Podcasts about Lagos

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  • 1,810PODCASTS
  • 4,208EPISODES
  • 37mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Nov 30, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Lagos

Show all podcasts related to lagos

Latest podcast episodes about Lagos

Reimagining Black Relations
#53 PAY - Part 1 Speakers

Reimagining Black Relations

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 26:53


Four of the speakers from the Inaugural Pan-African Youth (PAY) Summit.Dr. Jasmine L. Blanks-Jones, a dynamic theatre nonprofit leader, award-wining educator, who holds a dual PhD in Education and Africana Studies from the University of Pennsylvania, speaking on Pan-Africanism.Paulinarh Bolatito Ogunleye is 21 years old. The first female President of the Faculty of Arts Student Union at the University of Lagos, Nigeria, and the longest seating president of the same body. She will speak on the Perspectives of Youth in Africa.Prof. Seth N. Asumah, the State University of New York Distinguished Teaching Professor, Chair, and Professor of Africana Studies, and Professor of Political Science, speaking on Effective Mobilization for Political Success.Hon. Allyson Maynard-Gibson QC, former Attorney-General and Minister of Legal Affairs of The Commonwealth of Bahamas, an advocate for people centered justice, diversity, and the rights of women and children and an expert in governance, restructuring and rebranding of organizations, speaking on Ethics and Leadership. 

Black Entrepreneur Experience
BEE 274 Nigeria's Bulk-Buy Online Grocery Store, Founder & CEO of Pricepally, Luther Lawoyin

Black Entrepreneur Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 37:24


Luther Lawoyin, the Founder & CEO of Pricepally is on a mission to provide access to the best quality farm-fresh food items affordable for families and businesses living in African cities with the utmost efficiency, starting with Lagos. In 2019, Pricepally was born to bring innovation to an inefficient food distribution system in African cities. We believe in connecting farmers, manufacturers, and wholesalers directly to you, the consumer, in an innovative way that benefits all players in the value chain. We want to build the next generation food system for African cities, a platform where key players in the food value chain who add value can plug in to exchange their deals with the end consumer. We are not just another online service provider for fresh bulk food items. We are more than that. Using Data, Technology, and Partnerships, we have successfully built a system that enables our customers to get the best value for their money at no extra cost and from the convenience of their homes and workplaces. At Pricepally, we believe in Sharing, and that is why we have enabled our customers with the Pally feature, which allows them to get more for less and build community spirit. This is the new economy, and we are excited to do this! Website: https://pricepally.com

The Conversation Weekly
How abortion access is changing around the world

The Conversation Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 43:42


Justices on the US Supreme Court are considering two challenges to abortion restrictions that could have wide-reaching implications for access to abortion across the country. In this episode, we look at what's at stake, and how else abortion laws are changing around the world.Featuring Amanda Jean Stevenson, assistant professor of sociology, University of Colorado Boulder; Sydney Calkin, lecturer in political geography, Queen Mary University of London and Jane Marcus Delgado, professor of political science, College of Staten Island, CUNY. We talk to a forensic scientist, Patrick Randolph-Quinney, Associate Professor of Forensic Science, Northumbria University, Newcastle in England. He explains how he studied bones to help solve the mystery of how to tell if a person was killed by a lightning strike.And Wale Fatade, commissioning editor at The Conversation in Lagos, gives us some recommended reading. The Conversation Weekly is produced by Mend Mariwany and Gemma Ware, with sound design by Eloise Stevens. Our theme music is by Neeta Sarl. You can sign up to The Conversation's free daily email here. Full credits for this episode available here.Further readingThe erosion of Roe v. Wade and abortion access didn't begin in Texas or Mississippi – it started in Pennsylvania in 1992, by Alison Gash, University of OregonPoland's abortion ruling amounts to a ban – but it will not end access, by Sydney Calkin, Queen Mary University of LondonStudy shows an abortion ban may lead to a 21% increase in pregnancy-related deaths, by Amanda Jean Stevenson, University of Colorado BoulderForensic science is unlocking the mysteries of fatal lightning strikes, by Patrick Randolph-Quinney, Northumbria University, Newcastle; Nicholas Bacci and Tanya Nadine Augustine, University of the WitwatersrandAfrican marine rules favour big industry, leaving small-scale fishers in the lurch by Ifesinachi Okafor-Yarwood, University of St Andrews; Edward H. Allison, CGIAR System Organisation My formula for a tasty and nutritious Nigerian soup - with termites by Adedayo Adeboye, Osun State University See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Maris Review
Episode 131: Chibundu Onuzo

The Maris Review

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 32:18


Chibundu Onuzo was born in Lagos, Nigeria and lives in London. A Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and regular contributor to The Guardian, she is the winner of a Betty Trask Award. The author of Welcome to Lagos, Sankofa is her third novel. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Radio Duna | Hablemos en Off
Los programas de los candidatos presidenciales y el respaldo de Ricardo Lagos a Gabriel Boric

Radio Duna | Hablemos en Off

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021


Nicolás Vergara, Matías del Río y Consuelo Saavedra analizaron cuáles son los cambios que deberán hacer los postulantes a La Moneda para sumar más adherentes. Además, conversaron con el ex presidente l ex Presidente de la República, Ricardo Lagos, analizó las posturas de los candidatos de cara a al balotaje del 19 de diciembre.

Submarine and A Roach
Episode 85: "Get A Nice Job, Marry A Good Wife And Raise Some Boring Kids" ft. (@jessjessfinesse)

Submarine and A Roach

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 96:59


On this episode, we're joined by the coolest babe in Lagos. We discuss being a creative in Lagos, Davido's guap, friendships, and a whole lot more!! Tap In!! Live show tickets: tix.africa/sroach

Haitian All-StarZ's Music Mix
Episode 165: HAITIAN ALL-STARZ RADIO - WBAI 99.5 FM - EPISODE #161 - HARD HITTIN HARRY

Haitian All-StarZ's Music Mix

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 119:56


Tune in! @djhardhittinharry & @DJayCeenyc presents another brand new episode of @haitian_all_starz Radio Podcast on @wbai995 & WBAI.ORG 2am - 4am late Monday/early Tuesday. Also streaming on @itunes @googleplaymusic @amazonpodcasts @iheartradio @mixcloud @soundcloud

Living Legacy Podcast
Creative Branding with Ashlee Green of A Louise Creative

Living Legacy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 42:10


This episode is an excerpt of a conversation from the See Life Different Summit 2021. Ashlee Green is the host of the Eff the Glitter Podcast and founder of A Louise Creative She is our team member at Phocused Media Group. It's a great time to meet the team. She is an eighties baby whose mission is to help entrepreneurs build and grow profitable businesses by designing and building systems through her company, A. Louise Creative. When not designing, speaking, or teaching Ashlee can be found grooving to Maxwell's Urban Hang Suite and watching family comedies with her husband and kids. In this conversation you'll hear how down-to-earth and humorous she is. She is a self taught graphic and brand designer with a B.A. in Psychology and a Master's degree in Professional Counseling. By thinking outside of the box with unconventional ideas, Ashlee helps people navigate their wants, determine their needs, and figure out the steps needed to achieve their business goals. She launched a podcast, Eff the Glitter, which caters to other like-minded creatives. She was born in Maryland but now lives in Houston, Texas. We got to meet in person in Houston in September 2021. I was actually a guest on her podcast not once but twice. Connect with Ashlee:Efftheglitter.com Alouisecreative.com https://www.linkedin.com/in/alouisecreative/ The See Life Different Summit is a summit for women by women. It's a 3 day virtual event with over 25 speakers. This is a story of more positivity, gratitude, and manifestation, and also how to be creative. Master your mindest, imagery (your brand), and your marketing (tell your story). Watch or listen to the replay get lifetime access to the videos and workbook visit seelifedifferent.com to purchase access to the private community where you also get one strategy or coaching call with Zaakirah.  This episode is sponsored by Notiq NOTIQ is a lifestyle brand for ambitious and luxurious women like you.  With 30 pocket sized cards and a 34 or 22 ounce water bottle, Each of the four to eight affirmations serves as a milestone and an elegant reminder to keep your dreams at the forefront. Visit notiq.com and use code LEGACY to get $5 off the pink or white 34 ounce or 22 ounce BPA safe affirmation tracking water bottle and cards combo with free shipping. A portion of the proceeds will go to the Water Project in Lagos, Nigeria. This episode is sponsored by Phocused Media Group  We focus on helping entrepreneurs with their Instagram growth, business strategy and branding services. Visit phocusedmediagroup.com to learn more This episode is sponsored by: Seeing Life Through a Different Lens: A Survivor's Guide to Overcoming Adversity with Resilience. Now available on Amazon as Kindle, paperback, and audiobook. Purchase here: http://bit.ly/seeinglifedifferentlens

Africa Today
Kampala rocked by three suicide bombings

Africa Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 29:31


The authorities in Uganda have blamed the Islamist ADF rebel group for three suicide bombings in the capital Kampala, which killed at least six people. Plus, the leaked findings of a panel investigating the Lekki Tollgate shootings in Lagos says the Nigerian army killed at least 11 protesters. And after COP26 concludes in Glasgow, a report from Liberia on how one community is threatened by rising sea levels.

The Maverick Show with Matt Bowles
159: Founding “Hijabi Globetrotter” and Building a Community for Adventurous Muslim Women Who Travel with Kareemah Ashiru

The Maverick Show with Matt Bowles

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 57:58


Kareemah Ashiru talks about growing up in Lagos, Nigeria, and then moving to the U.S. and attending high school in Toledo, Ohio as one of the only Muslims in her school.  She explains how her love of travel developed growing up, and how she navigated her strict parents who had traditional cultural expectations in order to pursue her dreams of living abroad and traveling the world.  Kareemah shares some of her travel highlights from Spain, the Basque Country, Turkey, Morocco, and Peru, including her experiences connecting with the local Muslim communities.  She then talks about founding Hijabi Globetrotter as an online platform to highlight underrepresented travel stories from a Muslim perspective and reflects on how it has grown and evolved over the years. Kareemah also talks about founding the “Muslimahs Who Travel” group as a supportive community for adventurous Muslim women who travel.  She then shares some of her top budget-travel hacks, tips for solo female travelers, and her #1 piece of advice for Muslim travelers.  Kareemah also suggests specific ways non-Muslims can be better allies to Muslims. And, finally, she reflects on how travel has impacted her and what travel means to her today.  FULL SHOW NOTES AVAILABLE AT: www.TheMaverickShow.com

Saturday Mornings with Joy Keys
Joy Keys chats with Author Chibundu Onuzo

Saturday Mornings with Joy Keys

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 32:00


CHIBUNDU ONUZO was born in Lagos, Nigeria and lives in London. A Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and regular contributor to The Guardian, she is the winner of a Betty Trask Award, has been shortlisted for the Dylan Thomas Prize, the Commonwealth Book Prize, and the RSL Encore Award, and has been longlisted for the Desmond Elliott Prize and Etisalat Literature Prize. Her first novel was The Spider King's Daughter. The author of Welcome to Lagos, Sankofa is her third novel.

