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Childless not by Choice
Episode 134--The Dame Who Made a Difference

Childless not by Choice

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 18:07


Intro:Hello, and welcome to episode 134 of the Childless not by Choice Podcast. My name is Civilla Morgan. My mission is to recognize and speak to childless not by choice women and men around the world, reminding you that you can live a joyful, relevant, fulfilled, childless not by choice, life.   Whether you have children or not, thank you for tuning in!   What is today's show about? Today's show is about a dame. But first, thank you to… ...my Patreon contributors: I would like to take a moment to thank the people who make a financial contribution to the platform on a monthly basis, my Patreon Contributors.  Your contributions help pay my podcast producer, my podcast host, Zoom, where I interview most of my guests, etc. So thank you very much!      If you are not yet a Patron, visit patreon.com/childlessnotbychoice to set up your monthly contribution. No matter your giving level, I have a gift for you!   If you prefer to give via PayPal, you can find me there at booksbycivillamorgan@gmail.com.  Your contributions to the platform are greatly appreciated! Thank you! https://www.patreon.com/Childlessnotbychoice  Jordan Morgan The Knights Susie Tiffany Your Name Here  https://www.patreon.com/Childlessnotbychoice Questions or comments? Contact me at:   Email: Info@civillamorgan.com                                                  Or   Visit the website at www.childlessnotbychoice.net, look to the left on the home screen and click on the link below the telephone to leave me an up to 90-second voicemail.   BTW, if you are a Patron, there is a fresh new video on the Patreon site. Be sure to check it out!  So, welcome to December Ya'll! It's a tough month for us as childless people, but never you fear, have I got a story for you?! But first I want to thank you so much for your support this year. Thanks for listening to episodes, and thanks for reaching out to let me know how the episodes, the podcast, is helping you.  I hear from a lot of you on Instagram, how cool right? Remember, you can find and follow me @joyandrelevance on Instagram. I'm also on Pinterest, Civilla Morgan.  Sooo, January is already recorded! I can't wait for you to hear my conversation with Sarah Roberts. It is just the perfect way to start a new year! Be sure to tune in. Hey, tune in all year. And don't be a stranger. Your feedback really is a real source of encouragement.   I'm a history buff. I mean I love anything history. World history, the history of humanity, medieval history, art history. I mean I love history! In fact, one of my favorite podcasts is all about women throughout history.  So imagine my shock and surprise when I heard about this amazing woman!  You see, the woman I'm talking about today was childless and husbandless, like many of us. And that's what caught my eye. She had been mentioned on social media on the anniversary of her death. I believe it was a Google Doodle. I like to read the story behind Google Doodles because well, I love history and historical facts. But when they said she never married or had children, well, me too!  The timing of it all was quite interesting too. I had been reading lots of posts on IG, about the treatment by society of those of us who never married and never had children, in earnest, the last couple of months. I mean it's a thing, I'm living it, and have been for many years. But I had not heard much talk about it until the last few months as of this recording.  The pain in the posts was palpable.  Well, after a little digging, I found one book on Amazon which I promptly ordered. I had to wait a little bit for the book, which made me a little nervous, but it finally came. It is an interesting read. Information on the book in the show notes, as well as some additional informational links on this lady!  So here's the thing:  Childless, husbandless, and a dame. Mary Eugenia Charles' father started his life as a mason and then a farmer. He was snubbed by the elite, but that did not get in the way of his goals. He quietly went about the business of amassing wealth while the community looked down on him until he surpassed them in wealth. Her farmer father turned banker for the everyday person. His plan was to send his four children to the best schools. Two of them became doctors, one became a nun, against her parent's wishes. And Eugenia went to law school. Then she got into politics.  Oh, but imagine a woman getting into politics in the 1960s. You think it's a man's world now. She had to create a tough exterior to deal with men who definitely did not want her in their presence. They felt she was a deviant because she never married and never had children. They felt she belonged in a lower class because her father had to work his way up the class ladder.  She has been listed in Guida-Myrl Jackson-Laufer's list of ‘Women Rulers Throughout the Ages', listed among women such as Cleopatra, Mary Queen of Scots, and Isabella Queen of Spain; just to name a few.   But hey, she gave as good as she got, although it had to be tough to hear that she was sterile, wore cheap underwear, really? Ignored when she fainted in the midst of these sharks. But she survived.  She was indeed so successful at turning her country around, she ruled for 15 years, even surviving two attempted coups. Some of you may remember the invasion of Grenada back in the 1980s? She was an integral part of that. She brought battling factions in her country Dominica, not to be confused with The Dominican Republic. Two very different places.  together, and put strong people in her cabinet; which tells me she had a healthy level of self-confidence. Something I personally like in people I surround myself with. Just an aside.  Intriguing right?  I mean aside from the obvious that she was childless and husbandless? It is said that she never married because she never met anyone she wanted to marry.  These aren't the days of arranged marriage right? So she just never met anyone and sometimes that's just the way it is. Yet she made things happen despite the treatment she received, and despite not adhering to society's ‘norms'. I mean some people marry so that they are not lonely. Some people opt not to marry if they can't marry for love. Oh, this diehard romantic was shocked when I found out in my younger years that people married for all types of reasons and that love was just one of the reasons! The shock!  I also came to the realization that for me, I had no intention of marrying for anything less than love because when the going gets tough I have to know I love this person.  But that's me. So, how are you making stuff happen despite being childless or childless and husbandless? How do you deal with the people who watch you faint and ignore you? Or the people who accuse you of wearing cheap underwear? What about the people who spread assumptions about you? How will you deal? How do you deal?  Let me remind you... Those of us who are husbandless and childless are a family unit unto ourselves. I've said it before, a family is not only parents and kids, or husband and wife no kids. It can be you, just you. Human, worthy, single, childless, beautiful you.  Remember that this holiday season. You deserve a place at the adult table just as much as the couple or the parents. Your sleeping arrangements should not be an afterthought.   Now look, I realize you don't want to create drama at the family gatherings, and I don't want you to either. But I bet that's why some families believe they can treat the single childless family member as an afterthought. They don't believe you will make a scene. And you don't have to. If there is a problem, kindly pull the host aside and have a civil conversation. If you feel the conversation is going nowhere, feel free to adult and make alternate plans some years.  Look, we all want to see our family members, we all want to belong. But we have to decide if we want to belong so much we are willing to accept bad treatment gathering after gathering after gathering. Making alternate plans sometimes shows that you love and respect yourself. Please, love and respect yourself. Until you do, no one else will.  We are living in unbelievably difficult times. I mean family gatherings were difficult pre-pandemic. Now, everything has changed. Life as we knew it is no longer, no matter how much we want it to be all back to normal.  Normal is going to be different. And I believe the reason some of us are having a difficult time acclimating is that we are not moving ahead, but looking backward.  There was good back there, but there was also bad back there. There was dysfunction, there was petty behavior at family gatherings. And yes, there are good memories from back there.  But ahead, are good memories and good times. Especially when you create those moments and exercise those kind but firm boundaries. Trust your decisions. Trust your heart. Trust yourself. And have a lovely Holiday Season. Details of her life:  Mary Eugenia Charles, DBE was a Dominican politician who was Prime Minister of Dominica from 21 July 1980 until 14 June 1995. The first woman lawyer in Dominica, she was Dominica's first, and to date only, female prime minister. Wikipedia Born: May 15, 1919, Pointe Michel, Dominica Died: September 6, 2005, Fort-de-France, Martinique Nationality: Dominican Previous office: Prime Minister of Dominica (1980–1995) Education: University of Toronto, London School of Economics and Political Science Organization founded: Dominica Freedom Party   Gabrielchn@aol.com www.marylandattorneyatlaw.com; 301-218-9400 Articles/links of interest:   https://www.thegrenadarevolutiononline.com/damecharles.html   https://www.britannica.com/biography/Eugenia-Charles   Add hashtags: #youdonthaveto   Add alt tags: they help sight impaired people know what the episode is about    Survey link: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfpPOQQq0a8gUuhnkuYZdi-RM7JKzbQWs3pw151I0LYSjQSNw/viewform?usp=sf_link My contact information:Website: www.childlessnotbychoice.net and www.civillamorgan.comFacebook: booksbycivillamorganTwitter: @civilla1Instagram: @joyandrelevancePinterest: Civilla M. Morgan, MSMLinkedIn: Civilla Morgan, MSMhttps://www.teepublic.com/stores/childless-not-by-choice     Research links: Articles/links of interest: https://21stcenturyhannah.libsyn.com/episode-85-adenomyosis-in-april   https://21stcenturyhannah.libsyn.com/episode-120-lets-talk-about-it Special thank you to: Everyone who reached out the last few months, including 2020.  I received several pieces of feedback on Instagram Messenger from people who advised the podcast has helped them quite a bit. I have put links to the episodes mentioned in the feedback here in the show notes. I cannot tell you how much it means to me to hear from you when an episode or the podcast on a whole, has helped you on your childless not by choice journey. Podcasters do not ask for feedback because we are narcissistic. Feedback is an engine for us. I like to give you all little tidbits of insight into the world of podcasting from time to time. And in the world of podcasting, feedback is part of the engine that keeps us going. When I first started podcasting and I was not getting tons of downloads, I would sometimes ask myself why exactly I was doing this. No one is listening, I would tell myself. I am not hearing from anyone. And just then, so many times, just then, I would get an email, a message in Facebook Messenger, or an Instagram post from a listener thanking me for what I do. It never failed. Those messages helped. So when you send a message, know that I read it. In fact, I have responded to every piece of feedback I've received. Thank you!   My contact information: Website: www.childlessnotbychoice.net and www.civillamorgan.comFacebook: booksbycivillamorganTwitter: @civilla1Instagram: @joyandrelevancePinterest: Civilla M. Morgan, MSMLinkedIn: Civilla Morgan, MSMhttps://www.teepublic.com/stores/childless-not-by-choice

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick
Episode 415: The Phantom of New Guinea (Entry 928.IS0117)

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 60:28


In which a purple-clad comic strip hero becomes a warrior totem in the western highlands of Papua New Guinea, and John locates the Dominican Republic of Asia. Certificate #24126.

