Podcasts about Bob Gibson

American baseball pitcher and coach

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Best podcasts about Bob Gibson

Latest podcast episodes about Bob Gibson

Toeing The Slab with David Cone
54 | Triston McKenzie on the Guardian's run to a division title; Aaron Judge's historic hitting season

Toeing The Slab with David Cone

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 63:35


Guardians starting pitcher Triston McKenzie joins the show to discuss his breakout season, what it took for Cleveland to seize the AL Central, how he uses pitching technology during games and why he and his teammates are embracing the doubters as they gear up for the playoffs. David, Justin and James touch on Aaron Judge closing out one of the best offensive seasons we've ever seen, regardless of era. The crew examines what Spencer Strider's absence means for the Braves, who could get big outs in the Dodgers bullpen during October, Luis Castillo's new contract and reactive pitching as it relates to Gerrit Cole. Plus, Bob Gibson's stellar start in the ‘68 Fall Classic, Tyler Glasnow's season debut, Luis Severino's reemergence and Kyle Bradish. Don't miss out on all the action this week at DraftKings! Download the DraftKings Sportsbook app today! Sign-up using https://draftkings.com/sportsbook or through my promo code JOMBOY Head to https://winreality.com/slab to sign up today! Head to https://order.bareburger.com to find yourself at the best happy hour, tastiest burger joint, and overall great spot! 00:00 INTRO 02:38 The Opener 07:34 Spencer Strider injury 11:35 Dodgers 18:20 Luis Castillo's $110M extension 20:38 Emotions on the mound 25:08 Triston McKenzie interview 49:13 Interview recap + Guardians talk 52:12 This week in pitching history 55:48 Three up three down 59:00 OUTRO If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, crisis counseling and referral services can be accessed by calling 877-8-HOPENY/text HOPENY (467369) (NY) 1-800-GAMBLER (1-800-426-2537) (IL/IN/LA/MI/NJ/PA/WV/WY), 1-800-NEXT STEP (AZ), 1-800-522-4700 (CO/KS/NH), 888-789-7777/visit ccpg.org/chat (CT),

Various and Sundry Podcast
Episode 143 - OSU Stomps Wisky, The Puritans, and Bob Gibson

Various and Sundry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 47:24


Join the conversation as Matt and John talk about a wild football weekend, The puritans, and Bob Gibson.    0:00- Intro 3:15- sports 21:22- puritans 39:20- this day in sports 43:21- one thing Resources Gospel Coalition: https://www.thegospelcoalition.org/topics/puritans/ Joel Beeke, Puritan Reformed Spirituality: Historical, Experiential, and Practical Studies for the Whole of Life → https://www.amazon.com/Puritan-Reformed-Theology-Historical-Experiential/dp/1601788118/ref=sr_1_1?crid=1DBSOEPFP3R27&keywords=puritan+reformed+theology+beeke&qid=1664130310&sprefix=beeke+puritan+reformed%2Caps%2C425&sr=8-1 J. I. Packer, The Quest for Godliness: The Puritan Vision for the Christian Life → https://www.amazon.com/Quest-Godliness-Puritan-Vision-Christian/dp/1433515814/ref=sr_1_1?crid=5SXCMQLXBXNT&keywords=a+quest+for+godliness+ji+packer&qid=1664130385&sprefix=packer+quest+for+%2Caps%2C199&sr=8-1 Joel Beeke, A Puritan Theology: Doctrine for Life → https://www.amazon.com/Puritan-Theology-Doctrine-Life/dp/1601781660/ref=sr_1_1?crid=PC8X4I4LN7OE&keywords=beeke+puritan+theology&qid=1664130563&sprefix=beeke+purtian+t%2Caps%2C129&sr=8-1&ufe=app_do%3Aamzn1.fos.08f69ac3-fd3d-4b88-bca2-8997e41410bb Joel Beeke and Randall J. Pederson, Meet the Puritans: With a Guide to Modern Reprints → https://www.amazon.com/Meet-Puritans-Guide-Modern-Reprints/dp/1601780001/ref=sr_1_1?crid=D2XYWRSJ2TD6&keywords=beeke+meet+the+puritans&qid=1664130703&sprefix=beeke+meet+the+puritans%2Caps%2C113&sr=8-1 Hot Protestants by Winship -- https://www.amazon.com/Hot-Protestants-History-Puritanism-England/dp/0300255004/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1664209572&sr=8-1&asin=030012628X&revisionId=&format=4&depth=1

A.V.’s Ripping Wax Packs
A.V.'s Ripping Wax Packs Podcast - Episode #82 - 1992 Donruss Triple Play - "This One is for the Kids!"

A.V.’s Ripping Wax Packs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 15:58


In this episode, A.V. bust a 1992 Donruss Triple Play pack and discusses it. The "Curt Facts" segment has special "throw back" player Bob Gibson this week and his stats are unreal! He also discusses a couple of football players from last week's football pack that was ripped. Check it out!email: rippingwaxpacks@gmail.comtwitter: @rippingwaxpacksFacebook: Ripping Wax PacksYouTube: A.V.'s Ripping Wax PacksClick on the the link below and sign up for a paid Buzzsprout plan and get a $20 Amazon gift card! https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=1660801

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 153: “Heroes and Villains” by the Beach Boys

