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Private foundation based in New York City

  • 379PODCASTS
  • 506EPISODES
  • 48mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Nov 30, 2021LATEST
Ford Foundation

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Best podcasts about Ford Foundation

Latest podcast episodes about Ford Foundation

Rob Hopkins
From What If to What Next: Episode Thirty Five.

Rob Hopkins

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 44:57


Today's episode of From What If to What Next is about care. Care has been very much on our minds of recent. COVID has highlighted how vitally important care is and yet how undervalued it is. It is so often seen as being the domain of women, and around the world it is often either underpaid, or unpaid work. As the populations of the Global North live longer and longer, and as young people are unable to afford, often, to leave home, it tends to often fall to women to care for both the younger and the older generations simultaneously, what is sometimes called the ‘Sandwich Generation'. Many people are happy to stand on their doorsteps and clap for those who provide the care in our society, but not to really value care, not to campaign for it to be truly valued. These days of COVID have the potential to be a real watershed moment. So in today's episode, with two extraordinary women, we're asking "what if care work was valued?” This is an episode that might very well lead to inner paradigm shifts... Kavita Ramdas is a recognized global advocate for intersectional gender equity and justice. She currently serves as the Director of the Women's Rights Program at the Open Society Foundations. She also serves on a few select non-profit advisory boards, the board of trustees of the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, and the board of directors of GRIST, a publicly supported journalism non-profit focused on climate justice. Ai-jen Poo is an award-winning organizer, author, and a leading voice in the women's movement. She is the Executive Director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance, Director of Caring Across Generations, Co-Founder of SuperMajority, Co-Host of Sunstorm podcast and a Trustee of the Ford Foundation. Ai-jen is a nationally recognized expert on elder and family care, the future of work, and what's at stake for women of color. She is the author of the celebrated book, The Age of Dignity: Preparing for the Elder Boom in a Changing America.

Britt Happens
EP 47: A Strong Family Is The Cornerstone Of A Strong Legacy - with Thomasina H. Williams, Founder, Sankofa Legacy Advisors

Britt Happens

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 53:24


"We cannot always build the future for our families, but we can build our families for the future" After a stellar 20-year career of groundbreaking accomplishments as a lawyer and 6 years of making philanthropic investments at the second largest foundation in the U.S., the Ford Foundation, my guest, Thomasina Williams realized her personal passion and professional mission to help others avoid the loss of wealth and fracturing of relationships that befell her family. Thomasina facilitates and coaches business-owning individuals and families to build stronger relationships and make better decisions, so their families flourish and businesses thrive across generations. She was the very first consultant in the nation hired by Wells Fargo Private Bank to go in-house and play a leadership role in building a new internal group to support its ultra-high net worth clients in navigating the family side of wealth. Thomasina earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Mount Holyoke College, and a Juris Doctor degree from the University of Michigan Law School. She is a longtime student of Bowen Family Systems Theory, a Certified Resilient Leadership Coach, and a Conversational Intelligence Coach. Thomasina holds certificates in Advanced Family Business Advising and Family Wealth Advising from the Family Firm Institute. She is also a member of the Purposeful Planning Institute, where she serves on its Advisory Board; the Galliard Family Business Advisor Institute, where she serves on its Board; the Independent Trustee Alliance; and The Florida Bar. Additionally, Thomasina serves on the Advisory Board of Enterprising Women magazine and the Advisory Council of the Women Business Collaborative, and is a member of the Inner Circle of How Women Lead. Host: Brittany Sharpton

America Meditating Radio Show w/ Sister Jenna
Adding Humanity to Humans with Mallika Dutt & Sister Jenna

America Meditating Radio Show w/ Sister Jenna

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 37:00


Our world is in trouble.  We are ruled by fear, separation, conflict and division. We are disconnected from ourselves, our communities are struggling, our systems are broken, and our planet is burning. Our guest today, Mallika Dutt says, “It's time to remember that we are all interconnected.” She opens hearts and minds to a world where change is possible across the personal, political and spiritual realms. Strategic innovator, Mallika Dutt is the Founder and Director of Inter-Connected and has pioneered effective approaches of social change through the founding of several nonprofits, including Breakthrough and Sakhi for South Asian Women. She has also provided transformational leadership in her roles as a Program Officer for Human Rights and Social Justice at the Ford Foundation's New Delhi Office, the Director of the Norman Foundation, and the Associate Director of the Center for Women's Global Leadership at Rutgers University. Visit https://www.mallikadutt.com Listen to the Om Shanti album by Sister Jenna on Spotify. Visit www.americameditating.org and subscribe to our YouTube page at www.YouTube.com/AmericaMeditating.   

WashingTECH Tech Policy Podcast with Joe Miller
How Remote Court Proceedings Affect Equal Access with Douglas Keith [Ep. 257]

WashingTECH Tech Policy Podcast with Joe Miller

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 18:53


When the pandemic started, courts that were slower in adopting technology had to undergo a two-week revolution to move their operations to a remote setting. Under normal circumstances, that would have taken them twenty years to achieve.  Existing research shows that while remote technologies can be helpful in court proceedings, they can also harm individuals if not used carefully. Several issues have been coming up around the effects that remote court proceedings have had on our communities. Today's guest is Douglas Keith, counsel in the Brennan Center's Democracy Program, where he works primarily on promoting fair, diverse, and impartial courts. He will walk us through the various concerns. Douglas Keith was the George A. Katz Fellow at the Brennan Center, where he worked on issues around money in politics, voting rights, and redistricting. His work has been featured in the New York Times, Washington Post, NPR, Atlantic, Guardian, New York Daily News, and Huffington Post. Before that, Keith worked as a Ford Foundation public interest law fellow at Advancement Project. He directed voting rights advocates in New York, served as an international election observer for the National Democratic Institute and OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights, and educated poll workers for the New York City Board of Elections. Keith is a graduate of NYU School of Law and Duke University. What should we be concerned about? All existing research suggests a real reason exists for courts to be cautious about doing video hearings. Studies have shown that video court cases have not always worked out as well as those cases when people have appeared in person. Higher bail amounts charged for video court cases in Chicago In Chicago, in the early 2000s, courts began using video for most of their felony bail hearings. A study that looked at 600,000 of those hearings found that judges imposed much higher bail amounts for those required to have video hearings rather than appearing in person. On average, the video cases paid 50% more bail, and in some instances, they paid up to 90% more. People detained in deportation proceedings People detained in deportation proceedings stood a much higher chance of being removed if they were required to appear by video rather than appearing in person. A quiet place to appear and access to broadband When people get detained, questions tend to arise about the quality of the broadband and them having access to a quiet place to appear. Also, when someone has to appear in court remotely from a jail or prison setting, the background could influence, impact, or change how a judge might view them as an individual.  The digital divide When someone not detained has to appear remotely, many different issues related to the digital divide could arise. They might not have the quality of internet that a judge might expect, and there are also massive differences in terms of the devices people are using to access the proceedings. Those issues need to be taken into account if the proceedings are to be fair. What has changed? Since Douglas has been advocating for the communities that have been affected by doing court proceedings remotely, there have been technological improvements that might make a difference.  Remote proceedings are here to stay Over the last year, courts have become very enthusiastic about how remote proceedings have been working out. Court leaders across the country have said that remote proceedings are here to stay because they have been efficient, speedy, and time-saving. The problem Most jurisdictions have not been talking to the people going through remote court proceedings or their attorneys to learn what is and is not working. A common concern A common concern with remote hearings is the ability for the client to communicate with their attorney during the proceedings. That ability gets hampered because remote tools do not allow the client and attorney to make eye contact and quietly confer about any information that might be relevant to the case during the proceedings. Eviction proceedings Douglas spoke to many individuals from legal aid organizations, representing people earning below certain income thresholds and going through eviction proceedings.  What you can do, on a local level, when someone's rights are violated Pay closer attention to what the courts in your jurisdiction are doing. Courts often allow for public comment or testimony when going through the process of proposing rule changes to allow for more remote proceedings. Engage with the courts and get involved. Watch your local courts to see the types of rule changes they are proposing, in terms of remote proceedings. If you disapprove and they do not require consent to move forward remotely, write to the court to tell them about your concerns and why you think consent should be required. Resolving the issues Advocates from all over the country are busy working on resolving these issues. They range from academics studying the impact of remote tools during the pandemic to practitioners in various spaces, guiding attorneys. Research More research is needed because we do not know enough about how people are being affected by remote tools. At the Brennan Center, they advocate for more resources towards that research to prevent the courts from inadvertently doing any harm. Some other issues that Douglas is working on that are happening where tech intersects with the judicial system Douglas is working on allowing the public access to court proceedings. During the pandemic, many courts started live streaming. That allows court watch groups to remotely observe the court proceedings and report to the public what is and is not working in the courthouses. That raised questions about the point of allowing public access to the courts.  The watchdog effect Public access makes the court aware that it is being watched and reminds them of their responsibility. Live streaming might result in a loss of some of that watchdog effect. So although technology has improved public access to the courts in some ways, we could also lose something along the way. Remote tools The use of remote tools in the courts is nuanced. They can lessen the burden that the courts place on people, but there are also times when those tools could be a cause for concern. That is why the courts need to work with their communities to find the right answers.  Resources: The Brennan Center for Justice Washingtech.org

Using the Whole Whale Podcast
267: (news) Infrastructure $ for Nonprofits & COP26 Pledge Updates

Using the Whole Whale Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 21:24


  Nonprofit News for 11/8/2021     Bipartisan Infrastructure Bill Passes, Includes Energy Updates For Nonprofits The $1-trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill passed the U.S. House of Representatives last Friday, to become one of the most significant investments in infrastructure in U.S. history. The bill includes provisions for helping religious and nonprofit organizations update the sustainability of their spaces and buildings, according to reporting by Haaretz. “The Nonprofit Energy Efficiency Act in the bipartisan infrastructure bill fixes that by providing critical funds for nonprofits to upgrade decades-old buildings with inefficient heating and cooling systems, lowering energy costs and reducing their environmental impact,” according to Elana Broitman, the senior vice president for public affairs at the Jewish Federations of North America. The funding includes up to $50 million in grants as part of the program. Read more ➝   Governments and Private Foundations Announce $1.6 Billion In Support of Indigenous People  Governments including those of the U.K., Germany, Norway, U.S., and the Netherlands have announced, in partnership with numerous private foundations, a $1.6 billion pledge to support indigenous communities at the COP26 climate summit. The program seeks to both promote anti-deforestation efforts and support local communities. The Ford Foundation, one of the initiative's partners, notes that “a growing body of evidence shows that Indigenous Peoples are the most effective guardians of biodiverse tropical forests.” The partnership seeks to include local and indigenous communities in the decision making process regarding climate mitigation. “Indigenous Peoples and local communities manage half the world's land and care for an astonishing 80% of Earth's biodiversity,” according to the press release. Read more ➝     Summary EducationSuperHighway eyes free WiFi to solve the digital divide WFP chief responds to Elon Musk's challenge on world hunger - CNN Video Jeff Bezos pledges $2 billion toward combatting deforestation #NFTuesday - The Giving Block  Nonprofit helps those with former convictions find jobs  

Add Passion and Stir
Charlotte Moss and Darren Walker on Home, Dignity, and Ending Child Hunger