The History Hour
The assassination of the Mirabal sisters

The History Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 50:10


The three Mirabal sisters were leading figures in the Dominican Republic's opposition movement against the dictator General Rafael Trujillo. They were all killed on the 25th November 1960. We hear from the daughter of one of them, Minerva, who tells us about her family and from Professor Elizabeth Manley on the Mirabal sister's legacy in the Dominican Republic. Also in the programme, the last case of Smallpox in Europe, the woman who helped her mother to die and laid the groundwork for the Netherlands becoming the first country in the world to legalise euthanasia. Also how Estonia led the way on connecting up schools to the internet and the painting by Gustav Klimt which was stolen by Nazis and only returned to its Jewish owners after a lengthy legal battle. Photo: The three Mirabal Sisters, Patria, Minerva and Maria Teresa (Credit: Mirabal family collection)

Jesuitical
Cynical about Christian mission trips? Monsignor Ramkissoon will change your mind.

Jesuitical

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 36:12


“No child is going to be abandoned twice.” That is the mission of Mustard Seed Communities, a nonprofit founded by Monsignor Gregory Ramkissoon to serve some of the most vulnerable people on earth: children and adults in low-income countries with severe mental or physical disabilities. What began as a small home for a handful of children who were left to fend for themselves on the streets of Kingston, Jamaica, is now a network of communities providing 600 children and adults with shelter, education, health care and training in Jamaica, Nicaragua, Dominican Republic, Zimbabwe and Malawi. We ask Monsignor Gregory what inspired his ministry, about the ethics of “mission trips” and how working with people the world has discarded has shaped his understanding of God. You can find out more about Mustard Seed Communities—and support their incredible work this Giving Tuesday—here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Witness History
The assassination of the Mirabal sisters

Witness History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 8:58


The three Mirabal sisters were leading figures in the Dominican Republic's opposition movement against the dictator, General Rafael Trujillo. Patria, Maria Teresa and the most prominent of the three, Minerva, were all killed on the 25th of November 1960. They were dragged from their car and beaten to death on the orders of General Trujillo. Their murders sparked outrage in the Caribbean country, and are thought to have been a motivating factor in the assassination of Trujillo himself six months later. In 2016, Rebecca Kesby spoke to Minerva's daughter, Minou Tavarez Mirabal, who explained why her mother and aunts were called 'the butterflies' and how to this day people still decorate their houses with three butterflies in tribute to them. Photo: The three Mirabal Sisters, Patria, Minerva and Maria Teresa (Credit: Mirabal family collection)

Carlos Tonight
Ep. 4: Aries Sarte

Carlos Tonight

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 21:37


My guest this week is Aries Sarte who is competing in the Mister Tourism World in the Dominican Republic. He introduces us to the advocacy-orientated organization and shares what's it like preparing for this pageant for men. Aries talks about representing his country of the Philippines and the goals of the organization including Responsible Tourism, Respect Our Biodiversity, and Promotion of Cultural Understanding. Join us!----- Vote for Aries during the competition by following www.instagram.com/mistertourismworldofficial and liking Aries photo.Follow Aries on Instagram at www.instagram.com/aries.sarte ------ This episode was written and produced by Carlos CorreaTheme by Sken Galis----- www.carlostonight.com

Rooted Deep
Thanksgiving

Rooted Deep

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 20:52


What does Allison do in the Dominican Republic for Thanksgiving? The great dressing vs stuffing debate and more fun times on today's podcast as we celebrate Thanksgiving!

Midnight Train Podcast
The Banana Massacre - Yep, bananas. Happy Thanksgiving 2021

