Podcasts about evangelicals

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Protestant Christian movement

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  • Oct 15, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about evangelicals

Show all podcasts related to evangelicals

Latest podcast episodes about evangelicals

Today's Conversation
Alex Mandes | Embracing the Marginalized

Today's Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 42:25


In Today's Conversation podcast, NAE President Walter Kim talks with Alex Mandes, author of “Embracing the New Samaria,” about the importance of our multi-ethnic future. Walter and Alex also discuss: How our response to fear impacts the Church's mission; How migration patterns can be an evangelistic tool; What leaders and churches can do to bridge ... The post Alex Mandes | Embracing the Marginalized appeared first on National Association of Evangelicals.

Stand Firm Podcast
#72: Courting the Cultured Despisers: Elites, Evangelicals, and the Struggle for Status

Stand Firm Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 42:39


Think Act Be: Aligning thought, action, and presence
Ep. 152: Dr. Kristin Kobes Du Mez — God, the Flag, and Sex Manuals in White Evangelical Christianity

Think Act Be: Aligning thought, action, and presence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 75:41


My guest this week is Dr. Kristin Kobes Du Mez, author of a recent book called Jesus and John Wayne: How White Evangelicals Corrupted a Faith and Fractured a Nation. We explored the definition of an “evangelical,” which apparently I was for the first half of my life (without realizing it), and themes of a patriarchal, male-centered, even toxic masculinity that pervades many evangelical circles. We also considered how it is that evangelical Christianity became so wrapped up in notions of patriotism, military strength, and other things that don't necessarily come from the life and message of Jesus Christ. Even if a person comes to reject the teachings from their evangelical upbringing, it can be a real challenge to let go of the attitudes and assumptions that have been instilled in us from a young age, as I know from personal experience. Kristin and I shared openly about our understanding of Christ, and the sadness that I certainly feel from the realization that we so often miss the central message of the Gospel—like somehow we just lost our way. And there's a lot to grieve when we realize how much we squander when we pattern our identity as religious followers after the worldly way of doing things, and how it doesn't seem to lead to something transcendent, like it could.

TonioTimeDaily
The concepts of "porn addiction" and masturbation in Evangelical churches

TonioTimeDaily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 44:50


"Buchs, Gallagher, and Pure Life Ministries believe that Evangelical churches are filled with “porn addicts.” What should we make of this assertion? Is “porn addiction” even a thing? Sure, people can become addicted to many things, but has Internet porn turned half of all teen and adult Evangelical church members into addicts? Imagine for a moment an Evangelical megachurch with 20,000 members. Does Buch expect anyone to believe that this church has thousands and thousands of porn addicts; men (and women) so obsessed with porn that they spend every waking moment on the Internet, fulfilling their lustful desires? This, on its face, is absurd. Do Evangelicals look at porn? Sure, many do, including pastors. Do Evangelicals masturbate after watching YouPorn and other sites? Sure, many do. However, is this a sign of “addiction”? Of course not. Why, then, do Evangelicals confess to porn addiction?" --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/support

Did That Really Happen?
Bright Young Things

Did That Really Happen?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 64:35


Grab a martini, because this week we're traveling back to 1930s London with Bright Young Things! Join us to learn more about 30s cocktail culture, the so-called King of Anatolia, interwar newspaper magnates, American evangelists in the UK, Armistice day poppies, and more! Sources: Cocktails: Harry Craddock, Savoy Cocktail Book, 1930 Edition. Full Text Available at https://euvs-vintage-cocktail-books.cld.bz/1930-The-Savoy-Cocktail-Book International Bartenders' Association, Official Website: https://iba-world.com/iba-official-cocktail-list/ Lord Beaverbrook: Laura Beers, "Education or Manipulation?: Labour, Democracy, and the Popular Press in Interwar Britain," Journal of British Studies 48, 1 (2009) Laura Beers, "Punting on the Thames: Electoral Betting in Interwar Britain," Journal of Contemporary History 45, 2 (2010) Alan Travis, Bound and Gagged: A Secret History of Obscenity in Britain (Profile Books, 2000) Gary Love, "The Periodical Press and the Intellectual Culture of Conservatism in Interwar Britain," 57 (4) 2014 JM McEwen, "The Press and the Fall of Asquith," The Historical Journal 21, 4 (1978) The King of Anatolia: Patrick J. Kriger, "Six Reasons Why the Ottoman Empire Fell," History https://www.history.com/news/ottoman-empire-fall "Abdulmejid II" Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abdulmejid_II M. Sukru Hanoiglu, A Brief History of the Late Ottoman Empire (Princeton University Press, 2008), https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt7t314.13 Mona Hassan, Longing for the Lost Caliphate: A Transregional History (Princeton University Press, 2016), https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt1q1xrgm.6 . https://www.firstworldwar.com/bio/mehmedvi.htm Evangelicals in the UK: "History" National Association of Evangelicals https://www.nae.org/about-nae/history/ British Pathe "Kentucky Singers (1930)" YouTube, https://youtu.be/M5lb-4oWc14 Roberta Freund Schwartz, "Preaching the Gospel of the Blues: Blues Evangelists in Britain," Cross the Water Blues: African American Music in Europe ed. Neil A. Wynn (University of Mississippi Press, 2007), https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt2tvbm7.12 Guido Van Rijn, "Lowland Blues: The Reception of African American Blues and Gospel Music in the Netherlands," Cross the Water Blues, https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt2tvbm7.16 Hans Krabbendam, Saving the Overlooked Continent: American Protestant Missions in Western Europe, 1940-1975 (Leuven University Press, 2020), https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctv1595mtj.5 Kira Thurman, "Singing the Civilizing Mission in the Land of Bach; Beethoven; and Brahms: The Fisk Jubilee Singers in Nineteenth-Century Germany," Journal of World History 27:3 (September 2016): 443-471. https://www.jstor.org/stable/44631474 Brian Ward, "Music, Musical Theater, and the Imagined South in Interwar Britain," The Journal of Southern History 80:1 (February 2014): 39-72. https://www.jstor.org/stable/23796843 Poppies: James Fox, "Poppy Politics: Remembrance of Things Present," in Cultural Heritage Ethics: Between Theory and Practice ed. Constantine Sandis (Open Book Publishers, 2014), https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt1287k16.8 . Jon Dean, "Poppy Fascism," The Good Glow: Charity and the Symbolic Power of Doing Good (Bristol University Press, 2020), https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctv123x5b8.11 Sarah Freeland, "The Poppy Lady: Moina Michael started a movement for veterans," UGA Today (5 November 2017). https://news.uga.edu/poppy-lady-moina-michael/ John McCrae, "In Flanders Fields," Poetry Foundation, https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/47380/in-flanders-fields Film Background: BBC Interview with Stephen Fry: https://www.bbc.co.uk/films/2003/09/30/stephen_fry_bright_young_things_interview.shtml Roger Ebert review of Bright Young Things: https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/bright-young-things-2004 Bright Young Things Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bright_Young_Things_(film) https://www.bl.uk/20th-century-literature/articles/the-bright-young-things-behind-the-party-mask  

MoneyWise on Oneplace.com
Bless Your Pastor Month with Brian Kluth

MoneyWise on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 24:57


To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/1085/29 Let the elders who rule well be considered worthy of double honor, especially those who labor in preaching and teaching.That verse in 1 Timothy 5 is especially timely in October because it's Bless Your Pastor month. We'll talk with Brian Kluth about how you can lift up and encourage your pastor in the weeks ahead then it's your calls at 800-525-7000. Brian Kluth is a best-selling author of several books on generosity. He was a pastor himself for 10 years and is now the national spokesperson for Bless Your Pastor month organized by the National Association of Evangelicals. State of the Plate research conducted with over 1,000 churches in all 50 states discovered COVID-19 shutdowns caused 65 percent of churches to see giving decrease. Prior to COVID-19, our national research showed most pastors were already struggling financially 80% of pastors serve at churches under 200 people with an average budget of $125,000 90% of pastors feel financial pressure, 60% of pastors receive no retirement, health care or employee benefits, and 50% of pastors earn less than $50,000 per year while working 50 to 70 hours per week Encouraging members to support their pastors and church staff financially is a big part of Bless Your Pastor month, but there are many other ways to show our gratitude to those who serve us so tirelessly. Brian put together a list of 50 ways we can bless our pastors and church staff. A few examples are babysitting, gift cards, and inviting them over for a meal. Pastor Brian Kluth has been our guest today. Visit BlessYourPastor.org to learn more. On today's program we also answer a few of your calls: How do I determine which credit card to close? We are looking to buy a work truck. Is there a particular time of year that is best to buy a new car? What is the best resource to compare vehicle values? My workplace was bought out and we have a new owner. They offered for us to roll over our 401K to the new owner. Should I do this or roll it over into an IRA? Remember, you can call in to ask your questions 24/7 at (800) 525-7000 or email them toQuestions@MoneyWise.org. Also, visit our website atMoneyWise.orgwhere you can listen to past programs, connect with a MoneyWise Coach, and even download free, helpful resources like the free MoneyWise app. Like and Follow us on Facebook at MoneyWise Media for the very latest discussion! And remember that it's your prayerful and financial support that keeps MoneyWise on the air. Help us continue this outreach by clicking the Donate tab on our website or in our app.

Straight White American Jesus
Why Will No One Listen to Ex-Evangelicals?

Straight White American Jesus

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 40:55


Blake Chastain, host of #Exvangelical and Powers and Principalities, and the author of a recent piece on the recent Christianity Today podcast on the downfall of Mars Hill, stops by to talk about why religious leaders and thinkers refuse to listen to ex-evangelicals. He and Brad discuss the excuses that the Christianity Today podcast and other sources make about why people leave high demand religions. What becomes clear throughout the conversation is that the refusal to listen is a refusal to self-reflect on the issues within church communities and religious traditions. For an ad-free premium feed, https://irreverent.supportingcast.fm/straight-white-american-jesus-premium. Use code SWAJ for 60% off the monthly rate! Use code SWAJyear for $12 off the annual membership! All patrons receive an ad-free experience too! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://swaj.supportingcast.fm

Happy & Holy
Fan Favorites | Evangelicals and Sex with Sheila Gregoire

Happy & Holy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 36:05


My guest today is Sheila Wray Gregoire is passionate about changing the evangelical conversation about sex! A popular speaker, marriage blogger, and award-winning author of nine books, including The Good Girl's Guide to Great Sex, and her latest book, The Great Sex Rescue, she wants to challenge Christians to go beyond pat answers on marriage to reach real intimacy. Sheila believes in authenticity, and gives real solutions to the very real and messy problems women, and couples, can face. She and her husband Keith spend a lot of their time touring North America in an RV, speaking at marriage conferences, hiking, and birdwatching. The parents to two adult daughters, you can usually find her in Belleville, Ontario, where she's either knitting, blogging, or taking her grandson out for a walk. We talk all about what evangelicals got wrong about sex and how create healthier sex and marriage conversations in our churches. Quick content warning: there is discussion of sex and use of frank terms for sex contained in this episode. If you want to keep up with Sheila, you can find her online at ...https://tolovehonorandvacuum.comhttps://instagram.com/sheilagregoirehttps://facebook.com/sheila.gregoire.bookshttps://twitter.com/sheilagregoire Her book The Great Sex Rescue is also for sale now and available at the link in our show notes. https://greatsexrescue.com/ If you enjoyed our discussion, I'd love if you would rate + review on your favorite podcast player. This helps more people to find the show and learn with us. Then come on over to social media and let's talk about it! You can find me on Instagram @kateboyd.co and on Twitter @thekateboyd. And don't forget to check the show notes to find and follow today's contributors as well. Thank YOU for joining us, and I'll see you next time.If you find yourself in the messy middle as a Christian, you're not alone, and I'd love to help. I've created the Untidy Faith newsletter just for you. Together, we'll navigate the many tensions of the Christian life and in the process find ourselves wandering closer to the Way of Jesus. When you sign up, you'll get a printable version of the Messy Middle Christian manifesto to your inbox today and first access to more Untidy Faith resources as they come out. You can sign up today at kateboyd.co/newsletter

The Mo'Kelly Show
Trump's ‘Religion' Boast, Bruce's Beach & the Hollywood Strike Threat

The Mo'Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 31:47


ICYMI: The Mo'Kelly Show Presents – Thoughts on Donald Trump's claims that nobody has done more for 'Christianity, Evangelicals or for Religion itself' than him…PLUS – Efforts to return Bruce's Beach to its heirs are being fast-tracked AND Hollywood is facing a strike threat from off-screen workers on KFI AM 640 – Live everywhere on the iHeartRadio app

TonioTimeDaily
Abortion laws part 4

TonioTimeDaily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 60:47


"Pro-Choice and Pro-Life Groups Some prominent pro-choice organizations include Planned Parenthood, NARAL Pro-Choice America, the National Abortion Federation, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), and the National Organization for Women. Although many pro-life positions derive from religious ideology, several mainstream faith groups support the pro-choice movement, such as the United Methodist Church, United Church of Christ, the Episcopal Church, Presbyterian Church (USA), and the Unitarian Universalist Association. The 2016 Democratic Party Platform endorsed the pro-choice position, stating, “We believe unequivocally, like the majority of Americans, that every woman should have access to quality reproductive health care services, including safe and legal abortion – regardless of where she lives, how much money she makes, or how she is insured. We believe that reproductive health is core to women's, men's, and young people's health and wellbeing.” [169] However, 26% of Democrats consider themselves to be pro-life. [170] Some prominent pro-life organizations include The National Right to Life Committee, Pro-Life Action League, Operation Rescue, the Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, Americans United for Life, the National Association of Evangelicals, Family Research Council, Christian Coalition of America, and the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (Mormon Church). [6] The 2016 Republican Party Platform opposed abortion, stating, “We oppose the use of public funds to perform or promote abortion or to fund organizations, like Planned Parenthood, so long as they provide or refer for elective abortions or sell fetal body parts rather than provide healthcare… We will not fund or subsidize healthcare that includes abortion coverage… We thank and encourage providers of counseling, medical services, and adoption assistance for empowering women experiencing an unintended pregnancy to choose life.” [171] However, 36% of Republicans consider themselves to be pro-choice. [170]" --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/support

Mere Fidelity
Exvangelical Deconstruction

Mere Fidelity

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 55:07


What's the difference between someone “deconstructing” their faith and plain, old apostasy? Are Exvangelicals really leaving Christianity? Andrew, Alastair, and Matt discuss the new trend of Evangelicals prominently deconstructing their faith and what it means for the church and the doctrine of assurance. Full show notes at www.merefidelity.com.

