Podcasts about pinups

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Best podcasts about pinups

Latest podcast episodes about pinups

Only Lovers Book Club
85 The Accidental Pinup by Danielle Jackson

Only Lovers Book Club

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 53:07


The Accidental Pinup Tip Jar Instagram Bookshop Youtube

GEARS, GREASE, AND GASOLINE,  VOL 1

Hello folks, can you believe it another year gone? Well we look forward into The New Year 2023 and can't wait to get started with new things here at the Magazine and podcast. Plus listen to something new we added,  you need to listen to find out what. See you guys next  year!!!!!  We love ya thanks for listening!!!!!  Be sure to go check out our store page to support the Podcast so we can keep the episodes Free for everyone. Thank you, and January the 4th 2023 marks a new day for our magazine.. On that day is when wwe turn it over to digital. Click for the store: https://my-store-d4e7b9.creator-spring.com and Www.BustedKnuckleMagazine.com

GEARS, GREASE, AND GASOLINE,  VOL 1
Christmas in Azle Texas

GEARS, GREASE, AND GASOLINE, VOL 1

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 31:05


This past Saturday we were invited to come out to this really cool Car show from our buddy Brandon C. Reese which by the way is a top notch guy and very busy at that from hearing everything he is a part of. I was introduced Saturday to one of the original members of the FORT WORTH SHIFTERS CAR CLUB from back in the day. Brandon tells the other stuff he has his hands in. Be. sure you check out one of his shows here in Texas. Be sure you go check out : https://www.facebook.com/groups/moslahshifters/  www.BustedKnuckleMagazine.com  Empphotos.com

GEARS, GREASE, AND GASOLINE,  VOL 1
Buddy and The Caddy

GEARS, GREASE, AND GASOLINE, VOL 1

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 60:46


Buddy and  his friend drove this car all the way back to Texas after they bought it. They, had to stop some where along the way though. The two ran into and officer on their trip and it well, let's just say the Joke was on. Be sure you check out our New episodes normally a New one drops every Monday so sit back as you listen to this cool interview!

LA Review of Books
Hilton Als' "My Pinup"

LA Review of Books

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 30:21


Hilton Als, joins Eric Newman to discuss his new book, My Pinup, a hybrid memoir-essay that explores questions of race, desire, and autonomy through an intense and intimate focus on Hilton's relationship with and to polymath musician and sexual dynamo Prince. By looking at Prince as a subject of queer desire and being and at his recording career as a study in the struggle between Black excellence and white corporate control, MY PINUP probes the simultaneous allure of Black queer aesthetics and its disavowal in the hostile terrains of the music industry and American culture. The memoir/essay offers us a chance to remember and get close to the Prince that was, and to mourn the Prince that could have been. Also, Dionne Irving, author of The Islands, returns to recommend A Little Devil in America: Notes in Praise of Black Performance by Hanif Abdurraqib.

LARB Radio Hour
Hilton Als' "My Pinup"

LARB Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 30:22


Hilton Als, joins Eric Newman to discuss his new book, My Pinup, a hybrid memoir-essay that explores questions of race, desire, and autonomy through an intense and intimate focus on Hilton's relationship with and to polymath musician and sexual dynamo Prince.  By looking at Prince as a subject of queer desire and being and at his recording career as a study in the struggle between Black excellence and white corporate control, MY PINUP probes the simultaneous allure of Black queer aesthetics and its disavowal in the hostile terrains of the music industry and American culture. The memoir/essay offers us a chance to remember and get close to the Prince that was, and to mourn the Prince that could have been.  Also, Dionne Irving, author of The Islands, returns to recommend A Little Devil in America: Notes in Praise of Black Performance by Hanif Abdurraqib.

All Up In My Lady Business
All Up In: Art History, Feminism, and Pinup Girls with Maria Elena Buszek

All Up In My Lady Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 73:09


Today we have a spicy topic—the art and history of the Pinup Girl. I'm joined by the remarkable Maria Elena Buszek and together we talk about her journey to and through Art History school as a minority, the rise of the pinup girl in popular culture, and feminism from her perspective.Maria is a scholar, critic, curator, and Professor of Art History at the University of Colorado Denver, where she teaches courses on Modern and Contemporary art. Her recent publications include the books Pin-Up Grrrls: Feminism, Sexuality, Popular Culture and Extra/ordinary: Craft and contemporary art.We also discuss:Choosing the dead white guy (or not)Becoming a feminist at the age of 9 thanks to a priest and a big dose of sexismWWII and the changing landscape of women as professional and sexualGenerational issues that hold us backThe Industrial Revolution's impact on accessible pornographyThe disconnect between historical and contemporary craft workPress play then smash that subscribe button so you never miss an episode, and come hang with us on Instagram & Twitter!Links:Visit Maria's WebsiteOrder Maria's BooksFollow Maria on InstagramLearn more about Toast & JamLaunch your DJ business with The Toast & Jam Lab

GEARS, GREASE, AND GASOLINE,  VOL 1

Folks we get to see a lot of nice cars as we are running all around Texas. This car is just breath taking, well you see the photo but up close it is just wow! Kameran and his dad are my kind of people. To hear all that passion in his voice is awesome. If you come out to a show here in Texas some time you might just see this car it is one to really check out. Sit back relax and hang out for a bit. Thank you for listening and downloading. Be sure you go get signed up for our New digital Magazine. Www.BustedKnuckleMagazine.com Dec 04th 2022 issue #27 digital (1)

Dragnet
The Falcon - Puzzling Pinup

Dragnet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 29:40


GEARS, GREASE, AND GASOLINE,  VOL 1

I met Richard back in 2015 right after Dad and I moved here to Texas. We hit it off right off the bat. Richard was the first one to sign up for the Magazine, he really believed in it and would keep telling me to  to focus focus on it you got something here. Richard loved his wife with all his heart, and just loved the family life like his kids and grandkids. Richard was the one who got me to meet our friend the famous Joey V. I am honored that I had the chance to share some fun times with him. Richard was very passionate about his car and was so proud of it. He would tell Joey and I what new thing he did to it or what he was going to do to it. Richard we Miss you and we love you.

GEARS, GREASE, AND GASOLINE,  VOL 1

Well folks we are honored that we get to travel all around here in Texas and talk to the great people that own these one of a kind rides. This one is owned by Ricky and it is a mint. Ricky sat down to share his story on his car. Be sure you see it in our new digital issue number 27 Busted Knuckle Rod And Truck Magazine.  Www.BustedKnuckleMagazine.com

Cloudy Conclusions with CinderRello
From Pinup to Lockup

Cloudy Conclusions with CinderRello

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 57:19


In this week's episode, we will discuss the life of Bettie Page, better known as The Queen of Pinup. Bettie did not have a favorable upbringing, but that did not prevent her from being an icon in her own right, later in life. Nobody could have predicted the spiraling that happened after, but maybe if they paid more attention to the person behind the image... After reading and preparing for this case, I think my conclusion me be a little cloudy. If you are a listener to Spotify, please be sure to scroll below for polls and questions! If you are a listener on Apple Podcasts, please leave a review and rating! Sources for this case: These Stunning Photos Prove Why Bettie Page Was the “Queen of Pinups” ~ Vintage Everyday The Story Of Bettie Page's Tumultuous Life After The Spotlight (allthatsinteresting.com) The Garbo of Bondage - TIME Bettie Page: The Case of The Vanishing Pinup – Rolling Stone (1521) Inside The Secret Life Of Notorious Pinup Girl-Turned-Recluse Bettie Page - YouTube The Repetition Compulsion: Why Rape Victims Are More Likely To Be Assaulted Again - Girls' Globe (girlsglobe.org) Foster, Richard. The Real Bettie Page: The Truth about the Queen of Pinups. United States, Kensington Publishing Corporation, 2005. Rodriguez, Tori. Bettie Page: The Lost Years: An Intimate Look at the Queen of Pinups, Through Her Private Letters & Never-Published Photos. United States, Lyons Press, 2018. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cinderrello/support

Tall, Dark & Fictional
S02.E38 - DANIELLE JACKSON writes THE ACCIDENTAL PINUP

Tall, Dark & Fictional

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 54:40


PSL w/ TDF for the month of November continues and do we have an AMAZING guest to close out the week with! @catwynnauthor and @sjtillyauthor had the honor to speak with author and podcaster at Fresh Fiction Danielle Jackson on today's episode where talked about fanfiction, Danielle's previous job as a publicist in the publishing industry, cover design and what to do when you just can't read anymore (hint, pick up a graphic novel). Danielle was so much fun and you absolutely don't want to miss this one. You can check out Danielle and her books at www.daniellejacksonbooks.com and where books are sold. You can find her online @djacksonbooks You can find Cat Wynn on most platforms @catwynnauthor. Check out Cat's debut workplace romcom PARTNER TRACK at www.catwynnauthor.com, available where books are sold. You can find SJ Tilly on most platforms @sjtillyauthor. You can find LATTE DARLING on KU or available for order on amazon. You can find SJ Tilly on most platforms at SJTillyAuthor and on her website at www.sjtilly.com You can find the pod on instagram @talldarkfictional and @tdfpod on Twitter and Tiktok. Music by Vincent Augustus @ https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Vincent_Augustus --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/talldarkfictional/message

Tall, Dark & Fictional
S02.E38 - DANIELLE JACKSON writes THE ACCIDENTAL PINUP

Tall, Dark & Fictional

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 54:40


PSL w/ TDF for the month of November continues and do we have an AMAZING guest to close out the week with! @catwynnauthor and @sjtillyauthor had the honor to speak with author and podcaster at Fresh Fiction Danielle Jackson on today's episode where talked about fanfiction, Danielle's previous job as a publicist in the publishing industry, cover design and what to do when you just can't read anymore (hint, pick up a graphic novel). Danielle was so much fun and you absolutely don't want to miss this one. You can check out Danielle and her books at www.daniellejacksonbooks.com and where books are sold. You can find her online @djacksonbooks You can find Cat Wynn on most platforms @catwynnauthor. Check out Cat's debut workplace romcom PARTNER TRACK at www.catwynnauthor.com, available where books are sold. You can find SJ Tilly on most platforms @sjtillyauthor. You can find LATTE DARLING on KU or available for order on amazon. You can find SJ Tilly on most platforms at SJTillyAuthor and on her website at www.sjtilly.com You can find the pod on instagram @talldarkfictional and @tdfpod on Twitter and Tiktok. Music by Vincent Augustus @ https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Vincent_Augustus --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/talldarkfictional/message

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 157: “See Emily Play” by The Pink Floyd