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 90:05


So we're gonna get into something a bit different this week. Not really truecrime, not unsolved, but definitely crazy. This is another one we got from a listener that we had no clue ever happened. While the official death toll of this incident is usually put at around 45, some estimates say it could be up to 2000. Those bodies are said to either have been dumped in the sea or buried in mass graves. So what was the incident about you ask? Well, long story very short… Bananas. We're gonna dive into what is simply known as the Banana massacre,  a crazy tale of a government squashing a banana strike with excessive force and what came after. Buckle up guys, here we go!   Before we start, I want to acknowledge the great sources of info for this episode. 90% of the information on this week's episode came from two amazing sources that had tons of info that we couldn't find anywhere else. First a paper by Jorge Enrique Elias Caro and Antonino Vidal Ortega on the website scielo.org was our source for the actual massacre info while an article called Rotten Fruit by Peter Chapman on the Financial Times website was our source for the company history.  So, let's start by talking about a fruit company. United Fruit company to be exact. United Fruit began life in the 1870s when Minor Cooper Keith, a wealthy young New Yorker, started growing bananas as a business sideline, alongside a railway line he was building in Costa Rica. Both ventures took off, and by 1890 he was married to the daughter of a former president of Costa Rica and owned vast banana plantations on land given to him by the state. The bananas were shipped to New Orleans and Boston, where demand soon began to outstrip supply.Keith teamed up with Andrew Preston, a Boston importer, and in 1899 they formed United Fruit. Bananas sold well for their tropical cachet: they were exotic, a luxury only affordable to the rich. But the rapidly rising output of United Fruit's plantations brought down prices. The company created a mass market in the industrial cities of the US north-east and Midwest. The once bourgeois banana became positively proletarian.   By the 1920s, United Fruit's empire had spread across Central America. It also included Jamaica, Cuba and the Dominican Republic. In South America the company owned chunks of Colombia and Ecuador. It came to dominate the European as well as the US banana markets with the help of its Great White Fleet of 100 refrigerated ships, the largest private navy in the world.   There are more than 300 varieties of banana, but United Fruit grew only one: the Gros Michel or ”Big Mike”. This variety suited most tastes; it was not too big or too small, too yellow or too sweet - if anything, it was a little bland. This was the forerunner of the transnational products we have today.           But mass production took its toll. In 1903, disease hit United Fruit's plantations in Panama. An array of pathogens kept up the attack, and the banana was discovered to have a genetic weakness. Its seeds are ill equipped for reproduction, so growers take cuttings from one plant to create another. The banana is a clone, with each inbred generation less resilient.    Although the banana was diseased, United Fruit marketed it as a product that exemplified good health. Banana diseases did not affect humans, and the fruit was said to be the cure for many ills: obesity, blood pressure, constipation - even depression. In 1929, United Fruit set up its own ”education department”, which supplied US schools with teaching kits extolling the benefits of the banana and the good works of the company. Meanwhile, United Fruit's ”home economics” department showered housewives with banana recipes.   One of United Fruit's most successful advertising campaigns began in 1944, designed to boost the banana's profile after its scarcity during the war. It featured Senorita Chiquita Banana, a cartoon banana who danced and sang in an exuberant Latin style. Senorita Chiquita bore a close resemblance to Carmen Miranda, the Brazilian entertainer who, in her ”tutti-frutti” hat, wowed Hollywood at the time. Sales soon regained prewar levels.   By the 1960s, the banana had become an inseparable accompaniment to the morning cereal of most American children. And today, in countries such as the US and Britain, it has ousted the apple as the most popular fruit. In the UK, figures indicate that more than 95 per cent of households buy bananas each week, and that more money is spent on them than on any other supermarket item, apart from petrol and lottery tickets.    Soooo sounds like a pretty typical big business rise to power by providing a wholesome treat to the people right? Wrong… There was more going on than almost everybody knew.    Over the years, United Fruit fought hard for low taxes and light regulation. By the beginning of the 20th century, troublesome anti-trust laws had been passed in the US to crack down on business behaviour such as price-fixing and other monopolistic practices. Taxes on large corporations were increased to fund welfare benefits in the US and fully fledged welfare states in Europe. But, with a centre of operations far from the lawmakers of Washington DC, United Fruit largely avoided all this.   The company also gained a reputation as being ruthless when crossed, and acted to remove governments that did not comply with its wishes. United Fruit had first shown its tough nature in the invasion of Honduras in 1911, which was planned by Sam ”The Banana Man” Zemurray, a business partner of United Fruit who later headed the company. Efforts by Zemurray and United Fruit to set up production in Honduras had been blocked by the Honduran government, which was fearful of the power it might wield. United Fruit was not so easily deterred. Zemurray financed an invasion, led by such enterprising types as ”General” (self-appointed) Lee Christmas and freelance trouble-shooter Guy ”Machine Gun” Molony. Thanks to United Fruit, many more exercises in ”regime change” were carried out in the name of the banana.   In 1941, the company hired a new consultant, Sigmund Freud's nephew, Edward Bernays, who had adapted the early disciplines of psychoanalysis to the marketplace. Bernays is known as the ”father of public relations” following his seminal 1928 book, Propaganda, in which he argued that it was the duty of the ”intelligent minority” of society to manipulate the unthinking ”group mind”. This, Bernays asserted, was for the sake of freedom and democracy.   United Fruit had become concerned about its image. In Central America, it was commonly known as el pulpo (the octopus) - its tentacles everywhere. In the US, United Fruit's territories were seen as troubled and forbidding. Under Bernays' guidance, the company began issuing a steady flow of information to the media about its work, rebranding the region as ”Middle America”.   America”.   In 1954, Bernays exercised his manipulative powers to get rid of the Guatemalan government. Democratically elected, it had taken some of United Fruit's large areas of unused land to give to peasant farmers. Bernays' response was to call newspaper contacts who might be amenable to the company view. Journalists were sent on ”fact finding” missions to Central America and, in particular, Guatemala, where they chased false stories of gunfire and bombs. In dispatches home, Guatemala became a place gripped by ”communist terror”.   The company looked, too, to friends in high places, both in the corridors of power and in the offices where the big decisions were made. During the Guatemalan crisis, John Foster Dulles, one of the world's most esteemed statesmen, was secretary of state. His brother, Allen Dulles, was head of the CIA. Both were former legal advisers to United Fruit. Together, the Dulles brothers orchestrated the coup that overthrew Guatemala's government in 1954.   Despite its ugly reputation, United Fruit often made philanthropic gestures.  Eli Black, chief executive of the United Fruit Company, played a part in coining the term ”corporate social responsibility” when, in reference to earthquake relief sent to Nicaragua in 1972, he extolled the company's deeds as ”our social responsibility”.  And in the 1930s, Sam Zemurray donated part of his fortune to a children's clinic in New Orleans. He later gave $1m to the city's Tulane University to finance ”Middle American'' research; he also funded a Harvard professorship for women. Philanthropy, however, did not prevent United Fruit's abuses, and, in the 1950s, the US government decided it had to act. The company's activities had caused such anti-US feeling in Latin America that leftwing revolutionaries such as Fidel Castro and Che Guevara had prospered. And so Washington began to take away some of United Fruit's land.   Ironically, Castro had benefited from the presence of United Fruit in Cuba. His father, a sugar planter, leased land from the company, and had made enough money to afford a good upbringing for his children. Guevara had fought both United Fruit and the CIA during the Guatemalan coup; he maintained thereafter that Latin America had no choice but ”armed struggle”. At New Year 1959, Castro and Guevara seized power in Cuba and kicked out the US-supported regime of Fulgencio Batista.   Like an ailing dictator, United Fruit lashed out - and nearly took the world with it. In 1961, it lent part of its Great White Fleet to the CIA and Cuban exiles in the US who were plotting to overthrow Castro. When the Bay of Pigs invasion failed, Castro, fearing another attack, ushered in armaments from the Soviet Union, prompting the missile crisis of 1962.   United Fruit battled on through the 1960s, its product ever more the victim of disease. Big Mike flagged, died and gave way to the dessert banana most of the developed world eats today, the Cavendish. It was said to be ”disease resistant”. Now that's dying, too.   Eli Black took over the company in 1970, imagining he could turn it back into the colossus it once was. The early 1970s, however, were a terrible period for the image of multinational corporations. Chief among them, oil companies made huge profits from the crisis after the 1973 Middle East war, to the inflationary ruin of rich and poor countries alike. United Fruit became an embarrassment. It was weak where others, such as the oil moguls, remained strong. When its stock market value crashed and regulators moved in, it looked like natural selection.   Early on Monday February 3 1975, a man threw himself out of his office window, 44 floors above Park Avenue, New York. He had used his briefcase to smash the window, and then thrown it out before he leapt, scattering papers for blocks around. Glass fell on to the rush-hour traffic, but amazingly no one else was hurt. The body landed away from the road, near a postal service office. Postmen helped emergency workers clear up the mess so the day's business could carry on.    This jumper was quickly identified as Eli Black, chief executive of the United Fruit Company.   It emerged that Black, a devout family man, had bribed the Honduran president, Oswaldo Lopez Arellano, with $1.25m to encourage him to pull out of a banana cartel which opposed United Fruit. The story was about to come out in the US press. United Fruit's Central American plantations were also struggling with hurricane damage and a new banana disease. Facing disgrace and failure, Black took his own life. His death was shocking, not least because he had the reputation of a highly moral man. Wall Street was outraged, the company's shares crashed and regulators seized its books to prevent ”its further violation of the law”. The company subsequently disappeared from public view and was seemingly erased from the collective mind.   After the fall of the Berlin Wall, in 1989, in a born-again spirit of globalisation, the world's main banana companies picked up the free-market banner once carried by United Fruit. The companies - Chiquita, Del Monte and Dole from the US, and Noboa from Ecuador - did not have anything like the force of United Fruit individually, but they were still a formidable presence. Together they were known to their critics, if not to themselves, as the ”Wild Bunch”.   In the 1990s, the US took its case to the World Trade Organisation, the new high court of globalisation. The companies protested that west European countries unfairly protected the producers of so-called ”Fairtrade” bananas in former European colonies through a complex system of quotas and licences. The Wild Bunch characterised this as revamped colonialism and outmoded welfare state-ism and, instead, promoted their own ”Free Trade” bananas.   In the new millennium, after what had become a general trade war, the Europeans backed down and agreed to concessions. They did so with some rancour, protesting that Washington had again allowed itself to be manipulated by narrow interests. Some spoke of a return of the ”old and dark forces”. They were thinking of United Fruit.   Ok so that's kind of a basic history of United Fruit company to get us going in the right direction to talk about one of the most brutal things they carried out on their workers. You've seen the connection they had and the power they had.. Pretty nuts for a fucking banana company.    On the evening of October 5, 1928, the delegates for Colombia's banana workers in Magdalena gathered to discuss their grievances. Among their concerns were their long hours and low pay; one worker, Aristides López Rojano, remembered: “We worked from six in the morning until eleven and then from one in the afternoon until six.... The contractor paid the salary and reserved up to thirty percent for himself.” Erasmo Coronel (the one wearing the bowtie in the group portrait) spoke in favor of a strike, and the others agreed. At around five in the morning on October 6, 1928, the workers issued the United Fruit Company a list of nine demands.   Stop their practice of hiring through sub-contractors   Mandatory collective insurance   Compensation for work accidents   Hygienic dormitories and 6 day work weeks   Increase in daily pay for workers who earned less than 100 pesos per month   Weekly wage   Abolition of office stores   Abolition of payment through coupons rather than money   Improvement of hospital services   The strike turned into the largest labor movement ever witnessed in the country until then. Radical members of the Liberal Party, as well as members of the Socialist and Communist Parties, participated.   The workers wanted to be recognized as employees, and demanded the implementation of the Colombian legal framework of the 1920s.   After U.S. officials in Colombia and United Fruit representatives portrayed the workers' strike as "communist" with a "subversive tendency" in telegrams to Frank B. Kellogg, the United States Secretary of State, the United States government threatened to invade with the U.S. Marine Corps if the Colombian government did not act to protect United Fruit's interests. The Colombian government was also compelled to work for the interests of the company, considering they could cut off trade of Colombian bananas with significant markets such as the United States and Europe.   As there was no agreement the Government militarized the zone. The newspaper "La Prensa" published the following:   "MORE TROOPS FOR THE BANANERA REGION. We have been informed that the leaving of the Commissioner sent by the Industry Ministry due to the existing conflict between the workers and the company has turned the situation critical. For this reason, the War Ministry ordered the concentration of more troops in Ciénaga. Therefore, yesterday night, a numerous contingent was dispatched from here on a special ship"   By the end of November the Magdalena Agriculture Society tried to find a solution to the situation. They named a Commission and along with the Chief of the Work Office and the workers' delegates would have a meeting with the UFC since the conflict was affecting everyone's interests. The multinational rejected meeting the Commission stating that the workers were out of the law. The representatives of the workers left for Ciénaga with the aim of convincing their fellow workers to abandon the region. They also demanded the arbitration as a last legal resort.   Social Party (PSR) founded in 1927 in Bogotá. The strike was also supported by the national and departmental union leaders ascribed to the Magdalena Workers Federation, the Magdalena Worker Union and the General Union of Workers of the Union Society (popularly known as the Yellow Union which integrated railway, port and construction workers of Santa Marta).   The first week of December everything was at a standstill, without a solution. The company hired a steamboat and brought 200 military men and took over the town hall without the mayor's authorization. To this respect the Ciénaga newspaper "Diario del Córdoba" noted:   "We do not know who ordered changing the town house into a campsite of troops, but we are certain that the municipality spokesman was not consulted for this illegal occupation. He would have certainly opposed it since there was no alteration of public order according to the norms in force. We see that the procedures here are "manu militari", without any consideration under the obvious alarm of these peoples, panic in society and business."   