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022


Episode one hundred and fifty-three of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “Heroes and Villains” by the Beach Boys, and the collapse of the Smile album. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a sixteen-minute bonus episode available, on "I Had Too Much to Dream Last Night" by the Electric Prunes. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources There is no Mixcloud this week, because there were too many Beach Boys songs in the episode. I used many resources for this episode. As well as the books I referred to in all the Beach Boys episodes, listed below, I used Domenic Priore's book Smile: The Story of Brian Wilson's Lost Masterpiece and Richard Henderson's 33 1/3 book on Van Dyke Parks' Song Cycle. Stephen McParland has published many, many books on the California surf and hot-rod music scenes, including several on both the Beach Boys and Gary Usher.  His books can be found at https://payhip.com/CMusicBooks Andrew Doe's Bellagio 10452 site is an invaluable resource. Jon Stebbins' The Beach Boys FAQ is a good balance between accuracy and readability. And Philip Lambert's Inside the Music of Brian Wilson is an excellent, though sadly out of print, musicological analysis of Wilson's music from 1962 through 67. Catch a Wave: The Rise, Fall, and Redemption of the Beach Boys' Brian Wilson by Peter Ames Carlin is the best biography of Wilson. I have also referred to Brian Wilson's autobiography, I Am Brian Wilson, and to Mike Love's, Good Vibrations: My Life as a Beach Boy. As a good starting point for the Beach Boys' music in general, I would recommend this budget-priced three-CD set, which has a surprisingly good selection of their material on it, including the single version of “Heroes and Villains”. The box set The Smile Sessions  contains an attempt to create a finished album from the unfinished sessions, plus several CDs of outtakes and session material. Transcript [Opening -- "intro to the album" studio chatter into "Our Prayer"] Before I start, I'd just like to note that this episode contains some discussion of mental illness, including historical negative attitudes towards it, so you may want to check the transcript or skip this one if that might be upsetting. In November and December 1966, the filmmaker David Oppenheim and the conductor and composer Leonard Bernstein collaborated on a TV film called "Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution".  The film was an early attempt at some of the kinds of things this podcast is doing, looking at how music and social events interact and evolve, though it was dealing with its present rather than the past. The film tried to cast as wide a net as possible in its fifty-one minutes. It looked at two bands from Manchester -- the Hollies and Herman's Hermits -- and how the people identified as their leaders, "Herman" (or Peter Noone) and Graham Nash, differed on the issue of preventing war: [Excerpt: Inside Pop, the Rock Revolution] And it made a star of East Coast teenage singer-songwriter Janis Ian with her song about interracial relationships, "Society's Child": [Excerpt: Janis Ian, "Society's Child"] And Bernstein spends a significant time, as one would expect, analysing the music of the Beatles and to a lesser extent the Stones, though they don't appear in the show. Bernstein does a lot to legitimise the music just by taking it seriously as a subject for analysis, at a time when most wouldn't: [Excerpt: Leonard Bernstein talking about "She Said She Said"] You can't see it, obviously, but in the clip that's from, as the Beatles recording is playing, Bernstein is conducting along with the music, as he would a symphony orchestra, showing where the beats are falling. But of course, given that this was filmed in the last two months of 1966, the vast majority of the episode is taken up with musicians from the centre of the music world at that time, LA. The film starts with Bernstein interviewing Tandyn Almer,  a jazz-influenced songwriter who had recently written the big hit "Along Comes Mary" for The Association: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] It featured interviews with Roger McGuinn, and with the protestors at the Sunset Strip riots which were happening contemporaneously with the filming: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] Along with Frank Zappa's rather acerbic assessment of the potential of the youth revolutionaries: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] And ended (other than a brief post-commercial performance over the credits by the Hollies) with a performance by Tim Buckley, whose debut album, as we heard in the last episode, had featured Van Dyke Parks and future members of the Mothers of Invention and Buffalo Springfield: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] But for many people the highlight of the film was the performance that came right before Buckley's, film of Brian Wilson playing a new song from the album he was working on. One thing I should note -- many sources say that the voiceover here is Bernstein. My understanding is that Bernstein wrote and narrated the parts of the film he was himself in, and Oppenheim did all the other voiceover writing and narration, but that Oppenheim's voice is similar enough to Bernstein's that people got confused about this: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] That particular piece of footage was filmed in December 1966, but it wasn't broadcast until April the twenty-fifth, 1967, an eternity in mid-sixties popular music. When it was broadcast, that album still hadn't come out. Precisely one week later, the Beach Boys' publicist Derek Taylor announced that it never would: [Excerpt: Brian Wilson, "Surf's Up"] One name who has showed up in a handful of episodes recently, but who we've not talked that much about, is Van Dyke Parks. And in a story with many, many, remarkable figures, Van Dyke Parks may be one of the most remarkable of all. Long before he did anything that impinges on the story of rock music, Parks had lived the kind of life that would be considered unbelievable were it to be told as fiction. Parks came from a family that mixed musical skill, political progressiveness, and achievement. His mother was a scholar of Hebrew, while his father was a neurologist, the first doctor to admit Black patients to a white Southern hospital, and had paid his way through college leading a dance band. Parks' father was also, according to the 33 1/3 book on Song Cycle, a member of "John Philip Sousa's Sixty Silver Trumpets", but literally every reference I can find to Sousa leading a band of that name goes back to that book, so I've no idea what he was actually a member of, but we can presume he was a reasonable musician. Young Van Dyke started playing the clarinet at four, and was also a singer from a very early age, as well as playing several other instruments. He went to the American Boychoir School in Princeton, to study singing, and while there he sang with Toscaninni, Thomas Beecham, and other immensely important conductors of the era. He also had a very special accompanist for one Christmas carolling session. The choir school was based in Princeton, and one of the doors he knocked on while carolling was that of Princeton's most famous resident, Albert Einstein, who heard the young boy singing "Silent Night", and came out with his violin and played along. Young Van Dyke was only interested in music, but he was also paying the bills for his music tuition himself -- he had a job. He was a TV star. From the age of ten, he started getting roles in TV shows -- he played the youngest son in the 1953 sitcom Bonino, about an opera singer, which flopped because it aired opposite the extremely popular Jackie Gleason Show. He would later also appear in that show, as one of several child actors who played the character of Little Tommy Manicotti, and he made a number of other TV appearances, as well as having a small role in Grace Kelly's last film, The Swan, with Alec Guinness and Louis Jourdain. But he never liked acting, and just did it to pay for his education. He gave it up when he moved on to the Carnegie Institute, where he majored in composition and performance. But then in his second year, his big brother Carson asked him to drop out and move to California. Carson Parks had been part of the folk scene in California for a few years at this point. He and a friend had formed a duo called the Steeltown Two, but then both of them had joined the folk group the Easy Riders, a group led by Terry Gilkyson. Before Carson Parks joined, the Easy Riders had had a big hit with their version of "Marianne", a calypso originally by the great calypsonian Roaring Lion: [Excerpt: The Easy Riders, "Marianne"] They hadn't had many other hits, but their songs became hits for other people -- Gilkyson wrote several big hits for Frankie Laine, and the Easy Riders were the backing vocalists on Dean Martin's recording of a song they wrote, "Memories are Made of This": [Excerpt: Dean Martin and the Easy Riders, "Memories are Made of This"] Carson Parks hadn't been in the group at that point -- he only joined after they'd stopped having success -- and eventually the group had split up. He wanted to revive his old duo, the Steeltown Two, and persuaded his family to let his little brother Van Dyke drop out of university and move to California to be the other half of the duo. He wanted Van Dyke to play guitar, while he played banjo. Van Dyke had never actually played guitar before, but as Carson Parks later said "in 90 days, he knew more than most folks know after many years!" Van Dyke moved into an apartment adjoining his brother's, owned by Norm Botnick, who had until recently been the principal viola player in a film studio orchestra, before the film studios all simultaneously dumped their in-house orchestras in the late fifties, so was a more understanding landlord than most when it came to the lifestyles of musicians. Botnick's sons, Doug and Bruce, later went into sound engineering -- we've already encountered Bruce Botnick in the episode on the Doors, and he will be coming up again in the future. The new Steeltown Two didn't make any records, but they developed a bit of a following in the coffeehouses, and they also got a fair bit of session work, mostly through Terry Gilkyson, who was by that point writing songs for Disney and would hire them to play on sessions for his songs. And it was Gilkyson who both brought Van Dyke Parks the worst news of his life to that point, and in doing so also had him make his first major mark on music. Gilkyson was the one who informed Van Dyke that another of his brothers, Benjamin Riley Parks, had died in what was apparently a car accident. I say it was apparently an accident because Benjamin Riley Parks was at the time working for the US State Department, and there is apparently also some evidence that he was assassinated in a Cold War plot. Gilkyson also knew that neither Van Dyke nor Carson Parks had much money, so in order to help them afford black suits and plane tickets to and from the funeral, Gilkyson hired Van Dyke to write the arrangement for a song he had written for an upcoming Disney film: [Excerpt: Jungle Book soundtrack, "The Bare Necessities"] The Steeltown Two continued performing, and soon became known as the Steeltown Three, with the addition of a singer named Pat Peyton. The Steeltown Three recorded two singles, "Rock Mountain", under that group name: [Excerpt: The Steeltown Three, "Rock Mountain"] And a version of "San Francisco Bay" under the name The South Coasters, which I've been unable to track down. Then the three of them, with the help of Terry Gilkyson, formed a larger group in the style of the New Christy Minstrels -- the Greenwood County Singers. Indeed, Carson Parks would later claim that  Gilkyson had had the idea first -- that he'd mentioned that he'd wanted to put together a group like that to Randy Sparks, and Sparks had taken the idea and done it first. The Greenwood County Singers had two minor hot one hundred hits, only one of them while Van Dyke was in the band -- "The New 'Frankie and Johnny' Song", a rewrite by Bob Gibson and Shel Silverstein of the old traditional song "Frankie and Johnny": [Excerpt: The Greenwood County Singers, "The New Frankie and Johnny Song"] They also recorded several albums together, which gave Van Dyke the opportunity to practice his arrangement skills, as on this version of  "Vera Cruz" which he arranged: [Excerpt: The Greenwood County Singers, "Vera Cruz"] Some time before their last album, in 1965, Van Dyke left the Greenwood County Singers, and was replaced by Rick Jarrard, who we'll also be hearing more about in future episodes. After that album, the group split up, but Carson Parks would go on to write two big hits in the next few years. The first and biggest was a song he originally wrote for a side project. His future wife Gaile Foote was also a Greenwood County Singer, and the two of them thought they might become folk's answer to Sonny and Cher or Nino Tempo and April Stevens: [Excerpt: Carson and Gaile, "Somethin' Stupid"] That obviously became a standard after it was covered by Frank and Nancy Sinatra. Carson Parks also wrote "Cab Driver", which in 1968 became the last top thirty hit for the Mills Brothers, the 1930s vocal group we talked about way way back in episode six: [Excerpt: The Mills Brothers, "Cab Driver"] Meanwhile Van Dyke Parks was becoming part of the Sunset Strip rock and roll world. Now, until we get to 1967, Parks has something of a tangled timeline. He worked with almost every band around LA in a short period, often working with multiple people simultaneously, and nobody was very interested in keeping detailed notes. So I'm going to tell this as a linear story, but be aware it's very much not -- things I say in five minutes might happen after, or in the same week as, things I say in half an hour. At some point in either 1965 or 1966 he joined the Mothers of Invention for a brief while. Nobody is entirely sure when this was, and whether it was before or after their first album. Some say it was in late 1965, others in August 1966, and even the kind of fans who put together detailed timelines are none the wiser, because no recordings have so far surfaced of Parks with the band. Either is plausible, and the Mothers went through a variety of keyboard players at this time -- Zappa had turned to his jazz friend Don Preston, but found Preston was too much of a jazzer and told him to come back when he could play "Louie Louie" convincingly, asked Mac Rebennack to be in the band but sacked him pretty much straight away for drug use, and eventually turned to Preston again once Preston had learned to rock and roll. Some time in that period, Van Dyke Parks was a Mother, playing electric harpsichord. He may even have had more than one stint in the group -- Zappa said "Van Dyke Parks played electric harpsichord in and out." It seems likely, though, that it was in summer of 1966, because in an interview published in Teen Beat Magazine in December 66, but presumably conducted a few months prior, Zappa was asked to describe the band members in one word each and replied: "Ray—Mahogany Roy—Asbestos Jim—Mucilage Del—Acetate Van Dyke—Pinocchio Billy—Boom I don't know about the rest of the group—I don't even know about these guys." Sources differ as to why Parks didn't remain in the band -- Parks has said that he quit after a short time because he didn't like being shouted at, while Zappa said "Van Dyke was not a reliable player. He didn't make it to rehearsal on time and things like that." Both may be true of course, though I've not heard anyone else ever criticise Parks for his reliability. But then also Zappa had much more disciplinarian standards than most rock band leaders. It's possibly either through Zappa that he met Tom Wilson, or through Tom Wilson that he met Frank Zappa, but either way Parks, like the Mothers of Invention, was signed to MGM records in 1966, where he released two solo singles co-produced by Wilson and an otherwise obscure figure named Tim Alvorado. The first was "Number Nine", which we heard last week, backed with "Do What You Wanta": [Excerpt: Van Dyke Parks, "Do What You Wanta"] At least one source I've read says that the lyrics to "Do What You Wanta" were written not by Parks but by his friend Danny Hutton, but it's credited as a Parks solo composition on the label. It was after that that the Van Dyke Parks band -- or as they were sometimes billed, just The Van Dyke Parks formed, as we discussed last episode, based around Parks, Steve Stills, and Steve Young, and they performed a handful of shows with bass player Bobby Rae and drummer Walt Sparman, playing a mix of original material, primarily Parks' songs, and covers of things like "Dancing in the Street". The one contemporaneous review of a live show I've seen talks about  the girls in the audience screaming and how "When rhythm guitarist Steve Stillman imitated the Barry McGuire emotional scene, they almost went wiggy". But The Van Dyke Parks soon split up, and Parks the individual recorded his second single, "Come to the Sunshine": [Excerpt: Van Dyke Parks, "Come to the Sunshine"] Around the time he left the Greenwood County Singers, Van Dyke Parks also met Brian Wilson for the first time, when David Crosby took him up to Wilson's house to hear an acetate of the as-yet-unreleased track "Sloop John B". Parks was impressed by Wilson's arrangement techniques, and in particular the way he was orchestrating instrumental combinations that you couldn't do with a standard live room setup, that required overdubbing and close-micing. He said later "The first stuff I heard indicated this kind of curiosity for the recording experience, and when I went up to see him in '65 I don't even think he had the voices on yet, but I heard that long rotational breathing, that long flute ostinato at the beginning... I knew this man was a great musician." [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Sloop John B (instrumental)"] In most of 1966, though, Parks was making his living as a session keyboard player and arranger, and much of the work he was getting was through Lenny Waronker. Waronker was a second-generation music industry professional. His father, Si Waronker, had been a violinist in the Twentieth Century Fox studio orchestra before founding Liberty Records (the label which indirectly led to him becoming immortalised in children's entertainment, when Liberty Records star David Seville named his Chipmunk characters after three Liberty executives, with Simon being Si Waronker's full forename). The first release on Liberty Records had been a version of "The Girl Upstairs", an instrumental piece from the Fox film The Seven-Year Itch. The original recording of that track, for the film, had been done by the Twentieth Century Fox Orchestra, written and conducted by Alfred Newman, the musical director for Fox: [Excerpt: Alfred Newman, "The Girl Upstairs"] Liberty's soundalike version was conducted by Newman's brother Lionel, a pianist at the studio who later became Fox's musical director for TV, just as his brother was for film, but who also wrote many film scores himself. Another Newman brother, Emil, was also a film composer, but the fourth brother, Irving, had gone into medicine instead. However, Irving's son Randy wanted to follow in the family business, and he and Lenny Waronker, who was similarly following his own father by working for Liberty Records' publishing subsidiary Metric Music, had been very close friends ever since High School. Waronker got Newman signed to Metric Music, where he wrote "They Tell Me It's Summer" for the Fleetwoods: [Excerpt: The Fleetwoods, "They Tell Me It's Summer"] Newman also wrote and recorded a single of his own in 1962, co-produced by Pat Boone: [Excerpt: Randy Newman, "Golden Gridiron Boy"] Before deciding he wasn't going to make it as a singer and had better just be a professional songwriter. But by 1966 Waronker had moved on from Metric to Warner Brothers, and become a junior A&R man. And he was put in charge of developing the artists that Warners had acquired when they had bought up a small label, Autumn Records. Autumn Records was a San Francisco-based label whose main producer, Sly Stone, had now moved on to other things after producing the hit record "Laugh Laugh" for the Beau Brummels: [Excerpt: The Beau Brummels, "Laugh Laugh"] The Beau Brummels  had had another hit after that and were the main reason that Warners had bought the label, but their star was fading a little. Stone had also been mentoring several other groups, including the Tikis and the Mojo Men, who all had potential. Waronker gathered around himself a sort of brains trust of musicians who he trusted as songwriters, arrangers, and pianists -- Randy Newman, the session pianist Leon Russell, and Van Dyke Parks. Their job was to revitalise the career of the Beau Brummels, and to make both the Tikis and the Mojo Men into successes. The tactic they chose was, in Waronker's words, “Go in with a good song and weird it out.” The first good song they tried weirding out was in late 1966, when Leon Russell came up with a clarinet-led arrangement of Paul Simon's "59th Street Bridge Song (Feeling Groovy)" for the Tikis, who performed it but who thought that their existing fanbase wouldn't accept something so different, so it was put out under another name, suggested by Parks, Harpers Bizarre: [Excerpt: Harpers Bizarre, "Feeling Groovy"] Waronker said of Parks and Newman “They weren't old school guys. They were modern characters but they had old school values regarding certain records that needed to be made, certain artists who needed to be