Straight White American Jesus
Weekly Roundup: The Blueprint for a Coup

Straight White American Jesus

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 53:18


Brad and Dan begin by discussing Trump and why exploring the ongoing revelations of the January 6th is more than just archival mining. The second major topic is the reclaiming of abortion as a religious right. Brad draws upon the United Church of Christ fight for queer marriage where religious leaders stated that a ban on queer marriage violated the religious liberty and leaders of their church. In this Brad and Dan ask what it means to frame abortion as a religious freedom - a narrative that Evangelicals have used for far too long. They finish by discussing the raising of the debit limit, Mitch McConnell, COVID-19 variants and reasons for hope.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://swaj.supportingcast.fm

The Holy Post
French Friday - “Buckets of Evangelicals”

The Holy Post

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 58:37


Senior editor of The Dispatch and constitutional attorney, David French, and Holy Post co-host, Skye Jethani, discuss why the executive committee of the Southern Baptist Convention should waive their attorney-client privilege in the ongoing abuse investigation. Then, French explains why the increase in self-identified evangelicals between 2016 and 2020 isn't good news, and why he now puts “evangelicals” in three different buckets. Finally, they examine claims from some neo-fundamentalists that empathy is a sin. French says the problem in America isn't too much empathy, but selective empathy. SBC Executive Committee review [1:17] https://religionnews.com/2021/09/21/sbc-executive-committee-agrees-to-pay-for-abuse-review-stalls-on-waiving-privilege/ Defining “evangelical” [15:28] https://frenchpress.thedispatch.com/p/did-donald-trump-make-the-church “The American Crisis of Selective Empathy” [33:26] https://frenchpress.thedispatch.com/p/the-american-crisis-of-selective

The Biblical Mind
Reading Evangelicals: Doctrine, Culture, and Popular Christian Fiction (Daniel Silliman)

The Biblical Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 39:39


Left Behind. This Present Darkness. Love Come Softly. The culture of faith in the West has been greatly shaped by Christian fiction. Many books that are popular in Christian circles plant flags of doctrines within their pages, providing something for Christians to buy into.  Join us this week as Daniel Silliman (author of Reading Evangelicals: How Christian Fiction Shaped a Culture and a Faith and news editor for Christianity Today) discusses how books such as Left Behind have influenced evangelicalism, and how the book market more broadly has influenced Western Christianity.  Show notes: 0:27 Fictional vs. non-fictional arguments 2:44 Christian fiction and the effect on culture 4:44 Novel belief and worldviews 8:17 How to think about evangelicals 9:54 Advocating vs. reflecting 10:47 The book market shapes evangelical culture 13:54 Creating narratives literature 16:48 Mental spaces and formative belief 21:26 Supposing 24:26 Fighting the imagination 30:18 Assume the importance of the four gospels 31:59 How Scripture teaches through narrative 32:09 Objection to mass Christian literature 34:24 Book recommendations Show notes by Dominique LaCroix  Credits for the music used in TBM podcast.

The Michael Brooks Show
RE-Air TMBS - Ep. 15 - Why Evangelicals Can't Quit Roy Moore ft. Ben Mankiewicz & Sarah Jones

The Michael Brooks Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 117:57


Description of Episode 15: Right Wing Mandela has an important message about Judge Roy Moore and improving young girls self-esteem. Michael explains how the neoliberal center stands in the way of the Left's fight with our true enemy the far-right. You can learn all you need to know to celebrate the 800-year anniversary of the Charter of The Forest. We have Ben Mankiewicz (@BenMank77) host of Turner Classic Movies and of The Young Turks call in to talk to us about how all around awful Harvey Weinstein is. New Republic writer Sarah Jones (@onesarahjones) joins us in studio and tells us about her journey to become a leftist and her new piece “Why Can't Evangelicals Quit Roy Moore?” Episode 15 first aired on November 14th 2017 TMBS re-aired episodes come out every Tuesday at 7PM EST here on The Michael Brooks Show Channel. This program has been put together by The Michael Brooks Legacy Project. To learn more and rewatch the postgame content visit https://www.patreon.com/TMBS

The Christian Worldview radio program
Is Evangelicalism Reformable to Biblical Fidelity?

The Christian Worldview radio program

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 53:59


GUEST: DON GREEN, founding pastor, Truth Community Church (Ohio) “Evangelical” has become a very broad term with hardly any meaning. It once described a follower of Christ who believed in the complete truthfulness of Scripture, essential doctrines about salvation, sin, God, Christ, the call to tell others about the gospel of Christ, and more. Today, seemingly every professing Christian who is not part of the totally compromised liberal mainline denominations self-identifies as an “Evangelical”…except for those who want to avoid at all costs being associated with Donald Trump, for whom Evangelicals mostly voted. But the doctrinal stances of professing Evangelicals today, including Evangelical churches and organizations—on interpreting Scripture or hot button issues like homosexuality, race, and women in preaching roles—span such a wide spectrum that the term has all been but lost. With the Evangelical church and movement becoming a mile wide and an inch deep, is it possible and even advisable to try to recapture the term back to its more faithful roots? Don Green, founding pastor of Truth Community Church in Cincinnati, Ohio, joins us on The Christian Worldview to discuss what was an "Evangelical", what caused the compromise, and whether Evangelicalism is reformable? Don is preaching at the upcoming “Reforming Evangelicalism” conference at Grace Church in Greeley, CO, which you can attend or watch online.

Progressive Spirit
Episode 426: Is the "Rapture" a Zionist Invention? A Conversation with Dr. Chuck Baldwin

Progressive Spirit

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 54:59


Dr. Chuck Baldwin is the pastor of Liberty Fellowship in Kalispell, Montana. His sermons and columns are seen and read around the world at ChuckBaldwinLive. I spoke with him in May 2020 regarding the "Covid Psyop" and he returns to discuss the Scofield Bible and its influence on evangelicalism, particularly in reference to the "rapture" and other Christian Zionist doctrines. He believes that it is because of Christian Zionism that the vast majority of evangelicals cannot see this Covid Psyop for what it is. 

The Common Good Podcast
Kevin Halloran shares encouragement from his book, “When Prayer Is a Struggle,” Brian and Aubrey react to the heartbreaking testimony of U.S. gymnasts before Congress, and they unpack the term, “Political Evangelicals” - September 16, 2021

The Common Good Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 45:16


(00:00-9:38): Brian and Aubrey discussed Matt Henslee's Lifeway Research article, “Comfort for the Ghosted Pastor.” (9:38-27:20): Kevin Halloran, Author of, “When Prayer Is a Struggle: A Practical Guide for Overcoming Obstacles in Prayer,” joined Brian and Aubrey to talk about his book and his Gospel Coalition article, “How the Lord's Prayer Can Help You Overcome Your Prayer Struggles” Learn more about Kevin at kevinhalloran.net and connect with him on Twitter at @kp_halloran (27:20-36:05): Brian and Aubrey reacted to the “testimony from gymnasts as Congress investigates FBI's handling of Larry Nassar sexual abuse case.”  (36:05-45:16): How should Christians respond to the label, “‘Political Evangelicals'?” Brian and Aubrey talked about this and commented on Kate Shellnutt's Christianity Today article, “‘Political Evangelicals'? More Trump Supporters Adopt the Label.” See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The San Francisco Experience
Christians Against Christianity: How Right Wing Evangelicals are destroying our Nation and our Faith. In conversation with Dr. Obery Hendricks.

The San Francisco Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 32:46


The Evangelical Right has played a prominent role ensuring its agenda is part of the national debate especially during the presidential elections of 2016 and 2020. But is that agenda soundly based in scripture as they would have us believe ? Dr. Obery Hendricks a biblical scholar, social activist and one of the foremost commentators on the intersection of religion and politics, debunks that agenda as not being based in scripture. And argues that it is largely antithetical to Christ's teaching. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/james-herlihy/message

Today's Conversation
Myal Greene | Empowering the Church to Serve the Most Vulnerable

Today's Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 35:42


In Today's Conversation podcast, NAE President Walter Kim sits down with Myal Greene, World Relief's new president and CEO. They discuss the situations in Haiti and Afghanistan, and especially the opportunity for Christians to show the love of Christ with refugees. Myal also shares: What inspires and sustains his ministry with the vulnerable and those ... The post Myal Greene | Empowering the Church to Serve the Most Vulnerable appeared first on National Association of Evangelicals.

New Books in American Studies
Postscript: The Changing Landscape of Abortion Politics

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 78:58


Today's Postscript (a special series that allows scholars to comment on pressing contemporary issues) engages the latest chapter in American abortion politics as the United States Supreme Court has just allowed a Texas statute banning abortions after 6 weeks to go into effect. Lilly Goren and Susan Liebell have assembled a panel of experts in political science and law to interrogate the construction of the Texas law, the Supreme Court ruling, and how these cases map onto the wider political landscape. Dr. Renée Ann Cramer is a Professor of Law, Politics, and Society at Drake University -- and the author of Birthing a Movement: Midwives, Law, and the Politics of Reproductive Care from Stanford University Press, 2021. Dr. Rebecca Kreitzer is an Associate Professor of Public Policy and an Adjunct Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill -- and the author of some of the most downloaded articles in political science on the policy environment in which abortion laws are passed. Her most recent work, “Anti-Abortion Policymaking and Women's Representation” (co-authored with Reingold, Beth, Tracy L. Osborn, and Michele Swers) appears in Political Research Quarterly. Dr. Andrew R. Lewis is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Cincinnati and the author of The Rights Turn in Conservative Christian Politics: How Abortion Transformed the Culture Wars (Cambridge, 2017). He writes at the intersection of politics, religion, and law in America with expertise in Evangelicals and politics, conservative legal activism, and rights politics. Dr. Joshua C. Wilson is Professor of Political Science at the University of Denver -- and the . author of The Street Politics of Abortion: Speech, Violence, & America's Culture Wars and The New States of Abortion Politics both from Stanford University Press 2013 and 2016. His article “Striving to Rollback or Protect Roe: State Legislation and the Trump-Era Politics of Abortion appeared in Publius last summer. Dr. Mary Ziegler is a Stearns Weaver Miller Professor at Florida State University College of Law. She is the author of Abortion and the Law in America: A Legal History, Roe v. Wade to the Present (Cambridge University Press, 2020) and has a forthcoming book Dollars for Life: The Antiabortion Movement and the Fall of the Republican Establishment expected from Yale University Press, 2022). Daniella Campos assisted with this podcast. Susan Liebell is Dirk Warren '50 Professor of Political Science at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in Gender Studies
Postscript: The Changing Landscape of Abortion Politics

New Books in Gender Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 78:58


Today's Postscript (a special series that allows scholars to comment on pressing contemporary issues) engages the latest chapter in American abortion politics as the United States Supreme Court has just allowed a Texas statute banning abortions after 6 weeks to go into effect. Lilly Goren and Susan Liebell have assembled a panel of experts in political science and law to interrogate the construction of the Texas law, the Supreme Court ruling, and how these cases map onto the wider political landscape. Dr. Renée Ann Cramer is a Professor of Law, Politics, and Society at Drake University -- and the author of Birthing a Movement: Midwives, Law, and the Politics of Reproductive Care from Stanford University Press, 2021. Dr. Rebecca Kreitzer is an Associate Professor of Public Policy and an Adjunct Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill -- and the author of some of the most downloaded articles in political science on the policy environment in which abortion laws are passed. Her most recent work, “Anti-Abortion Policymaking and Women's Representation” (co-authored with Reingold, Beth, Tracy L. Osborn, and Michele Swers) appears in Political Research Quarterly. Dr. Andrew R. Lewis is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Cincinnati and the author of The Rights Turn in Conservative Christian Politics: How Abortion Transformed the Culture Wars (Cambridge, 2017). He writes at the intersection of politics, religion, and law in America with expertise in Evangelicals and politics, conservative legal activism, and rights politics. Dr. Joshua C. Wilson is Professor of Political Science at the University of Denver -- and the . author of The Street Politics of Abortion: Speech, Violence, & America's Culture Wars and The New States of Abortion Politics both from Stanford University Press 2013 and 2016. His article “Striving to Rollback or Protect Roe: State Legislation and the Trump-Era Politics of Abortion appeared in Publius last summer. Dr. Mary Ziegler is a Stearns Weaver Miller Professor at Florida State University College of Law. She is the author of Abortion and the Law in America: A Legal History, Roe v. Wade to the Present (Cambridge University Press, 2020) and has a forthcoming book Dollars for Life: The Antiabortion Movement and the Fall of the Republican Establishment expected from Yale University Press, 2022). Daniella Campos assisted with this podcast. Susan Liebell is Dirk Warren '50 Professor of Political Science at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