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022


Episode one hundred and fifty-seven of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “See Emily Play", the birth of the UK underground, and the career of Roger Barrett, known as Syd. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-five-minute bonus episode available, on "First Girl I Loved" by the Incredible String Band. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources No Mixcloud this time, due to the number of Pink Floyd songs. I referred to two biographies of Barrett in this episode -- A Very Irregular Head by Rob Chapman is the one I would recommend, and the one whose narrative I have largely followed. Some of the information has been superseded by newer discoveries, but Chapman is almost unique in people writing about Barrett in that he actually seems to care about the facts and try to get things right rather than make up something more interesting. Crazy Diamond by Mike Watkinson and Pete Anderson is much less reliable, but does have quite a few interview quotes that aren't duplicated by Chapman. Information about Joe Boyd comes from Boyd's book White Bicycles. In this and future episodes on Pink Floyd I'm also relying on Nick Mason's Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd and Pink Floyd: All the Songs by Jean-Michel Guesdon and Philippe Margotin. The compilation Relics contains many of the most important tracks from Barrett's time with Pink Floyd, while Piper at the Gates of Dawn is his one full album with them. Those who want a fuller history of his time with the group will want to get Piper and also the box set Cambridge St/ation 1965-1967. Barrett only released two solo albums during his career. They're available as a bundle here. Completists will also want the rarities and outtakes collection Opel.  ERRATA: I talk about “Interstellar Overdrive” as if Barrett wrote it solo. The song is credited to all four members, but it was Barrett who came up with the riff I talk about. And annoyingly, given the lengths I went to to deal correctly with Barrett's name, I repeatedly refer to "Dave" Gilmour, when Gilmour prefers David. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A note before I begin -- this episode deals with drug use and mental illness, so anyone who might be upset by those subjects might want to skip this one. But also, there's a rather unique problem in how I deal with the name of the main artist in the story today. The man everyone knows as Syd Barrett was born Roger Barrett, used that name with his family for his whole life, and in later years very strongly disliked being called "Syd", yet everyone other than his family called him that at all times until he left the music industry, and that's the name that appears on record labels, including his solo albums. I don't believe it's right to refer to people by names they choose not to go by themselves, but the name Barrett went by throughout his brief period in the public eye was different from the one he went by later, and by all accounts he was actually distressed by its use in later years. So what I'm going to do in this episode is refer to him as "Roger Barrett" when a full name is necessary for disambiguation or just "Barrett" otherwise, but I'll leave any quotes from other people referring to "Syd" as they were originally phrased. In future episodes on Pink Floyd, I'll refer to him just as Barrett, but in episodes where I discuss his influence on other artists, I will probably have to use "Syd Barrett" because otherwise people who haven't listened to this episode won't know what on Earth I'm talking about. Anyway, on with the show. “It's gone!” sighed the Rat, sinking back in his seat again. “So beautiful and strange and new. Since it was to end so soon, I almost wish I had never heard it. For it has roused a longing in me that is pain, and nothing seems worth while but just to hear that sound once more and go on listening to it for ever. No! There it is again!” he cried, alert once more. Entranced, he was silent for a long space, spellbound. “Now it passes on and I begin to lose it,” he said presently. “O Mole! the beauty of it! The merry bubble and joy, the thin, clear, happy call of the distant piping! Such music I never dreamed of, and the call in it is stronger even than the music is sweet! Row on, Mole, row! For the music and the call must be for us.” That's a quote from a chapter titled "The Piper at the Gates of Dawn" from the classic children's book The Wind in the Willows -- a book which for most of its length is a fairly straightforward story about anthropomorphic animals having jovial adventures, but which in that one chapter has Rat and Mole suddenly encounter the Great God Pan and have a hallucinatory, transcendental experience caused by his music, one so extreme it's wiped from their minds, as they simply cannot process it. The book, and the chapter, was a favourite of Roger Barrett, a young child born in Cambridge in 1946. Barrett came from an intellectual but not especially bookish family. His father, Dr. Arthur Barrett, was a pathologist -- there's a room in Addenbrooke's Hospital named after him -- but he was also an avid watercolour painter, a world-leading authority on fungi, and a member of the Cambridge Philharmonic Society who was apparently an extraordinarily good singer; while his mother Winifred was a stay-at-home mother who was nonetheless very active in the community, organising a local Girl Guide troupe. They never particularly encouraged their family to read, but young Roger did particularly enjoy the more pastoral end of the children's literature of the time. As well as the Wind in the Willows he also loved Alice in Wonderland, and the Little Grey Men books -- a series of stories about tiny gnomes and their adventures in the countryside. But his two big passions were music and painting. He got his first ukulele at age eleven, and by the time his father died, just before Roger's sixteenth birthday, he had graduated to playing a full-sized guitar. At the time his musical tastes were largely the same as those of any other British teenager -- he liked Chubby Checker, for example -- though he did have a tendency to prefer the quirkier end of things, and some of the first songs he tried to play on the guitar were those of Joe Brown: [Excerpt: Joe Brown, "I'm Henry VIII I Am"] Barrett grew up in Cambridge, and for those who don't know it, Cambridge is an incubator of a very particular kind of eccentricity. The university tends to attract rather unworldly intellectual overachievers to the city -- people who might not be able to survive in many other situations but who can thrive in that one -- and every description of Barrett's father suggests he was such a person -- Barrett's sister Rosemary has said that she believes that most of the family were autistic, though whether this is a belief based on popular media portrayals or a deeper understanding I don't know. But certainly Cambridge is full of eccentric people with remarkable achievements, and such people tend to have children with a certain type of personality, who try simultaneously to live up to and rebel against expectations of greatness that come from having parents who are regarded as great, and to do so with rather less awareness of social norms than the typical rebel has. In the case of Roger Barrett, he, like so many others of his generation, was encouraged to go into the sciences -- as indeed his father had, both in his career as a pathologist and in his avocation as a mycologist. The fifties and sixties were a time, much like today, when what we now refer to as the STEM subjects were regarded as new and exciting and modern. But rather than following in his father's professional footsteps, Roger Barrett instead followed his hobbies. Dr. Barrett was a painter and musician in his spare time, and Roger was to turn to those things to earn his living. For much of his teens, it seemed that art would be the direction he would go in. He was, everyone agrees, a hugely talented painter, and he was particularly noted for his mastery of colours. But he was also becoming more and more interested in R&B music, especially the music of Bo Diddley, who became his new biggest influence: [Excerpt: Bo Diddley, "Who Do You Love?"] He would often spend hours with his friend Dave Gilmour, a much more advanced guitarist, trying to learn blues riffs. By this point Barrett had already received the nickname "Syd". Depending on which story you believe, he either got it when he started attending a jazz club where an elderly jazzer named Sid Barrett played, and the people were amused that their youngest attendee, like one of the oldest, was called Barrett; or, more plausibly, he turned up to a Scout meeting once wearing a flat cap rather than the normal scout beret, and he got nicknamed "Sid" because it made him look working-class and "Sid" was a working-class sort of name. In 1962, by the time he was sixteen, Barrett joined a short-lived group called Geoff Mott and the Mottoes, on rhythm guitar. The group's lead singer, Geoff Mottlow, would go on to join a band called the Boston Crabs who would have a minor hit in 1965 with a version of the Coasters song "Down in Mexico": [Excerpt: The Boston Crabs, "Down in Mexico"] The bass player from the Mottoes, Tony Sainty, and the drummer Clive Welham, would go on to form another band, The Jokers Wild, with Barrett's friend Dave Gilmour. Barrett also briefly joined another band, Those Without, but his time with them was similarly brief. Some sources -- though ones I consider generally less reliable -- say that the Mottoes' bass player wasn't Tony Sainty, but was Roger Waters, the son of one of Barrett's teachers, and that one of the reasons the band split up was that Waters had moved down to London to study architecture. I don't think that's the case, but it's definitely true that Barrett knew Waters, and when he moved to London himself the next year to go to Camberwell Art College, he moved into a house where Waters was already living. Two previous tenants at the same house, Nick Mason and Richard Wright, had formed a loose band with Waters and various other amateur musicians like Keith Noble, Shelagh Noble, and Clive Metcalfe. That band was sometimes known as the Screaming Abdabs, The Megadeaths, or The Tea Set -- the latter as a sly reference to slang terms for cannabis -- but was mostly known at first as Sigma 6, named after a manifesto by the novelist Alexander Trocchi for a kind of spontaneous university. They were also sometimes known as Leonard's Lodgers, after the landlord of the home that Barrett was moving into, Mike Leonard, who would occasionally sit in on organ and would later, as the band became more of a coherent unit, act as a roadie and put on light shows behind them -- Leonard was himself very interested in avant-garde and experimental art, and it was his idea to play around with the group's lighting. By the time Barrett moved in with Waters in 1964, the group had settled on the Tea Set name, and consisted of Waters on bass, Mason on drums, Wright on keyboards, singer Chris Dennis, and guitarist Rado Klose. Of the group, Klose was the only one who was a skilled musician -- he was a very good jazz guitarist, while the other members were barely adequate. By this time Barrett's musical interests were expanding to include folk music -- his girlfriend at the time talked later about him taking her to see Bob Dylan on his first UK tour and thinking "My first reaction was seeing all these people like Syd. It was almost as if every town had sent one Syd Barrett there. It was my first time seeing people like him." But the music he was most into was the blues. And as the Tea Set were turning into a blues band, he joined them. He even had a name for the new band that would make them more bluesy. He'd read the back of a record cover which had named two extremely obscure blues musicians -- musicians he may never even have heard. Pink Anderson: [Excerpt: Pink Anderson, "Boll Weevil"] And Floyd Council: [Excerpt: Floyd Council, "Runaway Man Blues"] Barrett suggested that they put together the names of the two bluesmen, and presumably because "Anderson Council" didn't have quite the right ring, they went for The Pink Floyd -- though for a while yet they would sometimes still perform as The Tea Set, and they were sometimes also called The Pink Floyd Sound. Dennis left soon after Barrett joined, and the new five-piece Pink Floyd Sound started trying to get more gigs. They auditioned for Ready Steady Go! and were turned down, but did get some decent support slots, including for a band called the Tridents: [Excerpt: The Tridents, "Tiger in Your Tank"] The members of the group were particularly impressed by the Tridents' guitarist and the way he altered his sound using feedback -- Barrett even sent a letter to his girlfriend with a drawing of the guitarist, one Jeff Beck, raving about how good he was. At this point, the group were mostly performing cover versions, but they did have a handful of originals, and it was these they recorded in their first demo sessions in late 1964 and early 1965. They included "Walk With Me Sydney", a song written by Roger Waters as a parody of "Work With Me Annie" and "Dance With Me Henry" -- and, given the lyrics, possibly also Hank Ballard's follow-up "Henry's Got Flat Feet (Can't Dance No More) and featuring Rick Wright's then-wife Juliette Gale as Etta James to Barrett's Richard Berry: [Excerpt: The Tea Set, "Walk With Me Sydney"] And four songs by Barrett, including one called "Double-O Bo" which was a Bo Diddley rip-off, and "Butterfly", the most interesting of these early recordings: [Excerpt: The Tea Set, "Butterfly"] At this point, Barrett was very unsure of his own vocal abilities, and wrote a letter to his girlfriend saying "Emo says why don't I give up 'cos it sounds horrible, and I would but I can't get Fred to join because he's got a group (p'raps you knew!) so I still have to sing." "Fred" was a nickname for his old friend Dave Gilmour, who was playing in his own band, Joker's Wild, at this point. Summer 1965 saw two important events in the life of the group. The first was that Barrett took LSD for the first time. The rest of the group weren't interested in trying it, and would indeed generally be one of the more sober bands in the rock business, despite the reputation their music got. The other members would for the most part try acid once or twice, around late 1966, but generally steer clear of it. Barrett, by contrast, took it on a very regular basis, and it would influence all the work he did from that point on. The other event was that Rado Klose left the group. Klose was the only really proficient musician in the group, but he had very different tastes to the other members, preferring to play jazz to R&B and pop, and he was also falling behind in his university studies, and decided to put that ahead of remaining in the band. This meant that the group members had to radically rethink the way they were making music. They couldn't rely on instrumental proficiency, so they had to rely on ideas. One of the things they started to do was use echo. They got primitive echo devices and put both Barrett's guitar and Wright's keyboard through them, allowing them to create new sounds that hadn't been heard on stage before. But they were still mostly doing the same Slim Harpo and Bo Diddley numbers everyone else was doing, and weren't able to be particularly interesting while playing them. But for a while they carried on doing the normal gigs, like a birthday party they played in late 1965, where on the same bill was a young American folk singer named Paul Simon, and Joker's Wild, the band Dave Gilmour was in, who backed Simon on a version of "Johnny B. Goode". A couple of weeks after that party, Joker's Wild went into the studio to record their only privately-pressed five-song record, of them performing recent hits: [Excerpt: Joker's Wild, "Walk Like a Man"] But The Pink Floyd Sound weren't as musically tight as Joker's Wild, and they couldn't make a living as a cover band even if they wanted to. They had to do something different. Inspiration then came from a very unexpected source. I mentioned earlier that one of the names the group had been performing under had been inspired by a manifesto for a spontaneous university by the writer Alexander Trocchi. Trocchi's ideas had actually been put into practice by an organisation calling itself the London Free School, based in Notting Hill. The London Free School was an interesting mixture of people from what was then known as the New Left, but who were already rapidly aging, the people who had been the cornerstone of radical campaigning in the late fifties and early sixties, who had run the Aldermaston marches against nuclear weapons and so on, and a new breed of countercultural people who in a year or two would be defined as hippies but at the time were not so easy to pigeonhole. These people were mostly politically radical but very privileged people -- one of the founder members of the London Free School was Peter Jenner, who was the son of a vicar and the grandson of a Labour MP -- and they were trying to put their radical ideas into practice. The London Free School was meant to be a collective of people who would help each other and themselves, and who would educate each other. You'd go to the collective wanting to learn how to do something, whether that's how to improve the housing in your area or navigate some particularly difficult piece of bureaucracy, or how to play a musical instrument, and someone who had that skill would teach you how to do it, while you hopefully taught them something else of value. The London Free School, like all such utopian schemes, ended up falling apart, but it had a wider cultural impact than most such schemes. Britain's first underground newspaper, the International Times, was put together by people involved in the Free School, and the annual Notting Hill Carnival, which is now one of the biggest outdoor events in Britain every year with a million attendees, came from the merger of outdoor events organised by the Free School with older community events. A group of musicians called AMM was associated with many of the people involved in the Free School. AMM performed totally improvised music, with no structure and no normal sense of melody and harmony: [Excerpt: AMM, "What Is There In Uselesness To Cause You Distress?"] Keith Rowe, the guitarist in AMM, wanted to find his own technique uninfluenced by American jazz guitarists, and thought of that in terms that appealed very strongly to the painterly Barrett, saying "For the Americans to develop an American school of painting, they somehow had to ditch or lose European easel painting techniques. They had to make a break with the past. What did that possibly mean if you were a jazz guitar player? For me, symbolically, it was Pollock laying the canvas on the floor, which immediately abandons European easel technique. I could see that by laying the canvas down, it became inappropriate to apply easel techniques. I thought if I did that with a guitar, I would just lose all those techniques, because they would be physically impossible to do." Rowe's technique-free technique inspired Barrett to make similar noises with his guitar, and to think less in terms of melody and harmony than pure sound. AMM's first record came out in 1966. Four of the Free School people decided to put together their own record label, DNA, and they got an agreement with Elektra Records to distribute its first release -- Joe Boyd, the head of Elektra in the UK, was another London Free School member, and someone who had plenty of experience with disruptive art already, having been on the sound engineering team at the Newport Folk Festival when Dylan went electric. AMM went into the studio and recorded AMMMusic: [Excerpt: AMM, "What Is There In Uselesness To Cause You Distress?"] After that came out, though, Peter Jenner, one of the people who'd started the label, came to a realisation. He said later "We'd made this one record with AMM. Great record, very seminal, seriously avant-garde, but I'd started adding up and I'd worked out that the deal we had, we got two percent of retail, out of which we, the label, had to pay for recording costs and pay ourselves. I came to the conclusion that we were going to have to sell a hell of a lot of records just to pay the recording costs, let alone pay ourselves any money and build a label, so I realised we had to have a pop band because pop bands sold a lot of records. It was as simple as that and I was as naive as that." Jenner abandoned DNA records for the moment, and he and his friend Andrew King decided they were going to become pop managers. and they found The Pink Floyd Sound playing at an event at the Marquee, one of a series of events that were variously known as Spontaneous Underground and The Trip. Other participants in those events included Soft Machine; Mose Allison; Donovan, performing improvised songs backed by sitar players; Graham Bond; a performer who played Bach pieces while backed by African drummers; and The Poison Bellows, a poetry duo consisting of Spike Hawkins and Johnny Byrne, who may of all of these performers be the one who other than Pink Floyd themselves has had the most cultural impact in the UK -- after writing the exploitation novel Groupie and co-writing a film adaptation of Spike Milligan's war memoirs, Byrne became a TV screenwriter, writing many episodes of Space: 1999 and Doctor Who before creating the long-running TV series Heartbeat. Jenner and King decided they wanted to sign The Pink Floyd Sound and make records with them, and the group agreed -- but only after their summer holidays. They were all still students, and so they dispersed during the summer. Waters and Wright went on holiday to Greece, where they tried acid for the first of only a small number of occasions and were unimpressed, while Mason went on a trip round America by Greyhound bus. Barrett, meanwhile, stayed behind, and started writing more songs, encouraged by Jenner, who insisted that the band needed to stop relying on blues covers and come up with their own material, and who saw Barrett as the focus of the group. Jenner later described them as "Four not terribly competent musicians who managed between them to create something that was extraordinary. Syd was the main creative drive behind the band - he was the singer and lead guitarist. Roger couldn't tune his bass because he was tone deaf, it had to be tuned by Rick. Rick could write a bit of a tune and Roger could knock out a couple of words if necessary. 'Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun' was the first song Roger ever wrote, and he only did it because Syd encouraged everyone to write. Syd was very hesitant about his writing, but when he produced these great songs everyone else thought 'Well, it must be easy'" Of course, we know this isn't quite true -- Waters had written "Walk with me Sydney" -- but it is definitely the case that everyone involved thought of Barrett as the main creative force in the group, and that he was the one that Jenner was encouraging to write new material. After the summer holidays, the group reconvened, and one of their first actions was to play a benefit for the London Free School. Jenner said later "Andrew King and myself were both vicars' sons, and we knew that when you want to raise money for the parish you have to have a social. So in a very old-fashioned way we said 'let's put on a social'. Like in the Just William books, like a whist drive. We thought 'You can't have a whist drive. That's not cool. Let's have a band. That would be cool.' And the only band we knew was the band I was starting to get involved with." After a couple of these events went well, Joe Boyd suggested that they make those events a regular club night, and the UFO Club was born. Jenner and King started working on the light shows for the group, and then bringing in other people, and the light show became an integral part of the group's mystique -- rather than standing in a spotlight as other groups would, they worked in shadows, with distorted kaleidoscopic lights playing on them, distancing themselves from the audience. The highlight of their sets was a long piece called "Interstellar Overdrive", and this became one of the group's first professional recordings, when they went into the studio with Joe Boyd to record it for the soundtrack of a film titled Tonite Let's All Make Love in London. There are conflicting stories about the inspiration for the main riff for "Interstellar Overdrive". One apparent source is the riff from Love's version of the Bacharach and David song "My Little Red Book". Depending on who you ask, either Barrett was obsessed with Love's first album and copied the riff, or Peter Jenner tried to hum him the riff and Barrett copied what Jenner was humming: [Excerpt: Love, "My Little Red Book"] More prosaically, Roger Waters has always claimed that the main inspiration was from "Old Ned", Ron Grainer's theme tune for the sitcom Steptoe and Son (which for American listeners was remade over there as Sanford and Son): [Excerpt: Ron Grainer, "Old Ned"] Of course it's entirely possible, and even likely, that Barrett was inspired by both, and if so that would neatly sum up the whole range of Pink Floyd's influences at this point. "My Little Red Book" was a cover by an American garage-psych/folk-rock band of a hit by Manfred Mann, a group who were best known for pop singles but were also serious blues and jazz musicians, while Steptoe and Son was a whimsical but dark and very English sitcom about a way of life that was slowly disappearing. And you can definitely hear both influences in the main riff of the track they recorded with Boyd: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Interstellar Overdrive"] "Interstellar Overdrive" was one of two types of song that The Pink Floyd were performing at this time -- a long, extended, instrumental psychedelic excuse for freaky sounds, inspired by things like the second disc of Freak Out! by the Mothers of Invention. When they went into the studio again with Boyd later in January 1967, to record what they hoped would be their first single, they recorded two of the other kind of songs -- whimsical story songs inspired equally by the incidents of everyday life and by children's literature. What became the B-side, "Candy and a Currant Bun", was based around the riff from "Smokestack Lightnin'" by Howlin' Wolf: [Excerpt: Howlin' Wolf, "Smokestack Lightnin'"] That song had become a favourite on the British blues scene, and was thus the inspiration for many songs of the type that get called "quintessentially English". Ray Davies, who was in many ways the major songwriter at this time who was closest to Barrett stylistically, would a year later use the riff for the Kinks song "Last of the Steam-Powered Trains", but in this case Barrett had originally written a song titled "Let's Roll Another One", about sexual longing and cannabis. The lyrics were hastily rewritten in the studio to remove the controversial drug references-- and supposedly this caused some conflict between Barrett and Waters, with Waters pushing for the change, while Barrett argued against it, though like many of the stories from this period this sounds like the kind of thing that gets said by people wanting to push particular images of both men. Either way, the lyric was changed to be about sweet treats rather than drugs, though the lascivious elements remained in. And some people even argue that there was another lyric change -- where Barrett sings "walk with me", there's a slight "f" sound in his vocal. As someone who does a lot of microphone work myself, it sounds to me like just one of those things that happens while recording, but a lot of people are very insistent that Barrett is deliberately singing a different word altogether: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Candy and a Currant Bun"] The A-side, meanwhile, was inspired by real life. Both Barrett and Waters had mothers who used  to take in female lodgers, and both had regularly had their lodgers' underwear stolen from washing lines. While they didn't know anything else about the thief, he became in Barrett's imagination a man who liked to dress up in the clothing after he stole it: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Arnold Layne"] After recording the two tracks with Joe Boyd, the natural assumption was that the record would be put out on Elektra, the label which Boyd worked for in the UK, but Jac Holzman, the head of Elektra records, wasn't interested, and so a bidding war began for the single, as by this point the group were the hottest thing in London. For a while it looked like they were going to sign to Track Records, the label owned by the Who's management, but in the end EMI won out. Right as they signed, the News of the World was doing a whole series of articles about pop stars and their drug use, and the last of the articles talked about The Pink Floyd and their association with LSD, even though they hadn't released a record yet. EMI had to put out a press release saying that the group were not psychedelic, insisting"The Pink Floyd are not trying to create hallucinatory effects in their audience." It was only after getting signed that the group became full-time professionals. Waters had by this point graduated from university and was working as a trainee architect, and quit his job to become a pop star. Wright dropped out of university, but Mason and Barrett