heard regardless. So there was still that going on. The fact that ‘Feeling Groovy' was a number 10 hit nationwide and ‘Sit Down, I Think I Love You'  made the Top 30 on Western regional radio, that gave us credibility within the company. One hit will do wonders, two allows you to take chances.” We heard "Sit Down, I Think I Love You" last episode -- that's the song by Parks' old friend Stephen Stills that Parks arranged for the Mojo Men: [Excerpt: The Mojo Men, "Sit Down, I Think I Love You"] During 1966 Parks also played on Tim Buckley's first album, as we also heard last episode: [Excerpt: Tim Buckley, "Aren't You the Girl?"] And he also bumped into Brian Wilson on occasion, as they were working a lot in the same studios and had mutual friends like Loren Daro and Danny Hutton, and he suggested the cello part on "Good Vibrations". Parks also played keyboards on "5D" by the Byrds: [Excerpt: The Byrds, "5D (Fifth Dimension)"] And on the Spirit of '67 album for Paul Revere and the Raiders, produced by the Byrds' old producer Terry Melcher. Parks played keyboards on much of the album, including the top five hit "Good Thing": [Excerpt: Paul Revere and the Raiders, "Good Thing"] But while all this was going on, Parks was also working on what would become the work for which he was best known. As I've said, he'd met Brian Wilson on a few occasions, but it wasn't until summer 1966 that the two were formally introduced by Terry Melcher, who knew that Wilson needed a new songwriting collaborator, now Tony Asher's sabbatical from his advertising job was coming to an end, and that Wilson wanted someone who could do work that was a bit more abstract than the emotional material that he had been writing with Asher. Melcher invited both of them to a party at his house on Cielo Drive -- a house which would a few years later become notorious -- which was also attended by many of the young Hollywood set of the time. Nobody can remember exactly who was at the party, but Parks thinks it was people like Jack Nicholson and Peter and Jane Fonda. Parks and Wilson hit it off, with Wilson saying later "He seemed like a really articulate guy, like he could write some good lyrics". Parks on the other hand was delighted to find that Wilson "liked Les Paul, Spike Jones, all of these sounds that I liked, and he was doing it in a proactive way." Brian suggested Parks write the finished lyrics for "Good Vibrations", which was still being recorded at this time, and still only had Tony Asher's dummy lyrics,  but Parks was uninterested. He said that it would be best if he and Brian collaborate together on something new from scratch, and Brian agreed. The first time Parks came to visit Brian at Brian's home, other than the visit accompanying Crosby the year before, he was riding a motorbike -- he couldn't afford a car -- and forgot to bring his driver's license with him. He was stopped by a police officer who thought he looked too poor to be in the area, but Parks persuaded the police officer that if he came to the door, Brian Wilson would vouch for him. Brian got Van Dyke out of any trouble because the cop's sister was a Beach Boys fan, so he autographed an album for her. Brian and Van Dyke talked for a while. Brian asked if Van Dyke needed anything to help his work go smoothly, and Van Dyke said he needed a car. Brian asked what kind. Van Dyke said that Volvos were supposed to be pretty safe. Brian asked how much they cost. Van Dyke said he thought they were about five thousand dollars. Brian called up his office and told them to get a cheque delivered to Van Dyke for five thousand dollars the next day, instantly earning Van Dyke's loyalty. After that, they got on with work. To start with, Brian played Van Dyke a melody he'd been working on, a melody based on a descending scale starting on the fourth: [Plays "Heroes and Villains" melody] Parks told Wilson that the melody reminded him vaguely of Marty Robbins' country hit "El Paso" from 1959, a song about a gunfighter, a cantina, and a dancing woman: [Excerpt: Marty Robbins, "El Paso"] Wilson said that he had been thinking along the same lines, a sort of old west story, and thought maybe it should be called "Heroes and Villains". Parks started writing, matching syllables to Wilson's pre-conceived melody -- "I've been in this town so long that back in the city I've been taken for lost and gone and unknown for a long, long time" [Excerpt: Brian Wilson and Van Dyke Parks, "Heroes and Villains demo"] As Parks put it "The engine had started. It was very much ad hoc. Seat of the pants. Extemporaneous values were enforced. Not too much precommitment to ideas. Or, if so, equally pursuing propinquity." Slowly, over the next several months, while the five other Beach Boys were touring, Brian and Van Dyke refined their ideas about what the album they were writing, initially called Dumb Angel but soon retitled Smile, should be. For Van Dyke Parks it was an attempt to make music about America and American mythology. He was disgusted, as a patriot, with the Anglophilia that had swept the music industry since the arrival of the Beatles in America two and a half years earlier, particularly since that had happened so soon after the deaths both of President Kennedy and of Parks' own brother who was working for the government at the time he died. So for him, the album was about America, about Plymouth Rock, the Old West, California, and Hawaii. It would be a generally positive version of the country's myth, though it would of course also acknowledge the bloodshed on which the country had been built: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Bicycle Rider" section] As he put it later "I was dead set on centering my life on the patriotic ideal. I was a son of the American revolution, and there was blood on the tracks. Recent blood, and it was still drying. The whole record seemed like a real effort toward figuring out what Manifest Destiny was all about. We'd come as far as we could, as far as Horace Greeley told us to go. And so we looked back and tried to make sense of that great odyssey." Brian had some other ideas -- he had been studying the I Ching, and Subud, and he wanted to do something about the four classical elements, and something religious -- his ideas were generally rather unfocused at the time, and he had far more ideas than he knew what to usefully do with. But he was also happy with the idea of a piece about America, which fit in with his own interest in "Rhapsody in Blue", a piece that was about America in much the same way. "Rhapsody in Blue" was an inspiration for Brian primarily in how it weaved together variations on themes. And there are two themes that between them Brian was finding endless variations on. The first theme was a shuffling between two chords a fourth away from each other. [demonstrates G to C on guitar] Where these chords are both major, that's the sequence for "Fire": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Mrs. O'Leary's Cow/Fire"] For the "Who ran the Iron Horse?" section of "Cabin Essence": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Cabinessence"] For "Vegetables": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Vegetables"] And more. Sometimes this would be the minor supertonic and dominant seventh of the key, so in C that would be Dm to G7: [Plays Dm to G7 fingerpicked] That's the "bicycle rider" chorus we heard earlier, which was part of a song known as "Roll Plymouth Rock" or "Do You Like Worms": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Bicycle Rider"] But which later became a chorus for "Heroes and Villains": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains"] But that same sequence is also the beginning of "Wind Chimes": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Wind Chimes"] The "wahalla loo lay" section of "Roll Plymouth Rock": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Roll Plymouth Rock"] And others, but most interestingly, the minor-key rearrangement of "You Are My Sunshine" as "You Were My Sunshine": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "You Were My Sunshine"] I say that's most interesting, because that provides a link to another of the major themes which Brian was wringing every drop out of, a phrase known as "How Dry I Am", because of its use under those words in an Irving Berlin song, which was a popular barbershop quartet song but is now best known as a signifier of drunkenness in Looney Tunes cartoons: [Excerpt: Daffy Duck singing "How Dry I Am" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ap4MMn7LpzA ] The phrase is a common one in early twentieth century music, especially folk and country, as it's made up of notes in the pentatonic scale -- it's the fifth, first, second, and third of the scale, in that order: [demonstrates "How Dry I Am"] And so it's in the melody to "This Land is Your Land", for example, a song which is very much in the same spirit of progressive Americana in which Van Dyke Parks was thinking: [Excerpt: Woody Guthrie, "This Land is Your Land"] It's also the start of the original melody of "You Are My Sunshine": [Excerpt: Jimmie Davis, "You Are My Sunshine" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yYvgNEU4Am8] Brian rearranged that melody when he stuck it into a minor key, so it's no longer "How Dry I Am" in the Beach Boys version, but if you play the "How Dry I Am" notes in a different rhythm, you get this: [Plays "He Gives Speeches" melody] Which is the start of the melody to "He Gives Speeches": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "He Gives Speeches"] Play those notes backwards, you get: [Plays "He Gives Speeches" melody backwards] Do that and add onto the end a passing sixth and then the tonic, and then you get: [Plays that] Which is the vocal *countermelody* in "He Gives Speeches": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "He Gives Speeches"] And also turns up in some versions of "Heroes and Villains": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains (alternate version)"] And so on. Smile was an intricate web of themes and variations, and it incorporated motifs from many sources, both the great American songbook and the R&B of Brian's youth spent listening to Johnny Otis' radio show. There were bits of "Gee" by the Crows, of "Twelfth Street Rag", and of course, given that this was Brian Wilson, bits of Phil Spector. The backing track to the verse of "Heroes and Villains": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains"] Owed more than a little to a version of "Save the Last Dance For Me" that Spector had produced for Ike and Tina Turner: [Excerpt: Ike and Tina Turner, "Save the Last Dance For Me"] While one version of the song “Wonderful” contained a rather out-of-place homage to Etta James and “The Wallflower”: [Excerpt: “Wonderful (Rock With Me Henry)”] As the recording continued, it became more and more obvious that the combination of these themes and variations was becoming a little too much for Brian.  Many of the songs he was working on were made up of individual modules that he was planning to splice together the way he had with "Good Vibrations", and some modules were getting moved between tracks, as he tried to structure the songs in the edit. He'd managed it with "Good Vibrations", but this was an entire album, not just a single, and it was becoming more and more difficult. David Anderle, who was heading up the record label the group were looking at starting, would talk about Brian playing him acetates with sections edited together one way, and thinking it was perfect, and obviously the correct way to put them together, the only possible way, and then hearing the same sections edited together in a different way, and thinking *that* was perfect, and obviously the correct way to put them together. But while a lot of the album was modular, there were also several complete songs with beginnings, middles, ends, and structures, even if they were in several movements. And those songs showed that if Brian could just get the other stuff right, the album could be very, very, special. There was "Heroes and Villains" itself, of course, which kept changing its structure but was still based around the same basic melody and story that Brian and Van Dyke had come up with on their first day working together. There was also "Wonderful", a beautiful, allusive, song about innocence lost and regained: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Wonderful"] And there was CabinEssence, a song which referenced yet another classic song, this time "Home on the Range", to tell a story of idyllic rural life and of the industrialisation which came with westward expansion: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "CabinEssence"] The arrangement for that song inspired Van Dyke Parks to make a very astute assessment of Brian Wilson. He said later "He knew that he had to adhere to the counter-culture, and I knew that I had to. I think that he was about as estranged from it as I was.... At the same time, he didn't want to lose that kind of gauche sensibility that he had. He was doing stuff that nobody would dream of doing. You would never, for example, use one string on a banjo when you had five; it just wasn't done. But when I asked him to bring a banjo in, that's what he did. This old-style plectrum thing. One string. That's gauche." Both Parks and Wilson were both drawn to and alienated from the counterculture, but in very different ways, and their different ways of relating to the counterculture created the creative tension that makes the Smile project so interesting. Parks is fundamentally a New Deal Liberal, and was excited by the progresssive nature of the counterculture, but also rather worried about its tendency to throw the baby out with the bathwater, and to ignore the old in pursuit of the new. He was an erudite, cultured, sophisticated man who thought that there was value to be found in the works and attitudes of the past, even as one must look to the future. He was influenced by the beat poets and the avant garde art of the time, but also said of his folk music period "A harpist would bring his harp with him and he would play and recite a story which had been passed down the generations. This particular legacy continued through Arthurian legend, and then through the Middle Ages, and even into the nineteenth century. With all these songs, half of the story was the lyrics, and the folk songs were very interesting. They were tremendously thought-driven songs; there was nothing confusing about that. Even when the Kingston Trio came out -- and Brian has already admitted his debt to the Kingston Trio -- 'Tom Dooley', the story of a murder most foul 'MTA' an urban nightmare -- all of this thought-driven music was perfectly acceptable.  It was more than a teenage romantic crisis." Brian Wilson, on the other hand, was anything *but* sophisticated. He is a simple man in the best sense of the term -- he likes what he likes, doesn't like what he doesn't like, and has no pretensions whatsoever about it. He is, at heart, a middle-class middle-American brought up in suburbia, with a taste for steaks and hamburgers, broad physical comedy, baseball, and easy listening music. Where Van Dyke Parks was talking about "thought-driven music", Wilson's music, while thoughtful, has always been driven by feelings first and foremost. Where Parks is influenced by Romantic composers like Gottschalk but is fundamentally a craftsman, a traditionalist, a mason adding his work to a cathedral whose construction started before his birth and will continue after his death, Wilson's music has none of the stylistic hallmarks of Romantic music, but in its inspiration it is absolutely Romantic -- it is the immediate emotional expression of the individual, completely unfiltered. When writing his own lyrics in later years Wilson would come up with everything from almost haiku-like lyrics like "I'm a leaf on a windy day/pretty soon I'll be blown away/How long with the wind blow?/Until I die" to "He sits behind his microphone/Johnny Carson/He speaks in such a manly tone/Johnny Carson", depending on whether at the time his prime concern was existential meaninglessness or what was on the TV. Wilson found the new counterculture exciting, but was also very aware he didn't fit in. He was developing a new group of friends, the hippest of the hip in LA counterculture circles -- the singer Danny Hutton, Mark Volman of the Turtles, the writers Michael Vosse and Jules Siegel, scenester and record executive David Anderle -- but there was always the underlying implication that at least some of these people regarded him as, to use an ableist term but one which they would probably have used, an idiot savant. That they thought of him, as his former collaborator Tony Asher would later uncharitably put it, as "a genius musician but an amateur human being". So for example when Siegel brought the great postmodern novelist Thomas Pynchon to visit Brian, both men largely sat in silence, unable to speak to each other; Pynchon because he tended to be a reactive person in conversation and would wait for the other person to initiate topics of discussion, Brian because he was so intimidated by Pynchon's reputation as a great East Coast intellectual that he was largely silent for fear of making a fool of himself. It was this gaucheness, as Parks eventually put it, and Parks' understanding that this was actually a quality to be cherished and the key to Wilson's art, that eventually gave the title to the most ambitious of the complete songs the duo were working on. They had most of the song -- a song about the power of music, the concept of enlightenment, and the rise and fall of civilisations: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Surf's Up"] But Parks hadn't yet quite finished the lyric. The Beach Boys had been off on tour for much of Brian and Van Dyke's collaboration, and had just got back from their first real tour of the UK, where Pet Sounds had been a smash hit, rather than the middling success it had been in the US, and "Good Vibrations" had just become their first number one single. Brian and Van Dyke played the song for Brian's brother Dennis, the Beach Boys' drummer, and the band member most in tune with Brian's musical ambitions at this time. Dennis started crying, and started talking about how the British audiences had loved their music, but had laughed at their on-stage striped-shirt uniforms. Parks couldn't tell if he was crying because of the beauty of the unfinished song, the humiliation he had suffered in Britain, or both. Dennis then asked what the name of the song was, and as Parks later put it "Although it was the most gauche factor, and although maybe Brian thought it was the most dispensable thing, I thought it was very important to continue to use the name and keep the elephant in the room -- to keep the surfing image but to sensitise it to new opportunities. One of these would be an eco-consciousness; it would be speaking about the greening of the Earth, aboriginal people, how we had treated the Indians, taking on those things and putting them into the thoughts that come with the music. That was a solution to the relevance of the group, and I wanted the group to be relevant." Van Dyke had decided on a title: "Surf's Up": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Surf's Up"] As the group were now back from their tour, the focus for recording shifted from the instrumental sessions to vocal ones. Parks had often attended the instrumental sessions, as he was an accomplished musician and arranger himself, and would play on the sessions, but also wanted to learn from what Brian was doing -- he's stated later that some of his use of tuned percussion in the decades since, for example, has come from watching Brian's work. But while he was also a good singer, he was not a singer in the same style as the Beach Boys, and they certainly didn't need his presence at those sessions, so he continued to work on his lyrics, and to do his arrangement and session work for other artists, while they worked in the studio. He was also, though, starting to distance himself from Brian for other reasons. At the start of the summer, Brian's eccentricity and whimsy had seemed harmless -- indeed, the kind of thing he was doing, such as putting his piano in a sandbox so he could feel the sand with his feet while he wrote, seems very much on a par with Maureen Cleave's descriptions of John Lennon in the same period. They were two newly-rich, easily bored, young men with low attention spans and high intelligence who could become deeply depressed when understimulated and so would get new ideas into their heads, spend money on their new fads, and then quickly discard them. But as the summer wore on into autumn and winter, Brian's behaviour became more bizarre, and to Parks' eyes more distasteful. We now know that Brian was suffering a period of increasing mental ill-health, something that was probably not helped by the copious intake of cannabis and amphetamines he was using to spur his creativity, but at the time most people around him didn't realise this, and general knowledge of mental illness was even less than it is today. Brian was starting to do things like insist on holding business meetings in his swimming pool, partly because people wouldn't be able to spy on him, and partly because he thought people would be more honest if they were in the water. There were also events like the recording session where Wilson paid for several session musicians, not to play their instruments, but to be recorded while they sat in a pitch-black room and played the party game Lifeboat with Jules Siegel and several of Wilson's friends, most of whom were stoned and not really understanding what they were doing, while