New Books Network
Postscript: The Changing Landscape of Abortion Politics

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 78:58


Today's Postscript (a special series that allows scholars to comment on pressing contemporary issues) engages the latest chapter in American abortion politics as the United States Supreme Court has just allowed a Texas statute banning abortions after 6 weeks to go into effect. Lilly Goren and Susan Liebell have assembled a panel of experts in political science and law to interrogate the construction of the Texas law, the Supreme Court ruling, and how these cases map onto the wider political landscape. Dr. Renée Ann Cramer is a Professor of Law, Politics, and Society at Drake University -- and the author of Birthing a Movement: Midwives, Law, and the Politics of Reproductive Care from Stanford University Press, 2021. Dr. Rebecca Kreitzer is an Associate Professor of Public Policy and an Adjunct Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill -- and the author of some of the most downloaded articles in political science on the policy environment in which abortion laws are passed. Her most recent work, “Anti-Abortion Policymaking and Women's Representation” (co-authored with Reingold, Beth, Tracy L. Osborn, and Michele Swers) appears in Political Research Quarterly. Dr. Andrew R. Lewis is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Cincinnati and the author of The Rights Turn in Conservative Christian Politics: How Abortion Transformed the Culture Wars (Cambridge, 2017). He writes at the intersection of politics, religion, and law in America with expertise in Evangelicals and politics, conservative legal activism, and rights politics. Dr. Joshua C. Wilson is Professor of Political Science at the University of Denver -- and the . author of The Street Politics of Abortion: Speech, Violence, & America's Culture Wars and The New States of Abortion Politics both from Stanford University Press 2013 and 2016. His article “Striving to Rollback or Protect Roe: State Legislation and the Trump-Era Politics of Abortion appeared in Publius last summer. Dr. Mary Ziegler is a Stearns Weaver Miller Professor at Florida State University College of Law. She is the author of Abortion and the Law in America: A Legal History, Roe v. Wade to the Present (Cambridge University Press, 2020) and has a forthcoming book Dollars for Life: The Antiabortion Movement and the Fall of the Republican Establishment expected from Yale University Press, 2022). Daniella Campos assisted with this podcast. Susan Liebell is Dirk Warren '50 Professor of Political Science at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Company of Disciples' Recordings
"Catholicism: Choose Your Religion Part 4" with Dan Forest

Company of Disciples' Recordings

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 29:39


Since Protestants rejected the Catholic faith 500 years ago, there has still been residual skepticism and animosity between these two branches of Christianity. But Evangelicals would be surprised to learn they have a lot more in common with the Catholics than they realize, especially since the Catholic Church has undergone its own reformation since the Protestants left. Sure, there are still differences in practice and theology, but there is a lot Evangelicals could glean from the Catholic faith. Dan continues our Choose Your Religion series by looking at Catholicism. Enjoy! Did you enjoy our podcast? Visit www.companyofdisciples.com to learn more about who we are and how we serve the business professional community!

Politics Done Right
Biden mandates & polls, w/ Chuck Todd & Michael Moore. Schaeffer slams Evangelicals. Porter

Politics Done Right

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 57:40


California Congresswoman Katie Porter made a case for the $3.5 Trillion human infrastructure bill as she schooled Joe Manchin on fiscal responsibility. Katie Porter did not hold back on those presenting obstacles to the vital $3.5 Trillion human infrastructure bill. It was clear that Stephanie Ruhle was surprised by her candor. Chuck Todd to anti-mandate rambling governor: What about the freedom of those who got vaccinated? Chuck Todd started the interview by soft balling Governor Asa Hutchinson. He told the governor he is in a difficult space since he believes in the vaccine but does not support vaccine mandates. Todd asked the governor if mandates are not all that is left. Frank Schaeffer compares the Evangelical movement with the Taliban. He knows. He was a part of it! Frank Schaeffer is atoning for his past involvement in capturing the Evangelical movement. He, his dad, and their cohort did not do it for any good intentions. It was aimed at controlling the controllable to execute the will of a few. Register: Ask Egberto Anything. It is Saturday, October 2nd, at 11:00 AM Central. --- If you like what we do please do the following! Most Independent Media outlets continue to struggle to raise the funds they need to operate much like the smaller outlets like Politics Done Right SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube Channel here. LIKE our Facebook Page here. Share our blogs, podcasts, and videos. Get our books here. Become a YouTube PDR Posse Member here. Become a Politics Done Right Subscriber via Patreon here. Become a Politics Done Right Subscriber via Facebook here. Consider providing a contribution here. Please consider supporting our GoFundMe equipment fund here.

Quick to Listen
Did 9/11 Change How Evangelicals See Muslims?

Quick to Listen

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 51:43


This year marks 20 years since 19 men hijacked four planes, driving two of the aircraft into the World Trade Center, one into the Pentagon, and one into a field in Pennsylvania, after several of the passengers fought back. The attacks killed nearly 3,000 people and left 25,000 people injured and were organized by Osama bin Laden, who used his faith as justification for the attacks. Several days after September 11, 2001, President Bush addressed the country: These acts of violence against innocents violate the fundamental tenets of the Islamic faith. And it's important for my fellow Americans to understand that. The English translation is not as eloquent as the original Arabic, but let me quote from the Koran, itself: In the long run, evil in the extreme will be the end of those who do evil. For that they rejected the signs of Allah and held them up to ridicule. The face of terror is not the true faith of Islam. That's not what Islam is all about. Islam is peace. These terrorists don't represent peace. They represent evil and war. When we think of Islam we think of a faith that brings comfort to a billion people around the world. Billions of people find comfort and solace and peace. And that's made brothers and sisters out of every race. Under the Bush administration, the US initiated the “War on Terror” which carried out a number of military inventions around the world to fight Islamic extremism, which included invading and occupying two majority Muslim nations, Iraq and Afghanistan. Of course, all of this political rhetoric and direct action had significant consequences for how the country and church engaged Muslims domestically and internationally.Thomas Kidd is the author of American Christians and Islam: Evangelical Culture and Muslims from the Colonial Period to the Age of Terrorism (Princeton University Press, 2008) and works at Baylor University where is a distinguished professor of history, the James Vardaman endowed professor of history and the associate director of Institute for Studies of Religion. His most recent book is Who Is an Evangelical?: The History of a Movement in Crisis. Kidd joined global media manager Morgan Lee and executive editor Ted Olsen to discuss how American evangelicals interacted with Muslim before 9/11 and what has changed since. What is Quick to Listen? Read more Rate Quick to Listen on Apple Podcasts Follow the podcast on Twitter Follow our hosts on Twitter: Morgan Lee and Ted Olsen Follow our guest Thomas Kidd Music by Sweeps. Quick to Listen is produced by Morgan Lee and Matt Linder The transcript is edited by Faith Ndlovu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Erin and Aliee HATE Everything
Ep. 158: Effie We All Got Pain

Erin and Aliee HATE Everything

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 66:15


Trigger warnings: climate disasters, Texas abortion law, white supremacy, Jeff Bezos, school integration, boba, The Day After Tomorrow, Big Horn Sheep, objective truth, Hurricane Ida, camping, rocks, "daddy issues", compliments, Evangelicals, horse windows, Capitol Reef, believing lived experiences, lesbian necromancers in space

Bede's Podcast with Michael A.G. Haykin
Evangelicals and Technology

Bede's Podcast with Michael A.G. Haykin

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 51:50


Since the Gutenberg Revolution in the fifteenth century, Christians have embraced technology for the spread of the gospel and sometimes at great cost to the faith. Join Drs. Haykin and Pohlman as they discuss the history of Evangelicals and technology. What can this history teach us as the church strives for faithfulness in our digital age?    Work discussed:  Broadcasting the Faith: Protestant Religious Radio and Theology in America, 1920-1950 by Michael E. Pohlman

Straight White American Jesus
Free Britney (from the Evangelicals)!

Straight White American Jesus

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 39:23


Brad speak with Ryan Stollar, expert on child protection and a Christian homeschooling survivor. Ryan shares his research on the evangelical and ex-evangelical components of Britney's story--from her childhood in church, to her experiences in purity culture, to the powerful evangelical business manager who convinced her dad to put Britney under conservatorship. It is a story of sexualizing young women, toxic sexual standards, overwhelming patriarchy, and a shocking loophole in our legal system. Stollar makes a compelling case that #FreeBritney is an exvangelical cause, and that Spears's conservatorship represents the culmination of many evangelical beliefs and practices concerning wayward, apostate children Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://swaj.supportingcast.fm

Company of Disciples' Recordings
"Evangelicalism: Choose Your Religion Part 3" with Jonny Cage

Company of Disciples' Recordings

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 26:00


Who are the Evangelicals? Some of them have been on the news for the wrong reasons of late. The Anit-vaxxers, Anti-maskers and those who consume questionable remedies to fight Covid like using horse de-wormers. There are also those who believe in conspiracy theories, thinking the vaccine is part of Satan's agenda. Are they REALLY evangelicals? Because there are many Evangelicals, including yours truly, who aren't Republican, who believes in evolution, who thinks Noah's ark is just a story to prove a point, who is more middle in political and sociological views, stand for LGBTQ and Feminist rights and still love Jesus. So who are the Evangelicals? Jonathan continues our Choose Your Religion series with a discussion on Evangelicalism. Enjoy! Did you enjoy our production? Visit our website at www.companyofdisciples.com to learn more about what we do for business professionals. Are you looking for a church? Try Crucible Church. email community@cruciblechurch.com or visit their website at www.cruciblechurch.com for more information.

The Remnant with Jonah Goldberg
The Worst is Yet to Come

The Remnant with Jonah Goldberg

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 76:41


Graeme Wood, staff writer for The Atlantic, joins TheRemnant for the first time to discuss the future of the Taliban, the psychology of extremists, and why, depressingly, America's political situation may only get crazier. For the sake of levity, Jonah is also sure to ask about Graeme's experiences hitchhiking across Afghanistan and bootlegging liquor in Iraq, as well as the quirks of being bilingual. Tune in additionally for an update on Jonah's book collection, but stick around for your periodical reminder not to immanentize the eschaton. Show Notes: - Graeme's author page at The Atlantic - Graeme on the future of ISIS - Graeme on understanding the Taliban - The overrepresentation of converts among jihadists - Evangelicals who don't go to church - Eric Voegelin's New Science of Politics - Is the Muslim world ignoring the plight of the Uyghurs? - Graeme's profile of Peter Turchin - The great man theory of history See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The BreakPoint Podcast
The Disillusion of Millennial Evangelicals

The BreakPoint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 5:03


Into the Pray
Clarifying Catholicism 2/2 (feat. Dave Brennan)

Into the Pray

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 59:20


Hello!Thank you for tuning in again to Into the Pray. There are more than 100 episodes of this podcast to listen to now including a wide range of guests spanning the period before lockdown to the current day, weekly episodes with Dave Brennan of Brephos (just like today's) as well as 33 teaching episodes in the book of 1 Corinthians. If you are one of our regular listeners, perhaps you could check this out as we continue to develop things moving into 2022. Become one of our Patrons here!What are evangelical leaders saying about what's happening in the Church today? Are they saying anything that's worth listening to? And what about this critical issue of the blurred lines between Evangelicals and Catholics? This podcast is seeking to at least clear-up some of that blur. We're grateful as always for our friend, Dave Brennan of Brephos, featuring on this podcast every Wednesday. If you would prefer to give directly, you can do that here. If you would like to join our mailing list, you can do so here. Please also take a minute or two to rate and review Into the Pray on whatever podcast platform you listen on - this really is important!Thanks to everyone. Maranatha!Love, N&M xx

Neil Rogers Show
Neil Rogers Show (January 21, 2008)

Neil Rogers Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 176:17


MLK day. Neil rips television Evangelicals and politicians. Chris gets lessons on football and old tv stars. “It's just another day” at 1:41:20. And the Poll..Who is more electable.