Add Passion and Stir

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 44:54


Interior designer and philanthropist Charlotte Moss and Ford Foundation President Darren Walker discuss the importance of ending child hunger. Moss selected No Kid Hungry to be the beneficiary of her latest project, Home: A Celebration . Home is an ode to Edith Wharton's The Book of the Homeless, which was a 1916 fundraiser to help refugees and children during WWI. Home features 120 artists, poets, chefs, designers, photographers, and writers offering personal reflections on the essence of home. Contributors include Drew Barrymore, Candice Bergen, Tory Burch, Seth Godin, Renee and John Grisham, Bianca Jagger, Annie Leibovitz, Jon Meacham, Bette Midler, Joyce Carol Oates, Al Roker, Gloria Steinem, Darren Walker, and Fanny and Alice Waters. “This is really philanthropy at its best, when people come together to for single cause and give of themselves - in essence sharing their strength - is what you're all about and what this book is all about,” says Moss. Walker was compelled to write the book's foreword. “It was a moment when we were all experiencing deep anguish in this country over the impacts of COVID which we immediately recognized as compounding the already deep inequality we have in this country… Charlotte used her privilege to raise awareness and consciousness of the conditions of poverty, particularly child poverty, which is the most difficult and pernicious poverty that we have in this country… Charlotte reminded us that there are far too many Americans who live without the dignity of shelter, of food, of nutrition, and particularly the most vulnerable among us, our children,” he says.All royalties from book sales support No Kid Hungry's essential mission to help end childhood hunger. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Time Sensitive Podcast
Elizabeth Alexander on Moving Forward in the Face of Adversity

Time Sensitive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 62:57


The poet, educator, and scholar Elizabeth Alexander, president of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, views her work as an urgent political act. Following in the footsteps of her father, who was a civil rights advisor and special counsel to President Lyndon B. Johnson, Alexander has witnessed the sometimes exasperatingly slow pace of progress, particularly when it comes to racial equality, and the resoluteness required for the vital work of pressing on. She approaches each day as an opportunity to do as much as she can, with all she has. Through her teaching, scholarship, and poetry, Alexander built the foundation for her role as a philanthropic leader. She has held professorships at the University of Chicago; Smith College; Yale University, where she worked for 15 years and chaired the African American studies department; and Columbia University. From 2015 to 2018, she served as director of creativity and free expression at the Ford Foundation, and last year, launched the Mellon Foundation's Monuments Project, a $250 million initiative that aims to rethink and transform America's commemorative landscape. Alexander's consciousness and compassion are especially apparent in her writing, which often weaves together biography, history, and memory to potent effect. In articles for publications such as Time and The New Yorker, she has reflected, with great acuity, on racist violence in America. Her collection American Sublime (2005) and memoir, The Light of the World (2015), were both finalists for the Pulitzer Prize. At President Barack Obama's 2009 inauguration, she recited her optimistic, clear-eyed poem “Praise Song for the Day.”On this episode, Alexander discusses the vast possibilities of social justice, talking with Spencer about using language to promote change, how monuments and memorials shape collective memory, and the profundity of grounding oneself in the present.Show notes:Full transcriptelizabethalexander.net[10:34] “‘Can you be Black and Look at This?' Reading the Rodney King Video(s)” (1994)[25:05] Andrew W. Mellon Foundation[25:05] The Monuments Project[49:05] The Clifton House[50:11] The Venus Hottentot (1990)[50:15] Body of Life (1996)[50:15] Antebellum Dream Book (2001)[50:15] American Sublime (2005)[50:42] “Crash” (2001)[55:37]  The Light of the World (2015)[55:37] Ficre Ghebreyesus

R.O.G. Return on Generosity
56. Mia Ives-Rublee - Accessible Voices

R.O.G. Return on Generosity

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 29:58


56. Mia Ives-Rublee - Accessible Voices “If you are an organization that wants to be extremely open and welcoming to the disability community, you shouldn't go for the bare minimum. You should be attempting to be as accommodating and open as possible because that's going to bring in more talented individuals who are excited about working at your location.” Guest Info: Mia Ives-Rublee is the director for the Disability Justice Initiative at American Progress. Prior to coming to American Progress, she advocated for disability justice and inclusion at nonprofit organizations and businesses across the United States. She has worked with Women's March, Families Belong Together, DC Action Lab, Adoptees for Justice, Fair Fight, People's Collective for Justice and Liberation, and numerous other progressive organizations. Best known for founding the Women's March Disability Caucus, Ives-Rublee helped organize the original Women's March on Washington in 2017. The Women's March was one of the first large-scale events to have certified deaf interpreters on stage. Ives-Rublee's work pushed for better access to disability accommodations at progressive events and more policy platforms inclusive of the disability community. For her work on the Women's March, Ives-Rublee was named by Glamour magazine as one of 2017's Women of the Year Award. She was also recognized by She the People as one of 20 Women of Color in Politics to Watch in 2020 and awarded the 2019 Distinguished Alumni Award from the University of North Carolina (UNC) School of Social Work.  Mia Ives-Rublee worked on several political campaigns during the 2020 cycles. As a North Carolina community regional organizing director for the Elizabeth Warren Campaign for President, she communicated policies and organized events around specific issues affecting the disability and Asian American communities. She volunteered on Warren's Disability Policy Group, helping shape the Disability Policy Platform and developing the campaign's private event accessibility toolkit. During the general election, Ives-Rublee worked as the field director for Down Home NC to encourage rural residents to vote. She also worked with the Asian American Advocacy Fund and the Georgia Disability Vote Partnership to help elect Sen. Jon Ossoff (D-GA) and the Rev. Sen. Raphael Warnock (D-GA) during the 2021 special election. For six years, Ives-Rublee worked as a vocational counselor at the North Carolina Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services to help disabled people obtain substantial employment and connect with services in their communities. She researched alternative mental health diversion programs at UNC Chapel Hill in 2015 and, in 2017, was the confidential assistant to Commissioner Chai Feldblum at the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. At the Ford Foundation in 2019, Ives-Rublee created a Disability Inclusion Toolkit for nonprofit organizations. Ives-Rublee holds a bachelor's degree in sociology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and a master's degree in social work from UNC Chapel Hill.   Favorite Quote: “Need to make sure people with disabilities are at the table when policy is being made." — Mia Ives-Rublee   R.O.G. Takeaway Tips: 1. Policies Does your organization have an employee handbook? If so, what does your employee handbook say about hiring people with disabilities? What does it say about accommodations? How will you learn more about ADA, SSI, SSDI and Medicaid for your disabled employees?   As Mia says, "Make sure people with disabilities are at the table when policy is being made."   2. Accommodations   Does your current process include a question to the candidate about accommodations?  During the interview, how do you inquire about what accommodations may be needed?  Once hired, what accommodations do you offer? What could you offer?  Consider how inclusive the interview, hiring, onboarding and employment processes are and how you can make them even better. Resources: Mia Ives-Rublee on LinkedIn Mia Ives-Rublee on Twitter (@SeeMiaRoll) Ford Foundation Disability Inclusion Toolkit Sienna Heights University 2018 interview with Mia She the People - Mia Ives-Rublee Meet Mia Ives-Rublee: An Endorphin Junkie Who Made The Women's March Accessible Mia's Meeting with Vice President Kamala Harris 20 Questions for Disability-Inclusive Employers   Coming Next: Episode 57, we will be joined by Wade Thomas, CEO Aim to Win, Author of From the Heart: Achieving Epic Results Through Building a Heart-Based Culture of Compassion and Empathy   Credits: Mia Ives-Rublee, Sheep Jam Productions, Host Shannon Cassidy, Bridge Between, Inc.

Wisdom Shared with Carole Blueweiss
Jewel and her Tribe

Wisdom Shared with Carole Blueweiss

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 64:05


FOLLOW IVANAFacebook: @mauimovementlessonsLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ivana-gadient-8b21a536/CONTACT VERENAemail: vera9nyc@yahoo.comRESOURCES recommended by Ivana"Wheelchairs are a HUGE conversation. It is best to create a trusted, knowledgable and openminded team that you hand pick to help you successfully seat your loved one"https://aci.health.nsw.gov.au/networks/spinal-cord-injury/spinal-seating/module-6/wheelchair-seating-a-complex-puzzleTALK TOOLS: for finding a therapist, and continuing education.https://talktools.com FEEDING MATTERS: Parent Support Network"Feeding Matters is a great organization, started by two moms. They pursued chasing the CDC for a stand alone diagnosis and code called PFD pediatric feeding disorder. They dedicated five years to this and it came to pass this year. They have a lot of free resources and supports for parents."https://www.feedingmatters.org JABBERMOUTHS: Speech, Oral-Motor, and Feeding Therapy"This is Jewel's latest SLP who is amazing!  I highly recommend Jenn, she is licensed in HI and AZ and does Zoom lessons. Highly skilled, highly educated, great instinct, grew up around disability and very comfortable around our families. She can teach premature babies to latch on to both breast and bottle!"https://jabbermouths.com/ THERAPISTS AND THERAPIES in episodeARLENE WARD is the owner of Genesis Rehabilitation Ltd., a vocational rehabilitation and disability management company based in Nanaimo, BC. Their goal is to keep workers at work. She is also an Adjunct Professor at the University of Northern BC Canada.https://www.linkedin.com/in/arleneatgenesis/JUDITH HEUMANN is an internationally recognized disability advocate who served in the Clinton and Obama Administration and was a Senior Fellow at the Ford Foundation.https://judithheumann.comKAREN ERICKSON, PH.D. is the Director of the Center for Literacy and Disability Studies, a Professor in the Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences, and the Yoder Distinguished Professor in the Department of Allied Health Sciences, School of Medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.https://www.med.unc.edu/ahs/clds/directory/karen-erickson/JENNIFER BUCK, MA, CCC-SLP, owner of Jabbermouths Therapy, is a licensed and certified Speech-Language Pathologist with over a decade of experience in working with individuals with disabilities. https://jabbermouths.comNEUROMOVEMENT THERAPY: Anat Baniel and NeuroMovement® (ABMN®)Anat Baniel, a student of Moshe Feldenkrais, developed and evolved NeuroMovement® from 30+ years of experience with thousands of clients using practical applications of brain plasticity principles. The Anat Baniel Method® approach is founded in neuroscience and the biodynamics of the human body, and utilizes movement and the 9 Essentials to create conditions for the brain to wake up and upgrade its own functioning.Read more about the Nine Essentials:https://www.anatbanielmethod.com/about/neuromovement/neuromovement-and-9-essentialsHIPPOTHERAPY: an approach to physical therapy where the patient rides horses in order to address physical health.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5175116/AYSO VIP: provides a quality soccer experience for individuals whose physical or mental disabilities.https://ayso.org/play/vip/PRODUCTSKINDERPACK produces baby carriers that are small-batch made, exclusively in the USA in sizes to fit infants, toddlers, and even preschool sized children.https://mykinderpack.com

