Podcast appearances and mentions of William Bradford

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Best podcasts about William Bradford

Latest podcast episodes about William Bradford

Presidencies of the United States
SATT 005 – William Bradford

Presidencies of the United States

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 67:45


Tenure of Office: January 27, 1794 – August 23, 1795 Though William Bradford wasn't Attorney General for long, he did have an impact on some key events in the Washington administration. With my special guest for this episode, we examine his life and career to understand what sort of a legacy Bradford left. Thanks so … Continue reading SATT 005 – William Bradford →

How To Love Lit Podcast
The Iroquois Constitution - An Important Part of the American Political Tradition!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 39:18


The Iroquois Constitution - An Important Part of the American Political Tradition!   Hi, I'm Christy Shriver and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    And I'm Garry Shriver, and this is the How to Love Lit Podcast.   If you are listening to this in real time, it is the first week of December.  The Christmas season is descending on Memphis and that means lots of decorations, and festivities and parties- so fun.  Last night we were at a “friendsgiving”-     A friendsgiving is a new word I had never heard of before.     I think it's been around for awhile.    I'm pretty sure the first time I heard of it really is when the girls started having them with friends.  Lizzy would have them with her friends back when she was still in high school, most of the time the day after thanksgiving, they'd have a meal- kind of like we'd had as a family- they'd cook.  And then, when Anna was in college, she hosted an enormous one, actually bigger than our family one.  Over 40 college kids all sitting around eating turkey and what not before they would go home to celebrate Thanksgiving with their families.   I'll post a picture on Instagram.  Anna couldn't get all of the crowd in a single picture because they were spread all over her house, but you can get the idea.     And of course, Thanksgiving is a very American thing, indigenous to this hodgepodge which is culture in America which has pulled from so many other and older cultures from all over the world.  As a national holiday, Thanksgiving didn't exist until 1863 when Abraham Lincoln proclaimed that a national Thanksgiving day would be held each November.  But the holiday has its roots in the early days when the Europeans first arrived on the American continent, starving and suffering from scurvy.  They were helped by indigenous people who taught them how to cultivate corn and other techniques that would enable them to survive in this foreign howling wilderness.  Those original settlers formed an alliance with the Wampanoag tribe that would last over fifty years, and unfortunately although it is one of few examples of harmony between Europeans and the indigenous peoples of the America, it IS one example of harmony.  After the first harvest for those early pilgrims, William Bradford their governor invited their new indigenous friends for a festival that would last for three days in which they celebrated together.  The official Pilgrim chronicler wrote these words, “Our harvest being gotten in, our governor sent four men on fowling, that we might, after a special manner rejoice together, after we had gathered the fruits of our labors; they four in one day killed as much fowl, as with a little help besides, served the company almost a week, at which time amongst other recreations, we exercised our arms, many of the Indians coming amongst us, and amongst the rest their greatest king Massasoit, with some ninety men, whom for three days we entertained and feasted.”    Well, there you go- the original thanksgiving was actually a friendsgiving…which brings us to this time between Thanksgiving and Christmas. Garry and I are Christians, so as the year comes to a close, we turn our thoughts towards Christmas, as a sacred holiday celebrating Christ, but also all of the fun that goes with that. We love it- lots of decorations, parties, food, and music- this idea of peace on earth and good tidings for all people.  But, Christians, obviously are not the only people to seek peace, or even celebrate the end of the year with festivities-  all peoples of all nations do that in various ways.  And on this American continent, in the cultures that existed here long before the pilgrims had their friendsgiving with the Wampanoag people, there was a very influential hero who contributed greatly to bringing peace to thousands of indigenous people of this continent and who likely influenced the peacekeeping instrument that still binds Americans together, the American constitution.    And in case you haven't figured out who we are talking about, or are unfamiliar with this name, today we have decided to take a minute to look at the Iroquois confederation, the notable creators of the document today we call the Iroquois constitution and their mythical peacemaker, Dekanawidah.      Dekanawidah was so revered man during his lifetime that most of his tribesman did not even utter his name, instead choosing only to call him The Peacemaker.  His story is mythical and has left a strong legacy in the area that today is upstate New York and lower Canada.      The land of the Iroquois confederacy, generally speaking, includes the area to the South of Lake Ontario and to the east of Lake Erie.  Because these people recorded history through oral traditions instead of written ones, the dates are difficult for us to really pinpoint.  The Peacemaker likely dates back to the 12th century.     That is much earlier than where our English literature textbooks start, obviously, since English wasn't spoken by indigenous peoples.  Interestingly enough, though, the first piece of literature included in the American literature textbook is one of the the Iroquois people, that confederation of six tribal nations and the document included in our textbook is the Iroquois Constitution.  I will admit, however, that there is not much by way of explanation, and many years, if not most years, I just skip over it, not trying to be disrespectful, but because I just don't know enough about it.  Much of the discussion stems around wanting to discuss and debate as to whether the Iroquois constitution influenced the American constitution, and how much credit should be given to this document.  I never felt qualified to speak to that, so I just left it alone, until now.  Today, we will read the exert of the Iroquois Constitution, talk a little bit about the text itself, explore the symbolism that has left its mark on modern American culture and maybe even come up with the answer to that question- does the American constitution  owe a debt to the Iroquois Constitution?      Ha!  That is a terribly loaded question, and not as simple to answer as you might think- as all true history tends to be.  The Congress of the United States says yes, we know that for sure.  In October of 1988 a concurrent resolution passed acknowledging the contribution of the Iroquois confederacy to the formation and development of the United States, but of course, Congress is not a historical body, it's a political one, so that answer is not a historical answer but a political one.  Historians are not so quick to agree on that answer.  History, for those of us who are honest, is complicated.  It's messy and sometimes we can't even really know for sure the details surrounding the creation of anything- things are so inter-tangled.  To illustrate what I mean we need to look no further than the very word Iroquois.  Who are the Iroquois?  Well, they weren't Iroquois- at least not to them?  That is not an indigenous word at all- the people of Dekanawida were known and are still known as the Haudenosaunee- or the people of the long house.  The document you are referring to is call Gayanesshagowa, or the great law of peace.  It, in its entirety exists only in the Iroquois oral tradition and even though it is still maintained and recited to this day, we would probably not like to read it on the podcast for the simple reason that it takes seven or eight days to recite fully.  It was recorded on wampum belts through wampum symbols that conveyed its meaning.  Hundreds of years after it was created it was translated into English.  The written version was divided into 117 articles.      Oh my, the selection in our textbook is about a page long and written on paper.       Whether or not the Iroquois constitution influenced the US constitution, although interesting, for my money is not the most interesting and important reason to read and think about it.  The Iroquois confederacy and its constitution is important and distinctive in its own right as a political document.  And this is what I want to highlight, like we said, the Iroquois constitution predates the advent of Europeans to the American continent perhaps by several hundred years.  What that means is that the Iroquois can lay claim to the first constitutional system in this area that today we refer to as the United States of America.  The confederacy of the five and then six nations which we are getting ready to discuss is important and stands alone in its importance for being one of the longest surviving documented confederated governments on planet earth.  For those of us interested in history and politics- that is an incredible distinctive.  It is an amazing document for another reason.  At this same time in Europe we are seeing indigenous peoples of Europe formulate similar documents regarding powersharing starting with the magna carta.  The indigenous people here in this continent, with no connection, and doing the same thing at roughly the same time.    One question that historians often discuss is how societies transitioned from pre-political societies to the emergence of states as we know them today.  The Iroquois confederation provides a documented example of how this transition has occurred and may have occurred in similar fashions all over planet earth.       Okay, gotcha- of course, the culture of the Haudenosaunee or Iroquois people is unique and something I actually remember studying as a child at Tayac Elementary school in Prince George's Country, Maryland in the second grade.      Really, before you moved to Brazil, what do you remember?    Well, the main thing I remember are the long houses.  I think we may have even made some in art class.  If you've never heard of long houses, they were these wooden structures where people lived by extended family.  They could be two hundred feet long, were partitioned off by family unit, but had multiple fireplaces where families could gather.  I just remember thinking how fun that sounded.  Interestingly enough, and this is really an aside, my dad and stepmother, Barbara,  have actually slept in a long house.      Where?  For fun?    No, not for fun, they were doing some missionary work with an indigenous people in Malaysia.  And in Malaysia, there are still indigenous people today who live communally in long houses.    That's incredible.  It's also interesting that that is one of the things you remember from your early school days?  Did your teacher back then tell you the Iroquois were matriarchal- or run by women- I'm pretty sure you would have hung on to that bit of trivia- In that culture when a man married he left his father's home and joined the long house of his wife which was run by a senior female.     Gosh.  I don't remember that.  I bet it was a concealed fact! Ha!    I DO remember the images of those long houses.       Well, the long houses of the Iroquois were under the supervision of the senior matron.  In Iroquios society, the division of labor was also gender-based- Women did most of the farming, and the men, among other things, were responsible for hunting, fighting and conducting relations with other tribes.  This meant that the men were gone for long period of times from the long house.  The social unit of the Iroquois people was not the nuclear family, like we think of, but was the extended family- a grandmother, her daughters and grandchildren along with their spouses living under a very long extended room.  These family groupings were highly organized into clans and the clans passed down names or something close to what the Europeans would call titles. Although this is somewhat of a simplification, these titles or names are what they called sachems.  We don't have an equivalent of a sachem in the modern American context, but it is an extremely important role in the Iroquois confederacy.   A sachem was a man, specifically selected to represent his people and whose role was in help establishing peace among the other nations.      Is it what we call a chief?    Well, it's not the same thing as a chief, although the European settlers really got confused and used that term quite a bit for lack of a better alternative.   The sachem is a leadership role of great importance- maybe you could see it as something like what the British have in the House of Lords, but since we didn't adopt anything similar in American government,  it is kind of difficult for us to relate to.  But all of that to say, the people of the long house were literally people who lived in long houses, and at the basic level were governed by women, but they took this picture of a long house, the physical place where they lived,  and use it to symbolize a confederacy between peoples who shared a similar language and way of life.  This confederacy was united politically through a council of 50 men called sachems who were selected by the various nations through various means.  The series of events that led to this organization have been handed down orally and produced an oral document- documented visually through symbols.        Which brings us to the origin story of the Peacemaker.  Oral tradition holds that the various clans  living in this area around Lake Ontario and Lake Erie were engaged in constant warfare, which by everything that I read was brutal, bloody, ruthless and apparently never-ending.  According to oral tradition, and there are various accounts obviously, but I'll just pick one with the admission that details are very different if you read a different account.  But, it comes down to a specific woman and her mother who was forced to flee for their lives during one of these  attacks from one of these warring groups.  Once they were away to safety, this woman realized she was pregnant which made no sense to her because she was still a virgin.  She had a dream and in her dream a spirit told her the child in her womb had been chosen by the Creator to bring a message of peace to his people.  This woman raised her son, and starting in his childhood, the young man taught words of kindness, understanding, love and respect.  He called his people to return to the ways of their Creator.  The people listened to him, and he became known as the Peacemaker.  After he grew up, he turned his attention to other peoples who needed to hear this message of peace.  He carved a canoe out of white stone- and his mother and grandmother were shocked to see that it floated down the river.  The peacemaker brought his message first to the Mohawks and then to the Oneida and then to the Cayuga and the Seneca.  The Seneca were reluctant to trust him.  The Peacemaker found two warriors who were willing to support him.  One of those helpers we today call Hiawatha.  Longfellow, another American poet, later borrowed that name for a poem by that same name, but not about the real Hiawatha which is confusing.   The other warrior many think was a woman named Jikonsaseh. In many versions of this story, The Peacemaker has a speech impediment and Hiawatha is the main preacher speaking the words of the prophet.  But in all the versions this group traveled up and down the shores of Lake Erie, Ontarios and the St Laurence river preaching and teaching about peace.  At one point, this group united a special council on Onodaga Lake where representatives from other nations were gathering.  One obstacle they had was in confronting a sorcerer, who lived on the lake and inspired a lot of fear.  In various versions he had snakes as hair.  He also was truly evil to the point that he had Hiawatha's three daughters killed.  There's a lot to the story, but it comes down to the idea that Hiawatha forgave the sorcerer, and this incredible act enabled the peace to move forward.  The Peacemaker brought in the Sorcerer to be a central chief in the peace process.  The sorcerer became a positive part of the system and  became the council's fire keeper- going back to the long house symbolism we know how important this role is, the fires in the long houses are places where people come together and are important features of the culture.  The sorcerer also became the keeper of the wampum which is that string of beads where the constitution would eventually be recorded.  With eleven representatives in place at the grand council, the Peacemaker created the laws of the great Peace- at some point after this, the Seneca people joined the council- the original confederacy was formed from these five nations- 50 sechems would sit as members of the council and would meet at Onnadaga which was the center of the confederacy.  In order to symbolize this peace the Peacemaker chose a white pine tree.  The members buried their weapons under the tree agreeing to never use them again against each other.  On top of the tree was an eagle which would act as a guardian of the peace.      The idea was the nations were now going to be a single long house.  If you look at a map, you can see they nations align vertically just that way- with the Seneca to the West and the Mohawk nation on the far east.  The Mohawks would be the Eastern door to the confederacy and the Seneca would be the keepers of the West.  They were now the Hodenausaunee, or the people of the long house- the long house being the metaphor for the nation.  The laws governing the confederacy were very complex and highly sophisticated.  The Mohawks were the first among equals- the preeminent tribe.  You have to remember that the individual people groups were not equal in size or strength, so negotiations were not simplistic.  We also have to remember that the confederacy was designed to keep peace BETWEEN the nations, not within the different nations.  They weren't interested in building a nation-state like we think of today.  Each nation governed itself separately.  The council was not telling families how to interact with each other within the individual nations.      So, we are talking about a confederacy.  This is not a democracy like we think of today with one person, one vote- that sort of thing.  But the confederacy held for centuries, and actually, it's STILL in place today and to this day representatives of the whole confederacy still meet and gather around a single council fire to discuss issues that affect the nations.  Let's read the beginning words.  It's kind of a famous introduction.  You have to remember that this is a translation, so as with all poetry that is translated,  it may sound slightly stilted and not as natural as it would if we were able to understand the original words in its original context.  Christy, let's read Dkanawideh's words about the tree of the Great Peace.    Read from the xeroxed copy.     I want to point out, and I don't know if this is interesting for English students, but it's very interesting to history people, the organic metaphor is not original to any one people group.  Making metaphors of nature is used by various traditional societies.  That is not what is distinctive here although it is beautiful and symbolic.  But the Iroquois confederation in its second provision contains a different and remarkable idea stating that individuals and nations outside the confederation may trace their roots to the great tree and thereby come under the shelter of the confederation- not by joining the culture but by making a promise to obey the wishes of the  confederate council.  This is explicitly political language and moves this document from a shared myth to a constitution that allows for future members to join sheerly on political grounds- not cultural grounds- that's a huge shift and very exciting really.  What we see here is a blend of traditional prepolitical structures with political institutions like we are accustomed to today.  It's really amazing.      In other words, you could be of a different people group and still be a member without converting to the culture.    That's it exactly- which of course what we have in the Unisted States today- hundreds of cultures attempting to live together with a political agreement, not requiring any group to convert to a different culture.  It's a difficult thing to manage.  Let's read Deganawidah's last Message- it's dated by most scholars to be around 1450 AD.      From xerox sheet      Wow, the language is very optimistic and considering the dates, and obviously the document worked.  Even if you line this up next to colonial history which didn't begin until 1776, if you start the beginning with Continental Congresses.  So, Garry, getting back to the controversy, is there any agreement at all as to the question of if the Founding Fathers of the American Constitution, as we call them, studied the Iroquois constitution and used it to form the basis  of the US one?  I can see that it is representative, but we don't sechems.      Sure, there's not total agreement.  You have to remember, and this of course, is where the history of indigenous people gets very sad, by the time of the American revolution, much of Iroquois population had been decimated by small pox and chicken pox.  The Iroquois nations suffered horrible epidemics starting from the 1630s.  If we just look at one example,  over 60% of the Mohawk population alone died in the first smallpox epidemic in 1634.      Because the numbers of these indigenous peoples were so reduced, by the colonial era, compared to the numbers of British and French settlers, the native peoples were in the minority and the awkward position of trying to navigate neutrality between the European warring opponents.  In other words, they had to take sides- who were they going to support- the French, the British or the Americans. That's a story within itself.  But to get to the question at hand, we know for sure that Benjamin Franklin was a student of indigenous life, spent time with Iroquois leadership and was an admirer of Chief Canastego, the most prominent of the Iroquois leaders during Franklin's life.  We also know that another Iroquois leader by the name of Hendrick was asked to provide insight for the colonists as to how the confederation of the Iroquois was structured.  This was in reference to the Albany plan which was one plan presented for consideration in uniting the colonies.  We also know for a fact that in May and June of 1776, 21 Iroquois leaders visited Philadelphia to meet with the Continental Congress, and this was right before, of course the Declaration of Independence.  That's what we know for sure.      The colonists or James Madison in particular never gave direct credit to any indigenous documents, but there is no doubt the founders were aware of indigenous confederations and how they were structured- not just the Iroquois, actually, there were others, but they were aware that indigenous peoples were using central governments with limited powers to live together in peaceful arrangements on this continent.  We also have been given a few hints, that the Houdenosaunee left an impact on our American heritage through some of our most important American symbols- the first being the most iconic of American symbols- the eagle.    Yes, and I find that very cool- this summer, we, as a family, all went to Dollywood – that's an amusement park Dolly Parton built up in the Appalachian mountains here in Tennessee.  Anyway, they have bald eagles up there that they keep at the park.  We saw them and they are incredible birds.  Another thing about bald eagles, and I love this uniqueness,  they are indigenous to this continent.  Of course, I didn't know til I started studying for this podcast that this was the bird chosen by the Iroquois to fly above the tree of peace.  The eagle is known for its amazing eyesight.  This was an important idea for the Iroquois,  the idea being that the Iroquois government should be protective and watchful for its people just like the eagle.      Of course, the eagle isn't the only symbol used in American iconography.  Deganawida very famously took an arrow and broke it.  He then took two arrows and broke them.  But then he bound five arrows together and illustrated that five arrows could not be broken. The cluster of arrows was to symbolize the strength found in the joining of several nations.  Hendrick illustrated this for the colonists.  One of the delegates is recorded to have said this, “Hendrick used the example the Iroquois used when t heir nations came together: He held up one arrow and broke it, then held up five arrows bound together and showed how they could not be broken.”  If you look at the symbol of the United States, in the left talon of the eagle, you will see 13 arrows held by an eagle.        Well, that's very cool.  I know, just like a soaring eagle, we flew through that story perhaps more quickly than we should have.  The story of the peacemaker, Hiawatha and the Haudenosaunee is way more intricate then what we just discussed.  There is a lot of wisdom in those myths and legends that we would do well to think about.  I know you knew this, but I had never thought of the expression “burying the hatchet” as coming from a famous indigenous document- I certainly didn't know it had anything to do with Hiawatha's ability to offer forgiveness and forge a confederacy that would be the basis for one of the oldest working forms of democracy on planet earth.  It's an amazing legacy, and goes to show, if nothing else, and of course, this is what Whitman was preaching his entire life, that we are all a lot more alike than different.  If we look closely, we will see our paths have intertwined way more than we could ever imagine- and if we choose, even the most divided and hurt among us can forge a future towards peace. And that is a reason to celebrate friendsgiving at any time of year.    Indeed,  we hope you enjoyed listening to this very abbreviated discussion of an incredible document from our continent, an excerpt for the Iroquois constitution.  We also hope if you enjoyed this discussion that you will share about us to your friends and colleagues.  Give us a five star rating on your podcast ap, post this episode on social media and follow us on any of our social media platforms: Instagram, facebook, twitter and Linked in.  Also, don't forget to check out our materials on howtolovelitpodcast. Com    Peace out   

Feet to the Fire Politics: Conservative Talk Show
Ep. 161 11.25.21 Bonus: Remembering the Pilgrims on Thanksgiving!

