minutos. ¿Entiendes porque cuando llegan estos barcos a puerto son los remolcadores los encargados de las maniobras? Este motor debutó en el barco Emma Maersk en su momento el mercante más grande del Mundo. Conclusión. La conclusión está clara: Creo que he cumplido con mi promesa… ¿a qué ahora los 700 CV de un motor de F1 se ven de otra manera? La verdad es que ver funcionar a un motor de avión con motor en estrella o el motor de un barco a tope de vueltas, dándolo todo a 100 rpm… es una pasada. Eso lo he visto… un dragster no… tengo una asignatura pendiente. Coche del día. He elegido el Bugatti Bolide… ¿por qué? Porque me ha dado pena… tiene el título de coche de serie más potente del mundo, con motor térmico, y el pobre da solamente 1.825 CV… Bromas aparte, Bugatti dentro del Grupo VAG es quizá la marca que más se esfuerza por fabricar el coche más espectacular del momento… Este coche tiene un motor W16 de 8 litros y cuatro turbos y 1.825 CV… no son 100.000 CV, pero no está mal… creo que me llegarían.

From My Experience Podcast
Digital Footprints Episode 237

From My Experience Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 36:11


Yerrrrr! What is going on everybody? On this episode Rob shares his thoughts and expereinces with the importance of keeping an eye on your digital footprint. He also speaks on the RICO case that Young Thug, Gunna and 26 other affiliates will be facing. Sheesh.  Follow us on Instagram: The show: fme_podcast Rob: komplete_vision CV: passthepeazapp Music by: Romo: Support Romo' Music Jenova 7: Support Jenova 7's Music Baskaat: Support Baaskat's Music J Create: Support J Create's Music Affiliate Links: Support The Show By Shopping With Our Affiliates Check Out Garner's Garden Affiliate code:      Fmepodcast

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots
422: Verge HealthTech Fund with Joseph Mocanu