From What If to What Next
35 - What if Care Work Was Valued

From What If to What Next

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 44:58


Today's episode of From What If to What Next is about care. Care has been very much on our minds of recent. COVID has highlighted how vitally important care is and yet how undervalued it is. It is so often seen as being the domain of women, and around the world it is often either underpaid, or unpaid work. As the populations of the Global North live longer and longer, and as young people are unable to afford, often, to leave home, it tends to often fall to women to care for both the younger and the older generations simultaneously, what is sometimes called the ‘Sandwich Generation'.   Many people are happy to stand on their doorsteps and clap for those who provide the care in our society, but not to really value care, not to campaign for it to be truly valued. These days of COVID have the potential to be a real watershed moment. So in today's episode, with two extraordinary women, we're asking "what if care work was valued?” This is an episode that might very well lead to inner paradigm shifts...   Kavita Ramdas is a recognized global advocate for intersectional gender equity and justice. She currently serves as the Director of the Women's Rights Program at the Open Society Foundations. She also serves on a few select non-profit advisory boards, the board of trustees of the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, and the board of directors of GRIST, a publicly supported journalism non-profit focused on climate justice.   Ai-jen Poo is an award-winning organizer, author, and a leading voice in the women's movement. She is the Executive Director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance, Director of Caring Across Generations, Co-Founder of SuperMajority, Co-Host of Sunstorm podcast and a Trustee of the Ford Foundation. Ai-jen is a nationally recognized expert on elder and family care, the future of work, and what's at stake for women of color. She is the author of the celebrated book, The Age of Dignity: Preparing for the Elder Boom in a Changing America.   Please consider supporting the podcast by visiting www.patreon.com/fromwhatiftowhatnext and becoming a patron.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 10.22.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 57:47


"The war for our minds (con'd)." The colonization of independent media.    Patrick Lawrence THE SCRUM  Oct 21       21 OCTOBER—Watch and listen, O you with open eyes and ears. The national security state's long, very long campaign to control our press and broadcasters has taken a new turn of late. If independent media are what keep alive hope for a vigorous, authentic Fourth Estate, as argued severally in this space, independent media are now subject to an insidious, profoundly anti-democratic effort to undermine them. The Independent Consortium of Investigative Journalists, Frances Haugen, Maria Ressa: Let us consider this institution and these people. They are all frauds, if by fraudulent we mean they are not what and who they tell us they are and their claim to independence from power is bogus. The Deep State—and at this point it is mere pretense to object to this term—long ago made it a priority to turn the mainstream press and broadcasters to its purposes—to make a free press unfree. This has gone on since the earliest Cold War decades and is well and responsibly documented. (Alas, if more Americans read the many excellent books and exposés on this topic, assertions such as the one just made would not arrive as in the slightest outré.)    But several new realities are now very evident. Chief among them, the Deep State's colonization of corporate media is now more or less complete. CNN, filling its airtime with spooks, generals, and a variety of official and formerly official liars, can be counted a total takeover. The New York Times is prima facie government-supervised, as it confesses in its pages from time to time. The Washington Post, owned by a man with multimillion-dollar CIA contracts, has turned itself into a comic book. For reasons I will never entirely fathom, corporate media have not merely surrendered their legitimacy, such as it may have been: They have actively, enthusiastically abandoned what frayed claim they may have had to credibility. The national-security state incorporates mainstream media into its apparatus, and then people stop believing mainstream media: The thrill is gone, let's say.  In consequence of these two factors, independent media have begun to rise as … independent media. They accumulate audiences. A little at a time, they acquire the very habits of professionalism the mainstream press and broadcasters have let decay. Gradually, they assume the credibility the mainstream has lost. The media ecosystem—horrible phrase but there it is—begins to take on a new shape.  Certain phenomena engendered by independent media prove popular. There are whistleblowers. People inside Deep State institutions start to leak, and they turn to independent media, most famously WikiLeaks, to get information out. While the Deep State's clerks in mainstream media keep their heads down and their mouths shut as they cash their checks, independent media take principled stands in favor of free expression, and people admire these stands. They are, after all admirable. Those populating the national-security state's sprawling apparatus are not stupid. They can figure out the logical response to these developments as well as anyone else. The new imperative is now before us: It is to colonize independent media just as they had the mainstream in previous decades. There are some hopelessly clumsy cases. I urge all colleagues to stop bothering with The Young Turks in any capacity. Those running it, creatures of those who generously fund it, are simply infra-dig. As Matt Taibbi pointed out over the weekend in a piece wonderfully headed, “Yes, Virginia, There Is a Deep State,” they've now got some clod named Ben Carollo proclaiming the CIA as an accountable force for good, savior of democracy—this in a video appearing under the rubric “Rebel HQ.” As an East European émigré friend used to say, “Gimme break.” Democracy Now! is a subtler instance of colonization. The once-admirable Amy Goodman drank the Russiagate Kool-Aid, which I counted the first indication of covert intervention of one or another kind. Then she caved to the orthodoxy on the chemical-weapons scam during the Syrian crisis, and lately—you have to watch to believe—Goodman has begun broadcasting CNN “investigative” reports with unalloyed approval. The debate in this household is whether Ms. Goodman had a long lunch in Langley or her donors started threatening to delay their checks. I have no evidence of either but tend to the latter explanation. The three recent phenomena suggested at the top of this piece are indications of the Deep State's latest tactics in its assault on independent media and the culture that arises among them. It behooves us to understand this.  Two weeks ago, the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists published “The Pandora Papers,” a “leak” of 12 million electronic documents revealing the tax-fiddling, money-hiding doings of 300–odd political figures around the world. “The Pandora Papers” followed publication of “The Panama Papers” in 2016 and “The Paradise Papers” a year later. There are many useful revelations in these various releases, but we ought not be fooled as to the nature of the project. Where did the ICIJ get the documents in “The Pandora Papers,” and how?  Are they complete? Were names redacted out? They have been verified? Explaining provenance, authenticity, and so forth is essential to any investigative undertaking, but ICIJ has nothing to say on this point. Why, of all the people “The Pandora Papers” exposes, is there not one American on its list? As Moon of Alabama notes in an analysis of this release, it amounts to a list of “people the U.S. doesn't like.” The ICIJ vigorously insists on its independence. But on close inspection this turns out not to be so by any serious understanding of the term. Among its donors are the Ford Foundation, whose longtime ties to the CIA are well-documented, and the Open Societies Foundation, the (in)famous George Soros operation dedicated to cultivating coups in nations that fall outside the fence posts of neoliberalism.  The group was founded in 1997 as a project of the Center for Public Integrity, another institution dedicated to “inspiring change using investigative reporting,” as the center describes itself. Among its sponsors are Ford, once again, and the Democracy Fund, which was founded by Pierre Omidyar, bankroller of The Intercept (another compromised “independent” medium). Omidyar is, like Soros, a sponsor of subversion ops in other countries masquerading as “civil society” projects. ICIJ's other sponsors (and for that matter the Democracy Fund's) are comprised of the sorts of foundations that support NPR, PBS, and other such media. Let us be crystal clear on this point. Anyone who assumes media institutions taking money from such sponsors are authentically independent does not understand philanthropy as a well-established, highly effective conduit through which orthodoxies are enforced and public discourse circumscribed.  What are we looking at here? Not what we are supposed to think we are looking at, certainly. I will return to this question. There is the case of Maria Ressa, which I considered briefly in a previous commentary. Ressa is the supposedly courageous, speak-truth-to-power co-winner of the Nobel Peace Prize this year, a Filipina journalist who co-founded The Rappler, a web publication in Manila. The Nobel committee cited Ressa for her “fight for freedom of expression.” Who is Maria Ressa, then, and what is The Rappler? I grow weary of writing this sentence: She and her publication are not what we are supposed to think they are. Ressa and The Rappler, each insisting on independence just as the ICIJ does, are straight-out lying on this point. The Rappler recently received a grant of $180,000 from the National Endowment for Democracy, a CIA front—this according to an NED financial report issued earlier this year. None other than Pierre Omidyar and a group called North Base Media own nonvoting shares in the publication. Among North Base's partners is the Media Development Investment Fund, which was founded by George Soros to do what George Soros likes to do in other countries. Does a picture begin to emerge? Read the names together and one will. You have to figure they all party together. Nobel in hand, Maria Ressa has already declared that Julian Assange is not a journalist and that independent media need new regulations, as in censorship. Henry Kissinger got a Nobel as a peacemaker: Ressa gets one as a defender of free expression. It's a fit. This brings us to the case of Frances Haugen, the former Facebook exec who recently appeared before Congress waving lots of documents she seems to have secreted (supposedly) out of Facebook's offices to argue for—what else at this point?—increased government regulation of social media, as in censorship. Frances Haugen, you see, is a courageous, speak-truth-to-power whistleblower. Never mind that her appearance on Capitol Hill was carefully choreographed by Democratic Party operatives whose party simply cannot wait to censor our First Amendment rights out of existence.  It is hard to say who is more courageous, I find—the ICIJ, Maria Ressa, or Frances Haugen. Where would we be without them? The culture of independent media as it has germinated and developed over the past decade or so gave us WikiLeaks, and its effectiveness cannot be overstated. It gave us all manner of gutsy journalists standing for the principles of a genuinely free press, and people listened. It gave us whistleblowers who are admired even as the Deep State condemns them.     And now the national-security state gives us none other than a secret-disclosing crew of mainstream hacks, a faux-independent journalist elevated to the highest honors, and a whistleblower who was handed her whistle and taught how to toot it—three crowd-pleasers, three simulacra. These are three frauds. They are to independent journalism what McDonald's is to food.  There is only one defense against this assault on truth and integrity, but it is a very good one. It is awareness. CNN, Democracy Now!, the ICIJ, Maria Ressa, Frances Haugen—none of these and many other media and people are properly labeled. But the labels can be written with modest efforts. Awareness and scrutiny, watching and listening, will prove enough.

Truth's Table
We Gon' Learn Today: Fugitive Pedagogy with Jarvis R. Givens

Truth's Table

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 55:31


In this episode, Ekemini and Christina are sitting at the table with Jarvis R. Givens to learn about his book, Fugitive Pedagogy:Carter G. Woodson and the Art of Black Teaching. What is fugitive pedagogy? Why does it matter? How is it still in operation today? Dr. Givens takes us to school, y'all! So pull up a chair and have a seat at the table with us. Jarvis R. Givens, a native of Compton, California, is an assistant professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, a faculty affiliate in the department of African & African American Studies, and the Suzanne Young Murray assistant professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University. Givens earned his undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of California, Berkeley. He is a Mellon Mays, Ford Foundation, and Gates Fellow. Jarvis Givens is a co-director of a major new research project called The Black Teacher Archive with Imani Perry, PhD, of Princeton University. Givens is also the co-editor of We Dare Say Love: Supporting Achievement in the Education Life of Black Boys. He lives in Roxbury, Massachusetts. About the Fugitive Pedagogy: A fundamental part of black education during slavery and in the post-Emancipation period—centered on African Americans concealing important elements of their learning and masking their true intentions for education. In Fugitive Pedagogy, Jarvis R. Givens chronicles the efforts of Carter G. Woodson—a veteran schoolteacher during the Jim Crow era—as an iconic example of how African Americans strategically subverted an anti-black school system even as they were coerced to comply with white authority. Woodson, who went on to found Black History Month, spent his career fighting the “mis-education of the Negro" by helping teachers and students to see themselves and their mission as set apart from an anti-black world. Follow: Jarvis R. Givens Twitter: JarvisRGivens Facebook: Jarvis Givens Purchase Fugitive Pedagogy here: https://bookshop.org/books/fugitive-pedagogy-carter-g-woodson-and-the-art-of-black-teaching/9780674983687 Truth's Table Listeners can purchase Beasts of Prey by Ayana Gray here: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/673322/beasts-of-prey-by-ayana-gray/ Black Women, join Truth's Table Black Women's Discipleship Group on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/truthstablediscipleship Support Truth's Table: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/TruthsTable PayPal: https://www.paypal.me/TruthsTable Merchandise: https://www.teespring.com/truthstable

Elevate with Robert Glazer
Cliff Hudson on Building Sonic Into A National Brand

Elevate with Robert Glazer

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 36:03


ABOUT CLIFF HUDSON Cliff Hudson is the former CEO of Sonic, a popular drive-in restaurant that grew from a regional favorite to a national name under his leadership. Cliff is also a noted public servant, serving as the Chairman of the Oklahoma City School Board, was a Presidentially appointed Chairman of the SIPC Board of Directors and a trustee of the Ford Foundation. He's also the author of the book, Master of None, which shares lessons from his career as leader of a national restaurant brand. This Episode Is Brought To You By Stello Mints We're dealing with an epidemic of stress, and millions of us trying to figure out how to cope with pressures of work, and life. The team at Stello are on a mission to help others be calmer, sharper and more collected. Powered by CBD, Stello's mints are a fast and simple way to feel calmer and clearer throughout your day even when juggling tasks. Each tin contains 30 mints, and they come in three bold flavors: Peppermint, Lemon & Matcha. And now, for a limited time, you can get 20 percent off Stello mints. Just go to stellomints.com  and use the code elevate for 20 percent off.