Military roadblocks were displayed. Trains were searched and the army prevented strikers from using them33. Tension increased and temporary workers started to return to their hometowns. Military pressure blocked the communication systems and the mail, telephones, telegraph and even the press stopped working. The strikers seized the train from Ciénaga to the plantations and they prevented its exit during the day.   On December 3rd, the press was conscious of the extreme situation: The situation of the Banana Strike is worse than ever. Especially because of the uneasiness caused by the Governor's Office for having called the Army. Any kind of meeting was banned, as it was assumed that they questioned the state legitimacy and stability and the government decisions. This measure outraged workers, because some detentions took place in Ciénaga and they were justified by the police since some documents of an apparently communist campaign were confiscated.   From this moment on, American Diplomats started to worry for the security of the American employees up to the point that the Government of the United States sent a ship to Santa Marta for the protection of their citizens as was stated by the US ambassador in Bogotá. He made clear that it was not a war cruise. Anyhow, it was possible to confirm that in the ports of Ciénaga and Santa Marta war ships docked with the aim of reinforcing troops.    To break the strike, on December 2nd, a military contingent of 300 men arrived in Ciénaga from the interior of the country. The major of the zone considered that these soldiers would be better at facing the situation than those native of the region. At the same time that same day some municipalities protested against the disposition of the governor's office. The workers exodus continued, the general situation of commerce aggravated, many commercial houses closed and some of them stopped paying their debts alleging the scarce security conditions and low sales. Similarly occurred with the stores of the UFC which closed due to lack of business activity. There was a total lack of supplies of basic products in the banana zone.   With the excuse that in Ciénaga the strikers were committing all kinds of outrages, the army seized the train to mobilize troops to the different towns, preventing normal circulation; this information proved false and the train returned to Cienaga during the first hours of the next day. The community remained isolated and without the possibility to use the train as a transportation means. The train was used by the militaries for the surveillance of plantations.   A State of Siege declaration was expected and this increased tension among strikers who organized collective bodies in different locations to prevent the work of producers. Detentions continued. The train detention by the military and the impossibility to take bananas out due to the positions of the strikers and small landowners, the harvested fruit began to rot.   The Workers Union used the newspaper Vanguardia Obrera and other pasquinades to inform about their position and to keep public opinion updated. On December 5th, alleging that the strikers had managed to get weapons, the government decreed the State of Siege. This was not made public to the workers and for this reason they became more exacerbated.   A pressure mechanism used to obtain the support of merchants was the fact of creating solidarity to boycott the public market stores and other commercial firms if the transaction was not authorized by the Workers Union. This way, merchants could not sell if they did not have the "permission". To accomplish this policy the union had 5.000 workers acting as vigilantes. This situation led the UFC to ask the government if the State was in condition to protect its interests. The State response was dubious. In its effort to reach an equilibrium between the pressure of the company and that of the workers, it submitted a communication where it stated that it would analyse the situation and would take the corresponding steps.   The workers' unrest for not feeling the State support led them to radicalization of their protest and since that moment, seizures of banana farms took place in different municipalities. There were confrontations between land owners, the military and the workers. It is worth mentioning the events in Sevilla, where workers detained a group of soldiers.   As the tension increased with this last event the Ministry Council declared general alteration of public order on December 5th, and gave special faculties to Minister Arrazola to act as a mediator between the parties and positioned General Cortés Vargas as Civil and Military Chief. This intervention was justified by the economic losses of the socio-economic and political system of the nation because it had been estimated that up to that moment the losses exceeded one million dollars and given the fact that the fierce position of the workers had stopped communications and transportations and even there had been seizures in several localities and there was fear concerning the situation of Santa Marta.   The government sent information to the United Press as follows: "The government has decreed the State of Siege in the Province of Santa Marta where the workers of the United Fruit Company maintain a strike lasting several days. General Carlos Cortés Vargas has been appointed Civil and Military Chief". On the other hand, the national press and especially that of the capital announced: " there has never been a longer and more numerous strike in the country than this of the workers of Magdalena. Thirty-two thousand workers have been in total inactivity for more than thirty days in the banana region, there are no signs that this situation will have a favourable solution"   Events reached their peak in Ciénaga. The workers had concentrated for a pacific demonstration in the evening of the 5th of December. The Governor Nuñez Roca decreed the dispersion of the demonstration. The workers did not receive this well; they declared that authorities had taken this decision with the support of the UFC and the militaries without the presence of workers' representatives. This made clear to them that authorities were defending the interests of the Company and the local "bananacracy"and not theirs as Colombian workers. The concentration ended in a protest.   The militaries obeyed the orders of the Governor and it was authorized to follow orders and demand the workers to dissolve the demonstration as it was not authorized.   The text was read in the square and at the same time the troop took positions. There were approximately 1.500 strikers in the square.   The army gave the strikers 15 minutes to disperse and the workers' answer was a the massive agitation of the Colombian flags and shouts related to the workers movement. The army responded with drumbeats and the menace to repel the strikers. Three bugle warnings were given, but nevertheless the strikers remained in their positions. A deep silence reigned in the square and the menace of the army became an unfortunate reality when the shout "Shoot" was uttered. Rifles and machine guns were discharged against the defenceless and unarmed demonstrators. In minutes the ground of the square was tinted with blood.   Once the attack of the army against their own fellow citizens ended, the sight was dantesque. The cadavers, the wounded and their relatives were troubling scenes. These events took place at the dawn of December 6th: a brutal aggression against a workers' demonstration.   The news invaded the media and the first chronicles appeared with living information about the tragic balance of the events. The first report on the newspaper "La Prensa" from Barranquilla informed of 8 people killed and 20 wounded. After a week, the same newspaper mentioned 100 dead and 238 wounded. Meanwhile official sources and diplomatic communications signalled the number of people killed as being 1.000. This number, and along with other kind of testimonies collected, agree that the number of killings was over a thousand and that the militaries loaded the trains with the corpses and buried them in mass graves in inaccessible areas and up to the present times they have not been localized.   This repression caused a massive exodus of the terrified population. They abandoned the zone and migrated to different parts of the country for fear of military persecution and arrestment. Many of them left their scarce possessions behind.   National and international media widely covered this event. Both the UFC and the government tried to manipulate the information to protect their image. The press echoed and broadcasted the sometimes biased news, informing about "combats" between the army troops and the "revolutionaries" and that as a result of these combats, 8 "bandits" were killed and 20 were wounded. The War Ministry insisted that "in Magdalena there was no strike, but a revolution".   Other newspapers such as "La Prensa" from Barranquilla, issued their edition of December 8th in red characters as a reference to this event that brought mourning to the entire country and as a symbolic commemorative act.   Referring to a communication sent to the United Press, the War Ministry informed officially that in the attack of the strikers against the troops there had been 8 dead and 20 wounded and that in order to control the revolutionary outbreaks against state order, the immediate mobilization of more troops had been ordered. They would arrive from cities of the interior of the country. It also emphasised the position of the government that the workers' situation in Magdalena was delicate and that vigorous decisions had to be taken in order to solve this issue. It also informed that beside Ciénaga, other localities had to be intervened.   The Times from New York informed in a biased and extended way that the turmoil in the Colombian Banana Region was provoked by Mexican incendiaries, who had led the process of the Mexican Revolution, two decades earlier. It also gave details about the aspects of the banana strike that were consequences of the expiration of the Barco Concession .   At the same time the UFC issued a press communication to the New York agencies and the worldwide correspondents declaring: "the difficult situation experienced during the past days in the Colombian banana region, where the company has valuable interests, has quite improved in the last 24 hours and the dispatches sent from the scene, give rise to expectations for a prompt solution of the conflict surged between the workers and the company which ended in an extended strike of revolutionary nature".   While the American press provided biased information, trying to defend the multinational interests and that of their government, the national press analysed the situation with greater objectivity. The daily newspaper "El Tiempo" from Bogotá commented in an extended note that most of the claims of the strikers were righteous improvement of working conditions. Nevertheless, due to its conservative position, the editorial stated that they did not agree with the strike since they considered that the workers had a bad leadership and they made the leaders responsible for what had happened. They reminded the authorities that force is not the supreme reason as the only system to solve a conflict since violence is not a valid option to impose certain vindications.   In response to these events and as a protest for the massacre, several offices of the United Fruit and the railway were set on fire and destroyed. The hard situation caused by the army repression and the lack of jobs led to the assault of the company's stores where people seized food.    "It is not about fixing anyhow a difficult situation, it is about avoiding more critical events in the immediate future. Therefore we need a wise, prudent, political Colombian, who does not forget the circumstances regarding the conflict. Someone who does not forget how the United Fruit Company manipulates the political and civil life of Magdalena and who does not think it indispensable to send troops for hunting workers as animals. Someone who will not be hard and inflexible with them and subordinated and honey mouthed with the company agents"   After the massacre, the workers who managed to escape emigrated to other areas of the region and new versions of the events started to become public. It was the version of the defeated. This version informed the public opinion about the concentration in the Ciénaga square and not in farms as had been informed by authorities to justify the fact of not being able to notify the exact number of deaths.   On December 10th after a convulsed weekend, the headings announced "the revolutionaries' flee in stampede to the Sierra Nevada," "government troops completely defeated the strikers "; the War Minister informs that there were more deaths during the last combats". In general, the press informed about a revolutionary movement which confronted the military forces and that the army was responding with rigor, but that there had not been any excess on their part. The banana zone was returning to normal, as well as the train service between Ciénaga and Santa Marta and the steam boat service between Ciénaga and Barranquilla. They also informed that since public order had been reestablished, businesses had already opened and that the exodus of the population had ended.   General Cortés Vargas issued a decree through which the revolutionaries of Magdalena were declared a gang of outlaws. The decree consisted of three articles and in one section, as a justification, it was stated that the rebel strikers committed all kinds of outrages: arson in public and private property, pillage, interruption of telegraphic and telephonic communications, destruction of railways, assault of citizens who did not agree with their communist and anarchist doctrine. This was the justification for decreeing martial law to give security to citizens and to re-establish public order. On the other hand the workers' leaders and accessories should be prosecuted to face their responsibilities. And to finish, the public force was authorized to use their guns.   At the same time troops were sent to avoid the surviving strikers' flee to the Sierra Nevada and the Departament of Atlántico. To accomplish this all the towns neighbouring the banana zone were alerted. Numerous detentions occurred and the prisoners were sent to Ciénaga to be judged by a Martial Court.   Wow…. Fucking bananas caused all this shit… Well obviously not than JUST bananas but holy shit man.    So the crazy thing is United Fruit company continued to operate did so long after this incident until eventually after the the suicide of Eli Black things unraveled and the company went away. Or did it? Well it did not. In fact the company is now still a huge banana company called… Chiquita! But at least all that bullshit is on the past… Oh wait wait… No it's not!    While Chiquita is not actively massacring people, in 2007, it admitted to paying $1.7 million to the United Self-Defense Forces of Columbia (A.U.C.), a far-right paramilitary group responsible for thousands of killings and some of the worst massacres in Colombia. The A.U.C. was designated by the United States as a terrorist group at the time and Chiquita was forced to pay $25 million for violating counterterrorism laws. In particular, the A.U.C. targeted labor leaders, liquidated problem employees, and removed people from lands needed for cultivation.   “They are so bad that in 2001, even the Bush administration was forced to designate them as a terrorist organization,” said Terry Collingsworth, a Labor and Human Rights Attorney. He proceeds to say that multinational corporations had automatically aligned with the A.U.C. “They've made it safe for business here. That's what they do.” Collingsworth states, from his and his associates' reporting, that Chiquita likely paid much more than $1.7 million to the A.U.C.   Over much of the 20th century, banana companies like United Fruit effectively took over governments in countries like Guatemala and Honduras, leading to the countries' model being known as “banana republics”. A banana republic would describe politically unstable countries economically dependent on bananas as a sole export and product, and it has been diversified to include other limited-resource products. The CIA would strong-arm these governments to protect the business interests of banana companies at the expense of workers and people who lived in those countries, often propping up repressive regimes. With a historic priority of keeping the costs of bananas low, banana companies were willing to do whatever it took to keep prices low, from stifling labor movements, keeping wages low, and strong-arming governments. The United Fruit Company did it then, and Chiquita Brands does it now.   In 1999, President Clinton apologized to Guatemala, saying that “support for military forces and intelligence units which engaged in violence and widespread repression was wrong, and the United States must not repeat that mistake.” Movies:   Horror movies about killer food   https://screenrant.com/funniest-horror-b-movies-murderous-food/