they got angrier and more frustrated. Alan Jardine -- who unlike the Wilson brothers, and even Mike Love to an extent, never indulged in illegal drugs -- has talked about not understanding why, in some vocal sessions, Brian would make the group crawl on their hands and knees while making noises like animals: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains Part 3 (Animals)"] As Parks delicately put it "I sensed all that was destructive, so I withdrew from those related social encounters." What this meant though was that he was unaware that not all the Beach Boys took the same attitude of complete support for the work he and Brian had been doing that Dennis Wilson -- the only other group member he'd met at this point -- took. In particular, Mike Love was not a fan of Parks' lyrics. As he said later "I called it acid alliteration. The [lyrics are] far out. But do they relate like 'Surfin' USA,' like 'Fun Fun Fun,' like 'California Girls,' like 'I Get Around'? Perhaps not! So that's the distinction. See, I'm into success. These words equal successful hit records; those words don't" Now, Love has taken a lot of heat for this over the years, and on an artistic level that's completely understandable. Parks' lyrics were, to my mind at least, the best the Beach Boys ever had -- thoughtful, intelligent, moving, at times profound, often funny, often beautiful. But, while I profoundly disagree with Love, I have a certain amount of sympathy for his position. From Love's perspective, first and foremost, this is his source of income. He was the only one of the Beach Boys to ever have had a day job -- he'd worked at his father's sheet metal company -- and didn't particularly relish the idea of going back to manual labour if the rock star gig dried up. It wasn't that he was *opposed* to art, of course -- he'd written the lyrics to "Good Vibrations", possibly the most arty rock single released to that point, hadn't he? -- but that had been *commercial* art. It had sold. Was this stuff going to sell? Was he still going to be able to feed his wife and kids? Also, up until a few months earlier he had been Brian's principal songwriting collaborator. He was *still* the most commercially successful collaborator Brian had had. From his perspective, this was a partnership, and it was being turned into a dictatorship without him having been consulted. Before, it had been "Mike, can you write some lyrics for this song about cars?", now it was "Mike, you're going to sing these lyrics about a crow uncovering a cornfield". And not only that, but Mike had not met Brian's new collaborator, but knew he was hanging round with Brian's new druggie friends. And Brian was behaving increasingly weirdly, which Mike put down to the influence of the drugs and these new friends. It can't have helped that at the same time the group's publicist, Derek Taylor, was heavily pushing the line "Brian Wilson is a genius". This was causing Brian some distress -- he didn't think of himself as a genius, and he saw the label as a burden, something it was impossible to live up to -- but was also causing friction in the group, as it seemed that their contributions were being dismissed. Again, I don't agree with Mike's position on any of this, but it is understandable. It's also the case that Mike Love is, by nature, a very assertive and gregarious person, while Brian Wilson, for all that he took control in the studio, is incredibly conflict-avoidant and sensitive. From what I know of the two men's personalities, and from things they've said, and from the session recordings that have leaked over the years, it seems entirely likely that Love will have seen himself as having reasonable criticisms, and putting them to Brian clearly with a bit of teasing to take the sting out of them; while Brian will have seen Love as mercilessly attacking and ridiculing the work that meant so much to him in a cruel and hurtful manner, and that neither will have understood at the time that that was how the other was seeing things. Love's criticisms intensified. Not of everything -- he's several times expressed admiration for "Heroes and Villains" and "Wonderful" -- but in general he was not a fan of Parks' lyrics. And his criticisms seemed to start to affect Brian. It's difficult to say what Brian thinks about Parks' lyrics, because he has a habit in interviews of saying what he thinks the interviewer wants to hear, and the whole subject of Smile became a touchy one for him for a long time, so in some interviews he has talked about how dazzlingly brilliant they are, while at other times he's seemed to agree with Love, saying they were "Van Dyke Parks lyrics", not "Beach Boys lyrics". He may well sincerely think both at the same time, or have thought both at different times. This came to a head with a session for the tag of "Cabinessence": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Cabinessence"] Love insisted on having the line "over and over the crow flies uncover the cornfield" explained to him, and Brian eventually decided to call Van Dyke Parks and have him come to the studio. Up to this point, Parks had no idea that there was anything controversial, so when Brian phoned him up and very casually said that Mike had a few questions about the lyrics, could he come down to the studio? He went without a second thought. He later said "The only person I had had any interchange with before that was Dennis, who had responded very favorably to 'Heroes and Villains' and 'Surf's Up'. Based on that, I gathered that the work would be approved. But then, with no warning whatsoever, I got that phone call from Brian. And that's when the whole house of cards came tumbling down." Parks got to the studio, where he was confronted by an angry Mike Love, insisting he explain the lyrics. Now, as will be, I hope, clear from everything I've said, Parks and Love are very, very, *very* different people. Having met both men -- albeit only in formal fan-meeting situations where they're presenting their public face -- I actually find both men very likeable, but in very different ways. Love is gregarious, a charmer, the kind of man who would make a good salesman and who people use terms like "alpha male" about. He's tall, and has a casual confidence that can easily read as arrogance, and a straightforward sense of humour that can sometimes veer into the cruel. Parks, on the other hand, is small, meticulously well-mannered and well-spoken, has a high, precise, speaking voice which probably reads as effeminate to the kind of people who use terms like "alpha male", and the kind of devastating intelligence and Southern US attention to propriety which means that if he *wanted* to say something cruel about someone, the victim would believe themselves to have been complimented until a horrific realisation two days after the event. In every way, from their politics to their attitudes to art versus commerce to their mannerisms to their appearance, Mike Love and Van Dyke Parks are utterly different people, and were never going to mix well. And Brian Wilson, who was supposed to be the collaborator for both of them, was not mediating between them, not even expressing an opinion -- his own mental problems had reached the stage where he simply couldn't deal with the conflict. Parks felt ambushed and hurt, Love felt angry, especially when Parks could not explain the literal meaning of his lyrics. Eventually Parks just said "I have no excuse, sir", and left. Parks later said "That's when I lost interest. Because basically I was taught not to be where I wasn't wanted, and I could feel I wasn't wanted. It was like I had someone else's job, which was abhorrent to me, because I don't even want my own job. It was sad, so I decided to get away quick." Parks continued collaborating with Wilson, and continued attending instrumental sessions, but it was all wheelspinning -- no significant progress was made on any songs after that point, in early December. It was becoming clear that the album wasn't going to be ready for its planned Christmas release, and it was pushed back to January, but Brian's mental health was becoming worse and worse. One example that's often cited as giving an insight into Brian's mental state at the time is his reaction to going to the cinema to see John Frankenheimer's classic science fiction horror film Seconds. Brian came in late, and the way the story is always told, when he was sat down the screen was black and a voice said from the darkness, "Hello Mr. Wilson". That moment does not seem to correspond with anything in the actual film, but he probably came in around the twenty-four minute mark, where the main character walks down a corridor, filmed in a distorted, hallucinatory manner, to be greeted: [Excerpt: Seconds, 24:00] But as Brian watched the film, primed by this, he became distressed by a number of apparent similarities to his life. The main character was going through death and rebirth, just as he felt he was. Right after the moment I just excerpted, Mr. Wilson is shown a film, and of course Brian was himself watching a film. The character goes to the beach in California, just like Brian. The character has a breakdown on a plane, just like Brian, and has to take pills to cope, and the breakdown happens right after this: [Excerpt: Seconds, from about 44:22] A studio in California? Just like where Brian spent his working days? That kind of weird coincidence can be affecting enough in a work of art when one is relatively mentally stable, but Brian was not at all stable. By this point he was profoundly paranoid -- and he may have had good reason to be. Some of Brian's friends from this time period have insisted that Brian's semi-estranged abusive father and former manager, Murry, was having private detectives watch him and his brothers to find evidence that they were using drugs. If you're in the early stages of a severe mental illness *and* you're self-medicating with illegal drugs, *and* people are actually spying on you, then that kind of coincidence becomes a lot more distressing. Brian became convinced that the film was the work of mind gangsters, probably in the pay of Phil Spector, who were trying to drive him mad and were using telepathy to spy on him. He started to bar people who had until recently been his friends from coming to sessions -- he decided that Jules Siegel's girlfriend was a witch and so Siegel was no longer welcome -- and what had been a creative process in the studio degenerated into noodling and second-guessing himself. He also, with January having come and the album still not delivered, started doing side projects,  some of which, like his production of tracks for photographer Jasper Daily, seem evidence either of his bizarre sense of humour, or of his detachment from reality, or both: [Excerpt: Jasper Daily, "Teeter Totter Love"] As 1967 drew on, things got worse and worse. Brian was by this point concentrating on just one or two tracks, but endlessly reworking elements of them. He became convinced that the track "Fire" had caused some actual fires to break out in LA, and needed to be scrapped. The January deadline came and went with no sign of the album. To add to that, the group discovered that they were owed vast amounts of unpaid royalties by Capitol records, and legal action started which meant that even were the record to be finished it might become a pawn in the legal wrangling. Parks eventually became exasperated by Brian -- he said later "I was victimised by Brian Wilson's buffoonery" -- and he quit the project altogether in February after a row with Brian. He returned a couple of weeks later out of a sense of loyalty, but quit again in April. By April, he'd been working enough with Lenny Waronker that Waronker offered him a contract with Warner Brothers as a solo artist -- partly because Warners wanted some insight into Brian Wilson's techniques as a hit-making producer. To start with, Parks released a single, to dip a toe in the water, under the pseudonym "George Washington Brown". It was a largely-instrumental cover version of Donovan's song "Colours", which Parks chose because after seeing the film Don't Look Back, a documentary of Bob Dylan's 1965 British tour, he felt saddened at the way Dylan had treated Donovan: [Excerpt: George Washington Brown, "Donovan's Colours"] That was not a hit, but it got enough positive coverage, including an ecstatic review from Richard Goldstein in the Village Voice, that Parks was given carte blanche to create the album he wanted to create, with one of the largest budgets of any album released to that date. The result was a masterpiece, and very similar to the vision of Smile that Parks had had -- an album of clever, thoroughly American music which had more to do with Charles Ives than the British Invasion: [Excerpt: Van Dyke Parks, "The All Golden"] But Parks realised the album, titled Song Cycle, was doomed to failure when at a playback session, the head of Warner Brothers records said "Song Cycle? So where are the songs?" According to Parks, the album was only released because Jac Holzman of Elektra Records was also there, and took out his chequebook and said he'd release the album if Warners wouldn't, but it had little push, apart from some rather experimental magazine adverts which were, if anything, counterproductive. But Waronker recognised Parks' talent, and had even written into Parks' contract that Parks would be employed as a session player at scale on every session Waronker produced -- something that didn't actually happen, because Parks didn't insist on it, but which did mean Parks had a certain amount of job security. Over the next couple of years Parks and Waronker co-produced the first albums by two of their colleagues from Waronker's brains trust, with Parks arranging -- Randy Newman: [Excerpt: Randy Newman, "I Think It's Going to Rain Today"] And Ry Cooder: [Excerpt: Ry Cooder, "One Meat Ball"] Waronker would refer to himself, Parks, Cooder, and Newman as "the arts and crafts division" of Warners, and while these initial records weren't very successful, all of them would go on to bigger things. Parks would be a pioneer of music video, heading up Warners' music video department in the early seventies, and would also have a staggeringly varied career over the years, doing everything from teaming up again with the Beach Boys to play accordion on "Kokomo" to doing the string arrangements on Joanna Newsom's album Ys, collaborating with everyone from U2 to Skrillex,  discovering Rufus Wainwright, and even acting again, appearing in Twin Peaks. He also continued to make massively inventive solo albums, releasing roughly one every decade, each unique and yet all bearing the hallmarks of his idiosyncratic style. As you can imagine, he is very likely to come up again in future episodes, though we're leaving him for now. Meanwhile, the Beach Boys were floundering, and still had no album -- and now Parks was no longer working with Brian, the whole idea of Smile was scrapped. The priority was now to get a single done, and so work started on a new, finished, version of "Heroes and Villains", structured in a fairly conventional manner using elements of the Smile recordings. The group were suffering from numerous interlocking problems at this point, and everyone was stressed -- they were suing their record label, Dennis' wife had filed for divorce, Brian was having mental health problems, and Carl had been arrested for draft dodging -- though he was later able to mount a successful defence that he was a conscientious objector. Also, at some point around this time, Bruce Johnston seems to have temporarily quit the group, though this was never announced -- he doesn't seem to have been at any sessions from late May or early June through mid-September, and didn't attend the two shows they performed in that time. They were meant to have performed three shows, but even though Brian was on the board of the Monterey Pop Festival, they pulled out at the last minute, saying that they needed to deal with getting the new single finished and with Carl's draft problems. Some or all of these other issues almost certainly fed into that, but the end result was that the Beach Boys were seen to have admitted defeat, to have handed the crown of relevance off to the San Francisco groups. And even if Smile had been released, there were other releases stealing its thunder. If it had come out in December it would have been massively ahead of its time, but after the Beatles released Sgt Pepper it would have seemed like it was a cheap copy -- though Parks has always said he believes the Beatles heard some of the Smile tapes and copied elements of the recordings, though I don't hear much similarity myself. But I do hear a strong similarity in "My World Fell Down" by Sagittarius, which came out in June, and which was largely made by erstwhile collaborators of Brian -- Gary Usher produced, Glen Campbell sang lead, and Bruce Johnston sang backing vocals: [Excerpt: Sagittarius, "My World Fell Down"] Brian was very concerned after hearing that that someone *had* heard the Smile tapes, and one can understand why. When "Heroes and Villains" finally came out, it was a great single, but only made number twelve in the charts. It was fantastic, but out of step with the times, and nothing could have lived up to the hype that had built up around it: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains"] Instead of Smile, the group released an album called Smiley Smile, recorded in a couple of months in Brian's home studio, with no studio musicians and no involvement from Bruce, other than the previously released singles, and with the production credited to "the Beach Boys" rather than Brian. Smiley Smile has been unfairly dismissed over the years, but it's actually an album that was ahead of its time. It's a collection of stripped down versions of Smile songs and new fragments using some of the same motifs, recorded with minimal instrumentation. Some of it is on a par with the Smile material it's based on: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Wonderful"] Some is, to my ears, far more beautiful than the Smile versions: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Wind Chimes"] And some has a fun goofiness which relates back to one of Brian's discarded ideas for Smile, that it be a humour album: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "She's Going Bald"] The album was a commercial flop, by far the least successful thing the group had released to that point in the US, not even making the top forty when it came out in September, though it made the top ten in the UK, but interestingly it *wasn't* a critical flop, at least at first. While the scrapping of Smile had been mentioned, it still wasn't widely known, and so for example Richard Goldstein, the journalist whose glowing review of "Donovan's Colours" in the Village Voice had secured Van Dyke Parks the opportunity to make Song Cycle, gave it a review in the New York Times which is written as if Goldstein at least believes it *is* the album that had been promised all along, and he speaks of it very perceptively -- and here I'm going to quote quite extensively, because the narrative about this album has always been that it was panned from the start and made the group a laughing stock: "Smiley Smile hardly reads like a rock cantata. But there are moments in songs such as 'With Me Tonight' and 'Wonderful' that soar like sacred music. Even the songs that seem irrelevant to a rock-hymn are infused with stained-glass melodies. Wilson is a sound sculptor and his songs are all harmonious litanies to the gentle holiness of love — post-Christian, perhaps but still believing. 'Wind Chimes', the most important piece on the album, is a fine example of Brian Wilson's organic pop structure. It contains three movements. First, Wilson sets a lyric and melodic mood ("In the late afternoon, you're hung up on wind chimes"). Then he introduces a totally different scene, utilizing passages of pure, wordless harmony. His two-and-a-half minute hymn ends with a third movement in which the voices join together in an exquisite round, singing the words, "Whisperin' winds set my wind chimes a-tinklin'." The voices fade out slowly, like the bittersweet afternoon in question. The technique of montage is an important aspect of Wilson's rock cantata, since the entire album tends to flow as a single composition. Songs like 'Heroes and Villains', are fragmented by speeding up or slowing down their verses and refrains. The effect is like viewing the song through a spinning prism. Sometimes, as in 'Fall Breaks and Back to Winter' (subtitled "W. Woodpecker Symphony"), the music is tiered into contrapuntal variations on a sliver of melody. The listener is thrown into a vast musical machine of countless working gears, each spinning in its own orbit." That's a discussion of the album that I hear when I listen to Smiley Smile, and the group seem to have been artistically happy with it, at least at first. They travelled to Hawaii to record a live album (with Brian, as Bruce was still out of the picture), taking the Baldwin organ that Brian used all over Smiley Smile with them, and performed rearranged versions of their old hits in the Smiley Smile style. When the recordings proved unusable, they recreated them in the studio, with Bruce returning to the group, where he would remain, with the intention of overdubbing audience noise and releasing a faked live album: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "California Girls [Lei'd studio version]"] The idea of the live album, to be called Lei'd in Hawaii, was scrapped, but that's not the kind of radical reimagining of your sound that you do if you think you've made an artistic failure. Indeed, the group's next albu