Atlantic Fellows
Being Human When Digital 06 | W Negron

Atlantic Fellows

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 22:40


BEING HUMAN WHEN DIGITAL 06 | ETHICAL ISSUES Join Atlantic Fellow FIONNUALA SWEENEY in conversation with WILNEIDA NEGRON, Strategic Advisor to the Ford Foundation and Atlantic Fellow for Racial Equity, as they discuss the ethical concerns that ran through the series, BEING HUMAN WHEN DIGITAL. BEING HUMAN WHEN DIGITAL PODCAST SERIES (1) Introduction (2) Narrative Change (3) The Creative & Activist Potential of Virtual Space (4) Virtual Health (5) Indigenous Approaches (6) Ethical Issues FURTHER INFORMATION | www.atlanticfellows.org/

InfluenceWatch Podcast
Episode 190: Big Left Philanthropy

InfluenceWatch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 26:01


The Ford Foundation: While created by a famed family of arch-capitalists, for decades the institution—long, though likely no longer, the largest private foundation in the country—has been the financial backbone of the radical left. And now some are proposing taking radical action to counter its influence; Republican candidate for U.S. Senate in Ohio J.D. Vance spitballed on Tucker Carlson's Fox News program: “Why don't we seize the assets of the Ford Foundation, tax their assets, and give it to the people who've had their lives destroyed by the radical open borders agenda?” Joining me to discuss what to do about the Ford Foundation and the broader Big Philanthropy is my colleague Mike Hartmann, director of Capital Research Center's Center for Strategic Giving and co-editor of the Philanthropy Daily Giving Review blog. Michael Hartmann: https://capitalresearch.org/person/michael-e-hartmann/ Subscribe to the podcast on your platform of choice at: https://influencewatch.fireside.fm/ • Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/capitalresearchcenter • Twitter: https://twitter.com/capitalresearch • Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/capital.research.center/ • YouTube: https://bit.ly/CRCYouTube Special Guest: Michael Hartmann.

Geopolitics & Empire
Kit Klarenberg: Information War Kicks into High Gear…Pandora, Bellingcat, & Facebook

Geopolitics & Empire

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 49:08


Geopolitics & Empire · Kit Klarenberg: Information War Kicks into High Gear…Pandora, Bellingcat, & Facebook #226 Kit Klarenberg discusses the latest ICIJ “Pandora Papers” leak and how they are part of the larger information war between the great powers. The ICIJ is funded by the usual suspects (e.g. Ford Foundation, Open Society) and its leaks […]

CBS This Morning
Charlize Theron joins the fight against COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in Africa

CBS This Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 18:19


Academy award winner Charlize Theron is joining the Ford Foundation in the fight against COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy and misinformation in Africa. Theron explains to CBS News correspondent Jonathan Vigliotti why she's committed to raising awareness in vulnerable communities about the dangers of COVID-19.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Acton Unwind: J.D. Vance wants to seize the wealth to own the libs

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021


Eric Kohn, Sam Gregg, and Michael Matheson Miller discuss U.S. Senate candidate J.D. Vance's comments about the Ford Foundation–namely, that we should “seize the assets of the Ford Foundation, tax their assets, and give it to the people who’ve had their lives destroyed by their radical open borders agenda.” When did it become acceptable for […]

Acton Unwind
J.D. Vance wants to seize the wealth to own the libs

Acton Unwind

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021


Eric Kohn, Sam Gregg, and Michael Matheson Miller discuss U.S. Senate candidate J.D. Vance's comments about the Ford Foundation–namely, that we should “seize the assets of the Ford Foundation, tax their assets, and give it to the people who’ve had their lives destroyed by their radical open borders agenda.” When did it become acceptable for the right to abandon concepts like constitutionality and the rule of law? Why is this kind of rhetoric constantly escalating? Is it really what the polity wants? Then, have we thrown open the Overton window on spending with the trillion-dollar infrastructure deal? When Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., who is still cool with spending $1.5 trillion on a reconciliation bill on top of the $1 trillion infrastructure bill, is the “conservative” in the conversation, have words lost their meaning entirely? And how long before we're talking about quadrillion-dollar spending bills? Subscribe to Acton Unwind, Acton Line & Acton Vault  J.D. Vance’s latest Fox News stunt is a far-left fantasy | Noah Rothman, MSNBC Ford Foundation's aim to ‘change philanthropy' warps the true meaning of ‘justice' and ‘generosity' | Dan Hugger, Acton Institute The Conservatives Dreading—And Preparing for—Civil War | Emma Green, The Atlantic A Whiff of Civil War in the Air | David French, The Dispatch Terry McAuliffe's War on Parents | National Review Attack Ads, Circa 1800 | Reason Manchin proposed $1.5T top-line number to Schumer this summer | Politico Related: Digital Contagion: 10 Steps to Protect your Family & Business from Intrusion, Cancel Culture, and Surveillance Capitalism | Michael Matheson Miller See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Film Florida
Episode 78- Taylor Miller and Ronald Baez, Slamdance Miami

Film Florida

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 43:52


Film Florida Podcast Episode 78- The Slamdance Film Festival is a showcase for raw and innovative filmmaking that lives and bleeds by its mantra: By Filmmakers, For Filmmakers. Taylor Miller and Ronald Baez from Slamdance Miami talk about the festival, which will celebrate emerging filmmakers from Central and South America, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Florida in an open-air festival experience at the North Beach Band Shell in Miami, October 28-30, 2021. The festival will then continue with a virtual component from October 31-November 7. Taylor O. Miller is an award winning documentary photographer and filmmaker. She studied for her PhD in Communications at the European Graduate School in Sadas Fee Switzerland and is a co-founder and manager of Slamdance Unstoppable and Slamdance Miami. Miller spent 2.5 years as the Director of Photography with Harbor Heights Entertainment filming a docu-series on the city of Detroit. Her work on the series led to an invitation to speak at Google about THIS IS DETROIT which will be released in 2022. Her recent appearances include a panel on Authenticity and Accessibility in Film and Entertainment for NBC Universal as well as being a panelist alongside New York Times Bestseller Francesca Cavallo and Vanity Fair journalist and advocate Marina Coehllo for the Inclusivity in Film Panel at the Not Film Festival in Italy.  Ronald Baez is an Afro-Latinx filmmaker and immersive media artist from Miami, FL. His short films have screened at film festivals and art museums worldwide including HBO's New York Latino Film Festival, the Florida Film Festival, Inside Out Toronto LGBT Film Festival, and the Norton Museum of Art. Several of Baez's projects would go on to be broadcast for television by PBS Stations and distributed online by PBS VOD and Seed & Spark SVOD. Baez's award-winning immersive media projects have opened in exhibition at MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), the Florida Museum of Natural History, and the National Association of Broadcasters Conference in Las Vegas (NAB Show). Baez was awarded the NAB Futures Innovator's Award in 2019 for his innovative XR work with South Florida immersive media collective Yellow Wood Immersive. Baez and his partners continue to work with local and national organizations and institutions like National Geographic, the New World Symphony, the University of Oregon, the Ford Foundation, and the Knight Foundation on a variety of ongoing immersive media and film projects. In addition to his work as a filmmaker and immersive media artist, Baez is a founding member of the White Elephant Group, a Miami-based filmmaking collective, and also serves as the Artistic Director of the After School Film Institute, a nonprofit organization mentoring at risk, inner-city students in South Florida.

Govern America
Govern America | October 2, 2021 | Praying for the Asteroid

Govern America

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 177:33


"Praying for the Asteroid" Hosts: Darren Weeks, Vicky Davis Show website: https://governamerica.com Vicky's websites: https://thetechnocratictyranny.com and http://channelingreality.com COMPLETE SHOW NOTES AND CREDITS AT: https://governamerica.com/radio/radio-archives/22435-govern-america-october-2-2021-praying-for-the-astroid Listen LIVE every Saturday at 11AM eastern time at http://radio.governamerica.com ON THIS SHOW: Rona and the contact tracers. Hospital death traps, and are family physicians being told not to treat Covid patients? Entire population is being turned into research subjects. Congress kicks the funding can to December. Janet Yellen and the Biden administration want to tax wealth that Americans don't even have yet. Follow-up on the year without a summer. Mastercard is positioning itself to be the arbiter of who gets online. Another caravan of 60,000 more Haitian refugees coming to the U.S. via Panama. After attacks and smears, New York Times finally confirms Darren Beatie's reporting that FBI knew far more about January 6th incident than they previously admitted, and that "informant" entered capitol building. Why Christopher Wray's hair annoys Vicky. Communist rot at the Ford Foundation laid bare by whistleblowers. The Trump administration signed a peace agreement with the Taliban before leaving office. What do the COVID death jabs look like under a microscope? Doctor says he's witnessed cancer rates explode after the frankenshots. Governments openly at war with the People, as they announce they are going to punish and take away the freedoms of the people. Alberta's chief health officer says they will count all sick who refuse a test as COVID-positive. Doctor who predicted the pandemic may not sound so crazy now. Phone calls.