took sabbaticals. Barrett in particular seems to have seen this very much as a temporary thing, talking about how he was making so much money it would be foolish not to take the opportunity while it lasted, but how he was going to resume his studies in a year. "Arnold Layne" made the top twenty, and it would have gone higher had the pirate radio station Radio London, at the time the single most popular radio station when it came to pop music, not banned the track because of its sexual content. However, it would be the only single Joe Boyd would work on with the group. EMI insisted on only using in-house producers, and so while Joe Boyd would go on to a great career as a producer, and we'll see him again, he was replaced with Norman Smith. Smith had been the chief engineer on the Beatles records up to Rubber Soul, after which he'd been promoted to being a producer in his own right, and Geoff Emerick had taken over. He also had aspirations to pop stardom himself, and a few years later would have a transatlantic hit with "Oh Babe, What Would You Say?" under the name Hurricane Smith: [Excerpt: Hurricane Smith, "Oh Babe, What Would You Say?"] Smith's production of the group would prove controversial among some of the group's longtime fans, who thought that he did too much to curtail their more experimental side, as he would try to get the group to record songs that were more structured and more commercial, and would cut down their improvisations into a more manageable form. Others, notably Peter Jenner, thought that Smith was the perfect producer for the group. They started work on their first album, which was mostly recorded in studio three of Abbey Road, while the Beatles were just finishing off work on Sgt Pepper in studio two. The album was titled The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, after the chapter from The Wind in the Willows, and other than a few extended instrumental showcases, most of the album was made up of short, whimsical, songs by Barrett that were strongly infused with imagery from late-Victorian and Edwardian children's books. This is one of the big differences between the British and American psychedelic scenes. Both the British and American undergrounds were made up of the same type of people -- a mixture of older radical activists, often Communists, who had come up in Britain in the Ban the Bomb campaigns and in America in the Civil Rights movement; and younger people, usually middle-class students with radical politics from a privileged background, who were into experimenting with drugs and alternative lifestyles. But the  social situations were different. In America, the younger members of the underground were angry and scared, as their principal interest was in stopping the war in Vietnam in which so many of them were being killed. And the music of the older generation of the underground, the Civil Rights activists, was shot through with influence from the blues, gospel, and American folk music, with a strong Black influence. So that's what the American psychedelic groups played, for the most part, very bluesy, very angry, music, By contrast, the British younger generation of hippies were not being drafted to go to war, and mostly had little to complain about, other than a feeling of being stifled by their parents' generation's expectations. And while most of them were influenced by the blues, that wasn't the music that had been popular among the older underground people, who had either been listening to experimental European art music or had been influenced by Ewan MacColl and his associates into listening instead to traditional old English ballads, things like the story of Tam Lin or Thomas the Rhymer, where someone is spirited away to the land of the fairies: [Excerpt: Ewan MacColl, "Thomas the Rhymer"] As a result, most British musicians, when exposed to the culture of the underground over here, created music that looked back to an idealised childhood of their grandparents' generation, songs that were nostalgic for a past just before the one they could remember (as opposed to their own childhoods, which had taken place in war or the immediate aftermath of it, dominated by poverty, rationing, and bomb sites (though of course Barrett's childhood in Cambridge had been far closer to this mythic idyll than those of his contemporaries from Liverpool, Birmingham, Newcastle, or London). So almost every British musician who was making music that might be called psychedelic was writing songs that were influenced both by experimental art music and by pre-War popular song, and which conjured up images from older children's books. Most notably of course at this point the Beatles were recording songs like "Strawberry Fields Forever" and "Penny Lane" about places from their childhood, and taking lyrical inspiration from Victorian circus posters and the works of Lewis Carroll, but Barrett was similarly inspired. One of the books he loved most as a child was "The Little Grey Men" by BB, a penname for Denys Watkins-Pitchford. The book told the story of three gnomes,  Baldmoney, Sneezewort, and Dodder, and their adventures on a boat when the fourth member of their little group, Cloudberry, who's a bit of a rebellious loner and more adventurous than the other three, goes exploring on his own and they have to go off and find him. Barrett's song "The Gnome" doesn't use any precise details from the book, but its combination of whimsy about a gnome named Grimble-gromble and a reverence for nature is very much in the mould of BB's work: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "The Gnome"] Another huge influence on Barrett was Hillaire Belloc. Belloc is someone who is not read much any more, as sadly he is mostly known for the intense antisemitism in some of his writing, which stains it just as so much of early twentieth-century literature is stained, but he was one of the most influential writers of the early part of the twentieth century. Like his friend GK Chesterton he was simultaneously an author of Catholic apologia and a political campaigner -- he was a Liberal MP for a few years, and a strong advocate of an economic system known as Distributism, and had a peculiar mixture of very progressive and extremely reactionary ideas which resonated with a lot of the atmosphere in the British underground of the time, even though he would likely have profoundly disapproved of them. But Belloc wrote in a variety of styles, including poems for children, which are the works of his that have aged the best, and were a huge influence on later children's writers like Roald Dahl with their gleeful comic cruelty. Barrett's "Matilda Mother" had lyrics that were, other than the chorus where Barrett begs his mother to read him more of the story, taken verbatim from three poems from Belloc's Cautionary Tales for Children -- "Jim, Who Ran away from his Nurse, and was Eaten by a Lion", "Henry King (Who chewed bits of String, and was cut off in Dreadful Agonies)", and "Matilda (Who Told Lies and Was Burned to Death)" -- the titles of those give some idea of the kind of thing Belloc would write: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Matilda Mother (early version)"] Sadly for Barrett, Belloc's estate refused to allow permission for his poems to be used, and so he had to rework the lyrics, writing new fairy-tale lyrics for the finished version. Other sources of inspiration for lyrics came from books like the I Ching, which Barrett used for "Chapter 24", having bought a copy from the Indica Bookshop, the same place that John Lennon had bought The Psychedelic Experience, and there's been some suggestion that he was deliberately trying to copy Lennon in taking lyrical ideas from a book of ancient mystic wisdom. During the recording of Piper at the Gates of Dawn, the group continued playing live. As they'd now had a hit single, most of their performances were at Top Rank Ballrooms and other such venues around the country, on bills with other top chart groups, playing to audiences who seemed unimpressed or actively hostile. They also, though made two important appearances. The more well-known of these was at the 14-Hour Technicolor Dream, a benefit for International Times magazine with people including Yoko Ono, their future collaborator Ron Geesin, John's Children, Soft Machine, and The Move also performing. The 14-Hour Technicolor Dream is now largely regarded as *the* pivotal moment in the development of the UK counterculture, though even at the time some participants noted that there seemed to be a rift developing between the performers, who were often fairly straightforward beer-drinking ambitious young men who had latched on to kaftans and talk about enlightenment as the latest gimmick they could use to get ahead in the industry, and the audience who seemed to be true believers. Their other major performance was at an event called "Games for May -- Space Age Relaxation for the Climax of Spring", where they were able to do a full long set in a concert space with a quadrophonic sound system, rather than performing in the utterly sub-par environments most pop bands had to at this point. They came up with a new song written for the event, which became their second single, "See Emily Play". [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "See Emily Play"] Emily was apparently always a favourite name of Barrett's, and he even talked with one girlfriend about the possibility of naming their first child Emily, but the Emily of the song seems to have had a specific inspiration. One of the youngest attendees at the London Free School was an actual schoolgirl, Emily Young, who would go along to their events with her schoolfriend Anjelica Huston (who later became a well-known film star). Young is now a world-renowned artist, regarded as arguably Britain's greatest living stone sculptor, but at the time she was very like the other people at the London Free School -- she was from a very privileged background, her father was Wayland Young, 2nd Baron Kennet, a Labour Peer and minister who later joined the SDP. But being younger than the rest of the attendees, and still a little naive, she was still trying to find her own personality, and would take on attributes and attitudes of other people without fully understanding them,  hence the song's opening lines, "Emily tries, but misunderstands/She's often inclined to borrow somebody's dream til tomorrow". The song gets a little darker towards the end though, and the image in the last verse, where she puts on a gown and floats down a river forever *could* be a gentle, pastoral, image of someone going on a boat ride, but it also could be a reference to two rather darker sources. Barrett was known to pick up imagery both from classic literature and from Arthurian legend, and so the lines inevitably conjure up both the idea of Ophelia drowning herself and of the Lady of Shallot in Tennyson's Arthurian poem, who is trapped in a tower but finds a boat, and floats down the river to Camelot but dies before the boat reaches the castle: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "See Emily Play"] The song also evokes very specific memories of Barrett's childhood -- according to Roger Waters, the woods mentioned in the lyrics are meant to be woods in which they had played as children, on the road out of Cambridge towards the Gog and Magog Hills. The song was apparently seven minutes long in its earliest versions, and required a great deal of editing to get down to single length, but it was worth it, as the track made the top ten. And that was where the problems started. There are two different stories told about what happened to Roger Barrett over the next forty years, and both stories are told by people with particular agendas, who want particular versions of him to become the accepted truth. Both stories are, in the extreme versions that have been popularised, utterly incompatible with each other, but both are fairly compatible with the scanty evidence we have. Possibly the truth lies somewhere between them. In one version of the story, around this time Barrett had a total mental breakdown, brought on or exacerbated by his overuse of LSD and Mandrax (a prescription drug consisting of a mixture of the antihistamine diphenhydramine and the sedative methaqualone, which was marketed in the US under the brand-name Quaalude), and that from late summer 1967 on he was unable to lead a normal life, and spent the rest of his life as a burned-out shell. The other version of the story is that Barrett was a little fragile, and did have periods of mental illness, but for the most part was able to function fairly well. In this version of the story, he was neurodivergent, and found celebrity distressing, but more than that he found the whole process of working within commercial restrictions upsetting -- having to appear on TV pop shows and go on package tours was just not something he found himself able to do, but he was responsible for a whole apparatus of people who relied on him and his group for their living. In this telling, he was surrounded by parasites who looked on him as their combination meal-ticket-cum-guru, and was simply not suited for the role and wanted to sabotage it so he could have a private life instead. Either way, *something* seems to have changed in Barrett in a profound way in the early summer of 1967. Joe Boyd talks about meeting him after not having seen him for a few weeks, and all the light being gone from his eyes. The group appeared on Top of the Pops, Britain's top pop TV show, three times to promote "See Emily Play", but by the third time Barrett didn't even pretend to mime along with the single. Towards the end of July, they were meant to record a session for the BBC's Saturday Club radio show, but Barrett walked out of the studio before completing the first song. It's notable that Barrett's non-cooperation or inability to function was very much dependent on circumstance. He was not able to perform for Saturday Club, a mainstream pop show aimed at a mass audience, but gave perfectly good performances on several sessions for John Peel's radio show The Perfumed Garden, a show firmly aimed at Pink Floyd's own underground niche. On the thirty-first of July, three days after the Saturday Club walkout, all the group's performances for the next month were cancelled, due to "nervous exhaustion". But on the eighth of August, they went back into the studio, to record "Scream Thy Last Scream", a song Barrett wrote and which Nick Mason sang: [Excerpt: Pink Floyd, "Scream Thy Last Scream"] That was scheduled as the group's next single, but the record company vetoed it, and it wouldn't see an official release for forty-nine years. Instead they recorded another single, "Apples and Oranges": [Excerpt: Pink Floyd, "Apples and Oranges"] That was the last thing the group released while Barrett was a member. In November 1967 they went on a tour of the US, making appearances on American Bandstand and the Pat Boone Show, as well as playing several gigs. According to legend, Barrett was almost catatonic on the Pat Boone show, though no footage of that appears to be available anywhere -- and the same things were said about their performance on Bandstand, and when that turned up, it turned out Barrett seemed no more uncomfortable miming to their new single than any of the rest of the band, and was no less polite when Dick Clark asked them questions about hamburgers. But on shows on the US tour, Barrett would do things like detune his guitar so it just made clanging sounds, or just play a single note throughout the show. These are, again, things that could be taken in two different ways, and I have no way to judge which is the more correct. On one level, they could be a sign of a chaotic, disordered, mind, someone dealing with severe mental health difficulties. On the other, they're the kind of thing that Barrett was applauded and praised for in the confines of the kind of avant-garde underground audience that would pay to hear AMM or Yoko Ono, the kind of people they'd been performing for less than a year earlier, but which were absolutely not appropriate for a pop group trying to promote their latest hit single. It could be that Barrett was severely unwell, or it could just be that he wanted to be an experimental artist and his bandmates wanted to be pop stars -- and one thing absolutely everyone agrees is that the rest of the group were more ambitious than Barrett was. Whichever was the case, though, something had to give. They cut the US tour short, but immediately started another British package tour, with the Jimi Hendrix Experience, the Move, Amen Corner and the Nice. After that tour they started work on their next album, A Saucerful of Secrets. Where Barrett was the lead singer and principal songwriter on Piper at the Gates of Dawn, he only sings and writes one song on A Saucerful of Secrets, which is otherwise written by Waters and Wright, and only appears at all on two more of the tracks -- by the time it was released he was out of the group. The last song he tried to get the group to record was called "Have You Got it Yet?" and it was only after spending some time rehearsing it that the rest of the band realised that the song was a practical joke on them -- every time they played it, he would change the song around so they would mess up, and pretend they just hadn't learned the song yet. They brought in Barrett's old friend Dave Gilmour, initially to be a fifth member on stage to give the band some stability in their performances, but after five shows with the five-man lineup they decided just not to bother picking Barrett up, but didn't mention he was out of the group, to avoid awkwardness. At the time, Barrett and Rick Wright were flatmates, and Wright would actually lie to Barrett and say he was just going out to buy a packet of cigarettes, and then go and play gigs without him. After a couple of months of this, it was officially announced that Barrett was leaving the group. Jenner and King went with him, convinced that he was the real talent in the group and would have a solo career, and the group carried on with new management. We'll be looking at them more in future episodes. Barrett made a start at recording a solo album in mid-1968, but didn't get very far. Jenner produced those sessions, and later said "It seemed a good idea to go into the studio because I knew he had the songs. And he would sometimes play bits and pieces and you would think 'Oh that's great.' It was a 'he's got a bit of a cold today and it might get better' approach. It wasn't a cold -- and you knew it wasn't a cold -- but I kept thinking if he did the right things he'd come back to join us. He'd gone out and maybe he'd come back. That was always the analogy in my head. I wanted to make it feel friendly for him, and that where we were was a comfortable place and that he could come back and find himself again. I obviously didn't succeed." A handful of tracks from those sessions have since been released, including a version of “Golden Hair”, a setting by Barrett of a poem by James Joyce that he would later revisit: [Excerpt: Syd Barrett, “Golden Hair (first version)”] Eleven months later, he went back into the studio again, this time with producer Malcolm Jones, to record an album that later became The Madcap Laughs, his first solo album. The recording process for the album has been the source of some controversy, as initially Jones was producing the whole album, and they were working in a way that Barrett never worked before. Where previously he had cut backing tracks first and only later overdubbed his vocals, this time he started by recording acoustic guitar and vocals, and then overdubbed on top of that. But after several sessions, Jones was pulled off the album, and Gilmour and Waters were asked to produce the rest of the sessions. This may seem a bit of a callous decision, since Gilmour was the person who had replaced Barrett in his group, but apparently the two of them had remained friends, and indeed Gilmour thought that Barrett had only got better as a songwriter since leaving the band. Where Malcolm Jones had been trying, by his account, to put out something that sounded like a serious, professional, record, Gilmour and Waters seemed to regard what they were doing more as producing a piece of audio verite documentary, including false starts and studio chatter. Jones believed that this put Barrett in a bad light, saying the outtakes "show Syd, at best as out of tune, which he rarely was, and at worst as out of control (which, again, he never was)." Gilmour and Waters, on the other hand, thought that material was necessary to provide some context for why the album wasn't as slick and professional as some might have hoped. The eventual record was a hodge-podge of different styles from different sessions, with bits from the Jenner sessions, the Jones sessions, and the Waters and Gilmour sessions all mixed together, with some tracks just Barrett badly double-tracking himself with an acoustic guitar, while other tracks feature full backing by Soft Machine. However, despite Jones' accusations that the album was more-or-less sabotaged by Gilmour and Waters, the fact remains that the best tracks on the album are the ones Barrett's former bandmates produced, and there are some magnificent moments on there. But it's a disturbing album to listen to, in the same way other albums by people with clear talent but clear mental illness are, like Skip Spence's Oar, Roky Erickson's later work, or the Beach Boys Love You. In each case, the pleasure one gets is a real pleasure from real aesthetic appreciation of the work, but entangled with an awareness that the work would not exist in that form were the creator not suffering. The pleasure doesn't come from the suffering -- these are real artists creating real art, not the kind of outsider art that is really just a modern-day freak-show -- but it's still inextricable from it: [Excerpt: Syd Barrett, "Dark Globe"] The Madcap Laughs did well enough that Barrett got to record a follow-up, titled simply Barrett. This one was recorded over a period of only a handful of months, with Gilmour and Rick Wright producing, and a band consisting of Gilmour, Wright, and drummer Jerry Shirley. The album is generally considered both more consistent and less interesting than The Madcap Laughs, with less really interesting material, though there are some enjoyable moments on it: [Excerpt: Syd Barrett, "Effervescing Elephant"] But the album is a little aimless, and people who knew him at the time seem agreed that that was a reflection of his life. He had nothing he *needed* to be doing -- no  tour dates, no deadlines, no pressure at all, and he had a bit of money from record royalties -- so he just did nothing at all. The one solo gig he ever played, with the band who backed him on Barrett, lasted four songs, and he walked off half-way through the fourth. He moved back to Cambridge for a while in the early seventies, and he tried putting together a new band with Twink, the drummer of the Pink Fairies and Pretty Things, Fred Frith, and Jack Monck, but Frith left after one gig. The other three performed a handful of shows either as "Stars" or as "Barrett, Adler, and Monck", just in the Cambridge area, but soon Barrett got bored again. He moved back to London, and in 1974 he made one final attempt to make a record, going into the studio with Peter Jenner, where he recorded a handful of tracks that were never released. But given that the titles of those tracks were things like "Boogie #1", "Boogie #2", "Slow Boogie", "Fast Boogie", "Chooka-Chooka Chug Chug" and "John Lee Hooker", I suspect we're not missing out on a lost masterpiece. Around this time there was a general resurgence in interest in Barrett, prompted by David Bowie having recorded a version of "See Emily Play" on his covers album Pin-Ups, which came out in late 1973: [Excerpt: David Bowie, "See Emily Play"] At the same time, the journalist Nick Kent wrote a long profile of Barrett, The Cracked Ballad of Syd Barrett, which like Kent's piece on Brian Wilson a year later, managed to be a remarkable piece of writing with a sense of sympathy for its subject and understanding of his music, but also a less-than-accurate piece of journalism which led to a lot of myths and disinformation being propagated. Barrett briefly visited his old bandmates in the studio in 1975 while they were recording the album Wish You Were Here -- some say even during the recording of the song "Shine On, You Crazy Diamond", which was written specifically about Barrett, though Nick Mason claims otherwise -- and they didn't recognise him at first, because by this point he had a shaved head and had put on a great deal of weight. He seemed rather sad, and that was the last time any of them saw him, apart from Roger Waters, who saw him in Harrod's a few years later. That time, as soon as Barrett recognised Waters, he dropped his bag and ran out of the shop. For the next thirty-one years, Barrett made no public appearances. The last time he ever voluntarily spoke to a journalist, other than telling them to go away, was in 1982, just after he'd moved back to Cambridge, when someone doorstopped him and he answered a few questions and posed for a photo before saying "OK! That's enough, this is distressing for me, thank you." He had the reputation for the rest of his life of being a shut-in, a recluse, an acid casualty. His family, on the other hand, have always claimed that while he was never particularly mentally or physically healthy, he wasn't a shut-in, and would go to the pub, meet up with his mother a couple of times a week to go shopping, and chat to the women behind the counter at Sainsbury's and at the pharmacy. He was also apparently very good with children who lived in the neighbourhood. Whatever the truth of his final decades, though, however mentally well or unwell he actually was, one thing is very clear, which is that he was an extremely private man, who did not want attention, and who was greatly distressed by the constant stream of people coming and looking through his letterbox, trying to take photos of him, trying to interview him, and so on. Everyone on his street knew that when people came asking which was Syd Barrett's house, they were meant to say that no-one of that name lived there -- and they were telling the truth. By the time he moved back, he had stopped answering to "Syd" altogether, and according to his sister "He came to hate the name latterly, and what it meant." He did, in 2001, go round to his sister's house to watch a documentary about himself on the TV -- he didn't own a TV himself -- but he didn't enjoy it and his only comment was that the music was too noisy. By this point he never listened to rock music, just to jazz and classical music, usually on the radio. He was financially secure -- Dave Gilmour made sure that when compilations came out they always included some music from Barrett's period in the group so he would receive royalties, even though Gilmour had no contact with him after 1975 -- and he spent most of his time painting -- he would take photos of the paintings when they were completed, and then burn the originals. There are many stories about those last few decades, but given how much he valued his privacy, it wouldn't be right to share them. This is a history of rock music, and 1975 was the last time Roger Keith Barrett ever had anything to do with rock music voluntarily. He died of cancer in 2006, and at his funeral there was a reading from The Little Grey Men, which was also quoted in the Order of Service -- "The wonder of the world, the beauty and the power, the shapes of things, their colours lights and shades; these I saw. Look ye also while life lasts.” There was no rock music played at Barrett's funeral -- instead there were a selection of pieces by Handel, Haydn, and Bach, ending with Bach's Allemande from the Partita No. IV in D major, one of his favourite pieces: [Excerpt: Glenn Gould, "Allemande from the Partita No. IV in D major"]  As they stared blankly in dumb misery deepening as they slowly realised all they had seen and all they had lost, a capricious little breeze, dancing up from the surface of the water, tossed the aspens, shook the dewy roses and blew lightly and caressingly in their faces; and with its soft touch came instant oblivion. For this is the last best gift that the kindly demi-god is careful to bestow on those to whom he has revealed himself in their helping: the gift of forgetfulness. Lest the awful remembrance should remain and grow, and overshadow mirth and pleasure, and the great haunting memory should spoil all the after-lives of little animals helped out of difficulties, in order that they should be happy and lighthearted as before. Mole rubbed his eyes and stared at Rat, who was looking about him in a puzzled sort of way. “I beg your pardon; what did you say, Rat?” he asked. “I think I was only remarking,” said Rat slowly, “that this was the right sort of place, and that here, if anywhere, we should find him. And look! Why, there he is, the little fellow!” And with a cry of delight he ran towards the slumbering Portly. But Mole stood still a moment, held in thought. As one wakened suddenly from a beautiful dream, who struggles to recall it, and can re-capture nothing but a dim sense of the beauty of it, the beauty! Till that, too, fades away in its turn, and the dreamer bitterly accepts the hard, cold waking and all its penalties; so Mole, after struggling with his memory for a brief space, shook his head sadly and followed the Rat.

