Podcasts about Theranos

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

Defunct American privately held health technology company

  • 672PODCASTS
  • 931EPISODES
  • 44mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 15, 2021LATEST
Theranos

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about Theranos

Latest podcast episodes about Theranos

Squawk Pod
Crypto Futures & the Theranos Trial, Week 6

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 21:13


A key FDA advisory committee unanimously recommended giving booster shots of Moderna's Covid-19 vaccine to people ages 65 and older and other vulnerable Americans. Dr. Kavita Patel, a fellow at the Brookings Institution and former White House health policy director, breaks down the FDA's debate over Covid-19 boosters. CNBC's Scott Cohn provides an update on the trial of Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes, on week six of what's slated to be a 13-week trial. According to court testimony this week, the blood-testing start-up hired a dermatologist with no board certification in laboratory science or pathology to become the lab director. Bitcoin has climbed above $60,000 as traders expect U.S. regulators to clear the first bitcoin futures ETF. Plus, Virgin Galactic plans to delay spaceflights to next year as it refurbishes its vehicles.In this episode:Dr. Kavita Patel, @kavitapmdScott Cohn, @ScottCohnTVBecky Quick, @BeckyQuickAndrew Ross Sorkin, @andrewrsorkin

ScamWow
140: The Cult of Theranos : Elizabeth Holmes Trial Update with Rebekah Sebastian!

ScamWow

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 79:40


Little bit of blood but a lotta bit of trouble! Rebakah Sebastian guest on this week's episode to update us on the Elizabeth Holmes/Theranos trial. Caity and Rebekah go over the new evidence, the basis of the case, and the absolutely unbelievable gall of starting a medical company without any background in medicine. Caity shares her own experience with blood testing and genetics counseling and why it's SO important for accurate, informed work in this industry for the sake of patients. Rebekah and Caity speculate how Elizabeth Holmes used cult-like tactics to scam and misrepresent her company and her investors.  Check out Rebekah's podcast Die-alogue! And her pod about crime in reality TV, Criminality! RESOURCES: Key takeaways from the fourth week of the Elizabeth Holmes trial. - NYT Elizabeth Holmes trial: Lawyer claims ‘incompetent' lab chief, not Holmes, to blame - MercuryNews Ex-Theranos lab director testifies in tense exchange during Elizabeth Holmes trial - Wash Post RebekahSebastian.com @caitybrodnick  @scamwowpodcast Scamwowpodcast.com DISCLAIMER: We are comedians and this is satire. C'mon Send us your scams! scamwowpodcast@gmail.com Or call: 347-509-9414 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

ada: Heute das Morgen verstehen
Theranos – Die Geschichte einer spektakulären Täuschung

ada: Heute das Morgen verstehen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 32:52


Theranos galt einst als das heißeste Start-up im Silicon Valley. Die Gründerin Elizabeth Holmes wollte mit innovativen Bluttests die Medizin revolutionieren. Inzwischen wurde das Unternehmen aufgelöst und Holmes drohen 20 Jahre Haft wegen Betrugs. Miriam Meckel und Léa Steinacker beleuchten den größten Start-up-Bluff der vergangenen Jahre und gehen der Frage nach, warum das Silicon Valley den Bau von betrügerischen Luftschlössern erlaubt oder vielleicht sogar fördert.

Freedomain Radio with Stefan Molyneux
4923 The Truth About Theranos! WEDNESDAY NIGHT LIVE

Freedomain Radio with Stefan Molyneux

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 125:25


Plus: abuse in the music industry...www.freedomain.com

Marketplace All-in-One
Examining the Safeway, Walgreens perspectives in the Elizabeth Holmes trial

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 9:47


The former CEO of Safeway and the ex-CFO of Walgreens shared their testimonies of dealing with Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes at her trial this week. We spoke to the reporter who is covering the trial on what the two execs said and what it could mean for the trial going forward. Diane Swonk talks with us about the markets following a not-so-great jobs report and the government’s warning about the cost of keeping homes warm for the winter. The Federal Trade Commission has issued a warning to companies against the use of fake reviews, paid ratings, and deceptive online endorsements.

Marketplace Morning Report
Examining the Safeway, Walgreens perspectives in the Elizabeth Holmes trial

Marketplace Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 9:47


The former CEO of Safeway and the ex-CFO of Walgreens shared their testimonies of dealing with Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes at her trial this week. We spoke to the reporter who is covering the trial on what the two execs said and what it could mean for the trial going forward. Diane Swonk talks with us about the markets following a not-so-great jobs report and the government’s warning about the cost of keeping homes warm for the winter. The Federal Trade Commission has issued a warning to companies against the use of fake reviews, paid ratings, and deceptive online endorsements.

People Always, Patients Sometimes
Meet the Digital Apothecary

People Always, Patients Sometimes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 30:33