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Black Diamonds
Dave Stewart, and the Nashville Stars

Black Diamonds

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 58:58 Very Popular


1989 World Series MVP Dave Stewart joins Bob Kendrick in front of a live audience at the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum to talk about Rickey Henderson, Bob Gibson, Vida Blue, his place among baseball's Black Aces, and his efforts to bring baseball its first Black-owned franchise since the Negro Leagues, with the expansion Nashville Stars. Learn more about the Nashville Stars - MLBMusicCity.comFollow Bob Kendrick on Twitter - @nlbmprezTo support the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum, and preserve the legacy of Buck O'Neil, please visit ThanksAMillionBuck.comVisit the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum in Kansas City - NLBM.com

Dingers and Ks
Episode 45 - Bob Gibson and Pedro Martinez Edition

Dingers and Ks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 80:20


Episode 45 - Bob Gibson and Pedro Martinez Edition Nothing beats seeing the crowd go wild and watching pros doing their thing on the diamond. Jeremy and Jamal share their awesome experience of witnessing a weekend of this year's All Star Game. All of this week's dingers and ks are from All Star Games, recent and historic. The J boys also share their views about the booing crowd of the Dodgers stadium when the Astros came in. In this episode: [03:41] Dinger of the week from Jamal: 2002 All Star Dinger by Barry Bonds' second swing, making the game tied [07:20] Dinger of the week from Jeremy: 81 home runs by Julio Rodriguez, witnessed by Jeremy at the Home Run Derby [15:24] Jeremy asks: Would it be cool to see Home Run Derby seniors and rookies go up against each other? [27:13] K of the week from Jamal: Bruce Sutter's pitch saves 1980 All Star Game in the Dodgers Stadium [32:56] K of the week from Jeremy: Greatest All Star Start in MLB history - Clayton Kershaw's first inning of 2022 ASG [41:49] What did you think of the Astro's boos in the Dodgers Stadium and Dusty Baker's stand regarding what happened? [50:25] Anything else you like about the All Star Weekend? Meet The Hosts Dingers and Ks is a podcast for baseball fans of all ages—new ones or lifelong ones. You'll learn something new about the baseball scene with Jeremy and Jamal to give you perspective on what it means to be in the pro ball today. Jamal Rousell is a baseball blogger from Sportbumz, a left-handed pitcher since high school, and a lifelong fan of the game. Baseball is Jeremy Altshule's first love in high school, which helped him explore other sports and do shows. Find Jeremy and Jamal here Jamal's Blogs on Sportbumz: https://sportbumz.com/brothaonbaseball/ Trade your sports teams like stocks here: https://simbull.app/ Find us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dingersandkspodcast/ Find us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/thedingersandks --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dingers-and-ks/support

G&T's Sports Talk
Eric Kittelberger Triple Play Design

G&T's Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 36:34


We talked about his baseball card designs, the Bob Gibson foundation, Negro League, Spanish Leagues and more

Karraker & Smallmon
#WednesdaysWithWaino with Adam Wainwright

Karraker & Smallmon

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022


Waino joins Carey & Michelle to talk about his serving experience at Grace Meat + Three, trying to remember to enjoy getting to live the dream, what it was like from Waino's POV when Albert had his 2-HR game, the friendly competition going on within the pitching staff, the starters feeding off each other after strong starts, looking back at what cost him his no-hitter, how different his attitude is on start-days vs. off-days, how he handles great starts that don't get Ws, an impeccable Bob Gibson impersonation, his thoughts on a wild walking walk-off against the Rockies and getting ready to take home to championship in this years fantasy league.