Feet to the Fire Politics: Conservative Talk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 13:51


Even our forebears the Pilgrims learned the misery of attempting socialism, as William Bradford writes: “as if they were wiser than God.” They learned that “God in His wisdom saw another course fitter for them.” Property rights. Capitalism. Enjoy today the blessings of liberty!

MoneyWise on Oneplace.com
400 Years of Thanksgiving

MoneyWise on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 24:57


To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/1085/29 1 Thessalonians 5:18 tells us to Give thanks in all circumstances; for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus for you. And today on MoneyWise, we will do exactly that! Rob West celebrates God's faithfulness and provision as we mark 400 years of Thanksgiving in America. In the year 1621, 400 years ago this month, the Puritans of Plymouth Colony in Massachusetts celebrated the first Thanksgiving.The Puritans had intended to get to the New World early in summer, but the crossing of the Atlantic was much rougher and took longer than expected. They didn't arrive in the New World until November 1620. Planting was impossible and a harsh winter delayed the building of the first houses until late January. All of that resulted in what became known as The Starving Time for the Plymouth colony. One hundred and two Puritans had crossed over on the Mayflower. Nearly half of their number died that first winter due to disease and starvation. But spring finally came, and those who survived had established good relations with the Native Americans, who helped them plant crops that eventually became a fair harvest in the fall.That brings us to the first thanksgiving when the Puritans were moved to celebrate and praise God for their survival. Many have forgotten the reason the Puritans had dared to venture into the harsh New World in the first place: religious freedom.Persecuted for their faith in England, they fled to Holland first. But English authorities even pursued them there, leading many to undertake the perilous voyage to America. William Bradford would later write of their earliest days in America, Thus out of small beginnings greater things have been produced by His hand that made all things of nothing, and gives being to all things that are; and, as one small candle may light a thousand, so the light here kindled hath shone unto many. And Four hundred years later, we Christians in America still give thanks to God for His provision. We hope your day is as blessed as the first Thanksgiving. LISTENER QUESTIONS On today's program, Rob West answered the following listener questions: ●Is it worthwhile to pay an extra $50-100 per month toward your mortgage? ●If you're selling your house but have no immediate plans to purchase another house, what should you do with the proceeds from the home sale? And are those proceeds taxable? ●Is it beneficial to continue working until your full retirement age? ●What should you do with funds in a 403B when changing jobs? ●Can you roll funds from a Roth IRA into another Roth IRA? RESOURCES MENTIONED DURING THIS PROGRAM: Sound Mind Investing Remember, you can call in to ask your questions most days at (800) 525-7000 or email them toQuestions@MoneyWise.org. Also, visit our website atMoneyWise.orgwhere you can connect with a MoneyWise Coach, join the MoneyWise Community, and even download the free MoneyWise app. Like and Follow us on Facebook atMoneyWise Mediafor videos and the very latest discussion!Remember that it's your prayerful and financial support that keeps MoneyWise on the air. Help us continue this outreach by clicking theDonate tab on our websiteor in our app.

Kill Bigger Radio with Kyle Keegan
Communism: The Original Way To Ruin Thanksgiving - Ep 259

Kill Bigger Radio with Kyle Keegan

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 39:46


Most people probably look at a title like that and laugh, knowing that I am probably going to talk about politics ruining a "good time." Not really... It's not an argument. It's the communists' fault completely. Let's be honest, thanksgiving, for a lot of people looks more like a scary movie than a pleasant dinner. There is actually AN ORIGINAL way to ruin thanksgiving. The colonists, under the governorship of William Bradford in 1620, needlessly suffered and died of famine... BECAUSE THEY WERE COMMUNISTS. So If someone tells you not to "ruin thanksgiving," with your capitalist truth, you can quite literally tell them that their commie bullshit is the original way to ruin thanksgiving.  Peace out! The Great Thanksgiving Hoax is an article from Richard J. Maybury available at: https://mises.org/library/great-thanksgiving-hoax-0   Want to keep "Killing Bigger?"   Text KKRS to: 713-528-8219   Telegram Community: https://t.me/killbigger   Twitter: https://twitter.com/killbiggerradio   Parler: https://parler.com/#/user/KillBiggerRadio   Check out https://KillBigger.com   The American Precious Metals Exchange at https://apmex.com   Protect your privacy on your phone and computer with https://nordvpn.com/keegan      Chase INK Credit Cards: https://www.referyourchasecard.com/21/IEDS1NQ9H2   Join the discussion at https://www.thefastlaneforum.com/community/threads/kaks-kill-bigger-radio-show.95326/    DISCLAIMER! I am NOT your financial advisor. Do your own research. I advocate heavily that you should make intelligent and informed decisions based on your own understanding or hire someone that does this for you. Kill Bigger™️ and Kill Bigger Media™️ are © Atlas Southwest LLC.

The Sean Casey Show
Episode 206 - The True Story of Thanksgiving

The Sean Casey Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 30:24


For over 30 years Rush Limbaugh would share the true story of the first Thanksgiving in the New World. Now that Rush is gone, we pick up the torch and share this incredible story about the how the Pilgrims survived in America and what led to the most prosperous nation on earth.Copyright Sean Casey All Rights Reserved

The Kim Monson Show
William Bradford Saved Plymouth Rock with Capitalism

The Kim Monson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 57:43


This coming weekend, America's Veterans Stories will broadcast three separate shows featuring veterans who we thank for their service to our country.  Sunday afternoon at 3pm will feature Bear Owen, Vietnam Veteran Marine pilot.  The other shows broadcast 10pm Saturday and 10pm on Sunday.  All can be heard on KLZ 560 AM and KLZ 100.7 FM or by downloading the KLZ app. Bill Federer, speaker and host of the radio show American Minute and author of numerous books including The Treacherous World of the 16th Century & How the Pilgrims Escaped It: The Prequel to America's Freedom, joins Kim for a lively discussion on the truth surrounding the Pilgrims coming to America.  Bill explains in detail the historical perspective of the founding of America.  Interesting facts include that the Pilgrims were terrorized by Muslim Barbary pirates.  Bill also explains the devastation caused by the Ottoman Empire as it sieged Constantinople and Vienna, and its relevance to America.  The Ottomans influenced the ruling style of the kings of Spain, France, England and the Turkish Sultans.  Learn how the Caribbean got its name.  Addressing American history, Bill notes the differences between the founding of Plymouth Rock and Jamestown.   He tells the story of Squanto and Squanto’s importance to the settlers.  Bill ends by examining the Pilgrim's experiment with communism.  Originally, the land was public and held in a community pact.  People did minimal work because there was no incentive to produce; it was a complete failure and the Pilgrims almost starved to death.  Then William Bradford and other Pilgrim leaders proposed to let everyone have their own property and be responsible for themselves.  A complete shift of work ethic emerged as people became industrious and kept most of the fruits of their labor or to be voluntarily traded with others.  The Pilgrims began to thrive and flourish. Lorne Levy, mortgage specialist with Polygon Financial, joins Kim to express his thanks to Kim and the wonderful shows she has produced over the year.  He expresses his gratitude to the many listeners he has worked with in securing mortgages, refinances and reverse mortgages.  He is especially thankful that he has helped his clients save money on their mortgages. If you are looking for any type of mortgage, give Lorne a call at 303-880-8881.

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead
Spotlight: Free Markets Produce Prosperity: Lessons Learned From The Pilgrim's Plymouth Colony Economy

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 3:20


Contrary to legend, the Pilgrims' first Thanksgiving did not yield a bountiful harvest, but let us give thanks that the Pilgrims embraced free markets and, in success, produced prosperity. Steve Forbes on the lessons to be learned from the Pilgrim's Plymouth Colony economy and the relevance of these lessons to the Biden Administration's current push for a new socialism.Steve Forbes shares his What's Ahead Spotlights each Tuesday, Thursday and Friday.

Coffee with Cascade
QP: The Story Behind Thanksgiving That Every Elected Official Should Know

Coffee with Cascade

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 2:05


Full Text: The quintessential American holiday, Thanksgiving evolved from the Pilgrims' celebrations to thank God for the harvests that saved Plymouth Colony. What most people didn't learn in school is that nearly half the Mayflower Pilgrims died of starvation because many refused to work in the fields. Plymouth Colony originally had a socialist economy. Land and crops were held in common. In the words of Governor William Bradford, “the young men who were most able objected to being forced to spend their time and strength working for other men's wives and children without any recompense.” Collectivism incentivized colonists needlessly to rely on the efforts of others. Realizing this, Governor Bradford assigned each household its own plot of land. Families could keep what they produced or trade for things they needed. The result was a bountiful harvest in 1623. Instituting private property and respecting the autonomy of the family unit caused Plymouth to survive. Collectivism and central planning produce scarcity. Private property, free markets, and personal responsibility lead to prosperity and plenty. A healthy economy, with strong and independent families, enables a community to help those who genuinely need assistance. All are important lessons for America today from William Bradford's first Thanksgiving. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/coffeewithcascade/message

That Shakespeare Life
Ep 188: Plymouth Colony with David and Aaron Bradford

That Shakespeare Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 55:08


It is Thanksgiving this week here in the US where we take time to intentionally be grateful for what we've been given and count our blessings, but it is also the one time of year where the whole nation remembers an event that began during the life of William Shakespeare: the journey of the Pilgrims on the Mayflower. Not many people realize the story of William Shakespeare overlaps with that of the Pilgrims, due mostly to the fact that the Pilgrims wouldn't actually set sail from Plymouth until 1620, which is 4 years after the death of William Shakespeare. However, The Puritans were a major part of Shakespeare's life in England prior to that fateful day in 1620, including Puritans who lived within walking distance of the known residences Shakespeare took up in London. The story of the Mayflower, Pilgrims, and so-called “Strangers” that travelled with them including Miles Standish, William Brewster, and William Bradford, informs our understanding of Shakespeare's culture and the strong religious tensions that were building up in early 17th century England..    As many countries were flocking to the New World and trying to establish colonies there, England, too was placing a mark on the new land with settlements like Jamestown being established under Captain John Smith in 1607. At the same time, the Pilgrims were seeking to go to this New World, but for a decidedly different reason. As a group of religious separatists, as they were known then, they were seeking the right to freedom of religion. The group capitalized on the popular wave of exploration under James I to secure a land patent that allowed them to travel to England and set up a new colony where they could worship, and live, in freedom. Accompanied by the Merchant Adventurers and sanctioned by the Plymouth Colony, the Pilgrims set sail on September 6, 1620.    Here today to tell us about the history behind the Pilgrim's journey from England to Plymouth and the realities of that First Thanksgiving are our guests and historians behind the 1620 Experience, David and Aaron Bradford.

RAD Radio
Rob's Soapbox - The True Story Of Thanksgiving

RAD Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 10:07


On November 3, 2008, I originally printed the essay below. We have reprinted it each year since on Thanksgiving weeks, with small alterations to address issues of the time, and it never ceases to garner a huge reaction. In 2021, more than ever, people need to be reminded of the positive roots of their nation…and despite what you're told seemingly on the daily, there are some positive things about America. The story below is 100% provably true (and footnoted accordingly), and the fact that most of you have never heard it before is scandalous to say the least:What really happened in 1621, at the first alleged “Thanksgiving feast” in what would later become America? Most Americans, sadly, don't know. If they even have an answer, it usually involves a fake narrative of Native Americans feeding starving pilgrims, only to be thanked years later with genocide. While it is true that Pilgrims and Indians ate together, both sides contributed equal amounts of food over the three-day feast…and while it is true that war led to Europeans conquering what later became America (which was quite literally the way of life in the 17th century), the true story and message of that first Thanksgiving is entirely lost and essentially covered up by focusing on what we're all supposed to view as America's racist founding. This country has been “woke” when it comes to Thanksgiving for decades.The real events of the original Thanksgiving are known and have been known since they happened, in 1621 thanks to a man named William Bradford, who most people learned about (wrongly) and have long since forgotten. Bradford was the governor of the Plymouth Colony and kept copious notes in real-time of all events occurring to the Pilgrims and is also, some believe, the true father of what later became known to be Capitalism, the American monetary system. Bradford's words have never been disputed. He wrote every day for more than 30 years as the Pilgrims assimilated into the colonies. Multiple sources confirmed more than most of his observations through simultaneous yet separate writings, all but irrefutably proving Bradford's perception of events that were happening right before his very eyes. Sadly, this is unimportant to history revisionists. To them (and most of them are teaching your children) it is more important to twist facts or make them up entirely so that people in America are taught to hate themselves and their country so that they will go through life atoning for, what in some cases are, non-existent mistakes of our genuinely horrific past. We've had, and continue to have, plenty of missteps on our way to forming a more perfect union; we don't need to fabricate stories of bigotry that never happened.The true story of Thanksgiving is actually one of the most inspiring tales of entrepreneurship and the human work ethic ever written. The true story of Thanksgiving highlights one of life's eternal truths; each of us has the ability to rise above challenges seemingly greater than our skills and not just survive, but thrive if we desire to do so. The true story of Thanksgiving is about choosing to win and refusing to lose; which in the 17th century meant choosing to live and refusing to die. The true story of Thanksgiving is not only not shameful, it is one of the building blocks upon which the greatest nation in Earth's history was built. And for those of you who are mistaught snowflakes that are somehow still reading, that nation is the United States of America. Still.In his 'History of Plymouth Plantation,' the governor of the colony, William Bradford, reported that the colonists went hungry for years because they refused to work in the fields. They preferred instead to steal food. He says the colony was riddled with "corruption," and with "confusion and discontent." The crops were small because "much was stolen both by night and day before it became scarce eatable." This, in my opinion, furthers the notion that, at our core, most humans are both lazy and unmotivated, yearning not for some prideful pursuit of earning our keep, but always choosing the path of least resistance if we are so allowed. People will always choose what's easiest if they're allowed to. If you give someone what they perceive to be free food and/or shelter in perpetuity, they will happily accept it, for it is in their nature to do as little as possible. Those of us with work ethic, drive, and a prideful belief that we must earn what we get were taught that, not born with it.In the famed and fabled harvest feasts of 1621 and 1622, we're told to believe that the Indians showed up and fed the settlers out of generosity, but this is absolutely false. The colonists had produced their own food, but very little. The prevailing condition during those years was famine and death. The first "Thanksgiving" was not so much a celebration as it was the last meal of condemned men.But in subsequent years something changed. The harvest of 1623 was different. In fact, in 1624, so much food was produced that the colonists were able to begin exporting corn.What happened?After the poor harvest of 1622, writes Bradford, "they began to think how they might raise as much corn as they could, and obtain a better crop." They began to question their form of economic organization. As has happened countless times throughout history, desperate, starving men deemed that “good enough” was no longer good enough.Originally and prior to 1623, the pilgrims had operated under the “it takes a village” system and required that "all profits & benefits were to be placed in the common stock of the colony, and that, "all such persons as are of this colony, are to have their meat, drink, apparel, and all provisions out of the common stock." In other words, everything that everyone made, grew, harvested, invented, or found was placed in one big pile for the entire community to share. A person was to put into the common stock all that he could, and take out only what he “needed.” In other words, it didn't matter if a colonist had ever contributed a damned thing to the bounty; he or she was still entitled to his or her share of the food, drink, and clothing. That share, incidentally, was determined solely by individual greed and desire, and based in no way on them having earned any of it or having contributed anything to it. Each person helped themselves to as much of whatever they desired.This "from each according to his ability, to each according to his need" was an early form of socialism, and it is why the Pilgrims were starving in 1621 and1622. Bradford writes that "young men that are most able and fit for labor and service" complained about being forced to "spend their time and strength to work for other men's wives and children." So, the young and strong refused to work and the total amount of food produced was never adequate.To rectify this situation, in 1623 Bradford abolished socialism amongst the pilgrims. No longer would there be a community pool of rations. No longer would few work, so that all could have. He surveyed the land they held and he gave each household a parcel of land and told them they could keep what they produced, or trade it away as they saw fit. In other words, every family, every man, was required to produce his or her own food, shelter and clothing. It was left to each private landowner to decide whether or not they wanted to produce only enough for those who lived on their property, or whether or not they wanted to produce excess and sell or trade that excess to people less willing to work or take risk. In other words, he replaced socialism with a free market, and that was the end of famine, for they had more food than they could use in the years that followed. So, this year as you enjoy your Thanksgiving feast, take a moment to bear in mind that while the media, most educators, and Hallmark want you to believe that this is a day about celebrating friends and family, the truth is far greater than that. Thanksgiving is yet another day to celebrate the greatest nation on Earth and its stunningly noble beginnings. Enjoy the bounty that you have worked so hard to achieve; and if you somehow find yourself wanting for more this Thanksgiving, take a page from the Pilgrims and instead of singing the pitiful “woe is me, I'll never get ahead because life's not fair,” refrain, commit yourself to finding a way to thrive. And on Friday morning, work harder.https://sourcebooks.fordham.edu/mod/1650bradford.asphttp://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2010-11-24/gop-puts-the-lame-back-in-lame-duck-session-commentary-by-caroline-baumhttp://www.freedomworks.org/content/thank-capitalism-thanksgiving-daySee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The World and Everything In It
11.11.21 China's pressure tactics, free speech, and William Bradford

The World and Everything In It

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 34:46


Josh Schumacher reports on how China is using its economic clout to rewrite its geopolitical narrative; Mary Reichard talks to Steve West about the latest challenge to free speech on campus; and Sarah Schweinsberg meets a man on a mission to bring the story of William Bradford to life. Plus: commentary from Whitney Williams, repurposed phone booths, and the Thursday morning news.Support The World and Everything in It today at wng.org/donate. Additional support comes from Ambassadors Impact Network, a group of faith-driven investors who finance private companies led by gospel-advancing entrepreneurs. More at ambassadorsimpact.com. From Providence Christian College, where students are grounded in biblical truth and a classic liberal arts core to produce virtuous citizens. More at ProvidenceCC.edu And from Samaritan Ministries. Health care sharing is affordable, and you can join today. More at samaritanministries.org/worldpodcast.