Real Science Exchange
Biosecurity Imperatives and the Feed Supply

Real Science Exchange

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 63:57


Guests: Dr. Jordan Gebhardt, Kansas State University and Dr. Chad Paulk, Kansas State University Co-host: Dr. Zack Lowman, BalchemTonight we are talking feed supply biosecurity and the many challenges we face as we try to keep various animal diseases at bay. In late July, the USDA announced that African Swine Fever was detected in the Dominican Republic, inching dangerously close to the U.S. swine herd.Dr. Jordan Gebhardt explained that African Swine Fever (ASF) is caused by a virus. He discussed the history of the virus and the impact that a disease like this can have on the animals, the producer and the industry. He also expressed his concern of the virus spreading to South America or Central America from its current location in the Dominican Republic. (7:26)Dr. Chad Paulk discussed the potential contamination of the feed supply if or when the virus reaches the United States and how the feed supply chain can be changed to help reduce the spread of the virus. (16:36)Dr. Jordan Gebhardt explains that African Swine Fever can only infect swine - domesticated pigs or wild boar. If a human were to consume a contaminated product, there would be no threat to them whatsoever. (24:03)Dr. Chad Paulk discusses prevention of the virus and steps to take in order to reduce the risk. He gave the example of a feed mill processing a potential contaminated product and producing particles in the air that could contaminate the airspace of a road that has a lot of swine in transit. The steps will have to be used by everyone involved in production to help eliminate the spread of the virus so it needs to be built into the industry culture if that time comes. (40:00)Dr. Jordan Gebhardt discusses the importance of making biosecurity practices convenient for the producer and their employees. If it is convenient for employees, they will be more likely to stick with the biosecurity measures to go about their daily routine. (51:43)Dr. Chad Paulk and Dr. Jordan Gebhardt both discuss the importance of working together as an industry to prevent this disease from making it to the United States as well as working together with biosecurity as an industry if/when it does get here. (1:01:05)To find Dr. Jordan Gebhardt's presentation from the K-State Swine Day, visit Latest findings from the K-State-Vietnam partnership – Jordan Gebhardt If you like what you heard, please remember to hit the 5-star rating on your way out. Don't forget to request your Real Science Exchange t-shirt. You just need to like or subscribe to the Real Science Exchange and send us a screenshot along with your address and size to ANH.marketing@balchem.com. Please subscribe and share with your industry friends to bring more people to join us around the Real Science Exchange virtual pub table. This podcast is sponsored by Balchem Animal Nutrition and Health. 

Confessing Animals
The Gossipers In My Mind: Patrick Grant

Confessing Animals

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 53:06


Patrick Grant grew up in Overland Park, KS where he is now a high school Spanish teacher. After graduating from the University of Kansas, Patrick worked with a Christian collegiate ministry in San Antonio, Texas and then the Dominican Republic. In his free time he enjoys playing sports, hanging with friends and family, and being overly-particular about beer and coffee. https://www.facebook.com/patrick.grant.98Seasoned and fresh-faced artists (of every genre) discuss how to make creativity work within the complexities and challenges of adult life. Confessing Animals podcast co-hosts Jen Harris + Vanessa Aricco, both working writers, unveil the secrets and struggles of creative living in a rapid fire capitalist society. One guest at a time, Jen + Vanessa ask, How Does Your Life Translate to Art?Intro & music provided by Ashley Raines www.ashleyrainesmusic.comFollow us on Instagram @confessinganimalspodcastListen, Love & Support Us!https://www.patreon.com/confessinganimalspodcastSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/confessinganimalspodcast)

ADHD Aha!
ADHD runs in the family (Michelle's story)

ADHD Aha!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 26:57


Like many parents, Michelle Lassiter started to notice her own ADHD symptoms during her son's evaluation for ADHD. In this episode, Michelle, whose mom is from the Dominican Republic, looks back on how ADHD impacted her growing up in Mexico, Venezuela, and Puerto Rico. And she connects this to her son's experience with ADHD — confusing signs, feeling “stupid,” and the strengths they share. Michelle also talks about parenting a child with ADHD when you have ADHD yourself: “When you're also lacking those skills, it is very tough.”Understood is a nonprofit and social impact organization dedicated to shaping a world where the 1 in 5 people who learn and think differently can thrive. Learn more about ADHD Aha! and all our podcasts at u.org/podcasts. Copyright © 2021 Understood for All, Inc. All rights reserved. Understood is not affiliated with any pharmaceutical company.

Entrepreneur Stories 4⃣ Inspiration
225: Surviving an Arson Attack to Making it BiG in the Boating Business - Rob Hannah of Chicago Yacht Works

Entrepreneur Stories 4⃣ Inspiration

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 79:37


Rob Hannah is the CEO and Managing Partner of Chicago Yacht Works. In 2011, Rob redirected his business experience to the marine industry after assuming control of Chicago Yacht Yard, a full-service marine service and storage facility located on the river in downtown Chicago. In a short time, this business has been transformed into an industry leader with significant gains in both service and storage as well as adding both brokerage and new boat sales to their business lines. They now boast the Midwest's only Formula Factory Showroom and Factory Service Center. January 2015, Rob changed the name to Chicago Yacht Works to better reflect their expanding business. The company is now recognized as the premier marine sales, service, and storage facility in lower Lake Michigan and one of the best in the Great Lakes. This Episode is Sponsored By: Small business owners know the digital marketing world is constantly evolving, every change means spending time finding and keeping track of vendors for different projects. That's why you need Anthem Software to be your dedicated partner. Anthem Software provides a whole suite of services – Business Management Software, Digital Marketing, and Consulting, all designed to help your small business grow and thrive against the competition. To learn more about Anthem Software, visit: millionaire-interviews.com/anthemsoftware Laika goes beyond integration, their platform connects you to everyday applications and applies actual human expertise to a robust software that powers your compliance. Laika easily connects to your application and instantly creates tailor policies based on your business. Laika is the only compliance platform that offers a true integrated audit solution, no more messy spreadsheets and miscellaneous audit documents. Listeners can get 20% off when you join, just go to: millionaire-interviews.com/laika What if you could test out your product ideas with target consumers whenever you want before you put all the time and money into development? That's what startups and fortune 500 companies do with Feedback Loop. Get quality feedback from their target customers early and often. Feedback Loop is the test before you invent a product research platform. If you go to: millionaire-interviews.com/feedbackloop you'll get 3 full tests for FREE. With Scribd, you get instant access to millions of eBooks, audiobooks, magazines, and more. You also get thoughtfully curated editor picks and smart recommendations based on what you've read, which makes choosing your next book that much simpler. For just $9.99 per month, enjoy instant access to Sribd's entire library for less than a cost of a single book. Right now, Scribd is offering our listeners a free 60-day trial, go to: millionaire-interviews.com/scribd When it comes to your next business read, you have options. You could pick up that trendy, buzzworthy business book or you could learn the timeless, buzzword free, lessons of a straightforward modern classic. I'm talking about Good Profit by Charles Cook, a CEO with real world track record of decade upon decade of actual exponential business growth. If you want the lessons from someone who has actually done it? Start by visiting: millionaire-interviews.com/goodprofitbook Rommel in the Dominican Republic has a great time talking one-on-one with Austin on how to become a billionaire. If you want to jump on a call with our host, Austin, and have a lively, entertaining, and enriching discussion on becoming a billionaire, then become a Patreon member today. Sign up at millionaire-interviews.com/patreon   Want to Support the Show? Well we'd love for you to join our Patreon Group!  What's in it for you?  Well you'll instantly get a scheduled call from Austin, where he'll help you with your current or future business... Sign-Up Now at millionaire-interviews.com/patreon.