Harvest Community Church (PCA) in Omaha, NE
“Who May Enter into Holy Places?” – Hebrews 9:1-14

Harvest Community Church (PCA) in Omaha, NE

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021


If you have your Bibles, please turn with me to Hebrews 9:1-14. As always, I'll be reading out of the ESV, the English Standard Version. And so hear now the word of the Lord. 9 Now even the first covenant had regulations for worship and an earthly place of holiness. 2 For a tent was prepared, the first section, in which were the lampstand and the table and the bread of the Presence. It is called the Holy Place. 3 Behind the second curtain was a second section called the Most Holy Place, 4 having the golden altar of incense and the ark of the covenant covered on all sides with gold, in which was a golden urn holding the manna, and Aaron's staff that budded, and the tablets of the covenant. 5 Above it were the cherubim of glory overshadowing the mercy seat. Of these things we cannot now speak in detail. 6 These preparations having thus been made, the priests go regularly into the first section, performing their ritual duties, 7 but into the second only the high priest goes, and he but once a year, and not without taking blood, which he offers for himself and for the unintentional sins of the people. 8 By this the Holy Spirit indicates that the way into the holy places is not yet opened as long as the first section is still standing 9 (which is symbolic for the present age). According to this arrangement, gifts and sacrifices are offered that cannot perfect the conscience of the worshiper, 10 but deal only with food and drink and various washings, regulations for the body imposed until the time of reformation. 11 But when Christ appeared as a high priest of the good things that have come, then through the greater and more perfect tent (not made with hands, that is, not of this creation) 12 he entered once for all into the holy places, not by means of the blood of goats and calves but by means of his own blood, thus securing an eternal redemption. 13 For if the blood of goats and bulls, and the sprinkling of defiled persons with the ashes of a heifer, sanctify for the purification of the flesh, 14 how much more will the blood of Christ, who through the eternal Spirit offered himself without blemish to God, purify our conscience from dead works to serve the living God. Hebrews 9:1-14, ESV Well, earlier this week, I stumbled across an attention grabbing headline that stated this. It said, "More than 60 percent of born again Christians in America between the ages of 18 and 39 believe that Buddha, Muhammad and Jesus are all valid paths to salvation." Now, this was based on a study on religious pluralism in America that was conducted by some Christian ministry. But after digging into the data a little bit that was provided, I discovered that while the headline singled out the 18 to 39 age bracket, those in the older brackets didn't really fare much better either. And in some cases they were actually worse. In short, it seems that among self-professed evangelicals, regardless of age demographics, pluralism that is the view that there are multiple valid religions in the world is a serious problem. This study also fits with a similar survey that was conducted by another Christian ministry last year, where respondents were asked to respond to the phrase, "God accepts the worship of all religions, including Christianity, Judaism and Islam." And respondents to that statement, fifty-two percent, in fact, of evangelicals between the ages of 18 and 34 either agreed or strongly agreed with that statement. Now, assuming that these results are truly representative of the religious landscape among self-professing evangelicals in America, it goes to show, I think, just how well the world has catechized and discipled the church and her members. After all, when the world happily elevates such values as plurality, as the supreme values that we should live by, but downplays values such as truth. Well, it's no wonder why so many of our neighbors and people we love and maybe even you have followed suit in rearranging values more in line with what the world treasures and less in line with what the Bible affirms from start to finish is true. But when we turn to the Bible, we find the unmistakable claim that our God is in fact unique among the so-called gods of the world. Rather than being just one God among many in a buffet of religious options, the Bible tells us that our God isn't anything like the so-called gods of the world. Our God, for one thing, is a triune begin. For another thing, our God, we learn, is infinite, eternal, all wise, all powerful, love, merciful, gracious, majestic, good. And he's the perfection of all of his attributes. God just isn't like the so-called gods of the world, and as a consequence, how we approach this one triune perfect God really does matter. We can't approach this God through the values or systems of any world religion we choose, and neither can we approach this God as the weak and morally troubled people that all of us are and think that he'll smile upon us all the same. Whether the Bible tells us that to approach a holy holy Holy God, that is a God who's set apart from what's common in every way, to be received as children and people of this holy God, and to have our worship accepted by this holy God requires nothing short of holiness. Holiness, according to God's standards ourselves. And so our big idea this morning is this, Holiness lies at the heart of our worship.. Again, we need to know that the one we worship, the one that we cling to for life is holy and therefore how we approach the holy God requires holiness ourselves. So two points as we walk through this passage. 1. The Problem of Holiness. Yes, it requires holiness to approach a holy God, but we have a problem and it's a holiness problem. That's the first point. 2. Access Through the Holy One - And then second is how we nonetheless gain access to the Holy God through a Holy One. The Problem of Holiness So let's start out for this first point. First, the problem of holiness. And notice that when we turn to our passage, our author begins picking up where he left off in chapter eight. In chapter eight, you may recall a few weeks back when we spent some time studying that passage, our author spent some time comparing and contrasting the so-called old covenant. The old covenant was this covenant that God made with Moses to the nation of Israel. And he contrasts this old covenant with the new covenant, the new covenant, the covenant that God has inaugurated through his son, Jesus Christ, our Lord. After comparing and contrasting these two covenants the old covenant and the new covenant, or the first covenant in the second covenant in chapter eight of Hebrews, arguing all along the way for the superiority of the new covenant. Now, in chapter nine, our author focuses on just one aspect of these various covenants. Namely how one worshiped in the old covenant versus how we worship in the new covenant. In fact, that's his focus throughout this passage. And to begin, he spends the first 10 verses or so focused on what worship in this old covenant with Moses looked like in its own day. So to begin our survey of the contrast that our author draws in our passage, look with me at versus two through five of our passage. There our author begins by going back well over a thousand years from the time in which he writes, to explain to us the system of worship in the old covenant with the so-called tabernacle. Notice that in the first five verses or so of our passage, our author spends a lot of time here describing to us this earthly place of holiness that was known as the tabernacle. So to give you a little bit of background to this thing called the tabernacle. After the Exodus event, and you can read all about this in the Book of Exodus, when God, through his servant Moses led his people out of slavery and captivity in Egypt. He gathered his people in the desert to himself at a place called Mount Sinai. This is an event you can read about beginning in Exodus 19, where the people of Israel were wandering through the desert and God led them to this mountain called Mount Sinai. It was at Sinai where God called Moses up on the mountain, and he gave him the Ten Commandments. God entered at that point into a covenant with Israel. He secured a relationship with his people. He promised at that point to be their God. He promised that they would be his people. He gave them laws, and he promised that if they lived according to those laws, that they would be blessed. Well, after articulating that the essence of these laws in the Ten Commandments, much of the Book of Exodus, the second half of Exodus that is, is taken up with describing to us the construction and design of this thing called the tabernacle. Now, the tabernacle was this large mobile tent in the old covenant where God's people would go in order to worship God. They would come into the tabernacle and they would offer bloody animal sacrifices when they sinned. The priest of Israel, a special group of among the nation, would also minister day and night in the tabernacle complex. So with that background in mind, when we look at versus two through five of our passage, we noticed that our author is concerned here with describing to us the various sections of this mobile tent called the tabernacle and some of the furniture or the equipment that was in the tabernacle. And by the way, if you're using a sermon worksheet this morning, the ones that we normally hand out or place in the back, I've included a schematic of the tabernacle in that for you to follow along as we work through these verses. Nonetheless, let's point out a few features of this tabernacle, according to our passage. Well, for one thing, our author tells us that this tabernacle had various sections to it. When a worshipper would come into this tabernacle with a sacrifice, he would have to go into, first of all, this outer portion called the outer court of the tabernacle. That was as far as he could go. A worshipper could bring an offering a bull or a goat or a bird, depending on whatever the kind of sacrifice he came to offer would be. He would then have to kill the sacrifice himself in the outer courtyard. It gets a little bit graphic. He then had to chop up the sacrifice accordingly and then let the priest do the rest. Which often involved taking a portion of the sacrifice or all of the sacrifice, and then burning it all up on this thing called the brazen altar or the altar of burnt offering that was in this outside, outer court kind of complex. Then towards the back of this tabernacle complex was a smaller tent, which was called the tent of meeting. This tent of meeting this enclosure in the back was divided into two sections, and only the priests of Israel were allowed to enter that tent. Average Joe Israel worshipper couldn't go in it. Only the priests were allowed to go in that tent. So our author and Hebrews tells us that in this first section of the tent, this was known as the Holy Place, there was a lamp stand that was kept burning continually. If you've ever seen a menorah that represents this lamp, stand in the tabernacle, the lampstand was known as a menorah. There was also a golden table which had these 12 loaves of bread on it called show bread that were replaced every Sabbath day. Then in front of the second curtain, so there was another curtain inside, there was an altar known as the Altar of Incense, on which the priests would crush up incense every day, and they burn these incense on this small Altar of Incense. This was located right in front of the second section, which is called the Most Holy Place. You have a Holy Place, and then the second section is called the Most Holy Place. So let's talk about that second section for a moment. Again, after you entered the temple or tabernacle complex, then you walked into the tent of meeting, you'd arrive at the Holy Place. We just talked about that. Then there was a second curtain that opened into this Most Holy Place, and it was in that central most interior room that God's people held it to be the Most Holy Place on Earth. Because that in that Most Holy Place was where God in a sense, dwelled on Earth. Now, the whole tabernacle complex was holy, but as you drew further and further into the tabernacle complex, you get into the courtyard, then the Holy Place, then the Most Holy Place. The idea was that you were drawing closer and closer to the glory and the presence of God. So what was in this Most Holy Place? Well, our author points out, at least one thing. He tells us that this thing called the Ark of the Covenant was in there. Now this Ark of the Covenant was this ornate golden box that contained the two tablets of the Ten Commandments that were given to Moses on Mount Sinai. Then there was a jar of Manna and Aaron's staff that were placed nearby. This Ark of the Covenant also had on it something called the Mercy Seat, which is just a fancy name for the lid of this big thing called the Ark of the Covenant. Then above the ark, there are these two golden cherubim. These images of heavenly creatures who overshadowed the mercy seat and they themselves represented the glory of God looking down upon the people. Now, this is only a short summary of all of the various items that were in the tabernacle and what the tabernacle looked like. And you could go to the Book of Exodus or Leviticus, or to a lesser extent, Numbers and read about all the details that you ever would want to know about tabernacle and tabernacle worship. Bear in mind that there were author gives us these these many details in verses two through five, and we could probably spend an entire sermon just talking about all those details and what everything represented. Our author gives us these details not to just give us some information, right? He does it with a particular purpose in mind. He wants us to see that though the tabernacle and all the furniture in it was arranged with with purpose and meaning and thought in mind. Though, this whole thing was carefully crafted by the best craftsmen in Israel, and it must have been a sight to behold in its own day. Pastor Jacob reminded us that it was a glorious place to be and in fact it was. It was nevertheless limited, incomplete and imperfect in what it could actually do. For as elaborate and ornate and as glorious as it must have been to be in the tabernacle in its own day. There was something about it that was always wanting. Over in San Jose, California, there's a historic landmark known as the Winchester Mystery House. It's this massive mansion that's about twenty-four thousand square feet. One hundred and sixty rooms, ten thousand windows, forty-seven staircases and six kitchens. Now, as the story goes, Sarah Winchester, whose husband was the owner of the Winchester Repeating Arms Co. They made the Winchester rifles. She tragically lost, in a short span of time, both her husband and her infant daughter to various diseases. So widowed and alone and severely depressed, Sarah Winchester moved from her home in New England to California. At some point along the way, she became convinced that her family was cursed by the people who had fallen dead to the Winchester rifle, and that the only way to find relief from this supposed curse was to continually nonstop build a house. And so in 1884, Sarah Winchester purchased this very small farmhouse, and between the years of 1884 and until her death in 1922, this farmhouse was subject to round the clock construction. As Sarah frantically sought to expand the house to what it is today. She spared no expense in the process. Now, if you were to visit the Winchester mystery house in its own day, I would imagine that you would probably encounter a beautiful, though still unfinished building. Although it probably looked majestic during its expansion. You nevertheless be faced with the fact that it was still incomplete. Regardless of how well it looked, there always seemed to be no end to the constant work and construction and expansion that was directed by Sarah Winchester. Now, well, the tabernacle never underwent endless construction like the Winchester house. Worshippers nevertheless still had to face a similar reality to the one that onlookers and visitors to the Winchester house had to face in its own day. And that is, it was incomplete. In one sense, the construction of the tabernacle may have been done, but the tabernacle itself could never achieve what it pointed towards. It may have looked beautiful. It may have been this glorious place where God's presence dwelled, but its outward appearance couldn't make up for the fact that it was only provisional and limited, imperfect and incomplete, and it would never see the end to which it looked. Just as this earthly place of holiness was limited, provisional, so too the holy regulations that governed what happened inside were likewise limited and incomplete. Notice that when we proceed in our passage to verses six through 10, our author tells us how the priests of Israel ministered inside the tabernacle. So we hear a lot about the furniture and the construction and verses two through five. And now we learned what happened inside the tabernacle. Our author tells us a few things. First, he tells us that it was the priest's job, like we already said, to enter into this first section of the tabernacle regularly, what we call the Holy Place, to perform their ritual duties. Now, these duties would have included things like trimming the lamps on the menorah, which was constantly lit up. It would have included crushing incense and burning incense, always at the altar of incense, Among other duties that they had to perform. While these priests had the weighty job of drawing near to God, of drawing into the Holy Place, it was only the job of the High Priest, one select priests out of all the priests, who got to go into the Most Holy Place once a year and have as close to direct access to God as one could ever hope to have under the old covenant. On the so-called Annual Day of Atonement and this is described for us in Leviticus 16, the High Priest got to draw near to God in the Most Holy Place. To do so required quite an ordeal to unfold. First, the high priest before he would enter in, he had to dress himself in pure white linen. A special vestments had to be procured and put on. Then after clothing himself accordingly, the high priest had to go outside. He had to slaughter a bull and