Pharmacy companies are an important part for Spencer Health Solutions, and pharmacists are an integral part of fulfilling our mission to serve patients in their homes. Hi, I'm Tom Rhodes, CEO, Spencer Health Solutions. We have had the opportunity to bring patient pharmaceutical and digital health thought leaders to previous podcasts. However, today we're speaking with our first pharmacist, digital health advocate and analyst, Timothy Aungst, also known as the digital apothecary. He joins our host Janet Kennedy for an insightful conversation and a call to action to the pharmacy industry on the People Always, Patients Sometimes podcast.   Janet Kennedy: (00:45) Welcome to People Always, Patients Sometimes. I'm very excited that today's guest is Timothy Aungst, the digital apothecary. He is an associate professor of pharmacy practice and also a clinical pharmacist. Timothy, welcome to the podcast.   Timothy Aungst: (01:03) Thank you, Janet, I'm really excited to be here today to talk about, you know, all this stuff that's been going on.   Janet Kennedy: (01:08) It's been a crazy couple of years and that's one of the things that I wanted to talk to you about. I found you because I read your primer, "Digital Health Primer for Pharmacists." You published it in February of 2019. At that time you wrote, "after being involved in the digital health space for almost a decade, I can say with complete sincerity, that the topic is still relatively out of the realm of the general pharmacy profession grasp." Okay. You put a challenge out there. 10 years you've been involved in digital health and you're saying pharmacy is still not up to speed. Would you say that that's true two years later?   Timothy Aungst: (01:52) Yes. I still would stand by that. I would argue that we have seen entrepreneurship within the pharmacy profession gravitate towards digital health at large, but I would also conversely say that as a profession for pharmacists, we have not really actually actively engaged in this area. We still lack a large number of educational roles and trying to get people aware of the space. There is a lack of discussion around it. Most of our public organizations that provide guidance on what our next steps for the profession don't really think about it in, I think it's for that reason, I still would say the gap is there. Now that is changing. I would say that there has been a semi call to action amongst several pharmacy organizations, whether it's say PHA, ACP and several others who are now trying to get the profession up to speed on what digital health is.   Timothy Aungst: (02:44) And that's been a big focus of mine serving as so-called subject matter expert or key opinion leader to help get information out there regarding the topic. But very, at this time it's quite topical just because we are not actively highly engaged with it. I would probably say we're maybe like two or three years behind other healthcare professions, such as the medical community. The American medical association has an active digital health component that they've been pushing, I would say probably for about two or three years at this point, have reports coming out, organizations associated with it. And I think pharmacists have to play catch up to that. And depending on key stakeholders at this current time that may or may not go fast or may go slow. And that's one thing I'm actively keeping my eye on.   Janet Kennedy: (03:27) Well, I'm curious about whether pharmacists or the pharmacy is even included in some of this digital health development.   Timothy Aungst: (03:36) I'm always a person who would've actually separate the two. The pharmacist and the pharmacy, I think are no longer synonymous organizations. You don't need a pharmacy to have a pharmacist. I think it's going to be what we see in the 2020s or 2030s at this point. I think those two things will actually diverge and that will just come down to logistics and also some legal parameters I think people are pushing right now. Technicians will be empowered to take on most of the stuff on site and pharmacists will probably feel remote. That being the case then to accomplish that, and also to get pharmacies up to speed where healthcare is going, I think the pharmacy businesses will engage in digital health activities. For good or for bad. The big news right now, right, is that Elizabeth Holmes is in court with Theranos. And if we look at Thernos, who was one of the biggest backers? That was Walgreens. And I always looked at what happened with Walgreens being burned there is a reason why they actually had a huge number of digital health initiatives back in the 2010s. And I think they pulled back because they got burned so heavily.   Timothy Aungst: (04:31) In the meantime, we see, let's say a business like CVS Health going down a whole vertical pipeline. Now we got Aetna involved, we got long-term care stuff, we got them pushing to go into kidney disease with dialysis treatments. They are partnering up with digital health companies all over the place. One of the biggest ones, for example, was Sleepio for a digital therapeutic that they've been piloting out there, which has actually initial positive results I'm actually reading through right now. So some of these companies are more involved than others. And I think it's going to come down to, you know, what assets they have to really push that. Whether they see the market going a certain way and they want to meet consumer demands because they are also aware of that, with the changing dynamics within healthcare, pharma is going down the digital health path. Payers are looking at this. Employers are looking at this and even the big tech companies are pushing this stuff out there. So are they going to let other people dictate to them the incumbents of what to do, or are they going to be the drivers themselves? And I think that's going to be something that's going to be interesting to watch.   Janet Kennedy: (05:34) Well, so you mentioned the need to separate the pharmacist from pharmacy. So speaking from the individual's perspective, do you hear pharmacists talking about wanting more and better tools to be able to help their patients or are they just basically the Amazon employee at the warehouse where they're just cranking out the work?   Timothy Aungst: (05:57) See, I used to think we're still on the razor's edge between two possibilities: one was pharmacists finding some kind of clinical services they pay for under some, say, value-based care agreements. And by providing clinical services would receive renumeration that would allow them to be so-called clinicians in health care. Or the other one was being fully remote and being consigned to these activities, to these virtual workshops where they basically just review medications that have been turned out by Amazon or other companies like true pill, et cetera. There might be a third path, which is a mix between the two. And that's kind of where I'm more leaning towards right now from a pharmacist perspective. Yes, there is a huge interest in digital pathway as a means to basically call back clinical services and kind of like be able to provide services that could then actually have objective feedback in terms of what they did, that they could then bill for services and, you know, make money from it.   Timothy Aungst: (06:51) But I don't know if that's going to be enough at this current point to actually say, "oh, well, you're now a remote clinical pharmacist that overviews these data's on people's adherence or their information on disease states, and you get this much," because one of the issues is actually even though they're like remote patient monitoring services that we're seeing CPT codes being pushed up by CMS and such, they're in the physician still. So the pharmacist almost has to still be partnered with someone else in order to receive the renumeration. And then at that point in time, you know, it was kind of like, what slice of the pie are you going to get? And I think that's really what concerns me is that from a healthcare perspective, the pharmacist is still really trapped in their other engagements, which has traditionally held us back. And I think this is because we again have very little stakes in digital health and we were coming to the table kind of late. The other people have already kind of figured this out and have already been making inroads. Making propositions to other organizations to get themselves ahead. And we're kind of almost, I don't want to say asking for crumbs, but we're going to have to really do our best claw back some of this stuff for ourselves. And that's going to delay, I think those aspects.   Janet Kennedy: (07:56) And do you see the trade associations being the ones that should be leading this charge?   Timothy Aungst: (08:01) I think the trade associations unfortunately all have different stances out why they would want to engage in this stuff. The trade associations value pharmacists to different extents. And within a pharmacy community, we know with the alphabet soup of different pharmacy organizations, they don't all have one central voice. They don't all have one central take on what is the role of pharmacists. I've heard some people say we have a pharmacist practice at the top of their license. I don't know what that means. To be quite honest, whenever I hear that I kind of have to roll my eyes, because what is the top of their license? I think in their eyes probably is just, you know, sending off for prescriptions. So that's great. That's what they see as the business that they have to focus on. I could see definitely some trade associations making an argument to empower technicians, to move back at scale back the role of the pharmacist as a, you know, as a rate limiting step in terms of evaluating prescriptions and getting them out the door.   Timothy Aungst: (08:53) And also because there are high cost margin right there, and that would reduce the overhead versus some other trade associations are definitely more clinically focused and would push that down too. So within pharmacy, the unfortunate thing right now is there are some tenuous arguments going on about, you know, who has the right step for the profession or which to be used, how to utilize them. And I think those are the conversations, the hard conversations to have to occur now versus later, because this whole approach of them to let's say digital health and such could become very fragmented. You could see some people that operate large corporations would probably want to use digital health for alternative means versus maybe some smaller companies. And I think that's going to really, for me, I have to bemoan them is that's gonna really muddy the waters and I guess, slow down the process of any adoption by the profession. So yes, I think the trade professions will probably be key here, but I would also, or you, because historically they don't always get along or had the same thought processes that this is going to be another area. That's going to be a sticking point where argue about how to do this.   Janet Kennedy: (09:57) You know, I find that health care was still slow to come to digital tools and platforms. I'm curious to know whether, with your ear to the ground, do you find that patients are pushing their desire for digital health into the healthcare system? And do you find that that's being impacted or felt on the pharmacy side?   Timothy Aungst: (10:21) And this is a good question because you know, who's the drivers for change. I think it's one of the things that always comes up. Patients are often said to be one of the major drivers, and I do believe that to a certain points payers are probably one of the biggest drivers I would argue though, overall, because they ultimately are paying the money. Patients themselves are vocal population that can dictate those favorable or unfavorable role, lots of different programs and services at the end of the day. So from that perspective, I think with the ongoing pandemic, we saw this huge push for, you know, delivery of services for the ability to have a so-called digital front door. And you know, what was in the news the other day was that Walgreens got in trouble apparently because they're whole vaccine signup and testing site wasn't secure. And the data is now - someone's getting into it. And this, I think is going to give some feedback to people like, you know, if we have to do remote practice, sign up and go through an app or make an account and et cetera, but you can't even keep my data secure - Is that good or bad?   Timothy Aungst: (11:17) You know, is that a company I'm going to trust? And those are the things that they're hitting people now it's not so much like, oh, you know, I have a brick and mortar business. People come and buy things and they leave. I just had to worry about the credit cards now I have to worry about their online accounts. I have to worry about health history that's been uploaded or shared. This is definitely a new area I think people are considering. Hospitals and health systems have been dealing with this for years. They've been getting hit by malware attacks for a long time. Now people will ask you for cryptocurrency just to unlock their systems, for goodness sake. And because of this, the population does expect a digital front door, digital services. And I think ultimately businesses have had to pivot to address an answer to that.   Timothy Aungst: (11:57) But I don't think they traditionally had that as a, you know, as something that is a high concern for them in the pandemic was a force multiplier that really had to make them rush into, this for good or for bad. I mean, the pandemic is going to go on for awhile. We're going to see this go up in waves, in different parts of the United States. So these companies are going to have a long time to pilot certain programs, but I think many of them have recognized, no matter what, post pandemic, this is going to be a status quo. So whatever works now has to work in the future as well.   Janet Kennedy: (12:27) Well, certainly the pandemic has made a lot of things happen faster; that we have seen an acceleration of the interest in some kinds of digital health, particularly tele-health, which sounds new to a lot of people, but it's been around for 20 years. And I know you've been around in the digital health space for over a decade. So let's step back for a second. Could you tell me a little bit about the digital apothecary and why did you start it?   Timothy Aungst: (12:54) Sure. So the digital apothecary was kind of like just a little passion product, a little thing that I spread out based on my interests. So I started off as a resident during my PGY1. I got an iPad in 2011. So keep in mind the iPad came out 2010. So one of the things that I did was I actually started processing orders in the hospital using my iPad through Citrix. And this is funny because this is a period where we had so-called COWs, or computers on wheels, or WOWs, workstation on wheels, as they're often called now, and people would argue over these things to process orders in the hospital, et cetera. And I just basically started using my iPad to do all this stuff. And people started catching attention, like why is he doing this stuff faster? He's looking for information faster in there and blah, blah, blah.   Timothy Aungst: (13:36) And I was like, yeah, cause I had this device that can do this. I start thinking of something, what is a good app? What is a good thing? And so I started reviewing and looking at stuff and then I joined another group called iMedicalApps and we start reviewing mobile apps. We actually wrote a bunch of papers about how to quantify what is and what is not a good app and to use clinically for patients in patient care. And we gave presentations all over place on this topic. And that was a huge thing for me. And this was when it was mobile health that was my focus. And then circa 2014-15, I moved on to just the bigger digital health space and started writing for different organizations and serving as a speaker advisor consultant for different companies actually were asking a lot of these questions. The years I started thinking with remote patient monitoring, questions about tele-health, pharmacy, how to adopt medication adherence is a big one for me as well.   Timothy Aungst: (14:20) And it kind of really changed my thought process in terms of like, you know, this stuff's just kind of adjunctive to care versus, okay, this is going to be actually part in driving care. Eventually digital health, I kinda thought to myself, is just a interim term. I think digital health eventually turns into just health. It's kind of the same period we went through with like digital banking. We don't call it digital banking anymore, we just call it banking. When you go onto your app cash or check or use Venmo, like no one calls it really digital banking. I think that's where healthcare is at. So I noticed there wasn't that many people around the space. There is one person I look up to is Kevin Clawson, who's now into blockchain for healthcare down at Lipscomb. He was a great mentor for me early on. And it was a few other people I've talked to them such as Brent Fox about this too.   Timothy Aungst: (15:01) And, but the reality is in the academia circles, that generally there was not a lot of pharmacists, I think, into digital health or into this technology thing. So I kind of got into it, talking about it. I had a lot of people say this was like a waste of time. And I really had to take a thought for myself academically - do I really want to dedicate all my time towards investigating and research in this space. Or should I start moving towards something else as an academic? And I chose to keep on it. And I'm actually pleased because now with the, you know, things are really changing the payment like that, people really want to talk more about it. People aren't real into telehealth. And they were like, who even knows about this in pharmacy? Then my name comes up because that's been something I've been talking about for so long.   Timothy Aungst: (15:39) People are looking at different digital health technologies and like, okay, who's in digital talking about, oh, Timothy's talking about it. Timothy's been talking about it for so long now. So it's kind of just in many ways for me, unfortunately, the pandemic has been a driving force around trying to actually get my message out more than it was in the past. I think if the pandemic had not happened digital health would not have seen the rampant advancements that it has, and probably would have been towards the tail end of 2020s that I foresee that would have taken off in versus the early 2020s at this time.   Janet Kennedy: (16:09) One of the things you mentioned in your primer was that digital health definitely isn't informatics. Can you tell me what you mean by that?   Timothy Aungst: (16:20) Oh, this is, this is, this is a good one. Okay. So this is unbearably one of the hardest questions I had to deal with in terms of talking within my community. So there's always been a push in pharmacy, informatics, you know informational management information, using different data streams and such, EHR management, et cetera, et cetera. And that's been a group that's been around for decades. I would probably say early two thousands, 1990s. We saw them out there and there's always been pharmacy informatics people. And it's the, you know, the American informatics Association and such, or AMIA. But you know, when, when I started talking about digital health, one thing that I actually got in trouble with early on was people like, isn't it just informatics. I was like, what do you mean? Like this is technology. I was like, "technology is not synonymous with informatics." Informatics definitely plays a role in digital health and managing all the data streams that come down.   Timothy Aungst: (17:04) But I would argue that the traditional informatics thought processes around management of health. It does not mean lik,e this whole digital health kind of ecosystem. And that's actually where I would have conversations with people like, oh, they'll get all this person, their informatics person, we have the conversation and people will talk about, you know, KPIs, C-Colon and different things in programming. And they'll be like, "Yeah, I don't do any of this stuff. That's not my business. I'm more interested in the clinical workflow design associated with this stuff and how to actually evaluate one technology versus another and blah, blah, blah." And so that does overlap. Yes, it does. But I think some people have assumed that, especially in pharmacy and for pharmacists, that informatics would subsume and take over digital health. And that's one area I'm not too sure on. I think some people may want that. And some people don't. I for one don't. I think informatics works within digital health space in that it's definitely a conversation and there's been other publications around this that kind of delved into a little bit more different therapeutic areas like oncology. But early on, It was very, very difficult actually to separate the two. I think at this time, most of it is separated, but I, that was a early conversation I had had with people.   Janet Kennedy: (18:13) Okay. I'm interested in the amount of data that could be available through digital health apps and how a pharmacist might actually interact with that. So I'm really getting around to a conversation about adherence. Right now, when we think of adherence, it's the next fill - did you get the next prescription filled? But there's 30 or even 90 days in between those fills. If you had that data and it was daily, would a pharmacist be able to actually manage that information, and would they want to?   Timothy Aungst: (18:48) So here is a loaded question. And I mean this, cause this is an area that I'm fully invested - I love this topic. It is too many stakeholders, I think we can go over in detail about maybe some, the big ones like, you know, who cares about adherence at the end of the day? You know, is it, the patient, is it the clinician, is the payer? I would argue payers recognize there's enough research out there saying that on average, a patient takes for medications, hopefully their diseases won't progress and they'll get better. Same with the clinicians and same with the patients who probably think that to a certain extent. But when we look at adherence data, if we look at HEOR and stuff like that, like what do they use as their metrics? Half the time it's like medication possession ratio, right? And I am not convinced that thing is actually really, really useful.   Timothy Aungst: (19:29) I think globally? Yes. I think scalable factor for most organizations, that is the go-to way to doing this. And yet I think about all the patients that I visit in their homes that have boxes of medications still stacked away. And it's like, why are they getting it? Well, you know, I just buy it because I'm told I have to buy it. So you buy your medication and then you store it away, but you're not taking it? And you know, I can't help it go walk away and thinking back my head, like, you know, what? If they show up in a report, people are going to say they're adherent. I just walked into their house and they had like 12 Advair discuses sitting there, and their COPD is still not doing good. Why? No, they're not probably taking and using it correctly, right? But anyone else would probably see that and not make that tie together.   Timothy Aungst: (20:10) So I think the biggest problem we've focused and seen in adherence is there's been no way to actually really assess if people have been taking their medications. So we argue about a topic that is potentially anywhere between $300 and $500 billion, which is really, I think, around medication optimization - which adherence is one of those things. But we've had very little quantitative data to back up our arguments. We've had qualitative data; but from a quantitative side, we've never really been able to scale. Even pharma has struggled with this in their clinical trials. You know, we've seen things like MEMSCAP and everything else out there for years trying to make a market here, and they've never really blown up. And then the 2010s, we had a flood in the market of all these different digital health devices because they recognize that stuff, but not all of them have been successful.   Timothy Aungst: (20:54) And the question is why? And I think it's because we've come to realize that adherence is very, very, very challenging. Human behavior is very challenging. I think humans are very chaotic in terms of adherence and such. So it comes back to the key stakeholders, you know? Why does the pharmacy care about, you know, adherence? To me, if pharmacy cares about adherence, instead of talking about value for the pharmacy, is the more prescriptions that are dispensed equal more profits. So if a patient's taking their medication on time, theoretically and filling on time, then that profit margin, at least is correct - 12 refills a year for a monthly supply versus if they're not, then they're not refilling and then you're not billing and you're not making money from it. So as a pharmacy, clinicians I think also have kind of a mixed feeling around adherence. To be honest, I think this might be actually one of the biggest conversations that should occur is there are therapeutic areas where we want a hundred percent adherence or at least above 90%.   Timothy Aungst: (21:47) There are therapeutic areas where I think we could be fine if people were not truly adherent. If you miss your Metformin a few days a month, am I going to care? Probably not? Your statin, and probably not? You know, and this comes down to, you know, how maybe severe a patient is, you know, how high their co-morbidity is. But there's certain diseases where, you know, what if I miss getting a biologic therapy by a day or two? Is I can really ruin me? Some day, we'll say yes. Some day we'll say no. But there's other therapeutic areas. Like let's say schizophrenia; you know, if they miss your medication, will it be problematic? Yeah. Probably. And the payers are going to be concerned about that. Cause that increases ER visits and hospitalizations, right? So often when we talk about adherence I feel like it's such a global issue that people focus on when it's very granular and it's really around different sensitivities associated with therapeutic areas that I don't really see a lot of people talk about, at large, associate with that technology.   Timothy Aungst: (22:40) That technology always seems focused just on trying to solve adherence from a very global perspective. While I think clinically we've had a lot of research talking about adherence from a very small perspective in terms of what diseases and such does it really impact. And so there isn't this mismatch behind there. So there's a financial aspect, there is the clinical aspects I think. And then there's some design aspects, you know, solving adherence, you know? What does it take to do that? And is actually the money invested really worth it? I think it's one thing that's often not discussed like, you know, just because we can solve adherence; should we? And again, they come back to the fact that we blocked a lot of objective information in many ways. If this goes to your question, would we want to actually have this data?   Timothy Aungst: (23:21) We are opening Pandora's box. We now know more about people's habits than we have in the past. So to gives some examples would be, let's go with inhalers. Propeller both have this interesting study where they evaluated people's utilization of inhalers and found them, I think they found 60, 80% of people were using their inhaler or Saba rescue inhaler incorrectly. Okay. That's actually really, really concerning, right? Because that's higher than what we probably have historically noted in research. Secondly, if these are patients that we've been signing off saying that they've been adherent or a technique is good, this really calls into question what and how well we've actually been approaching this area for decades. And I think that's actually one of the big things I'm actually concerned about. And I think many companies are kind of thinking about is, you know, we're getting a more objective information about people's habits than we ever had a past.   Timothy Aungst: (24:09) And in many ways this could be good, or it could be downright terrible if we're not prepared for the ramifications that everything we thought we knew may be wrong. And I think that's actually an area that most of us may be concerned about because that calls in attention like; okay, we find out that we've been wrong and we've not doing things perfectly. That's great. Well now we've got to fix it. No fix is going to come out overnight. So solving adherence also probably means finding out this data and understanding it while also trying to solve the underlying questions about how do we address some of these issues? Thinking about it clinically, thinking about our workflow. So when pharmacists want to see adherence on a daily basis, I don't think that'd be a problem, but I would throw back then this, what is the value of it? What is the value knowing if someone took their medication on a daily basis? Do they skip through the center pro clinically, is that meaningful? Maybe, maybe not depending on how bad their hypertension is, right? Or maybe heart failure or some other condition? From a peer perspective then maybe yes. And then along with that though, could also be focused on the money that you get for people not refilling on time. So these are the things I think that need to really be questioned.   Janet Kennedy: (25:17) Well, it's also the question of the firehose or the very specific stream of data that's relevant. So yes, any digital solution is going to gather all the information, but you wouldn't need all the information. What you would need is the alert that says based on the parameters for this patient, with these meds, now we need to worry about adherence and it could be on day four or five for a lesser impactful drug. It could be on day two for something that is of imperative nature that they take it. So that's the benefit of course, of being overwhelmed by analytics and informatics is that you can also then design the algorithm that sets the actions.   Timothy Aungst: (26:02) And that is the biggest issue then at this time, because who decides what the algorithm looks like? And this is a question that I throw most companies. And when I actually hear back, is well do it. But do you actually have the clinical staff and know how to do it? That's the issue. So I'm actually very curious if a company will come along, and actually would build this in their backend. You know, like we already have drug information databases out there, right? You know, is someone going to make something like this that they could then sell out to other companies to then utilize? Are they going to build it in-house, or would these alerts be optionable for a clinical site or a business? That would be nice. But you know, if you gave me a package deal and say, "you know, we could default this or you can change it, whatever you want."   Timothy Aungst: (26:46) Then I think that might change the conversation because it's just, you know, how many medications are out there? It's like, you know, NDC codes sitting on the shelf in pharmacies, enormous. So from a theoretical perspective, yes, this could be very possible. For practical perspective, who's going to build it and the timeframe it's going to take to build that is going to be enormous because the fact of matter is we can't build it because we don't know the data around some of this stuff, these questions. And that's the, that's a factor with Pandora's box. It opened up this huge conversation because we have the objective data to back it up now, compared in the past. But we don't know really, you know, what is the right answer? We don't know. If you go through like the literature and start like, you know, going into like pubmed and other things, how many days can you go without skipping his medication? It's not like there's gonna be a publication saying, oh, you can do this, this, this. That stuff doesn't exist, because we've never known.   Janet Kennedy: (27:34) All right. Well that sounds like the call to action to the industry, is we've got to start talking about, you know, when you have this data from digital health, how are you going to apply it and make it be not just an endless stream of numbers, but something that is actionable that supports the patient's health journey?   Timothy Aungst: (27:53) Actionable data is key. The when to have an action is the unknown. And this is where I think companies could freak out users; because it's easy enough for a patient to call me and say, you know, I've missed my medication past three days, and be like, okay, well you should take your medication or titrate back up, or let's have you in the off spot. And having the patients take that on. All right. Cause they self activated and they chose to do this. I didn't know that until they told me, right? So my liability or whatever we want to call it is limited on a patient discretion, because they own what happened to them. The minute you start putting this subjective information out there, that means the ownership and responsibility shifted to some group that never was responsible in the past. So to expect that people like selling them, want this data and use it, you may hear people say, no, not really.   Timothy Aungst: (28:43) And if you peel back the layers, you'll probably eventually find out it's this trepidation around, "I don't know what to do with this data." And I don't really trust the company to tell me what to do with this data, because I don't know where they're pulling that from. So there's gotta be some kind of evidence-based approach around there, but where is the evidence? And then this is where the ground falls out from all of us is, that Aetna says it exists. And that to me, I think is the overwhelming issue around truly objectifying medication here is the fact that we don't know what to do with it this time. And it's very troubling. So for me personally, I think this is great. This is what we should do. Are we there yet? I don't think so. And I think one of the biggest problems has been, it's not the technology. It's not even like the process of logistics; I think it's the overloading clinical scenarios that we never really hadn't think about in the past, and who's going to be responsible for what?   Janet Kennedy: (29:37) Okay. You have now laid some pretty big questions that could take us down another rabbit hole for at least an hour. So I'm going to hold those thoughts for our next conversation. And Timothy, just thank you very much for joining us on People Always, Patients Sometimes. Would you mind sharing how they can find you online?   Timothy Aungst: (29:58) You can find me on LinkedIn, you can find me on Twitter. Usually just my name. If you look it up, you'll find it. My website, thedigitalapothecary.com is also out there where I write about a lot of stuff. A lot of it is theory crafting, a lot of it is focused on next steps and such or issues I see in the industry. So you're welcome to come and contact me and reach out.   Janet Kennedy: (30:17) Excellent. Well, I think we're going to have a part two of this conversation. So I look forward to seeing you on the podcast again soon.   Timothy Aungst: (30:24) Thank you very much for having me.