KBS WORLD Radio Korea 24
Korea 24 - 2021.11.22

KBS WORLD Radio Korea 24

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021


Korea24 – 2021.11.22. (Monday) News Briefing: The government has assessed last week's COVID-19 risk level for the nation as "high” and the Seoul metro region as "very high," in a new five-point scale system. This comes as the nation reported 2,827 new cases on Monday, the highest number for a Monday. The number of severe cases stayed above 500 for the third straight day. (Eunice Kim) In-Depth News Analysis: President Moon Jae-in held a town hall meeting with members of the public on Sunday to answer questions about his major policies. This was only the second such event during his presidency, and with less than 6 months left of his time in office, it was likely his last. Most questions were centered around the coronavirus situation and people’s livelihoods, but as this meeting came during election campaign season, no questions related to politics or the presidential candidates were allowed, which led to criticism that it did not serve to answer questions that the public most wanted to ask. Law professor Kim Ki-chang (김기창) from Korea University joins us on the line to provide his review of the event. Korea Trending with Walter Lee: 1. The police are facing strong criticism for failing to save a woman under police protection from her ex-boyfriend, who stabbed her to death. (흉기 찔려 숨진 신변 보호자, 경찰 대응 논란) 2. The Supreme Court overturned lower court rulings to find a bus driver liable for injuries that a passenger received when they fell as the bus stopped. (버스 정차 전 일어나 다친 승객…대법 "기사 책임") 3. The new Korean fantasy horror series ‘Hellbound’ was reportedly the most-watched show on Netflix on Saturday. (넷플릭스 '지옥' 공개 하루 만에 전 세계 드라마 1위) Monday Sports Round-up: Last Thursday, the KT Wiz completed their sweep of the Doosan Bears in the KBO Korean Series, securing their first ever championship. Sports reporter Yoo Jee-ho from the Yonhap News Agency wraps up the series for us, as well as the latest twist in the football K League 1 title race, and golfer Ko Jin-young’s win in the final championship of the LPGA season to capture both the Player of the Year and money titles. Morning Edition Preview with Mark Wilson-Choi: - In tomorrow’s Korea Times, Kwon Mee-yoo writes about “The Republic of Color” exhibition that showcases the vibrant culture of the Dominican Republic. - Tomorrow’s Korea Herald features a piece by Kan Hyeong-woo that delves into why politicians in Korea often visit graves and national cemeteries.