McKinsey on Start-ups
Can fintech fuel Nigeria's economic resurgence?

McKinsey on Start-ups

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 33:13


Like several countries in Africa, Nigeria was already enduring tough economic times even before the pandemic. Yet one of the real bright spots in the economy of the continent's most populous country has been its burgeoning fintech sector. Nigeria has a large, young population, accelerating digital and smartphone adoption, and a focused regulatory drive to increase financial inclusion, conditions that create a strong foundation for fintech to become a major economic engine. Between 2014 and 2019, the fintech sector in Nigeria raised more than $600 million in funding; in 2019 alone, it attracted fully 25% of the nearly $500 million raised by all African tech startups. In an episode of the McKinsey Africa podcast from earlier this year, Kerry Naidoo, McKinsey Director of Communications for Africa, spoke to two partners based in the firm's Lagos, Nigeria office, Topsy Kola-Oyeneyin and Mayowa Kuyoro, about the state of fintech in Nigeria, the challenges and opportunities it presents, and what the various stakeholders may need to do in order for the sector to reach its full potential. Read more > Listen to the podcast (duration: 33:13) >

El Villegas - Actualidad y esas cosas
El apoyo de Florencia Lagos | E775

El Villegas - Actualidad y esas cosas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 48:16


Hoy hablamos de Carolina Goic, Carlos Montes y el voto sobre el cuarto retiro. También sobre el apoyo de Florencia Lagos a la candidatura de Gabriel Boric. Para acceder al programa sin interrupción de comerciales, suscríbete a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/elvillegas ADIÓS VALPARAÍSO https://www.elvillegas.cl/adios/ INSURRECCIÓN, mi nuevo libro en: https://elvillegas.cl/tienda Internacional por Amazon: https://amzn.to/3gHDn08 TAMBIÉN APÓYANOS EN FLOW: https://www.flow.cl/app/web/pagarBtnPago.php?token=0yq6qal COMPRA "Grandes Invitados" en Amazon: https://amzn.to/3ccAWPV AMAZON KINDLE https://amzn.to/2yYcuDy Encuentra a El Villegas en: Web: http://www.elvillegas.cl Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/elvillegaschile Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/elvillegaschile Soundcloud: https://www.soundcloud.com/elvillegaspodcast Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/7zQ3np197HvCmLF95wx99K Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/elvillegaschile

F&S Uncensored
Not Your Role Models

F&S Uncensored

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 101:51


This week, Feyikemi and Simi delve into all the crazy things that have happened over the past week in pop culute. They also talk about their top pasta and day-time spots in Lagos, as well as a discussion on why not all artists are ‘album artists'. As usual, they also put you on to their favourite songs right now! Make sure you listen to our playlist - F&S Rotations on Apple Music and Spotify, updated weekly.Send fan mail & enquiries to: contactfands@gmail.comFollow us on Twitter & Instagram

CrossXCultured
Ep. 92 - Ciara's Prayer

CrossXCultured

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 95:14


After a mini hiatus, we are back! And we came back on a good week. #HotTopics begins with prayers to the families that suffered in building collapse in Ikoyi, Lagos. As Will Smith is on his book tour, more and more tea keeps getting revealed. The gworlz have been in the studio. Young Miami drops “Rap Freaks”. Megan The Stallion Drop an EP “For the Hotties”, and Summer Walker drops her long awaited sophomore album “Still Over It”. #OlodooftheWeek goes to Howard University. #CarefortheCulture is Dawn Staley for setting a new standard in Women's Basketball.. Join us as we catch up with the latest in Music and TV. This week's episode is , “ Ciara's Prayer” this is.. CrossxCultured

Haitian All-StarZ's Music Mix
Episode 164: HAITIAN ALL-STARZ RADIO - WBAI 99.5 FM - EPISODE #160 - HARD HITTIN HARRY

Haitian All-StarZ's Music Mix

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 170:04


Tune in! @djhardhittinharry & @DJayCeenyc presents another brand new episode of @haitian_all_starz Radio Podcast on @wbai995 & WBAI.ORG 2am - 4am late Monday/early Tuesday. Also streaming on @itunes @googleplaymusic @amazonpodcasts @iheartradio @mixcloud @soundcloud

Cha Cha Music Review Podcast
Cha Cha Let's Talk Music Series Featuring Habeeb Ajiwokewu

Cha Cha Music Review Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 31:55


Ladies and Gentlemen, Boys and Girls and every Cha Cha Geng across the globe, welcome to another episode of the Cha Cha Let's Talk Music Series on Cha Cha Music Review Podcast, I remain your host Hafeestonova; Your Musical Plug and Creator of the Energy Force. In today's episode, I spoke with the CEO of Homeboyz INC, Habeeb Ajiwokewu and we spoke about What A&R means and the importance of A&R to music artists. We also spoke about how he discovers artists, some of the artists he has worked with and many more Homeboyz INC is an A&R firm based in the United States, they are into Artist Discovery, Artist Management, Music Distribution, they have a recording studio in Ebute Ikorodu, Lagos, Nigeria and they are the sponsor of Cha Cha Spotlight Series Click on the play button to enjoy this informative and entertaining episode --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/hafeestonova1/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hafeestonova1/support

Hormonally Speaking
Season 3, Episode 4: How To Get Good Healthcare When You Are A Traveler Or Expat w/Vashti Kanahele

Hormonally Speaking

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 43:06


Planning a long trip or moving abroad for a job or for fun (aka #lifegoals)? Figuring out the healthcare situation in a new place can be both daunting and frustrating. That's where Expat Health Code comes in. Especially if you have been working with or using Functional or Naturopathic medicine, it can be hard to find these options outside of the US or Europe. That's why today's guest, Vashti Kanahele, MS, CHHC created Expat Health Code. Bringing together a Naturopathic Doctor alongside functional health coaches, Vashti has developed a comprehensive experience for the expat community to access the healthcare they may be missing. After living in 6 countries outside of the US, from Iraq to Nigeria, Vashti understands the ups and downs and pitfalls of trying to figure out healthcare in different countries. She shares her experiences (some of which will surprise you!) and explains how to navigate a new place to build yourself the best healthcare team. You'll also learn where she got the best healthcare, and where it was the toughest. This is a fascinating episode for those Americans living outside the US, or anyone who moves to a country different from their place of origin. Or if you are like me, and plan to eventually move abroad, this episode will give you the health foundations you need for the eventual move. Find out more at the Expat Health Code website or on their IG. Vashti Kanahele is a Functional Medicine Coach and founder of Green Papaya Health.Vashti has a background in healthcare and international development. She is a certified holistic health coach through the Integrative Women's Health Institute. Vashti has pursued further education in Hormone Health, Environmental Health, completed the Fix Your Period Apprenticeship, as well as advanced studies in Functional Medicine. Before becoming a Health Coach, she worked for the United States Agency for International Development, focusing on maternal/fetal health. Vashti worked in conjunction with the United Nations on several projects in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. She holds a BA and MSHS. Her own journey with complex chronic illness, miscarriages, and feeling passed over by the medical system led Vashti to change careers and become a health coach. She believes that crap food, toxins, and stress are a big reason why we struggle and is on a mission to help as many people as possible get better and stay better. In her private practice, Vashti works with women with complex chronic illnesses including mold illness, Lyme, and autoimmune conditions. Vashti doesn't subscribe to a one-and-done method, but rather that each individual that she's see's is unique, and therefore, their coaching experience is based on their biodindivuality. She is constantly researching new methods to meet clients where they're at to help them regain vitality. Vashti has been an expat for 12 years, and while it has its challenges, she can't imagine living life any other way. She has lived in Baghdad, Beirut, Phnom Penh, Bangkok, Lagos, and Willemstad. Vashti is passionate about bringing a blend of functional and naturopathic care toexpats and their families and building a supportive community. In her practice, Vashti provides 1:1 consultations and coaching packages. Find out more at her website. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/christine-garvin/support

Business Daily
Nigeria's eNaira: Africa's first digital currency

Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 18:29


Central Banks around the world are introducing digital currencies and last month Nigeria became the first African country to launch one - the eNaira. But what is a digital currency and how are Nigerians reacting to theirs? We hear from people on the streets of Abuja. Tamasin Ford speaks to Rakiya Mohammed, director of information security at the Central Bank of Nigeria. Chinwe Egwim, chief economist at Coronation Merchant Bank in Lagos, explains why the eNaira has been introduced and the benefits it could have. Digital currency expert Josh Lipsky of the Atlantic Council puts the launch of the eNaira in the context of the others that are springing up all over the globe. Producer: Benjie Guy. (Picture: the eNaira mobile phone app. Credit: enaira.gov.ng)

Africa Today
Ethiopia in state of emergency

Africa Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 23:43


Ethiopia declares a state of emergency as rebel groups appear to be winning major towns in Amhara state. More people are rescued alive from a collapsed building in Lagos, but fourteen have been confirmed dead and more are still missing. The options for Sudan's coup leader are running out believes the country's foreign minister. And we take a look at the first pledges coming out of climate crisis talks at COP26.