DIE-ALOGUE: a true crime conversation
Rebecca Jarvis | The Drop Out: Elizabeth Holmes on Trial, ABC News Correspondent

DIE-ALOGUE: a true crime conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 24:24


What a thrill meeting and speaking with Rebecca Jarvis, ABC News Chief business, economics, and technology correspondent, and of course, host of the Drop Out, now in its' second season: Elizabeth Holmes on trial. We waste no time and get right into the current trial of Elizabeth Holmes, why we remain so captivated by her, who might be funding her defense, and how inaccurate Theranos results have had devastating effects on the patients who used it. Stay tuned to The Drop Out because this trial is ongoing with a possible 200+ list of potential witnesses. There are new episodes every Tuesday and you can listen via the link below, but start with Season 1 if you are new to the podcast! https://open.spotify.com/show/7lrJqILWfMuQhqDHJEFUK6?si=70b6a54d5c04470cYou can get early, ad free episodes, plus exclusive bonus episodes when you become a DIE-HARD on #patreon. https://www.patreon.com/diealogueReview the show on Apple Podcasts! https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/die-alogue-a-true-crime-conversation/id1470890320Follow @diealoguepod on IG/Twitter/FBShare an episode you love on social media + tag @diealoguepodShare the show with your friends, family, foes, + true crime communities.Thank you so much for joining me in these conversations. You can always reach out to me via my website:https://www.rebekahsebastian.com/discover/#contact

The Dropout
Crime and Punishment

The Dropout

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 34:19


This week, two jurors ask to be excused, citing stress around punishment and the responsibilities in deciding the future of Elizabeth Holmes. A young woman, with unusual ties to this case, gives her perspective as a trial observer, and a veteran Silicon Valley investor puts the Theranos saga in larger context. 

In House Warrior
Vampirette - A Journalist's View of Theranos' Elizabeth Holmes With Vivia Chen, Columnist With Bloomberg Legal and Host Richard Levick of LEVICK

In House Warrior

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 35:46


Vampirette - A Journalist's View of Theranos' Elizabeth Holmes: Vivia Chen, a legal columnist with Bloomberg Legal, speaks with host Richard Levick of LEVICK and discusses Ms. Holmes chameleons-like ability to go from Silicon Valley can-do wunderkind to victim of the patriarchy, just in time for trial. How did she entice Henry Kissinger, George Shultz, Sam Nunn, James Mattis, David Boise, Rupert Murdoch and other powerful white men to empower her and her fantastic yet unproven technology? In a flash, she plays her privileged white female card, employing the “Svengali defense” – my ex-boyfriend of color made me do it.

La Story
Theranos, le procès qui passionne la Silicon Valley

La Story

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 19:30


C'est le procès d'une ambition qui a dépassé la raison. Pierrick Fay et ses invités retracent dans « La Story », le podcast d'actualité des « Echos », l'ascension et la chute de Theranos, l'entreprise qui se rêvait comme un nouvel Apple et qui était prête à tout pour y arriver.La Story est un podcast des « Echos » présenté par Pierrick Fay. Cet épisode a été enregistré en octobre 2021. Rédaction en chef : Clémence Lemaistre. Invitées : Hortense Goulard (correspondante des « Echos » à San Francisco) et Anaïs Moutot (journaliste aux « Echos Week-End »). Réalisation : Willy Ganne. Musique : Théo Boulenger. Identité graphique : Upian. Photo : Yichuan Cao/Sipa USA/SIPA. Sons : Orchestre national du Capitole « Ainsi parlait Zarathoustra », ABC News, L.E.J « Pas l'time », TVA Nouvelles, HBO. Voir Acast.com/privacy pour les informations sur la vie privée et l'opt-out.

WeCrashed: The Rise and Fall of WeWork
Wondery Presents: Over My Dead Body - Fox Lake

WeCrashed: The Rise and Fall of WeWork

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 5:45


A small town cop is gunned down in a swamp in the summer of 2015. He quickly became a martyr in the national media, until a dogged investigator uncovered the officer's bizarre and dark past. When the truth comes out, the townspeople must reconcile betrayal, corruption and the secrets of an American hero. From Wondery, the makers of The Shrink Next Door and Dr. Death comes the third season of Over My Dead Body: Fox Lake.Listen to Over My Dead Body Fox Lake - wondery.fm/FL_WeCrashedSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Q as in Cucumber Podcast
Elizabeth Holmes & Theranos Trial-Week 5: The Charade

Q as in Cucumber Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 36:05


Hey Q Crew! This week we kick things off with the telling of the “Barnes and Noble Incident” story. Then we dive into week 5 of the Elizabeth Holmes trial (and go back a little bit to cover some things that we missed from earlier in the trial). We discuss the fraudulent Pfizer endorsement, more texts between Sunny and Elizabeth, the brutal cross examination of Rosendorff (the head of the lab below Sunny), and Buddhist juror #4 who got excused. Links we covered in this episode: https://www.businessinsider.com/elizabeth-holmes-trial-judge-rebukes-theranos-founder-defense-2021-10 https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2021/10/theranos-missed-deadlines-without-explanation-safeway-ceo-tells-jury/ https://www.almanacnews.com/news/2021/09/23/elizabeth-holmes-trial-nurse-practitioner-describes-alarming-inaccurate-theranos-test-results Check out our Theranos series and some of our Theranos update episodes! Theranos Part 1 https://www.podbean.com/ew/pb-q8s49-b987da Theranos Part 2 https://www.podbean.com/ew/pb-2nics-ba77f3 Theranos Part 3 https://www.podbean.com/ew/pb-dzpt4-bbd87f Updates https://www.podbean.com/ew/pb-vg6gd-ff1067 https://www.podbean.com/ew/pb-247ei-104edbc https://www.podbean.com/ew/pb-ghjpb-1088877 https://www.podbean.com/ew/pb-s4bse-106c1ed https://www.podbean.com/ew/pb-9uaqi-10d1b20 https://mcdn.podbean.com/mf/web/rx9bte/Cornfuzzled.mp3 https://www.podbean.com/ew/pb-tiq9t-10f51c8

轉角國際・重磅廣播
重磅廣播 – 239.Theranos詐欺大審判:「惡血」之女的反英雄之辯?