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 36:52


Joseph Mocanu is Co-founder and Managing Director of Verge HealthTech Fund, which invests globally in seed-stage healthcare technology startups relevant to emerging Asia that focus on disease prevention and management, digital therapies, and health system efficiency. Chad talks with Joseph about the healthcare landscape in different places of the world, funding criteria for companies, and how the pandemic has changed prospects for the fund and the market in general. Verge HealthTech Fund (https://www.vergehc.com/) Follow Verge HealthTech Fund on LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/verge-healthtech-fund-i/). Follow Joseph on Twitter (https://twitter.com/jmocanu) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/jmocanu/). Follow thoughtbot on Twitter (https://twitter.com/thoughtbot) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/150727/). Become a Sponsor (https://thoughtbot.com/sponsorship) of Giant Robots! Transcript: CHAD: This is the Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots Podcast, where we explore the design, development, and business of great products. I'm your host, Chad Pytel, and with me today is Joseph Mocanu, Co-founder and Managing Director of Verge HealthTech Fund, which invests globally in seed-stage healthcare technology startups relevant to emerging Asia that focus on disease prevention and management, digital therapies, and health system efficiency. Joseph, thank you for joining me. JOSEPH: Thanks so much, Chad, for having me. CHAD: So you have been focused on emerging Asia healthtech for a little while both at Verge HealthTech Fund, and prior to that, how did you get involved in this space? JOSEPH: I wish I had a really cool, deliberate story that made it sound like it was a smooth transition from point A to point B. But I simply have to owe it to an opportunity to transfer to the region through my old employer which is Oliver Wyman, a global management consultancy. So I joined this consultancy in 2011 after doing my Ph.D. and MBA really to understand how to be a better investor, which, again, sounds a little bit backwards. But I had worked at a hedge fund in China just after my MBA, and I learned that they use management consulting techniques to add value to their portfolio companies. And I thought that's a great skill to learn. And it'd be great to even learn it in English and doing it in healthcare 100% of the time. So I had joined Oliver Wyman in 2011 in Toronto office back home, where I spent a lot of my life. And they asked me one day if I wanted to transfer to the Singapore office to help start healthcare over there. And when I went to Singapore, of course, it's this futuristic city, really well planned. It's got a lot of fine names and a reputation globally of being a modern cosmopolitan place to do business. Some people refer to it as Asia-lite. But the surrounding areas have a lot of issues when it comes to their health systems. I knew this from an academic perspective, having studied about the region before moving to Singapore but seeing it firsthand was a completely different experience. At the time, I was working for primarily pharmaceutical clients, helping them with market access and other commercially relevant activities. And they were faced with a fundamental challenge of trying to sell their product, which was usually placed in the premium category to markets that had difficulty affording this. And not only did it have difficulty affording this, it had difficulty in delivering it as well as in using the product appropriately, making sure it gets to the patients when it's needed at the right time, at the right dose. And so they were looking for partners. They were looking for partners on the ground that could assist with this delivery education, the technology, and the financing around it as well. Now, there was a real shortage of said partners on the ground. At the same time, there were also insurance companies that wanted to expand their business. They also realized that the policies tended to be a bit simple, and they tended to resemble one another across competitors. And also, to manage increasing claims, they had a tendency to increase the premium that they charged. This was not possible to do indefinitely. And at some point, they needed to actually manage the medical conditions, which you're probably seeing more and more of in the U.S. and in Western markets, less so of in this part of the world. And then lastly, you had conglomerates and investors who said, "Hey, we hear healthcare is going to be a pretty hot field. How do we get started? How do we invest?" And all of this basically set me on a mission of target hunting. And during the course of this, well, I met a lot of interesting companies, a lot of them really, really early in their journey and really too small for any of my clients to find a meaningful way to engage with them. And unfortunately, they couldn't get to the point where they are relevant and large enough to engage with without a lot of capital. This is where, you know, you'd have a nice investment ecosystem coming in to fill in the gaps. This, unfortunately, did not really exist at the time. And I had the hubris of thinking that I could do something about it by being an angel investor and starting to support these founders directly, which, thankfully, seemed to work to a certain degree. It worked to the point where one day, I woke up, and I realized I had 13 angel investments, 9 of which were in healthcare technology, and not a lot of money left in my bank account to do other things with. CHAD: Uh-oh. [laughs] JOSEPH: Yeah. And at the same time, I also realized that the work that those founders are doing is a whole lot more impactful than me sitting up until 3:00 o'clock in the morning every night writing PowerPoint slides or begging analysts to write the PowerPoint slides that would more or less sit and collect dust on my clients' shelves for various reasons. So I came to the realization that I need to do this full time. I didn't have, you know, $10 million in my pocket as reference to spending all my money on angel investments. So I realized that I have to use other people's money, and the way to do that is to join a fund. Now, the problem with that idea is that there weren't any funds that were doing this, like really, really early investing in healthtech companies in the region that was really geared to helping solve some of these really big access challenges. So then I realized I had to start a VC fund that did this and only this. So that's really kind of a long-winded introduction as to how I got started with this. CHAD: Yeah, I want to come back to the process of actually starting a VC fund in a bit. But I'm curious, were the companies that you were doing angel investment in and now doing seed-stage investment in do they tend to be local companies, or do they tend to be international companies that are planning to solve a problem locally? JOSEPH: It's funny you ask that. At the beginning, they were local. Well, actually, if I really were to take a step back, the very first angel investment I made was for a mentee, and she was based in Toronto. But I'd say that the first true angel investment I made, you know, it was in Singapore, first and foremost, because I was there. And then I started branching out. I started making investments in the Philippines. I started looking at companies in Taiwan and other parts. And actually, that opened my eyes to the fact that there may be other companies around the world that are trying to solve a problem that may not necessarily be in my own backyard. So I started to, you know, cheekily, I sent my wife to tech conferences around the world. And she herself is an entrepreneur from the tech industry; hardware was her specialty. And we started identifying companies from all over the world. And the second angel investment where I was the very first investor was actually from a company in South Africa with similar challenges. So the things that we saw as major health system deficiencies or maybe shortages in infrastructure and human capital were very much true not just in Southeast Asia but in a lot of parts of the world. And we noticed that while there were different reasons for why they ended up in that position, the outcome was similar. CHAD: I'm not sure that everyone listening has a good sense of what the healthcare landscape actually looks like in these different places of the world. So let's take insurance, for example; what is the insurance landscape, generally speaking, in Southeast Asian countries? JOSEPH: So, in Southeast Asia, we do have insurers. I mean, private insurance is certainly there. But it's just not -- CHAD: Do most companies have public insurance, too, like universal healthcare? JOSEPH: That depends on which country you're in. Now, the one interesting thing about our entire region is that they've all committed to universal healthcare coverage. I would say that the implementation thereof has been heterogeneous; let's put it that way. Out of Southeast Asian countries that are not Singapore, I'd say that Thailand probably has the strongest public healthcare system. And in fact, they even do health technology assessments, which is really looking at the true cost-effectiveness of a new intervention versus what's currently done in practice to make decisions as to whether they're going to pay for it. And they cover a pretty high percentage of their population with this. And then there are other places where the financing mechanisms are in place, but you don't necessarily have the doctors or the hospitals where they need to be to address the needs of the population. Still, we are dealing with places that are not fully urbanized. And in fact, a good deal of the population is still working on the pharm, basically. One of the other complexities of our region is that just between the Philippines and Indonesia, which together has a combined population of 380 million at least, maybe it's 390 now, you've got 25,000 islands, and not all of those islands tend to hold major tier-one cities, even though they can hold a lot of people. And if there is one thing about healthcare that seems to be a universal truth is that highly skilled workers like to live in the rich cities. CHAD: And so what I'm hearing is that on an individual island, if there's not a major city there, the access to the actual healthcare might be really limited. JOSEPH: That is exactly it. CHAD: In these economies in these countries, it's typical to have private insurance layered on top. But the pharmas probably aren't doing that, right? JOSEPH: Oh, no, no, unfortunately not. There are some pilots of trying to do co-ops or collective insurance or micro-insurance policies. But again, when you look at the amount of premium that they could pay in, the kind of coverage they get is pretty basic. CHAD: So, how does that landscape influence the solutions that startups are creating? JOSEPH: Well, first and foremost, you've got to try to get some sort of mechanism by which you can seek care without having to travel too much. And I think that concept is extremely familiar to all of us thanks to the global pandemic that I hope we're coming out of right now, although there's always a new strain surprising us. The idea of basic telemedicine is one that can have a great deal of impact in these populations. But even before that, just understanding the importance of healthcare, like, what the concept of healthcare is, what the concept of the modern medical system is, is something that a fair number of people never really had awareness of. And I'll call out an example country, and I try not to call out too many examples. But Indonesia did a really good job of educating people about the concept of healthcare when they promoted their universal healthcare coverage. Even if they didn't have the ability to deliver it as well as they wanted to or as widespread as they wanted to, at least they got people paying attention to this concept called health. So awareness is really the first step. The second challenge is all right, so you know health exists. When do you know when you need it? Where are you going to find a doctor? How do you know if a doctor is even good? And how do you know that the products that you're going to get are appropriate? So there are so many challenges that you have to face when you are in a lack of access situation. CHAD: I assume you're getting pitched on a lot of ideas coming to your fund, a lot of startups. Correct me if that's wrong. [laughs] JOSEPH: No, no, that's absolutely true. So one of the blessings and curses of being one of the very few super early-stage healthtech venture funds out there is that there aren't many of us out there. And when we started...let's just put it this way, if I could find a fund that was doing what I wanted to do, I would have sent my CV in, and I couldn't. And starting a fund was basically the last thing I wanted to do, having never worked at a VC before or ever raised money in my life before. So I still think that we are the only truly global impact-oriented seed - I hate the term pre-seed, but I'll use it because of the audience's familiarity with it- investment fund out there right now for healthtech. So by virtue of that, we do see a lot of companies. CHAD: So what are some of the criteria? JOSEPH: So I'd say some of the criteria that we look for is number one, are you solving a real problem? And we define a real problem by the breadth of the problem, like, how many people are suffering from it or how systemic is this problem if it's an infrastructural one? And depth being how severe is this problem: is it life or death, or is it a minor inconvenience? So first and foremost, it's got to be solving a real problem. Second, it's really around the team. You need a lot of clinical, technical, and commercial experience in order to pull off a healthtech startup successfully. And even before that, we want to understand why are you doing this? Because this is not easy. I'd say on a scale of 1 to 10, doing a startup is like an eight, and then doing a healthtech startup is like an 11. It's slow; it's technical, it's regulated, it's super risky. And health systems are very pathway-dependent in the intent to not have many things in common with one another. So it is really, really hard. So we want to know the motivation. Are you going to stick through the thick and thin, or are you doing this healthtech startup because you think healthtech is cool or hot this particular period in the market cycle? So that's another criterion. Another criterion is, well, what's your edge? I mean, okay, you can have a great team, and I think that is definitely a prerequisite. You can solve a problem. But do you have something that could make sure that you are going to be competitive and remain competitive? CHAD: Given the barriers to market entry that you just outlined, do most of the companies that you're investing in have any sort of traction already in the market, or where are they in the product development or business development cycle? JOSEPH: I'm going to give the ultimate cop-out answer of it depends. CHAD: [laughs] Yeah. JOSEPH: But I will qualify that by saying it depends on whether it's hardware or software, and it depends whether it's regulated or non-regulated. So if you are a software company that's unregulated so, what does this mean? It could be like a marketplace. It could be health education. It could be some telemedicine in a loosely regulated market. We'd really like to see user traction. We'd really like to see revenue even. However, if you're a device company and you need to get FDA before you can earn a single dollar, we're okay with it being a science experiment or a prototype on the table as long as the science part of it has been de-risked. So if we know that the fundamental scientific principles are sound, then we're willing to take the productization and regulatory risk because we've been through this journey ourselves. CHAD: And also, you said a team is really important, so if it's a team that has never gone through that before, that's less attractive than a team that has done it before, I assume. JOSEPH: Yeah, absolutely. However, one of the challenges is that outside of the U.S., certain European markets in Israel, it's really difficult to find a team that's gone through the entire medical device development process before. So you are going to rely heavily on your professional service providers, consultants, advisors, other investors who've done this before. And as long as you have at least a path to getting to a point where you can unlock and utilize that expertise, that's okay. But if you don't, then that's a really, really big risk. Mid-Roll Ad I wanted to tell you all about something I've been working on quietly for the past year or so, and that's AgencyU. AgencyU is a membership-based program where I work one-on-one with a small group of agency founders and leaders toward their business goals. We do one-on-one coaching sessions and also monthly group meetings. We start with goal setting, advice, and problem-solving based on my experiences over the last 18 years of running thoughtbot. As we progress as a group, we all get to know each other more. And many of the AgencyU members are now working on client projects together and even referring work to each other. Whether you're struggling to grow an agency, taking it to