Sustain
Episode 92: Niels ten Oever on Human Rights, Open Source, and Digital Infrastructure

Sustain

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 41:52


Guest Niels ten Oever Panelists Eric Berry | Justin Dorfman | Richard Littauer Show Notes Hello and welcome to Sustain! The podcast where we talk about sustaining open source for the long haul. Our guest today is Niels ten Oever, who is a Postdoctoral Researcher at the University of Amsterdam, and recently published a really interesting report from the Ford Foundation on “Human Rights Are Not A Bug: Upgrading Governance for an Equitable Internet,” which we will learn more about. Today, Niels shares his thoughts on what the internet is, what human rights are, and how to make sure that we all work in the open. Niels tells us about the idea he had to build this powerful tool for the people in Ethiopia and what happened with that. He explains how he got interested in Internet Governance, his thoughts on 5G, working with the Guardian Project to develop the StoryMaker app, and more about his PhD report called, “Wired Norms.” Niels also shares great advice for open source developers on what they can do to make the world a better place. Download this episode now to hear so much more from Niels. [00:01:41] Niels tells us how he got into being a developer and working in open source, and tells us about working with the Guardian Project to develop the StoryMaker app. [00:04:25] Niels explains how he came up with this idea to build this powerful tool for the people in Ethiopia. He talks about his involvement with Tactical Tech and more about the report he wrote for the Ford Foundation on “Human Rights Are Not A Bug: Upgrading Governance for an Equitable Internet” and he goes in depth about infrastructural norm of interconnection.” [00:16:23] Since Niels is someone who is an open source developer and has worked with open tools, Richard asks him how he views the intersection between large unseen infrastructure, human rights, and open source as this whole idea of everything should be able to be used by anyone else and how does that work with him with the idea of privacy. [00:20:56] Niels talks about an article that he did along with Mallory Knodel, that the New York Times printed called, ‘Master,' ‘Slave' and the Fight over Offensive Terms in Computing. [00:26:06] Richard is curious to know how Niels personally chooses what level of the stack to approach to figure out how to be a better person. Niels shares his thoughts and advice for open source developers on what they can do to make the world a better place. He mentions Cloudflare as a company that has adopted a Human Rights Policy. [00:31:58] We find out from Niels about writing his PhD report called “Wired Norms,” why he came out with it, and the best part of it. [00:36:12] Find out where you can follow Niels online and learn more about things that he's writing. [00:36:27] Justin brings one final point about how Niels writes a lot of papers on 5G and how in America there a certain people that have this conspiracy theory that 5G is not secure, and since Niels works very closely in that community, he shares his thoughts. Quotes [00:03:18] “Then we develop different distros for the different parts of the radio station that have been in use ever since.” [00:03:52] “So we tend to think that you need the really fancy computers to do things, but Linux actually allowed me to reuse so much of the hardware and software there to enable freedom of expression.” [00:05:38] “I had also studied a year in Berlin and one of the quotes on top of the Humboldt University directly when you entered is in German and it means “Philosophers have always interpreted the world differently, but what really matters is to change it.” And that's what I actually wanted to do. I didn't want to be an armchair philosopher.” [00:08:42] “And then I thought like hey, but all these smartphones people carry around, they have as much computing power as my Linux boxes. Why don't we actually do editing on that?” [00:09:51] “So then I got really involved with technical tech and other organizations working on digital security issues, but also found out that like teaching people who were under the most stressful situation of their lives to do something else added on top and that the best possible outcome of that behavior is nothing happens is almost like the worst premise for behavior change.” [00:10:30] “So, then I started wondering, why don't we address this in the infrastructure itself?” [00:11:03] “So, that really confused me because my whole premise, freedom of expression plus access to information equals social change, clearly wasn't true.” [00:13:09] “What is so interesting about the internet, which consist of more than 70,000 independent networks, lots of different devices from different manufacturers, lots of networking stacks, operating systems, that are all working together, that is possible through what I call “infrastructural norm of interconnection.” [00:14:49] “But this is the nature of infrastructure, it hides itself, it only shows what it breaks.” [00:17:47] “But, as open source developers know, the most central part in this are actually people.” [00:18:35] “But, unfortunately, as the excellent researcher Corinne Cath shows, is that many of these governance bodies, such as the internet engineering task force, there is a total monoculture that is actually very resistant to change.” [00:19:09] “And there is nothing inherently wrong with that, but it is wrong if they set the rules for a global internet.” [00:20:56] “Together with Mallory Knodel, officer at the Center for Democracy and Technology, I made a really simple internet draft to request people to stop using “master,” “slave” and “blacklist”, “whitelist,” and that ended up being a huge route which ended up in the New York Times.” [00:23:22] “But what's the most important part I think is that it's never done, your human rights are like muscles, you need to keep training them or else you lose them.” [00:24:10] “If your code is used for a bad thing, that doesn't make you a bad person, but it makes you a bad person if you don't do anything about it and if you don't relate to that.” [00:24:37] “Our actions have consequences and people who work with computers have a disproportional impact on society.” [00:27:20] “Try to make the things a bit better, try to document your code better, try having discussions, try having people who are not just all CS white dudes on the developing team, but really do your best to bring more people in.” [00:28:43] “So, I do a lot of martial arts and I really enjoy it. And so, the first time you get punched in the face, you feel almost like insulted, right, like whoa, what, can you do this?” [00:29:35] “And I think that's what open source software is and can be really good for because we can fork, we can change, we can make iterative changes, discuss them in our meetings.” [00:30:41] “So like it's just another sign that says, “Club, need to comply to our methods, our tools, to be able to partake in this.” Spotlight [00:38:22] Eric's spotlight is news that he just heard that Nadia Eghbal got engaged! [00:38:52] Justin's spotlight is cosign, a container signing, verification storage application. [00:39:23] Richard's spotlight is Der Kleine Hobbit (The Hobbit in German) by J.R.R. Tolkien. [00:39:55] Niels spotlights are** **organizations that are active in Internet Governance: ARTICLE19 and the Center for Democracy and Technology. Also, great researchers such as Corinne Cath, and great pieces of software such as the Python community and Debian. He is also working on building 5G networks and has the Ettus B210. Links SustainOSS (https://sustainoss.org/) SustainOSS Twitter (https://twitter.com/SustainOSS?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor) SustainOSS Discourse (https://discourse.sustainoss.org/) Niels ten Oever Twitter (https://twitter.com/nielstenoever?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor) Niels ten Oever Website (https://nielstenoever.net/) “Human Rights Are Not A Bug: Upgrading Governance for an Equitable Internet” by Niels ten Oever (https://www.fordfoundation.org/work/learning/research-reports/human-rights-are-not-a-bug-upgrading-governance-for-an-equitable-internet/) Wired Norms: Inscription, resistance, and subversion in the governance of the internet infrastructure by Niels ten Oever (https://nielstenoever.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/WiredNorms-NielstenOever.pdf) ‘Master,' ‘Slave' and the Fight Over Offensive Terms in Computing-New York Times (https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/13/technology/racist-computer-engineering-terms-ietf.html) Guardian Project-StoryMaker (https://dev.guardianproject.info/projects/wrapp/) Tactical Tech (https://tacticaltech.org/) Dr. Corinne Cath-Speth Website (https://corinnecath.com/) Qalb (programming language) (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qalb_(programming_language)) Cloudflare-Human Rights Policy (https://www.cloudflare.com/resources/images/slt3lc6tev37/fdLHB1OGp8ZWwzCTVlM0n/e0a42a032592ded778bda8c31c6747b1/BDES-2133_Impact-Week-Human-Rights-Policy.pdf) ARTICLE19 (https://www.article19.org/) Python Software Foundation (https://www.python.org/psf/) Ettus-USRP B210 (https://www.ettus.com/all-products/ub210-kit/) Debian (https://www.debian.org/) Nadia Eghbal Twitter (https://twitter.com/nayafia?lang=en) cosign-GitHub (https://github.com/sigstore/cosign) [Der Klein Hobbit (The Hobbit in German) by J.R. Tolkien](https://www.amazon.com/Kleine-Hobbit-German-dp-0828811938/dp/0828811938/ref=mtother?encoding=UTF8&me=&qid=) [Harry Potter y la Piedra filosofal (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone in Spanish) by J.K. Rowling](https://www.amazon.com/Harry-Potter-piedra-filosofal-Sorcerers-Spanish/dp/1644732076/ref=sr11?dchild=1&keywords=harry+potter+in+spanish&qid=1629927272&s=books&sr=1-1) Center for Democracy & Technology (https://cdt.org/) Credits Produced by Richard Littauer (https://www.burntfen.com/) Edited by Paul M. Bahr at Peachtree Sound (https://www.peachtreesound.com/) Show notes by DeAnn Bahr at Peachtree Sound (https://www.peachtreesound.com/) Special Guest: Niels ten Oever.

The Marketing Book Podcast
350 The Long Game by Dorie Clark

The Marketing Book Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 65:36


The Long Game: How to Be a Long-Term Thinker in a Short-Term World by Dorie Clark About the Book: Your personal goals need a long-term strategy. It's no secret that we're pushed to the limit. Today's professionals feel rushed, overwhelmed, and perennially behind. So we keep our heads down, focused on the next thing, and the next, without a moment to breathe. How can we break out of this endless cycle and create the kind of interesting, meaningful lives we all seek? Just as CEOs who optimize for quarterly profits often fail to make the strategic investments necessary for long-term growth, the same is true in our own personal and professional lives. We need to reorient ourselves to see the big picture so we can tap into the power of small changes that, made today, will have an enormous and disproportionate impact on our future success. We need to start playing The Long Game. As top business thinker and Duke University professor Dorie Clark explains, we all know intellectually that lasting success takes persistence and effort. And yet so much of the relentless pressure in our culture pushes us toward doing what's easy, what's guaranteed, or what looks glamorous in the moment. In The Long Game, she argues for a different path. It's about doing small things over time to achieve our goals—and being willing to keep at them, even when they seem pointless, boring, or hard. In The Long Game, Clark shares unique principles and frameworks you can apply to your specific situation, as well as vivid stories from her own career and other professionals' experiences. Everyone is allotted the same twenty-four hours—but with the right strategies, you can leverage those hours in more efficient and powerful ways than you ever imagined. It's never an overnight process, but the long-term payoff is immense: to finally break out of the frenetic day-to-day routine and transform your life and your career. About the Author: Dorie Clark helps individuals and companies get their best ideas heard in a crowded, noisy world. She has been named one of the Top 50 business thinkers in the world by Thinkers50, and was recognized as the #1 Communication Coach in the world by the Marshall Goldsmith Leading Global Coaches Awards, and one of the Top 10 Communications Professionals in the World by Global Gurus. She consults and speaks for a diverse range of clients, including Google, the World Bank, Microsoft, Morgan Stanley, the Ford Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and Yale University. Dorie is the author of Entrepreneurial You, Reinventing You, and Stand Out, which was named the #1 Leadership Book of 2015 by Inc. magazine. A former presidential campaign spokeswoman, Dorie has been described by the New York Times as an “expert at self-reinvention and helping others make changes in their lives.” She is a frequent contributor to the Harvard Business Review, and she is quoted frequently in the worldwide media, including NPR, the BBC, and MSNBC. And, interesting facts - she is a former journalist, a producer of a multiple Grammy-winning jazz album, and a graduate of Harvard Divinity School. Click here for this episode's website page with the links mentioned during the interview... https://www.salesartillery.com/marketing-book-podcast/long-game-dorie-clark

Speak Like a Leader
How to Be a Long-Term Thinker in a Short-Term World | Dorie Clark

Speak Like a Leader

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 52:33


Dorie Clark has been named one of the Top 50 business thinkers in the world by Thinkers50 and was recognized as the #1 Communication Coach in the world by the Marshall Goldsmith Leading Global Coaches Awards. Clark, a consultant and keynote speaker, teaches executive education at Duke University's Fuqua School of Business and Columbia Business School.Recognized as a “branding expert” by the Associated Press, Fortune, and Inc. magazine, she is the author of The Long Game, Entrepreneurial You, Reinventing You, and Stand Out, which was named the #1 Leadership Book of the Year by Inc. magazine and one of the Top 10 Business Books of the Year by Forbes. It was also a Washington Post bestseller. Her books have been translated into Russian, Chinese, Arabic, French, Polish, Korean, Spanish, Italian, Vietnamese, and Thai.Clark, whom the New York Times described as an “expert at self-reinvention and helping others make changes in their lives,” is a frequent contributor to the Harvard Business Review. She consults and speaks for a diverse range of clients, including Google, the World Bank, Microsoft, Morgan Stanley, the Ford Foundation, and Yale University.A former presidential campaign spokeswoman, Clark has also taught for Spain's IE Business School, HEC-Paris, Babson College, Smith College Executive Education, UNC's Kenan-Flagler School of Business, and more.She has guest lectured at universities including Harvard Business School, the Harvard Kennedy School, Stanford University's Graduate School of Business, the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School of Business, the University of California-Berkeley's Haas School of Business, Georgetown, NYU, the MIT Sloan School of Management, and the University of Michigan.Her work has been published in the Harvard Business Review Guide to Getting the Right Job and the Harvard Business Review Guide to Networking, and she is quoted frequently in the worldwide media, including NPR, the BBC, and MSNBC. She has been a regular commentator on Canada's CTV and was named one of Inc. magazine's “100 Great Leadership Speakers for Your Next Conference.”A former New England Press Association award-winning journalist, Clark directed the environmental documentary film The Work of 1000 and was a producer for a multiple-Grammy-winning jazz album. She is a Broadway investor, as well as a member of BMI's Lehman Engel Musical Theatre Advanced Workshop, widely considered the premier training ground for musical theater lyricists and composers.At age 14, Clark entered Mary Baldwin College's Program for the Exceptionally Gifted. At 18, she graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Smith College, and two years later received a Master of Theological Studies from Harvard Divinity School.You can download her Long Game strategic thinking self-assessment at dorieclark.com/thelonggame. Follow Dorie on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube. 