Langsam gesprochene Nachrichten | Deutsch lernen | Deutsche Welle
02.11.2021 – Langsam gesprochene Nachrichten

Langsam gesprochene Nachrichten | Deutsch lernen | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 8:02


Trainiere dein Hörverstehen mit den Nachrichten der Deutschen Welle von Dienstag – als Text und als verständlich gesprochene Audio-Datei.UN-Klimakonferenz: 100 Staaten wollen Entwaldung stoppen Auf dem Weltklimagipfel in Glasgow haben sich mehr als 100 Staaten verpflichtet, die Zerstörung von Wäldern bis 2030 zu stoppen. Die an dem Projekt beteiligten Länder, darunter Deutschland und die gesamte EU, repräsentieren 85 Prozent der weltweiten Waldfläche, also etwa 34 Millionen Quadratkilometer. Mit dabei sind die Staaten mit den größten Wäldern überhaupt, also Kanada, Russland, Brasilien, Kolumbien, Indonesien sowie China, Norwegen und die Demokratische Republik Kongo. Für das Vorhaben werden zunächst etwa zwölf Milliarden US-Dollar mobilisiert. Frankreich vertagt im Fischereistreit Sanktionen gegen Großbritannien Im Fischereistreit mit Großbritannien verzichtet Frankreich zunächst auf Sanktionen. Frankreichs Präsident Emmanuel Macron sagte, dass er die geplanten Strafmaßnahmen gegen Großbritannien um einen Tag verschiebe. Auf diese Weise könnten beide Seiten über neue Vorschläge beraten, um ihre Differenzen doch noch beizulegen. In dem Streit zwischen den beiden Staaten geht es um Fischereirechte nach dem Austritt Großbritanniens aus der Europäischen Union. Stimmungstest bei Gouverneurswahl in Virginia Ein Jahr vor den US-Kongresswahlen bestimmen die Bürger im Bundesstaat Virginia einen neuen Gouverneur. Umfragen sagen ein Kopf-an-Kopf-Rennen zwischen dem Demokraten Terry McAuliffe und dem Republikaner Glenn Youngkin voraus. Die Abstimmung gilt als erster großer Stimmungstest für die Politik des demokratischen US-Präsidenten Joe Biden. Eine weitere Gouverneurswahl findet im Staat New Jersey statt. Dort hat der demokratische Amtsinhaber Phil Murphy gute Chancen auf eine Wiederwahl. Außerdem wählt New York einen neuen Bürgermeister. Auch hier ist der Kandidat der Demokraten, Eric Adams, der Favorit. Bulgarien schickt wegen Migranten Soldaten an Grenze zur Türkei Bulgarien hat wegen der steigenden Zahl an Migranten 350 Soldaten an seine Grenze zur Türkei entsandt. Das bestätigte Verteidigungsminister Georgi Panajotow. Nach Angaben des Innenministeriums haben in diesem Jahr mehr als 6500 Menschen die bulgarisch-türkische Grenze illegal überquert. Das entspricht einem dreifachen Anstieg im Vergleich zum Vorjahreszeitraum. Die knapp 260 Kilometer lange bulgarisch-türkische Grenze ist eine der Außengrenzen der Europäischen Union. Sechs Tote und 100 Vermisste in Lagos Nach dem Hochhaus-Einsturz in Nigerias größter Stadt Lagos ist die Zahl der Todesopfer auf mindestens sechs gestiegen. Bis zu 100 Menschen werden nach Angaben der Rettungskräfte noch unter den Trümmern vermutet, sieben konnten bislang lebend gerettet werden. Das 21-stöckige, noch im Bau befindliche Gebäude im wohlhabenderen Wohnviertel Ikoyi war am Montag zusammengestürzt, die Ursache ist noch ungeklärt. Aufgebrachte Anwohner kritisierten das schleppende Tempo der Rettungsmaßnahmen. 2014 waren beim Einsturz eines kirchlichen Gästehauses in Lagos mehr als hundert Menschen ums Leben gekommen. Start von Weltraummission mit deutschem Astronaut Maurer erneut verschoben Die US-Weltraumbehörde NASA hat den Start der Weltraummission mit dem deutschen Astronauten Matthias Maurer erneut verschoben. Der Start der SpaceX-Raumkapsel werde frühestens am kommenden Samstag stattfinden, teilte die NASA mit. Grund sei eine "geringfügige medizinische Angelegenheit", die ein Besatzungsmitglied des Flugs betreffe. Es handele sich weder um einen medizinischen Notfall noch gebe es eine Verbindung zum Coronavirus.

HABERTURK.COM
Nijerya'da 21 katlı bina çöktü: Çok sayıda kişi enkaz altında!

HABERTURK.COM

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 0:26


Nijerya'nın ticari şehri olan Lagos'ta, inşa halindeki 21 katlı binanın çökmesi sonucu ilk belirlemelere göre 6 kişi hayatını kaybetti, en az 100 kişinin ise enkaz altında olduğu ifade edildi.

Flat Out With Komo
HOT TAKES FOR OUR SEASON 3 OPENER with Dipo Ilesanmi!!!

Flat Out With Komo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 36:46


Dipo Ilesanmi is a graduate of the University of Lagos who has a knack for sport analysis. On the season opener, we discuss the Nigerian Basketball Federation vs D'Tigress Saga and how the basketball season for biggest leagues will turn out - WNBA Season came to a close with Chicago Sky claiming their first championship in Franchise history. - NBA Season getting all the attention KINDLY SUBSCRIBE TO THE PODCAST PLATFORMS Anchor: http://anchor.fm/theflatoutpodcast Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/flat-out-with-komo/id1482677854?uo=4 Google podcast: https://podcasts.google.com/?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy9lYTkwMzE4L3BvZGNhc3QvcnNz&ep=14 FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/flatoutwithkomo_/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Flatoutwithkomo?s=09 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FlatOutwithKomo/ Instrumental: Fireboy - Peru

Los ñoños comunes
Ep 169: Calamares y Murciélagos

Los ñoños comunes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 115:34


Estamos de vuelta y en este episodio hablamos de lo que hicimos en la semana. Hablamos de lo que mas nos gustó del DC Fandome. Leemos los mensajes que llegaron al buzón de Yaroto y por último hablamos del Juego del Calamar sin y con spoilers 0:00 - Intro / La reseña de nuestra semana 30:05 - DC Fandome 1:04:48 - El Buzón de Yaroto 1:21:13 - El Juego del Calamar sin/con spoliers 1:52:08 - Despedida No olvides dejar tus comentarios y/o saludos para leerlos en el siguiente podcast

Surviving Eko with Fecko
Ep. 24 | Reaction to Foreigner's Awful Experience at the Lagos Airport

Surviving Eko with Fecko

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 12:53


This is our reaction to the story of the American lady who shared her awful experience at the Lagos airport. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/survivingeko/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/survivingeko/support

Talking Locs
Meet the Expert Locticians

Talking Locs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 80:47


In this episode of the Talking Locs with Locitude podscast, we are joined by Chiaka Michael - Ogbonna, a natural hair practitioner, a loctician and loc critic who runs a personalized loc salon for women in Lagos. Today, Chiaka and Ade Balogun of Locitude have a peer to peer conversation as loc experts.The conversation is broad, long and covers a wide spectrum of loc'ing methods, maintenance and pop culture.Chiaka can be reached via instagram - @chiaka.the.locgicianMany thanks to our producer @XavageMedia and @ETheMasterMind for this season's beat. I remain your host, Ade Balogun.For feedback, enquires or participation you can reach on instagram @locitude, email: info@loc-itude.com or by phone. +234 818 900 1122 or +1 240 733 9047.

Comunidad Hosanna
Cuida tu corazón en Él - Pastor Jairo Lagos - T4 - Episodio 234

Comunidad Hosanna

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 1:53


En El Secreto - Comunidad de Renovación Familiar Hosanna

Reportage Afrique
Reportage Afrique - Nigeria: opération main basse sur le «Saddle Club» d'Ikeja

Reportage Afrique

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 2:21


Au Nigeria, c'est l'un des rares espaces verts de la mégalopole de Lagos qui pourrait bientôt disparaître. Le « Saddle Club », le seul club équestre du pays, est menacé par des spéculateurs immobiliers qui en revendiquent la propriété. Ce parc de huit hectares, situé en plein cœur du quartier d'Ikeja, a été envahi et en partie détruit à la fin du mois de septembre. Sur place, les cavaliers du club se battent pour le sauver. 

Monocle 24: Monocle on Design
Design Week Lagos

Monocle 24: Monocle on Design

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 30:00


We meet the founder of Design Week Lagos and hear about a collaboration between celebrated lamp-maker Anglepoise and the UK's National Trust. Plus: some words of wisdom on retail design from Joana Astolfi.

Two Takes and a Pod
'Dem Regular Trademark' | 20 10 2020 A year later

Two Takes and a Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 73:36


Young Professional: Africa Edition
Passion, Purpose, and Service.

Young Professional: Africa Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 45:54


On the show today we have Fidelis Bonaventure Uzoma and Annah Ruwanika.Annah is a marketing and communications professional with experience in the Financial Services sector. She holds a master's degree and a postgraduate diploma in Marketing from Edinburgh Business School. She is a Mandela Washington Fellowship Alumni under the Civic Engagement Track where she studied at Indiana University and holds certificates in Fundraising and Leadership.Fidelis is a Human Development and Social Impact ProfessionalFidelis has work and leadership experience as an international development practitioner. He has received many leadership awards, fellowships, and service with world-class organizations including the Obama Foundation, Aspen Institute, British Council, Tony Elumelu Foundation, U.S Department of State Atlas Corps, American Express, World Bank, Crans Montana, and the United Nations.Fidelis has a Masters's in Diplomacy and Strategic Studies from the University of Lagos and a Bachelors's in Philosophy from the University of Ibadan.

JenniSpeakz
Reaction to Lagos Wild Nights

JenniSpeakz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 26:35


I've been gone but I'm back and better! This episode is me reacting to the Lagos Wild Nights page on Instagram!

Rush Creek Church
Beggars | Week 2 | Mira Lagos

Rush Creek Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 41:56


The Jake Feinberg Show
The Randy Resnick Interview

The Jake Feinberg Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 61:58


Bad jazz is when people are playing real hard and nobodies listening. Lagos used to call it "Bar Mitzvah Jazz." No matter what kind of music you play people kind of expect a show. There's so much offer on cable, concerts are huge and the magic of ensemble playing which is people who can play even if there just playing chords behind somebody else. Even when it's a singer it can be smokin" if its ensemble playing and people are listening to each other. Don't get me wrong, we practiced for hours. It's not a question of practicing, what it is a question of is hearing the other person. Getting off on backing up, you don't have to take a solo to get off. It's not like watching a porn movie. Your part of it. If your playing rhythm guitar behind Sugarcane, your part of it. Paul (Lagos) knew so much. He used to study Joseph Schillinger compositions. He and Cane used to play duets that would just fly off, you can hear that on the recordings but we did that all the time. Sometimes that's shit would last 15 minutes. We do the intro to the song, Don would sing a couple of versus, he'd take a solo, sing another verse. The bass player and I would stop and he and Paul would play for 15 minutes. When we came back in it was knowing when to come back in. This isn't to say that Victor and I were so brilliant we just came in at the right time. No one ever said, "I needed you cats to come in later or early because their was no later/earlier it was just so obvious from the ensemble playing that we were doing. We would bring it down to a certain level and come back in and that's called music."