轉角國際・重磅廣播

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 60:18


主持/編輯佳琦、編輯七號 「萬眾矚目的大發明家,為何變成今日的詐騙惡女?」引起世界關注的美國「惡血大審」,2021年9月在加州正式開庭。矽谷新創公司 Theranos 曾在21世紀初以「高科技血液檢驗技術」驚豔全球,公司創辦人伊莉莎白・霍姆斯(Elizabeth Holmes)聲稱,透過新開發的醫療儀器,只需幾滴血就能檢測出包括癌症在內200多種疾病。但這場「血檢神話」卻在2015年被爆出是一場新創大騙局,包括美國前國防部長「瘋狗」馬提斯、媒體大亨梅鐸、前國務卿季辛吉等政商名流,都捲入了這場惡血風暴。

True Romance with Carolina Barlow and Devin Leary

Carolina withdraws from opiates while her and Devin discuss the second to last Bachelor in Paradise episode, specifically the Noah/Abigail breakup and the Dale/Abigail rumors. Then, they dive into the Elizabeth Holmes Trial and all of its inherent romance. Carolina imagines what it would be like to have one's texts to an ex read aloud in a courtroom and Devin imagines what it would be like if a loved one was marrying Elizabeth Holmes. The moral of the story is - don't trust someone who says (in a fake voice) that they don't have time to watch TV! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Non-Compliant
Non-Compliant Podcast Episode 39: The One with the Host of “The Dropout” Podcast, Rebecca Jarvis

Non-Compliant

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 43:35


In Non-Compliant Episode 39, Host Jay Edelson, nationally recognized plaintiff's attorney and Founder of Edelson PC, is joined by Rebecca Jarvis, host of the award winning podcast,“The Dropout”, and ABC News Chief Business, Technology & Economics Correspondent.To start the show, Jay and Rebecca discuss the evolution of "The Dropout", and the collection of three+ years of work that went into the production of season one (6:00). After discussing the origin of Rebecca's Theranos investigation, Jay and Rebecca discuss "The Dropout: Elizabeth Holmes on Trial". In the second season of the hit podcast, Rebecca and her team at ABC News cover the trial of the decade for Silicon Valley in real time. During this discussion, Rebecca opens up about what inspires her work— “I will always be motivated by the questions. I will always be motivated by the pursuit of truth and getting to the bottom of the story” (38:27), what she's looking forward to in the coming weeks of the trial, and what comes next. New episodes of “The Dropout: Elizabeth Holmes on Trial” post Tuesdays throughout the trial. Listen now wherever you get your podcasts.Connect with Rebecca:Twitter: https://twitter.com/RebeccaJarvisLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/rebecca-jarvis-217ba052Connect with us:Website: https://www.edelsoncreative.com/#podcastFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/edelsonlawTwitter: https://twitter.com/EdelsonCreativeLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/edelson-pcConnect with Jay:Twitter: https://twitter.com/jayedelsonEdelson PC Profile: https://edelson.com/team/jay-edelson/Recent Non-Compliant Podcast Episodes:Non-Compliant Podcast Episode 38: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/non-compliant-podcast-episode-38-the-one-where-we/id1491233296?i=1000536457137Non-Compliant Episode 37: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/non-compliant-podcast-episode-37-the-one-with/id1491233296?i=1000535241238Non-Compliant Podcast Episode 36:https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/non-compliant-podcast-episode-36-the-one-with-author/id1491233296?i=1000533115905Non-Compliant Podcast Episode 35:https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/non-compliant-podcast-episode-35-the-one-where-we/id1491233296?i=1000530990942

Lochhead on Marketing
128 The Theranos Scam: Implications for Entrepreneurs, Startups, VCs & Marketing Leaders

Lochhead on Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 24:46


All of you have probably heard about Theranos by now, and the huge impact it made in the industry. Though no matter the outcome of the trials of Elizabeth Holmes ( Theranos founder & CEO) and Sunny Balwani (Theranos COO), their actions represent a demarcation point for Silicon Valley, startups, VCs, and marketers. If by chance you don't know this story, I would recommend you search “Theranos” on Google or Youtube and get your popcorn ready, because it is one hell of a story. Short version of it was Elizabeth Holmes offered a technology that could revolutionize healthcare, but it all turned out to be a scam. What made the story interesting is how long Theranos had strung people along, until the inevitable caught up with them and it all crashing down. So in this episode of Lochhead on Marketing, let's dig into the three major things we should learn from in the wake of Theranos and Elizabeth Holmes, and how the new line VCs need to walk because of her. Don't Fake It ‘Til You Make It One of the biggest BS axioms in the industry is “Fake it til you make it”. It promotes the idea that people should project proficiency, even if they don't have the right skill set for it. There's actually an episode in Follow Your Different where we talked with Sabrina Horn (FYD 228) on why following this mantra is such a bad idea. So what's the difference between being a visionary, an optimist, a CEO, or a marketer versus being a scam artist? Let's be crystal clear about the Difference between these 3 things: Future Vision Current Capabilities Past Performance Is it okay to have a huge vision to have a radical category design, Hell yeah! As a matter of fact, it's the people who have huge visions, those who allow themselves to be radical and be unencumbered by the present and the past, that create new categories and massive new value. Though it is okay to lie about what your product or service does now? No. N.O. No way. We can't make promises to customers that we know we cannot keep. The Difference between Category Creators and Scam Artists In our last Lochhead on Marketing episode, Al Ramadan (Coauthor, Play Bigger) and I unpacked Rivian and their new IPO. Though before that IPO, they also had another revolutionary idea, which was the Tank Turn. It was a cool feature to have for your car, and people where hyped for it. Unfortunately, Rivian couldn't make it happen. They did not have the technology for it at this time. So what did they do? Well, they admitted that they could not do it. No BS, no cover-ups. Just straight-up admission and apology. While it did cause them to take a hit, they actually ended up building trust and affinity between them and the customers and the ideas that they are pursuing. Looking at it now, Rivian is poised to have a massive multi-billion IPO, and it's all thanks to the trust that they have built up for being radically transparent about their mistakes and overall process. Compare this with Theranos, who did almost the exact opposite in everything. While the initial idea for a compact medical testing machine would've been an amazing product, the fact that they strung investors along and straight-up faked results to keep up the facade was abhorrent. Unfortunately, they are not the only ones who seem to operate like this. Due Diligence and Good Governance Matters We cannot lie about what our products and services currently does. Also, legendary companies are radically transparent. The second you know your product is not performing up to task, you have to tell people, regardless of the impact on your revenue and stock. Due Diligence and Good Governance matters. When asked why they turned down Theranos, Bill Maris, founder of Google Ventures, told Business Insider that there were so much misdirection and disconnect in Theranos' pitch that it did not add up. So they sent someone to try it out, and it didn't take long to figure out that things may not be what Theranos wanted everyone to see.

Prison Professors With Michael Santos
185. ELIZABETH HOLMES' SILICON VALLEY FRAUD TRIAL (UPDATE #6)

Prison Professors With Michael Santos

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 12:37


In this podcast, we address the testimony of the government witnesses, including former Defense Secretary James Mattis and a veteran senior chemist from Theranos, Surekha Gangakhedkar. To read the entire blog, click the link below: https://prisonprofessors.com/holmes-fraud-trial-update-6/

Madigan's Pubcast
Episode 59: The Loch Ness Monster Surfaces, LuLaRoe's Scandal, & Passive Aggressive Corporate Email

Madigan's Pubcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 84:11


Kathleen opens the show drinking a Briney Mary bloody Mary from the Pittsburgh Pickle Company, which she looks forward to drinking every time she's in Pittsburgh. TERMITE SHOUTOUTS: Kathleen gives thanks to the Termites who leave notes at shows and send mail to her PO Box. She begins by thanking Termites Jennifer and Steve, who made her laugh out loud in anticipation of putting on her new “Vodka Cranberry, Please” face mask when she boards an airplane. Termite April from Wyoming sent in a very cool Ranch dressing Christmas tree ornament, and Kentucky Termite Carolyn sent an awesome Time & Oak whiskey aging stick, which Kathleen can't wait to try with her brother Patrick. Finally, Termite Diane (from “south of Boston”) sent a very touching note which makes Mama T tear up, along with a gold ribbon representing support for Pediatric Cancer in honor of her granddaughter. UPDATE ON KATHLEEN'S QUEEN'S COURT: Kathleen provides an update on the Queens, reporting that the Court has been quiet. She asks the Termites to vote for a new queen to try to shake up some new activity. What say you, Termites?“GOOD BAD FOOD”: In her quest for new and delicious not-so-nutritious junk food AND in continuing her search for the best Ranch, Kathleen samples Jalapeno Popper Goldfish, which she doesn't like as much as original Goldfish crackers. She moves on to taste Marzetti Buttermilk Romano Ranch, which she finds to be VERY tangy but she likes the flavor. Kathleen finishes her tasting session with a dessert: Apple Cider Donut Oreos which she absolutely hates, comparing the taste to “eating perfume.” She then shares with listeners that growing up in the Midwest her dad preferred Hydrox cookies to Oreos, and now she misses the flavor of those cookies over any Oreo. NEW EXPLOSIVE BRITNEY SPEARS DOCUMENTARY: Kathleen continues down her months-long rabbit hole following the conservatorship of Britney Spears and the #FreeBritney movement. She reads details behind a new documentary released by FX and Hulu entitled “Controlling Britney Spears,” an unannounced follow-up to “Framing Britney Spears” covered in an earlier episode of the Pubcast. In it, several former friends and colleagues of Spears's came forward to offer new glimpses into the heretofore well-concealed world of her conservatorship.LULAROE'S CORPORATE SCANDALS: Kathleen is fascinated as she reads an article about multilevel marketing company LuLaRoe, and goes on to describe to listeners her thoughts after watching “LuLaRich,” Amazon's new docuseries about the creation of the company and their fraud that was eventually settled through the legal system. The brand succeeded by targeting a group of stay-at-home moms seeking financial security and extra income, and for a few years, LuLaRoe was quite good at spreading empowerment through selling printed clothes. The company generated $2.3 billion in sales in 2017. But then scandals started rocking the business, including allegations of moldy, low-quality products, copyright infringement, and lawsuits calling LuLaRoe a pyramid scheme. Kathleen feels terribly sorry for the victims who suffered after being involved in this scam, but also states that she has yet to see something overly successful come from buying into a business whose primary business mantra advertises that you can “Work From Home In Your Pajamas.”THERANOS VICTIM TESTIMONIALS: In her reporting from the Elizabeth Holmes Theranos trial currently taking place in California, Kathleen provides an update to Termites regarding victims who received incorrect test results from the Theranos technology which resulted in emotional trauma. TERM LIMITS AND GRASSLEY VS THURMOND: Kathleen has a bit in her act where she makes a pitch for term limits for politicians, and is appalled to read an article stating that Sen. Chuck Grassley recently announced that he will run for reelection in 2022 — a decision Republicans believe will give them their best chance to hold onto the coveted Senate seat. Grassley, 88, released the highly anticipated news in characteristically understated fashion, posting the news to Twitter with little additional fanfare.COMEDIAN'S INTERPRETATION OF CORPORATE EMAILS: Kathleen laughs out loud reading an article on the underlying meaning behind buttoned-up corporate email language, and outlining how successful people communicate. She translates each email sample into “comic speak,” or how comedians (without an HR department) would address similar situations via email.MICHAEL FLYNN'S LATEST CONSPIRACY THEORY: Kathleen is bewildered when she reads an article where former Trump National Security Advisor Michael Flynn pushed a theory that COVID-19 vaccines are being snuck into salad dressing being sold in US supermarkets. Flynn was speaking this week to Clay Clark, the host of the conservative podcast "The Thrivetime Show.” Kathleen's comments can't necessarily be put into print ☺OSAGE INDIAN “PICTURE CAVE” SOLD IN MISSOURI: Kathleen reads an article from her home state of Missouri where the infamous Osage Indian “Picture Cave” was sold in September 2021 for over $2 million. More than 1,000 years ago, Indigenous people journeyed into a dark cave on the land now called Missouri and painted nearly 300 detailed images on its walls. The cave was a sacred space, where tribes performed ceremonies, made sense of the universe, and buried their dead. A millennium later, the paintings contained within it continue to offer clues about how those civilizations lived and what they believed. And for the Osage Nation, whose ancestors created much of the artwork in the cave, the sale came as a huge blow as it will prohibit access to their ancestral grounds. DISCOVERY OF OLDEST HUMAN FOOTPRINTS IN NORTH AMERICA: Kathleen reads an article announcing that 23,000-year-old footprints found in New Mexico recently could shed light on when humans arrived on the continent. Archaeological evidence, including spearheads used to kill mammoths, has long suggested a 13,500-year-old settlement was considered the continent's first civilization, and the forerunner of groups that became known as Native Americans.SPOTTING THE LOCH NESS MONSTER: Kathleen is a firm believer in the existence of the Loch Ness Monster and is thrilled to read an article stating that the Loch Ness Monster has been spotted by recent drone footage taken by a British outdoorsman paddling through Scotland's Loch Ness for a long-distance charity canoe trip. Watch the footage and state your opinions, Termites… WHAT TO WATCH THIS WEEK: Kathleen recommends watching the “Framing Britney Spears” documentary on Hulu, and “LuLaRich” on Amazon Prime.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

American Scandal
Theranos | Are Venture Capitalists to Blame? | 4

American Scandal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 37:37


Lindsay sits down with Charles Duhigg, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who covers the tech industry. The two explore why venture capitalists work to create monopolies, and whether these powerful investors bear responsibility for the failures at Theranos.Support us by supporting our sponsors!Better Help - American Scandal listeners get 10% off their first month at betterhelp.com/as.Sleep Number - Special offers now available for a limited time only at sleepnumber.com/scandal.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Dropout
Sounding the Alarm

The Dropout

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 40:23


This week, we hear some shocking insights from a former Theranos lab director who says he tried to stop the train before it ran off the tracks. From failing machines to a lack of proficiency testing, he tells of the pressure he felt to vouch for tests while maintaining his integrity as a lab director. And he describes how he says he tried to delay the Walgreens launch, pleading with a “nervous” Elizabeth, who went forward nonetheless. But does an aggressive and lengthy cross-examination undermine his claims?