The Quarantine Tapes
The Quarantine Tapes: Quotation Shorts - Stanley Kunitz

The Quarantine Tapes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 0:33


Today's Quotation is care of Stanley Kunitz.Listen in!Subscribe to the Quarantine Tapes at quarantinetapes.com or search for the Quarantine Tapes on your favorite podcast app!On July 29, 1905, Stanley Kunitz was born in Worcester, Massachusetts. About his own work, Kunitz has said: “The poem comes in the form of a blessing—‘like rapture breaking on the mind,' as I tried to phrase it in my youth. Through the years I have found this gift of poetry to be life-sustaining, life-enhancing, and absolutely unpredictable. Does one live, therefore, for the sake of poetry? No, the reverse is true: poetry is for the sake of the life.”Kunitz published his first book of poetry, Intellectual Things, in 1930. Fourteen years later, he published his second book, Passport to War. His recent books include: The Collected Poems of Stanley Kunitz (W. W. Norton, 2000); Passing Through: The Later Poems, New and Selected (1995), which won the National Book Award; Next-to-Last Things: New Poems and Essays (1985); The Poems of Stanley Kunitz, 1928-1978, which won the Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize; The Testing-Tree (1971); and Selected Poems, 1928-1958, which won the Pulitzer Prize.His honors include the Bollingen Prize, a Ford Foundation grant, a Guggenheim Foundation fellowship, Harvard's Centennial Medal, the Levinson Prize, the Harriet Monroe Poetry Award, a senior fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Medal of the Arts, and the Shelley Memorial Award. In 2000 he was named United States Poet Laureate. Kunitz was deeply committed to fostering community among artists, and was a founder of the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, Massachusetts, and Poets House in New York City. Together with his wife, the painter Elise Asher, he split his time between New York City and Provincetown, Massachusetts. He died at the age of 100 on May 14, 2006.From https://poets.org/poet/stanley-kunitzFor more information about Stanley Kunitz:“‘I Have Walked Through Many Lives': Listen to Stanley Kunitz read his poem ‘The Layers'”: https://lithub.com/i-have-walked-through-many-lives-listen-to-stanley-kunitz-read-his-poem-the-layers/“Stanley Kunitz, The Art of Poetry No. 29”: https://www.theparisreview.org/interviews/3185/the-art-of-poetry-no-29-stanley-kunitz“Poet Stanley Kunitz at 100”: https://www.npr.org/2005/07/29/4776898/poet-stanley-kunitz-at-100

OFF-KILTER with Rebecca Vallas
The ongoing fight for disability economic justice, over thirty years after the ADA

OFF-KILTER with Rebecca Vallas

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 104:54


Thirty-one years ago, the fabric of America's legal and policy landscape changed dramatically for people with disabilities in the United States when the Americans with Disabilities Act, or ADA, was signed into law by President George H. W. Bush, on July 26, 1990. But, as far we've come these past thirty-plus years, we still have incredibly far to go. Even prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, disabled people in the United States—who make up one in four Americans—were roughly twice as likely to live in poverty and two to three times more likely to be unemployed. Now, as federal policymakers work to "build back better," the United States has the opportunity to take another set of historic steps towards achieving the ADA's promise of equal opportunity, community integration, and participation in American life for people with disabilities—a promise that remains as-yet unfulfilled.  For this special relaunch episode of Off-Kilter, Rebecca talks with four of the disabled women leaders who've been making history on the front-lines of the ongoing fight for disability economic justice: Rep. Ayanna Pressley (MA-7); Judy Heumann, whose historic activism jumpstarted the disability rights movement over forty years ago; Rebecca Cokley, a lifelong disability advocate and program officer at the Ford Foundation, where she heads the first U.S. disability rights program at any major foundation in the country; and Mia Ives-Rublee, the director of the Disability Justice Initiative at the Center for American Progress. To take action on home and community-based services and SSI: Text SIGN PXPBNX to 50409 Check out Crip Camp: A Disability Revolution for more on Judy Heumann's activism and the origins of the disability rights movement at cripcamp.com

Latino USA
The Moving Border: Part Two, The South

Latino USA

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 50:59


In Part 2 of “The Moving Border,” our award-winning series from 2020, we visit Tapachula, Mexico in search of a young man whose life is in danger. And we find a new frontier where refugees trying to make it to the U.S. are increasingly stuck, thanks to an international effort to make Mexico a destination state for asylum. The Moving Border series was produced in partnership with the Pulitzer Center, with additional support provided by the Ford Foundation. This episode was first broadcast on May 27, 2020.

Town Hall Seattle Civics Series
252. Omar G. Encarnación with ChrisTiana ObeySumner: The Case for Gay Reparations

Town Hall Seattle Civics Series

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 48:02


In the last two decades, many nations have adopted “gay reparations,” or policies intended to make amends for a history of discrimination, stigmatization, and violence on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. The United States, however, has been reluctant to embrace any form of gay reparations, making the country something of an outlier among Western democracies. Professor and author Omar G. Encarnación joined us for a presentation, in conversation with CEO of Epiphanies of Equity LLC ChrisTiana ObeySumner, to share takeaways from his book, The Case for Gay Reparations. Beyond making the case for gay reparations in the US, Encarnación explored three big questions: why, after centuries of attempts to marginalize, dehumanize, and even eradicate LGBT people, are governments coming around to confront this historical legacy?; how do we make sense of the diversity of gay reparations being implemented by governments around the world?; and what would an American policy of gay reparations look like? Drawing upon the rich history of reparations to confront the legacies of genocide, slavery, and political repression, he argued that gay reparations are a moral obligation, intended to restore dignity to those whose human rights have been violated. He examined how other Western democracies notorious for their repression of homosexuals–specifically Spain, Britain, and Germany–have implemented gay reparations, from a formal apology to financial compensation, to the erection of monuments to the memory of those who have suffered. Encarnación invited us to consider that while there is no universal approach to gay reparations, foreign experiences reveal that it is never too late for countries to seek to right past wrongs. Omar G. Encarnación is Professor of Political Studies at Bard College, where he teaches comparative politics and Latin American and Iberian studies. He is the author of Out in the Periphery: Latin America's Gay Rights Revolution and Democracy without Justice in Spain: The Politics of Forgetting, and has written for The New York Times, The New York Review of Books, The Nation, Foreign Policy, and Foreign Affairs. He is the recipient of awards and fellowships from the Fulbright Program, the Ford Foundation, and the National Research Council, among others. ChrisTiana ObeySumner (they/them) is a Black/Indigenous, Queer, Non-Binary, and Multiply disabled person. They are a community organizer and activist, and CEO of Epiphanies of Equity LLC, a social equity consulting firm that particularly specializes in social change, intersectionality, antiracism, and disability justice. Buy the Book: The Case for Gay Reparations (Hardcover) Elliott Bay Books Presented by Town Hall Seattle. To become a member or make a donation online click here.

Adventures in Accessibility
Ep. 22 - Judy Heumann

Adventures in Accessibility

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 39:56


Transcript: https://bit.ly/AIAe022Today's guest is Judy Heumann. Judy, who contracted polio in 1949 and uses a wheelchair for her mobility, is a lifelong advocate for the rights of disabled people. She has played a role in the development and implementation of major legislation including the Individuals with Disabilities in Education Act, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disability Act and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.Judy is an internationally recognized leader in the disability rights community. She served in the Clinton and Obama Administrations and was a Senior Fellow at the Ford Foundation. Her recently released memoir called “Being Heumann: An Unrepentant Memoir of a Disability Rights Activist,” was audio recorded by Ali Stroker who is the first wheelchair actor to perform on Broadway. Judy is also featured in the Oscar-nominated documentary film Crip Camp: A Disability Revolution.These days, among other things, Judy is the producer of The Heumann Perspective, a podcast and YouTube channel that aims to share the beauty of the disability community.Connect with Judy:Judy's Website: https://judithheumann.com/Judy's Memoir: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/621090/being-heumann-by-judith-heumann/9780807002803/Judy's Young Adult Book: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/670588/rolling-warrior-by-judith-heumann/Crip Camp: https://cripcamp.com/Judy's Podcast: https://open.spotify.com/show/0CYpP8LB2wZ8vUM93DnINFSocial Media:https://twitter.com/judithheumannhttps://www.instagram.com/theheumannperspective/https://www.linkedin.com/in/judith-heumann-71b026122/https://www.youtube.com/c/JudyHeumannTHP/videosConnect with the Rocky Mountain ADA Center at https://rockymountainada.org/ or find us on social media. Don't forget to subscribe, rate and review us on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify or anywhere else you get your podcasts!

Everyday Leadership
Changing Rules Of Business Requires A Different Leader with Judy Samuelson

Everyday Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 45:01


About Judy SamuelsonJudy Samuelson is the founder and executive director of the Aspen Institute Business and Society Program and vice president at the Aspen Institute. She previously worked in legislative affairs in California and banking in New York's garment centre and ran the Ford Foundation's office of program-related investments. Author of The Six New Rules of Business: The rules of business are changing dramatically. The Aspen Institute's Judy Samuelson describes the profound shifts in attitudes and mindsets that are redefining our notions of what constitutes business success.She also writes regularly for Quartz at Work and is a Bellagio Fellow and a director of the Financial Health Network.Connect with Judy WebsiteLinkedInTwitterSome topics we cover in this episode:The design of how decisions are made  Incentive systems that are driving the behaviours we are seeing with leaders and why we need to change them.Learning from real-life stories that leaders can apply immediately.Why companies are not good or badHow to build resilient robust cultures that get the best out of people and care about their peopleEmployees are the new accountability mechanism Listening versus HearingConnect with meWebsite: https://mindsetshift.co.uk/Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/sopeagbelusi/LinkedIn:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/sopeagbelusi/Twitter: https://twitter.com/Sope_AgbelusiEmail: hello@mindsetshift.co.uk --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------SPREAD THE WORD. LEAVE A RATING, REVIEW, AND FEEDBACKYou can do this on Apple podcast or on StitcherYour ratings and reviews help us place the podcast in front of new leaders and listeners.I appreciate you and your support!---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Have a question, comment or a topic you want to be discussed?Send me a voice message: https://mindsetshift.co.uk/#ask-me-anything

Cafe con Pam Podcast
221 - On Writing with Sandra Cisneros

Cafe con Pam Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 22:43


Listeners, we're back this week with Sandra Cisneros.Sandra is a poet, short story writer, novelist, essayist, performer, and artist whose work explores the lives of the working-class. Her numerous awards include NEA fellowships in both poetry and fiction, a MacArthur Fellowship, several honorary doctorates, and national and international book awards, including Chicago's Fifth Star Award, the PEN America Literary Award, and the National Medal of Arts. Most recently, she received the Ford Foundation's Art of Change Fellowship, was recognized among the Frederick Douglass 200, and won the PEN/Nabokov Award for Achievement in International Literature. In addition to her writing, Cisneros has fostered the careers of many aspiring and emerging writers through two nonprofits she founded: the Macondo Foundation and the Alfredo Cisneros del Moral Foundation. She is also the organizer of Los MacArturos, Latino MacArthur fellows who are community activists.During our conversation, we talked about:Mental healthBecoming a writerHer new book Martita, I Remember YouWhat she does when she finishes a project Follow Sandra on all things social:WebsiteFacebookInstagram  Follow Cafe con Pam on all things socialInstagramFacebookhttp://cafeconpam.com/Join the FREE Cafe con Pam ChallengeIf you are a business owner, join us for Aligned MastermindJoin PowerSisters!  Findmypowersister.comSubscribe, rate, review, and share this episode with someone you love!And don't ever forget to Stay Shining!