Cha Cha Music Review Podcast
Cha Cha Spotlight Series Featuring Daisy

Cha Cha Music Review Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 23:57


Good day ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls and members of the Cha Cha Nation, welcome to another episode of Cha Cha Spotlight Series on Cha Cha Music Review Podcast, my name is Hafeestonova aka Your Musical Plug and Creator of the Energy Force  Cha Cha Spotlight Series is where I get to have conversations with fast-rising artists, we talk about their musical journey and everything in between In today's episode, I had a chat with Daisy, a fast-rising female rapper, we talked about how she went viral after a Slimcase rap challenge, her encounter with famous producer Major Bangz, how she started working on her EP titled Firecracker and many more Click on the play button to enjoy this wonderful conversation  Click here to stream her EP: https://open.spotify.com/album/7wBpSwMkHvAEMxkvnRffVo?si=a72mQSpVQvSVe2eWkMOS-A Cha Cha Spotlight Series is being brought to you by Homeboyz INC, an A&R firm in the United States, they are into Artist Management, Artist Discovery, Music Distribution. They also have a Recording Studio in Lagos, Nigeria.  --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/hafeestonova1/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hafeestonova1/support

USA Classic Radio Theater
Classic Radio Theater for October 23, 2021 Hour 3 - The Hand In The Coconut

USA Classic Radio Theater

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 49:23


Let George Do It starring Bob Bailey and Virginia Gregg, originally broadcast October 23, 1950, The Hand In The Coconut. A hunter and the hunted. Which is which...and who gets the girl? Also Part 7 of a 9 part Yours Truly Johnny Dollar story, The Phantom Chase Matter, originally broadcast October 23, 1956. Getting to the island of Lagos is easy, but getting away from it, that's another story!