then come into the Most Holy Place with the blood of a bull and was required to sprinkle it on the mercy seat, the mercy seat being that lid of the Ark of the Covenant that we already mentioned. In doing that, he would take care of his own sins and the sin of his family. But all wasn't done because remember, a priest was supposed to represent the nation of Israel. The high priest supremely so. So after atoning making up for his sins and the sins of his family, he then had to go out to the courtyard and he had to get a goat this time. Slaughter a goat, bring the blood of the goat in in order to deal with the sins of the people of Israel, those he represented. Now you only need to read a few chapters in the Book of Leviticus to know that this day, in particular, the Day of Atonement and tabernacle worship in general was a bloody affair. If you're the kind of person who gets queasy at the sight or thought of blood, I apologize. I do too just ask my wife. But the whole system revolved around the offering of blood in order to take care of the sins of our people. Notice that in our passage our author reminds us that when the High Priest went in to the Most Holy Place, he did so not without taking blood. Blood was central to these offerings because blood was seen as representing the life of an animal or person. And so when you offered the blood of an animal, you are offering life in your place. Because the wages of sin is death. Understand that sin is so serious, even one sin is such an affront against a holy and eternally Holy God, that life has to be taken. Blood has to be spilled in order to pay the debt that our sin incurs. In a sacrificial system, this is what you'd be reminded of over and over again. You'd be reminded every day about the seriousness of sin and about how costly rebellion against a Holy God really is. One the things we should take away from this curious study of the tabernacle is exactly that. That sin is serious and sin, brothers and sisters is quite costly. I can recall the first time in my life. Unfortunately, the only time up until now in my life where I got into a car accident. When I was in high school, I was driving through a parking lot and upon turning down one of the rows, I took to turn a little bit too tightly and ended up clipping the front end of a car with my parents minivan that I was driving. Apparently, I took the turn too tightly and in the aftermath I was quite embarrassed by it all. I was afraid of the consequences of my parents, but other than that, I didn't think too much about the fender bender, because outside of a few dents and scratches, the minivan seemed OK. It was still running fine, so no harm, no foul. But a week or two later, after the minivan got repaired, my dad reported to me the damage that was incurred to the minivan. Fortunately, insurance covered it, but he told us that he told me that the insurance claim was as far as I can recall, it's been a while, several thousand dollars. At the time that was shocking to hear because it just didn't look that bad. As a naive high schooler who admittedly had no conception for what things cost, it took me quite by surprise to hear that dents and scratches and bodywork could cost that much. It took that event for me to come to terms with just how costly it can be to scratch up your vehicle a little bit. It might not look that bad on the surface of things, but the cost can be quite steep. In the same way, friends, we often just don't get the costliness of our own sin. The only reason that such a pervasive belief exists even among Evangelicals, that there are many paths to God and that God accepts a variety of worship is because the need for holiness isn't held in as high regard as it needs to be.God just isn't elevated in our thoughts or affections as the one who is utterly holy, and we don't view ourselves very often through the lens in which the Bible sees us, as utterly unholy in our human nature. The only reason that belief that I mentioned at the outset, the only reason that gains a foothold in the world and in the church is because we have a severely distorted view of holiness. But even if you're on the right side of orthodoxy on that issue and you're part of the apparently 40 percent of evangelicals who rightly confess that the only way to God is through Jesus Christ and him alone. Well, we too, can sometimes carry a functionally naive view of our sin. After all, how often do we see ourselves completely justified and unstained in the midst of conflict? Or how long do we harbor grudges and bitterness when somebody sins against us in the most minor of ways? Or how many times do we relativize our sin to comfort ourselves in view of the apparent graver infractions of others? Friends, we need to understand that even the smallest sin is rebellion against God and his law, and even the smallest sin requires that blood be spilled and that life be paid to shield us from the righteous wrath of God. Do you understand that? Do you get that? And if you're a Christian, do you grieve your sin accordingly? Or are you humble when your church family graciously calls you to confession? And more importantly, are you looking to Jesus every single day as the only solution to your sin problem? And if you're not a Christian, if you don't even consider yourself a Christian, know that you have a serious holiness problem. God is more holy than you ever dared imagine, and you are less holy and less well off than you imagine that you are. The only solution, the only solution to our holiness problem and the only way any of us could draw near and stand in the presence of a Holy God is through a priestly representative who himself is the perfection of holiness. Access Through the Holy One This leads to our second point where we discover that though our sin makes access to God into Holy Places, tenuous at best. Through the Holy One of Israel, the doors to God's throne of Grace have been swung wide open for you and me. So second point, access through the Holy One. Know again, there were a couple of big issues with the tabernacle in the old covenant. For one thing, access we already mentioned this, was extremely limited. Remember only the High Priest and only at that once a year got to enter into the Most Holy Place. Another issue was that the entire sacrificial system couldn't, as our author tells us, quote, perfect the conscience of the worshipper. These sacrificial offerings may have been able to deal with external issues and ceremonial issues, but they couldn't get at the sin issue that's lodged deep in the human heart. But when the Holy One of Israel, Jesus Christ, our Lord came into the world as our better high priest. When he lived as an unstained priestly representative on our behalf and then died as a perfect and final bloody sacrifice for sin. What we learn in our text and Hebrews returns to this theme a number of times, that when that happened, Jesus entered in to the real heavenly tabernacle so that as a holy cleansed people, we could follow in his train. Down in the swamps of Central Florida lies what many people would believe to be the happiest place on Earth, Walt Disney World. At one of the parks in Disney World Epcot Center, you can immerse yourself if you so choose in the culture of a variety of different nations. You see at Epcot, there's this large lake, and around this large lake are 11 pavilions, which feature 11 different nations. The architecture of each of these pavilions is designed to reflect the respective nation they represent, as well as the food they serve and the items they sell. It's supposed to be this cross-cultural experience in the heart of Central Florida. So take France, for example, if you spent some time at Epcot Center and in the French Pavilion at Epcot, you could feast on authentic French pastries. I think they call them patisserie in French. You could speak with employees in French, even if your French is broken and they'll happily converse with you rather than rolling their eyes at you like a Frenchman did to me once in Paris, but that's another story. There's even a miniature Eiffel Tower at the French Pavilion in Epcot, too. Despite journeying to the French Pavilion at Epcot, you can't say you've been to France because it's not the real thing. It may have the look and feel of authentic French culture. People might speak the French language, but you'd be fooling yourself if when you return you said, I have been to France, because the pavilion is only an imperfect replica of the real thing. This is what the tabernacle of the old covenant was. We've already said that it was imperfect, it was incomplete, but in saying that, bear in mind, it was never going to be complete because it always represented something better. Heaven itself. When Jesus spilled his blood, we learned in Hebrews 9:12, he entered once for all into Holy Places. He didn't enter into the physical tabernacle or the physical temple in Jerusalem. Not at all, he entered into heaven itself, and in doing so, he opened up the way for you and me to truly fellowship with God in the present that no one, not even the high priest of the old covenant, was privy to. Friends, the benefits we receive from Christ's ascension into the better and more perfect tabernacle are benefits found in no other world religion and no other institution on Earth. The Heidelberg Catechism, one reformed confession catechism that we look at from time to time, ask the question at one point, how does Christ's ascension benefit us? It's a good question to ask. What should we gain from Christ ascension? And it answers that question by reminding us that because of Christ ascension, we have three things. We have one someone who advocates for you and me at the father's right hand. Because of Christ ascension two, we have the promise that we one day when we die and finish our sojourn on this Earth we will be taken to heaven too. Then three, because of Christ's ascension, we receive the spirit of the risen and ascended Christ right now, who, according to Heidelberg Catechism, who by whose power we seek, the things that are above where Christ is seated at the right hand of God and not things that are on Earth. So are you doing that right now? Are you seeking the things of heaven and not the things of Earth? Brothers and sisters, because Christ entered into the heavenly tabernacle, we have been granted the spirit of the risen and ascended Christ, who, among other things, directs our gaze heavenward. Who Directs our gaze from thinking about and concerning ourselves from day to night with the things of this Earth and instead directs our gaze to the heavenly places where Christ is seated. Is that where your mind, is that where your heart, is that where your affections are focused as you sojourn in this life under the sun? Ask yourself in relationships with people who you love, who don't know Christ, is it your desire above everything else that they would become citizens of this heavenly kingdom through faith in Christ? Is it your hope above everything else that the Kingdom of God that the will of God would be done on Earth as it is in heaven? And does your speech reflect that in the way you talk about God and in the way you talk about things? Does your schedule reflect that in the way you prioritize things? Or are you really more focused on building and preserving your own kingdom here on Earth? Friends through Christ's ascension into the real deal, the real heavenly tabernacle, we have access to God in the present. Access that no priest under the old covenant administration had. Access to better heavenly food and spiritual gifts and the great hope of one day joining Christ in the heavenly places, too. As our passage prepares to close, we're reminded once again that the only reason at all that we have these benefits in the so-called new covenant, which is where we live in and what we enjoy, is because of the broken body and shed blood of Jesus Christ. Now we've already heard quite a bit about blood in our passage. But the reality is that animal blood could never do anything about the problem of sin. It could purify the flesh as far as externalities were concerned, but it couldn't do anything about the human heart. And yet, Christ's blood does and can. First, we learn that Christ's blood didn't deal with temporary uncleanliness. Remember, the tabernacle blood had to be offered again and again. A worshipper sins, they come into the tabernacle, they offer blood. The next week, they sin, they come into the tabernacle, more blood and on and on and on. But with Christ, our author tells us, when he offered up his own blood, he secured an eternal redemption. This is why Jesus could say on the cross it is finished. No more laboring and never arriving, no more longing and never receiving. In Christ and it's finished and it's finished for good. Christ's blood, we read, redeems us, which means that it frees us from the slavery and bondage of sin. Understand that if you don't know Christ, the Bible tells us that you are not free. The Bible tells us that you are a captive, that you are enslaved by your own sin nature. You're not free in the way you might think. Yet Christ offers for us the perfect price to emancipate all those who find refuge in him from the slavery of guilt and sin, that apart from Christ, holds all of us captive. Then we learn that through the very same blood of Christ, it also purifies our consciences from dead works to serve the living God. Through Christ's blood our hearts are cleansed, our souls are cleansed, all of our spiritual faculties are cleansed whiter than snow. In telling us that Christ purifies our consciences or authors getting something specific here. Understand that in the Bible, the conscience is what gives us our sense of guilt. When we feel guilty about something, it's because our conscience has been pricked. John Owen, for example, notes that when Adam hid from God after he sinned, it was because of his conscience. His conscience produced in him a sense of guilt and shame. And so too, when our consciences are overwhelmed with a sense of guilt of our sin, it's often our tendency, we do this in various ways, to hide from God. Yet through the blood of Christ, our consciences, we hear have been purified such that we have no reason to hide from God. We don't need to hide our sin or try to hide our sin from God as if we ever could. We don't need to be apprehensive about coming to our Heavenly Father. Though we often do and should grieve our sin when we sin, we need not be haunted by the sins of our past. Christ has cleansed our whole being through his blood, including our consciences. As a consequence, we have been not only free to approach God regularly and boldly, approaching, as the author of Hebrews tells us earlier the throne of grace with confidence, but we've also been invited and this is where our passage ends to serve him too. This is the direction this whole passage drives. That having been cleansed, having been redeemed by the blood of Christ, we are urged then to serve the living God. As Christians, we serve God in a number of ways. First and foremost, we serve him in our worship by giving him the praise that he's due. We serve him in the world by bearing witness a salt and light in every opportunity that we're given. We serve him in the church by serving his body. We serve him at our homes by disciplining those in our household. Christ has set us free so that we might boldly do just that. That we might boldly serve him in all of the various ways and opportunities he's given us to do so. That's the call that this passage ends with. Application What should we take away from all this? Well, in conclusion, I just have one thing for us to think through. One thing for us to maybe apply, if you will, and that is be holy. By this, I mean two things. First, be holy positionally. That is if you don't embrace the Holy One of Israel, Jesus Christ as savior and king know once again that you will have no hope to enter the Holy Places where Christ is seated. Unfortunately, one of the typical tropes we hear in our pluralistic culture is that just as there are many ways up a mountain, theoretically, so too there are many ways to God. Yet the Bible tells us that the only way to ascend the mountain, the mountain which belongs to God, is with clean hands and a pure heart. Now, in our human nature, none of us meet those criteria spiritually. All our hands are dirty, and all of our hearts are stained with sin, rotten to the core. But Jesus Christ does meet those criteria. The plea from our passage is that you would therefore know him, that you would identify with him, that you would place your trust in him, and that when you do so that you know that you will be a member of the holy people of God. Who are holy, not because of anything we've done, but only because of Jesus Christ our Lord. Yet the starting point for all of us is to be holy in this positional kind of way through faith in Jesus Christ. The Bible still calls us to be progressively holy, too. After all, Peter tells us, "Just as he who called you as holy, you also be holy in all of your conduct." To be holy simply means to be set apart from that which is common. As it applies to our lives as Christians, holiness calls us to recognize first and foremost where our citizenship lies and to live as citizens of that kingdom during our sojourn on Earth. It's an appeal to learn the language of that kingdom, the customs of that kingdom, to grow in fellowship with the people of that kingdom, and to resist being discipled by the kingdoms of this world. So grow and holiness, because in Christ Jesus, you are already holy. Trust that the Holy One of Israel will welcome you into his holy, heavenly tabernacle through Christ and Christ alone when he calls each of us into our glorious home. Pray with me. Gracious, Heavenly Father, Lord, we are challenged in some ways by this appeal to holiness because we know in our flesh that we often don't live as holy people that we are. And we also take hold of the promise, the promise that through Christ Jesus, we are the holy people of God. Through the Holy One of Israel, we have become positionally holy so that we could draw near to you regularly and boldly and with confidence. Lord, I pray that we would remember that. That we would do that regularly. That we would not shortchange the benefits of the new covenant that are ours in Christ Jesus. That you would help us remember these things by your Spirit as we live, move and have our being. In Christ's name, we pray. Amen.