Latino USA
The Moving Border: Part One, The North

Latino USA

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 37:53


In this award-winning two-part investigation from 2020, "The Moving Border" from Latino USA, we delve into the increasing pressure put on refugees seeking safety in the United States via its southern border. It reveals the surprising support the former Trump administration received to create an impenetrable policy wall that pushes asylum seekers south, away from the U.S. In episode one, "The North," we visit Juárez and tell the story of a mother and daughter who are mired in a web of changing policy and subjected to ongoing violence. And we find evidence of how Mexican authorities are working hand-in-hand with the U.S. at the border. “The Moving Border” series was produced in partnership with the Pulitzer Center, with additional support provided by the Ford Foundation. This episode was first broadcast on May 20, 2020.

Barron's Live
Justice and Economic Mobility

Barron's Live

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 32:10


Tanya Coke, director of the gender, racial, and ethnic justice program at the Ford Foundation, and Mindy Tarlow, managing director of portfolio strategy and management at the philanthropic collaborative Blue Meridian, speak with Penta senior writer Abby Schultz about the $250 million Justice and Mobility Fund aimed at improving the lives of individuals touched by the criminal justice system.

Breaking the Bias
Founder & CEO of C Talent on Overcoming Ableism in Hollywood

Breaking the Bias

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 21:41


Although the people with disabilities comprise the largest minority community in the world (1 in 4 U.S. adults live with a disability), it remains one of the most underrepresented and underserved communities. In fact, according to a report funded by the Ford Foundation, people with disabilities are greatly lacking in representation both on screen and behind the camera. Only 2.7 percent of characters in the 100 highest-earning movies of 2016 were depicted with a disability, and among regular characters on primetime TV in the 2018-2019 season, only 2.1 percent had disabilities. In this episode of Breaking the Bias, Consciously Unbiased founder Ashish Kaushal (virtually) sits down with Keely Cat-Wells, Founder & CEO of C Talent and Born This Way Foundation (BTWF) Advisory Board Member, for an unplugged conversation about the powerful role the media can play in positively representing, educating, and amplifying the voices of disabled people. Keely also shares how we can build belonging for people with disabilities by recognizing the diversity of their lived experiences, and addressing the current legal and systemic frameworks that contribute to a lack of disability representation and accessibility.

60 Minutes
60 Minutes 8/1

60 Minutes

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 42:27


On this week's "60 Minutes," Anderson Cooper reports on the nerve-wracking Mars landing of the rover Perseverance, the painstaking process of launching the tiny helicopter Ingenuity, and the extraordinary images the two have already sent back to Earth. In his new book, Michael Lewis profiles people who tried to sound the alarm about COVID-19 as officials failed to act. John Dickerson tells us more. And Lesley Stahl profiles Darren Walker, a gay, African American man, and Founder of one of this country's largest and most storied philanthropies, the Ford Foundation.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

786 Boulevard
037: Missing & Misaligned: Empowering Muslim Filmmakers (Arij Mikati)

786 Boulevard

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2021 52:02


Arij Mikati is the managing director of storytelling and culture change work at Pillars Fund. Her work with her team at Pillars Fund helps to support Muslims who want to tell authentic and provocative stories full of mess, nuance and beauty, looking for infuse the existing landscape of media with fresh ideas and voices. Alongside actor Riz Ahmed, USC Annenberg and Ford Foundation, Pillars Fund recently unveiled their blueprint for Muslim inclusion, which found Muslims missing or misrepresented in aa study of top grossing films from 2017-2019. Alongside Riz Ahmed and his production company Left Handed films, Arij and her team at Pillars Fund have helped create the Pillars Artist Fellowship program, which seeks to empower Muslim writers and directors on their pathways to success, and features an all star advisory committee with names like Mahershala Ali, Hasan Minhaj, Lena Khan and others, a group who have affectionately been dubbed by Riz as the Muslim Avengers. We'll be speaking to Arij about the helping build this initiative and why it's so important to empower Muslim storytellers.

Just the Right Book with Roxanne Coady
Ursula Burns on the Dangers of Exceptionalism

Just the Right Book with Roxanne Coady

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 67:01


In this episode of Just the Right Book with Roxanne Coady, Ursula Burns joins Roxanne Coady to discuss her new memoir, Where You Are Is Not Who You Are, out now from Amistad Press. Ursula M. Burns was the chair and CEO of VEON from mid 2019 to early 2020, a senior advisor to Teneo LTD, Nestlé, Exxon Mobil, and The Ford Foundation among others. She is a member of the board of directors of Uber. She served as CEO of Xerox from 2009 to 2016, and as chairwoman from 2010 to 2017. In 2014, Forbes rated her the 22nd most powerful woman in the world. She was a leader of the STEM program of the White House from 2009 to 2016, and Vice Chair and then Chair of the President's Export Council for the Obama Administration. She lives in London and New York. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Fronteras
Fronteras: ‘Reclaiming The Border Narrative' Through Arts And Culture

Fronteras

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 21:30


People who have grown up or live on the U.S. southern border know there's more to the region than the issue of immigration policy. The National Association of Latino Arts and Cultures and the Ford Foundation awarded more than two dozen grants to community organizations and artists to help reframe the border narrative through an arts and cultural approach.

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle
07-14-21 IAIA's Museum of Contemporary Native Arts leaps ahead

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 56:30


The IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts in Santa Fe just received its largest donation ever. The $3 million unrestricted donation comes from MacKenzie Scott and her husband Dan Jewett, and was among the 286 gifts to help change the narrative about people struggling against inequities. The gift follows a $1.7 million grant from the Ford Foundation in 2020. And Scott previously donated $5 million to the IAIA. We'll check in with the country's only institution dedicated to progressive work by contemporary Indigenous artists.

Immigrantly
The Art of Storytelling

Immigrantly

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 41:05


Arij Mikati is the Managing Director of Leadership & Culture at the Pillars Fund. She works on creating & supporting opportunities that advance storytelling & cultural change work. For example, the Pillars Fund teamed up with  and the Ford Foundation to create fellowships for Muslim storytellers. Arij's work and its impact are felt in antiracism, coalition building, and solidarity action. The episode is sponsored by BetterHelp. Special offer for Immigrantly listeners, get 10% off your first month at The episode is also sponsored by Citizenpath. Go to citizenpath.com and use coupon code "Immigrantly" to get 15% off. Producer & Host: Saadia Khan Associate Producer: Kylee Roberts Content writer: Yudi Liu Editor: Tom Whelan 

Unswtnd + Unfltrd
Muslim Representation in Media (or Lack Thereof) featuring Arij Mikati

Unswtnd + Unfltrd

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 52:52


Raise your hand if you grew up believing that you wanted to be Jasmine from Aladdin only to realize that this movie was perpetuating orientalist stereotypes of the Middle East and Asia.Keep your hand raised if you are exhausted with the idea that being Muslim and being accepted by society are mutually exclusive.Don't you think it's time that we deserve more accurate portrayals of Muslims in media?If you've caught yourself holding your breath when you've seen a Muslim cross your television screens, you're not alone. You're silently hoping this Muslim character won't be portrayed as the villain, the terrorist or someone who is oppressed and needs to detach from their faith if they want to be accepted by others.Frankly, we are tired of these dangerous tropes and stereotypes that have been overdone for decades now."Let Muslims tell you who we are, rather than telling you what we're not by constantly playing defense."These are the words of Arij Mikati, today's special guest and someone whom I have been vocal about when it comes to how much I admire her and how many doors she has opened for herself and the rest of us as she continues to challenge these roadblocks and stereotypes.Recently, Riz Ahmed, with the help from Pillars Fund, USC Annenberg and the Ford Foundation have unveiled the Blueprint for Muslim Inclusion in Media and the Arts.Over 90% of films from 2017-2019 were missing Muslim characters, that's 181 out of 200 films that had no Muslim representation at all.In today's episode, Arij explains how the erasure of Muslim filmmakers behind and in front of the camera means that countless of stories go untold. She dives into what representation actually means and why it's so important. We discuss how the lack of positive and accurate portrayals of Muslims is directly linked to horrific and Islamophobic attacks on our Muslim communities and so much more.Arij and her peers are excited to announce what can be done to change the narrative and it all starts with the Muslim Visibility Challenge and the Pillars Artist Fellowship, just to name a few of the initiatives that are currently unfolding.Thank you once again to Arij, Pillars Fund, Riz Ahmed and the many others who are working tirelessly on this initiative. I am so incredibly honored to have Arij join us today to discuss the building blocks of a brighter future for Muslim creatives.Enjoy and follow the pod on Instagram:@unsweetenedandunfilteredFollow Arij Mikati  on Instagram:@arijmikatiFollow Pillars Fund on Instagram:@pillarsfundCheck out the Variety article here:Blueprint for Muslim Inclusion

The Do One Better! Podcast – Philanthropy, Sustainability and Social Entrepreneurship
Jo Swinson, Director of Partners for a New Economy and former Leader of the Liberal Democrats in the UK, joins Alberto Lidji to discuss transforming traditional economics to tackle the SDGs

The Do One Better! Podcast – Philanthropy, Sustainability and Social Entrepreneurship

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2021 40:04


Partners for a New Economy is a donor collaborative founded by the Oak, MAVA, Marisla and KR foundations, and today also includes the Ford Foundation and Laudes Foundation. This conversation is for anyone who believes existing economic systems need to be improved if society is to achieve the UN Sustainable Development Goals and meet the challenges of the 21st Century. Jo Swinson is the former leader of the Liberal Democrats in the United Kingdom. From 2012-2015, she served as Business Minister in the UK, and in 2009, she co-founded a cross-party group of MPs to work collaboratively on new economic thinking and well-being economics. In this fascinating conversation, Jo sheds light on her current work, political experience and her personal narrative.  For a full transcript of this episode visit The Do One Better Podcast website at Lidji.org  

Subliminal Jihad
[UNLOCKED] #67 - THE VELVET FOG OF ALTERNATIVITY: A Subliminal History of KPFA/Pacifica Radio

Subliminal Jihad

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2021 249:51


Dimitri and Khalid dive deep into the history of alternative media pioneer KPFA/Pacifica Radio, the anarcho-pacifist subliminal jihad of Pacifica founder/Phillips oil heir Lewis Hill, ubiquitous Theosophical influences, Betty Ford-Aquino's literary program and murky presence on the Pacifica Board, MK mystic Alan Watts, Pauline Kael, Betty Ford-Aquino's role in popularizing “Doctor Zhivago” and “Howl”, Ginsberg's MK-Ultra scientist cousin Oscar Janiger, Dwight MacDonald's homicidal obsession with “Stalinoids”, getting massive financial support from the CIA Yale bluebloods running the Ford Foundation, and various influences on/synchronicities with today's “alternative” left-wing podcast landscape. For access to full-length premium episodes and the SJ Grotto of Truth Discord, subscribe to the Al-Wara' Frequency at patreon.com/subliminaljihad.