Ideas Untrapped
RULE OF LAW AND THE REAL WORLD

Ideas Untrapped

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 64:14


''Rule of law'' is the generally accepted description for how well a political system conforms to formal rules - rather than functioning through the whims of the most powerful social or political agents. For a society to be described as one functioning under rule of law - there must be rules and those rules must be equally applied to everyone in the society. Let us call this Letter of the Law. These rules are usually expressed through the constitution of a country and enforced through the courts. But simply having rules and enforcing them does not suffice in the making of the rule of law - and it is an incomplete (however accurate) conception of it. Some rules can be drafted in bad faith or with the express purpose of protecting the interest of the political elites responsible for governance. This is why many scholars have argued that the rule of law can only be said to exist in a state that functions under rules designed to protect the civil liberties (individual rights, freedom of speech, freedom of association, etc.) of the people living within its territory. Let us call this the Character or Spirit of the Law. The character of the law understood as the fulfilment of constitutionally-guaranteed civil liberties is the most common standard by which governance is judged to conform or deviate from the rule of law. For example, countries that routinely violate the rights of citizens in whatever form cannot be said to be governed by the rule of law, even if it has a written constitution. Consideration of the character of the law is the context to understanding the work of my guest on this episode, Paul Gowder.He is a professor of law at NorthWestern university with a broad research interest and expertise. Paul departs from this common derivation of the character of the law as rooted in liberty - and argued that for the rule of law to be broadly applicable in different societies (not dependent on the political institutions and ethical ideals of any specific society) with varying cultures and traditions of governance, it must be rooted in Equality. To understand Paul's argument, I will briefly state two important aspects that set the tone for our conversation - this should not be taken as an exhaustive summary of his work and I encourage you to check out his website and book. The first is that the rule of law as a principle regulates the actions of the state (government), and it is not to be conflated with other rules that regulate the actions of citizens. This is such an important point because one of the most egregious expressions of the law is when a government uses it to oppress citizens. Secondly, Paul outlines three components of the rule of law based on equality as 1) regularity - the government can only use coercion when it is acting in ''good faith'' and under ''reasonable interpretation'' of rules that already exist and are specific to the circumstances. 2) publicity - the law has to be accessible to everyone without barriers (''officials have a responsibility to explain their application of the law, ...failure to do so commits hubris and terror against the public"). 3) generality - the law must be equally applicable to all. Putting all these elements together gives us a rule of law regime where everyone is equal before the law, and the state does not wantonly abuse citizens or single out particular groups for systematic abuse.I enjoyed this conversation very much, and I want to thank Paul for talking to me. Thank you guys too for always listening, and for the other ways you support this project.TRANSCRIPTTobi; I greatly enjoyed your work on the rule of law. I've read your papers, I've read your book, and I like it very much. I think it's a great public service if I can say that because for a lot of time, I am interested in economic development and that is mostly the issue that this podcast talks about. And what you see in that particular conversation is there hasn't really been that much compatibility between the question of the rule of law or the laws that should regulate the actions of the state, and its strategy for economic development. Most of the time, you often see even some justification, I should say, to trample on rights in as much as you get development, you get high-income growth for it. And what I found in your work is, this does not have to be so. So what was your eureka moment in coming up with your concept, we are going to unpack a lot of the details very soon, but what motivated you to write this work or to embark on this project?Paul; Yeah, I think for me, part of the issue that really drives a lot of how I think about the rule of law and you know, reasons behind some of this work is really a difference between the way that those of us who think about human freedom and human equality, right? I think of it as philosophers, right. So they're philosophers and philosophers think about the ability of people to live autonomous lives, to sort of stand tall against their government, to live lives of respect, and freedom and equality. And that's one conversation. And so we see people, like, you know, Ronald Dworkin, thinking about what the rule of law can deliver to human beings in that sense. And then, you know, there's this entire development community, you know, the World Bank, lots of the US foreign policy, all of the rest of those groups of people and groups of ideas, talk about the rule of law a lot and work to measure the rule of law and invest immense amounts of money in promoting what they call the rule of law across the world. But mostly, it seems to be protecting property rights for multinational investment. And I mean, that makes some kind of sense, if you think that what the rule of law is for is economic development, is increasing the GDP of a country and integrating it into favourable international networks of trade. But if you think that it's about human flourishing, then you get a completely different idea of what the rule of law can be, and should be. And so this sort of really striking disjuncture between the two conversations has driven a lot of my work, especially recently, and especially reflecting even on the United States, I think that we can see how domestic rule of law struggles - which we absolutely have, I mean, look at the Trump administration, frankly, as revolving around this conflict between focusing on economics and focusing on human rights and human wellbeing.Tobi; It's interesting the polarization you're talking about. And one way that I also see it play out is [that] analyst or other stakeholders who participate in the process of nation-building in Africa, in Nigeria… a lot of us that care about development and would like to see our countries grow and develop and become rich, are often at opposite ends with other people in the civil society who are advocating for human rights, who are advocating for gender equality, who are advocating for so many other social justice issues. And it always seems like there's no meeting ground, you know, between those set of views, and I believe it does not have to be so. So one thing I'm going to draw you into quite early is one of the distinctions you made in so many of your papers and even your book is the difference between the conception of the rule of law that you are proposing versus the generally accepted notion of the rule of law based on individual liberty in the classical liberal tradition. I also think that's part of the problem, because talking about individual liberty comes with this heavy ideological connotation, and giving so many things that have happened in Africa with colonialism and so many other things, nobody wants any of that, you know. So you are proposing a conception of the rule of law that is based on equality. Tell me, how does that contrast with this popularly accepted notion of the rule of law [which is] based on individual liberty?Paul; So I think the way to think about it is to start with the notion of the long term stability of a rule of law system. And so here is one thing that I propose as a fact about legal orders. Ultimately, any kind of stable legal order that can control the powerful, that is, that can say to a top-level political leader, or a powerful multinational corporation, or whomever, no, you can't do this, this violates the law and make that statement stick depends on widespread collective mobilization, if only as a threat, right. And so it's kind of an analytic proposition about the nature of power, right? If you've got a top-level political leader who's in command of an army, and they want to do something illegal, it's going to require very broad-based opposition, and hence very broad-based commitment to the idea of leaders that follow the law in order to prevent the person in charge of an army from just casually violating it whenever they want. Okay, accept that as true, what follows from that? Well, what follows from that is that the legal system has to actually be compatible with the basic interests of all. And what that tends to mean and I think this is true, both historically, and theoretically, is leaving aside the philosophical conceptual difference between liberty and equality, which I'm not sure is really all that important. Like I think, ultimately, liberty and equality as moral ideas tend to blur together when you really unpack them. But practically speaking, any stable legal order that can control the powerful has to be compatible with the interests of a broad-based group of the human beings who participate in that legal order. And what that entails is favouring a way of thinking about the rule of law that focuses on being able to recruit the interests of even the worst off. In other words, one that's focused on equality, one that's focused on protecting the interests of the less powerful rather than a laissez-faire libertarian conception of the rule of law that tends to be historically speaking, compatible with substantial amounts of economic inequality, hyper-focus on ideas - like property rights, that support the long-standing interests of those who happen to be at the top of the economy, often against the interests of those that happened to be at the bottom of the economy, right. That's simply not a legal order that is sustainable in the long run. Lately, I've been thinking a lot about the way that this has played out in [the] United States history, in particular. I might have a book that's coming out in December that focuses on a historical account of the development of the rule of law, particularly in the United States. I mean, it's my own country. And so at some point, I had to get talked into writing that book. And we can see that in our history right at the get-go, you know, in the United States, at the very beginning, the rule of law dialogue tended to be focused on protecting the interests of wealthy elite property holders. And this actually played a major part, for example, in the United States' most grievous struggle, namely the struggle over slavery, because slaveholders really relied on this conception of the Rule of Law focusing on individual freedom and property rights to insist on a right to keep holding slaves against the more egalitarian idea that “hey, wait a minute, the enslaved have a right to be participants in the legal system as well.” And so we can see these two different conceptions of legality breaking the United States and breaking the idea of legal order in the United States right at the get-go. And we see this in country after country after country. You know, another example is Pinochet's Chile, which was the victim of [the] United States' economics focused rule of law promotion efforts that favoured the interests of property holders under this libertarian conception over the interests of ordinary citizens, democracy and mass interests. In other words, over the egalitarian conception, and again, you know, devolved into authoritarianism and chaos.Tobi; Yeah, nice bit of history there, but dialling all the way, if you'll indulge me... dialling all the way to the present, or maybe the recent past, of course; where I see another relevance and tension is development, and its geopolitical significance and the modernization projects that a lot of developed countries have done in so many poor and violent nations, you know, around the world. I mean, at the time when Africa decolonized, you know, a lot of the countries gravitated towards the communist bloc, socialism [and] that process was shunted, failed, you know, there was a wave of military coups all over the continent, and it was a really dark period.But what you see is that a lot of these countries, Nigeria, for example, democratized in 1999, a lot of other countries either before then or after followed suit. And what you see is, almost all of them go for American-style federal system, and American-style constitutional democracy, you know. And how that tradition evolved... I mean, there's a lot you can explain and unpack here... how that tradition evolved, we are told is the law has a responsibility to treat people as individuals. But you also find that these are societies where group identities are very, very strong, you know, and what you get are constitutions that are weakly enforced, impractical, and a society that is perpetually in struggle. I mean, you have a constitution, you have rules, and you have a government that openly disregards them, because the constitutional tradition is so divorced from how a lot of our societies evolve. And what I see you doing in your work is that if we divorce the rule of law from the ideal society, you know [like] some societies that we look up to, then we can come up with a set of practical propositions that the rule of law should fulfil, so walk me through how you resolve these tensions and your propositions?Paul; Well, so it's exactly what you just said, right? I mean, we have to focus on actual existing societies and the actual way that people organize their lives, right. And so here's the issue is, just like I said a minute ago, the rule of law fundamentally depends on people. And when I say people, I don't just mean elites. I don't just mean the wealthy, I don't just mean the people in charge of armies, and the people in charge of courthouses, right? Like the rule of law depends, number one, on people acting collectively to hold the powerful to the law. And number two, on people using the institutions that we say are associated with the rule of law. And so just as you describe, one sort of really common failure condition for international rule of law development efforts - and I don't think that this is a matter of sort of recipient countries admiring countries like the US, I think this is a matter of international organizations and countries like the US having in their heads a model of what the law looks like and sort of pressing it on recipient countries.But you know, when you build institutions that don't really resemble how the people in a country actually organize their social, political and legal lives, you shouldn't be surprised when nobody uses them. You shouldn't be surprised when they're ineffective. But I mean, I think that it's been fairly compared to a kind of second-generation colonialism in that sense where countries like the US and like Germany, attempt to export their legal institutions to other countries, without attending to the ways that the people in those countries already have social and legal resources to run their lives. And so I'll give you an example that's interesting from Afghanistan. So in Afghanistan, sort of post the 2000s invasion, and so forth, some researchers, mostly affiliated with the Carnegie Institution, found that the really effective rule of law innovations, the really effective interventions were ones that relied on existing social groups and existing structures of traditional authority. And so, you know, you could build a courthouse and like, ask a formal centralized state to do something, maybe it would work, maybe it wouldn't, maybe people would use it, maybe they wouldn't. But if you took local community leaders, local religious leaders, gave them training, and how to use the social capital they already have to help do things like adjudicate disputes, well, those would actually be effective, because they fit into the existing social organization that already exists. So I'll give you another example. I have a student who... I had… I just graduated an S.J.D student from Uganda who wrote a dissertation on corruption in Uganda. And one of the things that he advocated for I think, really sensibly was, “ okay, we've got this centralized government, but we've also got all of these traditional kingdoms, and the traditional kingdoms, they're actually a lot more legitimate in the sociological sense than the centralized government.People trust the traditional kingdoms, people rely on the traditional kingdoms for services, for integrating themselves into their society. And so one useful way of thinking about anti-corruption reforms is to try and empower the traditional kingdoms that already have legitimacy so that they can check the centralized government. And so that kind of work, I think, is where we have real potential to do global rule of law development without just creating carbon copies of the United States. Tobi; The process you describe, I will say, as promising as it may sound, what I want to ask you is how then do you ensure that a lot of these traditional institutions that can be empowered to provide reasonable checks to the power of the central government also fulfil the conditions of equality in their relation to the general public? Because even historically, a lot of these institutions are quite hierarchical...Paul; Oh, yeah... and I think in particular, women's rights are a big problem.Tobi; Yeah, yeah and there's a lot of abuses that go on locally, even within those communities, you know. We have traditional monarchies who exercise blanket rights over land ownership, over people's wives, over so many things, you know, so how then does this condition of equality transmit across the system?Paul; Yeah, no, I think that's the really hard question. I tell you right now that part of the answer is that those are not end-state processes. By this I mean that any realistic conception of how we can actually build effective rule of law institutions, but also genuinely incorporate everyone's interests in a society is going to accept that there's going to be a kind of dynamic tension between institutions.You know, sometimes we're going to have to use the centralized state to check traditional institutions. Sometimes we're going to have to use traditional institutions to check the centralized state. Elinor Ostrom, Nobel Prize-winning political scientist and her sort of the Bloomington School of Political Economy, emphasized for many years this idea that they called Polycentrism. That is the idea that multiple, overlapping governance organizations that are sort of forced to negotiate with one another, and forced to learn from one another, and really integrate with one another in this sort of complex tension-filled kind of way, actually turns out to be a really effective method of achieving what we might call good governance. And part of the reason is because they give a lot of different people, in different levels of [the] organization, ways to challenge one another, ways to demand inclusion in this decision, and let somebody else handle that decision, and participate jointly in this other decision. And so I think that neither the centralized state alone, nor traditional institutions alone is going to be able to achieve these goals. But I think efforts to integrate them have some promise. And India has done a lot of work, you know, sort of mixed record of success, perhaps, but has done a lot of work in these lines. I think, for example, of many of the ways that India has tried to promote the growth of Panchayats, of local councils in decision making, including in law enforcement, but at the same time, has tried to do things like promote an even mandate, the inclusion of women, the inclusion of Scheduled Castes, you know, the inclusion of the traditionally subordinated in these decision making processes. And as I said, they haven't had complete success. But it's an example of a way that the centralized state can both support traditional institutions while pushing those institutions to be more egalitarian.Tobi; Let's delve into the three conditions that you identified in your work, which any rule of law state should fulfil. And that is regularity, publicity, and generality. Kindly unpack those three for me.Paul; Absolutely. So regularity is...we can think of it as just the basic rule of law idea, right? Like the government obeys the law. And so if you think about this notion of regularity, it's... do we have a situation where the powerful are actually bound by legal rules? Or do we have a situation where, you know, they just do whatever they want? And so I'd say that, you know, there's no state that even counts as a rule of law state in the basic level without satisfying that condition, at least to some reasonable degree. The idea of publicity really draws on a lot of what I've already been saying about the recruitment of broad participation in the law. That is, when I say publicity, what I mean is that in addition to just officials being bound by the law, ordinary people have to be able to make use of the law in at least two senses. One, they have to be able to make use of the law to defend themselves. I call this the individualistic side of publicity, right? Like if some police officer wants to lock you up, the decision on whether or not you violated the law has to respond to your advocacy, and your ability to defend yourself in some sense. And then there's also the collective side of this idea of publicity, which is that the community as a whole has to be able to collectively enforce the boundaries of the legal system. And you know, we'd talk a lot more about that, I think that's really the most important idea. And then the third idea of generality is really the heart of the egalitarian idea that we've been talking about, which is that the law has to actually treat people as equals. And one thing that I think is really important about the way that I think about these three principles is that they're actually really tightly integrated. By tightly integrated, I mean you're only going to get in real-world states, regularity (that is, officials bound by the law) if you have publicity (that is, if you have people who aren't officials who actually can participate in the legal system and can hold officials to the law). We need the people to hold the officials in line. You're only going to get publicity if you have generality. That is, the people are only going to be motivated to use the legal system and to defend the legal system if the legal system actually treats them as equals. And so you really need publicity to have stable regularity, you really need generality to have stable publicity.Tobi; Speaking of regularity, when you say what constrains the coercive power of the state is when it is authorised by good faith and reasonable interpretation of pre-existing reasonably specific rules. That sounds very specific. And it's also Scalonian in a way, but a lot of people might quibble a bit about what is reasonable, you know, it sounds vague, right? So how would you condition or define reasonable in this sense, and I know you talked about hubris when you were talking about publicity. But is there a minimum level of responsibility for reasonability on the part of the citizen in relation to a state?Paul; That's, in a lot of ways, the really hard philosophical question, because one of the things that we know about law is that it is inherently filled with disagreement, right? Like our experience of the legal system and of every state that actually has something like the rule of law is that people radically disagree about the legal propriety of actions of the government. And so in some sense, this idea of reasonableness is kind of a cop-out. But it's a cop-out that is absolutely necessary, because there's no, you know, what [Thomas] Nagel called a view from nowhere. There's no view from nowhere from which we can evaluate whether or not on a day to day basis, officials are actually complying with the law in some kind of correct sense. But again, I think, you know, as you said, to some extent, that implies that some of the responsibility for evaluating this reasonableness criterion falls down to day to day politics, falls down to the judgment of ordinary citizens. Like, my conception of the rule of law is kind of sneakily a deeply democratic conception, because it recognizes given the existence of uncertainty as to what the law actually requires of officials both on a case by case basis. And, broadly speaking, the only way that we're ever going to be able to say, Well, you know, officials are more or less operating within a reasonable conception of what their legal responsibilities are, is if we empower the public at large to make these judgments. If we have institutions like here in the US, our jury trials, if we have an underlying backstop of civil society and politics, that is actively scrutinizing and questioning official