Unbelievable?
Kristin Kobes Du Mez on masculinity, Mark Driscoll and the future for US evangelicals

Unbelievable?

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 79:08


Kristin Kobes Du Mez is the author of the bestselling book 'Jesus and John Wayne: How white evangelicals corrupted a faith and fractured a nation'. She chats live with Justin about the recent 'Rise and Fall of Mars Hill' podcast, the support Donald Trump received among white evangelicals, the concept of masculinity and the future of Christianity in the USA. For Kristin: https://kristindumez.com/  For exclusive resources and to support us:  • Support (USA): http://www.premierinsight.org/unbelievableshow • Support (rest of the world): https://resources.premier.org.uk/supportunbelievable   • For our newsletter https://www.premier.org.uk/Unbelievablenewsletter   • For our blog: http://www.premierinsight.org/unbelievable-the-blog   • For the podcast: http://www.premierchristianradio.com/Shows/Saturday/Unbelievable  • Facebook https://www.facebook.com/UnbelievableJB   • Twitter https://twitter.com/unbelievablejb   • Insta https://www.instagram.com/justin.brierley  

The Patrick Madrid Show
The Patrick Madrid Show: August 26, 2021 – Hour 2

The Patrick Madrid Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 51:08


Israeli rabbis send letter to Vatican expressing concern over papal remarks Chris – Passage from today’s gospel about the Son not knowing the end of world. Patrick recommends the book, “Theology for Beginners” by Frank Sheed Frank – Can you give me some examples of Evangelicals who can’t find the word ‘imputation’ in the bible […] All show notes at The Patrick Madrid Show: August 26, 2021 – Hour 2 - This podcast produced by Relevant Radio

Holy Conversations: The WCA Podcast
Evangelicals in the British Methodist Church with David Hull

Holy Conversations: The WCA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 38:57


In June of 2021, the Methodist Church in the UK voted to allow same-sex marriages and adopted other sweeping changes in the area of marriage and human sexuality. In this episode Rev. Dr. David Hull, President of Methodist Evangelicals Together, an evangelical renewal group in the Methodist Church, describes the impact of the decision on the "mother Church" of Methodism and how evangelicals in Great Britain are responding. He provides insight and encouragement for Methodists around the world to continue to "spread Scriptural holiness across the land" as some churches and cultures move away from orthodox Christian faith and teaching.  Visit the Methodist Evangelicals Together website. David references Carl Trueman's book The Rise and Triumph of the Modern Self Learn more about the Wesleyan Covenant Association at our website. Send your questions and comments to podcast@wesleyancovenant.org. Follow us on Twitter @WCAPod. Leave us a review on your favorite podcast platform!   

Uncertain
S2: Bonus Responding to Joshua Harris & “The Rise and Fall of Mars Hill” with New Evangelicals and Holy Heretics Podcast

Uncertain

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 65:00


You may have heard about the podcast “The Rise and Fall of Mars Hill”. It's a podcast mini series gaining popularity and it chronicles the story of Mark Driscoll and Mars Hill church. It's a story of systemic spiritual abuse, and I definitely recommend it. However, the bonus episode that came out last week added problematic elements to the conversation, including a misunderstand of the devastation caused by spiritual abuse. Uncertain and a couple other podcasters, Melanie Mudge from the Holy Heretics and Tim Whitaker of The New Evangelicals, decided to record our own bonus episode in response.

Wretched Radio
Proper Hermeneutic’ing and Can There be Unity Between Evangelicals & Catholics?

Wretched Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 54:49


Wretched Radio | Air Date: August 24, 2021 What's the word(s)? Grammatical Historical Hermeneutic Could introducing the idea of a consistent hermeneutic in your church hold things together in a tricky time? Today we have bad hermeneutics and a bad view of the Bible. Evangelicals and Catholics – can there be unity? Wretched Worldview examines […] The post Proper Hermeneutic’ing and Can There be Unity Between Evangelicals & Catholics? appeared first on Wretched.

Straight White American Jesus
Race, Xenophobia, and the History of White Evangelicalism with Randall Balmer

Straight White American Jesus

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 36:49


Dartmouth professor and pre-eminent scholar of Evangelicalism Dr. Randall Balmer returns to talk about his new book, Bad Faith: Race and the Rise of the Religious Right. He and Brad discuss how over the course of the 20th century, race and xenophobia have been the drivers of Evangelical theology and politics. Balmer explains how Evangelicals once invested in social reform, but over the last century have undergone a transformation at the hands of conservative political operatives and fear of ethnic and racial others. Bonus: The open race-baiting of Ronald Reagan's 1980 presidential campaign Bonus: Balmer explains the Abortion Myth and how race, rather than reproductive rights shaped the Religious Right Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Moms in Prayer Podcast
Episode 167 - Travel the World Through Prayer Africa with Martha Barnett

Moms in Prayer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 36:20


“Through Moms in Prayer I have learned to walk in the presence of the Lord, to walk holding on to His promises, and pray His word over my entire family.”  Today Stacy welcomes Martha Barnett, our wonderful Moms in Prayer Ambassador to Africa.   Listen in to this amazing testimony of how the Lord chose Martha and appointed her to bear lasting fruit in her own home, her city, her state, and then around the world!   What the Lord has done through Martha, He can do through you as well.  About our Guest: Martha Barnett serves on the Moms in Prayer Georgia State Team as well as being an Ambassador for Moms in Prayer International to Africa. She is a mom and proud grandma with 8 grandchildren. Martha is delighted to be praying, now, for a second generation of loved ones and their schools. Martha and her husband Ted belong to the Africa Inland Mission organization and currently serve the church in Africa through the Association of Evangelicals in Africa (AEA) which has them traveling several times a year to Africa, as well as working virtually, to connect with African ministry leaders in numerous countries. Martha has the privilege of sharing the ministry of Moms in Prayer and partnering with African Moms in Prayer Leadership for training and encouragement wherever she is on the continent. She is passionate about what God is doing to spread this ministry of hope across the world as more and more women learn about and start Moms in Prayer groups that impact their children and schools for Christ by gathering mothers, grandmothers, and any Christian women to pray. Links: https://momsinprayer.org/who-we-are/global-community/ https://momsinprayer.org/new-to-moms-in-prayer/ https://momsinprayer.org/join-a-group To give to the ministry of Moms in Prayer: Support Our Mission | Moms In Prayer International             Moms in Prayer International- www.MomsInPrayer.org

Gospel Tangents Podcast
Differences between Evangelicals and Protestants? (Part 2 of 5)

Gospel Tangents Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2021 14:00


Mormons, myself included are often clueless, about protestants and evangelicals?  What's the difference?  I asked that question to Steven Pynakker, host of Mormon Book Reviews, and he gives his best answer. GT:  You've got your Catholics. You've got your Protestants. You've got your evangelicals, and I don't really understand what's the difference between a Protestant […] The post Differences between Evangelicals and Protestants? (Part 2 of 5) appeared first on Gospel Tangents.

Daily News Brief
Daily News Brief for Wednesday, August 18, 2021

Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 19:23


COVID is targeting evangelicals?, Russel Moore and Pastor Walter Kim are turning vaccines into a virtue, and the Afghan debacle is just getting worse.  I want to introduce you to a new partnership we have with Redballoon.work: Plug: Redballoon Not so long ago, the American dream was alive and well. Employees who worked hard were rewarded, and employers looked for people who could do the job, not for people who had the right political views. RedBalloon.work is a job site designed to get us back to what made American businesses successful: free speech, hard work, and having fun. If you are a free speech employer who wants to hire employees who focus on their work and not identity politics, then post a job on RedBalloon. If you are an employee who is being censored at work or is being forced to comply with the current zeitgeist, post your resume on RedBalloon and look for a new job. RedBalloon.work, the job site where free speech is still alive! https://redballoon.work/flf/ To use your FLF discount code, please do the following steps: Create an employer account.You get 2 active postings for a month automatically.For more postings or for postings beyond the first month, click on the pricing tab and purchase one of our posting subscriptions.Don't forget to put in discount code FLF2021 before placing the order. Discount codes cannot be applied retroactively. This is why you support CrossPolitic, because of crap like this: Listen to Reverend Walter Kim, President of the National Association of Evangelicals, and serves as Pastor for Leadership for the Trinity Presbyterian Church in Charlottesville, Virginia, as he shares his belief that the COVID-19 vaccines are gifts from God, and that the Christian perspective of “loving thy neighbor” is an important reason to get vaccinated. Roll Clip: https://youtu.be/OKXi7lEwajA In many COVID hot spots, a pattern: High concentrations of white evangelicals As COVID-19 cases surge again, two things are true about many counties considered hot spots: Vaccination rates are low and white evangelical Protestant populations are high, according to a new data analysis. Concern about vaccine hesitancy or outright anti-vaccine sentiment among white evangelicals has persisted since at least March, when, according to a poll from Pew Research Center, those who said they were Christian and born-again were far more likely than any other religious group to say they definitely or probably would not get a vaccine. A full 45% of white evangelicals fit this description. The next-closest religious classification (Americans who list their religious affiliation as “nothing in particular”) was a full 9 points lower at 36%, which was also the national average. Russell Moore, a former Southern Baptist Convention official, told Religion News Service: “Evangelical Christians should be leading the way in thanking God for the cure we spent a year praying for. The least we can do is get our shots so that we can carry on our mission in our communities, without fear of getting anyone sick. Our gospel witness should be contagious; we shouldn't be.” Moore (also) told RNS he has spoken with evangelical doctors “discouraged to the point of exhaustion by the low rates of vaccination among sectors of our fellow Christians,” despite pleading for people to get vaccinated. Victory for Freedom: Unexpected State Declares Churches Will Never Close Again The “Live Free or Die” state struck a blow for religious liberty Tuesday as Republican Gov. Chris Sununu signed a bill designating churches as essential services. The Associated Press reported that HB 542 “allows such religious organizations to operate to the same degree as essential businesses during a state of emergency.” The legislation specifies, “Nothing in this section shall prohibit the state government from requiring religious organizations to comply with neutral health, safety, or occupancy requirements issued by the state or federal government that are applicable to all organizations and businesses that provide essential services.” Why did New Hamshire have to do this? Doesn't the Constitution of the United States already do this? And where do the categorical definitions of essential and non-essential come from? Dallas ISD will continue enforcing mask mandate despite Supreme Court's move against Jenkins' order https://www.dallasnews.com/news/education/2021/08/15/dallas-isd-will-continue-enforcing-mask-mandate/ Dallas ISD will continue to require masks for all students and staff members, despite a decision Sunday by the Texas Supreme Court that temporarily halted Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins' public health order requiring masks in public schools and businesses. “Until there's an official order of the court that applies to the Dallas Independent School District, we will continue to have the mask mandate,” Superintendent Michael Hinojosa said late Sunday. But he said he knows the fight isn't over: “After a court rules, then I will comply, if it's not in my favor.” Rena Honea, the president of teacher union Alliance-AFT Dallas, said her organization would support Hinojosa if he decided to defy Abbott's executive order once again. “Certainly we're disappointed in the ruling, but not surprised,” Honea said. “Obviously, this decision is being made with the health and safety of students and employees in Dallas ISD not considered. We'll support him if he will stay strong and do what's right for these families.” Broward County School Board voted to make masks mandatory in classrooms, in defiance of the governor. https://www.npr.org/sections/coronavirus-live-updates/2021/08/14/1027730035/broward-county-florida-teachers-covid-coronavirus-deaths?utm_campaign=npr&utm_medium=social&utm_term=nprnews&utm_source=facebook.com How are these districts defying governors orders and state Supreme Court orders, and we can't get the church to even meet when there are no orders? New Zealand announces it's locking down the entire country ... over one Covid case https://www.cnn.com/2021/08/17/asia/new-zealand-lockdown-one-case-intl-hnk/index.html?utm_medium=social&utm_term=link&utm_content=2021-08-17T10%3A31%3A05&utm_source=fbCNN&fbclid=IwAR0ckXDxfwmxfQgwaiWoUMgVbuI49xEfjpDGqt_AHrLDRTQ1y2QlSDyP-Lk Fight Laugh Feast Business Network: Folks- I have been thinking about this since we have started CrossPolitic, and I think it is becoming even more relevant, than when I first thought of it in 2016. As Christians, we need to form a business network, a sort of Christian economy. We have made you aware that our friends at the Babylon Bee have been canceled from Mailchimp, our friends at Gab have been canceled by, I think, 5 banks in the last year, and so on. We of course have no problem doing business with unbelievers, but the time has come that we need to be intentional with working with each other. I want to find a Christian owned bank, a Christian server farm, a Christian owned hospital, and so forth. So, we want to create a business directory, which will probably go in our club portal or something along those lines (not quite sure how we want to deliver this directory yet), but go and sign your business up to www.FLFnetwork.com/business. We have over a 100 business already signed up, and can't wait to reach 5000 businesses, 10,000, etc... The "mastermind of the regime change" in Afghanistan is a Taliban commander that Obama traded in 2014 for a U.S. deserter, despite the Pentagon warning he was "too dangerous to release" https://notthebee.com/article/the-mastermind-of-the-regime-change-in-afghanistan-is-a-taliban-commander-that-obama-traded-in-2014-for-a-us-deserter-despite-the-pentagon-warning-he-was-too-dangerous-to-release- Back in 2014, the Obama administration traded five key Taliban members who were being held in Guantanamo for a U.S. soldier named Bowe Bergdahl who had deserted his post and gotten captured by the Taliban in 2009. At the time, people railed against Obama for the stupidity of the decision, saying it was supremely dumb to trade five top enemy soldiers for one AWOL sergeant who had abandoned his duties and his oath. Congressional investigators from the Governmental Accountability Office also determined that the trade was a violation of the law. No matter, though! Obama said the "Taliban 5" would be kept in Qatar, which definitely isn't known as a middleman for various Islamist groups and sympathizers. The "Taliban 5" were quickly back in Afghanistan, where all of them – led by former detainee Khairullah Khairkhwa – just orchestrated the entire takeover of the nation. Our friend, Matt Walsh, tweeted a video out of our State Deparment saying dumb things: Roll Clip: https://twitter.com/MattWalshBlog/status/1427389269170180109 Well Matt Zeller, former Afghan vet and co-founder of No One Left Behind, had this to say about Biden's “press conference” that Knox played on his News Brief yesterday: Make sure you catch the mid-week fix today, as we have guest coming on to talk the Afghan debacle. Closing This is Gabriel Rench with Crosspolitic News. Support Rowdy Christian media by joining our club at fightlaughfeast.com, downloading our App, and head to our annual Fight Laugh Feast Conference next fall. With your partnership, together we will fight outdated and compromised media, engage news and politics with the gospel, and replace lies and darkness with truth and light. Go to fightlaughfeast.com to take all these actions. Have a great day. Lord bless