This Date in Weather History
1635: The Great Colonial Hurricane

This Date in Weather History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 3:18


The Great Colonial Hurricane of 1635 hit the Jamestown Settlement in Virginia and the Massachusetts Bay Colony during August 1635. It is considered to be one of the earliest hurricanes to have struck New England, occurring just 15 years after the settlement at Plymouth rock. Although the hurricane's exact track remains unknown, several historical accounts describe the storm. The storm is first mentioned on August 24, 1635, as it moved rapidly to the east of the Jamestown Colony in Virginia, but did not cause any damage. Massachusetts Bay Governor, John Winthrop, kept a running journal of his experiences in the Boston area at that time. On August 25 he described a storm arriving before midnight on August 25, blowing with “such violence” and “an abundance of rain”. Historian and writer William Bradford, who lived in Plymouth Plantation, stated that the hurricane “was such a mighty storm of wind and rain as none living in these parts, ever saw… It caused the sea to swell to the southward [of this place] above 20 feet right up and down…” Reverend Richard Mather, who was traveling on the ship the James at the time of the storm, recounted strong, shifting winds while aboard the vessel. The hurricane produced a storm surge of 20 ft in Narragansett Bay. Due to strong winds, heavy rainfall, and high tide, hundreds of trees were toppled, homes were destroyed, and ships were blown off their anchors. An estimated 46 people died. The damage to structures and the losses described were similar to the descriptions from the 1938 New England Hurricane, so, historians believe the intensity of the Great Colonial Hurricane was comparable. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

That Shakespeare Life
Ep 170: William Bradford with David and Aaron Bradford

That Shakespeare Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 67:23


William Braford is most well known today as the man who served as the second governor of Plymouth Colony, leaving Europe for Virginia in 1620 aboard the Mayflower. Prior to this infamous voyage, Bradford was an Englishman whose life overlapped that of William Shakespeare, having been born in Yorkshire, England, when Shakespeare was 26 years old. There's no evidence to suggest Shakespeare knew Bradford personally, but the life of William Bradford shines a light on a huge aspect of Shakespeare's life: the presence and subsequent response to religious extremism in England. Queen Elizabeth restored Protestantism to England in 1559, along with requirements that everyone attend Protestant Church services. Many religious groups refused, moving to underground church services that were decidedly illegal in England. One of the people who attended such services was a young William Bradford. Relations with religious groups in England remained a tense tightwire act across two monarchs of Shakespeare's life, a situation we can see reflected in Shakespeare's Puritan character named Malvolio in Twelfth Night. The character is publicly humiliated while simultaneously painted as someone with whom we can sympathize. The duality of the character itself is a powerful reflection of the sentiments of England at the start of the 17th century. Efforts like the publication of the King James Bible in 1609 attempted to find a common ground with the Puritans, but peace could not be found, with arrests of religious dissenters increasing under James I and leading ultimately to groups like Bradford and the Pilgrims, leaving England entirely in the early 1600s. Here today to help us explore the life of William Bradford, explain the distinction between Puritans and Pilgrims, as well as the reality of religious extremists like the Anabaptists and Scottish Presbyterians, going on in England during Shakespeare's lifetime is our guests, and direct descendants of William Bradford himself, David and Aaron Bradford.

Ivy League Murders
William Bradford Bishop: Breaking News

Ivy League Murders

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2021 25:48


Join Sarah and Laura as they continue to heat up an Ivy League cold case. We check in with Kathy Gilchrist, Bishop's daughter. Can we figure out what happened to family annihilator William Bradford Bishop?

Our Jewish Roots video podcast
Faith of our Fathers - “Faith by Trial”

Our Jewish Roots video podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2021 28:30


2111 - Times of testing prove that neither personal ambition nor comfort is a goal for a life of faith. Our examples are Noah, the ark builder, and Zerubbabel, rebuilder of the Temple. The Mayflower brought pilgrims like William Bradford who sought their own “promised land” in the New World. Despite challenging circumstances, they based their colony on a Biblical lifestyle.

Overnight America
Listener Calls, Trump’s Executive Order

Overnight America

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2021 40:21


Host Ryan Wrecker takes your calls on Trump leaving office, voting, and the latest in politics. Lastly, Ryan previews an executive order from President Trump requesting an ‘American Heroes’ Statue Garden with 244 names. If you like what you hear, we're live weeknights on KMOX 1120AM. We welcome your calls at 800-925-1120. Like and follow on Facebook: www.facebook.com/RyanWreckerRadio/  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

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MGL
#39 Pilgrims

MGL

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2020 65:54


In this episode we discuss Christmas, re-opening safely, recalling Newsom, Gabriel talks about two books: "Bradford's History of the Plymouth Settlement, 1608-1650" by William Bradford and "From Dawn to Decadence" by Jacques Barzun, Cromwell, Mars colonies, Plato, and News Years Eve.Link to the audio book for "Bradford's History of the Plymouth Settlement, 1608-1650" https://librivox.org/bradfords-history-of-the-plymouth-settlement-by-william-bradford/

Generation Animation
Episode 417 – Animaniacs (2020)

Generation Animation

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2020 117:11


William Bradford joins us to talk about what it’s like to animate on the acclaimed reboot. Also to talk my Hero Academia. JOIN OUR DISCORD CHAT!WE NOW HAVE SHIRTS AND MORE FOR SALE! Broadcast on December 6th, 2020Featuring:Dave Roberts, Bianca Michaelson, Felipe Diaz-Vera, Tyler Moliterno & William Bradford Summary: An updated version of the 1990s

Coffee with Cascade
The first Thanksgiving's free market lesson

Coffee with Cascade

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2020 1:49


The quintessential American holiday, Thanksgiving evolved from the Pilgrims' celebrations to thank God for the harvests that saved Plymouth Colony. What most people didn't learn in school is that nearly half the Mayflower Pilgrims died of starvation because many refused to work in the fields. Plymouth Colonyoriginally had a socialist economy. Land and crops were held in common. In the words of Governor William Bradford, “the young men who were most able objected to being forced to spend their time and strength working for other men's wives and children without any recompense.” Collectivism incentivized colonists needlessly to rely on the efforts of others. Realizing this, Governor Bradford assigned each household its own plot of land. Families could keep what they produced or trade for things they needed. The result was a bountiful harvest in 1623. Instituting private property and respecting the autonomy of the family unit caused Plymouth to survive. Collectivism and central planning produce scarcity. Private property, free markets, and personal responsibility lead to prosperity and plenty. A healthy economy, with strong and independent families, enables a community to help those who genuinely need assistance. All are important lessons for America today from William Bradford's first Thanksgiving. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/coffeewithcascade/message

Bigfoot for Breakfast
Macabre Colonial History

Bigfoot for Breakfast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2020 40:49


We hope everyone had a great Thanksgiving!  Typically, in relation to Thanksgiving we hear a lot about Colonial America.  But it wasn't all sunshine and rainbows...and turkey.  This year, BF4B is bringing some of the darker stories to the light.  Because, we all know there is a dark side to how America got started.   'Proof' Jamestown settlers turned to cannibalism, Jane O'Brien; BBC News, Jamestown, Virginia https://www.businessinsider.com/history-of-thanksgiving-2017-11 Thanksgiving’s hidden past: Plymouth in 1621 wasn’t close to being the first celebration, Gillian Brockell; November 22, 2017 at 7:00 a.m. CST  “The Cross in the Sand.” By Michael Gannon Evidence of Cannibalism Found at Jamestown, SARAH PRUITT; UPDATED:SEP 1, 2018ORIGINAL:MAY 2, 2013 What happened to the “Lost Colony” of Roanoke? UPDATED:AUG 22, 2018ORIGINAL:OCT 2, 2012; HISTORY.COM https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2018/06/lost-colony-roanoke-history-theories-croatoan/ It Was America’s First English Colony. Then It Was Gone. BY ANDREW LAWLER https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/21/us/thanksgiving-myths-fact-check.html Everything You Learned About Thanksgiving Is Wrong, By Maya Salam; Nov. 21, 2017 http://www.thepeoplespaths.net/history/ThanksgivingDayMassacre.htm Research compiled, October 19, 1990 by Johyn Westcott and Paul Apidaca, Source:André Cramblit, Operations Director, (NCIDC) The Northern California Indian Development Council is a non-profit organization that helps meet the social, educational, and economic development needs of American Indian communities. THE FIRST THANKSGIVING IN AMERICA: It took place near Williamsburg, Va., not Plymouth, Mass. — and didn’t involve food! Published on: September 10, 2019 https://www.visitwilliamsburg.com/trip-idea/first-thanksgiving-america https://newsmaven.io/indiancountrytoday/archive/6-thanksgiving-myths-and-the-wampanoag-side-of-the-story-roJhk2s_AkW9pkyjONXr-w/ Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong by James Loewen 6 Thanksgiving Myths and the Wampanoag Side of the Story by Vincent Schilling; Nov 14, 2017 https://newsmaven.io/indiancountrytoday/archive/6-thanksgiving-myths-and-the-wampanoag-side-of-the-story-roJhk2s_AkW9pkyjONXr-w/ History of Massachusetts Blog.  Of Plymouth Plantation by William Bradford.  Rebecca Beatrice Brooks.  December 12th, 2012.  https://historyofmassachusetts.org/of-plymouth-plantation/ Native Americans Get the Change to tell Their Side of the Pilgrim Story.  The World.  Christopher Woolf.  November 17th, 2014.  https://www.pri.org/stories/2014-11-17/native-americans-get-chance-tell-their-side-pilgrim-story Life and Times of America’s First Murderer.  Matt Soniak.  September 9th, 2012.  Mental Floss. https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/12446/life-and-times-americas-first-murderer#:~:text=John%20Billington%20isn%27t%20a,the%20Atlantic%20to%20New%20England.  

Loving Liberty Radio Network
11-26-2020 Liberty RoundTable with Sam Bushman

Loving Liberty Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2020 109:40


Hour 1 * Live on Thanksgiving, The Liberty RoundTable Team to GiveThanks and Wish You a Blessed and Happy Thanksgiving Day! * Trump pardons Michael Flynn, Thanksgiving Turkeys but, Why Not Pardon Steve Stockman? * Splitting 5 to 4, Supreme Court to New York: The Constitution Still Matters! People of faith were given something extra special to be thankful for late Thanksgiving Eve. With Justice Barrett casting the deciding vote, the Supreme Court issued a decision stopping New York Governor Andrew Cuomo from enforcing strict 10-person or 25-person limitations for attending religious services. * America’s Socialist Origins – Was America once socialist? Surprisingly, yes. The early settlers who arrived at Plymouth and Jamestown in the early 1600s experimented with socialist communes. Did it work? History professor Larry Schweikart of the University of Dayton shares the fascinating story. PragerU is changing the minds of millions worldwide. * Gov. William Bradford documented his experiences in an historic book titled ‘Bradford’s History of Plymouth Plantation, 1606-1646’. * Wonder Why I’m Thankful in 2020? – Steven Mosher – POP.org. * 400 Years Later and Now This – Mat Staver, LC Action Chairman LC.org. Hour 2 * Guest: Former Sheriff Richard Mack Expresses his Gratitude on this Beautiful Thanksgiving Day! * For Thanksgiving Day, Zoom will lift its 40-minute time limit for free meetings. * You’re Thankful. You Told Us Why The Times’s daily newsletter invited readers to submit six words about what made them grateful this Thanksgiving. * Richard Mack: I’m Thankful for God, Family, Country! * Sam Bushman: Thank God For Life And Family! * How to find gratitude in hard times! * Thankful for You! – Citizens for Free Speech – Patrick Wood – CitizensForFreeSpeech.org. * Pennsylvania Judge Blocks Certification of Keystone State’s Election Results! * New subpoena in critical swing state – Right now, there are more than a dozen lawsuits ongoing in PA, MI, WI, GA and NV, and an active recount in WI. Yesterday, a lawsuit subpoenaed new video evidence in a Georgia location that had problems. * Dr. Robert Epstein: Google bias shifted at least 6 million votes! – Harvard-trained Democrat discloses findings from 2020 election research – Art Moore. * Attorney Mat Staver: Dragging the CA Gov to the Supreme Court! * Judge agrees to hear evidence of vote fraud in Nevada. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loving-liberty/support

Liberty Roundtable Podcast
Radio Show Hour 1 – 11/26/2020

Liberty Roundtable Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2020 54:50


* Live on Thanksgiving, The Liberty RoundTable Team to GiveThanks and Wish You a Blessed and Happy Thanksgiving Day! * Trump pardons Michael Flynn, Thanksgiving Turkeys but, Why Not Pardon Steve Stockman? * Splitting 5 to 4, Supreme Court to New York: The Constitution Still Matters! People of faith were given something extra special to be thankful for late Thanksgiving Eve. With Justice Barrett casting the deciding vote, the Supreme Court issued a decision stopping New York Governor Andrew Cuomo from enforcing strict 10-person or 25-person limitations for attending religious services. * America's Socialist Origins - Was America once socialist? Surprisingly, yes. The early settlers who arrived at Plymouth and Jamestown in the early 1600s experimented with socialist communes. Did it work? History professor Larry Schweikart of the University of Dayton shares the fascinating story. PragerU is changing the minds of millions worldwide. * Gov. William Bradford documented his experiences in an historic book titled 'Bradford's History of Plymouth Plantation, 1606-1646'. * Wonder Why I'm Thankful in 2020? - Steven Mosher - POP.org. * 400 Years Later and Now This - Mat Staver, LC Action Chairman LC.org.

Financially Simple - Business Startup, Growth, & Sale
What the First Thanksgiving Can Teach Us About Socialism

Financially Simple - Business Startup, Growth, & Sale

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2020 17:13


In episode 315 of Financially Simple, Justin reflects on the pilgrim settler’s attempt at Socialism and the subsequent establishment of Private Ownership. William Bradford wrote on the efforts of the first settler’s establishment of a communal system of government, and the hardships and costs it effected before shifting to a more individualistic approach. In this episode, Justin recounts Bradford’s journals, and on how a failed system led to private ownership and personal responsibility, setting the foundations for the modern American way. Don’t forget to subscribe, and let us know how we are doing by leaving a review. Thanks for listening! _________________   TIME INDEX: 01:02 - What the First Thanksgiving can Teach Us about Socialism 02:02 - Bradford’s Journal 09:29 - Private Ownership & Personal Responsibility 14:54 - Conclusion 16:39 - Wrap Up   RESOURCES: Of Plymouth Plantation - William Bradford Financially Simple Educational Website Financially Simple on YouTube Financially Simple podcasts are recorded on a Blue Yeti Microphone & Samsung Notebook 9. Subscribe to the Financially Simple Newsletter Ask Justin a Question NEW Book: The Ultimate Sale - A Financially Simple Guide to Selling Your Business for Maximum Profit _________________   BIO: Host Justin Goodbread, Certified Financial Planner, Certified Exit Planning Advisor, Certified Value Growth Advisor. He is a serial entrepreneur, author, speaker, educator, Investopedia Top 100 advisor, and business strategist with over 20 years of experience. Justin owns Heritage Investors LLC, a registered investment adviser with the State of Tennessee. Heritage Investors only transacts business in states where it is properly registered or is excluded or exempted from registration requirements. This material is for general information only and is not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for individuals. To determine what is appropriate for you, please consult a qualified professional. The Financially Simple podcast provides information, guidance, and support to Small Businesses in the United States.