action.Tobi; So speaking of publicity, which is my favorite...I have to say...Paul; Mine too. You could probably tell. Tobi; Because I think that therein lies the power of the state to get away with abusive use of its legitimacy, or its power, so to speak. When you say that officials have a responsibility to explain their application of the law, and a failure to do so commits hubris and terror against the public. So those two situations - hubris and terror, can you explain those to me a bit?Paul; Yeah. So these are really, sort of, moral philosophy ideas at heart, particularly hubris. The idea is there's a big difference, even if I have authority over you, between my exercising that authority in the form of commands and my exercising that authority in the form of a conversation that appeals to your reasoning capacity, right. So these days, I'm thinking about it in part with reference to... I'm going to go very philosophical with you here... but in reference to Kant's humanity formulation of the categorical imperative, sorry. But that is a sense in which if I'm making decisions about your conduct, and your life and, you know, affecting your fundamental interests, that when I express the reasons to you for those decisions, and when I genuinely listen to the reasons that you offer, and genuinely take those into account in my decision making process, I'm showing a kind of respect for you, which is consistent with the idea of a society of equals.As opposed to just hi, I'm wiser than you, and so my decision is, you know, you go this way, you violated the law, right? Are we a military commander? Or are we a judge? Both the military commander and the judge exercise authority, but they do so in very different ways. One is hierarchical, the other I would contend is not.Tobi; Still talking about publicity here, and why I love it so much is one important, should I say… a distinction you made quite early in your book is that the rule of law regulates the action of the state, in relation to its citizens.Paul; Yes.Tobi; Often and I would count myself among people who have been confused by that point as saying that the rule of law regulates the action of the society in general. I have never thought to make that distinction. And it's important because often you see that maybe when dealing with civil disobedience, or some kind of action that the government finds disruptive to its interests, or its preferences, the rule of law is often invoked as a way for governments to use sometimes without discretion, its enforcement powers, you know.So please explain further this distinction between the rule of law regulating the state-citizen relation versus the general law and order in the society. I mean, you get this from Trump, you get this from so many other people who say, Oh, we are a law and order society, I'm a rule of law candidate.Paul; Oh, yeah.Tobi; You cannot do this, you cannot do that. We cannot encourage the breakdown of law and order in the society. So, explain this difference to me.Paul; Absolutely, then this is probably the most controversial part of my account of the rule of law. I think everybody disagrees with this. I sort of want to start by talking about how I got to this view. And I think I really got to this view by reflecting on the civil rights movement in the United States in particular, right. Because, you know, what we would so often see, just as you say about all of these other contexts, is we would see officials, we would see judges - I mean, there are, you know, Supreme Court cases where supreme court justices that are normally relatively liberal and sympathetic, like, you know, Justice Hugo Black scolding Martin Luther King for engaging in civil disobedience on the idea that it threatens the rule of law. It turns out, and this is something that I go into in the book that's coming out in December... it turns out that King actually had a sophisticated theory of when it was appropriate to engage in civil disobedience and when it wasn't. But for me, reflecting on that conflict in particular, and reflecting on the fact that the same people who were scolding peaceful lunch-counter-sit-ins for threatening the rule of law and, you know, causing society to descend into chaos and undermining property rights and all the rest of that nonsense, were also standing by and watching as southern governors sent police in to beat and gas and fire hose and set dogs on peaceful protests in this sort of completely new set of like, totally unbounded explosions of state violence. And so it seems to me sort of intuitively, like these can't be the same problem, right, like ordinary citizens, doing sit-ins, even if they're illegal, even if we might have some reason to criticize them, it can't be the same reason that we have to criticize Bull Connor for having the cops beat people. And part of the reason that that's the case, and this is what I call the Hobbesian property in the introduction to the rule of law in the real world...part of the reason is just the reality of what states are, right? Like, protesters don't have tanks and police dogs, and fire hoses, right? Protesters typically don't have armies. If they do, then we're in a civil war situation, not a rule of law situation, the state does have all of those things. And so one of the features of the state that makes it the most appropriate site for this talk about the rule of law is this the state has, I mean, most modern states have, at least on a case by case basis, overwhelming power. And so we have distinct moral reasons to control overwhelming power than we do to control a little bit of legal disobedience, right, like overwhelming power is overwhelming. It's something that has a different moral importance for its control. Then the second idea is at the same time what I call the [...] property... is the state makes claims about its use of power, right? Like ordinary people, when they obey the law or violate the law, they don't necessarily do so with reference to a set of ideas that they're propagating about their relationship to other people. Whereas when modern states send troops in to beat people up, in a way what they're doing is they're saying that they're doing so in all of our names, right, particularly, but not exclusively in democratic governments. There's a way in which the state represents itself as acting on behalf of the political community at large. And so it makes sense to have a distinctive normative principle to regulate that kind of power.Tobi; I know you sort of sidestepped this in the book, and maybe it doesn't really fit with your overall argument. But I'm going to push you on that topic a bit. So how does the rule of law state as a matter of institutional design then handles... I know you said that there are separate principles that can be developed for guiding citizen actions, you know...Paul; Yes. Tobi; I mean, let's be clear that you are not saying that people are free to act however they want.Paul; I'm not advocating anarchy.Tobi; Exactly. So how does the rule of law state then handle citizens disagreements or conflicting interests around issues of social order? And I'll give you an example. I mentioned right at the beginning of our conversation what happened in Nigeria in October 2020. There's a unit of the police force that was created to handle violent crimes. Needless to say that they went way beyond their remit and became a very notoriously abusive unit of the police force. Picking up people randomly, lock them up, extort them for money. And there was a situation where a young man was murdered, and his car stolen by this same unit of the police force and young people all over the country, from Lagos to Port Harcourt to Abuja, everywhere, felt we've had enough, right, and everybody came out in protest. It was very, very peaceful, I'd say, until other interests, you know, infiltrated that action. Paul; Right. Tobi; But what I noticed quite early in that process was that even within the spirits of that protests, there were disagreements between citizens - protesters blocking roads, you know, versus people who feel well, your protest should not stop me from going to work, you know, and so many other actions by the protesters that other people with, maybe not conflicting interests, but who have other opinions about strategy or process feel well, this is not right. This is not how to do this. This is not how you do this, you know, and I see that that sort of provided the loophole, I should say, for the government to then move in and take a ruthlessly violent action. You know, there was a popular tollgate in Lagos in the richest neighbourhood in Lagos that was blocked for 10 days by the protesters. And I mean, after this, the army basically moved in and shot people to death. Today, you still see people who would say, Oh, well, that's tragic. But should these people have been blocking other people from going about their daily business? So how does the rule of law regulate issues of social order vis-a-vis conflict of interest?Paul; So I think this is actually a point in favour of my stark distinction between state action and social action as appropriate for thinking about the rule of law. Because when you say that the state used...what I still fundamentally think of as like minor civil disobedience...so, like blocking some roads, big deal! Protesters block roads all the time, right, like protesters have blocked roads throughout human history, you know, like, sometimes it goes big, right? Like they love blocking roads in the French Revolution. But oftentimes, it's just blocking... so I blocked roads.I participated in, you know, some protests in the early 2000s. I participated in blocking roads in DC, right, like, fundamentally "big deal!" is the answer that the state ought to give. And so by saying to each other and to the government, when we talk about the rule of law, we mean, the state's power has to be controlled by the law, I think that gives us a language to say... even though people are engaging in illegal things, the state still has to follow legal process in dealing with it, right.The state still has to use only the level of force allowed by the law to arrest people. The state can't just send in the army to shoot people. And the principle that we appeal to is this principle of the rule of law. Yeah, maintaining the distinction between lawbreaking by ordinary people and law-breaking by the state helps us understand why the state shouldn't be allowed to just send in troops whenever people engage in a little bit of minor lawbreaking and protests.Tobi; So how does the law... I mean, we are entering a bit of a different territory, how does the law in your conception handles what... well, maybe these are fancy definitions, but what some people will call extraordinary circumstances. Like protests with political interests? Maybe protesters that are funded and motivated to unseat an incumbent government? Or in terrorism, you know, where you often have situations where there are no laws on paper to deal with these sort of extraordinary situations, you know, and they can be extremely violent, they can be extremely strange, they're usually things that so many societies are not equipped to handle. So how should the rule of law regulate the action of the state in such extraordinary circumstances?Paul; Yeah, so this is the deep problem of the rule of law, you know, this is why people still read Carl Schmitt, right, because Carl Schmitt's whole account of executive power basically is, hey, wait a minute emergencies happen, and when emergencies happen, liberal legal ideas like the rule of law dropout, and so fundamentally, you just have like raw sovereignty. And that means that the state just kind of does what it must. Right. So here's what I feel about Schmitt. One is, maybe sometimes that's true, right? And again, I think about the US context, because I'm an American and you know, I have my own history, right? And so in the US context, I think, again, about, Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War, right.Like Abraham Lincoln broke all kinds of laws in the Civil War. Like today, we'd call some of the things that he did basically assuming dictatorial power in some respects. I mean, he did that in the greatest emergency that the country had ever faced and has ever faced since then. And he did it in a civil war. And sometimes that happens, and I think practically speaking, legal institutions have a habit of not standing in the way in truly dire situations like that. But, and here's why I want to push back against Carl Schmitt... but what a legal order can then do is after the emergency has passed...number one, the legal order can be a source of pressure for demanding and accounting of when the emergency has passed, right. And so again, I think of the United States War on Terror, you know, we still have people in United States' custody imprisoned at Guantanamo Bay.September 11 2001, was almost 20 years ago. It's actually 20 years ago and a month, and we still have people locked up in Guantanamo Bay. That's insane. That's completely unjustifiable. And one of the jobs of the legal system is to pressure the executive to say, okay, buddy, is the emergency over yet? No, really, we think that the emergency is over yet. I want reasons, right, publicity again, I want an explanation from you of why you think the emergency is still ongoing. And the legal system can force the executive to be accountable for the claim that the emergency is still ongoing. That's number one. Number two is that law tends to be really good at retroactively, sort of, retrofitting things into legal order, right. And so again, I think about the Civil War. You know, after the US Civil War, lots of civil wars, sorry. American-centric person trying to fight against it. But after the US Civil War, you know, the courts took a pause. And then we have a lot of cases where they took a lot of the things that Lincoln did, they said, okay, some of them at least were illegal, some of them were legal, but only under very specific circumstances. And so they actually built legal doctrine that took into account the emergency that Lincoln faced, and then later wars, such as in the Second World War, the courts took the lessons from the experience in the American Civil War, and used that to impose more constraints. So to bring it about that the emergency actions that Franklin Roosevelt took in the Second World War weren't completely sui generis, sort of like right acts of sovereignty, but were regulated by legal rules created during the Civil War, and after the Civil War. And again, they weren't perfect, right? You know, during the Second World War, the United States interned Japanese Americans, you know, again, sort of completely lawless, completely unjustifiable, but you know, it's an ongoing process. The point is that the legal system is always... the law is always reactive in emergencies. But the reactive character of the law can nonetheless be used as a way to control and channel sovereign power, even in these sort of Schmittian emergency situations.Tobi; So two related questions, your work is interdisciplinary, because you try to blend a lot of social science into legal philosophy. But speaking of legal order and your primary profession, I mean.. for the sake of the audience parties into a lot of other cool stuff, I'm going to be putting up his website in the show notes. But speaking of legal order, and the legal profession, why is so much of the legal profession fascinated with what I would say the rule by law, as opposed to the rule of law. A lot of what you get from lawyers, even some law professors in some situations is [that] the law is the law, and you have to obey it. And even if you are going to question it, however unjustified it may seem, you still have to follow some processes that maybe for ordinary citizens are not so accessible or extremely costly, you know, which I think violate regularity, right, the way you talk about it retrospective legislation, and so many other things. So why is the legal profession so fascinated with the law, as opposed to justification for the law?Paul; Yeah, I think that question kind of answers itself, right. It's unfortunate... I mean, it's sort of natural but it's unfortunate that the people who most influence our dialogue about the way that we, you know, live in [the] society together with a state, namely by organizing ourselves with law happen to be people who are the specialists who find it easiest, right? And so I think the simple answer is right on this one, at least in countries like the United States, I'm not sure how true this is in other countries. But in the United States, the domination of legal discourse by lawyers necessarily means that the sort of real practical, real-world ways in which ordinary people find interacting with anything legal to be difficult, oppressive, or both just aren't in view, right? This is hard for them to understand.But I think in the US, one of the distortions that we've had is that we have an extremely hierarchical legal profession, right. So we have very elite law schools, and those very elite law schools - one of which I teach at - tend to predominantly produce lawyers who primarily work for wealthy corporations and sort of secondarily work for the government. Those lawyers tend to be the ones that end up at the top of the judiciary, that end up in influential positions in academia, that end up, you know, in Congress. The lawyers that, you know, see poor people, see people of subordinated minority groups and see the very different kinds of interactions with the legal system that people who are worse off have, that see the way that the law presents itself, not as a thing that you can use autonomously to structure your own life. But as a kind of external imposition, that sort of shows up and occasionally inflicts harm on you. Those lawyers aren't the ones who end up in our corridors of power. And it's very unfortunate, it's a consequence of the hierarchical nature of, at least in the US, our legal profession. And I suspect it's similar in these other countries as well.Tobi; In your opinion, what's the... dare I say the sacrosanct and objective - those are rigid conditions sorry - expression of the rule of law? The current general conception of the rule accedes to the primacy of the Constitution, right. I've often found that problematic because in some countries you find constitutional provisions that are egregious, and in other cases, you find lawyers going into court to challenge certain actions that they deem unjust, or that are truly unjust on the basis of the same constitution. Right. So what do you think is the most practical expression of the rule of law? Is it written laws? Is it the opinion of the judges? Is it how officials hold themselves accountable? What's the answer?Paul; So I think I'm gonna like sort of twist this a little bit and interpret that question is like, how do you know the extent to which the rule of law exists in a particular place? And my answer is, can ordinary people look officials in the eye, right, you know... if you're walking down the street, and you see a police officer, you know, are you afraid? Or can you walk past them and confidently know you're doing nothing wrong so there's nothing really effectively but they can do to you, right? If you're called in to deal with some kind of bureaucratic problem, like the tax office, can you trust that you exist in a relationship of respect? You know, can you trust that when you show them, actually here are my receipts, I really did have that expense, that that's going to be taken seriously? You know, if people, everybody, feels like they can stand tall, and look government officials in the eye, then to that extent, I think that the rule of law exists in a society.Tobi; Final question, what's the coolest idea you're working on right now?Paul; Oh, gosh. So like I said, I've got two books under contract right now. The first book is a history/theoretical constitutional law account of the development and existing state of the rule of law in the United States. The second book, which I'm more excited about, because it's the one that I plan to write this year, but it's also a lot harder, is I'm trying to take some of the governance design ideas that we see from the notion of rule of law development, and others such as governance development things and apply them to Private Internet platforms, right? Like, basically to Facebook. Um, I was actually involved in some of the work, not at a super high level, but I was involved in some of the work in designing or doing the research for designing Facebook's oversight board. And I'm kind of trying to expand on some of those ideas and think about, you know, if we really believe that private companies, especially in these internet platforms are doing governance right now, can we take lessons from how the rest of the world and how actual governments and actual states have developed techniques of governing behaviour in highly networked, large scale super-diverse environments and use those lessons in the private context? Maybe we can maybe we can't I'm not sure yet. Hopefully, by the time I finish the book, I'll know.Tobi; That's interesting. And I'll ask you this, a similar, I'll say a related situation is currently happening in Nigeria right now, where the President's Twitter handle or username, tweeted something that sounded like a thinly veiled threat to a particular ethnic group. And lots of people who disagreed with that tweet reported the tweet, and Twitter ended up deleting the tweet in question, which high-level officials in Nigeria found extremely offensive, and going as far as to assert their sovereign rights over Twitter and say, well, it may be your platform, but it is our country and we are banning you. How would you adjudicate such a situation? I mean, there's the question of banning Donald Trump from the platform and so many other things that have come up.Paul; Yeah, I mean, it's hard, right? So there are no easy answers to these kinds of problems. I think, ultimately, what we have to do is we have to build more legitimate ways to make these decisions. I mean, here are two things that we cannot do, right?Number one is we can't just let government officials, especially when, you know, as with the Donald Trump example, and so many others, the government officials are the ones who are engaging in the terrible conduct make these decisions. Number two is we also just can't let a bunch of people sitting in the Bay Area in California make those decisions. Like, ultimately, this is on, you know, property in some abstracted sense of like the shareholders of these companies. But we cannot simply allow a bunch of people in San Francisco, in Menlo Park, and you know, Cupertino and Mountain View, and all of those other little tech industry cities that have no understanding of local context to make the final decisions here. And so what we need to do is we need to build more robust institutions to include both global and local and affected countries, grassroots participation, in making these decisions. And I'm trying to sort of sketch out what the design for those might look like. But, you know, talk to me in about a year. And hopefully, I'll have a book for you that will actually have a sketch.Tobi; You bet I'm going to hold you to that. So, a year from now. So still on the question of ideas, because the show is about ideas. What's the one idea you'd like to see spread everywhere?Paul; Oh, gosh, you should have warned me in advance... that... I'm going to go back to what I said at the very beginning about the rule of law. Like I think that the rule of law depends on people, right? Like there is no such thing as the rule of law without a society and a legal system that genuinely is equal and advantageous to ordinary people enough to be the kind of thing that people actually support. Like ordinary people... if you cannot recruit the support of ordinary people for your legal political and social system, you cannot have the rule of law. That's true whether you're a developing country, that's true whether you're the United States, right. Like I think, you know, part of the reason that we got Donald Trump in the United States, I think, is because our legal system and with it our economy, and all the rest are so unequal in this country, that ordinary voters in the United States didn't see any reason to preserve it. Right and so when this lunatic and I mean, I'm just going to be quite frank here and say Donald Trump is a complete lunatic, right... when this lunatic is running for office who shows total disregard for existing institutions, like complete willingness to casually break the law. An electorate that actually was full of people who felt (themselves) treated respectfully and protected and supported by our legal and political institutions would have sent that guy packing in a heartbeat. But because the American people don't have that experience right now, I think that's what made us vulnerable to somebody like Donald Trump.Tobi; Thank you so much, Paul. It's been so fascinating talking to you.Paul; Thank you. This has been a lot of fun. Yeah, I'm happy to come back in a year when I've got the platform thing done.Tobi; Yeah, I'm so looking forward to that. This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at www.ideasuntrapped.com/subscribe