Public Theologians
Anthea Butler - White Evangelical Racism

Public Theologians

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 48:51


Dr. Anthea Bulter joins the conversation to discuss her latest book White Evangelical Racism: The Politics of Morality in America. Our discussion includes the connections of proto-Evangelicals's theology and lynching, what it means to hide behind theological ideology and why Donald Trump's election was not out of character for religious Americans. Casey and Dr. Bulter also discuss the connections between Billy Graham's anti-communism and Evangelical push-back to civil rights and collective guilt that still goes on today (c.f. CRT, White Fragility discussion) and we explore the racist backlash to Barack Obama. But don't worry, we also discuss what it signaled when candidate Obama threw Rev. Jeremiah Wright under the bus and betrayed the Black church in the process. -------------------- This is also the final episode of season 1 of Public Theologians. It's been a blast and we'll be back with some amazing guests in September! --------------------- Anthea Butler is professor of religion at the University of Pennsylvania and the author of Women in the Church of God in Christ: Making a Sanctified World. A leading historian and public commentator on religion and politics, Butler has appeared on networks including CNN, BBC, and MSNBC and has published opinion pieces in the New York Times, the Washington Post, and many other media outlets. Follow Dr. Butler on Twitter Order White Evangelical Racism -------------------- Mentioned in this Episode: Candidate Barack Obama's denunciation of Rev. Wright 3/18/2008 Rev. Jeremiah Wright's "God damn America" sermon on 9/16/2001 The Southern Rite of Human Sacrifice by Don Matthews Casey's reflection on Kelly Gissendaner's execution from 2015 -------------------- ***Like the show? Rate and review us on Apple Podcasts!!!*** Promo Music by Orbach https://orbach.bandcamp.com/album/orbach Theme Music by Small Fish: https://soundcloud.com/small-fish Support the show: patreon.com/caseyhobbs Follow Casey's work: https://caseyhobbs.com/ https://twitter.com/caseyhobbs --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/publictheologians/support

The 511 News
Chosen Creator Dallas Jenkins: Mormons and Evangelicals Love the Same Jesus

The 511 News

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 28:48


The director of the hit show The Chosen Dallas Jenkins says he will die on the hill that says Mormons worship the same Jesus as you and I.

Crackers and Grape Juice
Episode 318 : Ryan Burge - The Nones, Myths about the Trump Voter, and the Shrinking Silver of Progressive Christianity

Crackers and Grape Juice

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 67:42


This episode has something for everyone. Ryan Burge, the Rainman of religious statistics joins the podcast to talk about the nones, COVID-19 vaccines and masks, and a whole list of things you probably wouldn't want to discuss in mixed company.Ryan Burge is the author of The Nones: Who They Are, Where They Came From, and Where They're Going. He's an American Baptist pastor, a Professor of Political Science at Eastern Illinois University, and rules Twitter with his graphs.