Frontier Missions
31. The Story of Thanksgiving - Bio

Frontier Missions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2020 41:59


The story of Thanksgiving is a powerful one, and often forgotten by the people who celebrate it. We are taught in public schools that it was a sort of love feast between the Pilgrims and the Native Americans, but there is so much more to it than that. It was a day of gratefulness to a supernatural, good God who answers prayers and does miracles. William Bradford journal: https://amzn.to/39eBA15 (Paid link) Revival Carriers Website: www.revivalcarriers.com If you would like to support this podcast, you can donate through the website, or in one of the following ways: Paypal: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/alancrookham CashApp: Acrookham Venmo: @Alan-Crookham Become a monthly sponsor through the website and I'll post add your name to the credits at the end of the episode next episode! Facebook page: Revival Carriers Podcast Email us at: revivalcarrierspodcast@gmail.com My Podcast Gear: Microphones: Samson Q2U - https://amzn.to/35MFH2x (Paid Link) Studio Headphones: Audio Technica ATH-M30x - https://amzn.to/3hJVrWz (Paid Link) Recording Device: Zoom H6 - https://amzn.to/3mAYUdq (Paid Link) Editing: Garageband (Free with MacBook Pro) Hosting: Anchor (Free) (I plan to upgrade to another service soon, this is very bare bones).

Trumpet Hour
#549: The Danger of Coming Famines, Protect Yourself From Coronavirus, a Lesson From the Pilgrims, and More

Trumpet Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2020 52:00


As America prepares to celebrate Thanksgiving, the UN World Food Program is warning that famines of “biblical proportions” may be coming because of the economic impacts of coronavirus. How can you protect yourself from COVID-19? You can do more than wash your hands and wear a mask. We’ll look at how to avoid getting it—and help your body recover if you do get it—by boosting your immune system through exercise. The Thanksgiving holiday recalls some wonderful U.S. history. This month marks 400 years since the first pilgrims landed in the Plymouth Colony under Gov. William Bradford. We look at an important lesson learned by those early Americans. I conclude with some thoughts from Herbert W. Armstrong in 1945 on why even democracy fails. Links [02:10] Famine (15 minutes) The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse "UN Warns of ‘Famines of Biblical Proportions" [17:15] Coronavirus and Exercise (13 minutes) [30:40] Thanksgiving History (14 minutes) “The Hidden Lesson Behind the First Thanksgiving” [44:05] LAST WORD: Democracy (6 minutes) “Why Even Democracy Fails”

Chase MedSearch Podcast
SPECIAL EPISODE: A Thanksgiving Discussion with John McDonald, Western Sales Director, Medtronic Deep Brain Stimulation (Retired)

Chase MedSearch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2020 38:52


In this special Thanksgiving themed episode, Jordan interviews his long-time and good friend John McDonald, now retired from Medtronic Deep Brain Stimulation. The pair discuss their Thanksgiving traditions, how John is staying in the game after retirement and how both a Wall Street Journal® article from 1961 & an excerpt from the journal of William Bradford still ring true today.

The Rush Limbaugh Show
The Rush Limbaugh Show Podcast - Nov 24 2020

The Rush Limbaugh Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2020 113:32


PODCAST SUMMARY HOUR 1: The Real Story of Thanksgiving. George Washington’s First Thanksgiving proclamation. Record-breaking EIB ratings in our 32nd year. Oregon governor encourages citizens to snitch on fellow citizens celebrating Thanksgiving. PA governor bans alcohol sales on Thanksgiving Eve. Dem govs drunk with power. Mattis to Biden: Get rid of America First. Trump legal team, Rudy says they still have a case. Poll: 79% of Trump voters think the election was stolen. It's absurd that we can't have an election and count the votes on election night. 16-year-old caller. Mattis and America First. Trump marks the DOW breaking the 30,000 mark.                            PODCAST SUMMARY HOUR 2:   Our Thanksgiving tradition: The True Story of Thanksgiving. The version of Thanksgiving that you were taught in school, compared to what really happened. William Bradford and the Mayflower Compact. The early settlers experimented with socialism and it did not work. If more people knew the real story of Thanksgiving, we may have prevented this election. It was private property and free enterprise that saved the Plymouth settlement. What Squanto really taught the Pilgrims. The Federalist on the real story of Thanksgiving. Biden names cabinet, says they will keep America safe, keep adversaries in check, terrorists at bay. Trump already did it! The monumental achievements of Donald Trump go unreported. Myth of Manhattan and the Indians.                                          PODCAST SUMMARY HOUR 3: Bozell: 45% of Democrat voters in battleground states say they didn't hear about Hunter Biden story, 9% say it would have changed their vote. Media is pure activism now, it's not journalism. GOP candidates are running against Big Tech, Big Media, Big Hollywood. George Washington's First Thanksgiving Proclamation. Why Rush wanted Obama to fail. The myth of the Indians and Manhattan. Carl Bernstein's list of 21 Republican he says hate Trump. Rush thanks his family and the audience. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Godward: A Lit-Wisdom Podcast
Episode 19: Thanksgiving and the Challenge of Nonconformism

Godward: A Lit-Wisdom Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2020 27:51


Yes, the Puritans hated art and subverted the Catholic hierarchy, but they weren't totally without insight. In this episode, hear a few sections from William Bradford's "Of Plymouth Plantation," including the primary source for the Thanksgiving story. It includes mention of eating wild turkey!

Ivy League Murders
Yale's William Bradford Bishop, Jr.: The Forty-Four Year Search for a Killer Fugitive

Ivy League Murders

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2020 37:30


How easy is it just to disappear? After committing an horrific crime in 1976, William Bishop used his experience in intelligence and foreign service to evade justice. He has never been found. Join us this week as we put our ILM spin on the case.

365 Christian Men
William Bradford, US, Governor

365 Christian Men

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2020 6:23


November 9. William Bradford. In England in the early 17th century, a group of people longed to break free of government-controlled religion and serve God from their hearts. They were called Separatists. Though they endured terrible persecution, they refused to give up.  But when their young people started to be drawn away by people in Holland, Bradford warned that their children […] The post William Bradford, US, Governor first appeared on 365 Christian Men.

Word with Bowne, or That Dude who Teaches English
Reading Receptively and Resistently with Historical Autobiographies and Documents

Word with Bowne, or That Dude who Teaches English

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2020 12:50


William Bradford, John Smith, Ben Franklin, and Frederick Douglass: all famous for personal narratives; all written for a specific purpose and auidence; consider how the past impacts the present; what can we learn from these writers? Can we believe everything they write? Why not? What type of persona are they crafting? What is the danger of believing what may be fictionalized as being passed off as truth. Think about writing a "conversational essay" where you address a topic from one or more of these narratives in an informal manner: divergent, digressive, pulling in current events and personal story, to create an essay that's interesting, engaging, and insightful.

Foundational Podcast
What is the Biblical Basis for Racial Reconciliation?

Foundational Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2020 64:51


March 1620, a Native American named Samoset came into the Plymouth colony. He told them about another Native American named Squanto. These two men became significant in the life of the Plymouth colony. They introduced the leaders of the colony to the leader of the Indians in that area, Massasoit. William Bradford, leader of the Pilgrims, described the event in this way in his journal entitled The Plymouth Settlement. After some time of entertainment, being dismissed with gifts, in a little while he returned with five more, and they brought back all the tools that had been stolen, and made way for the coming their great Sachem, called Massasoyt, who about four or five days after, came with the chief of his friends and other attendanctgs and with Squanto. With him, after friendly entertainment and some gifts, they made peace which has now continue for twenty-four years: William Bradford, Bradford’s History of the Plymouth Settlement, 1608-1650 Original Manuscript Entitled Of Plymouth Plantation, rendered into modern English by Harold Paget 1909 (San Antonio: Mantle Ministries 1988) 79-80 These were the terms: That neither he nor any of his, should injure or harm any of their people. That if any of his did any harm to any other theirs, he should send the offender, that they might punish him. That if anything were taken away from any of theirs, e should cause to be restored; and they should do the like to his. If any made unjust war against him, they would aid him; if any made war against them, he should aid them. He should send to his neighboring confederates, to certify, them of this, that they might not wrong them but might be likes comprised in the conditions of peace. That when their men came to them, they should leave their bows and arrows behind them. Some historical records document this treaty went beyond the 24 years of Bradford’s records into 60 years of peace. The peace pact was broken by another tribe of Native Americans that was either discontent or did not agree with the treaty being signed in the first place. Professor Mookgo Solomon Kgatle of the University of South Africa, Department of Christian Spirituality, Church History, and Missiology, is a prolific writer. In 2016 he authored, The influence of Azusa Street Revival in the early developments of the Apostolic Faith Mission of South Africa. He wrote in the introduction of that paper, This article demonstrates the influence of Azusa Street Revival in the early developments of the Apostolic Faith Mission (AFM) of South Africa. This will be done by studying the Azusa Street Revival in context, the role played by William Sey- mour and the characteristics of the Revival. The article also studies the influence of Azusa Street Revival on the pioneers of Pentecostalism in South Africa, John G Lake and Thomas Hezmalhalch, African Pentecostal like Elias Letwaba and the Central Tabernacle Congregation. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate that the main impact of Azusa Street Revival in the early developments of the AFM of South Africa was its ability to unite people beyond their differences of race, gender, colour, age and others in a hostile political environment and Pentecostal experiences. Mookgo Solomon Kgatle, PhD., The influence of Azusa Street Revival in the early developments of the Apostolic Faith Mission of South Africa (Missionalia, Vol. 44, No. 3, 2016) He concluded the article with, “Therefore, the main impact of Azusa Street Revival in the early developments of the AFM of South Africa was its ability to unite people beyond their differences of race, gender, age, and color and Pentecostal experiences.” The greatest capacity for racial reconciliation and the healing of our land is not political. It is not protesting, or riots, or Black Lives Matter. It is a Holy Spirit awakening. What is the Old Testament view of color and race? God created the first couple, Adam and Eve, in His own image. They were the first parents of mankind. The entire human race has its origin and DNA from this first couple (Genesis 1:26-28). Following the flood in which the entire population of the earth perished except three couples, Noah and his wife with his three sons and their wives, God repopulated the earth from these three families. They were the sole survivors of the original parents and are now the parents of all human beings (Genesis 9:1-6). It was God who scattered the people across the globe and initiated the various languages (Genesis 11:1-9). The Holy Scriptures reveal God’s heart about racial prejudice in a very power way. Miriam, the biological sister of Moses, was offended he had married a black woman of Ethiopia. Miriam shared that bitterness with their brother, Aaron. Out of the bitterness caused by the prejudice in their heart, Aaron and Miriam became critical and judgmental of Moses. They spoke about him in a demeaning way as a leader and they claimed equal status and equal authority. God dealt with their racial prejudice severely (Numbers 12:1-16). What is the New Testament view of color and race? The Apostle Paul was in Athens on his second missionary journey when he was invited by some the philosophers to speak at the Areopagus. In his address to these humanists the Apostle pointed out among the many deities of the Athenians on display was an altar “to the unknown god.” He explained, the God for which they were searching was Almighty God, “who made the world and everything in it, since He is Lord of heaven and earth, does not dwell in temples made with hands.” The Apostle then made this profound statement: “And He has made from one blood every nation of men to dwell on all the face of the earth, and has determined their preappointed times and the boundaries of their dwellings…” (Acts 17:22-28). The Apostle was referencing the Old Testament narrative. All of mankind are of the same blood because we are of the same parentage. Every human being, regardless of color or race, stands equal in worth and value in the sight of God. “For you are all sons of God through faith in Christ Jesus. For as many of you as were baptized into Christ have put on Christ. There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is neither male nor female; for you are all one in Christ Jesus” (Galatians 3:26-28; Colossians 3:9-11; Revelation 5:9-10). What is the Biblical conclusion? Every human being has the same original parents in Adam and Eve and through Noah and his family. We are all related. God has your parentage, your skin color, and your nationality written in His book from the foundation of the world (Psalm 139:13-17). The Holy Scriptures have the only basis for reconciliation. All men and woman are sinners from birth. Stereotypes and racial profiling have their origin in the sinful heart of mankind. Bigotry is a sin that fosters from bitterness in the heart of a man or woman. We must not be blind to the sinfulness of racial prejudice and to the politicizing of it. Only the redemptive work of Jesus Christ can transform a sinful heart. The Apostle Paul wrote in 2 Corinthians 5:17-2, "Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation; old things have passed away; behold, all things have become new. Now all things are of God, who has reconciled us to Himself through Jesus Christ, and has given us the ministry of reconciliation, that is, that God was in Christ reconciling the world to Himself, not imputing their trespasses to them, and has committed to us the word of reconciliation." (NKJV). The ministry of reconciliation has been imparted to every disciple of Jesus Christ when they are born again. The Holy Spirit deposits in their heart the word of reconciliation. Based upon what foundation? The creation of a new person by the renewing and regeneration of the Holy Spirit (Titus 3:5) in which they are given a new heart that is made in the righteousness of Jesus Christ (2Corinthians 5:21). Bigotry and racial prejudice have no place in a righteous heart. Indeed, the righteous heart is an instrument of God for healing and reconciliation. The born again child of God must choose to love every person and see every person as family, regardless of color. We are not color blind. We see color and acknowledge the differences and the differences in the culture of each color. We choose to honor, respect, value and celebrate our differences. We believe the best about every person. We acknowledge we are all family because we have the same Creator, the same Heavenly Father, and the same Redeemer. More articles: A Biblical Answer to Black Lives Matter How the Church Should Respond to Racial Division America Needs Reconciliation If you enjoyed this podcast, please consider leaving us a review. This helps the Foundational podcast reach more listeners. Be sure to tell a friend about the Foundational blog and podcast. More about Pastor Dean Subscribe to receive my blog posts and podcasts Here is where you can find me online My Books Discovering True Identity Agape Charis Made By Design My Bible Studies Discovering Jesus The Joy of Becoming Like Jesus Becoming Ambassadors for Christ Father's Promise Join the Leadership Development Institute Join me at 10 AM PST every Sunday morning at my online Worship service About Dean Dr. F. Dean Hackett has served in full-time Christian ministry since October 1971. He has ministered throughout the United States, Canada and Europe, serving as pastor, conference speaker and mentor. He has planted four churches, assisted in planting 15 others and currently serves as lead pastor of Living Faith Church in Hermiston, Oregon. Dr. Hackett founded Spirit Life Ministries International in 2001 to facilitate ministries in Croatia and Bosnia Herzegovina and to open a training center for workers in those nations.

Every Town
Bethesda, Maryland: The Chilling Story of William Bradford Bishop, Jr.

Every Town

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2020 27:46


Go to https://deadboltmysterysociety.com/ and use the promo code: deadbolt20 for 20% OFF your first order!Scary Mysteries Youtube:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiE86yS_VM7qjiICqRPmwLQ?view_as=subscriberOwn Shares In Our New HORROR MOVIE: https://www.startengine.com/an-angry-boyContact US: info@newdawnfilm.comOn March 9, 1976, the screaming banner story of “The Washington Post” read: “Five members of a Bethesda family — the wife, mother and three sons of a missing State Department official — were beaten to death in their home last week and then driven to North Carolina, where their bodies were set afire in an open grave.” The five bodies found at a burning pit in a woods in Columbia, North Carolina were later connected to deplorable murders in a split-level house in Bethesda, Montgomery County in Maryland on March 1, 1976. The wasted lives belonged to William Bradford Bishop’s family – touted as a barometer of an ideal American family in their community during the 1970s. But what their neighbors and the public didn’t know was the troubled figurehead of the Bishop family, Bradford, who when stripped of his prestigious title as an American diplomat revealed a shocking persona – that of an unhinged murderer.

Park Predators
The Photographer

Park Predators

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2020 42:43


A ruthless and tactical predator posing as a photographer in Los Angeles’s Westside lures young women to their deaths with promises of fame and fortune. The capture of William Bradford may solve two murders, but his collection of work reveals to authorities there are even more victims to unearth in the canyons of California’s mountains and sands of the Mojave Desert. Sources for this episode cannot be listed here due to character limitations. For a full list of sources, please visit https://parkpredators.com/episode-11-the-photographer/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Eric Ludy Sermon Podcast: Church at Ellerslie

Podcast: The Church at Ellerslie Sermons   Title: Surviving the Second Cut Sub-title: a study in enduring to the end   Date: August 16, 2020   Series: The Spiritual Biography of a Nation Part: #12   Description: Many Christians start out strong, but few finish strong. Many believers come out of the gate with gusto but instead of continuing steadfast they either limp to the finish line or bail out altogether from the spiritual fray. Using the Pilgrim’s extraordinary send-off from England in 1620 as powerful illustration for the need of spiritual resilience, Eric Ludy will make every listener crave to be a William Bradford rather than a Robert Cushman.   

Eric Ludy Sermon Podcast: Church at Ellerslie

Podcast: The Church at Ellerslie Sermons   Title: Surviving the Second Cut Sub-title: a study in enduring to the end   Date: August 16, 2020   Series: The Spiritual Biography of a Nation Part: #12   Description: Many Christians start out strong, but few finish strong. Many believers come out of the gate with gusto but instead of continuing steadfast they either limp to the finish line or bail out altogether from the spiritual fray. Using the Pilgrim’s extraordinary send-off from England in 1620 as powerful illustration for the need of spiritual resilience, Eric Ludy will make every listener crave to be a William Bradford rather than a Robert Cushman.   

Muenster Mash Podcast
62 - We're a professional podcast, I swear

Muenster Mash Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2020 82:03


This week Steph covers murderer William Bradford and Jessica covers another murderer (big surprise) Paul Warner Powell. Thanks for downloading and Stay Fresh!

Foundational Podcast
Was America Founded For the Glory of God?