america tv love american death history black world children english uk space news americans british games young war walk spring secrets european wild heart inspiration stars dna songs african trip hospitals bbc wind sun vietnam wolf joker britain catholic beatles mothers lion tiger greece liverpool stem nurses cambridge birmingham wright iv kent david bowie eleven butterflies waters depending bomb bob dylan victorian newcastle civil rights john lennon invention bach lsd pink floyd apples communists rat boyd chapman bb boogie pops handel controls string heartbeat alice in wonderland kinks adler byrne ban mole greyhound emo sanford climax roald dahl tilt paul simon sigma yoko ono emi eaten camelot gnome james joyce syd pollock jenner abbey road gog rock music cautionary tales brian wilson elektra lewis carroll relics roger waters haydn notting hill jeff beck arthurian groupies marquee sainsbury willows etta james freak out i ching opel dick clark gilmour howlin edwardian coasters walk like gk chesterton john lee hooker bo diddley wish you were here labour mp tennyson sgt pepper richard wright penny lane twink pinups pat boone anjelica huston syd barrett new left john peel allemande manfred mann nick mason free school amm jimi hendrix experience klose sdp johnny b goode pretty things shine on rubber soul girl guides liberal mps american bandstand chubby checker oar notting hill carnival ray davies psychedelic experiences harrod newport folk festival bandstand elektra records frith bacharach roky erickson steptoe tam lin strawberry fields forever spike milligan soft machine andrew king joker's wild mose allison who do you love saucerful shallots joe boyd geoff emerick rhymer rick wright lodgers radio london distributism entranced ewan maccoll fred frith crazy diamond quaalude incredible string band belloc pete anderson partita no rob chapman track records slim harpo ron grainer addenbrooke what would you say mike leonard emily young cloudberry interstellar overdrive dave gilmour grimble nick kent norman smith ufo club skip spence chris dennis pink fairies first girl i loved jac holzman arnold layne malcolm jones dodder smokestack lightnin tilt araiza
Always On A Sunday With Den & Lo
S2E13: McMessy, Pin Ups & Puppies