the next level and having growing pains, or a solo founder who just needs someone to talk to, in my 18 years of leading and growing thoughtbot, I've seen and learned from a lot of different situations, and I'd be happy to work with you. Learn more and sign up today at thoughtbot.com/agencyu. That's A-G-E-N-C-Y, the letter U. CHAD: Earlier, you said FDA. FDA is a United States thing. Do most countries in Southeast Asia have a local regulatory agency like the FDA that things need to be approved through? JOSEPH: Yep, every single one. The question is, what's the process to go through that? Generally speaking, the FDA, as well as the European equivalent, which is the CE Mark, are used as predicates in order to kind of shortcut the process, make it go a little bit faster. Because then you don't have to create a bunch of new work or get the local regulator to really try to do things that they're unfamiliar with. CHAD: You said it's fairly rare for teams to have concrete experience doing that in the local market. Does that mean that most of these markets have been served by, I don't know, large companies previously? JOSEPH: Yeah, and still are. A fair number of emerging markets don't even have the manufacturing capability to even do local production, so they require a lot of importation. I'd say that this is a different case when it comes to generic pharmaceuticals and maybe vaccines and some consumables. But complex devices and biologics are generally manufactured in more developed markets or larger economies. CHAD: Yeah. Well, you mentioned the pandemic, and I'm curious how the pandemic has changed either your prospects for the fund but also the market in general. JOSEPH: I would say, again, it's both a blessing and a curse. So during the start of the pandemic, there was a great deal of societal and economic uncertainty around where are we going to be as a species in six months? And I remember early 2020; it was kind of these Hollywood movies that would paint this kind of semi-apocalyptic picture of where we're going to end up. And as a consequence, people really puckered up and stopped investing in things. I would say that the other side of it is now much of the world understands what it's like to not have access to quality healthcare or even access to healthcare. You see people not going to the hospital for things that they ought to and then suffering the consequences at home, like, let's say, not going for that heart checkup, and then you having a heart attack at home and passing when you otherwise wouldn't have. Or even cancer patients having to delay their therapy because the hospital is just too full. So this concept of telemedicine which has always been resisted by both the payers and providers for being infeasible, or inaccurate, or impossible to fund properly, suddenly had to be done. And the concept of telemedicine is fairly old. I mean, how else would you treat your astronauts in space in the '60s if they got sick? So this is something that NASA thought of and invented and implemented, you know, decades and decades ago. And finally, this came forward. And I was pleasantly surprised to see...and again, I'll quote the U.S. here where The Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services or CMS actually reimbursed a bunch of remote procedure codes, which is pretty amazing. And I think that was opening Pandora's Box. There's no going back from that. So I think telemedicine is absolutely here to stay. And the real challenge now is really how to make it more user-friendly, how to improve it, how to improve the decisions that come from it. I really don't think it's going back. And as a consequence of this, it's really benefited a lot of our startups that were trying to build this remote-connected future anyway. CHAD: Has there also been an influx of those kinds of startups? JOSEPH: Absolutely. I would say that there has been a veritable Cambrian explosion of startups where everyone and their uncle is starting a healthtech startup as well as a healthtech fund. I see a lot of new funds coming up promising to invest in this space. So I think it's good in that there's going to be a lot of really new ideas, and hopefully, it's going to improve the standard of care for everyone around the world. But at the same time, it is creating a lot of noise, and it's becoming increasingly difficult to filter through that. CHAD: Do the solutions tend to be local? I guess the nature of my question was, you know, like messaging apps. [laughs] Different countries have different popular messaging apps. What do you see as the penetration of different telemedicine solutions in the different countries? Do you think it's going to be, oh, you know, this is popular in this country? Or do you think it's possible for one company to come in and really have a significant impact in the market across multiple markets? JOSEPH: Yeah, I think it's eventually going to be the latter. So at the start, you do see that you have your national champions. And like instant messaging apps, it's kind of like a 90-10 rule where the number 1 player takes 90% of the market, number 2 takes most of what's left, and then number 3 player caters to some niche or another. And I see two competing forces here; one is, yes, there may be a big player like Babylon or Crew who comes in and rolls up everything backed by heaps of capital. But the other thing could also be that all the health systems start saying, "You know what? Why are we working with an external company? Why don't we just develop all these capabilities ourselves and then keep the patient captive?" And you are starting to see middleware providers who are basically providing that telemedicine layer, white-labeling it, or giving API access to the providers themselves, the legacy providers themselves, and then allowing them to do that. And I actually saw this statistic...I don't know how accurate it was, but I saw a chart in the U.S. that white-labeled or internal telemedicine consults exceeded the number of Teladoc consultations, which is the largest platform in the U.S., at some point last year. CHAD: I'm wondering, do you know if Teladoc uses Twilio? JOSEPH: I really should know the answer to that question, but unfortunately, I do not. CHAD: Because my sense is the real winner in this game might be companies like Twilio because I think everyone is using them. [laughs] JOSEPH: That makes a ton of sense. So when we do look at some investments, we actually want to invest in middleware because why duke it out to be the platform when you're the utility provider? CHAD: So let's turn our attention to the actual creation of the fund. And I know you just opened your second fund last month, right? JOSEPH: Actually, this month. I mean, last month was the paperwork, but it takes time for stuff to get approved. CHAD: Yeah, fair enough. So you already said actually starting a fund was, I think you said, the last thing on earth that you wanted to do. Why was that the last thing you wanted to do? JOSEPH: Frankly, it was a whole lot more uncertainty than I was prepared to handle at the time. And I was either blessed or cursed with this momentary clarity of purpose where I knew with all my being that this is what I wanted to do with myself for, if not the rest of my life, a very long time. And the only alternative, or rather the only choice to pursue this at the time, was really starting a fund. So that's what I had to do, right? CHAD: And how large was the first fund? JOSEPH: It was pretty small; it was $7.6 million, which in local currency equates to a nice number of just above 10 million sings. CHAD: And where did you...I'm going to ask where that ended up coming from. But in terms of the mechanics of actually starting a fund, what did that look like? JOSEPH: Well, it depends on each market. But typically, what happens is you need to first have permission from the regulator in order to actually start and run a fund. So in Singapore, you need to apply for a venture capital fund management license from the Monetary Authority of Singapore. That's what had to be done first, and we got that approved in a pretty good time, actually. I think we might have captured a lull period because now, with all the funds coming out, I've heard the queue is months long in some cases. And then came the business of incorporating the fund itself and then starting to draft all the legal paperwork, the conditions, the private memorandum or prospectus, depending on which geography and how regulated you are, that you show around to investors once they've expressed interest in learning substantially more details about your fund beyond what a simple PowerPoint deck or a casual coffee conversation can yield. And then you start collecting commitments, and then you start collecting the money. And at some point, you have enough money to say, all right, we'll do a close or first close, and that then gives you permission to start deploying that money into investments. And some funds they'll only do one close, some funds will do a first close, and then a final close when they get the rest of the money in or some money committed and then calling the rest of it to come in. Or some will do multiple closes just so that they have the ability to keep deploying continuously while they're doing this fundraising process. And in our case, we were doing rolling closes. So we would close every few months, and we'd continue to deploy. And by the time we finished fundraising, we actually already had nine companies out of the 15 that we have in our portfolio done. So it really depends on all sorts of different factors, which we probably don't have that much time to get into. And I risk perhaps putting my foot in my mouth and misspeaking if I give too many examples. CHAD: [laughs] When it comes to starting a fund, how cookie-cutter is it? Or do you find yourself having to create everything from scratch, all the legal documents, whatever platform you might be...or access you might be giving to the people who are contributing to the fund? JOSEPH: I'd say, again, it depends where you are. I think in the U.S. and especially with the advent of great service providers platforms like AngelList and Assure, it is super cookie-cutter. In our part of the world, I still think it's somewhat cookie-cutter, but we got a little too cute. CHAD: [chuckles] JOSEPH: We thought, okay, it's our first time doing a fund. I've been an LP in other funds. What did I wish I had as an LP? And as a consequence, we introduced some hurdle rates of tiered carry, and even zero carry if we don't hit a certain return. And all that really did was just create more questions from the investors. So we should have probably done it as cookie-cutter as possible in hindsight. CHAD: So I often hear from founders who talk about how it's important to have a VC fund behind you that you agree with, and want to work with, and are excited about, and that can be value additive. Do you need, as someone raising a fund, do you need to consider things like that or other things when it comes to the people you're taking money from the fund? JOSEPH: Absolutely. Maybe knock on wood here, but our relative inexperience when starting a fund probably selected out all the folks who might not have gotten along with us anyway. And the fact that we're pretty straightforward and direct with what we want to do in our objectives probably helped with that selection process as well on the positive side. But I absolutely, absolutely can recommend having that alignment of values and mission with those who are on the journey with you for a good decade. It's like getting married, right? CHAD: Yeah. Well, so when you're planning a fund and thinking about time horizons, is a decade what you're thinking about? JOSEPH: Yeah, all things considered. So our fund lifetime was eight years from final close. But still, it takes time to raise the fund and plan the fund, and you have people that are on board even before the fund begins. So it is a decade-long relationship, at least. And then some of the larger funds because they want to have a longer investment period, will push that out even further where they're going to be a 10-year fund from final close. And if you have enough of your portfolio that hasn't exited yet but still has some value to be uncovered, you may ask your investors to extend the fund life even further. So this is a supremely long relationship that you have. And aside from evergreen funds that don't have a fund lifetime, I think this is about as long as it gets, although I have seen some people float the idea of a 20-year fund or a 50-year fund, but that's really not widely practiced. I think five years is the fastest I've seen, and ten seems to be the average. CHAD: Where did that first fund come from? How did you drum up the interest and decide who would be a part of it? JOSEPH: It's really the folks who have known me the longest or worked with me. So you know how they say when you're raising money for a startup, you get it from the three F's, Friends, Family, and Fools? For funds and for first-time fund managers, I think it's a pretty analogous group of people, although I don't think we have any fools. CHAD: [laughs] JOSEPH: And, unfortunately, don't have family either. So it's really all friends, old co-workers, old clients, and then the people that they introduced us to. There were some serendipitous moments where people liked what I said at a conference, or we asked a tough question. And people asked, "Well, how can you ask such a tough question?" Then they got to know us and then decide to invest from there. But majority of it was just introductions, warm introductions. We never did any cold emails. CHAD: Have there been any exits in the first fund? JOSEPH: Not just yet. We do come in as either the first or second investor in these companies. So there is quite a long journey that we expect before we, you know, see some exits. There may be some this year. But if I look back at my angel investments, there was only real serious talk of an exit at the six-year mark for one of the companies that's doing really well. And even that exit turned out to be just another, you know, the investor changed their mind, and instead of buying the company, they decided to just invest more money into it. So this is a long journey. CHAD: Yeah, definitely. Did that make putting together the second fund any harder, or is that what everyone expects? JOSEPH: I am cautiously optimistic because we're still so early in our journey that the only folks we've really spoken with are the ones who invested in our first fund or passed on our first fund because they don't back first-time fund managers. They come to expect that your second fund is built on the momentum of the first fund. And it's really your third fund that's built on the exit and actual realized track record of your first fund. CHAD: That makes sense. What do you think is next for Verge HealthTech? JOSEPH: Well, first things first, we got to get started with the second fund and see if we can build something to scale. I mean, the first fund was an experiment. It was a small fund, you know. Could we build the world's seed-stage global impact healthtech fund on basically a shoestring? And the second fund is now let's take everything that we wish we had for the first fund and scale it up so bigger initial ticket sizes because we want to own more, the ability to follow on properly, the ability to do more deals, which requires a much bigger team which we now have. As well as to go back and support the winners of our first fund as well as some of the companies that maybe we made a mistake on and passed but still have a strong enough relationship to revisit and get them on the next round or the round after that, or just new companies that the market has moved. You know, the area that we might have been really interested in at the seed stage is now a pre-A stage or an A stage. So that's really what we want to do with the second one. And it would be amazing to see where this goes. I'm thrilled that we actually have, well, I think, one of the best healthtech investment teams in the world; maybe I'm slightly biased with this. CHAD: [laughs] JOSEPH: And I'm excited to see what we can do together. CHAD: That's great. Well, I wish you the best. And I really appreciate you for stopping by and sharing with us. If folks want to follow along with you or get in touch with you, where are the best places for them to do that? JOSEPH: Probably LinkedIn is the best way to do it. Also, I have a blog on Medium, which I'm sure can be linked in the show notes. I've been really bad...I've been traveling intensely in the past half-year. But I promise my next blog post will be interesting. CHAD: [laughs] JOSEPH: Because I just got back from Rwanda and Saudi Arabia, which are two very, very different countries, however, with a great emphasis on improving healthcare, especially on the digital side. CHAD: Well, that's exciting. So folks definitely can find the links for that in the notes, which you can find the notes; you can subscribe to the show and a full transcript of the episode at giantrobots.fm. If you have questions or comments, email us at hosts@giantrobots.fm. And you can find me on Twitter at @cpytel. This podcast is brought to you by thoughtbot and produced and edited by Mandy Moore. Thanks for listening, and see you next time. ANNOUNCER: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success. Special Guest: Joseph Mocanu.