Foundational Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2020 43:53


  What is it that makes America great and unique among the nations of the earth? “They cherished a great hope and inward zeal of laying good foundations, or at least of making some way towards it, for the propagation and advance of the gospel of the kingdom of Christ in the remotes part of the world, even though they should be but stepping stones to others in the performance of so great a work."  (William Bradford, The Plymouth Settlement, Mantle Ministries, San Antonio, 1988, 21). The Founding Fathers of the United States firmly believed God had called them to establish a colony in the Americas to be a light of the Gospel of Jesus Christ; a new Israel, as it were. Upon preparing to disembark from the Mayflower onto the shores at Plymouth Rock these hearty souls entered into a covenant with Almighty God. “In the name of God, Amen. We whose names are underwritten the loyal subjects of our dread sovereign lord, Kingdom James, by the grace of God, of Great Britain, France and Ireland, King Defender of the Faith, etc.,having undertaken for the glory of God, and advancement of the Christian faith and honor of our king and country, a voyage to plant the first colony in the northern parts of Virginia, do by these presents solemnly and mutually in the presence of God, and of one another, covenant and combine ourselves into a civil body politic, for our better ordering and preservation an d the furtherance of the ends aforesaid and by virtue, hereof to enact, constitute, and frame such just and equal laws ordinances acts, constitutions, and offices, from time to time, as shall be thought most meet and convenient for the general use of the Colony, unto which we promise all due submission and obedience. In witness whereof we have here underscribed our names at Cape Cod, 11th of November, in the year of the reign of our sovereign lord, King James of England, France and Ireland the eighteenth and of Scotland the fifty-fourth. A.D. 1620” (Bradford, The Plymouth Settlement, 75-76). Notice they were establishing a body politic and government structure “In the Name of God" and with the express purpose “for the glory of God, and advancement of the Christian faith.” It could not be clearer. Patrick Henry, leader in the American Revolution, Commander-in-Chief of the Virginia Militia, member of the Continental Congress, and a member of the Virginia General Assembly and House of Burgesses; offered the positions of Secretary of State and Chief Justice of the Supreme Court by George Washington, but he declined, knew very well the heart of our nation’s Founding Fathers. He boldly stated, “It cannot be emphasized too strongly or too often that this great nation was founded, not by religionists but by Christians; not on religions, but on the Gospel of Jesus Christ. For this very reason peoples of other faiths have been afforded asylum, prosperity and freedom of worship here.” This covenant with God was affirmed further in the Declaration of Independence, “We, therefore, the representatives of the United States of America in general congress assembled, appealing to the supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions… and for the support of this declaration with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.” The United States of America is unique in the nations of history because it was formed in covenant with Almighty God and His Word, the Holy Bible, was the guidebook and the foundation for the laws of the land and the constitution of its government. Only one other nation in the history of mankind was so formed, Israel. What does that mean for the United States of America, now that she has become post-Christian and rapidly moving toward anti-Christian? Is it possible for a nation to throw off its God or exchange its God for another god without serious consequence? Does it even matter? There is only one example to which America can look and discover the answer. The prophet Isaiah answered that question. “Come, O house of Jacob, let us walk in the light of the LORD. You have abandoned your people, the house of Jacob. They are full of superstitions from the East; they practice divination like the Philistines and clasp hands with pagans. Their land is full of silver and gold; there is no end to their treasures. Their land is full of horses; there is no end to their chariots. Their land is full of idols; they bow down to the work of their hands, to what their fingers have made. So man will be brought low and mankind humbled — do not forgive them” (Isaiah 2:5-9 NIV). Read part two The Danger of Tolerance and Political Correctness Resources mentioned in this article: More Articles About America: It Is Not a Political Problem - Part One It Is Not a Political Problem - A Double Tragedy This Is What Will Change Our Culture How the Church Should Respond When the Foundations Are Shaken The Crisis Point of the Modern American Church America is Filled With Idols and False Worship Why the Term "Forever President" Is a Dangerous Trend The Danger In Destroying Our Monuments How America Has Rejected God, Not Man Was America Founded For the Glory of God?

StoryConnect the Podcast
How Telcos are Responding to COVID-19 Part 1

StoryConnect the Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2020 16:05


In partnership with Lead Tennessee Radio, WordSouth has four telco managers discussing how COVID-19 has impacted their operations. This episode includes Mark Patterson, William Bradford, Bruce Mottern and Johnathan West.

Tudor History with Claire Ridgway
May 9 - Colonist William Bradford

Tudor History with Claire Ridgway

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2020 8:28


On this day in history, in the Stuart period, 9th May 1657, William Bradford died. He is known as the founder of the Plymouth Colony in America and the writer of a chronicle of its early years: “Of Plimmoth Plantation”. But how did a Yorkshire man of farming stock become a Puritan and a governor of a colony in North America? What led to him becoming a "pilgrim" and boarding The Mayflower? Find out in today's talk from Claire Ridgway, author of "On This Day in Tudor History". You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:https://youtu.be/5Q9XcxptpCg Bradford’s history of the Plymouth Plantation can be read online at - https://archive.org/details/historyplymouth00bradgoog/page/n11/mode/2up Also on this day in history, 9th May 1509, the remains of King Henry VII were taken to St Paul’s to prepare for his burial at Westminster Abbey. Find out more in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/sWeSiAkW7BcAnd on this day in 1536, King Henry VIII wanted an update on the investigation into his second wife, Queen Anne Boleyn. Find out more in the video for 9th May 1536 - https://youtu.be/ectaTReDez0 

Lead Tennessee Radio
#12 William Bradford, President and CEO of United Communications

Lead Tennessee Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2020 17:53


President and CEO William Bradford discusses United Communications' response to the Covid-19 outbreak and recent severe weather. He also discusses the company's work to extend broadband to its service area.

OldColonyCast
Mayflower Part 2: What's a Jackscrew?

OldColonyCast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2020 67:53


Hanna, Andy, and Fish return to finish the story of the Mayflower. We talk about William Bradford's slapstick misadventures, the origin of the Billington Sea, and why they needed the jackscrew.   Intro music is from "Across the Line" by the Wellington Sea Shanty Society

Messer Brothers Presents
WANTED: William Bradford Bishop

Messer Brothers Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 27, 2020 57:28


The Messer Brothers discuss the case of William Bradford Bishop, a man who allegedly murdered his wife, mother, and three kids in 1976...and then vanished. Where did he go? Could he still be out there somewhere, living his life with a new identity? Join Craig and Nick as they talk about possible sightings and theories of where Bishop could have gone.

FRANCY AND FRIENDS
DAYS OF THE DEAD PRESENTS NEVADA NECROMANCE EDITOR JOE MOE AND AUTHORS

FRANCY AND FRIENDS

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2020 140:00


On Francy & Friends this Saturday, March 20th at 2PM, we’ll feature editor and horror figure Joe Moe and Black Bed Sheet Books publisher Nicholas Grabowsky to discuss their ongoing series of Days of the Dead “fanthologies” where horror fans can submit their best short horror stories to be considered for publication. We’ll debut the latest fanthology, “Nevada Necromance” and take calls from contributing writers as well as fans interested in becoming published themselves. Join Francy and her co-hosts Tom Sawyer, and William Bradford to talk about these exciting new fanthologies and how you can turn the current quarantine into a productive workshop that could transform you into the writer you’ve always dreamed of being! Call in Sat. at 2PM: (914) 205-5523

FRANCY AND FRIENDS
DAYS OF THE DEAD PRESENTS NEVADA NECROMANCE EDITOR JOE MOE AND AUTHORS

FRANCY AND FRIENDS

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2020 140:00


On Francy & Friends this Saturday, March 20th at 2PM, we’ll feature editor and horror figure Joe Moe and Black Bed Sheet Books publisher Nicholas Grabowsky to discuss their ongoing series of Days of the Dead “fanthologies” where horror fans can submit their best short horror stories to be considered for publication. We’ll debut the latest fanthology, “Nevada Necromance” and take calls from contributing writers as well as fans interested in becoming published themselves. Join Francy and her co-hosts Tom Sawyer, and William Bradford to talk about these exciting new fanthologies and how you can turn the current quarantine into a productive workshop that could transform you into the writer you’ve always dreamed of being! Call in Sat. at 2PM: (914) 205-5523

Museum Archipelago
76. 400 Years Post-Mayflower, the Provincetown Museum Rethinks Its Historical Branding

Museum Archipelago

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2020 12:39


Sometimes, a historical event is all about the branding. And the brand of Plymouth Rock in Plymouth, Massachusetts as the spot where the Mayflower pilgrims first disembarked 400 years ago this year is pretty strong. The branding is strong enough to override the fact that the Mayflower actually first landed on the other side of Cape Cod, in what is now Provincetown. The Pilgrim Monument and Provincetown Museum commemorates that site. And even within a museum that’s trying to correct an inaccuracy, it has its own to grapple with: the museum used to portray the meetings between the members of the Wampanoag Nation and the Mayflower pilgrims with dehumanizing murals. In this episode, Courtney Hurst, board president of the Pilgrim Monument and Provincetown Museum, describes how the museum is working to correct these inaccuracies by working closely with the Wampanoag Nation. And as the 400th anniversary of the Mayflower arrival approaches, the museum is in the middle of yet another rebrand. Just as the word pilgrim was reframed by Mayflower passenger William Bradford as a way to tie his journey to stories in the Christian Bible, the museum is reframing the word pilgrim to include recent Provincetown history. This episode was recorded at the Pilgrim Monument and Provincetown Museum on February 22, 2020. Topics and Links 00:00 Intro 00:15 Plymouth Rock and Historical Branding 02:00 Courtney Hurst 02:20 Pilgrim Monument and Provincetown Museum (https://www.pilgrim-monument.org) 03:55 Portrayal of the Wampanoag Nation 04:30 Our Story 05:20 Corn Hill 06:00 Provincetown 400 (https://www.pilgrim-monument.org/provincetown-400/) 07:00 Reframing The Word Pilgrim 09:30 Spiritus Pizza Riot of 1990 (https://duckduckgo.com/?q=Spiritus+Pizza+Riot+of+1990) 10:17 Historical Brands are Powerful 11:30 Archipelago At the Movies

Your London Legacy
Special Season: Mayflower 400 – Rotherhithe Illuminated! A Legacy Lighting Scheme To Commemorate Rotherhithe’s Key Role In The Mayflower Story

Your London Legacy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2019 45:19


In this fourth and final part of our mini-series designed to be part of the wonderful Mayflower 400 commemorations—we shine a light, literally and metaphorically, on the historic Rotherhithe on the banks of The Thames. This fascinating and sometimes overlooked London gem has a stunning history that dates back many centuries. Christopher Jones—the Master and part owner of the Mayflower, lived and died in Rotherhithe, and it is thought to be its final resting place before being broken up. In keeping with the theme of this week’s conversation, we met up with three special ladies at The Ship Pub in Rotherhithe. Clare Armstrong, Pauline Adenwaller and Michele Page-Jones are driving forward a community led holistic lighting scheme called Rotherhithe Illuminated, with the intention of enhancing nighttime views of some of the areas most and historic sites—from St Mary’s Church, Thames Tunnel Mills, Brunel’s Engine House, as well as the Mayflower Public House and the figurines on The Old School House. The project will deliver a permanent Mayflower legacy for Rotherhithe, which perfectly compliments the wonderfully inspiring voyage taken 400 years ago. This your London Legacy  “I think some people having twice set out and having to come back lost their resolve. You squeezed more people on one ship than should have been.” 4:20 Rotherhithe was the home of Captain, or Master Christopher Jones. He was an exporter of wool and imported wine—his last cargo before sailing for the new world was all wine. His three children were baptized in the church in Rotherhithe and when he set out on the Mayflower the ship was full of other traders looking to find better life and better trade—specifically beaver pelts, a hot commodity back in the 1600s. 12:50 The Mayflower met up with the Speedwell in August of 1620, but that ship was felled by leaks and eventually the passengers all packed onto the Mayflower. This kicked off a perilous journey that we know of from a journal kept by William Bradford. This includes a famous story of John Hammond falling overboard, but barely managing to hold onto a rope and pull himself up in the terrible seas the ship was subject to—a tale called The Boy Who Fell Overboard. 14:50 Upon returning in 1621, with an empty ship, the Mayflower was left to rot on the foreshore—and Captain Jones died only a year later in 1622 and buried in St. Mary’s church. A sad end to a harrowing tale that has gone on to affect the lives of millions and change the geopolitical landscape across the globe.  “It will make people feel proud…and what used to be called civic pride about the area they live in.” However, Michele,Clare, and Pauline are set on making sure this tale gets commemorated not only during the Mayflower 400 celebrations, but for years to come. Their lighting project “Illuminate Rotherhithe” sets out to accentuate architecture and monuments in such a way that the features that played a part in this tale stand out at night to be seen by all. It is a celebration of Rotherhithe’s maritime history that includes educational components for children to help tell the story that many in the city still aren’t familiar with.   The trio are still fundraising for the project and I’d highly encourage you to visit the program’s website to find out how you can take part and see this wonderful project and celebration come to life and you can make a donation here at www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/rotherhithe-illuminated (https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/rotherhithe-illuminated)   Links SE16.RI@gmail.com (mailto:SE16.RI@gmail.com) https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/rotherhithe-illuminated (https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/rotherhithe-illuminated)   Support this podcast

Red Meat Radio
Giving Thanks For William Bradford's Legacy

Red Meat Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2019 12:28


State Auditor John Dougall and Salt Lake County Councilwoman (and gubernatorial candidate) Aimee Winder Newton talk with Weber County Clerk/Auditor Ricky Hatch about his 8th great grandfather William Bradford, governor of Plymouth Colony. Hatch shares various tales including the challenges of survival and the failed attempt at communal living.

The Mission Driven Mom
Mission Driven Stories: William Bradford and the Thanksgiving Story

The Mission Driven Mom

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2019 46:59


"'Blessed be the God in heaven who has brought us over this vast and furious ocean,' he prayed, 'You have delivered us from the perils and miseries at sea and set our feet on firm and stable ground--our proper place to dwell. For this we thank You and bless You.'" So many versions of the First Thanksgiving are told today! With Thanksgiving coming soon, we thought we'd bypass others' opinions and go right to the original source. To do this we learned all about the central figure that made it all possible - William Bradford. As a major driving force behind the escape to Holland, the decision to seek religious freedom in the New World, finding financial backers for their venture, determining the exact location for their colony, building peaceful relations with the local Indians and keeping everyone alive for the first 3 years, Bradford played THE biggest role in making the Plymouth Plantation a key part in America's eventual success.  In this podcast, you'll hear about the tremendous number of losses he experienced as a young boy, his phenomenal education and spiritual preparation, his personal sacrifices, and the exceptional leadership he provided as Plymouth's governor for 36 years. Make sure to share this story with all you love so they can appreciate with heartfelt gratitude this Thanksgiving the rich heritage they've been given. Listener's Guide: Use the time stamps below to skip to any part of the podcast.  0:43  Update on hard copies of The Mission Driven Life book, Podcasts, and Cottage Meetings 6:00  William Bradford's early years 9:40  Bradford's education 11:55  King James' reforms and Puritanism  14:35  Bradford tries out Puritanism 16:30  Bradford's attempts to escape 18:54  Conditions in Holland 21:28  The decision to move to the New World and the search for investors 25:35  Merchant Adventurers change the deal and they sail to America 29:55  The Mayflower Compact and the first prayer 35:00  Samoset and Squanto arrive and help the Puritans 38:00  Plymouth colony and Massasoit sign a peace treaty, the "First Thanksgiving" 40:11  Merchant Adventurers make things harder 42:40  Principles Bradford honored and led with Quotes from this episode: *All quotes from William Bradford, Plymouth's Rock by Janet and Geoff Benge and Of Plymouth Plantation: The Pilgrims in America by William Bradford "Williams was a good student and soon mastered reading, writing, and arithmetic. Most of all, he enjoyed reading, in particular, one book his tutor loaned him, Foxe's Book of Martyrs." "Tears ran down the faces of the Separatist men as they looked back in horror, realizing that their wives and children and their fellow Separatist men were being left behind and they were helpless to do anything about it." "It was challenging to feed and clothe everyone...everyone had to work hard to raise the money needed to survive. Even the children, some as young as four years old, had to work...The truth was, if a family could not make enough money, they were in danger of starving to death...A number of people lived in cramped quarters, where disease was a constant threat. Several children had died, including the Brewsters' new baby. Many families worked with linen, and over the years, tiny, wiry flax fibers had lodged in their lungs, making it hard to breathe." Mayflower Compact: "In the name of God, Amen. We, whose names are underwritten, the loyal subjects of our dread Sovereigne Lord, King James, by the grace of God, of Great Britaine, France and Ireland king, defender of the faith, etc. having undertaken, for the glory of God, and advancement of the Christian faith, and honour of our king and country, a voyage to plant the first colony in the Northerne parts of Virginia, doe by these presents solemnly and mutually in the presence of God and one of another, covenant and combine ourselves together into a civill body politick, for our better ordering and preservation,

We Talk About Dead People
102: William Bradford | The Pilgrim's Pride

We Talk About Dead People

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2019 96:47


Spoiler alert: IT WAS THE F*CKING BRITISH. The true story comedy podcast of the next generation. VENMO TIP JAR: @wtadp PATREON: www.patreon.com/wetalkaboutdeadpeople SOUNDCLOUD: @wetalkaboutdeadpeople FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/wetalkaboutdeadpeople TWITTER: www.twitter.com/wtadppodcast SPOTIFY: open.spotify.com/show/2OJRFxh9MGNb9AhA4JuOeX itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/we-ta…d1282606749?mt=2 #history #comedy #memes #funny #wtadp #wtadppodcast #podcast #true #story

Brother Trucker Book Club
Ep 087 Thanksgiving Mega Episode!

Brother Trucker Book Club

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2019 33:55


"Of Plymouth Plantation" by William Bradford, "Mayflower" by Nathaniel Philbrick, "The Mayflower and Her Passengers" by Caleb H. Johnson, "Squanto" by Charles River Editors, and "Brian's Winter" by Gary Paulsen.

Already Gone
LIVE!! Special Episode! William Bradford Bishop

Already Gone

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2019 53:27


This is a special LIVE episode recorded at the True Crime Podcast Festival in Chicago Illinois on Saturday July 13, 2019  Already Gone and Trace Evidence podcasts bring you the horrifying story of William Bradford Bishop  Special thanks to our sponsor, Better Help. Use code GONE for 10% off your first month.  #Murder #missing #unsolved #annihilator #Maryland #TraceEvidence #AlreadyGone  Support the show.