The Gottesdienst Crowd
[Gottesblog] Luecke Contra Baptism — Larry Beane

The Gottesdienst Crowd

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 29:57


Luecke Contra Baptism I would like to thank the Rev. Dr. David S. Luecke for providing a stark contrast between his Church Growth Movement (CGM) approach to liturgy and sacraments vs. what Gottesdienst has been not only advocating, but putting into practice for going on thirty years. His undated piece “Avoid Sacramentalism in Ministry” from his What Happened to our Churches? blog is a case in point. This article is a valuable example of why Gottesdienst exists, and why the work of pastors and the laity in the ongoing restoration of biblical theology and reverence in worship is not only needed, but is making a difference. He begins his piece by pointing out that the local Baptist Moody radio station “dropped broadcasts of the Lutheran hour” because of The Lutheran Hour's emphasis on “Baptism as a key to salvation.” He laments this as a “first-class communications problem,” and the fault for this “error” was “with Lutheran preachers.” He accuses Lutheran pastors of holding to an ex opere operato theology of Holy Baptism divorced from the Word and from the Holy Spirit. Luecke sums up his explanation of how salvation works, that the Holy Spirit works through the Word, and the water merely “visualizes” the Word. He never mentions Jesus or the cross in his mini-presentation of the ordo salutis in his own words. In fact, Dr. Luecke has a strange articulation of his confession of the Holy Trinity: All Protestants affirm the Trinity of Three Persons in One God, a concept very hard to understand. Calvinist focus on the First-Person God the Father. Lutherans emphasize the Second-Person God the Son. God the Spirit has been much neglected mostly because his role as Lord and Giver of church life was not needed when lively church life was heavily institutionalized. The rapidly growing Pentecostal movement of the last 100 years features the Third-Person Spirit. For Paul Christ and the Holy Spirit are inter-changeable. He attributes the same function in one place to Christ and another place to the Spirit. For Paul the Spirit is Christ present with us now [emphasis added]. Dr. Luecke's assertion of Lutheran pastors severing faith from Holy Baptism is a straw man argument. He never sites any source of this apparently rampant false doctrine among Lutheran clergy, in which Baptism is treated as a magic ceremony independent of the Holy Spirit, the Word of God, and presumably, our Lord Jesus Christ who told us to “make disciples” by baptizing them in the first place. And Dr. Luecke blames the Lutherans (Walt Kowalsky was right!) and acts as if being removed from the Moody radio station is a bad thing. In reality, The Lutheran Hour deserves kudos for not being afraid to confess our theology. Were a Baptist to read the Small Catechism's seven questions and answers on the Chief Part of Holy Baptism, he would reject it as false doctrine. I was raised in the Baptist Church. I'm grateful for the biblical instruction that I had as a child, as well as learning who Jesus is and why the cross matters. The people of my little Baptist congregation were confessors of the Gospel. That said, Baptists and Lutherans believe entirely different things about Holy Baptism. Moody's doctrinal statement is utterly silent about the sacraments. Dr. Luecke admits that Baptists reject infant baptism, mirroring their snarky tone about “sprinkling water on a baby” having nothing to do with one's “relationship with God.” Dr. Luecke also uses the curious term “water baptism” - a distinction often used among charismatics to distinguish actual baptism from a laying on of hands that accompanies “speaking in tongues” (which they call “baptism of the Spirit”). As an aside, Dr. Luecke says that he doesn't have the “gift of tongues,” but he recognizes modern glossolalia as valid in a response to a person who claims to “speak in tongues”: I did not intend to belittle something that has been a defining feature for millions of enthusiastic believers. I intended just to say that I have not been given that gift. I am appealing to a much broader audience than those who have had the experience of speaking in tongues. I gave my understanding of it as an emotional expression. Many Lutheran pastors have hostility toward charismatics from the conflicts involving charismatics in congregations in the 60s and 70s. I respect charismatics for their energy. Yours is the first expression of your prayer language being very rational. God bless your gift and the Giver. Moody is also to be commended for their faithfulness to their theology. They recognize what Luecke doesn't want to: that neo-Evangelicals and Lutherans have incompatible theologies of baptism, and of the sacraments in general. Dr. Luecke longs for a kind of faux unity by having The Lutheran Hour either compromise our theology, or dishonestly put it under a bushel. Dr. Luecke recognizes the inroads of the liturgical renewal that began in the middle of the twentieth century, as North American Lutherans began to dig out of the Pietist hole that their forbears, trying to fit in with a contemporary Protestant culture, fell into decades earlier - a cultural upheaval when the English language displaced the German during and after World War One. He describes his discomfort with “young pastors” and their “tendency toward sacramentalism” - which he defines as “treating the sacraments as more important than the Word.” Again, this is a straw man. The problem is actually the opposite of Dr. Luecke's complaint. While it is still not uncommon for a Lutheran congregation to have a Service of the Word without Holy Communion, I have never heard of a Service of the Sacrament without the Word. Can Dr. Luecke point to a single example of a Lutheran Divine Service that skips the Bible readings, omits the sermon, and heads right into the Eucharist? But we do see, again and again, especially in non-liturgical “church growth” congregations, the omission of the Sacrament rather than the omission of the Word. In some cases, non-liturgical churches boast about their “seeker sensitive” approach that pushes the Sacrament of the Altar to the fringes, perhaps only celebrating it once a month. I cannot imagine how malnourishing such a bland diet would be. It is a repudiation of our confession that Holy Communion strengthens our faith. And this is why Christians from time immemorial gathered on the Lord's Day for the “breaking of bread” - that is until men of Dr. Luecke's generation and inclination decided that what we needed was less Holy Communion. As to the accusation of “treating the sacraments as more important than the Word,” Gottesdienst's print journal is immersed in the Word of God. I've been the sermons editor for more than a decade. Every issue includes sermons. We insist that preaching be bound by, and centered on, the biblical text, the Word of God, as opposed to anecdotes, cutesy stories, emotional glurge, object lessons, or pop culture commentary. We also have regular columns devoted to the exegesis of Scripture. I have been to many Divine Services and other prayer offices at Gottesdienst events. The Word is always powerfully preached and proclaimed. I have never seen Dr. Luecke in attendance at any of them. This is a common straw man among our critics, that we - as I heard recently - pay more attention to “the proper form of a stole to proclaiming the pure Gospel” - and that this explains the decline of Christianity in our country, in the west, and around the world. This mirrors Dr. Luecke's Theology of Glory, in which he asserts that the number of the butts in the pews is in direct proportion to the faithfulness of the preacher and the correctness of the church's method of worship. The fact of the matter is that the editors and bloggers of Gottesdienst are parish pastors, some having been for decades - not primarily professors, experts in industrial organization, bureaucrats, theorists, academicians, or consultants about how to grow a church. And in the course of years of actual parish ministry, one sees the power of the Word of God, through preaching, through Baptism and the Lord's Supper, through Confession and Absolution, through praying the Psalms, through the liturgy, on deathbeds, in times of personal and family angst, in tragedy, in bringing Christ to bear in the midst of the Culture of Death and a world that is repulsed by the cross. Actual parish pastors baptize the babies - sometimes with an eye dropper. They also bury the babies and console the grieving parents who are comforted by our emphasis on baptism. They also baptize adults, and in some cases, the elderly. They teach the Word in Bible classes, in youth catechesis, and in sermons - week in and week out. They bring both Word and Sacrament to shut-ins and to the hospitalized. They proclaim the Word of God as their parishioners breathe out their final breath on this side of the grave. And in fact, we are so focused on the Word of God, we use the traditional liturgy! Your Lutheran Service Book (LSB) has the biblical references embedded in the liturgy on every page. The Church has used the liturgy for well over 1,500 years precisely because the liturgy is grounded in the living Word of God. In fact, the deviants from the liturgy are those who move away from the Word into the realm of either reason (as many of the Reformed do), emotion (as many neo-Evangelicals do), phony signs and wonders (as many Pentecostals and Charismatics do), or magisterial mysticism (as many Roman Catholics do). Dr. Luecke suffers from the Grass Is Always Greener syndrome - as do many cradle Lutherans who take their treasure for granted. As a convert, I see the futility of lusting after popularity by adopting worship alien to our confessions. I have been there, and done that - with all of its strengths and weaknesses. The reality is that we have the best of both worlds in our Lutheran confession: a rigorous cruciform theology informed not by direct revelation, the magisterium, or by a complex matrix of popes and councils, not by logic and reason, not by ginned up emotion and navel-gazing, but by the Word of God, sola scriptura. And we retain the biblical practice of baptismal regeneration and of the Lord's own words concerning His Supper (as the great I AM proclaims the great THIS IS), as well as retaining the biblical practice of Holy Absolution according to our Lord's institution. Dr. Luecke presents a false either/or dichotomy that offers us only option A) The Word or option B) the sacraments, without an option C) all of the above. And in fact, the real, fully-lived Christian life is not a multiple choice quiz, but rather an essay, a narrative, that is, the Gospel of Jesus Christ: His incarnation, birth, ministry, passion, death, resurrection, ascension, and the consummation of His coming again in glory. I would agree with Dr. Luecke if his critique were a caution against the danger falling into ex opere operato (seeing baptism and all other liturgical acts as a work severed from faith). For this warning is strewn about the Book of Concord. It is one of the chief criticisms of Rome. And where I see it is in the good intention of grandparents whose faithless children will not baptize or raise their own children in the faith. And so pious grandparents, lovingly desperate for the salvation of their grandchildren, will sometimes inquire about bringing their grandchildren to church to baptize them independent of the parents' wishes or intention to raise them as Christians. Sometimes grandparents will ask about doing a sort-of secret emergency baptism themselves (a situation so common that an episode of All in the Family depicted Archie Bunker doing this very thing). Their motivation is love. But we have to gently remind them that baptism is not a silver bullet, that faith matters, that like a seed that is watered, the ongoing life of the seedling requires ongoing care lest it die. Those with any time in the pastoral office has had to encounter this real-world situation. But Dr. Luecke is instead condemning those who worship by means of the liturgy, in “traditional churches,” and especially in “highly liturgical churches” and their pastors who emphasize Holy Baptism in the life of the Christian. Dr. Luecke refers back to Dr. Luther's famous dictum that when he was tormented by the devil, he would made the good confession: “I am baptized.” Dr. Luecke cautions, “This can be taken to mean he relied on the act of water baptism for his identity as a believer.” This shows that Dr. Luecke doesn't understand the Lutheran confession of Holy Baptism. Baptism is our identity as a believer. It is how disciples are made. It is the objective declaration of God of His objective work of regeneration. Otherwise, Dr. Luther would not refer back to it, but would rather exclaim, “I have faith.” The problem is that faith is subjective. It is impossible to quantify. Holy Baptism is objective. It is binary: you either are, or you are not. And Holy Baptism delivers faith. Nowhere in the Scriptures are we taught to sever the two, nor are we to treat baptism as a mere human act publicly acknowledging our faith (as is the Baptist confession). Rather, we confess baptism as “the washing of rebirth and renewal by the Holy Spirit.” To be baptized is to be born again. And in our first birth, we draw our first breath in the world. In our second birth, we draw our first breath in eternity. How can a Lutheran remove baptism from his identity? Baptism and faith are intertwined, but it is baptism that is the objective, extra nos reality to which a person whose faith may be tried and frayed can point. And that reality delivers faith as a gift. The remembrance of baptism strengthens our faith. Faith is not substitute for baptism. This is a theology alien to our Lutheran confession. I remember listening to the radio on a long drive across the entire state of Pennsylvania and the only thing I could pick up was a religious station. A Baptist pastor was preaching a thunderous fire-and-brimstone sermon, but at one point in his preaching, he broke down in tears. He could not determine if his faith were sufficient. He was broken and demoralized, and had no objective means of faith, nothing outside of himself and his own sinful works to which to anchor himself. This is the crabgrass that Dr. Luecke is peering at over the fence, convincing himself that it is greener. And it is, like the “sign” of “speaking in tongues,” a navel-gazing subjective self-validation of one's salvation as opposed to the objective, divinely-focused nature of Holy Baptism as a reality of the New Birth in a Christian's life. Dr. Luecke criticizes the mid twentieth century rediscovery of the liturgy as a blessing to the faith and life of the individual Christian and of the Church, as a “wrong turn.” He creates another straw man that emphasizing “renewing the forms and rituals of public worship” is antithetical to “the Word of God itself” and to “relationships.” This is not only factually untrue, it is a weird display of mental gymnastics. For ritual doesn't take away from relationships. In fact, all forms of relationships involve ritual. For example, I don't know if Dr. Lueke is married or not, but if so, I would be willing to wager that this entrance into a sacred relationship with his wife was accompanied by ritual, and it was probably quite traditional. She probably wore a wedding dress as opposed to a pair of blue jeans. Likewise, he was probably wearing, if not a tuxedo, some form of suit and tie (a form of male vesture dating back to the Pagan French Revolution). The wedding service was likely liturgical, as opposed to being ex corde. Interestingly, in my experience, weddings are an example in which Baptists actually follow a more liturgical form than the usual loosely-liturgical Sunday service. Words are read out of the book, and the couple and the pastor engage in a formal rote recitation. And likewise, married- and family-life involves a lot of rituals. I don't know if Dr. Luecke has children or not, but if so, I would bet that every year on the natal anniversary of his wife and children, the family would gather for a liturgy of sorts, a ritual involving a special meal, candles, and the singing of a particular traditional song. And far from standing in opposition to the idea of relationship, such rituals are like glue that bonds relationships. I wonder what Dr. Lueke thinks of the traditional ritual of celebrating one's baptismal birthday with the lighting of a candle and saying certain prayers. And of course, there are many social liturgies, like the Pledge of Allegiance and the National Anthem, fireworks on the fourth, handshakes, retirement dinners, clinking glasses together in a toast, the seventh-inning stretch, the starting pistol at the beginning of the race, clapping at the conclusion of a recital, eating popcorn at the movie theater, etc. All of these rituals foster relationships. They do not impede them. In the Church, we often refer to the Lord's Supper as “Holy Communion.” It is a “communion,” a ritual act of relationship between believers and God as well as believers to each other. How liturgy is seen in opposition to such relationships beggars belief. Nearly every act of human relationship involves rituals, formal and informal. Social iconoclasm leads only to the breakdown of civilization and the destruction of the faith - not to mention a destruction of relationships through deracination and atomization, creating a vacuum to be filled with a selfish desire for personal entertainment and the treating of “butts in the pews” as an impersonal, ego-driven barometer of faith and faithfulness. Dr. Luecke displays a shocking ignorance of history and of the Bible itself by arguing that “the roots” of our liturgical rituals: go back to the fourth century when the now-official Christian church began adopting special rituals, robes, and parades with incense of pagan worship. Pagan worship was meant to impress the gods, so they would look favorably on human efforts. Quality was important for that purpose. Emphasizing those rituals led to the sacramentalism that forms were more important than the Word of God itself. And herein lies the heart of the matter of Dr. Luecke's iconoclastic rebellion against the liturgy and the sacraments - and to be blunt, his rebellion against the Word of God itself. While some of our specific clerical vestments have their roots in the Greco-Roman world of our Lord, the apostles, and the Pagan (and later Christian) Roman Empire, the idea of liturgical vestments when ministering in the presence of God is an Old Testament idea. That which Dr. Luecke dismissively calls “robes” and other liturgical accoutrements are, per his argument, of Pagan origin to “impress the gods.” If Dr. Luecke were to read Exodus and Leviticus, he would learn what God's preferences are. When He appeared to Moses in the burning bush, God instructed Moses to remove his sandals, as this was a place of holiness - set apart from the ordinary because of the miraculous presence of God. He did not tell Moses “come as you are” or champion casualness as a virtue in the presence of God. And our Lutheran confession of the Lord's Supper is that it is a miracle, that Jesus is truly present in an incarnate, physical form occupying space and time. It is His same body born of the Virgin Mary, the same blood shed on the cross. It is not a symbol. It is not a “spiritual presence.” It is a miraculous manifestation of God in our midst: God in our sanctuary, God on our altar, God given to us to eat and drink and take into ourselves bodily, according to His Word and institution. This is why our churches are called “sanctuaries” - holy places - no less holy than the Holy of Holies in the tabernacle and temple. Why we would treat this most sublime gift and reality with anything less than complete awe and wonder and reverence can only be described by one word: disbelief. When the time came for the Lord to dwell among His people by means of His miraculous presence, the Lord Himself instructed that a beautiful tabernacle be constructed, with specific instructions for top quality items of beauty to be used in a liturgical setting. The priests were to be vested as they carried out their ministry, with fine linen, gems, and colorful cloth of superlative workmanship. God's house was to be adorned in the finest of silver and gold and other metals, with beautiful fabrics and artwork. And there are also liturgical instructions regarding ordinations, daily and weekly worship, and an annual calendric cycle. And it is impossible to read the Lord's worship preferences and not come away convinced that God prefers liturgy, ritual, beauty, reverence, and yes, “quality” when it comes to His presence on earth. There are no examples in Scripture of the miraculous presence of God being accompanied by come-as-you-are casualness and an entertainment emphasis. And there was also incense. Incense is a powerful image, the use of which is mandated in Old Testament worship, is referred to in Psalm 141 as symbolic of prayer, was presented to our Lord by the Magi, was part of our Lord's ritual of His burial, and is also mentioned numerous times in the Book of Revelation. Incense is not of Pagan origin, but Pagans copied it from the worship of the true God. The words “incense” and “frankincense” appear 110 times in the ESV translation, including both God's delight in it, as well as his condemnation of it being offered to false gods, or even to Himself by those who were not called to lead worship. Dr. Luecke's brand of de-emphasis of baptism, his anticlericalism and his innovationism is the real problem in the Church. It must be stamped out by constant and consistent catechesis (including by the teaching that happens by means of ceremonies), by a renewed biblical literacy, by a rediscovery of our Book of Concord and our Church History, by liturgical preaching, by embracing not American sectarianism but our Evangelical Catholic confession of the traditional, unchanging, apostolic faith, and by rejecting the idea that popularity is what determines righteousness. This latter one is the rotten fruits of the Church Growth Movement's libido numerandi and lusting after the ego-stroke of big churches and big budgets. Can you imagine if we raised our children to cultivate a desire to be popular? Would we advise our sons to do drugs? Would we advise our daughters to be promiscuous? Why do CGM advocates embrace worldly popularity as a gage of “church success.” Have they not read our Lord's words? Enter by the narrow gate. For the gate is wide and the way is easy that leads to destruction, and those who enter by it are many. For the gate is narrow and the way is hard that leads to life, and those who find it are few. These two verses are a repudiation of Dr. Luecke's entire career as a CGM advocate. I would posit that if he has baptized one baby in the course of his ministry, he has done more good for the growth of the kingdom than his entire corpus of books and articles. And when our Lord returns to this decimated, fallen world finding only a remnant of believers, He will not scold us for not being worldly enough, with our churches being too small, with not enough butts in the pews - but will commend His Bride for her faithfulness to His Word, promise, and command: Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you. And behold, I am with you always, to the end of the age.

OnScript
Bruce Hindmarsh – The Spirit of Evangelicalism

OnScript

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 64:41


This episode is designed to help Evangelicals, especially North American Evangelicals, to get out of their own heads. Bruce Hindmarsh traces the contours of early Evangelicalism as it emerged in Britain and America, and discusses how that historical perspective on Evangelicalism's "spirit" can help shape our interpretation of this present moment. The post Bruce Hindmarsh – The Spirit of Evangelicalism first appeared on OnScript.

Mea Culpa with Michael Cohen
Nancy Pelosi Bends Over Kevin McCarthy…Tells Jim Jordan to F@ck-Off + A Conversation with John Fugelsang

Mea Culpa with Michael Cohen

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 96:48


In a remarkable set of events, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi rejected two of the six representatives chosen by House Minority leader Kevin McCarthy to sit on the January 6th Commission. McCarthy chose Ohio Rep, Jacketless Gym Jordan who not only voted to overturn the election AFTER the insurrection but has repeatedly made up insane shit about the FBI being responsible for the riot. While Rep Indiana Rep Jim Banks, another MAGA blowhard has spent his time asking why Pelosi didn't do a better job of protecting the capital. This is akin to putting people who believe 9/11 was an inside job on that commission. Complete and total idiocy. Well, Pelosi kicked them all in the ass and now they got nothing. Later, SiriusXM's John Fugelsang joins Mea Culpa to discuss the creepiness of Jim Jordan and why the Evangelicals still love Trump.