Always On A Sunday With Den & Lo

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 32:22


Sunday Funday! Chatting about our day leads to some interesting information from Den's work life.

GEARS, GREASE, AND GASOLINE,  VOL 1
The Red Apache Interview

GEARS, GREASE, AND GASOLINE, VOL 1

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 52:56


Clent was inside one of our early print issues. We had to throw this truck on the cover of the new digital format Magazine to just spotlight his amazing awesome Truck, once again and why not do it right when we have a new format coming out. Matter of fact if you are still not signed up, you need to go get signed up over at www.BustedKnuckleMagazine.com. If you would like to see more of this cool truck you need to subscribe. It is only $20.00 a year! You need to get the FREE! dropbox account on your smart device so you can access our Digital Magazine. Sit back and take a listen!!!!! 

Young Urban Anesthesiologists
BGA-Analyse Teil 2 - Die Anionenlücke

Young Urban Anesthesiologists

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 38:37


Zum EFN-Fomular geht es hier: https://ains.umg.eu/index.php?id=8244 Achtung: Fortbildungspunkte können nur innerhalb von 4 Wochen nach Veröffentlichung der Episode beantragt werden. Eine nachträgliche Meldung ist bei der Ärztekammer leider nicht möglich.

GEARS, GREASE, AND GASOLINE,  VOL 1

Get ready! for another great, and awesome  story. This one is told by  ONE MAN that has the passion like so many of us out there. Ben dives in deeper in the interview. By looking at his Garage or Shop at his home, this kinda tells us this isn't his first Rodeo! Be sure you check out the new digital issue #27 of our Magazine. You can sign up for only: $20.00 Bucks a Year, over at Www.BustedKnuckleMagazine.com the Father and son  duo Ben and Tyler will both  be inside. When you do sign up make sure you head over to Www.Dropbox.com and download their FREE account so you can start receiving our new Magazine today on your smart device.

GEARS, GREASE, AND GASOLINE,  VOL 1
The Tyler Interview

GEARS, GREASE, AND GASOLINE, VOL 1

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 21:48


Few weeks back Dad and I headed down to Spring town, Tx Texas to do this Podcast. We caught up to Tyler and had to put this awesome beast in in the Magazine.  So sit back relax your in for a real cool Episode folks.

Troca Fitas
Ep 77 - VOOID, Panic Shack, El Mato a un Policía Motorizado e Leandro Ferraz (feat. Bruno Palma)

Troca Fitas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 73:38


Tratamento de canal surpresa, Santa Ceciliers, o destino atual da banda Pin Ups, ovo de codorna, salmonela, o momento em que um isqueiro deixa de ser isqueiro, elogios e homenagens ao Clube Outs, Glico de tomate, Ebicen e miojo com bananinha foram apenas alguns dos assuntos deste episódio do Troca Fitas, onde recebemos Bruno Palma (Frescobol) e ouvimos o som doidão psicodélico jazzy de Taiwan do VOOID, o rock ensandecido das inglesas Panic Shack, o indie delícia dos argentinos El Mató a un Policía Motorizado e o som deliciante e criativo do paulista Leandro Ferraz! BG: Hellephant - Leviatano Apoio: Porto Produções Musicais

Ampersand: The Poets & Writers Podcast
My Pinup: A Paean to Prince by Hilton Als

Ampersand: The Poets & Writers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 4:29


My Pinup: A Paean to Prince by Hilton Als by Poets & Writers

GEARS, GREASE, AND GASOLINE,  VOL 1
Tacos and Tires 2022 Gas Monkey Garage

GEARS, GREASE, AND GASOLINE, VOL 1

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 26:20


It was about a 45 minute drive for us, being from Fort Worth, but it was a nice day for a Car Show. This by know means was just any Car Show. Yes, you would be right it was the Famous Tacos n Tires put on Richard Rawlings at Gas Monkey Garage. We showed up I would say about 9:30 or a little after. The Cars were already parked out front and set up, it was starting to get really crowded out there. I had the Podcast Mic rolling as I walked around incase I got to do any interviews. We did, ran into a few friends out there, we got to catch up with Dwayne  Phibbs who works for Richard now, if you remember in the early days Gas Monkey Garage they started out in a little shop right on Reeder Rd. That shop were they filmed the early episodes from was owned by Dwayne and his Father. There is also another shop on that street famous,  the Monkeys would get all their interior work done on the cars they built for the show, Sue Martin of ASM Upholstery was seen on the show as well. How can I forget my friend Steve Mabry from The Rusty Buffalo Company this guy is so amazing with the designing as well as his craftsmanship and his attention to detail on his products that he creates. We also saw and spoke with Tony Taylor from Gas Monkey Garage.

DAVIDBOWIE: ALBUMTOALBUM
S4 Ep2: Mike Garson on Aladdin Sane

DAVIDBOWIE: ALBUMTOALBUM

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 32:47


In this episode we talk to the one and only Mike Garson, pianist extraordinaire! From playing with the Spiders from Mars to improvising one of the most extraordinary passages in pop music – that utterly frenetic piano solo in Aladdin Sane – to the elegance of 2003's Reality - Garson was one of the only musicians to have played with Bowie across decades, sculpting the sound for Aladdin Sane, Pin Ups, Diamond Dogs, Young Americans, Black Tie White Noise, Outside, Earthling, Heathen and Reality. And, as he explains here, he was originally only hired for eight weeks…! In this episode, Mike talks us through his story, demonstrates his process live and reflects on how, almost half a century later, people still love that solo.  Check out everything Garson here

Word In Your Ear
50 years of Nuggets, Ian Brown's karaoke and is there a band name worse than Jealous Nostril?

Word In Your Ear

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 44:41


Things given a grilling this week in hot pursuit of revelation and entertainment … .. would YOU pay £45 to see Ian Brown and some backing tracks? … the life of the late Joe Bussard, collector of 25,000 78s “who partied like it was 1929”. Joe thought real jazz ended in 1933 and the last great country record was Jimmy Murphy's I'm Looking For A Mustard Patch. We love this man. ... career-shrinking band names. … Chunkz, Pieface and the Beast: new adventures in stadium-filling entertainment. … is Nuggets the most famous and influential compilation ever released? … best albums of cover versions – among them Moondog Matinee, the Seeger Sessions, Irish Heartbeat, McCartney's Back In The USSR, Pin-Ups, These Foolish Things. … Paul Scholes meets Gary Neville. … rock stars separated by a single letter. … and more songs about seagulls and chips.   A short film about Joe Bussard here …https://youtube.com/watch?v=OPhtR09p6zM&feature=share&utm_source=EKLEiJECCKjOmKnC5IiRIQhttps://www.nytimes.com/2005/05/14/arts/a-loving-obsession-with-oldtime-jazz.html?smid=nytcore-ios-share&referringSource=articleShare Desperate Man Blues …https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0375702/Grab your EXCLUSIVE NordVPN Deal by going to https://nordvpn.com/yourear to get up a Huge Discount off your NordVPN Plan + 4 months for free! It's completely risk free with Nord's 30 day money-back guarantee!Subscribe to Word In Your Ear on Patreon to receive every future Word Podcast early, ad-free and with full visuals!: https://www.patreon.com/wordinyourear Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Word Podcast
50 years of Nuggets, Ian Brown's karaoke and is there a band name worse than Jealous Nostril?