Bizarre & Fascinating Details

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime/holmies-express-their-elizabeth-holmes-fandom-online-and-in-court/vp-AAOIwvHhttps://www.insider.com/elizabeth-holmes-theranos-trial-court-fans-holmies-girl-boss-fraud-2021-9https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder_of_Michelle_Lehttps://thecinemaholic.com/michelle-le-murder/https://www.cbsnews.com/news/michelle-le-murder-trial-giselle-esteban-found-guilty-in-nursing-students-2011-death/https://www.mercurynews.com/2012/12/10/michelle-les-murderer-sent-to-prison-for-25-years-to-life/https://heavy.com/entertainment/2020/07/giselle-esteban-michelle-le-jail-sentence-update/https://6abc.com/archive/8485853/https://www.nbcnews.com/dateline/video/full-episode-vanished-850776643503SOCIAL MEDIA: @thebfdpodcastEMAIL: thebfdpodcast@gmail.com

Cult Podcast
Ep. 197 Theranos Pt. 2: My King and My Tiger

Cult Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 59:46


It's week two of our series on Theranos! It's time to talk about Big Blood and awkward text messages between unlikely lovers! Also, we have a Patreon! [Insert Air Horn Noises Here] If you'd like to donate and join our cult, please visit www.patreon.com/cultpodcast or visit our website and click on the Patreon tab.

Q as in Cucumber Podcast
Elizabeth Holmes Week 4 Trial Update-SHE‘S AT IT AGAIN!

Q as in Cucumber Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 46:51


Hey Q Crew! Couple things: I lost my show notes with the links to the articles we covered today. If I find them I will add to the comments Also, there's so much that's happened with the Theranos trial that we got a little discombobulated and did not cover things chronologically. Finally, because of the discombobulation we sucked at even trying to cut out the “like” and “literally's”. We hear you and we are trying to get better. So this week we give a shout out to Waste Management, celebrate the good Britney Spears court ruling, and finally break down the Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos trial. Check out our Theranos series and some of our Theranos update episodes! Theranos Part 1 https://www.podbean.com/ew/pb-q8s49-b987da Theranos Part 2 https://www.podbean.com/ew/pb-2nics-ba77f3 Theranos Part 3 https://www.podbean.com/ew/pb-dzpt4-bbd87f Updates https://www.podbean.com/ew/pb-vg6gd-ff1067 https://www.podbean.com/ew/pb-247ei-104edbc https://www.podbean.com/ew/pb-ghjpb-1088877 https://www.podbean.com/ew/pb-s4bse-106c1ed https://www.podbean.com/ew/pb-9uaqi-10d1b20 https://mcdn.podbean.com/mf/web/rx9bte/Cornfuzzled.mp3   Keep sending you stories, deep dive topics, and questions to qasincucumber@yahoo.com. Don't forget to like and subscribe and all that jazz on iTunes or your favorite podcasting platform! Also follow us on our Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/QasinCucumber Enjoy! Love your faces, Lara Thank you to the amazing DVS NME for the use of his music in our intro and outro! Check him out here! https://dvsnme.bandcamp.com/ https://soundcloud.com/dvsnme #elizabethholmes #theranos #trialrecap

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe
The Skeptics Guide #847 - Oct 2 2021

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021


Ivory Billed Woodpecker Follow Up; News Items: Gigantic Cavity in Space, Oldest Evidence of Humans in North America, Treating Heart Disease in Women, Amazon Home Robot; Name That Logical Fallacy, Your Questions and E-mails: Theranos; Science or Fiction

Ink Stained Wretches
Eliana Vindicated

Ink Stained Wretches

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 40:30


Mark Milley fails his book report, Ben Smith shreds the Theranos of media, and local news is sending out the alert on put gummies in your kids' Halloween candy Times 1:16 - Segment: Front Page 1:25 - Mark Milley's Senate Armed Services Committee hearing 8:30 - Spending Bill 10:55 - Chris Cuomo, like his older brother, faces allegations of sexual harassment 15:42 - Anonymously-sourced report on South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem 24:27 - Stephanie Grisham's gives her reasoning for not holding press briefings 26:19 - Portland News' mental health day 27:45 - Local news sounds the alarm on pot gummies in kids' Halloween candy 30:27 - Segment: Obsessions 30:37 - Social media as news media (Chris) 33:05 - Ben Smith's story on Ozy Media, the Theranos of news media (Eliana) 36:55 - Segment: Favorite Item(s) of the Week 37:00 - Kudos to Simone Biles (Chris) 38:15 - Gunman who killed five Capitol Gazette employees convicted (Chris) 38:47 - Ben Smith's story (Eliana) 39:15 - "Fallatious" gorillas at the Bronx Zoo (guess who) Links Poynter article on journalism and trauma Oops I gave the kids edibles Ben Smith shreds Ozy Media The New York Post's story on the Bronx Zoo gorillas

True Crime Dumpster
#77, Part 2: The Rise & Fall of Theranos & Elizabeth Holmes

True Crime Dumpster

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 56:36


This is the second part of a two-part episode. This is an active court case. Theranos was supposed to revolutionize and democratize healthcare. Elizabeth Holmes was supposed to be the next Steve Jobs. Investors were supposed to rake in millions of dollars. However, things don't always work out the way they should, especially when that genius inventor is a fraud and that revolutionary company is a scam. Join us this week as we lay the groundwork for understanding Theranos, its young founder Elizabeth Holmes, and her flashy ex-business partner/ex-COO/ex-president/ex-boyfriend Sunny Balwani. This comes at a very relevant time--Elizabeth's trial began on August 31, 2021. She could face up to 20 years in prison for the fraud. You can join our True Crime Dumpster Facebook group. Follow us on Twitter: tcdumpster and on Instagram: truecrimedumpster. You can email us at truecrimedumpster@gmail.com. Listen to our show on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher,  Podbean, Spotify, YouTube, and many other platforms. Don't forget to rate, review, subscribe, and tell your friends about our podcast. Every review, rating, and referral helps us get to a larger audience. Tune in next time as we continue talking out the trash. Sources we used for this episode: The rise and fall of Elizabeth Holmes: A timeline 4 Startling Insights Into Elizabeth Holmes From Psychiatrist Who's Known Her Since Childhood Theranos: A Fallen Unicorn Did Elizabeth Holmes Uncle Death Inspire Theranos Idea? The Dropout Podcast Elizabeth Holmes Trial: What to Expect in the Theranos Case Timeline: The rise and fall of Elizabeth Holmes Theranos and Elizabeth Holmes A former Apple employee inspired Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes' change from 'frumpy accountant' to her signature Steve Jobs-style black turtleneck Elizabeth Holmes Black Turtleneck Fashion - Ana Arriola Interview Sunny Balwani Played an Important Role in the Elizabeth Holmes Theranos Story Theranos Whistleblower Shook the Company—and His Family Walgreens partners with a new blood-testing firm Safeway severs ties with Theranos as $350M deal collapses A Theranos scientist-turned-whistleblower, on jail time for Elizabeth Holmes Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup by John Carreyrou Elizabeth Holmes and the Theranos trial: What you need to know Elizabeth Holmes trial live updates: Former Theranos lab director testifies "It Kept Failing": Whistleblower Erika Cheung on Working at Theranos Events leading up to the trial of Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes A grueling day in Elizabeth Holmes' trial ended with evidence that Theranos tests sucked  HBO Documentary: The Inventor

WSJ What’s News
Congress Averts Shutdown; Updates From the Theranos Trial

WSJ What’s News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 15:58


P.M. Edition for Sept. 30. The closely-watched trial of Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes is still in its early weeks. Legal reporter Sara Randazzo joins host Annmarie Fertoli with the key moments so far. Plus, Congress approves a bill to avert a government shutdown, hours before the deadline. And a Senate panel grills Facebook's global head of safety about Instagram. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Long Distance Call
Plenary Matters

Long Distance Call

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021


Geraldine is launching a new podcast called "Plenary Matters". She'll follow a big, important gathering of the Catholic Church in Australia called the Plenary Council which will govern the future of the institution, of which she cares for so deeply. You can find it on iTunes, Spotify or however you listen to your podcasts. Also this week - how should employers and employees navigate the "Great Resignation" resulting from the global pandemic? And Eliza follows the Theranos trial in America. Thanks for listening! Join the conversation at the Facebook page "LDC Podcast" or email ldcpodcast1@gmail.com Plenary Matters podcast https://plenary-matters.zencast.website/episodes/preview-plenary-matters Here comes the Great Resignation - ABC Radio National https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-09-24/the-great-resignation-post-pandemic-work-life-balance/100478866 The latest data on suicide rates https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-10-01/abs-data-suicide-rates-still-high-despite-2020-covid-drop/100504214 The Dropout podcast - Elizabeth Holmes on trial https://abcaudio.com/podcasts/the-dropout/ Bad Blood podcast - John Carreyrou https://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast/bad-blood-the-final-chapter/id1575738174

Longform
Episode 458: Max Chafkin

Longform

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 49:34


Max Chafkin is a reporter for Bloomberg Businessweek. His new book is The Contrarian: Peter Thiel and Silicon Valley's Pursuit of Power. “I think there's like a really good way to come up with story ideas where you basically just look for people who have given TED Talks and figure out what they're lying about. And there's also a tendency in the press to pump up these startups based on those stories…. It's worth taking a critical look at these stars of the moment. Because often there's not as much there as we think. And if you're talking about Theranos or something, there's some potential to do harm—but also it means that maybe more worthwhile efforts are not getting the attention they deserve.” Show notes: @chafkin maxchafkin.com Chafkin on Longform Chafkin's Bloomberg Businessweek archive 02:00 "Anything Could Happen" (Inc. • Mar 2008) 09:00 "A Broken Place: The Spectacular Failure Of The Startup That Was Going To Change The World" (Fast Company • Apr 2014) 15:00 The Contrarian: Peter Thiel and Silicon Valley's Pursuit of Power (Penguin Press • 2021) 22:00 Conspiracy: A True Story of Power, Sex, and a Billionaire's Secret Plot to Destroy a Media Empire (Portfolio • 2019) 25:00 "The Education of a Libertarian" (Peter Thiel • Cato Unbound • Apr 2009) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Equity
Finding fraud in a world of fast-moving deals

Equity

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 25:30


Hello and welcome back to Equity, TechCrunch's venture-capital-focused podcast, where we unpack the numbers behind the headlines.We got the crew together — Natasha and Danny and Alex — this time 'round to talk fraud, one of our favorite topics. Sure, we've riffed on the ups and downs at Luckin, and we've spent more time talking about WeWork's implosion than we want to admit. But that's not the most recent stuff. There's been a raft of fraud lately which caught our eye. The heart of today's episode is a question about fraud, and what more of it might mean: Does more fraud indicate that we're in a growing bubble, or that we're in the later-stages of a bubble about to burst?Here's what we got into to help us understand our question:OpenSea admits incident as top exec is accused of trading NFTs on insider information -- NFTs are good fun until the market for them is bent in the favor of insiders!Goldman Sachs, Ozy Media and a $40 Million Conference Call Gone Wrong -- How to not get money from Goldman Sachs and possibly sink your company at the same time!App Annie and co-founder charged with securities fraud, will pay $10M+ settlement -- If you tell your customers that you won't use their data in a particular manner, and then you do, and possibly commit something akin to securities fraud at the same time, what happens? This!Turning to historical examples, we also brought up Nikola and Luckin and Theranos to help us draw a line around what its fraud, and what is not.With definitions out of the way, we ended this episode by trying to answer our complex, core question. We won't spoil the eventual conclusion, but here's a hint: checks are flying fast into startups with minimal due diligence, and it looks like there's much more money is coming.