RNZ: Morning Report
Nigeria marks anniversary of police brutality protests

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 3:06


Demonstrations have been held in cities across Nigeria to mark one year since security forces violently suppressed mass protests against police brutality. Last year's rallies, the largest in Nigeria's recent history, began by calling for the disbanding of the Special Anti-Robbery Squad but escalated into protests over bad governance. They ended when security forces shot at thousands of peaceful protestors at the Lekki toll gate in Lagos, killing at least 12 people. Susie Ferguson spoke to Amnesty International Nigeria director Osai Ojigho, who said protesters in Lagos circumvented police by protesting in vehicles to commemorate the anniversary.

234 Essential
T for Tired

234 Essential

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 60:42


Lagos is so wild(5:00), growing up, America was the land of hopes and dreams (20:23). Christmas is coming back to Lagos(31:30). The five core Igbo states are scattered (42:10), and why should NYSC be for 2 years? (52:33), and Superman's son becomes bisexual(56:00).For fan mail: fanmail@234essential.comFor ads: info@visualaudiotimes.comSubscribe for Newsletter: https://bit.ly/234newsletter234 Essential on Twitter234 Essential on Instagram

In These Moments
So, What Happened Was…

In These Moments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 10:06


It's been a year since the last episode was released, and it feels right to drop this today, on the first anniversary of the October 20 massacre at the Lekki toll gate in Lagos, Nigeria. I appreciate your patience during this period. In These Moments coming back soon. If you want to share a story […]

Work Like a Mother
Defining Motherhood and Success on Your Own Terms

Work Like a Mother

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 36:18


Blessing grew up in Lagos, Nigeria. She was determined to dream big and be successful in spite of the societal expectations that boys went to school and pursued careers and women prepared to stay at home. Blessing came to the USA for college and pursued chemical engineering. Once she entered the male dominated profession, she learned to stand up and advocate for herself and other working moms. Blessing continues that work through Mother Honestly- a community that brings together women and empowers them to stop comparing themselves to others and start defining their own success. 

What the Riff?!?
1974 - April: Paul McCartney and Wings "Band On the Run"