Daily Arxiv Radiostation
[May 12, 2022] Your Daily CV

Daily Arxiv Radiostation

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 12:49


Date: May 12, 2022Series: Your Daily CVThe daily episode of everything new in Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (cs.CV).List of papers:-1. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.05678-2. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.05264-3. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.05677-4. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.05476-5. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.05509-6. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.05245

Daily Arxiv Radiostation
[May 11, 2022] Your Daily CV

Daily Arxiv Radiostation

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 18:26


Date: May 11, 2022Series: Your Daily CVThe daily episode of everything new in Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (cs.CV).List of papers:-1. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.05019-2. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.04725-3. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.04502-4. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.04843-5. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.04596-6. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.04749-7. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.04903-8. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.04565

Cardionerds
203. Guidelines: 2021 ESC Cardiovascular Prevention – Question #9 with Dr. Noreen Nazir

Cardionerds

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 12:03


The following question refers to Section 4.3 of the 2021 ESC CV Prevention Guidelines. The question is asked by Dr. Maryam Barkhordarian, answered first by pharmacy resident Dr. Anushka Tandon, and then by expert faculty Dr. Noreen Nazir. Dr. Noreen Nazir is Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine at the University of Illinois at Chicago, where she is the director of cardiac MRI and the preventive cardiology program. The CardioNerds Decipher The Guidelines Series for the 2021 ESC CV Prevention Guidelines represents a collaboration with the ACC Prevention of CVD Section, the National Lipid Association, and Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association. Question #9 Mr. A is a 28-year-old man who works as an accountant in what he describes as a “desk job” setting. He shares that life got “a little off-track” for him in 2020 between the COVID-19 pandemic and a knee injury. His 2022 New Years' resolution is to improve his overall cardiovascular and physical health. He has hypertension and a family history of premature ASCVD in his father, who died of a heart attack at age 50. Prior to his knee injury, he went to the gym 3 days a week for 1 hour at a time, split between running on the treadmill and weightlifting. He has not returned to the gym since his injury and has been largely sedentary, although he is trying to incorporate a 20-minute daily walk into his routine. Which of the following exercise-related recommendations is most appropriate? A. A target of 75-150 minutes of vigorous-intensity or 150-300 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic physical exercise weekly is recommended to reduce all-cause mortality, CV mortality, and morbidity. B. Bouts of exercise less than 30 minutes are not associated with favorable health outcomes. C. Exercise efforts should be focused on aerobic activity, since only this type of activity is associated with mortality and morbidity benefits. D. Light-intensity aerobic activity like walking is expected to have limited health benefits for persons with predominantly sedentary behavior at baseline. Answer #9 The correct answer is A. There is an inverse relationship between moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and CV morbidity/mortality, all-cause mortality, and incidence of type 2 diabetes, with additional benefits accrued for exercise beyond the minimum suggested levels. The recommendation to “strive for at least 150-300 min/week of moderate-intensity, or 75-150 min/week of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity, or an equivalent combination thereof” is a Class 1 recommendation per the 2021 ESC guidelines, and a very similar recommendation (at least 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity or 150 minutes of moderate-intensity activity) is also Class 1 recommendation per 2019 ACC/AHA primary prevention guidelines. Both the ESC and ACC/AHA provide examples of activities grouped by absolute intensity (the amount of energy expended per minute of activity), but the ESC guidelines also offer suggestions for measuring the relative intensity of an activity (maximum/peak associated effort) in Table 7, which allows for a more individualized, customizable approach to setting activity goals. Importantly, individuals who are unable to meet minimum weekly activity recommendations should still be encouraged to stay as active as their abilities and health conditions allow to optimize cardiovascular and overall health. Choice B is incorrect, as data suggests physical activity episodes of any duration, including

El Garaje Hermético de Máximo Sant
BMW M3 E30, el primero y el mejor

El Garaje Hermético de Máximo Sant

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 19:19


No fue el primer BMW M de calle, mérito que le corresponde al M5, pero fue el más popular y fue el mejor… en realidad no… no fue el mejor, para nosotros sigue siendo el motor. Por eso le dedicamos este monográfico donde hablaremos de su historia, de cómo va, de su compra o venta y de cómo mejorarlo. Y lo haremos gracias a un nuevo patrocinador, soulauto.com. ¿No sabéis que es Soul Auto? Es una página Web que me ha seducido desde el primer momento por tres motivos básicos: Primero, porque todos los coches que se subastan son “coches con alma”, coches muy atractivos e interesantes Segundo, porque es un formato dinámico, pues la web se renueva permanentemente, y hay novedades casi cada día, estate atento porque fijo que va a aparecer el coche de tus sueños a subasta! Y tercero, porque tanto el que compra como el que vende sabe que paga un precio justo. El BMW M3 nació para la competición, sobre todo en circuitos y para el Mundial de Turismos, y enmarcado en el Grupo A. Las marcas rivales de BMW, sobre todo Audi y Mercedes, ya tenían modelos muy deportivos en ese segmento. Mercedes nada menos que el 190 2.3 16 válvulas, con motor de diseño Cosworth, y Audi nada menos que el Audi Quattro, el más revolucionario de todos, con motor 5 cilindros, turbo y tracción total… Vamos con la historia que comenzó en el Salón de Frankfurt de 1985. ¿Por qué un cuatro cilindros? Para BMW el Serie 3 era la base lógica para lanzarse a la competición. Eran coches compactos, en torno a los 4,3 metros; ligeros, con un peso en las versiones de 6 cilindros por debajo de los 1.200 kg.; con buenas suspensiones y motores potentes. El 323i era un mito y creció en cilindrada y potencia, llegando a los 2,5 litros y 171 CV, unas buenas cifras para la época. Pero BMW se decidió por un 4 cilindros de 2,3 litros, ¿por qué? Primero, ¡porque ya lo tenían! BMW tenía un competitivo motor de 4 cilindros, 2 litros y 16 válvulas para la F-2, que ofrecía cerca de 300 CV y era ligero y fiable. De hecho fue la base del motor de F1 de Brabham, Camnpeón del Mundo con Piquet. Aumentando la cilindrada hasta el límite que permitía el bloque y adaptándolo para el uso por la calle, el motor subía a 2,3 litros y ofrecía unos buenos 200 CV, 5 menos si era catalizado. Y pesaba en torno a 1.100 kg, casi la mitad que su sucesor actual. Pero es que, además, este motor era lógicamente más corto y unas decenas de kilos más ligeros que el 6 cilindros. Éxito total. Además del motor este M3 tenía muchas mejoras: 1. Retoques en la carrocería, con una luna más tendida y una nueva tapa de maletero con alerón. 2. Vías más anchas, con aletines para dar cabida a esas ruedas y otras mayores que se usarían en competición. 3. Frenos mucho más eficaces. 4. Suspensiones retocadas y afinadas. El éxito es tal que BMW se ve obligada a triplicar la producción. Versiones especiales. Buscando la perfección BMW ofrecía diversas versiones mejoradas. La primera es la Evolution II, conocido como Evo2, con 220 CV, menos peso y aerodinámica revisada con un alerón trasero de generosas dimensiones. Solo se hicieron 500. Pero para los coleccionistas el más interesante es la versión “Cecotto” un homenaje a este piloto de motos pasado a las cuatro ruedas, que ofrecía 215 CV y aerodinámica revisada. Hubo incluso una hubo una versión limitada a 148 ejemplares, el Europameister, con la firma del propio Roberto Ravaglia… Sin olvidarnos del descapotable, quizás un absurdo, pero hoy día de los más cotizados. ¡Cómo iba! De repente llegó la invitación para ir a Italia, a Mugello, circuito que no conocía, a probar este coche. Os aseguro una cosa, en esos años, 200 CV eran muchos, pero lo que convertía a este coche en algo muy especial era su eficacia y su progresividad, en unos años en que la electrónica brillaba por su ausencia… estaba un poco nervioso: Cochazo, circuito nuevo, periodistas internacionales de mucho prestigio de los que yo era lector, periodistas nacionales, entre ellos mi exjefe… pero todo esto se desvaneció en la primera curva… Sentía el coche como si fuese una prolongación de mi cuerpo, obedecía a la perfección a lo que le pedía. Adelantaba a todos los periodistas, nacionales e internacionales, incluido a mi jefe… este coche me hizo sentir que era un buen piloto. Una noticia buena y una mala. La buena es que estos coches, a pesar de ser coches de alto rendimiento, estaban muy bien hechos y eran muy fiables. A poco que el coche esté cuidado, es un coche eterno… muy recomendable como deportivo de colección… Y ahora, la mala: Cuestan un dineral. No vas a encontrar un BMW M3 E30 que valga la pena por menos de 55.000 €. Y fijaos en dos detalles: Primero, he dicho cuestan y no valen. Porque adoro el coche, pero me parece que pese a todo, cuesta más de lo que vale. La segunda que no he dicho “no vas a encontrar un M3… en España”. Porque por debajo de ese precio no lo vas a encontrar ni es España ni en su país natal, Alemania. Valen una pasta. ¡Ya tengo uno! ¿Qué hago? Mi consejo en este coche, más que en ningún otro de esta saga de monográficos de coches míticos es muy sencillo: Dejarlo de serie. Como he comentado en este video y en otros muchos, lo mejor de este coche era su increíble equilibrio. Y hoy día que encontrar uno de serie no es fácil. Si has comprado un coche de calle, no se te ocurra hacerlo de competición. Para eso es más interesante comprar uno de carreras ya hecho. Y si te animas a hacerle cosas no trates de hacer un “falso” EVO 2 o cosas así. De este coche encuentras de todo para mejorarlo, desde muchos elementos de la carrocería en carbono o preparaciones de motor de todo tipo. Pero, insisto, mi consejo es que lo dejes de serie. Conclusión. Sí, valen mucho dinero… ¡pero es que valdrán más! Porque lo decía al principio, luego cuando hablaba de la prueba y lo digo ahora al final: Para mi este M3 es el mejor de todos, con diferencia. Te hace bueno, parece que no corre… hasta que miras el velocímetro o el crono…

La Encerrona
#LaEncerrona HOY: Día R de Repartija en el Tribunal Constitucional

La Encerrona

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 21:34


Hoy tendremos nuevo Tribunal Constitucional. Hay 6 cupos libres y 6 candidatos listos. ¿Quiénes serán los nuevos dueños de la ley en el Perú? MIENTRAS TANTO: Primera Dama en problemas: la Fiscalía y el Congreso quieren que declare con ellos. ¿Cuáles son sus excusas? ADEMÁS: El delirante CV de la nueva embajadora peruana en Noruega. Y... La lucha por el aborto será más dura en el Perú luego del retroceso en EE.UU. Esta entrevista con la médico Patty Gonzáles es muy informativa sobre los aspectos legales y médicos. **** ¿Te gustó este episodio? ¿Buscas las fuentes de los datos mencionados hoy? Entra a http://patreon.com/ocram para acceder a nuestros grupos exclusivos de Telegram y WhatsApp. También puedes UNIRTE a esta comunidad de YouTube aquí https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCP0AJJeNkFBYzegTTVbKhPg/join **** Visita a Tkambio en sus redes sociales: Facebook: https://bit.ly/3mAqABP Instagram: https://bit.ly/3Drkj19 Youtube: https://bit.ly/2XXFmYV Y obtén el mejor tipo de cambio de verdad.