WSJ Tech News Briefing
Theranos's Investors: Were They Duped or Did They Make a Bad Bet?

WSJ Tech News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 13:37


A key question in the criminal fraud trial of Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes relates to the defunct blood-testing startup's investors: Were they deceived or did they just make an unwise bet? Reporter Heather Somerville joins host Zoe Thomas to discuss how the prosecution and defense will use the knowledge and experience of Theranos's investors to make their cases. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Gary and Shannon
(09/28) GAS Hour 2

Gary and Shannon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 33:28


In this hour of GaS we go underground to the operations of an Arcadia "Sex Therapist" living out of her business. Later we get into the Theranos trial and the apparent savages that customers have become.

Madigan's Pubcast
Episode 58: Sam Adams' Illegal Beer, Warren Buffett's Breakfast, & The Largest Cruise Ship In The World

Madigan's Pubcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 80:03


Kathleen opens the show drinking a Singing Frog Golden Lager from The Wynn in Las Vegas, sipping the beer from her Seamus McDaniel's pub pint glass. Kathleen then shares with the Termites all off her favorite highlights from her show at The Ryman in downtown Nashville, thrilled that she got to finally meet her Twitter friend Stella Parton, whom she can't wait to drink red wine with. Kathleen then gives an update on her birthday plans taking place on September 30th: she's going to the Ozarks to golf with her parents and see some friends, and then is excited to be heading to Johnny Morris's Big Cedar Lodge to golf with her siblings and cousins and drink in a cave bar. TERMITE SHOUTOUTS: Kathleen gives thanks to the Termites who leave notes at shows and send mail to her PO Box. She begins by thanking Termites from the Savannah Bananas for her new baseball-style t-shirt, and from Termite Baba Valentino for the cool golf balls. She then thanks Termite Donna from Abilene, TX for her homemade Pubcast sign and funky gravy boat. “GOOD BAD FOOD”: In her quest for new and delicious not-so-nutritious junk food AND in continuing her search for the best Ranch, Kathleen samples Drew's Creamy Ranch dressing from Vermont, which she loves. She moves on to taste Cap'N Crunch Chocolate Caramel Crunch, which she thinks is too sweet, and prefers Crunch Berries. Kathleen rounds out her tasting menu sampling the limited edition Cool Ranch Doritos, which she likes but still prefers the original or taco flavored Doritos. UPDATE ON KATHLEEN'S QUEEN'S COURT: Kathleen has limited updates on the Queens this week, but hopes that recent music releases and tour activity will provide more activity for next week's report. MOBSTER TIED TO ISABELLA STEWART GARDNER MUSEUM DIES: Kathleen provides an update that alleged mobster Robert Gentile, thought to have been the last person alive with knowledge of who committed the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum art heist, has died at the age of 85 of a stroke. THERANOS TRIAL UPDATE: Kathleen continues her obsession with seeing the downfall of Elizabeth Holmes, providing an update on Theranos trial currently taking place in California. She reads an article specifically reviewing Holmes' crazy emails sent in the middle of the night to employees while she was at the company's helm, as well as her defense strategy of trying to block testimony on her extravagant personal expenses while SAM ADAMS' ILLEGAL BEER: Kathleen is thrilled to read an article announcing that brewer Sam Adams is releasing the latest beer in their Utopias collection, which is available in limited capacity every 2 years. This release is so strong, it's illegal in 15 states because this year, the brews carry a staggering 28 percent alcohol by volume or ABV. By comparison, the classic Samuel Adams Boston Lager is just 5 percent ABV.CHINA BANS KIDS FROM MIDWEEK GAMING: Kathleen reads an article from China where new rules recently published by China's National Press and Publication Administration are allowing kids and teens under 18 years old be limited to three hours per week to play online video games. Kathleen laughs at the outcry that would happen in the US if such a move was made. THE WORLD'S LARGEST CRUISE SHIP DEBUTS: Never being a lover of cruise ship travel, Kathleen reads an announcement from Royal Caribbean advising that their newest ship, the Wonder of the Seas, has been authenticated as the largest cruise ship in the world. Originally meant to set sail from China, the ship will now begin sailing from Florida to the Caribbean in March 2022. The Wonder of the Seas will feature 8 “neighborhoods” and revised amenities such as a full waterslide. All of Kathleen's thoughts on cruise ship travel can be heard on her bits “Cruise Ship Day 1” and “Cruise Ship Day 2.”THE OLDEST LOBSTER TRAPPER IN MAINE: Kathleen is thrilled to read an article from Maine profiling Virginia Oliver, who has been fishing for lobsters for over a century. Despite having surpassed the typical retirement age decades ago, the Rockland, Maine-based fisherwoman works with her son, Max, catching lobsters three days a week from May through November. Kathleen applauds Virginia's efforts and work ethic, stating that the only other person that she could envision working into a second century would be her father, Jack. THE ‘SUEZ CANAL ON RAILS' UNVEILED: As listeners know, Kathleen loves a train ride and has a mad appreciation for any improvement to infrastructure. She's envious to read of plans in Cairo, Egypt where the Egyptian government has signed a $4.45 billion deal for a high-speed electric rail line to link its Red Sea and Mediterranean coasts. The 410-mile rail link will include a mainline designed to carry more than 30 million passengers annually as well as a freight line and will run between the Red Sea port of Ain Sokhna and 2 Mediterranean ports. Kathleen laughs that she's waited her entire life for a train to connect St. Louis and the Lake of the Ozarks, and wouldn't care how fast it traveled as long as there was a bar car made available. RUSSIAN CHESS STAR SUES NETFLIX: Like many Termites, Kathleen loved the premises of the Netflix series “The Queen's Gambit.” She reads an update where a former Soviet chess champion, Nona Gaprindashvili, is suing Netflix for defamation over the incorrect chronological sequence of the final episode where Gaprindashvili is referenced by name as not having ever faced male opponents, when in fact she HAD by 1968, the year that the last episode was situated in. No further details have been released from Netflix, but you can bet that Mama T will be on the lookout for an update!HOW TO BE LIKE WARREN BUFFETT: (or at least eat like him ☺) Kathleen loves reading about billionaire Warren Buffett, not only because he's a true Midwest delight but also because he's chosen to remain in Omaha his entire life and doesn't mind sharing some of the simple financial practices that he uses in his everyday life. Kathleen reads an article that outlines 9 frugal habits of Buffett's that we can incorporate to save money, and she laughs at her own approach to “wealth management” and her arguments with her brother Patrick over the cost of a cup of Starbucks coffee. She DOES agree with Buffett's love of McDonald's Egg McMuffin for breakfast and recommends not skipping out on an accompanying Diet Coke just because you can save more money buying the soda by the 12-pack. RALEIGH'S LOST COLONY: Kathleen loves history, and is excited to read an article announcing that archaeologists are embarking on a search for the lost colony of Roanoke in an attempt to determine what happened to the 117 people who completely vanished after its settlement. It's one of the nation's great mysteries: The first permanent colony of English settlers in what would become the United States, specifically North Carolina in 1587 by Sir Walter Raleigh, disappeared three years after it was erected with virtually no trace.THE MOB CHILDREN VS THE FBI: Kathleen laughs out loud reading an article announcing that a fugitive consigliere in Colombo crime family was recently arrested after his son taunted the FBI with a Florida poolside post of his father a day after his suspected mob family was arrested in a New York City raid. The taunting post was hurriedly deleted, but not in enough time for Federal Agents to screengrab the information and enact an arrest plan. Ralph DiMatteo, 66, was the only person mentioned in the federal indictment to evade arrest, and that's because it was able to be proven that he was soaking up the Florida rays. Kathleen muses that even “the children” can be caught at their own games.WHAT TO WATCH THIS WEEK: Kathleen recommends finishing “Nine Perfect Strangers” on Hulu, continuing through Season 2 of “Wu-Tang: An American Saga” on Hulu, and also listening to upcoming weekly episodes of the ABC News podcast “The Dropout” that is closely following the Elizabeth Holmes trial. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
John Carreyrou's final chapter on the Theranos scandal

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 62:10


Nilay Patel talks to John Carreyrou about his reporting on Theranos from his Wall Street Journal articles that broke the scandal in 2015 to his podcast covering the trial of Elizabeth Holmes today. Links: Bad Blood: The Final Chapter https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/bad-blood-the-final-chapter/id1575738174 Theranos' greatest invention was Elizabeth Holmes https://www.theverge.com/22656190/theranos-elizabeth-holmes-wire-fraud-trial-founder-myth Elizabeth Holmes is on trial for fraud over her time at Theranos https://www.theverge.com/22684354/elizabeth-holmes-trial-wire-fraud-theranos Apple Podcasts launches in-app subscriptions https://www.theverge.com/2021/4/20/22381980/apple-podcasts-app-subscriptions-new-design Hot startup Theranos has struggled with its blood-test technology https://www.wsj.com/articles/theranos-has-struggled-with-blood-tests-1444881901 *Tesla's Autopilot was engaged when Model 3 crashed into truck, report states https://www.theverge.com/2019/5/16/18627766/tesla-autopilot-fatal-crash-delray-florida-ntsb-model-3   Uber halts self-driving tests after pedestrian killed in Arizona https://www.theverge.com/2018/3/19/17139518/uber-self-driving-car-fatal-crash-tempe-arizona   Elizabeth Holmes “was in charge” of Theranos, says Gen. Mattis https://www.theverge.com/2021/9/22/22689083/elizabeth-holmes-trial-james-mattis-testimony-theranos-fraud   Theranos reaches settlement with investor Partner Fund Management https://techcrunch.com/2017/05/01/theranos-reaches-settlement-with-investor-partner-fund-management/   Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/22461304 Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. Today's episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone, Alexander Charles Adams, and Andrew Marino. And we are edited by Callie Wright. Our music is by Breakmaster Cylinder.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

American Scandal
Theranos | The Race to Publish | 3

American Scandal

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 43:24


An investigative journalist looks into Theranos, and is shocked by his discoveries. Elizabeth Holmes tries to fend off the potentially devastating story.Listen to new episodes 1 week early and to all episodes ad free with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/americanscandal.Support us by supporting our sponsors!Sleep Number - Special offers for a limited time only at sleepnumber.com/scandal.Sarah Flint Shoes - Get $50 off your first Sarah Flint purchase at sarahflint.com/as. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Dropout
The General and the Patient

The Dropout

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 39:12


This week, a high-profile witness from Elizabeth's superstar board of directors surprises the courtroom by taking the stand: 4-star general and former U.S. Secretary of Defense James Mattis. He speaks of being dazzled by the potential of Theranos' devices on the battlefield and the disillusionment he felt when the full story came to light. Plus, we meet a patient whose Theranos test results led to a terrifying ordeal. 