What the Riff?!?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 39:07


Band on the Run would be the turning point for Paul McCartney's post-Beatles career.  After completing two solo albums, McCarney formed Paul McCartney and Wings, with the Wings name being inspired by a time of prayer at the hospital while his wife Linda was having serious complications delivering their second child.Wings had already produced two albums which had met with mixed reviews.  McCartney had picked an exotic locale of Lagos, Nigeria as the recording spot for "Band on the Run," and just before heading out, guitarist Henry McCullough and drummer Denny Selwell left the band.  That left Paul, his wife Linda, and former Moody Blues alum Denny Laine to complete the album.Nigeria might have been exotic, but it was a horrible choice as a recording location.  The country was run by a corrupt military dictatorship, was in the midst of a cholera epidemic, and the studio was in very poor shape.  Despite all these problems,the band would turn in a spectacular critical and commercial success.The album has a theme of escape and freedom.  It was being put together at the same time as George Harrison, John Lennon, and Ringo Starr all were in litigation against Allen Klein, a hardnosed business manager appointed to run Apple Records in 1969.  McCartney had strongly opposed Klein's appointment at the time, and some of the confidence that comes through in the album may come from a sense of being proven right about Klein.McCartney insisted on recording with Linda despite her lack of previous experience as a musician because he didn't want them to be apart while he was on tour.  Linda McCartney would be a part of the band from the beginning of Paul McCartney's post-Beatles career. Band on the RunThe opening track and title song is a medley of three songs that all reflect freedom and escape.  The lyric, "if we ever get out of here" was inspired by George Harrison in one of the Beatles' business meetings.  The original demo recording for "Band on the Run" was stolen at knife-point in Lagos, and the band had to basically re-record it from memory.MamuniaThis deep cut, gets its name from the Mamounia Hotel where the McCartneys stayed in Marrakesh, Morocco in 1973.  Mamounia means "safe haven" in Arabic, and McCartney considered it a metaphor for rebirth, continuing the "freedom" theme that would permeate the album.  It was the first song recorded for the album.Helen WheelsThis song was not intended to be a part of the album, and does not appear on the British release.  Capitol Records convinced Paul McCartney to include it on the American release of the album.  The track is a road trip song, and takes its name from the nickname of the McCartney's Land Rover, "hell on wheels."  JetThe first single from the album was actually preceded by Helen Wheels as a non-album single released separately.  It went to number 7 on both the British and American charts at the end of March.  The name is supposedly inspired by the name of the McCartney's Labrador Retriever, though Paul McCartney has also indicated that it was also the name of a pony he owned.   ENTERTAINMENT TRACK:Daybreak by Harry Nilsson (from the motion picture Son of Dracula)A cult classic movie starring Ringo Starr and Harry Nilsson with Peter Frampton, John Bonham,  Keith Moon, and other rock stars. STAFF PICKS:Rock and Roll, Hoochie Koo by Rick DerringerWayne features a rock anthem based off a seductive dance from the 1880's.  Derringer originally wrote the song for Johnny Winter, but re-recorded it when he went solo.  In addition to working with Johnny Winter, he also played in Edgar Winter's group on both "Frankenstein" and "Free Ride."  Derringer also plays guitar on Weird Al Yankovic's parody, "Eat It."Jungle Boogie by Kool & the GangRob cranks up the funk with an early Kool & the Gang hit off their fourth album.  The band got their start 10 years prior to this in 1964 after high school.  The scat sound is from a roadie for the band.The Loco-Motion by Grand Funk RailroadBrian's pick this week is a cover originally performed by Little Eva in 1962.  The song was surprisingly successful despite the unusual choice of a 60's dance song being remade by a hard rock band.Already Gone by The EaglesBruce brings us the first single from the third Eagle's album "On the Border."  This song penned by Jack Tempchin and Rob Strandlund is the relational equivalent of a "you can't fire me, I quit" song. INSTRUMENTAL TRACK:TSOP (The Sound of Philadelphia) by MFSBAlmost entirely an instrumental, this disco track will take us out of this week's podcast.  MFSB stands for "Mother, Father, Sister, Brother."

Rush Creek Church
Beggars | Week 1 | Mira Lagos

Rush Creek Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 36:25


Hot Mess Hotline
Ep. 40: 5 Steps To Take After Being Fired with Emil Ekiyor

Hot Mess Hotline

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 58:11


Emil Ekiyor, CEO of Innopower, learned some tough lessons before finding his purpose. He came to America from Nigeria in high school, never having played football. He learned the game and earned his way into the NFL. He put his head down and got to work. Every. Single. Day. Working on his mind and body to always be competing against himself and the league's best with his speed, strength, and endurance. One day it was just over. After injury and an unexpected termination, his name was at the bottom of ESPN's screen and he was packing his bags to head home. If you've ever been fired, you know how Emil felt. If you've never been fired, it feels like that time you belly flopped off the diving board, smacking your whole front side and knocking the wind out of your lungs. Then trying to get back up to air as soon as possible. Our conversation reminded me that we over-romanticize hard work. We forget that an amazing career has hard work, luck, serendipity, tears, setbacks, and maybe, sometimes, success. Hard work might gain us visibility to the right powers that be, but it's not the only thing that takes us to the top. About Emil Ekiyor Born in Lagos, Nigeria, Emil Ekiyor left his family (7 sisters and two brothers) in Lagos to pursue educational opportunities in Daytona Beach, Florida, at the age of 15. Emil participated in basketball, soccer, and football in high school and received a full athletic scholarship to attend the University of Central Florida in Orlando, Florida. At the University of Central Florida, Emil was named a captain of the football team. After an outstanding college career, Emil went on to play six years in the NFL with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Atlanta Falcons, and Las Vegas Raiders (formerly Oakland Raiders). Upon retiring from the NFL, Emil started several businesses in the United States.  He launched several projects in Nigeria as CEO of EnabekSolutions, which works with companies in Sub-Saharan Africa and the United States to expand and take advantage of the rapid growth in Sub-Saharan imports and exports.  He also served as the National Executive Director for the GEO Foundation, a nonprofit organization that partners with local community leaders to start, support, and manage high-quality K-12 charter schools in the country; President of the Indianapolis Chapter of Indiana Black Expo, President of Indy Youth Sports, Indianapolis Prayer Breakfast Leadership Team, and Board of Directors for the Friends of Education, a nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving K-12 education in the state of Minnesota since 1999 and Board of Directors of the NFLPA Former Players Indy Chapter. Growing up in Nigeria and then coming to the US without family, Emil's journey offers a unique perspective on the gaps in Black communities in Sub-Saharan Africa and the US. These experiences and the desire to close the wealth and opportunity gaps for African Americans and Africans are the driving force behind the creation of INNOPOWER. About INNOPOWER INNOPOWER Indy is a nonprofit community development organization that works with communities and stakeholders to create capacity-building opportunities for underrepresented ecosystems, businesses, and professionals in education, workforce development, and entrepreneurship. Learn more at innopowerindy.com. Take the Hot Mess Hotline Quiz: As a leader, you've felt paralyzed by where to start first with your team's and organization's problems. Do you need team building or a frank conversation? Like a Rubik's cube, one shift changes everything else but may create more problems than it solves. Take this 3-minute quiz to find your next best step.

Haitian All-StarZ's Music Mix
Episode 163: HAITIAN ALL-STARZ RADIO - WBAI 99.5 FM - EPISODE #159 - HARD HITTIN HARRY

Haitian All-StarZ's Music Mix

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 119:42


Tune in! @djhardhittinharry & @DJayCeenyc presents another brand new episode of @haitian_all_starz Radio Podcast on @wbai995 & WBAI.ORG 2am - 4am late Monday/early Tuesday. Also streaming on @itunes @googleplaymusic @amazonpodcasts @iheartradio @mixcloud @soundcloud

The Coode Street Podcast
Episode 564: Oghenechovwe Ekpeki and African Speculative Fiction

The Coode Street Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 60:19


Welcome to episode 22 of Season 12 of The Coode Street Podcast. In this episode, Gary and Jonathan talk to Oghenechovwe Ekpeki, author of the Otherwise Award-winning and Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award, British SF Award, and Nebula Award-nominated novella "Ife-Iyoku, the Tale of Imadeyunuagbon", editor of The Year's Best African Speculative Fiction, and co-editor with Zelda K. Knight of the British Fantasy Award-winning anthology Dominion: An Anthology of Speculative Fiction from Africa and the African Diaspora.  Oghenechovwe joins us from Lagos, Nigeria to discuss growing up reading speculative fiction in Nigeria, his hopes for The Year's Best African Speculative Fiction series, the challenges facing writers from Africa to get a chance to be a part of the international science fiction community, his upcoming anthology African Risen for Tordotcom (co-edited with Sheree Renee Thomas and Zelda K. Knight), and much more. While there are, later in the podcast, a few moments where static affected our Skype connection, we hope you'll bear with the episode. As always, we'd like to thank Oghenechovwe for taking the time to talk to us, and hope that you enjoy the episode.   Available for order now:

Call Your Sister
How to Become Smart Money Women with Cheyenne Tyler Jacobs

Call Your Sister

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 114:52


In this episode sisters, Astrid Ferguson and Alexandra Hodge discuss the Netflix series The Smart Money Women with sister-friend Cheyenne Tyler Jacobs. We highly recommend this Netflix series based in Lagos, Nigeria. Not only did we enjoy all the great tips and deep conversations-- but the outfits and food is to die for!The series is based on Arese Ugwu's book. In this series we become fully immersed in the lives of five girlfriends (Zuri, Lara, Tami, Adesuwa, and Ladun). This series allowed us to see how our relationships can either foster our poor spending habits or inspire us to create smart money habits. Cheyenne is a screenwriter and works in film, so naturally, she loves highlighting films like these that cause us to raise our eyebrows and look inward.We discuss which character we related to the most (Zuri, Lara, Tami, Adesuwa, or Ladun) and why. We share how Astrid felt incredibly close to Lara, the tough oil and gas executive, who takes care of her entire family to only feel unappreciated and disrespected. We discuss the difference between helping and enabling family members. The importance of having an LLC when you own a business and what to consider when opening up a joint account with a significant other.This one is a mouthful and you won't want to miss. Then go watch the Netflix series The Smart Money Women and tell us your thoughts! We love having discussions with sister-friends!Don't forget to follow us on our social media accounts:https://www.callyoursisterpodcast.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cys_podcast Facebook: Call Your Sister PodcastTwitter: @CYS_PodEmail: cysnation@gmail.comSupport the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/cyspodcast)

DJ ANARCHY
Episode 66: TROPICAL TAKEOVER 61

DJ ANARCHY

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 59:49


Nigerian rapper, singer & songwriter CHEQUE joined me to discuss his new album "BRAVO" and also premiered his new single "No One Else" featuring American rapper JACKBOY.This episodes features new Hip Hop, Reggaeton & AfrobeatsSalute GRUNGECAKETune in EVERY Saturday at 11PM ET (10PM CT) on Pitbull's Globalization SiriusXM Channel 13 with DJ ANARCHYInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/djanarchyrmx/Twitter: https://twitter.com/djanarchyrmxFollow GRUNGECAKEInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/grungecake/Twitter: https://twitter.com/grungecake

The Audio Long Read
From Lagos to Winchester: how a divisive Nigerian pastor built a global following

The Audio Long Read

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 35:34


I first encountered TB Joshua as a teenager, when his preaching captivated my evangelical Christian community in Hampshire. Many of my friends became his ardent disciples and followed him to Lagos. How did he have such a hold over people? By Matthew McNaught. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

Sound & Vision
Dennis Osadebe

Sound & Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 77:16


Dennis Osadebe (born in 1991) is a Nigerian mixed-media artist wh o obtained a BSc in Business and Management from the Queen Mary University of London and a MSc from the University of Warwick, majoring in Innovation and Entrepreneurship. Dennis' art has been featured in numerous contemporary art exhibitions since relocating back to Lagos in 2013, and has coined a new cultural movement he calls ‘neo-africa', which aims to deconstruct the notion of “African art” and escape the expectations often projected onto contemporary artists emanating from the African continent. He has shown his work worldwide from Paris to South Africa to Korea and beyond. He has an upcoming show at GR gallery in New York City called “When Power Plays.”