When Football Was Football
Fantasy Football? When Halas Played Rockne

When Football Was Football

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 16:46


When Football Is Football is part of the https://sportshistorynetwork.com/ (Sports History Network - The Headquarters For Sports Yesteryear). NETWORK SPONSORS https://sportshistorynetwork.com/row1/ (Row One) - the vintage shop for sports history fans! EPISODE SUMMARY   With electronic, board, and online fantasy games extremely popular for both football and baseball fans, one can imagine the wild matchups that might be possible through these outlets. How would Nolan Ryan pitch to Babe Ruth? Could Ty Cobb fool Bob Gibson on the base path? And would Jim Thorpe have a chance against Dick Butkus, or vice-versa? Listeners to this program, appropriately called “When Football Was Football,” on the Sports History Network may have figured out by now that I have no life. I'm perfectly content to research the heroics and exploits of key professional football players from a century ago with the wonderful opportunity to share their stories via this platform. Read the entire episode blog post and check out some other cool info regarding this https://sportshistorynetwork.com/football/college/great-lakes-vs-notre-dame-1918 (episode here). https://www.newspapers.com/freetrial/?xid=2229&duration=semiannual&subtype=extra&ft=true (GET A 7-DAY FREE TRIAL TO NEWSPAPERS.COM TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THIS TOPIC AND MANY MORE SPORTS HISTORY MOMENTS FROM THE TIMEFRAME OF WHEN THEY OCCURRED.) WHEN FOOTBALL WAS FOOTBALL BACKGROUND Each episode takes the listener back to the very early days of the National Football League. Author Joe Ziemba will share a forgotten or lost story from one of the NFL's two oldest teams: The Bears and the Cardinals. Team championships, individual exploits, or long-buried items of interest from the earliest years of the NFL will be dusted off and resurrected for the listener. Not for the football faint-of-heart since these programs will document when the struggling Bears nearly went out of business or when Cardinals' players earned $15 a game and were proud of it! It's NFL history—with a twist!. See Joe's books below. https://amzn.to/32oYi2n (Cadets, Canons, and Legends: The Football History of Morgan Park Military Academy) https://amzn.to/3eGr8jK (When Football Was Football: The Chicago Cardinals and the Birth of the NFL) Music for the episode - https://www.purple-planet.com/

Strength In Recovery
Uniquely Similar with Bob Gibson

Strength In Recovery

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 41:26


This week, RCA Devon Alumni Coordinator Bob Gibson joins Jaye to talk about his recovery journey, finding himself in the Big Book, and reminding us that those in recovery are sometimes more alike than not.

The Suffering Podcast
Episode 86: The Suffering of D-Day with Bob Gibson

The Suffering Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 65:56 Transcription Available


Very seldomly in this life do we get to hear about history from a participant. Bob Gibson was a young man who was compelled to fight for his country during World War II. He found himself entering into the unknown as he landed on the beach during the D-Day invasion on June 6, 1944.  At 98 years old the memories are as fresh now as when they first happened.  After D-day was over, the war did not stop as Bob went  onto fight in the Battle of The Bulge.  In this episode of The Suffering Podcast, join us as we hear living history, and learn from it so that we can never forget.Find The Suffering PodcastThe Suffering Podcast InstagramKevin Donaldson InstagramMike Failace InstagramBuzzsproutApple PodcastGoogle PodcastSpotifyAmazon MusicListen NotesFacebookTikTokYouTubeThe Suffering Podcast FamilyDented Development ProjectToyota of HackensackThe Grande SaloonXBodyCafeinaBella Dama CigarsHackensack Brewing Company - Peace, Love, BeerThe Suffering Podcast Gear10-13 SurvivorsShots Fired Book: The Misunderstandings, Misconceptions, and Myths about Police ShootingsBuzzsprout:  Get your Podcast Started today and receive a 20$ Amazon Gift CardThe Jimmy Hauburger Memorial Foundation#keepsuffering #Realkevindonaldson #denteddevelopmentproject #mentalhealth #mike_failace #mentalhealthawareness #denteddevelopmentproject #mentalhealth #ptsd #pts #mentaltoughness #prariefire #episode9 #confidence #resilience #neveralone #anjmedia #wwii #dday #wwii #history #worldwar #military #secondworldwar #worldwartwo #war #worldwarii #wwiihistory #army #germany Support the show

Reading Baseball
Reading Baseball: Bob Gibson's Angell

Reading Baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 5:24


Pete Peterson examines how Hall of Fame writer Roger Angell got a unique glimpse into the life of Hall of Fame pitcher Bob Gibson for a renowned essay.

You Just Have To Laugh
260. Pete LaCock a professional baseball player and son of Peter Marshall, host of the Hollywood Squares shares great stories of baseball and celebrities. But it's his humanity that makes this a great podcast.

You Just Have To Laugh

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 69:18


Ralph Pierre "Pete" LaCock Jr. is a former Major League Baseball first baseman/outfielder. He batted and threw left-handed. In 1975, LaCock hit the only grand slam of his career in the final appearance of St. Louis Cardinals pitcher Bob Gibson. Pete's stories about his and Bob Gibson's relationship is hysterical.   Pete LaCock's father is Peter Marshall, the host of the Hollywood Squares, Broadway actor and great singer. Pete talks about what it was like growing up with celebrities in and out of the house and how great they were to him. Pete also talks about the time he, his wife and friends got mugged and had his life as well as his pregnant wife threated at gun point. The mugger held the gun to Pete's wife's pregnant stomach and said if all of them didn't give up their valuables he would blow the baby all over the place. You have to listen to hear the rest of the story.   Pete's generous heart is shown in his donation of his stem cells in addition to his rescues of dogs and cats. This is a fun and inspiring interview of a good man!  

Weekend Warrior with Dr. Robert Klapper

The pitch that made Bob Gibson unhittable in 1968.

Against All Odds with Cousin Sal (Extra Points Edition)
'69 World Series Champion Cleon Jones of the Miracle Mets

Against All Odds with Cousin Sal (Extra Points Edition)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 36:29


Cleon Jones of the '69 World Series Champion Miracle Mets joins Cousin Sal to discuss his new book Coming Home: My Amazin' Life with the New York Mets. Cleon starts the show talking about catching the final out of the '69 World Series and giving the ball to Jerry Koosman. Cleon discusses his 1969 batting title race between himself, Pete Rose, and Roberto Clemente as well as the toughest pitchers he faced including Bob Gibson and Sandy Koufax. Sal and Cleon discuss that magical season that involved a black cat at Shea Stadium, a shoe polish incident, and why he missed the World Series parade in New York. Cleon tells Sal about meeting Jackie Robinson, his thoughts on today's game, and the work he is doing in his hometown as well as the rich baseball history of Mobile, Alabama.

Roger McGuinn's Folk Den

Mp3: Well Well Well – Click To Play “Well Well Well” is an old gospel song that was revived by the folk community in the early 1960s and performed by many artists including Bob Gibson and Bob Camp, Peter Paul and Mary and the Seekers. Lyrics: [Em] Well well well who's that a-calling Well well … Continue reading "Well Well Well"

Black Diamonds
BONUS | Stanley Nelson, Producer of "After Jackie"

Black Diamonds

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 32:24 Very Popular


"After Jackie" premieres Saturday 6/18 at 8 PM ET on The HISTORY Channel. Bob Kendrick sits down with award-winning filmmaker Stanley Nelson to talk about his latest project, "After Jackie", a co-production with LeBron James' Uninterrupted. "After Jackie"  tells the often overlooked story of the second wave of talented Black baseball players after Jackie Robinson, including Bill White, Curt Flood and Bob Gibson, who were up next in the fight for racial equality. Follow Bob Kendrick on Twitter - @nlbmprezVisit the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum in Kansas City - https://nlbm.com

North Omaha History Podcast, Omaha History, South Omaha History

KOWH was a soul music radio station in Omaha owned by African Americans including Bob Gibson and Gale Sayers. It was on-air from 1970 to 1979 and our producer Steve loved listening to it in the day. Listen in as Adam fills us in on everything KOWH-FM. Our thanks to our patrons: Jeff Rockwell Gene E Pafford Barb Naughtin Lonnie (Hansen) Dunbier Paul Feilmann Tim Reeder Mike Schill Jenna Smith Dan Hedrick Richard Gude Daniel Ammons Sara Rogers Troy Lewellen Joanne Ferguson Cavanaugh Kristine Gerber Jay Flaunts His Ignorance Jim Collison and The Great Plains Black History Museum. The North Omaha History podcast is a volunteer effort, but you can help us meet expenses by becoming a patron for as little as $1 a month. Go to https://www.patreon.com/omaha

Team of Rivals Podcast
Season 6, Episode 20 – Protect the Boys

Team of Rivals Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 73:16


This is what happens when the Team doesn't discuss the night's show topics before hitting record. This week, you'll enjoy a discussion of Lorenzo Cain's outfield cup check, butt drags, Bob Uecker holding Bob Gibson's hand, the Cubs current stretch of futility, and the Cards sudden rise to the top of a lackluster NL Central race. And, of course, it wouldn't be a TOR episode without a discussion of Star Wars, as the guys talk about Part Five of Obi-Wan Kenobi and the future of Disney Star Wars. Lorenzo Cain's Cup Check The Bobs Hold Hands Follow us on Twitter, GETTR, and Instagram. Like us on Facebook. Check out Gateway City Sports.

Karraker & Smallmon
"After Jackie" Director Andre Gaines

Karraker & Smallmon

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 6:12


"After Jackie" premieres Saturday, June 18, breaking down the importance and struggle of black players post-Robinson, including a number of Cardinals that the documentary focuses on--director Andre Gaines joins the show to talk about the importance of players like Curt Flood and Bob Gibson and what else to look forward to for Saturday's debut.

The Ohioan
PODCAST: We talk with producer/director and Toledo native Andre Gaines on The History Channel's "After Jackie" which premieres June 18

The Ohioan

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 19:37


The HISTORY® Channel sets the premiere date for its new two-hour documentary “After Jackie” on Saturday, June 18 at 8 p.m. and during the 75th anniversary year of Jackie Robinson breaking the color barrier in Major League Baseball. Executive produced by UNINTERRUPTED's LeBron James and Maverick Carter, Emmy Award® winning and Academy Award® nominated filmmaker Stanley Nelson (“Tulsa Burning: The 1921 Race Massacre,” “Attica”), critically-acclaimed producer and director Andre Gaines (“The One and Only Dick Gregory,” “The Lady and the Dale”) and in association with Major League Baseball, the documentary tells the often-overlooked story of the second wave of talented Black baseball players after Jackie Robinson, including Bill White, Curt Flood and Bob Gibson, who were up next in the fight for racial equality. “After Jackie” honors these brave men and sheds light on the heroic story of how they stepped to the plate and put their lives on the line to integrate baseball and demand a fairer and more inclusive America for African American athletes around the world. How you can connect with us Subscribe to the podcast Ways you can support the show Check out our latest podcasts Connect with Chris Pugh on social media Ways you can save money Check out our latest contests --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/theohioan/message

Cardinals Off-Day
35. Liberatore, Gorman and the Cardinals of the Future

Cardinals Off-Day

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 64:36


On our last episode, we talked about the team being on the cusp of #Gormania, but concerns about his strikeouts and defense still kept the top prospect down on the farm. Now Nolan Gorman is a St. Louis Cardinal… and he brought his friends.**You can celebrate #Gormania with a t-shirt in a variety of styles and colors. Get yours at: http://bit.ly/gormania Proceeds go to the nonprofit More Than Baseball, which supports minor league players.08:15The Cardinals Youth Movement is already underway21:15Will they abandon the defense-first approach for the offensive upgrades of Yepez, Gorman and Donovan? What will that mean for their pitching staff?28:15It’s Game 7 of the World Series. The Cardinals are out of pitchers. Who would you put on the mound… Pujols or Yadi?36:35Listener Questions54:30What will we be watching for?Off Day Recommendations:Distance: The Game Belongs to Bob Gibson by Roger AngellRoger Angell archive at The New Yorker This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit cardinalsoffday.substack.com

Bandpraat
Moss

Bandpraat

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 104:49


Het is de laatste Bandpraat van dit seizoen. Maar niet getreurd: in oktober 2022 start het tweede seizoen. Voor deze seizoensafsluiter mocht ik naar Den Dolder. Daar had ik de grote eer om uitgebreid in gesprek te gaan met frontman Marien Dorleijn van de absolute topband Moss! We lopen door bijna twintig jaar geschiedenis van de band, praten over wisselingen in de samenstelling en over de terugkeer van Bob Gibson, over het nieuwe album HX en de vijf voorgangers, over opnemen en live spelen… en meer, heel veel meer! Ook deze laatste aflevering dobbelen we weer tijdens de vaste rubriek ‘De Standaardvragen', we bespreken vijf dilemma's en kijken waar Moss over vijf jaar staat.