Making Media Now
Filmmaker Tracy Heather Strain: Where Persistence Meets Passion

Making Media Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2021 39:38


Joining Michael Azevedo on this episode is award-winning filmmaker Tracy Heather Strain. Tracy is an award-winning director, producer and writer committed to using film and video to bring diverse and often unknown stories to light in order to advance social justice, build community and empower the marginalized in engaging ways.  Her documentaries have been supported the National Endowment for the Humanities, National Endowment for the Arts, Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Ford Foundation, Independent Television Service, LEF Foundation, among other funding organizations. In 1999 Tracy won a Peabody Award for her first two feature documentaries "Bright Like a Sun" and "The Dream Keepers" as part of the six-part Blackside/PBS series I'll Make Me a World: A Century of African American Arts, and another in 2019 for the American Masters television broadcast of her latest directing effort, “Lorraine Hansberry: Sighted Eyes/Feeling Heart,” the first feature film about the late artist/activist best-known for writing the play A Raisin in the Sun. The bio doc, which premiered at the 2017 Toronto International Film Festival also netted Tracy a 50th NAACP Image Award for Motion Picture Directing last year, the American Historical Association's John E. O'Connor Film Award and a Creative Arts Emmy producing nomination.  Tracy is also President and CEO of The Film Posse, the production company she co-founded with her partner and colleague Randall MacLowry. Together they have directed, produced and written the NEH-funded American Experience film "American Oz," which premiered April 19, 2021. The pair is presently developing a documentary for Nova. And Tracy also currently teaches documentary production, storytelling and history at Wesleyan University.  Making Media Now is sponsored by Filmmakers Collaborative, a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting media makers from across the creative spectrum. From providing fiscal sponsorship to presenting an array of informative and educational programs, FC supports creatives at every step in their journey.   About the host: www.mrazvo.com and https://www.linkedin.com/in/michael-azevedo/

Free Library Podcast
Ursula M. Burns | Where You Are Is Not Who You Are

Free Library Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 66:22


In conversation with Tracey Matisak, award-winning broadcaster and journalist The first Black woman CEO of a Fortune 500 company, Ursula M. Burns headed Xerox from 2009 to 2016. She was the chair and CEO of VEON from 2017 to early 2020, and previously served as a senior advisor to Nestlé, Exxon Mobil, and The Ford Foundation, among many other positions. A prominent figure in the Obama White House, she is currently a member of Uber's board of directors. Forbes ranked Burns in 2014 as one of the most powerful women in the world. Where You Are Is Not Who You Are charts Burns's story from tenement housing on Manhattan's Lower East Side to the halls of corporate power while also offering a critique of the excesses of big business. Books with signed book plates will be mailed after the event. Please allow three weeks for delivery. U.S. orders only. All others will be refunded. (recorded 6/15/2021)

Free Library Podcast
Carol Anderson | The Second: Race and Guns in a Fatally Unequal America

Free Library Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2021 56:44


In conversation with Tracey Matisak, award-winning journalist and broadcaster In appreciation of the George S. Pepper Society Carol Anderson is the author of the National Book Critics Circle Award winner White Rage, ''a riveting and disturbing history'' (The Nation) of white people and how they worked against Black advancement since Reconstruction. Her other books include Bourgeois Radicals; Eyes off the Prize; and One Person, No Vote, which was longlisted for the National Book Award and was a finalist for the PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award. The Charles Howard Candler Professor and Chair of African American Studies at Emory University and a member of the Advisory Board of the National Economic and Social Rights Initiative, Anderson has earned fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, the Ford Foundation, and the National Humanities Center, among many others. Her latest book offers a sobering look at the ways in which all levels of the government, white people, and U.S. courts have consistently weaponized the Second Amendment since its creation to deny African Americans their rights and citizenship. Signed books will be mailed after the event. Please allow three weeks for delivery. U.S. orders only. All others will be refunded. (recorded 6/10/2021)

World Reimagined
Setting a Gold Standard of Leadership: A Day in the Life of Dallas Fed CEO Rob Kaplan

World Reimagined

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2021 44:31


Imagine determining the course of the American economy. Twelve people in the United States actually have that job. They sit on the Federal Reserve's Open Market Committee. Their votes affect hundreds of millions of people. And it's just one of their many responsibilities. Rob Kaplan is one of those twelve. How does he do it? He focuses on communication - no small task when you help lead one of the most tight-lipped institutions on the planet. In this episode, Host Gautam Mukunda speaks with Rob Kaplan, the President and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, a giant institution responsible for everything from setting interest rates to keeping the economy growing at a steady pace to running a contest on economic analysis for high school students. Kaplan has a long and distinguished career in global finance, notably serving as the Vice Chairman of Goldman Sachs. He is the author of several bestselling books, and served ten years as a professor at Harvard Business School. “What do we do that's distinctive at the Fed? . . . We've got to be a thought leader and we've got to understand economic conditions. We have to be a leading citizen in our communities, and we have to track, retain and develop superb people.” Rob Kaplan Follow @GMukunda on Twitter or email us at WorldReimagined@nasdaq.com   Books Referenced: What You Really Need to Lead: The Power of Thinking and Acting Like an Owner, by Robert S. Kaplan   Guest Info: Rob Kaplan has served as the 13th president and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas since September 8, 2015. He represents the Eleventh Federal Reserve District on the Federal Open Market Committee in the formulation of U.S. monetary policy and oversees the 1,200 employees of the Dallas Fed. Kaplan was previously the Martin Marshall Professor of Management Practice and a Senior Associate Dean at Harvard Business School. He is the author of several books, including What You Really Need to Lead: The Power of Thinking and Acting Like an Owner; What You're Really Meant To Do: A Road Map for Reaching Your Unique Potential; and What to Ask the Person in the Mirror: Critical Questions for Becoming a More Effective Leader and Reaching Your Potential. Prior to joining Harvard in 2006, Kaplan was vice chairman of The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. with global responsibility for the firm's Investment Banking and Investment Management Divisions. He became a partner in 1990 and served as co-chairman of the firm's Partnership Committee. He was also a member of the Management Committee. Following his 23-year career at Goldman Sachs, Kaplan became a senior director of the firm. He serves as chairman of Project A.L.S. and co-chairman of the Draper Richards Kaplan Foundation, a global venture philanthropy firm that invests in developing non-profit enterprises dedicated to addressing social issues. He is also a board member of Harvard Medical School. Kaplan previously served on the boards of State Street Corporation, Harvard Management Company, Bed Bath & Beyond, and Heidrick & Struggles International, Inc. He was also a trustee of the Ford Foundation, co-founding board chair of the TEAK Fellowship, co-founder and chairman of Indaba Capital Management, LP, and chairman of the Investment Advisory Committee at Google, Inc. Kaplan was appointed by the Governor of Kansas as a member of the Kansas Health Policy Authority Board. Born and raised in Prairie Village, Kansas, Kaplan received a bachelor of science degree in business administration from the University of Kansas and a master's degree in business administration from Harvard Business School.

All About Skills!
027 Dorie Clark Discusses the Communications Skill and Her Upcoming Books

All About Skills!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2021 33:12


Dorie Clark has been named one of the Top 50 business thinkers in the world by Thinkers50, and was recognized as the #1 Communication Coach in the world by the Marshall Goldsmith Leading Global Coaches Awards. Clark, a consultant and keynote speaker, teaches executive education at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business and Columbia Business School. Dorie Clark - #1 Communications Coach in the World Recognized as a “branding expert” by the Associated Press, Fortune, and Inc. magazine, she is the author of Entrepreneurial You (Harvard Business Review Press,), Reinventing You, and Stand Out, whichwas named the #1 Leadership Book of 2015 by Inc. magazine and one of the Top 10 Business Books of the Year by Forbes. It was also a Washington Post bestseller. Her books have been translated into Russian, Chinese, Arabic, French, Polish, Korean, Spanish, Italian, Vietnamese, and Thai. Clark, whom the New York Times described as an “expert at self-reinvention and helping others make changes in their lives,” is a frequent contributor to the Harvard Business Review. She consults and speaks for a diverse range of clients, including Google, the World Bank, Microsoft, Morgan Stanley, the Ford Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and Yale University. A former presidential campaign spokeswoman, Clark has also taught for Spain’s IE Business School, HEC-Paris, Babson College, Smith College Executive Education, UNC’s Kenan-Flagler School of Business, and more. She has guest lectured at universities including Harvard Business School, the Harvard Kennedy School, Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business, the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business, the University of California-Berkeley’s Haas School of Business, Georgetown, NYU, the MIT Sloan School of Management, and the University of Michigan. Her work has been published in the Harvard Business Review Guide to Getting the Right Job and the Harvard Business Review Guide to Networking, and she is quoted frequently in the worldwide media, including NPR, the BBC, and MSNBC. She has been a regular commentator on Canada’s CTV and was named one of Inc. magazine’s “100 Great Leadership Speakers for Your Next Conference.” A former New England Press Association award-winning journalist, Clark directed the environmental documentary film The Work of 1000, and was a producer for a multiple-Grammy-winning jazz album. She is a Broadway investor, as well as a participant in BMI’s Lehman Engel Musical Theatre Workshop, widely considered the premiere training ground for musical theater lyricists and composers. At age 14, Clark entered Mary Baldwin College’s Program for the Exceptionally Gifted. At 18, she graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Smith College, and two years later received a Master of Theological Studies from Harvard Divinity School. You can download her Entrepreneurial You self-assessment at dorieclark.com/entrepreneur.

Subliminal Jihad
[PREVIEW] #67 - THE VELVET FOG OF ALTERNATIVITY: A Subliminal History of KPFA/Pacifica Radio

Subliminal Jihad

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2021 15:10


Dimitri and Khalid dive deep into the history of alternative media pioneer KPFA/Pacifica Radio, the anarcho-pacifist subliminal jihad of Pacifica founder/Phillips oil heir Lewis Hill, ubiquitous Theosophical influences, Betty Ford-Aquino’s literary program and murky presence on the Pacifica Board, MK mystic Alan Watts, Pauline Kael, Betty Ford-Aquino’s role in popularizing “Doctor Zhivago” and “Howl”, Ginsberg’s MK-Ultra scientist cousin Oscar Janiger, Dwight MacDonald’s homicidal obsession with “Stalinoids”, getting massive financial support from the CIA Yale bluebloods running the Ford Foundation, and various influences on/synchronicities with today’s “alternative” left-wing podcast landscape. For access to full-length premium episodes and the SJ Grotto of Truth Discord, subscribe to the Al-Wara’ Frequency at patreon.com/subliminaljihad.