Blocked and Reported
Historically, The Anatomy And Physiology Of Bodies With Vaginas Has Been Neglected

Blocked and Reported

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 62:59


An update on Katie's face, Catie's Correction Corner, the world's only black nonbinary conservative, the bizarre newspeak pertaining to females being embraced by major liberal institutions, personals, and Ellen Pao's very strange New York Times op-ed about Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos. Show notes/Links: Full, correct context for Daniel Lavery criticizing someone for reporting a home break-in: https://www.reddit.com/r/DearPrudence/comments/lzge8x/comment/gqdp0vz (https://www.reddit.com/r/DearPrudence/comments/lzge8x/comment/gqdp0vz) Troubled Daily Beast piece about Carson Griffith: https://www.thedailybeast.com/gawker-writers-quit-over-editorial-director-carson-griffiths-offensive-tweets-workplace-comments (https://www.thedailybeast.com/gawker-writers-quit-over-editorial-director-carson-griffiths-offensive-tweets-workplace-comments) The articles notes in its subhed: “The new site's only two full-time writers exited Wednesday in protest of editorial director Carson Griffith's offensive remarks about everything from race to penis size.” There is no subsequent explanation of the claim that Griffith made an “offensive remark” about penis size — instead, she forwarded an email thread in which other people were joking about someone's penis size, but which also contained information pertinent to a potential story idea. Tani writes: “Kosoff additionally told HR of an exchange in which Griffith took a dismissive stance towards the recruiting of a writer who identifies as non-binary. Kosoff, who was tasked with recruiting some new editorial staff, wrote in a Slack message that she was going to meet with a potential staffer ‘who is a person of color and nonbinary (uses they/them pronouns).' When she returned from the meeting two hours later, Griffith initially laughed off the preferred pronouns. ‘lol is [name redacted] a girl?' Griffith asked.” But Slack logs included in Griffith's complaint show that when Griffith said that, it wasn't in the context of responding to this individual being nonbinary, but was rather simply a question about their sex/pronouns: https://postimg.cc/yJwcRZ6k (https://postimg.cc/yJwcRZ6k) Now, this screenshot doesn't include the mention of “who is a person of color and nonbinary (uses they/them pronouns),” so it's unclear when that was said. But there's no evidence, within this excerpt, of Griffith responding directly to the applicant being nonbinary. Tani writes: “The two reporters also relayed to human-resources instances in which they believed Griffith—who holds a management role at the site—expressed an uncomfortably negative attitude on issues related to workplace diversity. In a Slack message reviewed by The Daily Beast, Griffith seemed to brag to Gawker staff that she had gotten them out of a company-wide diversity training session, though neither Kosoff nor Breslaw had asked her to do so. The two ended up attending.” Griffith claims she did not know this was a diversity meaning, and sure enough in the Slack log in question there is no mention of that aspect of it — she simply says she got them out of most of a long meeting that had been blocked off on their calendar (apologies for low quality): https://postimg.cc/PvqDsz2V/483230fa (https://postimg.cc/PvqDsz2V/483230fa) ACLU tweet: https://twitter.com/ACLU/status/1439259891064004610 (https://twitter.com/ACLU/status/1439259891064004610) Interview in The Atlantic in which Emma Green asks the ACLU's Louise Melling about language like “pregnant people”: https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2021/09/pregnant-people-gender-identity/620031/ (https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2021/09/pregnant-people-gender-identity/620031/) AOC on AC360 (note that she uses “menstruating person,” not ‘menstruator' as Jesse says in the show): https://www.cnn.com/videos/politics/2021/09/08/alexandria-ocasio-cortez-texas-abbott-abortion-ban-ac360-intv-sot-vpx.cnn (https://www.cnn.com/videos/politics/2021/09/08/alexandria-ocasio-cortez-texas-abbott-abortion-ban-ac360-intv-sot-vpx.cnn) Transcript: https://transcripts.cnn.com/show/acd/date/2021-09-07/segment/01 (https://transcripts.cnn.com/show/acd/date/2021-09-07/segment/01) Lancet tweet/cover: https://twitter.com/TheLancet/status/1441372277786951681 (https://twitter.com/TheLancet/status/1441372277786951681) Who Ellen Pao is: https://www.thecut.com/2017/08/ellen-pao-silicon-valley-sexism-reset-excerpt.html (https://www.thecut.com/2017/08/ellen-pao-silicon-valley-sexism-reset-excerpt.html) Her complicated departure: https://www.vox.com/2015/7/10/11614622/pao-out-as-reddit-ceo-co-founder-huffman-takes-over (https://www.vox.com/2015/7/10/11614622/pao-out-as-reddit-ceo-co-founder-huffman-takes-over) “The Perverse Incentives That Help Incels Thrive in Tech”: https://twitter.com/ekp/status/991817194987114496 (https://twitter.com/ekp/status/991817194987114496) Even crazier: https://www.wired.com/story/ellen-pao-the-perverse-incentives-that-help-incels-thrive-in-tech/ (https://www.wired.com/story/ellen-pao-the-perverse-incentives-that-help-incels-thrive-in-tech/) Her crazy NYT article: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/15/opinion/elizabeth-holmes-trial-sexism.html (https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/15/opinion/elizabeth-holmes-trial-sexism.html) Actual information about what Holmes did: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/16/podcasts/the-daily/elizabeth-holmes-trial-theranos-silicon-valley.html (https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/16/podcasts/the-daily/elizabeth-holmes-trial-theranos-silicon-valley.html) DoJ release noting she was was indicted alongside Ramesh “Sunny” Balwani who is very much male!): https://www.justice.gov/usao-ndca/pr/theranos-founder-and-former-chief-operating-officer-charged-alleged-wire-fraud-schemes (https://www.justice.gov/usao-ndca/pr/theranos-founder-and-former-chief-operating-officer-charged-alleged-wire-fraud-schemes) Tom Cotton op-ed: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/03/opinion/tom-cotton-protests-military.html (https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/03/opinion/tom-cotton-protests-military.html)

Real Coffee with Scott Adams
Episode 1511 Scott Adams: Imaginary Whips, Who Started the Simulation, Alcohol is Poison, and How I Will Destroy China

Real Coffee with Scott Adams

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 42:15


My new book LOSERTHINK, available now on Amazon https://tinyurl.com/rqmjc2a Find my "extra" content on Locals: https://ScottAdams.Locals.com Content: Africa colonization with alcohol Original species and the simulation President Biden whips Border Patrol Agent James Mattis $85,000 Theranos investment Poor White people can get a voter ID? Taliban public hangings ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ If you would like to enjoy this same content plus bonus content from Scott Adams, including micro-lessons on lots of useful topics to build your talent stack, please see scottadams.locals.com for full access to that secret treasure. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/scott-adams00/support

Coffee With Scott Adams
Episode 1511 Scott Adams: Imaginary Whips, Who Started the Simulation, Alcohol is Poison, and How I Will Destroy China

Coffee With Scott Adams

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 42:15


My new book LOSERTHINK, available now on Amazon https://tinyurl.com/rqmjc2a Find my “extra” content on Locals: https://ScottAdams.Locals.com Content: Africa colonization with alcohol Original species and the simulation President Biden whips Border Patrol Agent James Mattis $85,000 Theranos investment Poor White people can get a voter ID? Taliban public hangings If you would like to enjoy this … The post Episode 1511 Scott Adams: Imaginary Whips, Who Started the Simulation, Alcohol is Poison, and How I Will Destroy China appeared first on Scott Adams Says.

Blocked and Reported
Episode 83: Historically, The Anatomy And Physiology Of Bodies With Vaginas Has Been Neglected (early access, ad-free)

Blocked and Reported

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021


(Apologies -- initially uploaded this with the wrong episode number/URL, so here's a corrected redo.)An update on Katie's face, Catie's Correction Corner, the world's only black nonbinary conservative, the bizarre newspeak pertaining to females being embraced by major liberal institutions, personals, and Ellen Pao's very strange New York Times op-ed about Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos.Show notes/Links:Full, correct context for Daniel Lavery criticizing someone for reporting a home break-in: https://www.reddit.com/r/DearPrudence/comments/lzge8x/comment/gqdp0vzTroubled Daily Beast piece about Carson Griffith: https://www.thedailybeast.com/gawker-writers-quit-over-editorial-director-carson-griffiths-offensive-tweets-workplace-commentsThe articles notes in its subhed: “The new site’s only two full-time writers exited Wednesday in protest of editorial director Carson Griffith’s offensive remarks about everything from race to penis size.”There is no subsequent explanation of the claim that Griffith made an “offensive remark” about penis size — instead, she forwarded an email thread in which other people were joking about someone’s penis size, but which also contained information pertinent to a potential story idea.Tani writes: “Kosoff additionally told HR of an exchange in which Griffith took a dismissive stance towards the recruiting of a writer who identifies as non-binary. Kosoff, who was tasked with recruiting some new editorial staff, wrote in a Slack message that she was going to meet with a potential staffer ‘who is a person of color and nonbinary (uses they/them pronouns).’ When she returned from the meeting two hours later, Griffith initially laughed off the preferred pronouns. ‘lol is [name redacted] a girl?’ Griffith asked.”  But Slack logs included in Griffith’s complaint show that when Griffith said that, it wasn’t in the context of responding to this individual being nonbinary, but was rather simply a question about their sex/pronouns: https://postimg.cc/yJwcRZ6kNow, this screenshot doesn’t include the mention of “who is a person of color and nonbinary (uses they/them pronouns),” so it’s unclear when that was said. But there’s no evidence, within this excerpt, of Griffith responding directly to the applicant being nonbinary.Tani writes: “The two reporters also relayed to human-resources instances in which they believed Griffith—who holds a management role at the site—expressed an uncomfortably negative attitude on issues related to workplace diversity. In a Slack message reviewed by The Daily Beast, Griffith seemed to brag to Gawker staff that she had gotten them out of a company-wide diversity training session, though neither Kosoff nor Breslaw had asked her to do so. The two ended up attending.”Griffith claims she did not know this was a diversity meaning, and sure enough in the Slack log in question there is no mention of that aspect of it — she simply says she got them out of most of a long meeting that had been blocked off on their calendar (apologies for low quality): https://postimg.cc/PvqDsz2V/483230faACLU tweet: https://twitter.com/ACLU/status/1439259891064004610Interview in The Atlantic in which Emma Green asks the ACLU’s Louise Melling about language like “pregnant people”: https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2021/09/pregnant-people-gender-identity/620031/AOC on AC360 (note that she uses “menstruating person,” not ‘menstruator’ as Jesse says in the show): https://www.cnn.com/videos/politics/2021/09/08/alexandria-ocasio-cortez-texas-abbott-abortion-ban-ac360-intv-sot-vpx.cnnTranscript: https://transcripts.cnn.com/show/acd/date/2021-09-07/segment/01Lancet tweet/cover: https://twitter.com/TheLancet/status/1441372277786951681Who Ellen Pao is: https://www.thecut.com/2017/08/ellen-pao-silicon-valley-sexism-reset-excerpt.htmlHer complicated departure: https://www.vox.com/2015/7/10/11614622/pao-out-as-reddit-ceo-co-founder-huffman-takes-over“The Perverse Incentives That Help Incels Thrive in Tech”: https://twitter.com/ekp/status/991817194987114496 Even crazier: https://www.wired.com/story/ellen-pao-the-perverse-incentives-that-help-incels-thrive-in-tech/ Her crazy NYT article: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/15/opinion/elizabeth-holmes-trial-sexism.htmlActual information about what Holmes did: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/16/podcasts/the-daily/elizabeth-holmes-trial-theranos-silicon-valley.htmlDoJ release noting she was was indicted alongside Ramesh “Sunny” Balwani who is very much male!): https://www.justice.gov/usao-ndca/pr/theranos-founder-and-former-chief-operating-officer-charged-alleged-wire-fraud-schemesTom Cotton op-ed: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/03/opinion/tom-cotton-protests-military.html This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at www.blockedandreported.org/subscribe

Those Other Girls with Mallory and Friends
Episode 109 | Penguins in Freezers and Female CEO Frauds

Those Other Girls with Mallory and Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 88:42


It's the Weekly Teacap! Mal and Mel discuss Penguins, Elizabeth Holmes and her company Theranos, Johnny Deep speaking out of against cancel culture, and house passes the Women's Health Protection Act. Articles in episode: If you want to help us change culture donate here Get 10% off Culture of Life using the code "thoseothergirls1972" at https://col1972.com/ Get 10% off Future Female Leaders using the code "malpal" at https://futurefemaleleader.com/ You are able to listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, iHeartRadio, Google Podcast, Amazon Music, Pandora, Anchor, Breaker, OverCasts, Pocket Casts, and Radio Public PLUS YouTube and Rumble. Check out our website for our blogs and exclusive content: www.thoseothergirls.com Order Merch: https://www.thoseothergirls.com/merch Those Other Girls Rumble Channel: https://rumble.com/user/thoseothergirls Those Other Girls Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrq5L5VF05PEHFnMTaKTIHg Follow us on GETTR: https://gettr.com/user/thoseothergirls Make sure you follow our Instagram: @thoseothergirlspodcast Mallory's Personal Instagram: @lifeasmalpal131 Victoria's Personal Instagram: @victoria_kingnc Like our Facebook: Those Other Girls with Mallory and Friends Follow our Twitter: @podcast_tog Follow along with our weight loss journey: @thoseothergirlshealthyliving Follow That Political Couple on Instagram: @thatpoliticalcouple Visit their site: www.thatpoliticalcouple.com/blog --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/those-other-girls/support