Indiana Sports Talk Podcast
11:00PM-12:00AM-(Mike Moss and Brendan King)-5/14/2022

Indiana Sports Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 43:10


Voice of the Tincaps Mike Moss starts the final hour of Network Indiana's Indiana Sports Talk talking the Tincaps 11-7 loss to the South Bend Cubs, how they could improve, and a look ahead at the rest of the season. Plus he shares his thoughts on Monday's being a mandatory off day.  Coach then goes down memory lane with Eddie Garrison with a discussion on going to a St. Louis Cardinals game for his honeymoon and watching Bob Gibson. Longtime Indiana Sports talk veteran Brendan King joined the show to talk the South Bend Cubs big month, the Indy 500, and more. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Deeper Roots Radio Podcast
Episode 115: Peace and Happiness

Deeper Roots Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2022 116:48


We've got ourselves a blend of free form sounds from the Deeper Roots archives with themes of midnight runs, trains, and happiness spiced with instrumental punch. Tune in on a Friday morning on KOWS Community Radio for some oddball tunes from John D. Loudermilk, Bob Gibson, and Chip Taylor and The New Ukrainians. We're already halfway through the month and we'll find ourselves with a brighter eclectic blend of sounds from the past century. The antenna is installed and now the volunteers who pedal the wheels to churn those dynamos will soon have our signal spreading it's joy throughout the county. Go volunteers!!  Tune in why don't you...

Hard Rain & Slow Trains: Bob Dylan & Fellow Travelers
4/14/2022: TEMPEST at Ten: Ruination Day

Hard Rain & Slow Trains: Bob Dylan & Fellow Travelers

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 65:05


This episode continues a monthly, ten-part series celebrating the tenth anniversary of TEMPEST. Broadcasting on April 14th, the 110th anniversary of the Titanic's fateful convergence with the iceberg, how could we not dedicate this episode to the song that gave the album its name, "Tempest"? In "20 Pounds of Headlines," we round up news from the world of Bob Dylan, which includes a final update on Dylan's spring 2022 tour, which concludes this evening. In "Who Did It Better?" we ask you to vote this week to tell us who did "When That Great Ship Went Down" better: Woody Guthrie or Bob Gibson? Listen to the episode, then go to our Twitter page @RainTrains to vote!

Yesterday's Sports
St. Louis Cardinals: My Secret "2nd Favorite Team" Growing Up

Yesterday's Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 9:04


Yesterday's Sports is part of the https://sportshistorynetwork.com/ (Sports History Network - The Headquarters For Sports Yesteryear). NETWORK SPONSORS https://sportshistorynetwork.com/row1/ (Row One) - the vintage shop for sports history fans! EPISODE SUMMARY Most of us who follow sports have a favorite team. In baseball, my favorite team was always the Yankees. Having grown up only about 20 miles from the “House That Ruth Built,” it's only natural that I would root for the Yankees. But I don't think I'm too far out-of-line when I say that many of us also have a second favorite team or a team that we secretly root for. For me, that team was the St.Louis Cardinals. Why the Cardinals? Well, I guess the main reason is that they had a lot of players I liked. I was always a big fan of pitcher Bob Gibson and left-fielder Lou Brock. They also had the versatile Joe Torre, who could play third base, first base, and catcher. Years later, Joe would lead my Yankees to six American League Pennants and four World Series trophies..... You can read the https://sportshistorynetwork.com/baseball/mlb/st-louis-cardinals-my-secret-2nd-favorite-team (full blog post here). https://www.newspapers.com/freetrial/?xid=2229&duration=semiannual&subtype=extra&ft=true (Get a FREE 1-Week Trial to Newspapers.com to learn about this topic and much more!!!) YESTERDAY'S SPORTS BACKGROUND Host Mark Morthier grew up in New Jersey just across the river from New York City during the 1970s, a great time for sports in the area. He relives great moments from this time and beyond, focusing on football, baseball, basketball, and boxing. You may even see a little Olympic Weightlifting in the mix, as Mark competed for eight years. See Mark's book below. https://amzn.to/3kf5MuO (No Nonsense, Old School Weight Training: A Guide For People With Limited Time) https://amzn.to/3snjccy (Running Wild: (Growing Up In The 1970s))

St. Louis Cardinals Podcast
4/1/22 | Al Hrabosky

St. Louis Cardinals Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 54:50


1:00 - Al's draft story and early years in pro ball 4:30 - Meeting Stan Musial at Dodger Stadium 9:00 - Joe Cunningham's influence on his post-baseball life 10:45 - Lou Brock and Bob Gibson stories 16:52 - The 70s Cardinals and what could have been 20:17 - Brawls and his glove pounding routine 35:26 - Ken Reitz 39:35 - Bob Forsch 42:50 - Cardinals partners: Jack Buck, Joe Buck, Ken Wilson, & Dan McLaughlin Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Cardinals Insider
4/1/22 | Al Hrabosky

Cardinals Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 54:50


1:00 - Al's draft story and early years in pro ball 4:30 - Meeting Stan Musial at Dodger Stadium 9:00 - Joe Cunningham's influence on his post-baseball life 10:45 - Lou Brock and Bob Gibson stories 16:52 - The 70s Cardinals and what could have been 20:17 - Brawls and his glove pounding routine 35:26 - Ken Reitz 39:35 - Bob Forsch 42:50 - Cardinals partners: Jack Buck, Joe Buck, Ken Wilson, & Dan McLaughlin Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Hot Take Central
03-31-S3-Clayton Keller injury-Blues knock of Canucks-Thwarted theft story-Fierce competitors

Hot Take Central

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 25:44


Clayton Keller takes a nasty spill Blues knock off Canucks 4-3 without Jordan Kyrou Ryan O'Reilly shinesA thwarted theft attempt in a minor league city Common denominator with fierce competitors (i.e. Bob Gibson): they never lose it

The Far Middle
Troubling Trends

The Far Middle

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 31:22


Episode 45 of The Far Middle is dedicated to Hall of Fame pitcher Bob Gibson—the ultimate intimidator while on the mound. In this installment, Nick discusses several troubling trends, starting with America’s mass transit systems. Despite ridership declines, government continues to pour taxpayer dollars into “keeping the rails greased.” Next, Nick questions why we’re not paying closer attention to environmental groups’ funding sources. Another troubling trend is the softening of American patriotism, revealed by a recent poll asking Americans if they would stand and fight if the U.S. was invaded. Also discussed are: NYU’s new class on Taylor Swift; Milton Friedman’s four ways to spend money; and, today’s anniversary of the assassination attempt of President Ronald Reagan by John Hinckley.

Folkscene Radio Show
Bob Gibson guesting on FolkScene. Recorded 7-18-76.

Folkscene Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2022 52:57


FolkScene presents a classic archive program with the legendary Bob Gibson. Recorded 7-18-76. Hosted by the late Howard Larman. Probably engineered by Alan Kanter. Remastered for broadcast by Peter Cutler. ©FolkScene. Sharing FolkScene recordings with your friends is cool, but the reproduction of our programs for commercial purposes is illegal. FolkScene airs on Sunday evenings from 6 to 8 p.m. (PST) at KPFK 90.7 Los Angeles and online at www.kpfk.org.

Mona Lisa Baseball
The Only Show in Town

Mona Lisa Baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2022 41:17


Assuming humans exist in 100 years, what will baseball look like? Do you need some skin in the game to enjoy the game? (01:36) Will baseball still be the only show in town? (03:48) Indifference does not apply to the price of beers (06.36) nor bad behavior at Wrigley. (10:46) Is memory a sweet lair? (13:58) Or was Bob Gibson really that good? (16:45) How does the Shohei miracle (19:52) relate to the Braves pitching in the 90's? (20:22) Jeter is out (24:53) because there are two kinds of baseball teams. (25:16) We acknowledge the role of villains, bars, and re-remember that baseball is a business. The term "universal DH" gets a cosmic slap down, (29.53) and pitchers get a shot clock (33:51) as we don lab coats and eye protection to observe some truly crazy experimental baseball rule changes (33:51) that may allow us to completely skip over 102, 103, and 104. (37:14)

Long Gone Podcast
Ep. 47: MLB Wants to Blow Up Minors, ESPN's Top-100 Prospects, Then & Now Series Continued (14-10)...

Long Gone Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 16, 2022 66:09


The boys begin this week's episode with the latest from the MLB Lockout. The new updates have rocked them, leaving each blaming both sides. One of these updates is that MLB is considering eliminating Minor League baseball players and formats. After they cool down from that hot topic, they discuss the universal DH and possible MLB Draft lottery points the owners/league and the players union agreed upon. ESPN released their Top-100 prospects, which revealed some surprises. The boys give their takes and select where they would put some of these prospects on the list. They continue their Then & Now series with picks 14-10 for Then and also best second basemen in the game right now for Now. They round out the show with Collection Corner.

Banjo Hangout Newest 100 Other Songs

One of Bob Gibson's finest songs, best performed with his singing partner in the early 1960s - Hamilton Camp. Gibson is an often overlooked seminal influence of the folk revival of the 1950s and 1960s, who began, inspired by Pete Seeger, by playing a Gibson long neck banjo. I play this on my Vega Pete Seeger model long neck.

MNM Presents : The State of Sports
Bob Gibson vs. Nolan Ryan

MNM Presents : The State of Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 31:34


Merry Christmas!Bob Gibson vs. Nolan RyanSocialsTwitter : @mnmsospodInstagram : @mnmsospodFacebook : @mnmsospodYoutube : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQv92OmgZfgsoFRa2-I1puw

Blaseball Analysis Co.
Episode 15: Burke Gonzales is as incredible as 190 smooth orbs (ICBACo Crossover)

Blaseball Analysis Co.

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 58:56


Benjy and DeeJay have a guest over! Karp of Infinite Cities Blaseball (https://infinitecities.gay). Together they go through the wonders of the Mexico City Wild Wings specifically focusing on their ACE Burke Gonzales. Is Burke Gonzales this universe's Bob Gibson? Absolutely. Submit your player deep dive recommendations here: https://forms.gle/gQTyTVpjMz2icBhS9 You can also LEAVE US A VOICE MAIL! Submit your questions youd like us to answer at blaseballanalysisco@gmail.com or tweet at us! Find us on twitter: @BlaseballACo and ICB at @CitiesPod The rest of our episodes are at https://tacoba.co You can find the BACo team around the Taco Stand: https://discord.gg/fm6mRwy Look out for kilozombie#7157, InnercityGriot#2859, benjaminrees#1140, theremin#3538 and DeeJay#2609

Long Gone Podcast
Ep. 35: MLB Awards & the Annual Long Gone Podcast Awards

Long Gone Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 50:04


This week the boys discuss the finalists for the MLB awards that were recently announced and predict who will take home the accolades. They then follow this up with giving out their own awards for this past season. You don't want to miss it! They round out the show with collection corner and some quotes about the late-great Bob Gibson.

The Box Score Show
Gibson vs. McLain ’68 | MLB’s Speedy Changeup

The Box Score Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 45:04


1968 World Series. Game 1. Forever remembered as Bob Gibson's Day. The St. Louis Cardinals pitcher recorded a shutout while notching a still standing postseason record of 17 strikeouts in the pitchers duel of pitchers duels against Denny McLain after both had won the MVP and Cy Young awards in their respective leagues. Set against a backdrop of an ever-changing America, the country's national pastime was also set to go through a revolution in an attempt to level the balance between pitching and offense by leveling the mound, Chris DeSalvo and Kevin Chroust (along with a heavy dose of Harry Caray!) head back to Busch Stadium to relive this memorable day. You can subscribe to all the podcasts from The Analyst on your favorite podcast applications now to ensure you don't miss an episode. Don't forget to rate and review the shows while you are there too.