Spiritual Dope
Milagros Phillips A New Perspective on Race Healing

Spiritual Dope

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 61:51


Spirituality encompasses the light and the dark… with the darkness meaning your shadows… without exploration, you may never uncover your truth. ⁠ ⁠ Join me this weekend with Milagros Phillips as we have an open conversation regarding spirituality, race, and more.⁠ ⁠ Racism is one of the most divisive issues in America today. From Charlottesville, VA to Ferguson, MO, tensions about race relations are high. ⁠ ⁠ There are many people who feel that racism is too sensitive a topic to discuss, but if we don't have the conversation around racism, how do people know what is acceptable and what isn't? ⁠ ⁠ This is an issue that will not disappear on its own or through silence.⁠ Connect with Milagros here: https://www.milagrosphillips.com/ and here: https://www.instagram.com/theracehealer/ The below is a machine transcript from otter.ai and has not been edited: Unknown Speaker 0:00 Your journey has been an interesting one up to hear you've questioned so much more than those around you. You've even questioned yourself as to how you could have grown into these thoughts. Am I crazy? When did I begin to think differently? Why do people in general appear so limited in this process? Rest assured, you are not alone. The world is slowly waking up to what you already know inside yet can't quite verbalize. Welcome to the spiritual dough podcast, the show that answers the questions you never even knew to ask, but knew the answers to questions about you, this world, the people in it? And most importantly, how do I proceed? Now moving forward? We don't have all the answers, but we sure do love living in the question. Time for another head of spiritual dub with your host, Brandon Handley. Let's get right into today's episode. Brandon Handley 0:41 Hey, there's spiritual dope. I'm on here today with Milagros Phillips and she is affectionately known as the race healer. logros has been facilitating programs for over 35 years on race literacy, racial conditioning and healing from racism that inform transform and lead to inspired action. Programs are presented at educational institutions, fortune 100, companies, corporations and public courses seminars, a keynote speaker TEDx presenter, three times author or four times four time author, and certified coach for logros fourth book cracking the healers code, a prescription for healing racism and finding wholeness has been, it's been released recently, and we'll lagosians work comes from lived experience and is backed by historical and scientific research. It comes from walking through the shadow to find her light and in the process helping others find theirs. What she brings to this work is great compassion, a deep understanding of race and an awareness of people's individual and collective power. Waters. I'm gonna I'm gonna direct everybody else. So to your website to get the rest of your bio there. I think that should get us get us fired up there. Milagro Phillips 1:53 How are you doing? I'm doing well. Thank you. Thank you so much for inviting me to be here to have this conversation with you. Brandon Handley 2:00 Absolutely, definitely looking forward to it. So I usually like to start these off with the whole idea that you know, you and I are kind of vessels for Source Energy, right? Call it what you want. And the idea is that somebody tuning into this podcast today that's going to hear a message that made specifically for them, it's going to be delivered through you. And it can only be delivered through you at this time in this place. What is that message today? That we're one human family, and we have a history that has never been healed? has barely been told, that gets in the way of us being that one human family that one global village. I really like that concept. It's funny. My children had a course called I think they went to a school called like the global village. This last year they did at home. Courtney didn't go into school traditionally, right. So they did at home studies. And that was the the coursework that they did. And you know, it's a global village, right. I mean, how else? How else could we look at it? And I guess that that's a little bit about what we'll be talking about today. Right? I mean, I'd love to just kind of, you know, talk to you about some of the work that you you're doing. Let's talk about how you became to be known as the race healer, which we'll just start right there. Milagro Phillips 3:29 Sure. Yeah, I was having a conversation with a friend about my work. And he said to me, Oh, you're here to be hunted if you're here to be one of the human race healers. And so we joked about how you know, the acronym was HRH, and which of course, he was like, of course, you know, Her Royal Highness, that would be you. Right. So so we got rid of the human piece. We just left it as race healer. And he kept calling me that and I really resisted that, you know, that title for a very long time. And then I finally I actually went to, to New York to have some work done on my website. And one of the women that was working on the website said, Well seems to meet your race healer. And I was like, okay, message from spirit. You're hearing it more than once you probably pay attention. And so to that became my nickname the race healer. Brandon Handley 4:42 Yeah, I mean, what what was your resistance to it? Like, who Milagro Phillips 4:46 am I to have a title like that? You know, I mean, I There have been things in my life that I've resisted like, when it comes to this work. For instance, I got my calling when I was 13 years old, the day that Dr. King died And, and I talked about that in the book, I locked myself in the bathroom to cry and my father kept knocking on the door and going okay in there. And I, you know, I keep saying, Yeah, I'm fine, but it really wasn't. And at some point while I was in there, just sobbing my eyes out, actually heard a voice, I said, Your to continue the work. And I had no idea what that meant. Except that I knew there was no way in the world I was ever gonna do race work like that was just not I'm not doing it, you know? And eventually, you know, obviously, I said yes to the column. But what's really interesting is that in that saying, yes, which, by the way, took decades for me to actually say yes to my calling. What I realized was that I sort of look back on my life, I realized I came in wired to do that work. You know, the people who were my parents, the place where I was born, the things that, like, who has a history like this. So I'll give you an example. My mother's best friend, this is when I was a little girl in the Caribbean, and mother's best friend lived around the block from us, and their backyard abutted our backyard. And at night, my mother was she was going to go visit her friend, and she would take me with her, we would walk through the backyard, because obviously that was the shortcut, right. And I remember being terrified of my favorite tree, which was huge with this huge avocado tree in the backyard. It was a beautiful tree. And I love this tree. And during the day, this tree was like my best friend sit under it to read. I was like, I learned to cook under that tree and just absolutely love this tree. So at night, though, I was terrified of that tree. I always felt like if I opened my eyes in the dark, I would see people hanging from that tree. Now I'm just a little girl, okay, like, between the ages of we lived in a house till I was eight. So I must have been between five and six years old. And it was rumored that they had hung slaves on that tree. And so I you know, like, who has a history like that you don't me like it just sort of, you know, politics and people in the south where it's like, yeah, it wasn't just a rumor. You know, we actually saw people being wrong from these trees. But, you know, in things that my father would say, and my mother would say, I mean, you know, I look back and I realized, wow, I spent a lifetime preparing to do this work. Brandon Handley 7:44 And I think that that makes sense. Especially when you said you know, you you heard the calling. And at a young age, right. Which sounds to me like it was because it was delivered by spirit. I don't know what kind of your your spiritual upbringing was at that point. But I mean, you we all kind of resist that, that first calling? Well, not everybody you hear that call me like, not me. Not now. This isn't this isn't for me, I'm gonna go do these 90,000 Other things that I feel like I should be doing other than this. Because to your point, you said, Who am I? Right, who am I and to play such a large role. But I think it's Joseph Campbell kind of talks about in the hero's journey in the call, right? That call doesn't go away that call like it will still kind of follows you around like a lost puppy is like, Are you sure? Milagro Phillips 8:39 Until you say yes. Brandon Handley 8:40 Right. I mean, I think I mean, I really agree to that. I think that that's right. And and and to your point, like, you're building up to that you are the perfect person for that calling. And when you feel that calling you kind of open up and apparently right for books. Can you do all the work? Right, right. Right. So I mean, I I'm not too familiar with, and I'm curious as we're having this kind of racism talk. What was the Caribbean like, I mean, versus the state. So you're there to your eight and then you come to the States I imagine. What was that? Yeah, no actually came Milagro Phillips 9:19 when I was the dance. And, I mean, obviously it was, it was a huge difference, right? The first thing that happened was, I came the beginning of November. And I remember my sister picked me up at the airport with a big fur coat. And, and I was wearing my, my cabana hat and my you know, it was dressed for the Caribbean right? It's got what else would I have been dressed with these short bobby socks and the whole thing and and I put on the scope. We walk outside and we get into a taxi. And all of a sudden this white stuff starts to fall on the taxi is nighttime And I said to my sister, that she goes nearly no, in other words, you better get used to it. So that in and of itself was quite a shock, you know, and of course, the cold air because you're not used to that, you know, it's sort of Olson's is this big shock, like, you stepped into a refrigerator kind of thing, you know, so. So there's that. And then, of course, I didn't speak the language at the time, so I had to learn to speak English. And, and just, you know, in also going from living in a house that was, you know, it was one floor, and living on a fifth floor, fourth floor, in an apartment building, it was just, you know, and instead of a backyard, there was a park across the street. So we were lucky, because we had a park across the street, of our apartment in New York, but, but it was just, it was just completely different, completely different. I was talking with someone recently, and I said, you know, we don't stop to think that people are migrating today, for the same reason that they have always migrated for the same reason that the people in the Mayflower migrated from Europe to come to the continental USA, and to go to other parts of the world. And that's because of, you know, people normally migrate because of food insecurity, housing insecurity, they migrate because of natural disasters, famines, and in you know, things like that. And wars, obviously, you know, and skirmishes and things like that. And so, you know, we forget that. And I think it's important for people to remember to be more compassionate, and to realize that the people who are who are at the border, are coming here for the same reasons that the Europeans came here when they came in the 1600s, and the 1700s 1800s, early 1900s, and so on. And how a lot of them were not considered white, you know, the Irish were not considered white, when they first came to this country, neither were the Italians, you know, and people had to lose their accent to assimilate, they have to stop speaking their own language to assimilate. So there were things that you had to do in order to be able to fit in, the difference is, if you're a black or brown person, you never do fit in, because the structure is not set up, for you to fit in. And so, you know, becoming aware of the ways in which immigrating and leaving your land behind affects you, at the psychological, emotional, spiritual level, you know, people also left their country, because they didn't have spiritual freedom. You know, and that's a huge thing for people to be able to practice their religion and their spirituality in the way that they want to do it. And so, you know, just being aware of all of that is extremely important. And then understanding the historical context as to why people had to leave Europe when they did, you know, in the place was rife with diseases, there was no sanitation. And so there was a lot of sickness, and you had only three months to grow your food. So a lot of people were starving and malnutrition, you can't even think straight when you're malnutrition, you know, not to mention the fact that the Crime and Punishment, the way that it was set up was something you know, it was set up to, it was basically based on violence, to traumatize, to destabilize to control. And so when the Europeans traveled the world and began to colonize the rest of the world, they brought with them what they had, which was their own unresolved trauma, the violence that they had experienced, receiving perpetrated upon the people that they were coming across. And then they were the diseases and things like that, that they brought. But they did the same thing to others that have been done to them. They made sure that people couldn't practice their religion or their, their spirituality, they had to let go of their languages, you know, the few native tribes that did survive. And the Africans that survived the Middle Passage, were were they had to give up their language. They had to give up their spiritual practices. They had to, you know, they, they had to fit in in the way that they were being made to fit in to this system. And when you stop to think about the fact that, you know, people who grow in cold climates who only have about three months to grow their food, who look out into their world, nine months out of the year, and there isn't even a leaf on the tree, their consciousness is the consciousness of lack, where people who are in places where it's always green, it's always lush, if the papaya is not growing the mangoes growing or, you know, something is always growing. So you can always feed your family, you have, you know, anyone can build shelter, because shelter is four sticks, and some plantain leaves to keep you from the sun, you know, to shelter you from the heat of the sun, that, you know, you don't really need to cover your body because it's hot, as opposed to you know, cold weather we have to layer up and you know, and so, so the the, the ways in which people did culture had to do with where they lived in the world, where their tribes developed in the world. And the and you know, those ways those cultures work well in their own environment. You know, like, for people in cold climates, it's good for them to preserve food and to be good preservers, because they only have three months to grow their food and whatever they harvest has to last until they can grow and harvest again, right. Whereas if you try to preserve food in hot climates, the food's gonna go bad. So it's, you know that those cultures and things work well in their own environment. The problem is, when you take one culture, and you impose it on other people, and in places where it doesn't belong, and then you get people to stop telling their stories, so they no longer have access to their history, you make them stop speaking their language, so they can't connect to the previous generation, who doesn't speak the same language and campus on the wisdom and the information and so on and so forth. I mean, you start to see what a mess, right? Brandon Handley 16:41 Yeah, no honor. percent. I mean, I see that, that last part, I see that even in a generational divide, where we're separated from even our young and our parents, right, that the whole tribal elder thing kind of goes out there, especially, at least in the Western civilization, and an America where it's like, alright, well, you're. So now that you're not usable, basically, is what we're saying, can you just go finish out your years in this corner, but all that wisdom is going there too. And there's conversations that aren't being had, and there's a lot of wisdom that