Screaming in the Cloud
Serverless Should be Simple with Tomasz Łakomy

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 38:43


About TomaszTomasz is a Frontend Engineer at Stedi, Co-Founder/Head of React at Cloudash, egghead.io instructor with over 200 lessons published, a tech speaker, an AWS Community Hero and a lifelong learner.Links Referenced: Cloudash: https://cloudash.dev/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/tlakomy TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate. Is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other; which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability: it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at ChaosSearch. You could run Elasticsearch or Elastic Cloud—or OpenSearch as they're calling it now—or a self-hosted ELK stack. But why? ChaosSearch gives you the same API you've come to know and tolerate, along with unlimited data retention and no data movement. Just throw your data into S3 and proceed from there as you would expect. This is great for IT operations folks, for app performance monitoring, cybersecurity. If you're using Elasticsearch, consider not running Elasticsearch. They're also available now in the AWS marketplace if you'd prefer not to go direct and have half of whatever you pay them count towards your EDB commitment. Discover what companies like Equifax, Armor Security, and Blackboard already have. To learn more, visit chaossearch.io and tell them I sent you just so you can see them facepalm, yet again.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. It's always a pleasure to talk to people who ask the bold questions. One of those great bold questions is, what if CloudWatch's web page didn't suck? It's a good question. It's one I ask myself all the time.And then I stumbled across a product that wound up solving this for me, and I'm a happy customer. To be clear, they're not sponsoring anything that I do, nor should they. It's one of those bootstrapped, exciting software projects called Cloudash. Today, I'm joined by the Head of React at Cloudash, Tomasz Łakomy. Tomasz, thank you for joining me.Tomasz: It's a pleasure to be here.Corey: So, where did this entire idea come from? Because I sit and I get upset every time I have to go into the CloudWatch dashboard because first, something's broken. In an ideal scenario, I don't have to care about monitoring or observability or anything like that. But then it's quickly overshadowed by the fact that this interface is terrible. And the reason I know it's terrible is that every time I'm in there, I feel dumb.My belief is—for the longest time, I thought that was a problem with me. But no, invariably, when you wind up working with something and consistently finding it a bad—you don't know enough to solve for it, it's not you. It is, in fact, the signs of a poorly designed experience, start to finish. “You should be smarter to use this tool,” is very rarely correct. And there are a bunch of observability tools and monitoring tools for serverless things that have made sense over the years and made this easier, but one of the most—and please don't take this the wrong way—stripped down, bare essentials of just the facts, style of presentation is Cloudash. It's why I continue to pay for it every month with a smile on my face. How did you get here from there?Tomasz: Yeah that's a good question. I would say that. Cloudash was born out of desire for simple things to be simple. So, as you mentioned, Cloudash is basically the monitoring and troubleshooting tool for serverless applications, made for serverless developers because I am very much into serverless space, as is Maciej Winnicki, who is the another half of Cloudash team. And, you know, the whole premise of serverless was things are going to be simpler, right?So, you know, you have a bunch of code, you're going to dump it into a Lambda function, and that's it. You don't have to care about servers, you don't have to care about, you know, provisioning stuff, you don't have to care about maintenance, and so on. And that is not exactly true because why PagerDuty still continues to be [unintelligible 00:02:56] business even in serverless spaces. So, you will get paged every now and then. The problem is—what we kind of found is once you have an incident—you know, PagerDuty always tends to call it in the middle of the night; it's never, like, 11 a.m. during the workday; it's always the middle of the night.Corey: And no one's ever happy when it calls them either. It's, “Ah, hell.” Whatever it rings, it's yeah, the original Call of Duty. PagerDuty hooked up to Nagios. I am old enough to remember those days.Tomasz: [unintelligible 00:03:24] then business, like, imagine paying for something that's going to wake you up in the middle of the night. It doesn't make sense. In any case—Corey: “So, why do you pay for that product? Because it's really going to piss me off.” “Okay, well… does that sound like a good business to you? Well, AWS seems to think so. No one's happy working with that stuff.” “Fair. Fair enough.”Tomasz: So, in any case, like we've established an [unintelligible 00:03:43]. So you wake up, you go to AWS console because you saw a notification that this-and-this API has, you know, this threshold was above it, something was above the threshold. And then you go to the CloudWatch console. And then you see, okay, those are the logs, those are the metrics. I'm going to copy this request ID. I'm going to go over here. I'm going to go to X-Ray.And again, it's 3 a.m. so you don't exactly remember what do you investigate; you have, like, ten minutes. And this is a problem. Like, we've kind of identified that it's not simple to do these kinds of things, too—it's not simple to open something and have an understanding, okay, what exactly is happening in my serverless app at this very moment? Like, what's going on?So, we've built that. So, Cloudash is a desktop app; it lives on your machine, which is a single pane of glass. It's a single pane of glass view into your serverless system. So, if you are using CloudFormation in order to provision something, when you open Cloudash, you're going to see, you know, all of the metrics, all the Lambda functions, all of the API Gateways that you have provisioned. As of yesterday, API Gateway is no longer cool because they did launch the direct integration, so you have—you can call Lambda functions with [crosstalk 00:04:57]—Corey: Yeah, it's the one they released, and then rolled back and somehow never said a word—because that's an AWS messaging story, and then some—right around re:Invent last year. And another quarter goes by and out it goes.Tomasz: It's out yesterday.Corey: Yeah, it's terrific. I love that thing. The only downside to it is, ah, you have to use one of their—you have to use their domain; no custom domain support. Really? Well, you can hook up CloudFront to it, but the pricing model that way makes it more expensive than API Gateway.Okay, so I could use Cloudflare in front of it, and then it becomes free, so I bought a domain just for that purpose. That's right, my serverl—my direct Lambda URLs now live behind the glorious domain of cheapass.cloud because of course. They are. It's a day-one product from AWS, so of course, it's not feature-complete.But one of the things I like about the serverless model, and it's also a challenge when it comes to troubleshooting stuff is that it's very much set it and forget it style because serverless in many cases, at least the way that I tend to use it, is back-office stuff, its back-end things, it's processing on things that are not necessarily always direct front and center. So, these things can run on their own for years until finally, you find a strange bug in a new use case, or you want to go and change something. And then it's how the hell did this ever work? And it's still working, kind of, but what fool built this? Of course, it was me; it's always me.But what happened here? You're basically excavating your own legacy code, trying to understand what's going on. And so, you're already upset then. Cloudash makes this easier to find the things, to navigate through a whole bunch of different accounts. And there are a bunch of decisions that you made while building the app that are so clearly correct, that I get actively annoyed when others don't because oh, it looks at your AWS configuration file in your user home directory. Great, awesome. It's a desktop app, but it still consults that file. Yay, integration between ClickOps and the terminal. Wonderful.But ah, use SSO for a lot of stuff, so that's going to fix your little red wagon. I click on that app, and suddenly, bam, a browser opens asking me to log in and authenticate, allow the request. It works, and then suddenly, it goes back to doing exactly what you'd expect it to. It's really nice. The affordances behind this are glorious.Tomasz: Like I said, one of our kind of design goals when building Cloudash was to make simple things simple again. The whole purpose is to make sure that you can get into the root cause of an issue within, like, five minutes, if not less. And this is kind of the app that you're going to tend to open whenever that—as I said, because some of the systems can be around for, like, ages, literally without any incident whatsoever, then the data is going to change because somebody [unintelligible 00:07:30] got that the year is 2020 and off you go, we have an incident.But what's important about Cloudash is that we don't send logs anywhere. And that's kind of important because you don't pay for [PUT 00:07:42] metric API because we are not sending those logs anywhere. If you install Cloudash on your machine, we are not going to get your logs from the last ten years, put them in into a system, charge you for that, just so you are able to, you know, find out what happened in this particular hour, like, two weeks ago. We genuinely don't care about your logs; we have enough of our own logs at work to, you know, to analyze, to investigate, and so on; we are not storing them anywhere.In fact, you know, whatever happens on your machine stays on the machine. And that is partially why this is a desktop app. Because we don't want to handle your credentials. We don't—absolutely, we don't want you to give us any of your credentials or access keys, you know, whatever. We don't want that.So, that is why you install Cloudash, it's going to run on your machine, it's going to use your local credentials. So, it's… effectively, you could say that this is a much more streamlined and much more laser-focused browser or like, an eye into AWS systems, which live on the serverless side of things.Corey: I got to deal with it in a bit of an interesting way, recently. I have a detector in my company's production AWS org, to detect when ClickOps is afoot. Now, I'm a big proponent of ClickOps, but I also want to know what's going on, so I have a whole thing that [runs detects 00:09:04] when people are doing things in the console versus via API. And it alerts on certain subsets of them. I had to build a special case for the user agent string coming out of Cloudash because no, no, this is an app, this is not technically ClickOps—it is also read-only, which is neither here nor there, to my understanding.But it was, “Oh yeah, this is effectively an Electron app.” It just wraps, effectively, a browser and presents that as an application. And cool. From my perspective, that's an implementation detail. It feels like a native app—because it is—and I can suddenly see the things I care about in a way that is much more straightforward without having to have four different browser tabs open where, okay, here's the CloudTrail log for this thing, here's the metrics next to it. Oh, those are two separate windows already, and so on and so forth. It just makes hunting down to the obnoxious problems so much nicer.It's also, you're one of those rare products where if I don't use it for a month, I don't get the bill at the end of the month and think, “Ooh, that's going to—did I waste the money?” It's no, nice. I had a whole month where I didn't have to mess with this. It's great.Tomasz: Exactly. I feel like, you know, it's one of those systems where, as you said, we send you an email at the end of every month that we're going to charge you X dollars for the month—by the way, we have fixed pricing and then you can cancel anytime—and it's like one of those things that, you know, I didn't have to open this up for a month. This is awesome because I didn't have any incidents. But I know whenever again, PagerDuty is going to decide, “Hey, dude, wake up. You know, if slept for three hours. That is definitely long enough,” then you know that; you know, this app is there and you can use that.We very much care about, you know, building this stuff, not only for our customers, but we also use that on a daily basis. In fact, I… every single time that I have to—I want to investigate something in, like, our serverless systems at