Word Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 44:41


Things given a grilling this week in hot pursuit of revelation and entertainment … .. would YOU pay £45 to see Ian Brown and some backing tracks? … the life of the late Joe Bussard, collector of 25,000 78s “who partied like it was 1929”. Joe thought real jazz ended in 1933 and the last great country record was Jimmy Murphy's I'm Looking For A Mustard Patch. We love this man. ... career-shrinking band names. … Chunkz, Pieface and the Beast: new adventures in stadium-filling entertainment. … is Nuggets the most famous and influential compilation ever released? … best albums of cover versions – among them Moondog Matinee, the Seeger Sessions, Irish Heartbeat, McCartney's Back In The USSR, Pin-Ups, These Foolish Things. … Paul Scholes meets Gary Neville. … rock stars separated by a single letter. … and more songs about seagulls and chips.   A short film about Joe Bussard here …https://youtube.com/watch?v=OPhtR09p6zM&feature=share&utm_source=EKLEiJECCKjOmKnC5IiRIQhttps://www.nytimes.com/2005/05/14/arts/a-loving-obsession-with-oldtime-jazz.html?smid=nytcore-ios-share&referringSource=articleShare Desperate Man Blues …https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0375702/Grab your EXCLUSIVE NordVPN Deal by going to https://nordvpn.com/yourear to get up a Huge Discount off your NordVPN Plan + 4 months for free! It's completely risk free with Nord's 30 day money-back guarantee!Subscribe to Word In Your Ear on Patreon to receive every future Word Podcast early, ad-free and with full visuals!: https://www.patreon.com/wordinyourear Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Otaku Outsiders
Nerdy Pinup Cosplay

Otaku Outsiders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 50:05


In this part of the miniseries we are interviewing nerdy pin up girl (TT AND IG) --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

GEARS, GREASE, AND GASOLINE,  VOL 1
Behind Cars And Stars / Car Show

GEARS, GREASE, AND GASOLINE, VOL 1

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 21:05


Branden and Danny are two of the main guys among a bunch of other great folks that help these two put on one of the Best Shows here in all of Texas.  We got to sit down a few weeks back with Branden, Danny couldn't make it that day but he was there in spirt. We had to ask what goes into putting on an event as large as this.  I got to ask some things that I think we want to know. If you have not been to a Cars and Stars Car Show you need to, or you can contact them they are always looking for folks to help. Sit back relax and away we goooo.....

Care So Much
Accessibility - Everyone Deserves the Tools They Need to Succeed with Yi Shun Lai

Care So Much

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 75:26


The “A” of DIEA is often missed and is the most intersectional of the Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Accessibility works. This week Yi Shun Lai talks about why she cares so much more about accessibility, the need to center the voices of disabled people, and how it affects everyone. Find Yi Shun Twitter - https://twitter.com/gooddirt TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@yishunlai Website - https://thegooddirt.org/ Yi Shun's Work Books - https://thegooddirt.org/the-books/ Not a Self-Help Book: The Misadventures of Marty Wu My debut novel, published by Shade Mountain Press in 2016, was a semi-finalist for the Thurber Prize for American Humor. In it, you'll meet Marty Wu, compulsive reader of advice manuals and general mess of a career woman. When a professional disaster in Las Vegas sends her right back into the arms of her overbearing mother in New York, Marty must decide between filial duty and her own career aspirations. The journey takes her back to her home country of Taiwan, where she discovers more than she ever wanted to know about her family's secrets—but is it enough to set her on the right course? Buy it, and read more, at Amazon, Bookshop.org, and wherever books are sold. Pin Ups I have a long, ugly relationship with outdoor sports. I love mountain biking, trail running, skiing, adventure racing, and more, but it took me a long time figure out why I never could commit myself fully to any of them. The answer lies in my place as a woman of color in my mostly white, mostly male world. Pin Ups is a micro-memoir, the story of my love affair with the outdoors—and how I'm reconciling my place in it. Buy it from Bookshop.org, Amazon, and wherever books are sold. Some Articles https://www.writermag.com/author/yi-shun-lai/ https://yishunlai.medium.com/ Disability & Accessibility Resources Yi Shun Articles https://medium.com/completely-inclusive/temporary-disability-changed-the-way-i-look-at-my-environment-562f263872d0 https://medium.com/creators-hub/penning-alt-text-made-me-a-better-writer-a5abacc1b520 Imani Barbarin - https://imanibarbarin.com/ Crutches & Spice - https://crutchesandspice.com/ Follower her on TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@crutches_and_spice Andrew Gurza http://www.andrewgurza.com/ Charis Hill - https://beingcharis.com/ Why Don't We Care About Disabled People? Video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k8QmBmcXetg&t=49 As mentioned in the Episode Maggies Smith Book - https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/Keep-Moving/Maggie-Smith/9781982132071

Vinyl-O-Matic
Albums and All That, Starting with the letter P as in Papa, Part 3

Vinyl-O-Matic

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 70:49


The Photos [mm:ss] "Do You Have Fun" The Photos Epic NJE 36515 1980 Well, do you? Interested parties can spot Wendy Wu in this BBC doc on The New Romantics (https://youtu.be/Idkdr1s64HA). Aldo Ciccolini [mm:ss] "Trois Valses Distinguées Du Précieux Dégoûté" Piano Music of Erik Satie, Vol. 1 Angel Records S-36482 1968 Some modern waltzes of Erik Satie as performed by Mssr. Ciccolini. The Decemberists [mm:ss] "The Sporting Life" Picaresque Kill Rock Stars/Jealous Butcher Records JB-053 2005 A great packaging of this album, including some lovely extra bits on side 4 such as a cover of Joanna Newsome's "Bridges and Balloons" (https://youtu.be/6Drbt86VtOw). This tour also featured Petra Haden helping out on violin and tambo (https://youtu.be/3fmMHnPr9XQ). If I recall correctly, she also performed a rendition of "Wuthering Heights" (https://youtu.be/b6JO1iHmTBk). Spinners [mm:ss] "Games People Play" Pick of the Litter Atlantic SD 18141 1975 A mighty fine album featuring this track which got them to number one on the Billboard Hot Soul Singles in 1975. Iron Maiden [mm:ss] "Die with Your Boots On" Piece of Mind EMI 1A 064-07724 1983 I was all in on this album when I was 15 and played the cassette version of this album to dust. Fortunately I was able to pick up the Benelux pressing when I was in Amsterdam a few months ago. And in case you're wondering, this album made it to number 9 on the Dutch charts. Kowloon Walled City [mm:ss] "Oxygen Tent" Piecework Neurot Recordings/Gilead Media NR119/RELIC111 2021 Majestic and heavy album from this Bay Area band. One of my favorites from 2021, on milky white vinyl. Pinchas Zukerman/Daniel Barenboim/London Philharmonic Orchestra [mm:ss] "Elgar: Violin Concerto, II-Andante" Pinchas Zukerman, Violiin/Daniel Barenboim, Conductor Elgar: Violin Concerto, Op. 61 Columbia Masterworks M 34517 1976 Molto relaxo, molto romantico. Henry Mancini [mm:ss] "The Pink Panther Theme" The Pink Panther RCA Victor LSP-2795 1963 Every day someone is born who has never heard the Pink Panther theme. If you are one of those people, enjoy! The Monkees [mm:ss] "What Am I Doing Hangin' 'Round?" Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn & Jones Ltd. Colgems COS-104 1967 In case you were wondering, Mickey is an Pisces, Peter is an Aquarius, and both Michael and Davy are Capricorns. Boston Spaceships [mm:ss] "Canned Food Demons" The Planets Are Blasted Guided By Voices Inc. GBVI-5 2009 Robert Pollard, Chris Slusarenko, and John Moen. Mick Ronson [mm:ss] "White Light/White Hear" Play Don't Worry RCA APL1-0681 1975 Ok, we get it... you can play guitar. Evidently, Mick salvaged the backing track for this VU number from Bowie's Pin Ups session. George Martin and his Orchestra [mm:ss] "Help!" Play Help! United Artists Records UAS 6448 1965 A very layered jazzy rendtion of the my favorite Beatles' film theme song from the lads' arranger. The Melachrino Strings [mm:ss] "It's Not Unusual" Play the Tom Jones Hits! Pickwick/33 Records SPC-3242 1970 From the label that famously produced inexpensive soundalike compilations of hit songs comes some easy listening renditions of The Welshman. L.A. Witch [mm:ss] "Gen-Z" Play with Fire Suicide Squeeze SSQ173 2020 One of the bright spots of peak Covid was this gem by the excellent LA Witch in August of 2020. Not that you can see it, but this record is on beautiful popsicle red and orange vinyl. Delicious! Xiu Xiu [mm:ss] "Audrey's Dance" Plays the Music of Twin Peaks Polyvinyl Record Company PRC-312 2016 I can neither confirm nor deny that I had a thing for Audrey Horne. Music behind the DJ: "The Tiber Twist" by Henry Mancini

Boobies & Noobies: A Romance Review Podcast

The Novel: The Accidental Pinup The Author: Danielle JacksonThe Guest: Caleb Thomas, Boudoir Photographer The Synopsis: Photographer Cassie Harris loves her job—her company Buxom Boudoir makes people look beautiful and feel empowered with her modern twist on classic pinup photography. Cassie's best friend, Dana, is about to launch her own dangerously dreamy lingerie line and wants Cassie to shoot and direct the career-changing national campaign. But company politics and Dana's complicated pregnancy interfere, and Cassie finds herself—a proud plus size Black woman—not behind the camera but in front of it.Though she's never modeled herself, Cassie's pretty sure she can handle the sheer underwear and caution tape bralettes. She's not sure she can work so intimately with the chosen photographer, her long-time competitor in the Chicago photography scene, Reid Montgomery. Their chemistry is undeniable on set, however, and feelings can develop faster than film… Show Notes:- Let's talk about boudoir photography...- It's not selfish to celebrate yourself! - The concept of "Flanderization" (00:11:50)- Introducing today's read, The Accidental Pinup (00:14:22)- Be sure to check out my IGTV interview with the author, Danielle Jackson for more behind-the-book info- A brief synopsis for The Accidental Pinup, after a few brief ads (00:17:52)- A few petty notes about photography (from a professional photographer)- Ode to Chicago- Less drama, more REAL ASS characters - Emotional intelligence vs. Internalized misogyny (00:32:58)- Stop romanticizing bad behavior- My one complaint... pacing (00:38:57)- Perhaps a bit more character growth?- A few steamy sexcerpts (00:48:21)- The almighty empowering BJ scene - Heart, Humor, & Heat Ratings (00:55:55)- Some misconceptions about boudoirComing Soon:- Pre-order your copy of my upcoming holiday novella, Meet Me in Los Feliz (Available October 25th).- See Boobies & Noobies LIVE (with My Worst Date podcast) October 28th at Dynasty Typewriter in Los Angeles. Click HERE for tickets! There's also a livestream option if you can't make it to the show. Links:Follow Boobies & Noobies on Twitter, Instagram, & Facebook @boobiespodcast, on TikTok @b00biespodcast, and check out our blog, merch, and more on our brand new Boobies & Noobies website. 

Wine, Women and Words
"The Accidental Pinup" with Danielle Jackson

Wine, Women and Words

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 27:56


Author Danielle Jackson joins us to discuss her debut novel "The Accidental Pinup." We discuss Danielle's inspiration and research process behind "Dreamland," the lingerie line featured in the novel, how Danielle's past career as a publicist in publishing prepared her to become an author and much more! Be sure to check out our shop on Bookshop.org to be able to help support independent bookstores and this podcast. You can find  "The Accidental Pinup" under 'Featured Books' and our September title, "The Hidden Palace" by Helene Wecker in our 'Book of the Month' shop.  

Do you die in hell or stay alive?
LOLO BEAUTE S'EST MARIÉE EN CACHETTE L'EX PINUP SEMBLE HEUREUSE _Sur le coup, cela est gratifiant. Cela vous fait plaisir_Mais ....

Do you die in hell or stay alive?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 0:34


Un hypocrite est une personne qui a tendance à vous dire que vous êtes le plus beau, le plus fort et le plus intelligent pour vous faire plaisir. « Les meilleurs d'entre eux sont capables de se montrer très convaincants », admet Jean-Paul Guedj qui évoque, au passage, la fable de La Fontaine « Le Corbeau et le Renard ». Ils ont trouvé le point sensible et en abusent. Sur le coup, cela est gratifiant. Cela vous fait plaisir. Mais dans la réalité, les hypocrites n'en pensent pas moins et en prenant du recul, vous vous en rendrez vite compte.

TODAY
TODAY 3rd Hour: Mission behind Pin-Ups For Vets. Brad Thor's September book picks. Cooking with Cal – chicken piccata.

TODAY

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 33:10


Meet the team behind “Pin-Ups for Vets” – how they are empowering female veterans and supporting our troops through fashion. Plus, best-selling author Brad Thor shares five top reads for this month. And, Cooking with Cal – Dylan Dreyer and her son, Cal, are making chicken piccata.