Dingers and Ks
Episode 7 - Let's Try this again. Take 2

Dingers and Ks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 70:58


Episode 7 - Let's Try this again. Take 2 In this episode: Classic Dingers and Ks featured this week! We are starting to see who is winning these deadline trades.. Perspectives about phenomenal players who also bring life to the show, as well as for some players who are in bad shape right now. Jeremy and Jamal also talk about recent booing fans and how players responded to them. Is it fair or foul for fans to boo their teams? What are these fans trying to communicate with the players? How should a player respond? [02:48] If there's one player you could bring back to the Mets (who's still playing recently in the league, who is it, and why? [07:55] Dingers of the week: “Shot Heard 'Round the World” by Bobby Thomson in 1951, and Yoshi Tsustugo hits the walk-off home run, Pirates beat Cardinals [14:20] Ks of the week: Bob Gibson's 17th on the series of strikeouts in 1968 leaving Tigers no chance, and Mariano Rivera's record-breaking save number 602 for Yankees [18:03] Do you think that Kenley Jansen will enter the Hall of Fame at the end of his career? [26:54] MLB Trades Good or Bad: When are they going to make an impact? We have an answer for one of those - Blue Jays DFA'd Brad Hand [33:50] Last piece of Jay's news: George Springer pulled out for precautionary reasons, coming back from a left knee injury [38:46] Who are your 5 most hated teams? (not in any order) [42:05] Fair or Foul: Is it okay to “Boo” your own team? [51:00] As a Dodgers fan, would Jeremy be upset if they traded Cody Bellinger this off-season? [56:24] Why Javy Baez booed by Mets fans and responding with a thumbs down - opinions discussed [1:03:40] This player gets it - how to respond to a booing crowd Meet The Hosts Dingers and Ks is a podcast for baseball fans of all ages—new ones or lifelong ones. You'll learn something new about the baseball scene with Jeremy and Jamal to give you perspective on what it means to be in the pro ball today. Jamal Rousell is a baseball blogger from Sportsbumz, a left-handed pitcher since high school, a lifelong fan of the game. Baseball is Jeremy Altshule's first love in high school, which helped him explore other sports and do shows. Find Jeremy and Jamal here Jamal's Blogs on Sportsbumz: https://sportbumz.com/brothaonbaseball/ Trade your sports teams like stocks here: https://simbull.app/ Find us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dingersandkspodcast/ Find us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/thedingersandks --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dingers-and-ks/support

Washington Watch
Chip Roy, Matthew Spalding, Bob Gibson, Meg Kilgannon

Washington Watch

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 54:10


2 Tools Baseball Podcast
Updated Power Rankings, the Legacy of Lou Gehrig, a Very Young Home Run Race, and more!

2 Tools Baseball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2021 82:33


In this week's episode, Alex and Travis make their arguments for who they think the ten best teams in baseball are at this point in the season. They also commemorate Lou Gehrig Day in the MLB by discussing his legendary career and his place in baseball lore. Alex and Travis talk about how the young trio of Vladdy Guerrero Jr., Ronald Acuña Jr., and Fernando Tatis Jr. are leading the pack in the home run race and taking baseball by storm across the board. The 2 Tools also give some historical context to the deGromination that has taken over the MLB this season thus far by drawing comparisons to Bob Gibson's 1968 and Pedro Martinez's 2000 seasons, and they wrap-up on some Angels optimism after a pleasant 8-4 stretch of play. Listen now!

Say It Ain't Contagious
SIAC 14: Our Country Almost Made It

Say It Ain't Contagious

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2021 74:51


San Francisco civil rights legend Reverend Arnold Townsend joins Lincoln, Craig, Frank, and Steve to reminisce about being born into a segregated nation when there was still hope for equality, in part by meeting halfway--in the country of baseball. "If you can't appreciate Bob Gibson, you're not a baseball fan, you're a racist who watches baseball."

GOATS: On the Bump
Michael Wacha on The Legacy of Bob Gibson

GOATS: On the Bump

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2021 30:23 Transcription Available


This week, Ross is joined by Tampa Bay Rays' Pitcher, and his former Texas A&M teammate, Michael Wacha to talk about the most intimidating pitcher of all time, St Louis Cardinals, Bob Gibson. Being a former Cardinal himself, Wacha talked about the interactions he had with Gibson during his clubhouse visits, and the unforgettable advice that he left him with. Like many pitchers during his era, Gibson had an unbelievable workload, but it was in those big game moments where he really thrived. Ross and Wacha break down his remarkable World Series stat lines, and whether or not he would still be able to hold his own in today's league.    00:00:00 - Intro  00:05:47 - Interview with Michael Wacha  00:24:26 - Bob Gibson and the Modern Era   Follow us on social media GOATS: On The Bump (@twitter)  Jam Street Media (@twitter) (@instagram) (@facebook)  Follow Ross  on  (@twitter) &  (@instagram)  Follow Michael Wacha (@twitter)  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Sound Opinions
#800: Tune-Yards, serpentwithfeet & La Femme, Memories of 800 Episodes of Sound Ops

Sound Opinions

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 26, 2021 50:41


On the occassion of our 800th episode, hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot look back on the show with past producer and listener feedback. They also review new albums from Tune-Yards, serpentwithfeet and La Femme.Join our Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/3rozD7uBecome a member on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/soundopinionsMake a donation via PayPal: https://bit.ly/36zIhZK Record a Voice Memo: https://bit.ly/2PaahgL Featured Songs:Tune-Yards, "nowhere, man," sketchy, 4AD, 2021Tune-Yards, "hold yourself.," sketchy, 4AD, 2021Tune-Yards, "be not afraid.," sketchy, 4AD, 2021Tune-Yards, "make it right.," sketchy, 4AD, 2021serpentwithfeet, "Heart Storm," DEACON, Secretly Canadian, 2021serpentwithfeet, "Malik," DEACON, Secretly Canadian, 2021serpentwithfeet, "Fellowship," DEACON, Secretly Canadian, 2021La Femme, "Paradigme," Paradigmes, Disque Pointu, 2021La Femme, "Cool Colorado," Paradigmes, Disque Pointu, 2021La Femme, "Disconnexion," Paradigmes, Disque Pointu, 2021Arcade Fire, "Sprawl II (Live on Sound Opinions)," The Suburbs, Merge, 2010David Bowie, "Rebel Rebel," Diamond Dogs, RCA, 1974Talking Heads, "Once In A Lifetime (Live)," Stop Making Sense, Sire, 1984Thom Yorke, "I Want None Of This (Live on Sound Opinions)," Help - A Day In The Life, Independiente, 2005Radiohead, "The National Anthem (Live at Lollapalooza)," Kid A, Parlophone, 2000Bob Dylan, "Moonshiner," The Bootleg Series Volumes 1–3 (Rare & Unreleased) 1961–1991, Columbia, 1991Wilco, "Ashes of American Flags (Live on Sound Opinions)," Yankee Hotel Foxtrot, Nonesuch, 2002Wilco, "She's A Jar (Live on Sound Opinions)," Summerteeth, Reprise, 1999Carole King, "I Feel the Earth Move," Tapestry, Ode, 1971Carole King, "Home Again," Tapestry, Ode, 1971Amythyst Kiah, "Black Myself," (Single), Rounder, 2021Steely Dan, "Reelin' In the Years," Can't Buy a Thrill, ABC, 1973Bob Gibson, "Ballad of Fred and Mark," Bob Gibson, Capitol, 1970King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard, "K.G.L.W.," L.W., Flightless, 2021Aretha Franklin, "How I Got Over," Amazing Grace, Atlantic, 1972Rolling Stones, "Gimme Shelter," Let It Bleed, Decca, 1969

The Front Row
Ready To Deliver- Jack Flaherty

The Front Row

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 17, 2021 87:54


One of the most promising young pitchers in baseball, Jack Flaherty of the St. Louis Cardinals is also one of its most thoughtful. He reflects on the racial reckoning of the past year in this country, identifying as Black, what it means to him to impact others, life lessons learned from his hometown hero Kobe Bryant, and his special friendship with the late, great Cardinals Hall of Fame pitcher, Bob Gibson.

ALL EVEN PODCAST
10-03-20-ALL EVEN PODCAST EPISODE 23

ALL EVEN PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2020 59:13


EPISODE 23-TNF JETS BRONCOS, CAM NEWTON HAS COVID, NBA FINALS, KYRIE IS NUTS, NFL PICKS, ELTON BRAND IS RUINING THE SIXERS, YANKEES BRIEF PRAISE, DUMMY OF THE WEEK, BOB GIBSON..... Follow me on Twitter: All Even Podcast (@ALLEVENPODCAST) Follow me on Instagram! : allevenpodcast --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/allevenpodcast/support

Sports On The Positive Tip
Episode 10 - Sports On The Positive Tip

Sports On The Positive Tip

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2020 31:58


Joe Morgan...Bob Gibson...LeBron James...listen in...

Omaha Storm Chasers
Episode 11 - Gary Green (Omaha Storm Chasers)

Omaha Storm Chasers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2020 57:09


Jake Eisenberg and Tony Boone welcome Storm Chasers owner Gary Green to The StormCast! Gary has owned the Storm Chasers since 2012 and has since also bought and launched Union Omaha, a USL League One soccer franchise that plays at Werner Park. On this episode of The StormCast, Jake and Tony remember Bob Gibson (1:00), an Omaha and baseball legend who passed away on October 2nd, and discuss the group of former Storm Chasers/Royals playing in the MLB postseason (6:22). Next, Jake and Tony talk to Gary about the pandemic's impact on his day-to-day and the inaugural season of Union Omaha, the latest updates on the negotiations between Major League Baseball and Minor League Baseball, his favorite sports memories from the last decade (which include the Storm Chasers titles in 2013 and 2014), his love for Bruce Springsteen, and more!On the upcoming birth of his daughter (10:52)MiLB teams getting creative without a season (13:47)The first match in Union Omaha history (18:48)How the Storm Chasers & Union Omaha fanbases might mesh in 2021 and beyond (21:14)His thoughts on the MiLB and MLB negotiations (27:05)Concerns for MiLB (31:57)Memories from acquiring the team in 2012 (34:07)The top moments from the last eight years (36:11)Figuring out who to root for in the 2015 World Series (37:01)Hopes for MiLB in 2021 (42:11)Bruce Springsteen thoughts (42:41)Following the conversation, Jake and Tony dive into a discussion about the MLB postseason and make their World Series picks (44:25). Then, Tony shares his "ranking" of various Pacific Coast League pennants he recently shared on Twitter (48:30). Finally, Tony answers last episode's trivia question (52:10) before wrapping up the show with a new trivia question (56:00). Trivia question: What years did Bob Gibson pitch for the Omaha Cardinals? Share the answer on social media for a chance earn a shoutout on our next episode!Be sure to stay up to date with the Storm Chasers on social media by following the team on Twitter (@OMAStormChasers), Instagram (@omahastormchasers) and Facebook (Omaha Storm Chasers). Don't forget to subscribe, rate, and review the show! Share any comments or questions via email to podcast@omahastormchasers.com. 

The Alonso Bet Podcast
We're Back, Baby! A wild, week-long whip-around of NFL,NBA Finals, and MLB Playoffs

The Alonso Bet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2020 83:37


FOR BASEBALL PLAYOFFS JUMP TO 40:30!   After a two week layoff the boys are back with a big NFL whip-around (2:25) that includes an absolute HEATER from our very Sam Saskin that just begins to make up for the namesake bet of this podcast (7:50). After reveling in Sam's betting glory we take a peak at the current state of the NBA Finals (33:10). We then review all of the series in the Wild Card round of the MLB playoffs (40:30) where Aaron offers a hearfelt apology to Tim Anderson (1:04:00). The guys then preview the Divisional Series (1:05:08) before closing the episode out with a tribute to one of the all time greats, Bob Gibson (1:18:40).