Stedi because everything that we do at work, at Stedi, since this incident serverless paradigm. So, I tend to open Cloudash, like, 95% of the time whenever I want to investigate something. And whenever I am not able to do something in Cloudash, this goes, like, straight to the top of our, you know, issue lists or backlog or whatever you want to call it. Because we want to make this product, not only awesome, you know, for customers to buy a [unintelligible 00:11:22] or whatever, but we also want to be able to use that on a daily basis.And so far, I think we've kind of succeeded. But then again, we have quite a long way to go because we have more ideas, than we have the time, definitely, so we have to kind of prioritize what exactly we're going to build. So, [unintelligible 00:11:39] integrations with alarms. So, for instance, we want to be able to see the alarms directly in the Cloudash UI. Secondly, integration with logs insights, and many other ideas. I could probably talk for hours about what we want to build.Corey: I also want to point out that this is still your side gig. You are by day a front-end engineer over at Stedi, which has a borderline disturbing number of engineers with side gigs, generally in the serverless space, doing interesting things like this. Dynobase is another example, a DynamoDB desktop client; very similar in some respects. I pay for that too. Honestly, for a company in Stedi's space, which is designed as basically a giant API for deep, large enterprise business stuff, there's an awful lot of stuff for small-scale coming out of that.Like, I wind up throwing a disturbing amount of money in the general direction of Stedi for not being their customer. But there's something about the culture that you folks have built over there that's just phenomenal.Tomasz: Yeah. For the record, you know, having a side gig is another part of interview process at Stedi. You don't have to have [laugh] a side project, but yeah, you're absolutely right, you know, the amount of kind of side projects, and you know, some of those are monetized, as you mentioned, you know, Cloudash and Dynobase and others. Some of those—because for instance, you talked to Aidan, I think a couple of weeks ago about his shenanigans, whenever you know, AWS is going to announce something he gets in and try to [unintelligible 00:13:06] this in the most amusing ways possible. Yeah, I mean, I could probably talk for ages about why Stedi is by far the best company I've ever worked at, but I'm going to say this: that this is the most talented group of people I've ever met, and myself, honestly.And, you know, the fact that I think we are the second largest, kind of, group of AWS experts outside of AWS because the density of AWS Heroes, or ex-AWS employees, or people who have been doing cloud stuff for years, is frankly, massive, I tend to learn something new about cloud every single day. And not only because of the Last Week in AWS but also from our Slack.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of “Hello, World” demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking, databases, observability, management, and security. And—let me be clear here—it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself, all while gaining the networking, load balancing, and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build. With Always Free, you can do things like run small-scale applications or do proof-of-concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free? This is actually free, no asterisk. Start now. Visit snark.cloud/oci-free that's snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: There's something to be said for having colleagues that you learn from. I have never enjoyed environments where I did not actively feel like the dumbest person in the room. That's why I love what I do now. I inherently am. I have to talk about so many different things, that whenever I talk to a subject matter expert, it is a certainty that they know more about the thing than I do, with the admitted and depressing exception of course of the AWS bill because it turns out the reason I had to start becoming the expert in that was because there weren't any. And here we are now.I want to talk as well about some of—your interaction outside of work with AWS. For example, you've been an Egghead instructor for a while with over 200 lessons that you published. You're an AWS Community Hero, which means you have the notable distinction of volunteering for a for-profit company—good work—no, the community is very important. It's helping each other make sense of the nonsense coming out of there. You've been involved within the ecosystem for a very long time. What is it about, I guess—the thing I'm wondering about myself sometimes—what is it about the AWS universe that drew you in, and what keeps you here?Tomasz: So, give you some context, I've started, you know, learning about the cloud and AWS back in early-2019. So, fun fact: Maciej Winnicki—again, the co-founder of Cloudash—was my manager at the time. So, we were—I mean, the company I used to work for at the time, OLX Group, we are in the middle of cloud transformation, so to speak. So, going from, you know, on-premises to AWS. And I was, you know, hired as a senior front-end engineer doing, you know, all kinds of front-end stuff, but I wanted to grow, I wanted to learn more.So, the idea was, okay, maybe you can get AWS Certified because, you know, it's one of those corporate goals that you have to have something to put that checkbox next to it. So, you know, getting certified, there you go, you have a checkbox. And off you go. So, I started, you know, diving in, and I saw this whole ocean of things that, you know, I was not entirely aware of. To be fair, at the time I knew about this S3, I knew that you can put a file in an S3 bucket and then you can access it from the internet. This is, like, the [unintelligible 00:16:02] idea of my AWS experiences.Corey: Ideally, intentionally, but one wonders sometimes.Tomasz: Yeah, exactly. That is why you always put stuff as public, right? Because you didn't have to worry about who [unintelligible 00:16:12] [laugh] public [unintelligible 00:16:15]. No, I'm kidding, of course. But still, I think what's [unintelligible 00:16:20] to AWS is what—because it is this endless ocean of things to learn and things to play with, and, you know, things to teach.I do enjoy teaching. As you said, I have quite a lot of, you know, content, videos, blog posts, conference talks, and a bunch of other stuff, and I do that for two reasons. You know, first of all, I tend to learn the best by teaching, so it helps me very much, kind of like, solidify my own knowledge. Whenever I record—like, I have two courses about CDK, you know, when I was recording those, I definitely—that kind of solidify my, you know, ideas about CDK, I get to play with all those technologies.And secondly, you know, it's helpful for others. And, you know, people have opinions about certificates, and so on and so forth, but I think that for somebody who's trying to get into either the tech industry or, you know, cloud stuff in general, being certified helps massively. And I've heard stories about people who are basically managed to double or triple their salaries by going into tech, you know, with some of those certificates. That is why I strongly believe, by the way, that those certificates should be free. Like, if you can pass the exam, you shouldn't have to worry about this $150 of the fee.Corey: I wrote a blog post a while back, “The Dumbest Dollars a Cloud Provider Can Make,” and it's charging for training and certification because if someone's going to invest that kind of time in learning your platform, you're going to try and make $150 bucks off them? Which in some cases, is going to put people off from even beginning that process. “What cloud provider I'm not going to build a project on?” Obviously, the one I know how to work with and have a familiarity with, in almost every case. And the things you learn in your spare time as an independent learner when you get a job, you tend to think about your work the same way. It matters. It's an early on-ramp that pays off down the road and the term of years.I used to be very anti-cert personally because it felt like I was jumping through hoops, and paying, in some cases, for the privilege. I had a CCNA for a while from Cisco. There were a couple of smaller companies, SaltStack, for example, that I got various certifications from at different times. And that was sort of cheating because I helped write the software, but that's neither here nor there. It's the—and I do have a standing AWS cert that I get a different one every time—mine is about to expire—because it gets me access to lounges at physical events, which is the dumbest of all reasons to get certs, but here you go. I view it as the $150 lounge pass with a really weird entrance questionnaire.But in my case it certs don't add anything to what I do. I am not the common case. I am not early in my career. Because as you progress through your career, things—there needs to be a piece of paper that says you know things, and early on degree or certifications are great at that. In the time it becomes your own list of experience on your resume or CV or LinkedIn or God knows what. Polywork if you're doing it the right way these days.And it shows a history of projects that are similar in scope and scale and impact to the kinds of problems that your prospective employer is going to have to solve themselves. Because the best answer to hear—especially in the ops world—when there's a problem is, “Oh, I've seen this before. Here's how you fix it.” As opposed to, “Well, I don't know. Let me do some research.”There's value to that. And I don't begrudge anyone getting certs… to a point. At least that's where I sit on it. At some point when you have 25 certs, it's when you actually do any work? Because it's taking the tests and learning all of these things, which in many ways does boil down to trivia, it stands in counterbalance to a lot of these things.Tomasz: Yeah. I mean, I definitely, totally agree. I remember, you know, going from zero to—maybe not Hero; I'm not talking about AWS Hero—but going from zero to be certified, there was the Solutions Architect Associate. I think it took me, like, 200 hours. I am not the, you know, the brightest, you know, the sharpest tool in the shed, so it probably took me, kind of, somewhat more.I think it's doable in, like, 100 hours, but I tend to over-prepare for stuff, so I didn't actually take the actual exam until I was able to pass the sample exams with, like, 90% pass, just to be extra sure that I'm actually going to pass it. But still, I think that, you know, at some point, you probably should focus on, you know, getting into the actual stuff because I hold two certificates, you know, one of those is going to expire, and I'm not entirely sure if I want to go through the process again. But still, if AWS were to introduce, like, a serverless specialty exam, I would be more than happy to have that. I genuinely enjoy, kind of, serverless, and you know, the fact that I would be able to solidify my knowledge, I have this kind of established path of the things that I should learn about in order to get this particular certificate, I think this could be interesting. But I am not probably going to chase all the 12 certificates.Maybe if AWS IQ was available in Poland, maybe that would change because I do know that with IQ, those certs do matter. But as of [unintelligible 00:21:26] now, I'm quite happy with my certs that I have right now.Corey: Part of the problem, too, is the more you work with these things, the harder it becomes to pass the exams, which sounds weird and counterintuitive, but let me use myself as an example. When I got the cloud practitioner cert, which I believe has lapsed since then, and I got one of the new associate-level betas—I'll keep moving up the stack until I start failing exams. But I got a question wrong on the cloud practitioner because it was, “How long does it take to restore an RDS database from a snapshot backup?” And I gave the honest answer of what I've seen rather than what it says in the book, and that honest answer can be measured in days or hours. Yeah.And no, that's not the correct answer. Yeah, but it is the real one. Similarly, a lot of the questions get around trivia, syntax of which of these is the correct argument, and which ones did we make up? It's, I can explain in some level of detail, virtually every one of AWS has 300 some-odd services to you. Ask me about any of them, I could tell you what it is, how it works, how it's supposed to work and make a dumb joke about it. Fine, whatever.You'll forgive me if I went down that path, instead of memorizing what is the actual syntax of this YAML construct inside of a CloudFormation template? Yeah, I can get the answer to that question in the real world, with about ten seconds of Googling and we