Get the Balance Right
Ep. 104: Makeup Artist & Pinup Vixen (Sara Latt aka Bomber Betty) [Creator Spotlight]

Get the Balance Right

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 26:33 Transcription Available


Our guest is Sara Latt, who is a hair designer and makeup artist for her business, Vintage Vixen Vanity. When she's not making other people look fabulous, you can find her on Instagram and in magazines as her alter ego, Bomber Betty.Sara visits the podcast as a featured creator. This is a new show format for season three, and we're delighted to have her highlighted first. She is an extraordinarily talented stylist and model whose creativity overlaps both in front of and behind the camera.You'll learn how Sara got into the pinup modeling world and how others can too. If you ever wondered how to get the perfect winged eyeliner with drop-dead gorgeous lashes, stay for the end to get Sara's special technique.SHOW NOTES: Contact and Follow Sara Latt: Website - Bomber Betty Instagram - Vintage Vixen Vanity InstagramVintage Clothing Brands: Pinup Girl Clothing - Micheline Pitt - Unique VintagePhotographers: Bunny Yeager - Mitzi & Co. - Bonnie NavarroPinup Role Models: Hedy Lamarr - Bettie Page - Audrey Hepburn - Marilyn MonroePublications: Retro Lovely Magazine - Rocket MagazineFundraising Calendars for Veterans: Bombshell Bettys CalendarsFor more info, see complete show notes:  https://www.getthebalanceright.net/blog/episode104CONTACT HEATHER:Contact Heather: Instagram - LinkedInProfit Tracker Tool: DownloadHeather's Passion to Profits Group Program: RegisterGet the Balance Right Coaching: WebsiteBook a Discovery Call (via Zoom) - ScheduleHeather & Get the Balance Right - LinkTreeZeitzwolfe Accounting: Website - FacebookHey Female Entrepreneurs! oin me each month for the Monday Money Mayhem Makeover. This fun, interactive event is part mastermind, part networking and kind of like a pajama party without the PJs. You'll even learn make-up tips! The gathering happens via Zoom on the 4th Monday of every month at 4pm PST. Use the link to register. Inviting friends is encouraged. BYOB. Support the show

subMERGE: The Podcast
Episode 27- The Russian and Flying Anvil

subMERGE: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 60:58


Join us this week for not ONE but TWO amazing guests on subMERGE! Leia, The Russian and Flying Anvil chat all about Polyamory and how it works for them, others, and how many different ways polyamory can be structured and work for people!Flying Anvil has been in the kink scene for over 17 years, he's a kinkster, a maker, a voyeur, and a professional napper! From Flying Anvil:I like building and tinkering with classic cars and hotrods. I grew up building hot rods with my family. Rebuilding my dad's 39 Chevy coupe as a kid with him was my first love. Currently I'm building a 1962 Chevy Truck her name is Sugar. I also have a 65 Chevelle drag car that I've sold my soul to obtain.I also love the old school art that goes with them ie. PINUPS! (Bonus points if you love hotrods and pinup style as much as I do!) , pinstriping, bomber art, and antiques. But of course with my education background I love all kinds of art and architecture!I'm a huge fan of music as well, although I must admit I can't play a note to save my soul :( I love all kinds across the spectrum of rock, alt, punk, blues, old country, bluegrass, ethnic and cultural music you name it. I guess the only thing I really can't stand is Pop music as a whole. sorry if your a fan :( I find it to be a soulless - for pure profit genre... just my 2 cents anyways...When not doing all of these things my favorite thing to do is enjoy the company of others. Give me good food, good booze, good friends, and a good fire to sit by and I'm a happy man. A glass of scotch and good cigar wouldn't hurt either! Find him on fet @FlyingAnvilFor an exclusive video of today's episode visit our Patreon Page!https://www.patreon.com/submergelifehttps://submerge-merch-shop.creator-spring.cominstagram.com/sub.mergelife*ALL INTERVIEWS ARE FROM CONSENTING ADULTS SHARING CONSENSUAL EXPERIENCES FROM THEIR LIFE. ALL OPINIONS EXPRESSED IN TODAY'S EPISODE ARE THOSE OF THE INDIVIDUAL GIVING THEM AND SHOULD BE TAKEN AS SUCH. ALWAYS DO YOUR RESEARCH BEFORE ENTERING INTO ANYTHING POTENTIALLY DANGEROUS, VET YOUR PARTNER(S) AND ALWAYS NEGOTIATE THOROUGHLY. WE RECORD ALL EPISODES UNSCRIPTED, PLEASE REACH OUT IF ANY POTENTIAL CORRECTIONS TO INFORMATION YOU HEARD TODAY WOULD HELP OUR COMMUNITY BE SAFER AND MORE EDUCATED. WE'RE ALWAYS HAPPY TO CORRECT AN UNINTENTIONAL ERROR, CONTACT US AT LEIALEONEMEDIA@GMAIL.COMBeat Provided By https://freebeats.io & Produced By White Hot

The Fresh Fiction Podcast
The Accidental Pinup is Here! + Interview with Danielle Jackson

The Fresh Fiction Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 64:46


Vibe Check We took a break and feel great! But we're so happy to be back!! Danielle is attempting to go on vacation and release a book and work at the bookshop all at the same time. But she actually updated the News and Events sections of her website—go look at them! Gwen got a NEW PUPPY (who is noisily chewing/playing with her bone throughout this episode)! That is both her vibe and her achievement this week, and we are here for it.  * What pop culture have we been consuming this summer? We both HIGHLY recommend The Bear (FX on Hulu). What Gwen is watching: Loot (Apple TV+), Barry (HBO Max) What Danielle is watching: Heartstopper (Netflix), Ms. Marvel (Disney+) Queen Sugar (OWN/Hulu), Wimbledon What Gwen is reading: Meet Me in The Bathroom by Lizzie Goodman What Danielle is reading: Fake It Till You Bake It by Jamie Wesley, Heartbreaker by Sara MacLean (August), Our Missing Hearts by Celeste Ng (October); re-reads: the entire Reluctant Royals Series by Alyssa Cole, all of Lore Olympus on Webtoons What Gwen is listening to: Podcasts: You Must Remember This, Spectacle podcast, You're Wrong About (Go Ask Alice); Music: Wet Leg, WILLOW, Beyonce, Bob Moses What Danielle is listening to: Podcasts: Newcomers (MCU season), Wait is This a Date w/ Drew Gregory and Christina Tucker; Music: Harry's House * Interview with Danielle Jackson (we know her!) THE ACCIDENTAL PINUP hits stores on July 19th! For buy links and info to order personalized, signed copies from independent bookstores: https://daniellejacksonbooks.com/books Website: https://daniellejacksonbooks.com/ https://twitter.com/DJacksonBooks https://www.instagram.com/djacksonbooks/ https://www.goodreads.com/daniellejackson * Goals/Comfort & Joy Danielle didn't really spend a ton of time outside like she wanted to (plans to make up for this in FL!)… This week, Danielle wants to focus on enjoying vacation and her book launch week!!!! She has found immense comfort in Ben & Jerry's Stephen Colbert's Americone Dream Ice Cream and Pilot Acroball Fine Point ballpoint pens (Gwen recommends Pentel Energel RTX pens as well) Gwen did cook for herself while her husband was on a business trip, but then her fridge died, so... This week, Gwen wants to potty train her new pup, Aria! Her comfort this week comes from La Colombe Coffee (found at our beloved Costco, natch) * EMAIL US! Thoughts or questions? Email us at podcast@freshfiction.com. * Find us on the Socials! Gwen Reyes Twitter Facebook Instagram Danielle Jackson Twitter Instagram Fresh Fiction Twitter Facebook Instagram EventBrite

Reviews from the Crawl Space
Episode #146: Bowie (Pin Ups), Peter Schilling (Error In The System) and Sir Paul McCartney (Tug Of War)

Reviews from the Crawl Space

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 45:44


in todays episode, we chat about an album by David Bowie called Pin Ups, and album by German Pop Synth artist Peter Schilling and a solo album by Sir Paul McCartney called Tug of War. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/reviewsfromthecrawlspace/message

Someone Gets Me Podcast
Inner Inspiration that Drives You With Jennifer Marshall

Someone Gets Me Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 46:03


Jennifer Marshall's life story is like one that we see in movies. From a childhood filled with visiting food banks and relying on charity, she served in the military until she found herself walking the red carpets of Hollywood.    Jennifer reveals that the difficulties and pain of growing up in poverty led her to pursue acting to fulfill a need and a purpose. "The trauma I had accrued as a child, and a young adult was not a downfall for me. It was something that I could choose to lament and say; this was terrible. Of course, these things happened. But I saw it as an opportunity to tap into emotions, create beautiful art, and heal myself from the inside out."   Come along on our conversation to learn how to turn your life struggles into learning points to grow and thrive.   Join me in this episode of Someone Gets Me —Inner Inspiration that Drives You with Jennifer Marshall ▶️   Key point covered in this episode:    ✔️The power of persistence. Jennifer entered showbiz knowing she was not the youngest, prettiest, most talented, or wealthiest well-connected actress. As a Navy Veteran, she brought a terrific worth ethic and discipline, outworking many others.   ✔️The longer you lament about how hard it will be, the more you will be behind the other people in the buffet of life. Jennifer's journey navigating trauma and abuse taught her to turn her pain into power. She emphasizes the power of self-belief, integrity, and hard work in her transformation from victim to survivor.    ✔️The ultimate gift of all the discord and pain we go through is when it can finally be transmuted into something beautiful. It takes time and active effort for every person to come to peace with the past and appreciate the gifts that life's big tragedies have provided. A transformation is powerful after overcoming great adversity and crafting a beautiful path for yourself.    ✔️If it's your calling, it will hunt you down and never leave you alone.  There's a difference between what you can do and what you're called to do. Your soul purpose will keep following you around until you acknowledge it and will keep knocking on the door until you open yourself to embrace it.    What dreams keep tugging at you that you are running away from?   Jennifer Marshall is a proud Navy veteran and vocal advocate for the military veteran community. You may know her as the host of Mysteries Decoded on the CW (yes, she really is a licensed Private Investigator) or as Max's mom on Netflix's hit, Stranger Things. Other shows she's appeared on include NCIS, Hawaii Five-0, and Nickelodeon's Game Shakers, to name a few.   Jennifer graduated Magna Cum Laude from Virginia Wesleyan University with a double major in International Politics and Spanish and a minor in History. Jennifer received her graduate degree from American Military University in Administration of Justice, graduating with a 3.994 GPA.    As a proud Navy veteran, Jennifer volunteers in her community by mentoring other veterans looking to enter film and television. She also helps deliver food to homebound seniors through the local senior center. She raises funds for the award-winning and Congressionally recognized non-profit Pin-Ups for Vets to donate much-needed rehab equipment for our nation's veterans. Jennifer believes in the power of volunteerism and giving back to the community.    Jennifer Marshall Biography, IMDB 21 June 2022 https://www.imdb.com/name/nm1351148/bio?ref_=nm_ov_bio_sm   Connect with Jennifer  Website: www.jennifermarshall.com  LI: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jennifer-marshall-190b9a37/ FB: https://www.facebook.com/ActressJenniferMarshall/ YT: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2oUO29hTl2Y Twitter: https://twitter.com/jenn13jenn13   ———————————————————————————————— How to Connect with Dianne A. Allen You have a vision inside to create something bigger than you. What you need is a community and a mentor. The Someone Gets Me Experience could be that perfect solution to bringing your heart's desire into reality. You will grow, transform and connect. https://msdianneallen.com/someone-gets-me-experience/ Join our Facebook Group Someone Gets Me: https://www.facebook.com/groups/someonegetsme. Follow Dianne's Facebook Page: Dianne A. Allen: https://www.facebook.com/msdianneallen. Email contact: dianne@visionsapplied.com Dianne's Mentoring Services: https://msdianneallen.com Website: https://www.visionsapplied.com Be sure to take a second and subscribe to the show and share it with anyone you think will benefit. Until next time, remember the world needs your unique gift, let your light shine.

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Love That Album Podcast Episode 158 - Interview with John Kennedy and Peter Timmerman of the 68 Comeback Special

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 86:00


Since the Beatles showed up with a built-in songwriting team, bands have always had those members who practised the mysterious art of creating and arranging compositions rather than relying on outside professionals to do that for them. Of course, even those great songsmiths liked to take a break and release an album of music that inspired them to pick up the quill and ink in the first place – Bowie's “Pinups”, Patti Smith's “12”, John Lennon's “Rock n Roll” (maybe more for contractual obligations, but still...) Now we can add Australian songwriter John Kennedy's “Raining Treasure” to that mix. Welcome to episode 158 of Love That Album. John's been making great records since the 1980s with his bands like John Kennedy's Love Gone Wrong and JFK and the Cuban Crisis. His music has always had an Americana flavour to it, and he writes wonderful tales of life in Sydney. His 2017 album JFK and the Midlife Crisis was a concept album about a middle aged musician recalling his times younger days in Sydney working in the indie music scene and where he now sees himself.  In 2019, this led to the idea of recording an album of covers from fellow travellers in Australian independent music of the 70s and 80s, “Raining Treasure – Australian Indie Gold Covers Vol.1”.In 2022, John and his band The '68 Comeback Special have released a second volume, “Raining Treasure – More Australian Indie Gold Covers Vol.2” with their interpretations of songs from The Scientists, Weddings Parties Anything, Radio Birdman, and (in an extension of the definition of “independent”) The Angels (aka Angel City in the US). These are not carbon copies of their originals – the gents put deep thought into the arrangements of these songs, and the results in some cases show a greater musical alignment with the lyrics.  I met up with John Kennedy and Peter Timmerman from the band to discuss these great albums. Tales are also told of the oppressiveness of Queensland under the Bjelke-Petersen government, John's “Sex Pistols” moment meeting the Go Betweens, and whether it's appropriate for an audience to chant during a cover of THAT Angels song. If you're a fan of Kennedy, you won't want to miss this. If you're unfamiliar with his work, you're in for a treat. You can stream the Raining Treasure albums from the usual places OR get a physical copies of the CDs from https://www.thegroovemerchants.com/Product/106392?fbclid=IwAR0x6jxrn6V3nds5OV4EcVGER_pkmkSQrG6KqBUplMqxLWP4JKDY2-wREP4 If you want to do a compare and contrast with the originals, I've created a YouTube playlist:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aUPF49t_p_U&list=PLvosm3nd-62VG0NoFR3x8jhoMgPBkcm51 Download this episode of LTA from your podcast app of choice. The wider back catalogue of episodes can also be found at http://lovethatalbumpodcast.blogspot.com Love That Album is proudly part of the Pantheon Podcast network. Go to http://pantheonpodcasts.com to check out all their great shows. You can send me feedback at rrrkitchen@yahoo.com.au (written or mp3 voicemail) or join the Facebook group at http://www.facebook.com/groups/lovethatalbum If you'd consider writing an iTunes review I'd be immensely grateful. However, it'd be even better if you told a friend about the podcast and Pantheon – at a barbecue, over coffee, on social media….whatever way you choose, consider me grateful. Proudly Pantheon. 