Zero Blog Thirty
Dishonorable Discharge Is A Double Entendre

Zero Blog Thirty

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 61:11


ROUND 1: A former guerrilla fighter, convicted drug trafficker & biological father of at least 50 kids also became the world's oldest professional soccer player this week. The real kicker? He's the Vice President of Suriname. ROUND 2: Ahh the Bactrian Treasure… Ancient artifacts of gold & gems considered Afghanistan's most important & valuable… but where is it now?! ROUND 3: Remember fallen tech superstar Elizabeth Holmes & her fake deep voice & her Steve Jobs all black outfits & her fraudulent startup, Theranos? That was weird. Remember how Former Defense Secretary James Mattis was on the company's board? That was weird, too. This week he's testifying in court & sharing how he was duped! ROUND 4: Biden opposes honorable discharges for troops who refuse vaccine ROUND 5: Siiiick Calllllllll! Man ejaculates from anus but waits 2 years for medical help

The Megyn Kelly Show
Gabby Petito's Death, Theranos Fraud Trial, and Britney Spears with Brian Entin, Mark Eiglarsh and Arthur Aidala | Ep. 166

The Megyn Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 93:40


Megyn Kelly is joined by NewsNation Now correspondent, Brian Entin, to discuss the latest in the Gabby Petito case and his perspective from reporting on the ground in front of the Laundrie home in Florida. Megyn is also joined by criminal defense attorney Mark Eiglarsh and trial attorney Arthur Aidala to dive even deeper into the Petito case, Elizabeth Holmes defense in the Theranos fraud trial, Don Lemon's upcoming assault trial, updates on Britney Spears' conservatorship, why a man dressed as Michael Myers was arrested on a beach in Galveston, outrage over the ACLU altering a Ruth Bader Ginsburg quote, and more.Follow The Megyn Kelly Show on all social platforms: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/MegynKellyTwitter: http://Twitter.com/MegynKellyShowInstagram: http://Instagram.com/MegynKellyShowFacebook: http://Facebook.com/MegynKellyShow Find out more information at: https://www.devilmaycaremedia.com/megynkellyshow

Madigan's Pubcast
Episode 57: Halloween Ranch, Stevie vs Lindsey, & Resurrecting The Woolly Mammoth

Madigan's Pubcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 91:28


Kathleen opens the show drinking a Holy Donut Stout by Maine's Lone Pine Brewing, brought to her by her friend and fellow comedian Kelly MacFarland. She also gives a shoutout to Little Big Town for the “Day Drinking” trucker hat that was sent after Kathleen tasted their Day Drinking canned wine on a previous Pubcast. TERMITE SHOUTOUTS: Kathleen gives thanks to the Termites who leave notes at shows and send mail to her PO Box. She begins by thanking Termite Adam, who made his mother proud by sending the completed set of South Carolina rocks glasses. Also big thanks to Termite Summer for the Trader Joe's Carolina Gold bbq sauce and the “Calm Down Karen” t-shirt. “GOOD BAD FOOD”: In her quest for new and delicious not-so-nutritious junk food AND in continuing her search for the best Ranch, Kathleen samples Pumpkin Spice Cheerios, which she doesn't like because she doesn't like ANY pumpkin flavor (she and her dad always ask her mom to make a chocolate pie for any holiday), and then moves onto Taco Bell's Avocado Ranch sauce, which she recommends putting on anything. Kathleen finishes her tasting by sampling Cheeto's Crunch Pop Mix, telling Termites to stick with the original Cheeto's. ISABELLA STEWART GARDNER MUSEUM REVIEW: As a follow-up to Episode 38, Kathleen visited the ISGM when she was recently in Boston for shows. She describes the rooms and the artwork exhibited (which you can also see video of on her YouTube channel), with her favorite area being the iconic courtyard. Then in continuing to do the Lord's work, Kathleen mentions her official chowder tasting at Black Rose, the Chart House, and Legal Seafood in downtown Boston. UPDATE ON KATHLEEN'S QUEEN'S COURT: Kathleen provides an update on the Queens, reporting that Queen Tanya has canceled the remainder of her 2021 Tour dates, stating that she needs to concentrate on rehabilitating her hip after her recent surgery. Tanya has also recorded a very cool song with RuPaul called “This Is Our Country,” which Kathleen recommends cranking UP and listening to. In super breaking bombshell news, Queen Stevie has delivered a TKO to former boyfriend and bandmate Lindsey Buckingham after his latest rant to the press challenging Stevie's involvement in his firing from Fleetwood Mac. Buckingham dissed all of his former bandmates in his tirades, which Kathleen advises is probably not the best way to approach a possible reunion. HIDDEN VALLEY HALLOWEEN: Kathleen is thrilled to read an announcement that Hidden Valley is releasing limited-edition Halloween treats for Ranch lovers, as well as a Ranch bottle costume. BALTO HOLMES AND MORE THERANOS TRIAL UNCERTAINTY: In another chapter of the saga of Elizabeth Holmes' lies, Kathleen reports to the Termites that in 2017, Vanity Fair reports that Holmes flew first-class across the U.S. to adopt a 9-week-old Siberian husky. She named him Balto after the world-famous sled dog that made a dangerous 600-mile journey in 1925, bearing medicine to save an entire village from diphtheria. Holmes went on to boast to people that Balto is a wolf, which his AKC paperwork states otherwise. Kathleen then goes into detail on the latest developments in the Theranos trial, including issues with jurors, the ways in which Holmes as altered her appearance to look more “maternal,” and the and exquisite home that she's residing in with her new baby and billionaire husband while on trial for fraud. RESURRECTING THE WOOLLY MAMMOTH: Kathleen reads an article outlining where scientists are making a pitch to resurrect the woolly mammoth from extinction. Colossal, a biosciences and genetics company, has raised $15 million to bring back the mammoth in an altered genetic form. The move could help restore the fragile Arctic tundra ecosystem, however, the ethical issues involved are creating a firestorm with the Genetics community. Kathleen asks listeners what they think of the campaign, and Paddles votes to proceed as long as the end result produces a mini mammoth (much like a baby goat). BITCOIN BECOMES LEGAL TENDER IN EL SALVADOR: As listeners of the Pubcast know, Kathleen holds mad love for cryptocurrency. She's thrilled to read an article announcing that El Salvador has adopted Bitcoin as an official currency alongside the US dollar. Supporters argue the move will make it cheaper and easier for migrants to send money home to El Salvador, which is important given such remittances account for over 24 percent of the country's gross domestic product, according to figures from the World Bank reported by CNBC. Baby steps for big gain states Mama T. RIPPER THE TALKING DUCK: Kathleen reads an article from New Zealand where a duck, who was raised in captivity in the late 1980s, was recorded uttering the phrase: “You bloody fool!” Scientists have analyzed the recordings, and have added musk ducks to a small number of animals able to imitate human speech.THE BEST PLACE TO LIVE IN THE USA: Kathleen is excited to announce that Money Magazine has evaluated big cities and small towns all over the US and has determined that the best place to live is Chanhassen, Minnesota. The magazine revealed its 35th annual "50 Best Places to Live" list last week, looking at metrics across nine different categories to create its definitive ranking for 2021-22. Situated southwest of the Twin Cities, Chanhassen made the #1 pick overall, with two additional cities in Minnesota making the top fifty as well. Skol!A $400B UTOPIAN DESERT CITY PLANNED: Kathleen reads an article where former Walmart president and billionaire Marc Lore has announced his plans for a $400 billion utopian city. Lore wants to capture the cleanliness of Tokyo, the diversity of New York, and the social services of Stockholm, and his vision will incorporate 5-million-people. He has appointed world-famous architectural firm Bjarke Ingels Group to finalize the design and location, using scouting teams to review possible targets including Nevada, Utah, Idaho, Arizona, Texas, and the Appalachian region. Stay tuned for UPDATES ☺THE CAROLINA MURDAUGH MURDERS: Kathleen's ID Channel love attracts her to the bizarre details surrounding the murder of the family of a South Carolina lawyer, Alex Murdaugh. News of the deaths of Paul Murdaugh, 22, and Maggie Murdaugh, 52, has led to national headlines, not only for the mystery surrounding their murders but for the ties to other death investigations in the Lowcountry area: Stephen Smith in 2015, Gloria Satterfield in 2018 and Mallory Beach in 2019. Kathleen reads through the timeline of events leading up to the recent arrest of Alex Murdaugh, after admitting to enlisting a hitman to end his own life in an effort to release an insurance policy for his remaining living son. More to come as details unfold…See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

American Scandal
Theranos | The Walgreens Deal | 2

American Scandal

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 36:48


Theranos prepares to go public with its blood-testing devices. But the company faces increased scrutiny, as problems with its technology—and its leadership—add up.Listen to new episodes 1 week early and to all episodes ad free with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/americanscandal.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Sway
What Is 23andMe Doing With Your DNA?

Sway

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 32:07


Anne Wojcicki is sitting on a treasure trove of genetic data. The co-founder and chief executive of 23andMe has led the genetic testing company through 14 years in which it has collected data from millions of customers through their at-home DNA spit test kits. In 2018, the company announced a collaboration with GlaxoSmithKline to use this anonymized, aggregated data to develop new pharmaceutical drugs — and attracted a $300 million investment from the pharmaceutical giant. And in June, when Wojcicki took the company public, it was valued at $3.5 billion. In some ways, it's a standard Silicon Valley play: Lure customers in with the promise of democratizing information before quickly moving to monetize that information. But what are the implications when the information at stake is your DNA?In this conversation, Kara presses Wojcicki on the ethical, privacy and security questions intertwined with the 23andMe business model. They discuss what the rise of genetic testing might mean for today's 2-year-olds and how the United States is faring in a “genetic information race” with China. And they dig into the ongoing Theranos trial — specifically, whether the case against Elizabeth Holmes will rein in a Silicon Valley health tech sector that, in the past, has run a little wild.You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more information for all episodes at nytimes.com/sway, and you can find Kara on Twitter @karaswisher.

The Daily
The United States v. Elizabeth Holmes

The Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 31:51


When Elizabeth Holmes founded Theranos, the blood testing start-up, she was held up as one of the next great tech innovators.But her company collapsed, and she was accused of lying about how well Theranos's technology worked. Now she is on trial on fraud charges.The case against Ms. Holmes is being held up as a referendum on the “fake it till you make it” culture of Silicon Valley, but it's also about so much more.Guest: Erin Griffith, a reporter covering technology start-ups and venture capital for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: The trial of Ms. Holmes will cap a saga of Silicon Valley ambition and deception.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

On the Media
The Trial of Elizabeth Holmes

On the Media

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 18:35


In 2014, Fortune magazine ran a cover story featuring Elizabeth Holmes: a blonde woman wearing a black turtleneck, staring deadpan at the camera, with the headline, “This CEO is out for blood.” A decade earlier, Holmes had founded Theranos, a company promising to “revolutionize” the blood testing industry, initially using a microfluidics approach — moving from deep vein draws to a single drop of blood. It promised easier, cheaper, more accessible lab tests — and a revolutionized healthcare experience. But it turns out that all those lofty promises were empty. There was no revolutionary new way to test blood. And now, years later, Holmes is being charged with 10 counts of wire fraud and two counts of conspiracy to commit wire fraud. Two weeks into the trial, we're re-airing a conversation from 2018 between Brooke and John Carreyrou, host of the narrative podcast Bad Blood: The Final Chapter and the investigative journalist who exposed Holmes's alleged fraud.

The Dropout
Setting the Stage

The Dropout

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 45:26


Elizabeth, holding hands with her partner, Billy and her mother, Noel, breezes into the courthouse to hear opening statements in her financial fraud trial. The government and the defense set the stage, giving us a roadmap of how their sides of the case will unfold. The prosecution says this is a case about fraud, lying and cheating, while the defense paints a picture of an ambitious young woman trying to change the world. She made mistakes, they say, but didn't break the law. And we hear from the case's first witness: Theranos' top ranking financial employee who has a lot to say about how Elizabeth may have misled investors.