move on. That's the way most of us learn. It's not cramming trivia into our heads. There's something broken about the way that we do certifications, and tech interviews in many cases as well.I look back at some of the questions I used to ask people for Linux sysadmin-style jobs, and I don't remember the answer to a lot of these things. I could definitely get back into it, but if I went through one of these interviews now, I wouldn't get the job. One would argue I shouldn't because of my personality, but that's neither here nor there.Tomasz: [laugh]. I mean, that's why you use CDK, so you'd have to remember random YAML comments. And if you [unintelligible 00:23:26] you don't have YAML anymore. [unintelligible 00:23:27].Corey: Yes, you're quite the CDK fanboy, apparently.Tomasz: I do like CDK, yes. I don't like, you know, mental overhead, I don't like context switching, and the way we kind of work at Stedi is everything is written in TypeScript. So, I am a front-end engineer, so I do stuff in the front-end line in TypeScript, all of our Lambda functions are written in TypeScript, and our [unintelligible 00:23:48] is written in TypeScript. So, I can, you know, open up my Visual Studio Code and jump between all of those files, and the language stays the same, the syntax stays the same, the tools stay the same. And I think this is one of the benefits of CDK that is kind of hard to replicate otherwise.And, you know, people have many opinions about the best to deploy infrastructure in the cloud, you know? The best infrastructure-as-code tool is the one that you use at work or in your private projects, right? Because some people enjoy ClickOps like you do; people—Corey: Oh yeah.Tomasz: Enjoy CloudFormation by hand, which I don't; people are very much into Terraform or Serverless Framework. I'm very much into CDK.Corey: Or the SAM CLI, like, three or four more, and I use—Tomasz: Oh, yeah. [unintelligible 00:24:33]—Corey: —all of these things in various ways in some of my [monstrous 00:24:35] projects to keep up on all these things. I did an exploration with the CDK. Incidentally, I think you just answered why I don't like it.Tomasz: Because?Corey: Because it is very clear that TypeScript is a first-class citizen with the CDK. My language of choice is shitty bash because, grumpy old sysadmin; it happens. And increasingly, that is switching over to terrible Python because I'm very bad at that. And the problem that I run into as I was experimenting with this is, it feels like the Python support is not fully baked, most people who are using the CDK are using a flavor of JavaScript and, let's be very clear here, the every time I have tried to explore front-end, I have come away more confused than I was when I started, part of me really thinks I should be learning some JavaScript just because of its versatility and utility to a whole bunch of different problems. But it does not work the way I think, on some level, that it should because of my own biases and experiences. So, if you're not a JavaScript person, I think that you have a much rockier road with the CDK.Tomasz: I agree. Like I said, I tend to talk about my own experiences and my kind of thoughts about stuff. I'm not going to say that, you know, this tool or that tool is the best tool ever because nothing like that exists. Apart from jQuery, which is the best thing that ever happened to the web since, you know, baked bread, honestly. But you are right about CDK, to the best of my knowledge, kind of, all the other languages that are supported by CDK are effectively transpiled down from TypeScript. So it's, like, first of all, it is written in TypeScript, and then kind of the Python, all of the other languages… kind of come second.You know, and afterwards, I tend to enjoy CDK because as I said, I use TypeScript on a daily basis. And you know, with regards to front-end, you mentioned that you are, every single time you is that you end up being more confused. It never goes away. I've been doing front-end stuff for years, and it's, you know, kind of exactly the same. Fun story, I actually joined Cloudash because, well, Maciej started working on Cloudash alone, and after quite some time, he was so frustrated with the modern front-end landscape that he asked me, “Dude, you need to help me. Like, I genuinely need some help. I am tired of React. I am tired of React hooks. This is way too complex. I want to go back to doing back-end stuff. I want to go back, you know, thinking about how we're going to integrate with all those APIs. I don't want to do UI stuff anymore.”Which was kind of like an interesting shift because I remember at the very beginning of my career, where people were talking about front-end—you know, “Front-end is not real programming. Front-end is, you know, it's easy, it's simple. I can learn CSS in an hour.” And the amount of people who say that CSS is easy, and are good at CSS is exactly zero. Literally, nobody who's actually good at CSS says that, you know, CSS, or front-end, or anything like that is easy because it's not. It's incredibly complex. It's getting probably more and more complex because the expectations of our front-end UIs [unintelligible 00:27:44].Corey: It's challenging, it is difficult, and one of the things I find most admirable about you is not even your technical achievements, it's the fact that you're teaching other people to do this. In fact, this gets to the last point I want to cover on our conversation today. When I was bouncing topic ideas off of you, one of the points you brought up that I'm like, “Oh, we're keeping that and saving that for the end,” is why—to your words—why speaking at tech events gets easier, but never easy. Let's dive into that. Tell me more about it.Tomasz: Basically, I've accidentally kickstarted my career by speaking at meetups which later turned into conferences, which later turned into me publishing courses online, which later turned into me becoming an AWS Hero, and here we are, you know, talking to each other. I do enjoy, you know, going out in public and speaking and being on stage. I think, you know, if somebody has, kind of, the heart, the ability to do that, I do strongly recommend, you know, giving it a shot, not only to give, like, an honestly life-changing experience because the first time you go in front of hundreds of people, this is definitely, you know, something that's going to shake you, while at the same time acknowledging that this is absolutely, definitely not for everyone. But if you are able to do that, I think this is definitely worth your time. But as you said—by quoting me—that it gets easier, so every single time you go on stage, talk at a meetup or at a conference or online conferences—which I'm not exactly a fan of, for the record—it's—Corey: It's too much like work, too much like meetings. There's nothing different about it.Tomasz: Yeah, exactly. Like, there's no journey. There's no adventure in online conferences. I know that, of course, you know, given all of that, you know, we had to kind of switch to online conferences for quite some time where I think we are pretending that Covid is not a thing anymore, so we, you know, we're effectively going back, but kind of the point I wanted to make is that I am a somewhat experienced public speaker—I'd like to say that because I've been doing that for years—but I've been, you know, talking to people who actually get paid to speak at the conferences, to actually kind of do that for a living, and they all say the same thing. It gets simpler, it gets easier, but it's never freaking easy, you know, to go out there, and you know, to share whatever you've learned.Corey: I'm one of those people. I am a paid public speaker fairly often, even ignoring the podcast side, and I've spoken on conference stages a couple hundred times at least. And it does get easier but never easy. That's a great way of framing it. You… I get nervous before every talk I give.There are I think two talks I've given that I did not have an adrenaline hit and nervous energy before I went onstage, and both of those were duds. Because I think that it's part of the process, at least for me. And it's like, “Oh, how do you wind up not being scared for before you go on stage?” You don't. You really don't.But if that appeals to you and you enjoy the adrenaline rush of the rest, do it. If you're one of those people who've used public speaking as, “I would prefer death over that,” people are more scared of public speaking their death, in some cases, great. There are so many ways to build audiences and to reach people that fine, if you don't like doing it on stage, don't force yourself to. I'd say try it once; see how it feels meetups are great for this.Tomasz: Yeah. Meetups are basically the best way to get started. I'm yet to meet a meetup, either, you know, offline or online, who is not looking for speakers. It's always quite the opposite, you know? I was, you know, co-organizing a meetup in my city here in Poznań, Poland, and the story always goes like this: “Okay, we have a date. We have a venue. Where are the speakers?” And then you know, the tumbleweed is going to roll across the road and, “Oh, crap, we don't have any speakers.” So, we're going to try to find some, reach out to people. “Hey, I know that you did this fantastic project at your workplace. Come to us, talk about this.” “No, I don't want to. You know, I'm not an expert. I am, you know, I have on the 50 years of experience as an engineer. This is not enough.” Like I said, I do strongly recommend it, but as you said, if you're more scared of public speaking than, like, literally dying, maybe this is not for you.Corey: Yeah. It comes down to stretching your limits, finding yourself interesting. I find that there are lots of great engineers out there. The ones that I find myself drawn to are the ones who aren't just great at building something, but at storytelling around the thing that they are built of, yes, you build something awesome, but you have to convince me to care about it. You have to show me the thing that got you excited about this.And if you can't inspire that excitement in other people, okay. Are you really excited about it? Or what is the story here? And again, it's a different skill set. It is not for everyone, but it is absolutely a significant career accelerator if it's leveraged right.Tomasz: [crosstalk 00:32:45].Corey: [crosstalk 00:32:46] on it.Tomasz: Yeah, absolutely. I think that we don't talk enough about, kind of, the overlap between engineering and marketing. In the good sense of marketing, not the shady kind of marketing. The kind of marketing that you do for yourself in order to elevate yourself, your projects, your successes to others. Because, you know, try as you might, but if you are kind of like sitting in the corner of an office, you know, just jamming on your keyboard 40 hours per week, you're not exactly likely to be promoted because nobody's going to actively reach out to you to find out about your, you know, recent successes and so on.Which at the same time, I'm not saying that you should go @channel in Slack every single time you push a commit to the main branch, but there's definitely, you know, a way of being, kind of, kind to yourself by letting others know that, “Okay, I'm here. I do exist, I have, you know, those particular skills that you may be interested about. And I'm able to tell a story which is, you know, convincing.” So it's, you know, you can tell a story on stage, but you can also tell your story to your customers by building a future that they're going to use. [unintelligible 00:33:50].Corey: I really want to thank you for taking the time to speak with me today. If people want to learn more, where's the best place to find you?Tomasz: So, the best place to find me is on Twitter. So, my Twitter handle is @tlakomy. So, it's T-L-A-K-O-M-Y. I'm assuming this is going to be in the [show notes 00:34:06] as well.Corey: Oh, it absolutely is. You beat me to it.Tomasz: [laugh]. So, you can find Cloudash at cloudash.dev. You can probably also find my email, but don't email me because I'm terrible, absolutely terrible at email, so the best way to kind of reach out to me is via my Twitter DMs. I'm slightly less bad at those.Corey: Excellent. And we will, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:34:29]. Thank you so much for being so generous with your time. I appreciate it.Tomasz: Thank you. Thank you for having me.Corey: Tomasz Łakomy, Head of React at Cloudash. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, and if you're on the YouTubes, smash the like and subscribe button, as the kids say. Whereas if you've hated this episode, please do the exact same thing—five-star reviews smash the buttons—but this time also leave an insulting and angry comment written in the form of a CloudWatch log entry that no one is ever able to find in the native interface.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Daily Arxiv Radiostation
[May 10, 2022] Your Daily CV