The Tabernacle Today
Can Do Christians

The Tabernacle Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2019 39:51


Can Do Christians       Luke 17:1-10 “William Bradford, speaking in 1630 of the founding of the Plymouth Bay Colony, said that all great and honorable actions are accompanied with great difficulties, and both must be enterprised and overcome with answerable courage… We choose to go to the moon. We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one which we intend to win, and the others, too.”                                       -President John F. Kennedy, Sept. 12, 1962 at Rice University As we read the gospels we see Jesus challenge His disciples many times to do that which they could ______________ do in their own strength but that they can do through Him who gives them strength! Can Do Christians practice the ___________________ brother principle                                                                          V. 1-3a The word for offense is the Greek word skandalon (4625), from which we get our word scandal.  It indicates the trigger of a trap, a “trap-stick.” We are not to be the “_______________r” for somebody else falling into sin.                   Romans 14:10-13        I Cor. 1:1 Can Do Christians speak TO their brother, not _______________ their brother                                                                           V. 3b  “The character of an absent person should never be discussed.”                                                                            -Augustine Can Do Christians forgive as they have been forgiven        V. 3c-4 2 Parts of forgiveness… Can Do Christians focus on the ___________ of their faith V. 5-6 Romans 10:17 Can Do Christians don’t expect ________________ for doing what they ought                                                                           V. 7-10

The Tabernacle Today
Exodus Chapter 5

The Tabernacle Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2019 36:59


Exodus Chapter 5 “William Bradford, speaking in 1630 of the founding of the Plymouth Bay Colony, said that all great and honorable actions are accompanied with great difficulties, and both must be enterprised and overcome with answerable courage… We choose to go to the moon. We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one which we intend to win, and the others, too.”                   -President John F. Kennedy, Sept. 12, 1962 at Rice University Exodus is best described with two words – ___________________ and Worship. Genesis 15:12-14                           Genesis 50:24-26 I Kings 6:1 tells us that Solomon’s fourth year as king was 480 years after the Exodus. Archaeology tells us that that Solomon’s fourth year was 966/965 B.C. That means the Exodus happened in 1445 B.C.  Genesis ends with Israel down in Egypt with 70 people; Exodus will end with Israel as a nation of ______________ worshipping God at Mount Sinai. Moses Confronts Pharaoh with God’s __________________                 V. 1-5 What is significant about what Moses says there in the last part of verse 3? Now of course Pharaoh doesn’t know or obey Israel’s God, so he just gets angry at God’s people, which has been _____________________ throughout history. Pharaoh ____________________ God’s people Israel                              V. 6-19 Satan didn’t want Israel back in the Promised Land, so Satan uses Pharaoh to keep Israel enslaved and defeated. Their deliverance was coming, but that didn’t mean life would be ____________________. The __________________ game commences!                                            V. 20-23 What does Moses the leader do in Exodus 5 when the people complain to him? I love how Exodus tracks God’s ___________________ of Moses’ faith, and the model it is for us as our faith grows!

Reformed Hope
William Bradford: The Leiden Years (Episode 7)

Reformed Hope

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2019 18:00


William Bradford spent over a decade in Holland. These were the golden years of the Pilgrims, prior to coming to America. But there were also challenges to their new life in the Netherlands.

Reformed Hope
William Bradford: An Englishman in Amsterdam (Episode 6)

Reformed Hope

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2019 12:00


Finally arriving in Amsterdam, the Pilgrims were immediately confronted with several church controversies. One involved an unorthodox view of the Bible. The other involved sexual sin in the church. On top of this, Bradford and the other saints had to adjust to a new world where their farming skills were of little use.

Reformed Hope
William Bradford: Fleeing From Persecutors (Episode 5)

Reformed Hope

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2019 14:00


William Bradford and the congregation in Scrooby soon found themselves persecuted for their commitment to the New Testament model of the church. With King James on the throne, their future looked bleak in England. And so, they sought another land wherein they could worship according to their consciences.

Reformed Hope
William Bradford: Skipping Church (Episode 4)

Reformed Hope

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2019 14:00


William Bradford's path to becoming a Separatist began with an invitation to hear Richard Clyfton preach. Soon Bradford would be introduced to two other men who would shape his life for years to come- John Robinson and William Brewster. The small church that formed in Scrooby, England, was the birthplace of the Pilgrims and the cradle of Massachusetts.

Reformed Hope
William Bradford: A Boy and His Bible (Episode 3)

Reformed Hope

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2019 14:00


William Bradford was shaped from a youth by the sacred Scriptures. His love for reading, especially Foxe's Book of Martyrs and the Geneva Bible would shape him in a powerful way. In this episode, we briefly consider the impact of the Geneva Bible on both young Bradford and English-speaking people in general.

Reformed Hope
William Bradford: Born in Merrie England (Episode 2)

Reformed Hope

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2019 15:00


William Bradford was born into what has been called -Merrie England.- But for those seeking to worship Jesus Christ according to the Word of God, things were not so merry. Most people in Bradford's day submitted to Queen Elizabeth as the one authorized to dictate worship in the church. There were some, however, who refused to submit Christ's church to monarchs. These are the men who would come to change Bradford's life.

Reformed Hope
William Bradford: A Long-Lost Journal (Episode 1)

Reformed Hope

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2019 17:00


The first episode of Church History for Everyone is here- William Bradford has been called the -first American- and -the embodiment of the greatest values of Puritanism.- His story is an amazing one. It is a story of courage, faith, and dogged perseverance in the face of trials and hardships. Join us as we introduce this man and start our study of his life- You can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, Anchor, and all other podcast platforms-

Jensen and Holes: The Murder Squad

Billy Jensen and Paul Holes with special guest Georgia Hardstark look into the case of killer William Bradford. They want your help to identify his other victims. For more information, please visit TheMurderSquad.com

My Favorite Murder with Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark
Introducing Jensen and Holes: The Murder Squad - Episode 1

My Favorite Murder with Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2019 63:16


Billy Jensen and Paul Holes with special guest Georgia Hardstark look into the case of killer William Bradford. They want your help to identify his other victims. Follow The Murder Squad: http://themurdersquad.com/ https://twitter.com/JensenandHoles https://www.facebook.com/JensenandHoles/ https://www.instagram.com/jensenandholes/

Hidden History on WCAI
After 60 Years, Mayflower II Undergoes a Full-Scale Restoration

Hidden History on WCAI

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 4, 2019 4:35


The Mayflower II is currently undergoing a full-scale restoration at the DuPont Shipyard in Mystic, Connecticut. It’s a replica of the merchant ship that brought the Pilgrims first to Provincetown and then to Plymouth in 1620 - a now-historic event that was completely unremarkable at the time. “This is just cargo. The only good thing about this cargo is it was self-loading cargo,” said Whit Perry, Director of Maritime Preservation at Plimoth Plantation. The original Mayflower was sold for scrap in 1624. Many years later, a man named Warwick Charlton was returning to England after serving in World War Two, and he began reading “Of Plimoth Plantation” by William Bradford, the definitive account of the Pilgrims. “He formed a private company to build this reproduction and give it as a gift of appreciation to America for America’s help during World War Two,” said Perry. There are no surviving plans for the original Mayflower, so historians relied on their general knowledge of vessels from

VIDAL
1621 Informalmente Primer dia de Acción de Gracias EEUU

VIDAL

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2018 12:01


1621 en la primer colonia Plymouth(actualmente Massachusetts) entre peregrinos Ingleses y Nativos de la tribu Wampanoag. La fiesta en 1621 se celebró en agradecimiento por una buena cosecha. En los años posteriores, la tradición continuó con los líderes civiles tales como el gobernador William Bradford, quien planeó celebrar el día y ayudar en 1623.​ Dado que al principio la colonia de Plymouth no tenía suficiente comida para alimentar a la mitad de los 102 colonos, los nativos de la tribu Wampanoag ayudaron a los peregrinos dándoles semillas y enseñándoles a pescar. La práctica de llevar a cabo un festival de la cosecha como este no se volvió una tradición regular en Nueva Inglaterra hasta finales de la década de 1660. en Lucas 17:11-19 Jesus mando a 10 leprosos a mostrarse a los sacerdotes y en el camino fueron limpiados, v.15-16  Uno de ellos, al verse ya sano, regresó alabando a Dios a grandes voces. 16 Cayó rostro en tierra a los pies de Jesús y le dio las gracias. Siempre el agradecido sera mas bendecido, y en la historia hay mayoria que son ingratos, VAMOS A SER AGRADECIDOS!!

Documenteers: The Documentary Podcast
Episode 53: The Pilgrims

Documenteers: The Documentary Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2018 53:30


Give thanks, Doccalo. We actually have a Thanksgiving themed documentary to talk about! Bob and Angela discuss a PBS feature on the history of our most tight-assed of European Colonists. The Puritans. The Separatists. The Immigrants. "The Pilgrims" by Ric Burns. This "American Experience" special is available online at various cuts and lengths. It's the story of William Bradford and a bunch of folk that really weren't good at anything but praying and barely surviving. The story of the Pilgrims and the first Thanksgiving funneled through the filter of the Documenteers. It's the best version, really. Thanksgiving is Bob's favorite holiday. It's a lonely position to take. Bob would gladly fight Christmas in the streets for the honor of Thanksgiving. He would get his ass kicked horribly, but he would try. Just another casualty of the War on Thanksgiving. Get stuffed and Keep on Doccin®.

Southern Gone
S1 Episode 13: William Bradford Bishop Jr.

Southern Gone

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2018 16:33


On March 1, 1976, US Foreign Service Office William Bradford Bishop Jr. left his office in Washington DC and never came back. The bodies of his wife, mother, and 3 children were found one week later.Authorities believe that Bishop Jr. killed his family with a sledgehammer and used his station wagon to dispose of the bodies. Then, he disappeared.For everything Southern Gone visit our website www.SouthernGone.com. If you enjoy this podcast please leave a 5-star review and comment for a chance to be featured on a future episode.Investigating these cold cases is truly our passion project and we would not be able to do it without you! If you would like to support this podcast consider becoming a patron on patreon.com/southerngone.

Class A Felons, B-Films, C-Cups
2. Carolyn Bryant: Whistle Bait and the Murder of Emmett Till

Class A Felons, B-Films, C-Cups

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2018 32:31


1955, rural, Jim Crow-era Mississippi. Emmett Till, just 14 years old, met a horrific death after being accused of whistling at and putting his arm around 21-year-old Carolyn Bryant. Over 60 years later, her account of their fateful encounter changed. Just who is Carolyn, and what forces propelled her toward the center of a murder that would become a turning point in the Civil Rights Movement? This is the second episode in the podcast's first season, "Accessories to Murder." If you like this episode, please subscribe and rate us with 5 stars on iTunes or wherever you access podcasts. Hosts: Paris Brown and Desi Robba Produced & written by: Paris Brown Edited by: Paris Brown Music by: Dr. Frankenstein. "Theme for 'The Mad Thinker'" from The Cursed Tapes: Stolen Songs from Dr. Frankenstein's Lab, 2005 and by Lobo Loco. "Town Searching Murder" from Headcrash, 2018. Website Facebook Instagram Twitter SOURCES AND RECOMMENDED READING: Huie, William Bradford. “The Shocking Story of Approved Killing in Mississippi.” Look. Jan. 1956. Mitchell, Jerry. “Son of Emmett Till’s Killer in Panama Papers Scandal.” Clarion-Ledger. 9 May 2016. Nave, R.L. “Emmett Till Murder: The Full Text Testimony of Carolyn Bryant.” Mississippi Today. 12 Jul. 2018. Perez-Pena, Richard. “Woman Linked to 1955 Emmett Till Murder Tells Historian Her Claims were False.” The New York Times. 27 Jan. 2017. “Three Hurt in Collision Near Here on Sunday.” The Delta Democrat-Times. 19 Nov. 1956, p. 1. Tyson, Timothy B. The Blood of Emmett Till. Simon & Schuster, 2017. Weller, Sheila. “The Missing Woman: How Author Timothy Tyson Found the Woman at the Center of the Emmett Till Case.” Vanity Fair. 26 Jan. 2017.

Get Published Podcast
William Bradford - Book Writing Process

Get Published Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2018 22:16


In episode 52 of the Get Published Podcast, Host and 13-Time Bestselling Author Paul G. Brodie interviews William Bradford about his author journey and the process with writing his first book.

Gigabit Nation
Free At Last, TN Co-op Dives Into Broadband

Gigabit Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2018 61:00


Last year, the Tennessee governor and legislature freed co-ops of restrictions on delivering broadband to its members. Last month, the first co-op out of the gate announced its partnership with a local ISP to provide gigabit service to its members. Smart grid, public safety, and consumer and business services are some of the benefits middle Tennesseans will reap from the partnership. Chris Jones, President and CEO of Middle Tennessee Electric Member Corporation, William Bradford, president and CEO of United Communications and Fire Lieutenant Fritz Haimberger of the Peytonsville Volunteer Fire Department lay out the details.  There are several important lessons that co-ops nationwide as well as municipalities can learn from our guests.  Craig Settles hosts Gigabit Nation. He also assists communities with the business and marketing planning of their broadband networks.                

Interwoven
Isaac Allerton: Mayflower, Merchant, and Magistrate in the 17th-century Atlantic World

Interwoven

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2018 48:33


You may be familiar with some of the more famous Plymouth Colony names like William Bradford, William Brewster, or Miles Standish; but few know much about Isaac Allerton - an enigmatic man who rose to prominence in Plymouth, Marblehead, New Haven, and New Netherlands between 1620 and 1659. In this episode, host Hilary Goodnow spoke with historians David Furlow and Lisa Pennington who are working to unravel the mystery of Isaac Allerton and his family across the 17th-century Atlantic World.