Love That Album
Love That Album Podcast Episode 158 - Interview with John Kennedy and Peter Timmerman of the 68 Comeback Special

Love That Album

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 86:00


Since the Beatles showed up with a built-in songwriting team, bands have always had those members who practised the mysterious art of creating and arranging compositions rather than relying on outside professionals to do that for them. Of course, even those great songsmiths liked to take a break and release an album of music that inspired them to pick up the quill and ink in the first place – Bowie's “Pinups”, Patti Smith's “12”, John Lennon's “Rock n Roll” (maybe more for contractual obligations, but still...) Now we can add Australian songwriter John Kennedy's “Raining Treasure” to that mix. Welcome to episode 158 of Love That Album. John's been making great records since the 1980s with his bands like John Kennedy's Love Gone Wrong and JFK and the Cuban Crisis. His music has always had an Americana flavour to it, and he writes wonderful tales of life in Sydney. His 2017 album JFK and the Midlife Crisis was a concept album about a middle aged musician recalling his times younger days in Sydney working in the indie music scene and where he now sees himself.  In 2019, this led to the idea of recording an album of covers from fellow travellers in Australian independent music of the 70s and 80s, “Raining Treasure – Australian Indie Gold Covers Vol.1”.In 2022, John and his band The '68 Comeback Special have released a second volume, “Raining Treasure – More Australian Indie Gold Covers Vol.2” with their interpretations of songs from The Scientists, Weddings Parties Anything, Radio Birdman, and (in an extension of the definition of “independent”) The Angels (aka Angel City in the US). These are not carbon copies of their originals – the gents put deep thought into the arrangements of these songs, and the results in some cases show a greater musical alignment with the lyrics.  I met up with John Kennedy and Peter Timmerman from the band to discuss these great albums. Tales are also told of the oppressiveness of Queensland under the Bjelke-Petersen government, John's “Sex Pistols” moment meeting the Go Betweens, and whether it's appropriate for an audience to chant during a cover of THAT Angels song. If you're a fan of Kennedy, you won't want to miss this. If you're unfamiliar with his work, you're in for a treat. You can stream the Raining Treasure albums from the usual places OR get a physical copies of the CDs from https://www.thegroovemerchants.com/Product/106392?fbclid=IwAR0x6jxrn6V3nds5OV4EcVGER_pkmkSQrG6KqBUplMqxLWP4JKDY2-wREP4 If you want to do a compare and contrast with the originals, I've created a YouTube playlist:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aUPF49t_p_U&list=PLvosm3nd-62VG0NoFR3x8jhoMgPBkcm51 Download this episode of LTA from your podcast app of choice. The wider back catalogue of episodes can also be found at http://lovethatalbumpodcast.blogspot.com Love That Album is proudly part of the Pantheon Podcast network. Go to http://pantheonpodcasts.com to check out all their great shows. You can send me feedback at rrrkitchen@yahoo.com.au (written or mp3 voicemail) or join the Facebook group at http://www.facebook.com/groups/lovethatalbum If you'd consider writing an iTunes review I'd be immensely grateful. However, it'd be even better if you told a friend about the podcast and Pantheon – at a barbecue, over coffee, on social media….whatever way you choose, consider me grateful. Proudly Pantheon. 

Love That Album
Love That Album Podcast Episode 158 - Interview with John Kennedy and Peter Timmerman of the 68 Comeback Special

Love That Album

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 88:15


Since the Beatles showed up with a built-in songwriting team, bands have always had those members who practised the mysterious art of creating and arranging compositions rather than relying on outside professionals to do that for them. Of course, even those great songsmiths liked to take a break and release an album of music that inspired them to pick up the quill and ink in the first place – Bowie's “Pinups”, Patti Smith's “12”, John Lennon's “Rock n Roll” (maybe more for contractual obligations, but still...)   Now we can add Australian songwriter John Kennedy's “Raining Treasure” to that mix.   Welcome to episode 158 of Love That Album.   John's been making great records since the 1980s with his bands like John Kennedy's Love Gone Wrong and JFK and the Cuban Crisis. His music has always had an Americana flavour to it, and he writes wonderful tales of life in Sydney. His 2017 album JFK and the Midlife Crisis was a concept album about a middle aged musician recalling his times younger days in Sydney working in the indie music scene and where he now sees himself.    In 2019, this led to the idea of recording an album of covers from fellow travellers in Australian independent music of the 70s and 80s, “Raining Treasure – Australian Indie Gold Covers Vol.1”.In 2022, John and his band The '68 Comeback Special have released a second volume, “Raining Treasure – More Australian Indie Gold Covers Vol.2” with their interpretations of songs from The Scientists, Weddings Parties Anything, Radio Birdman, and (in an extension of the definition of “independent”) The Angels (aka Angel City in the US). These are not carbon copies of their originals – the gents put deep thought into the arrangements of these songs, and the results in some cases show a greater musical alignment with the lyrics.    I met up with John Kennedy and Peter Timmerman from the band to discuss these great albums. Tales are also told of the oppressiveness of Queensland under the Bjelke-Petersen government, John's “Sex Pistols” moment meeting the Go Betweens, and whether it's appropriate for an audience to chant during a cover of THAT Angels song. If you're a fan of Kennedy, you won't want to miss this. If you're unfamiliar with his work, you're in for a treat.   You can stream the Raining Treasure albums from the usual places OR get a physical copies of the CDs from https://www.thegroovemerchants.com/Product/106392?fbclid=IwAR0x6jxrn6V3nds5OV4EcVGER_pkmkSQrG6KqBUplMqxLWP4JKDY2-wREP4   If you want to do a compare and contrast with the originals, I've created a YouTube playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aUPF49t_p_U&list=PLvosm3nd-62VG0NoFR3x8jhoMgPBkcm51   Download this episode of LTA from your podcast app of choice. The wider back catalogue of episodes can also be found at http://lovethatalbumpodcast.blogspot.com   Love That Album is proudly part of the Pantheon Podcast network. Go to http://pantheonpodcasts.com to check out all their great shows.   You can send me feedback at rrrkitchen@yahoo.com.au (written or mp3 voicemail) or join the Facebook group at http://www.facebook.com/groups/lovethatalbum   If you'd consider writing an iTunes review I'd be immensely grateful. However, it'd be even better if you told a friend about the podcast and Pantheon – at a barbecue, over coffee, on social media….whatever way you choose, consider me grateful.   Proudly Pantheon.

American Warrior Radio
Jennifer Marshall – Navy Vet & Actress

American Warrior Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 41:58


Veteran Jennifer Marshall attended high school in a “one stoplight” town so it didn't take much convincing from the Navy recruiter to get her to join. She never imagined that someday she would appear in several Hollywood productions, host a television series and own her own private investigations firm. Jennifer started as a logistics specialist and also served on the fire and ship security defense support teams aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt. She had planned on making a career of the Navy but adverse reactions to vaccines on a Gulf War deployment forced her to leave at the five year mark. She decided to join the Los Angeles police department but was injured in the 14th week at the academy.  At that point she decided to pursue acting. Some of her roles include the TV series General Hospital, Hawaii Five-O, Jack Reacher and Stranger Things. We discuss some of the challenges she faced breaking into Hollywood including the odd remark “You don't LOOK like a Veteran.” Jennifer says she has no problem playing military roles because Veteran actors bring something extra to those characters.  “To a random actor the uniform is just a costume. A Veteran has a higher understanding.” Her best advice to other Veterans; “Know your own worth.” Though she never made in into the ranks of LAPD, she was always interested in detective work. Jennifer founded Deep Source Investigations in 2014. Producers of the CW series “Mysteries Decoded” called her their “purple magical uniform” because she is female private investigator who has worked in television. Jennifer Marshall is passionate about helping others. She funded the expansion of an orphanage in Uganda and two of her children are adopted from South America and Uganda. She also loves being part of the Pin-Ups for Vets organization. TAKEAWAY: “I am here today because of the generosity of many people and am very thankful for that. That is why I try to give back as much as possible.”

American Warrior Radio
Pin-Ups for Vets – Gina Elise

American Warrior Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 41:59


Pin-Ups for Vets founder Gina Elise began to hear news stories about Iraq war Veterans needing medical care and she wanted to do something creative to help. Her grandfather served in WWII and Gina had always been a fan of that era's pin-up art.  So in 2006 she decided to create a classy, 1940's style pin-up calendar to raise money for Veterans. After donating $5,000 in proceeds from the first calendar to a local Veteran's hospital, she began to get inquiries about the next calendar. Gina also heard from female veterans looking to volunteer. She saw this as an opportunity to empower them and shift perspectives about what a Veteran is. In the words of one model; “There's nothing that says I can't be a hard charging Marine AND a lipstick wearing pin-up. So I choose to be both.” Pin-Ups for Vets just released their 17th calendar and have donated over $100,000 to purchase rehab equipment for Veterans hospitals. In addition to shipping the calendars to troops deployed overseas, Gina and her Ambassadors embarked on a 50 state tour visiting Veteran hospitals/homes and military bases. She says it is very powerful to see the instant connection between these female Veterans and those they are visiting. In one case, after she had a conversation with a wounded soldier, the hospital staff told Gina he was suffering from a traumatic brain injury and that was the first time he had spoken in a month. To date, they have visited over 15,000 Veterans nationwide and overseas. Listeners can help by making a direct donation or purchasing the calendar & branded merchandise through the website.  Advertising opportunities within the calendar are also available. Casting notices for the calendar are posted on the website each spring. TAKEAWAY: “I came for the service but I stayed for the sisterhood."

The Beauty School Dropouts Podcast
Episode 19 - Miss Pinup New Zealand!

The Beauty School Dropouts Podcast

Play Episode Play 16 sec Highlight Listen Later Feb 16, 2022 74:01


Welcome to the nineteenth episode of The Beauty School Dropouts Podcast!From dinosaurs to aeroplanes, this year's Miss Pinup New Zealand contest had it all, so this week we are dishing up all the goss from  our favourite pinup pageant! We break down all the contestants outfits and talents, and Fran interviews our newest Miss Pinup New Zealand alum, Miss Jazzylicious, all about the experience (as well as a few hard hitting questions about her favourite sandwich flavour and what her job would be in the apocalypse, because we are all about serious journalism here at the BSD)Edited by Fran RobertsonMusic provided by ​RHVBARB / Pond5.com

Mick and the PhatMan Talking Music
Never Mind the Originals, Here's the Covers

Mick and the PhatMan Talking Music

Play Episode Play 38 sec Highlight Listen Later Jan 31, 2022 68:36


What IS a cover version?  Why do artists cover other artists' songs?  Who has had the most songs covered?  Has there ever been a cover version better than the original?  Mick and the Phatman talk about these and other pressing issues to kick off Season 2 with a bang!   References:  COVID immunity, Crowded House, “Woodface”, “1001 Albums You Must Hear before You Die”, Robert Dimery, “Here Come the Warm Jets”, Brian Eno, Chris Thomas, Robert Christgau, Oblique Strategies, “Baby's on Fire”, Carole King, Lou Reed, Clive Palmer, Twisted Sister, “We're not gonna take it”,  “Paradise City”, Guns'n'Roses, AC/DC, TripleJ Hottest 100, The Wiggles, Bruce Springsteen, “Blinded by the Light”, Manfred Mann's Earth Band, Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix, “All along the Watchtower”, Jimmy Barnes, “Ship Song”, Nick Cave, Joe Cocker, The Beatles, “She came in through the bathroom window”, “With a little help from my friends”, “Hallelujah”, Leonard Cohen, John Cale, “Hurt”, Trent Reznor/Nine Inch Nails, Johnny Cash, Prince, “Heartbreak Hotel”, “Under the Covers”, Susanna Hoffs & Matthew Sweet, Bowie, “Pin Ups”, Warren Zevon, Hindu Love Gods 100 Best Covers of All TimeMusic is Love Richard ClaptonYouTube Links The Mike Flowers Pops -  Wonderwall (Official Video) Other References Details about Beatles covers Podcast:Coverville by Brian Ibbott