Daily Arxiv Radiostation

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 30:44


Date: May 10, 2022Series: Your Daily CVThe daily episode of everything new in Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (cs.CV).List of papers:-1. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.03809-2. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.03923-3. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.03962-4. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.03777-5. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.03947-6. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.03555-7. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.03776-8. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.03892-9. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.03891-10. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.03633-11. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.03436-12. https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.03899-13. https://arxiv.org/abs/1909.01106

The Treasury Career Corner
Successful Career Progression in Treasury with Chris McConnachie

The Treasury Career Corner

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 40:42


Sometimes career progression is a linear rise through the ranks, but other times, it's sporadic growth that shoots treasury professionals to their dream roles. Someone who's experienced this first hand is Chris McConnachie, the CFO at National Grid. Chris joined National Grid in 2008, occupying several treasury roles in London before moving to the US in 2012 to guide the US function through their Global Treasury Systems Implementation. From 2013 to 2015, Chris was treasurer of the company's US business and, more recently, served as NY Controller and Head of US Business Services before starting in his current role as CFO in 2021. National Grid is one of the world's largest utilities, focused on delivering energy safely, efficiently, reliably, and responsibly. As an international electricity and gas company, they are one of the largest investor-owned energy companies in the world and play a vital role in delivering gas and electricity to many millions of people across Great Britain and North-Western US. On the podcast we discussed… Chris' introduction to finance and treasury Chris gives some insight into his time at Northern Rock before its insolvency How Chris transitioned to the international treasury scene Why having a long-term view is beneficial How US treasury differs from UK and European treasury How Chris transitioned from a treasury role to a controllership role The right frame of mind for career progression Why considering multiple routes to a successful career is beneficial You can connect with Chris on https://www.linkedin.com/in/chris-mcconnachie-3434362a/ (LinkedIn). Are you interested in pursuing a career within Treasury? Whether you've recently graduated, or you want to search for new job opportunities to help develop your treasury career, The Treasury Recruitment Company can help you in your search for the perfect job. https://treasuryrecruitment.com/jobs (Find out more here). Or, send us your CV and let us help you in your next career move! If you're enjoying the show please rate and review us on whatever podcast app you listen to us on, for Apple Podcasts https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/the-treasury-career-corner/id1436647162#see-all/reviews (click here)!

Expat Heroes
Comment réussir sa réinsertion professionnelle en France après une expat ?

Expat Heroes

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 34:00


Vous rentrez bientôt en France et vous avez peur de ne pas réussir à retrouver une activité professionnelle ? Cet épisode est fait pour vous ! J'ai trouvé une pro de la réinsertion professionnelle qui accompagne aujourd'hui les expats à définir leur projet professionnel avant leur retour en France : Magali Desmidt. Vous savez qu'il faut faire un CV, une lettre de motivation, utiliser LinkedIn et postuler en ligne. Oui bien sûr. Mais comment faire pour que votre recherche d'emploi soit efficace et prenne le moins de temps possible ? Dans cet épisode, vous allez comprendre quelle stratégie mettre en place pour une réinsertion professionnelle réussie à votre retour en France. Magali nous donne plein de conseils pour un CV et une lettre de motivation valorisant votre parcours / et surtout adaptés à votre recherche d'emploi en France. Elle nous explique surtout qu'il est essentiel de bien définir vos envies professionnelles car l'entrepreneuriat peut-être aussi une possibilité ! Retour en France: comment réussir sa réinsertion professionnelle après une expat ? Réponses dans ce podcast !

Cardionerds
202. Guidelines: 2021 ESC Cardiovascular Prevention – Question #8 with Dr. Eugene Yang

Cardionerds

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 9:19


This question refers to Sections 3.1 of the 2021 ESC CV Prevention Guidelines. The question is asked by CardioNerds Academy Intern, student Dr. Hirsh Elhence, answered first by internal medicine resident at Beaumont Hospital and soon to be Mayo Clinic cardiology fellow and Dr. Teodora Donisan and then by expert faculty Dr. Eugene Yang. Dr. Yang is professor of medicine of the University of Washington where he is medical director of the Eastside Specialty Center and the co-Director of the Cardiovascular Wellness and Prevention Program. Dr. Yang is former Governor of the ACC Washington Chapter and current chair of the ACC Prevention of CVD Section. The CardioNerds Decipher The Guidelines Series for the 2021 ESC CV Prevention Guidelines represents a collaboration with the ACC Prevention of CVD Section, the National Lipid Association, and Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association. Question #8 Please read the following patient vignettes and choose the FALSE statement. A. A 39-year-old man who comes for a regular physical, has normal vitals and weight, denies any significant past medical or family history – does not need systematic cardiovascular disease (CVD) assessment. B. A 39-year-old woman who comes for a regular physical, has normal vitals and weight, and has a history of radical hysterectomy (no other significant past medical or family history) – could benefit from systematic or opportunistic CVD assessment. C. A 39-year-old woman who comes for a regular physical, has normal vitals except for a BMI of 27 kg/m2 and a family history of hypertension – requires a systematic global CVD assessment. D. A 39-year-old man who comes for a regular physical, has normal vitals and weight, and has a personal history of type I diabetes – requires a systematic global CVD assessment. Answer #8 Option A is an accurate statement, as systematic CVD risk assessment is not recommended in men < 40 years-old and women < 50 years-old, if they have no known cardiovascular (CV) risk factors. (Class III, level C) Option B is an accurate statement, as this patient had a radical hysterectomy, which means the ovaries have been removed as well and she is considered postmenopausal. Systematic or opportunistic CV risk assessment can be considered in men > 40 years-old and women > 50 years-old or postmenopausal, even in the absence of known ASCVD risk factors. (Class IIb, level C) Option C is a false statement and thus the correct answer, as the recommendations for global screening in this patient are not as strong and would require shared decision making. Opportunistic screening of blood pressure can be considered in her, as she is at risk for developing hypertension. Blood pressure screening should be considered in adults at risk for the development of hypertension, such as those who are overweight or with a known family history of hypertension. (Class IIa, level B) Option D is an accurate statement, as systematic global CVD risk assessment is recommended in individuals with any major vascular risk factor (i.e., family history of premature CVD, familial hyperlipidemia, CVD risk factors such as smoking, arterial hypertension, DM, raised lipid level, obesity, or comorbidities increasing CVD risk). (Class I, level C) Additional learning points: Do you know the difference between opportunistic and systematic CVD screening? Opportunistic screening refers to screening without a predefined strategy when the patient presents for different reasons. This is an effective and recommended way to screen for ASCVD risk factors, although it is unclear if it leads to benefits in clinical outcomes. Systematic screening can be done following a clear strategy formally evaluating either the general population or targeted subpopulations (i.e., type 2 diabetics or patients with significant family history of CVD). Systematic screening results in improvements in risk factors but has no proven effect on CVD outcomes. Main Takeaway