Principled Uncertainty: A True Crime Podcast

PUPodcast, Episode 262: Bradford Bishop Mar. 2, 1976. 12:40 pm. About 5 mi. south of Columbia, NC, which lies in the far eastern stretches of the state, out near the coast. A NC forest ranger on Highway 94 named Wilma Swain observes smoke in the distance and calls in authorities to help locate and contain the fire. Thinking it to be no more than a disposal fire, Ranger Ron Brickhouse goes in search of it. Initially, he finds a pile of dirt, a shovel, and a red gas can, as if someone had started a fire and just left it to burn. However, in the hole near the implements, Brickhouse finds an arm, a leg, and shoes visible amidst the flames. It looks as though there is a human body in the fiery pit. As investigators extinguish the flames and begin to extract the body, they find another body underneath. And then another. And so on. They keep going until they reach the bottom, and by then, they have pulled five human beings from the fiery wreckage. The state medical examiner finds the cause of death for the family members to be “blunt trauma to the head.” No one can immediately identify the victims, and without a driver’s license or some other form of ID, the authorities struggle, at first, to get the investigation going. Judging by the ladies’ hairstyles — which do not match the ‘dos of the rural population — the investigators (correctly) assume they are from a more urban area. The only item that have anything to go on is a shovel left at the scene. At the base of the shovel, down near the blade, is a sticker with partial name for a hardware store on it. The only letters visible on the handle are OCH[space]HD, which meant it was a hardware store whose name ended in OCH. This partial name was the only actual clue they gather to identify either the killer or the victims, and so they begin there. Off to a bad start. Unhelpfully, not a single hardware store in NC ended in OCH, so Agent Lewis Young and another agent, travel up the NC coast into Virginia, looking for hardware stores matching the name from the abandoned shovel. Mar. 7, 1976. Agent Young approaches the Metro Police in Washington, DC., and they are able to identify a store in Potomac, Maryland named Poch [like 2Pac] Hardware. They post a flyer of four of the victims in the hardware store (one of the victims was too badly damaged) and then, having no sufficient leads, eventually return to NC. March 8, 1976. Bethesda, Maryland. The Bishop family — a mild-mannered “DC” family consisting of William Bradford, who is a foreign service agent, his wife Annette, Bradford’s mother Lobelia, and three sons Brad, Brenton, and Geoffrey — hasn’t been seen in days, and neighbors become suspicious after the front lawn piles up with newspapers. Montgomery County MD Mike McNally receives a call to basically do a welfare check for a family living on Lilly Stone Drive in Bethesda, Maryland. Officer McNally gets inside the residence and finds a scene nothing short of horrendous. Not a single member of the extended family is present in the home, but the excessive amount of blood speaks to the obvious presence of foul play. There is blood on the front porch, blood inside the home, blood leading up the stairs to the second floor, and gouts of blood cover the walls in the kids’ bedrooms. Meanwhile, dental records from the crime scene are used down in North Carolina confirm the identities of the bodies in the fire pit. The five victims are the members of the Bishop family, which brings up two important questions: where is the husband, William Bradford Bishop, and how did the bodies end up on the coast of North Carolina? A little background on Bradford Bishop. Though on the surface his life appears to be perfect — a Yale graduate with multiple degrees, a prestigious job, and a beautiful and caring family — the cracks beneath the facade reveal a much different picture. While it is true that Bishop was a foreign service agent, with multiple posts across the world, it seemed as though his light was dimming. He’d recently been brought home from his most recent post and was being reassigned to a desk job, ostensibly ending the glamorous, jet-setting career he had been fostering since the mid-1960s. Living abroad, the Bishops had been able to live for free on the government’s dime, with limos and chartered cars spiriting them to all their destinations. That all came to a crashing halt when the family returned to America. Bishop’s $26,000 salary — along with the fact that Annette, Bradford’s wife, was barred from working — was not enough to make ends meet. They even had to take some money from Lobelia, Bradford’s mother, in order to buy their home in Bethesda. The relationship, too, seemed to be under enormous strain at the time of the murders. Bradford had engaged in two extramarital affairs, and the difficult personality he brought to his coworkers in the State Department rose into prominence at home, and he and Annette began to have extreme disagreements over their quickly separating lives. It was yet another piece to add to the puzzle of what would come on that horrific night in March of 1976. Lastly, the final piece that seems to send Bishop into deadly action: On the day of the murders, Bishop finds out he is not to receive a much-envied promotion — one that would seemingly put him back in the game — and he ducks out of work early as a result. On the way out, he meets a colleague who commiserates with him about not receiving a promotion, and that man would later testified that Bishop appeared fraught and nervous about his current circumstances. After leaving work on March 1, sulking from his lost promotion, Bradford Bishop withdraws $400 from the family’s checking account, effectively zeroing it out, and goes home. He takes the family’s station wagon to a nearby SEARS and purchases a short-handled sledgehammer and a two gallon red gas can. He drives the car to a Texaco station and fills both the car and the can up. My research is a little unclear on this point, but I’m pretty sure he then travels to a spot called Poch’s Hardware and buys a pointed shovel and a pitchfork. He then returns home and arrives at around 9 pm. The family has already eaten dinner and begun the process of winding down for the night. Bradford’s mother, Lobelia, puts a leash on the family dog, a retriever named Leo, and heads out for a late-evening walk. A neighbor sees her walking up Lilly Stone drive around 9:30 pm, so we can be assured the time frame of the attack occurs sometime in this window. Back at the Bishop residence, Bradford begins a step-by-step bludgeoning of his family. He descends to the basement family room, where he strikes his wife repeatedly in the head with the mini-sledgehammer. She has been studying art for a class she’s been taking and is unaware of the attack until it’s actually happening. As he reached the ground floor, his mother Lobelia returns with Leo the Retriever. She seems something — maybe the blood on her son or the hammer dangling from his grasp — but she sprints for the bathroom and locks herself inside. He manages to get the door open and kill his mother right there in the bathroom. Afterwards, he treks upstairs and visits the same indescribable violence upon his three children. He goes first to his eldest son’s room — this is Brad III — and bashes in his head while he sleeps. Bradford Bishop then moves across the hall to the bunkbeds where his two youngest children — Brenton (10) and Geoffrey, just 5 years old — and kills them too. Here is a quote directly from the book A Killer in the Family: In what must have been a blind rage, Brad so violently attacked Brent, 10, in the top bunk that the coroner not only noted “multiple fractures” of Brent’s skull but “pulpefication of brain.” The furious backswing left scrape marks in the ceiling just above Brent’s head. Little Geoff, 5, lay below in the bottom bunk. Asleep in his football-player pajamas he cannot have known what hit him; the coroner said any single blow of the hammer could have been fatal. Geoff’s blood ran into a blue pillowcase with white stars on it. With the worst of the deed done, Bradford Bishop disposes of his bloody clothes and likely takes a shower. He then carries each of the five bodies — on different floors of the multi-level home — out to his Chevy Malibu station wagon and loads them in there, covering them with blankets when he is done. It should also be noted that besides himself, the only other living creature in the car is Leo, the family dog. Inexplicably, he’s left the family pet alive after this macabre and violent act. Then, in the middle of the night, Brad Bishop drives away, setting forth on a 300-plus mile journey that will take down a good stretch of the eastern seaboard, through DC and down I-95 down into North Carolina. He reaches the town of Columbia at around 9 the next morning and veers off the beaten path onto State Road 1103, where this grim and senseless crime will become very public very quickly. He digs for nearly three hours, giving up around noon, after he’s created a hole just under three feet in depth. He decides this is good enough and begins the process of dragging the bodies to the pit, beginning first with the smallest child, Geoff, and working his way up through the children, his wife, and then finally his mother, Lobelia, whom he places on the top of the pile. He pours nearly a gallon of gas on the bodies and throws a match on top. It’s unclear how long Bradford Bishop stands there, watching his family burn, but by the time the forest rangers respond to the call, he is long gone. He stops at a shop called Outdoor Sports in Jacksonville, North Carolina, just outside Camp Lejeune and buys a pair of Converse sneakers. What’s weird about this financial transaction is that the owner, John Wheatley, also reports having seen a woman with Bishop, whom he later describes as “about five-six, medium heavy-set” and “Caribbean.” After that, he goes off the grid until March 18, 17 days after the murders. On the 18th, Bishop’s Malibu is discovered at a campsite on the border of Tennessee and North Carolina, just outside Gatlinburg. According to locals, the car had been there for nearly two weeks. In the car, they find some dog biscuits -- presumably for Leo -- maps of the US, including brochures advertising hikes, and lots and lots of blood. The trunk area had been soaked through in the stuff. Three Credible Sightings In July 1978, a Swedish woman, who said she had collaborated with Bishop while on a business trip in Ethiopia, reported she had spotted him twice in a public park in Stockholm during a span of one week. She stated she was "absolutely certain" that the man was Bishop.[3] She did not contact the police at the time because she had not yet realized he was wanted for murder in the U.S.[21] In January 1979, Bishop was reportedly seen by a former U.S. State Department colleague in a restroom in Sorrento, Italy. The colleague greeted the bearded man, whom he personally believed to be Bishop, eye-to-eye, asking the man impulsively, "Hey, you're Brad Bishop, aren't you?" The man panicked suddenly, responding in a distinctly American accent; "Oh no." He then ran swiftly out of the restroom and fled into the Sorrento alleyways.[3] On September 19, 1994, on a Basel, Switzerland, train platform, a neighbor who had known Bishop and his family in Bethesda was on vacation and reported that she had seen Bishop from a few feet away.[3] The neighbor described Bishop as "well-groomed" and said that he was getting into a car.[22]   Motive Here is a quote from A Killer in the Family: Did Brad want the bodies to be found? Did he want the world to know that he had killed them? A tree falling in the woods is an unknown event. “He could have covered them up, thrown some branches on them, and it would have been years before they were discovered,” said Montgomery Co. Sheriff’s Office Lieutenant Sean Songco. “He wanted them found.” A Michigan forensic psychologist, Richard Walter, agrees. “It doesn’t count unless somebody sees them,” he told the CNN television show The Hunt with John Walsh. Twitter: @blakebraddy Podcast Twitter: @pupodcast The Rolson McKane Novels (Amazon)

History Goes Bump Podcast
Ep. 248 - Legends of Venice

History Goes Bump Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2018 38:03


Venice is considered one of the most romantic cities in the world and it really is an extraordinary and unusual city. The city gives the illusion as though it is floating on water as most of its streets are canals. The centerpiece of Venice is its Grand Canal that is lined with buildings whose origins date back centuries. Venice itself was founded centuries ago and any city that old is sure to have its share of tales of ghosts and curses. One only has to glimpse just past the Venetian masks, Burano lace, Murano glass and gondolas to see the sordid and haunted past of Venice. Join us as we share a brief history of Venice and its legends and hauntings! The Moment in Oddity features the cursed Black Angel statue and was suggested by listener Elizabeth (Quoylette on Twitter)and This Month in History features the birth of William Bradford. Check out the website: http://historygoesbump.com Show notes can be found here: https://historygoesbump.blogspot.com/2018/03/hgb-ep-248-legends-of-venice.html Get you spot in the graveyard: http://patreon.com/historygoesbump Music: Vanishing from http://purple-planet.com (Moment in Oddity) In Your Arms by Kevin MacLeod http://incompetech.com (This Month in History) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ All other music licensing: PODCASTMUSIC.COM License Synchronization, Mechanical, Master Use and Performance Direct License for a Single Podcast Series under current monthly subscription.

The Well-Educated Mothers Heart
WEMH #65 The Story of Liberty Chapter 28 William Bradford and His Friends

The Well-Educated Mothers Heart

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2018 13:57


The Well-Educated Mothers Heart
WEMH #25 Lessons from William Bradford and the Pilgrims

The Well-Educated Mothers Heart

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2017 31:03


Discovering America Podcast
106-Plymouth Colony Continues On

Discovering America Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2017 54:12


The Plymouth colony continues to grow and prosper. Bradford would on and off for the next several years act as their governor with others filling in as elected. What became the biggest problem was the paying down on the debt incurred by shipping supplies and people from Leyden. The beaver and otter skins trade was paying down money owed. It was the purchase of two ships, the Friendship and the White Angel that upset the adventurers or investors in England. The increase was above an acceptable level. Was Isaac Allerton acting as the agent in England delivering the goods ordered for the betterment of the colony or treating his voyages as a side business? James Sherley and William Bradford let the dealings concerning Allerton side too long. But in the end the crops were plentiful and able to sell off the excess to the outlying communities and the Indians. Life in Plymouth looked pretty good

Faith and Finances
058: Financial Freedoms afforded by our Founding Fathers

Faith and Finances

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2017 39:07


Is Capitalism a Christian system? Gov. William Bradford made a poor decision in the early days of what would become the Massachusetts Bay Colony: He believed that devout Christians would all work together equally for "The Greater Good." Collectivism (socialism) failed miserably. Many simply didn’t want to labor to produce food—over 50% died.   In This Episode, We Look At: Here are a handful of freedoms granted not only in our founding documents, but in Scripture as well. Freedom: to assemble and of religion—1st Amendment This is often taken for granted. We have freedom in Christ (Romans 8:2) and we have individual freedoms in this great nation. Property rights: 5th Amendment to the Constitution In Acts 4:36-5:1-5, Barnabas "having land, sold it, and gave it". It belonged to Barnabas and he could do as he wished. He chose to sell it and give it. Ananias and Saphira also owned property. Whilst it remained, was it not thine own? and after it was sold, was it not in thine own power? Incentive: also demonstrated in the Bible "…endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness" 2 Thessalonians 3:10 For even when we were with you, this we commanded you, that if any would not work, neither should he eat. There exists an incentive to work; there is really no ceiling for income/wealth creation. Rule of Law: (rather than the authority of man) "The state cannot grant rights to individuals, since our rights are God-given and hard-wired into us. The role of the state is to protect God-given rights. When the state attempts to overrule God's rule as the Grantor of rights, it is putting itself in the place of God , which is evil. This is one reason why socialism is a failed economic system. It is also the reason why God opposes socialism and advances the foundations on which capitalism is based." –Chad Hovind, Godonomics   Today's Resources and Links: Godonomics by Chad Hovind   One Thing You Can Do Today to Improve Your Faith and Finances: Remember these wonderful freedoms afforded to us by our God and these Founding Documents. Exercise them to the glory of God.   What Are Your Thoughts? If you have a question or comment about today's topic, we invite you to share your thoughts. Podcast on Facebook Tim Twitter Troy Twitter

Beyond the Blood
EP9 William Bradford Bishop Jr.

Beyond the Blood

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2017 23:03


A former United States Foreign Service Officer who has been a fugitive from justice since allegedly murdering five members of his family in 1976.

Podcast - SHE PROVES FAITHFUL
Episode 26: Q&A Discerning Women Teachers & Authors

Podcast - SHE PROVES FAITHFUL

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2017 42:50


There are a lot of Christian voices out there dropping books and conferences like toddlers drop food at the dinner table. Some of it seems so good, but sometimes the people that we’ve grown to love or follow go south. Or at least seem to be on a whole new trajectory. How do we become wise women who can identify bad theology? Today Andy Hlushak joins the SPF Podcast to give 8 great filtering questions we can ask to be discerning women. Question and Answer: Which Women Teachers Can We Trust? I recently received a question about how to discern what is good and biblical when looking to purchase Bible studies and books by Christian women. "I know critical thinking is what is truly needed, but what red flags can we look for?" What a great question! So I brought my husband on this episode who gives us 8 things to look for to make us discerning women.  Before the questions - you can always go to your pastors/elders at your church. They should have good recommendations and discernment to help guide you to a study or book. AND - this applies to all bible studies and book authors, not just women - the question received was specifically asking about women teachers.  Which women can we trust? Ask these questions: 1. How do they view Scripture? 2. How do they view the sovereignty of God? 3. What is their reputation? 4. Who are her friends who are her enemies? 5. Is she anthropocentric or theocentric? 6. Is her worldview to change or discover? 7. How do they apply the gospel to all of life? Or are they dualistic, separating faith and life? 8. Where do they fall in history? If you feel overwhelmed: Start with Scripture! You don't need a Bible study to study the Bible! Go old school - check out old Christian authors who have proved faithful and finished well. Puritans like Jonathan Edwards and William Bradford; Charles Spurgeon. Feel freedom to stop a study if you think it's not a biblically sound choice after starting it. Resources Inductive Bible Study Guide - from Andy Hlushak / www.newcitydenver.org Join us for a fun bible reading plan and challenge for the month of February. Free tips and tools and a plan! Click through! www.sheprovesfaithful.com/bible

AjiTerapia LLC
0116 AjiTerapia 24 Noviembre 2016 Una Ciudad Luminosa en la Colina Dios Dia Accion de Gracias El Mito Sangre Indígena Puerto Rico Podcast Tradición Colonial

AjiTerapia LLC

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2016 32:46


Las dos historias de el Día de Acción de Gracias www.ajiterapia.com  Origen de la “tradición” del Día de Acción de Gracias puertorriqueña Oye, eso no es de aquí. Tampoco generacional sino impuesto por el gobierno federal como resultado de la condición colonial de Puerto Rico. ¿Cómo empezó esto del Día de Acción de Gracias? Dos caras de la verdad. En 1614, una expedición inglesa exterminó las tribus indígenas de Nueva Inglaterra en   América. Esclavizaron y secuestraron veinticuatro (24) indigenas. Seis años después, en 1620, llega a las costas de Plymouth, Massachusetts, el barco Mayflower con ciento dos (102) peregrinos protestantes desde Inglaterra. Estaban huyendo de la iglesia católica.   Levantaron la "plantación de Plymouth" en las ruinas de la pasada población indígena de los Pawtuxet. Perecieron muchos dado el crudo invierno. Comieron de lo que encontraron en los campos abandonados por los indígenas aniquilados seis años atrás.   Squanto, sobreviviente de la pasada exterminación Pawtuxet, les gestionó ayuda y les proveyó adiestramiento para sembrar y obtener alimento en las nuevas tierras. También logró un tratado de paz con Massasoit, el jefe de la tribu Wampanoag. Ello les garantizo diez (10) años de paz y prosperidad.   Para 1621, obtuvieron la primera cosecha y para 1623, William Bradford, quien lideró la plantación de Plymouth, agradeció a los locales con un agasajo de tres (3) días.   La cantidad de extranjeros fue aumentando y apoderándose de las tierras locales a la fuerza. Lograron quitarles las tierras, matarlos y los sobrevivientes hoy en dia (2016) los tienen en reservas indígenas. Los esclavos negros, fueron traídos a falta de mano de obra indígena, igual que en Puerto Rico. Luego el comercio pre-navidad crea El Viernes Negro. Esta tradición fue impuesta en 1941 a Puerto Rico, por ser colonia americana. La Nación Borikua tiene raíces propias que AjiTerapia está recreando en su podcast. Te debemos entrevistar a ti también. Subscríbete en  www.ajiterapia.com La celebración va bien con nuestros valores familiares y tradiciones católicas. El darle gracias a Dios reunidos en familia favorable aunque el origen es negativo con la sistemática eliminación de los pueblos indígenas americanos marcando el comienzo de una historia repudiable de violación de los derechos humanos de un pueblo.   Añadamosle que la relación entre naturaleza y el ser humano es imprescindible para la sobrevivencia humana. Elemento que volvemos a retomar para crear balance en esta relación.   La otra cara de la verdad   Un hecho poco conocido: a Squanto, el "héroe" de los relatos tradicionales del primer día de Acción de Gracias, lo ejecutaron los indígenas por su traición.   El gobierno de Estados Unidos organizó celebraciones de ese primer día de Acción de Gracias porque le convenía; por eso inventaron esa fiesta. La primera celebración nacional la ordenó George Washington. Luego Abraham Lincoln decretó que sería un día feriado durante la guerra de Secesión (cuando mandó el ejército a atacar a los sioux de Minnesota). Washington y Lincoln fueron dos presidentes dedicados a forjar un estado nacional burgués unificado y el mito del día de Acción de Gracias cuadraba con esos planes. Celebra la "abundancia de la vida americana" y tapa la naturaleza brutal de la sociedad que la fundó.   Propósito de La Cena de Acción de Gracias   Si, claro, dar gracias a Dios por todo, especialmente por los alimentos. Profundicemos! Acomodate para, como anfitrión, tengas calidad de tiempo con tu familia e invitados. No puedes estar metido en la cocina, ser un buen anfitrión y disfrutar a la misma vez.  Es una celebración de agradecimiento por los alimentos que tenemos, hazlo que cuente, que todos la pasen bien con espacio o protocolos para que su empatía sea expresada.  La primera celebración de Acción de Gracias no hubo pavo porque el día fue escogido para dar gracias a Dios por la abundancia de alimentos.   ¿Cómo se celebra este día de Acción de Gracias?   Es una celebración familiar. Se busca estar unidos para compartir y agradecer. Familias viajan para esta reunión. Es bueno cultivar el hábito de la gratitud porque fortalece nuestra vida espiritual. Y claro, nunca está de más celebrar un día de agradecimiento al Todo Poderoso. Muchos latinos, los que viven en Estados Unidos, celebran que lograron sus sueños profesionales y personales en américa. Puedes usar este día para enseñar a tus hijos los orígenes de las celebraciones norteamericanas, hablarles de las tradiciones de tu propia cultura y ayudar a criarlos como biculturales. Marca el inicio de la temporada comercial de navidad. El viernes negro, también en internet, abre el apetito consumerista en preparación para la época de regalos que se avecina. Acción de Gracias boricua   Que tal pavo asado, papas majados, batatas azada y arroz con gandules, pasteles, guineos en escabeche, buena ensalada y de postre: tembleque, arroz con dulce y otros tantos de aquí. ¿Se me queda algo? Ah, coquito, pitorro, el café! Esa es una cena de aquí, de puertorriqueños. Pero también, aquí en Puerto Rico, hay panaderías, caterings, restaurants, delis y otros negocios donde consigues ofertas de cenas preparadas para el Día de Acción de Gracias. La ordenas unos días antes. Cómodamente, te libras de la cocina. Muchos prefieren cocinar y darle su toque tradicional pasado de pasadas generaciones. Hay cierta magia en el proceso. ¿Como se hacen los pasteles?   Prepara una masa de guineo verde rayado, un toque de yautia y calabaza hervida. Ahora hechale una cabeza de ajo molida, sal, achiote, orégano, aceitunas y… cuando lo estés empacando para cocinarlo, añadele un pimiento morrón en el tope del pastel. Tienes la opción de echarle la carne que gustes, pavo, cerdo, pollo, etc. El pique también es opcional. No es necesario que sigas el menú tradicional. Lo importante es compartir un día especial con amigos y familiares. Decoración   Flores: hortensias y orquídeas.   Ambienta el área utilizando piezas de conversación. Cada pieza fuera de lo común intriga al observador y el tema fluye.     Rituales antes del Día de Acción de Gracias   La Bendición Medita desde el día anterior. Bendice el Día de Acción de Gracias El Espejo Un espejo en la entrada de la casa rechaza y aleja fuera de tu hogar toda negatividad que traigan tus invitados. La Manzana con Miel Parte una manzana a lo ancho. Añádele miel pura a las dos mitades puestas en un plato. Luego de una semana, todas las energías recogidas en la manzana y miel las tiralas lejos y fuera de tu hogar.   ¿De donde viene el pavo?   El pavo inicialmente se exportó de México a Europa en el siglo XVI. El pavo salvaje o guajolote, se domesticó hace más de mil años.   ¿Donde consigo el pavo?   Los pavos congelados del supermercado fueron adquiridos de empresas americanas que los adquieren de granjas de crianza en masa. No veo calidad de alimento en ese sistema. Cierto que produce pavos en masa para una fecha de celebración nacional. Otros sabios consumidores adquieren pavos criados en suelo puertorriqueño. Los pueblos de Juana Díaz, Villalba y Coamo siguen produciendo pavos para el consumo local. Y claro, hay quien los cría para su consumo personal. El pavo Meleagris gallopavo, como se denomina científicamente se llaman los pavos ideales  para el consumo en esta festividad.   ¿Como preparo El pavo Meleagris gallopavo   Para preparar el pavo del país debe comienzan su preparación temprano en la semana. Claro, vas a asegurar ese sabor y frescura del ave local. Sal y pimienta es la base para toda preparación de carne. Bueno, criar estas aves es más complicado que mantener granjas pequeñas de gallinas comunes en los campos puertorriqueños. Ese sabor gourmet cuesta trabajo y debes conocer el proceso. Puedes llamar al departamento de agricultura para que te orienten.   Recomendaciones   No importa si comes pavo o no; si estás reunido en familia, con amistades o solo. Lo que realmente tiene valor es hacer una reflexión sobre tu vida, pensar en lo afortunados que somos al tener un plato de comida sobre la mesa. ¿Cómo celebrarlo saludablemente? Las festividades son época de alegría para los boricuas, pero también pueden ser un reto para las personas con diabetes. Según datos del Departamento de Salud, más de un 15 % de la población padece la condición. Esto significa que, muy probablemente, algún amigo, ser querido o quizás tú mismo tengas que hacer ajustes en la dieta, específicamente en el inicio de la época festiva, con la cena de Acción de Gracias.   Por si conoces a alguna persona con diabetes, busca proveerle la opción de comida baja en carbohidratos y azúcares.   Dé las gracias   Comunicate con familiares, amigos. Dile lo que sientes. Quizás puedes preparar un regalo de gratitud y compartir con ellos.   Muchas familias decoran este día su árbol de navidad o ponen el nacimiento.   Vamos más profundo en esta histórica acción colonial Polémicas:   -Que si es constitucional imponer un día para dar gracias a Dios. Tienen al igual que el Cristianismo, derecho a su dia especial el Judaísmo, Islamismo, Hinduismo y el Budismo?   -Que Teodoro Roosevelt estableció noviembre como el día anual de acción de gracias. -Que el 1° de noviembre de 1777, fue oficialmente declarado como día feriado. -Que fue el presidente Lincoln quien decretó el feriado nacional durante la Guerra Civil. -Que el presidente Washington había emitido una proclama en 1789 y que el jueves, 19 de febrero de 1795, George Washington separó ése día como el día nacional de acción de gracia.   Así que el primer presidente, George Washington, escribió su famosa proclamación de acción de gracias y lo cito:  "Nuestro deber como personas con reverente devoción y agradecimiento, reconocer nuestras obligaciones al Dios todopoderoso, e implorarle que nos siga prosperando y confirmado las muchas bendiciones que de Él experimentamos…" Cierro la cita.   -Que más tarde, Abraham Lincoln escogió el 3 de octubre de 1863 como día de reflexión y agradecimiento. -Que el 3 de octubre de 1863, Abraham Lincoln, proclamó por carta del congreso, un día nacional de acción de gracias. “El último jueves de noviembre, como un día de acción de gracias y adoración a nuestro padre benefactor, quien mora en los cielos” Cierro la cita.   -Que el presidente Theodore Roosevelt, cambió en 1941, el día de acción de gracias al cuarto jueves del mes de noviembre. ¿Cómo se robaron la tierra de los aborígenes americanos?   Esos quince años (15) acordados en el tratado de paz entre colonos y aborígenes fue una bonanza para los nuevos colonos. Los trescientos (300) pronto aumentó exponencialmente durante diez (10) años. Nuevos enclaves en Plymouth, Boston y Salem nacieron.   El sistema organizacional de los colonos, prácticas agrícolas basadas en la propiedad privada, dista del local, basado en la comunidad tribal. Se impuso el sistema colonial y se hizo caso omiso de los derechos del aborigen. Acto seguido crearon la esclavitud indígena. Ya en 1637, la población colonialista alcanzó dos mil (2,000) habitantes y se extendieron al interior del continente con las mismas tácticas de expropiación abusiva.   Una ciudad luminosa en la colina   La creencia colonial de que la Biblia les autorizaba a dominar las tierras continentales, fue utilizada como razonamiento para atacar y masacrar aborígenes opuestos a su dominación, expropiación y esclavitud. Lo habian logrado con las tribus de la costa este, narragansett, wampanoag y la tribu massachusetts.   Para el 1633, la tribu Pequot fue despojada de lo que hoy es Hartford, Connecticut. Los pequot mataron a dos ingleses que fueron a capturar esclavos y de ahi en adelante se dispusieron a defenderse de los intrusos.   La excusa para el abuso   Citando a Romanos 13:2: "De modo que, quien se opone a la autoridad, se rebela contra el orden divino, y los rebeldes se atraerán sobre sí mismos la condenación", les atacaron con 1,240 soldados y guerreros indígenas.   Masacre en la colina   El ejército colonial rodeó una aldea fortificada de los pequot en el río Mystic. Al amanecer, cuando todos dormían, le prendió fuego, destruyeron a unos 400 y capturaron 180 en esa ocasión. Vendieron como esclavos a mujeres y niños. "Teníamos suficiente luz de la palabra de Dios para guiar nuestras acciones".   Unos 350 años más tarde, Ronald Reagan repitió la frase "una ciudad luminosa en la colina" muchas veces en sus discursos. El descubrimiento de que la esclavitud da ganancias   Las colonias agrícolas inglesas en las Antillas, compraban esclavos para trabajar su minería y campos agrícolas. La venta de seres humanos se convirtió en un negocio. Asi que el tráfico de esclavos indígenas y, más tarde africanos se convirtió en emergente un negocio en Nueva Inglaterra.   Días de acción de gracias para celebrar masacres   En 1641, el gobierno ofreció pagar "recompensa por un cuero cabelludo indígena" Se ordenó la masacre de los wappinger. El gobierno contrató para que prendieron en candela y pasaran a cuchillo a una tribu matando a 500 de ellos. Luego de estas atrocidades, se declaró un día de acción de gracias en las iglesias de Manhattan.   "Donde hay opresión hay resistencia" Mao Tse-Tung   Para 1675 los wampanoag, la tribu que los salvó en 1620 y los que formaron parte del primer día de Acción de Gracias, le declararon la guerra a los colonos porque le arrestaron y ejecutaron tres de su tribu, sin mediar palabra con el jefe de la misma.   Salieron 500 esclavos del puerto de Plymouth   Los colonos dominaron y lanzaron una guerra total de genocidio contra los indígenas que quedaban. El gobierno de Massachusetts ofreció 20 chelines por cada cuero cabelludo indígena y 40 chelines por cada preso que se pudiera vender como esclavo. Salieron 500 esclavos del puerto de Plymouth. De los 12.000 indígenas de las tribus vecinas, probablemente la mitad murió en combates, masacres y de hambre.   Las Antillas, las Azores, Argelia, España e Inglaterra son hoy en día el hogar de la descendencia del estos indios vendidos como esclavos. Leyes y control de esclavos   Los marcaban para reconocerlos si se escapaban. Lo hacían con un hierro y les tatuaban la frente y mejillas.   Para 1695, se autorizó matar indígenas esclavos que se escaparan. Cantidad de leyes y reglamentos fueron establecidos para controlar a los esclavos, evitar que escaparan y que los atacaran.   El impacto de este podcast   Mi intención es que te tomes algún tiempo y analices tus acciones en este dia de Accion de Gracias. Que el podcast de www.AjiTerapia.com  podría desanimarte... cierto.   Empezamos las festividades de Navidad desde El Día de Acción de Gracias el cuarto jueves de noviembre. Pero la verdad del día de Acción de Gracias es distinta: es una historia del genocidio de los pueblos indígenas y del robo de sus tierras por colonos europeos, y de la crueldad del capitalismo.   AjiTerapia LLC Walter Rivera Santos PO Box 800218 Coto Laurel, PR  00780-0218 Oficina: 787-432-8092 Email: WalterRiveraSantos@ajiterapia.com Web: www.ajiterapia.com

Interwoven
What REALLY Happened During the Pilgrims' First Winter?

Interwoven

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2016 28:58


Plimoth Plantation's Deputy Executive Director, Richard Pickering, discusses with host Hilary Goodnow the Phinneus Pratt Narrative of 1662 and Pratt's discussion of the Pilgrim's first winter in New England. How do we marry Pratt's memories decades later with accounts from William Bradford and Edward Winslow written 1620-1622?

Geeks and Wrestling with Romeo Falcon
Podcast episode 11 – William Bradford aka Brad Sanders

Geeks and Wrestling with Romeo Falcon

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 23, 2016 82:56


In this episode Romeo sits down with William Bradford aka Brad Sanders.  Romeo and Brad cover everything from comics, music, football and pro wrestling. Romeo and Brad also have a serious conversation about what it’s like to be a single dad and be a pro wrestler. Romeo and C-los of course talk comics and discuss recent movie trailers. Enjoy Romeo and C-los clash in another fun filled episode of Geeks and Wrestling.

Extreme Genes - America's Family History and Genealogy Radio Show & Podcast
Ep. 122 - Collector Has Bradford Bible From Mayflower / Collecting Ancestors Related Items

Extreme Genes - America's Family History and Genealogy Radio Show & Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2016 49:34


Fisher opens the show with David Allen Lambert, Chief Genealogist of the New England Historic Genealogical Society and AmericanAncestors.org.  They talk about the news of the discovery of the very spot in Salem, Massachusetts where the accused witches were executed in the 17th Century.  Hear where you can see it!  David then explains how the 5,300 year old Ice Man continues to make headlines.  He apparently left a prehistoric GPS of his movements. Hear how scientists can now tell where he traveled in his life. And, the guys then talk about how the last survivor of the San Francisco Earthquake of 1906 has passed.  Catch his survival story.Next, Fisher talks with guest Brent Ashworth, a Provo, Utah man who collects items related to his family history.  He offers great advice on how you might do the same.  He also shares how he, as a Mayflower descendant, was excited to obtain one of the two Bibles carried by Gov. William Bradford to the New World on the Mayflower! (Are you kidding me?!)Then, Fisher visits with Ken Krogue, founder of InsideSales.com, who will be a keynote speaker during the Innovator Summit on the first day of the Roots Tech Family History Conference in Salt Lake City, Utah on February 3.  Ken offers sound advice on helping seniors get comfortable with technology to advance your family history efforts.In the final segments, Tom Perry from TMCPlace.com, the Preservation Authority, returns with thoughts on how to get the most out of the Innovator Summit, whether you're there in person or following the events on line.It's all this week on Extreme Genes, America's Family History Show!

Free Thoughts
Liberty and the American Experience

Free Thoughts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2014 56:15


Jim Powell claims that liberty is relatively rare thing in the span of human history.Why does it seem like liberty has gained a toehold and flourished in the United States in a way it hasn’t in other places around the world? And then, once it was established, how did liberty grow in America?Show Notes and Further ReadingJim Powell, The Triumph of Liberty: A 2,000 Year History Told Through the Lives of Freedom’s Greatest Champions (book)Captain John Smith, Writings with Other Narratives of Roanoke, Jamestown, and the First English Settlement of America (book)William Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation (book) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Greater Life Church
5 Kernels of Corn - Audio

Greater Life Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2014 44:31


Thanksgiving is a distinctly American holiday. It does not commemorate a battle, or the birth of a famous statesman. This holiday that we celebrate was begun by a group of struggling pilgrims in the fall of 1623. In the early days of our country there was a mixture of faith, hope, sacrifice and suffering. The pilgrims endured the hardship of a ocean voyage that lasted over 60 days. They encountered a storm that almost sunk the small boat of 120 people and their provisions. They were looking for a place where the could worship and live freely. They landed during a harsh winter that almost did them in. In the first year, almost half of them died. At one point there were only 7 healthy colonists to care for the rest. Their daily existence was life and death. Somehow, they survived that first winter. Because of their limited understanding of this new environment, they had difficulty in growing crops to sustain themselves. It is recorded in William Bradford's writings, that when the Mayflower returned to England, these colonists did not go back. They had come to stay. In November of the following year, another ship arrived with 35 more people who came with no additional provisions. At the lowest point in what was called the starving years. They existed on a meager ration of food. At times they existed on a few kernels of corn each day. In subsequent years at the colony began to thrive they would continue to celebrate Thanksgiving. History tells us that each year when they would sit for their feast, they would begin with an empty plate with 5 kernels of corn. This was to remind them of how God had sustained them in the lean times. This illustrations reminds us that we need to be thankful for the small blessings that God provides us with every day. Some people still complain in spite of God's blessings. The pilgrim's 5 kernels of corn remind us that we are blessed no matter what may come. Each of these 5 kernels of corn need to represent something to each of us for which we are thankful. If we are thankful for what we have, there is always enough to get us through. What are your 5 kernels of corn?

Chapel 2013-2014 audio
Mark Sargent Feb 15 2013

Chapel 2013-2014 audio

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2013 19:47


Mark L. Sargent assumed the role of Provost at Westmont College in the spring of 2012. A graduate of UC Santa Barbara, he earned his master's degree and doctorate in English at The Claremont Graduate University, specializing in American literature. He taught as a Fulbright scholar at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands and has written widely on history, literature, film, and higher education. For his research on William Bradford, he was awarded the Whitehill Prize in early American history. After holding administrative roles at Biola University and Spring Arbor College, he served as provost of Gordon College in Massachusetts from 1996-2012.. In 2008 the Council of Independent Colleges gave him the national Chief Academic Officers Award.

Chapel 2012-2013 Video
Mark Sargent Feb 15 2013

Chapel 2012-2013 Video

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 19, 2013 21:15


Mark L. Sargent assumed the role of Provost at Westmont College in the spring of 2012. A graduate of UC Santa Barbara, he earned his master's degree and doctorate in English at The Claremont Graduate University, specializing in American literature. He taught as a Fulbright scholar at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands and has written widely on history, literature, film, and higher education. For his research on William Bradford, he was awarded the Whitehill Prize in early American history. After holding administrative roles at Biola University and Spring Arbor College, he served as provost of Gordon College in Massachusetts from 1996-2012.. In 2008 the Council of Independent Colleges gave him the national Chief Academic Officers Award.

The One Way Ticket Show
Zaria Forman - Artist

The One Way Ticket Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2012 24:14


Zaria's enthusiasm for drawing began during her childhood when she and her family traveled to some of the world's most remote landscapes, the subject of her mother's fine art photography. A cum laude graduate in Studio Arts from Skidmore College, Zaria has exhibited extensively at galleries and venues throughout the United States and overseas. Zaria recently completed a series of drawings that will be the set design for the classic ballet "Giselle", premiering this October at the Grand Theatre of Geneva, Switzerland. In August 2012 she will lead Chasing the Light, an art expedition in Greenland, re-tracing the 1869 journey of American painter William Bradford and artistically documenting the rapidly changing landscape (www.kickstarter.com/projects/701351414/chasing-the-light). The expedition is dedicated to Zaria's mother who was inspired by Bradford's journey. A lovely backgrounder on Zaria and her work can be found at: https://www.artsy.net/artist/zaria-forman

Crossborn
The Week that Changed the World p1

Crossborn

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2011 21:21


Incedibly enough, it still happens today. "A Week that Changed the World" "He is not here, He is risen!" Lk 24:6 "Great things out of small things come and give being to greater things yet," wrote William Bradford once. And never was that more true than with that little, empty hillside tomb! Who could have guessed that it would change the entire world! And the great news is that it can change you too! Sermon by: Pastor Rod SchorrSermon Series: Easter Service 

Crossborn
A Week that Changed the World p2

Crossborn

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2011 20:59


Incedibly enough, it still happens today. "A Week that Changed the World" "He is not here, He is risen!" Lk 24:6 "Great things out of small things come and give being to greater things yet," wrote William Bradford once. And never was that more true than with that little, empty hillside tomb! Who could have guessed that it would change the entire world! And the great news is that it can change you too! Sermon by: Pastor Rod SchorrSermon Series: Easter Service