that's not being had there. And to your point, in regards of the language, there's only a certain way to convey that story. And that's with the authentic language, right? Because a lot of that stuff does not translate into you know, English, right, it loses its it loses its flavor, or as it were. So, I mean, lots of reasons to migrate, understand, like, you know, the racism, definitely, you know, I think that, you know, as a nation, we all forget that. A, we were all immigrants at one point, be, you know, we were not all accepted all the time, regardless of where we think we are right now. But when the question is, what brought your family to the states? And, you know, I know, we talked a little bit about kind of the culture shock and of itself, but one of the things that since we're covering the racism aspect of it, how, you know, what was it I'm not familiar with, how it wasn't a Caribbean for you, right? And then the culture and the acceptance or non acceptance and what it was like for you to fit in, in the States. Milagro Phillips 18:26 Yeah, so um, so it was definitely different. And I remember when I first started to go to school, and I was learning English. Um, I remember that I lived in in one of those neighborhoods that was changing was a mostly Jewish neighborhood. There were some African American families, some Cuban families, and a few Puerto Rican fan was very few Dominicans. This is it 64. And the end of 1964, beginning of 1965, was actually when I started school. And what was interesting was that the reason first of all that I came to this country was because the, my father realized that the US was about to go to war with the Dominican Republic. And he wanted to get the whole family out of there. And we had, you know, his sisters lived in the US and we had cousins here and so on. So he tried to get the entire family out before the end of 64. And sure enough, the United States attacked the Dominican Republic in 1965. And so So you see this this onslaught of Dominican families of a lot of people who were our neighbors in the in the Dr. Ended up being our neighbors in New York, you know, because they tuber escaping what had happened in the country at that time. So again, you know, little things that we don't talk about, because a lot of people don't know that the US went to war with the Dominican Republic, and it was like, you know, this tiny country To mean, and this big US Army and Navy and all of you know, and so, um, so that was the beginning of that. And then, um, then I had to, you know, I was in school, I had to learn the language. And it was really interesting for me, because I remember that the black children didn't play with me because I didn't speak English. The white children in play with me because I was black and Hispanic children and play with me because they didn't want anyone to know that people who look like me came from where they came from. Because what happens is, you know, and, and I explained this to several people. When you, when you go around the US, and, and you look at the Latin X community, people look a certain way, it's mostly lighter skin, or brown skin, people, lighter, brown skinned people who get to get out of those countries. And I was explaining to someone that you have to remember that, that for those of us coming into the US, you have to get a visa, you have to get your visa through the Council of general, the Council of general, usually white males, who bring with them the same racism that they experienced all their lives, which has to do with segregation, and everything else. And so the only people they let out of those countries are people who don't look like me. And we were at that time, we were kind of a novelty, because my, my parents folk, it, both my parents, my entire family was bilingual, except for me, I had at that time, five brothers and one sister, I was the only one who didn't speak any English, but everybody was bilingual. My grandmother never spoke Spanish. And my mother was an American citizen, because she was born in the Virgin Islands. And in 1936, when the Virgin Islands were bought by the US and became the US Virgin Islands, they were they were British Virgin Virgin Islands. When they bought them, they all the people who were on that island who had been born there up until that time, up until 1936, who become American citizens, that my mother could only give citizenship to any of her children who was born in 1936, which I wasn't even thought of back at that time, you know? And so, you know, so there are all these restrictions that are put on those immigrations, and we don't always consider that. And so the people, for the most part, who get to get out of those countries, and for whom it was certainly back in the 50s, and 60s and 70s, easier to get out of those countries are the more European you look, the better your chances of getting a visa to get out. Brandon Handley 22:56 Sure, I mean, that makes sense, given how we roll, right? Like I mean, that's just just kind of, you know, that's definitely a good history of it. Where would you say it is at this point in time? Just like kind of racism in general. You know, what can we do? What do you feel like we are now and some of the work that you're doing? What's the trajectory? Milagro Phillips 23:20 Yeah. So as of the murder of George Floyd, by Derek Shogun. People have awakened. However, however, it's been over a year now. And people are starting to fall asleep, again, is what I've noticed. And unless something happens, and it's on television, and even, you know, I've seen some pretty horrific stuff, be on the news in between the COVID stuff, right? People are not really paying attention like they were before. And I think that when it comes to the subject, people are prone to exhaustion. And the truth is that if we're going to change, we can't afford to stay exhausted, it's okay to be exhausted. And then, you know, take a nap if you need to, but don't fall fast asleep again. Because there's so much work to be done. And there's so much that we don't know that we need to really awaken to and in start changing. I think people don't realize that racism is institutional, systemic, internalized, and interpersonal. And we keep trying to solve it at the interpersonal perspective. Well, you said this, and I should say that and I actually have people say to me, if somebody says so and so what should I respond? And it's like, Are you kidding me? Really, if you can't respond from your heart, there's a problem, right? Like, maybe you should do some really work around it so that you can respond from your heart. And so so there's this whole thing. The reality is that Brandon Handley 24:57 look, you might just want to jump in there real quick, right? Like I mean, I think that There's the the idea. And this would be, you know, again, what do we call it like crusty old white guys, right? Like, you know, coming from come from like that side of the fence. It's like, it's like, alright, well, I want to be sensitive, but I don't even know I was supposed to be sensitive to at this point in time, like, you know? Yeah. Right, cuz I'm just playing devil's advocate. I don't know who that person was like, What am I supposed to say? Like, I just want to have a conversation, and I don't want to come out looking like a jerk. Yeah. And I think that, what do Milagro Phillips 25:30 we do with that is, so here's the thing. Healing takes courage. It just does. It's not for the faint hearted. It just is, doesn't matter what it is, right? Whether whether you're healing from a broken arm, or a broken spirit, it takes courage to be with whatever is in that moment. And then to ask ourselves, why is this still hurting? Why is this hurting so much, you know, that that a lot of it is about becoming self reflective, rather than having a quick response. So that you can be right or so that you can fit in or you can say the right thing or be politically correct. We can't afford to do that anymore. People need to be authentic. And then they also need to say, I don't know what I don't know. You know, and not expect to be taught either, you can say that. I don't know what I don't know. Without an expectation that someone has to teach you. You can begin to ask questions and search for things so that you can start to get your own answers. Because a white person's never going to know what it's like to be a black or brown person or black or brown versus not going to know what it's like to be white. But we have we have a common thread. And we we know now through epigenetics, that we're all related. There's only one human family and one global village. Right. And the fact that we have been misinformed, that is not anyone's fault. But it is our collective responsibility to begin to ask questions, and to sit in uncomfortable conversations. Because if we think that a conversation is uncomfortable, and we want to escape it, can you imagine what it's like to be a black and brown person be stopped by the police? Where there is no conversation? How comfortable? Yeah, look, Brandon Handley 27:28 I mean, look, look, I'm uncomfortable getting stopped by the police. I'm a white guy, right. So I can only imagine. Right? And and you know, and so no idea, like, like we talked about for what are some of the uncomfortable questions that you feel like we should be asking. Milagro Phillips 27:44 So what is the history? What is the real history? Because clearly, we've not been taught the real history. Yeah. And really starting to do our own research, looking into what traumatized our families, what brought our families here, because it was some kind of trauma. You can, you can pretty much bet. I mean, people didn't jump on the Mayflower because it was the Carnival Cruise, you know what I mean? That they were gonna fall off the face of the earth by getting those fish you know, they were willing to do it, they're willing to risk their lives because it was so horrific where they were. So what trauma brought your family here? And how does that still show up in your family? Because we know now through epigenetics, that trauma gets passed down from one generation to another, we also know that it's impossible for someone to to traumatize another person without themselves being compromised. So in other words, both the victim and the perpetrator get to pass on that trauma to their children, their grandchildren, their great grandchildren honor, not up to at least seven generations. And so what we need to do is we need to become race literate. We need to become literate about our history and to see, first of all to understand that there's no such thing as black history. It's American history, okay. The fact that it's been segregated, like everything else has been segregated doesn't change the fact that it's still American history, and what people call Black history is really white history in you see what I mean? Like there's this Brandon Handley 29:21 No, I got it, I get it. Like, I mean, so we've got this this again, this is a point of contention for me where like, there's there's a continuous continuous, like kind of forced segregation, right, where do we get to the point where we can integrate to your point as a human race? Yeah, right. Um, and and I mean, I definitely you know, for what it's worth, you know, my you know, my grandfather came over from Norway right had to you know, American Iron is Americanize his name and all the stuff that we're talking about too, but you know, of course, you know, being white and tall and blue eyed. You know, it probably didn't have the same challenges. But you know, nonetheless, there were challenges came over for a reason. So I think that that that that the trauma or that conversation that you're talking about can be had on both ends. And especially as we come at it, you know, you and I are having a mature conversation, right? Or a conversation at least just says, Hey, you know? Yeah, that's a lot of messed up things happen, right? So a lot of these things were outside of you and I are control, what can we do to facilitate, you know, something cohesive and compassionate going forward? Right, what does that what does that picture look like? Versus you when we're talking this evening, I've even seen the Latino community losing their mind over being called like, Latinx. Right below, we can't, like we can't even say Latinx. Right. And it's another thing that's kind of being forced that like, I saw something today, about what you're saying, like Black History Month, there's this Latin Heritage Month, like, why is it have to be like this constant like segregation, you know, people, I think, should be proud of, of, or at least know their story. Right? Here's my story. This is, you know, not even like, you know, and to your point, like, you're coming from the Caribbean, right? And you've got all these other people like, No, you can't have people knowing about, you know, you like you're talking about the Latino crowd saying we can't, you know, be associated with you. And so there's, there's different stories, and I think that they all deserve to be told and heard. But how do we how do we celebrate the differences versus? Versus being afraid of them? Milagro Phillips 31:42 Yeah, I think that I think there's, there's room for an awareness of both. I think that if we are too much into the celebration, without acknowledging the pain, then the shadow eats us up. And if we're too much into the shadow without seeing the hope, then the shadow eats us up. Either way the shadow was right. And so it's unbalanced. It's it's being aware of the fact that we need healing, because what do we do when something hurts, we go to the doctor, right? They ask for a lineage, right? They need your history, right? So understanding the historical context of that pain is is incredibly important, being being courageous enough to walk through the shadow of that, and be able to and willing to admit to the violence of that shadow, being willing to, to really take in, and when I say take care, I mean, listen to another's pain, without judging them or thinking, Well, what's wrong? What did you do wrong, or that kind of thing. And really having a greater sense of compassion for all of us, ourselves and others. And one of the I do a two day intensive. And in that program, one of the the stages of healing and I talk about it in the book, is forgiveness. And that's a huge one to ask for people who are continuously being re traumatized, and experiencing violence toward them. And yet, it's part of the healing process. And, you know, getting to that place where you can actually not, not just give it word, right, but really internalize that forgiveness, and that compassion and the realization that traumatize people traumatize others, that we've all been traumatized in one form or another, that if we don't become aware of that we will continue to traumatize each other without even being aware that we're doing it. Except that we know that there's a discomfort in these conversations, or there is something you know, let me like those. Brandon Handley 34:05 Tommy it is it's I mean, I know that I was talking to one of our network diversity specialist sounds like and I told her, I said, you know, I don't, I'm probably gonna say the wrong thing. And I'm not doing it on purpose, like I just want to have I just want to be able to talk. Right, and without being a landmine. And again, I appreciate this, you know, to appreciate the sensitivity, right, the sensitivity and awareness needs to be there. But I don't have you know, we, it'd be great to kind of work around that fear of having an open conversation. I don't think that you should be afraid. Like, I'm not really afraid, right of having an open conversation and, and being honest about it, right. To your point, like when you said earlier, if we can have an honest, authentic conversation, there really shouldn't be fear involved with it if we're talking from the heart, right. So I think Milagro Phillips 34:55 some of the fear is we we sort of have hang our lives on specific things, right? And there's the threat that someone's going to tell us something that dislodge. Is that, right? So, so if, if we believe that certain people or certain way, and that's what we've learned and that kind of thing. And then somebody comes along and says, Oh, actually, it isn't like that, you know, that rails, your cage, and it causes cognitive dissonance and people are very uncomfortable with that. And very often, what happens when you want to have a conversation about race in a mixed environment is that you trigger people stress response is fight flight or paralysis, they either want to defend themselves or come up with some way of either they get angry with you, or they want to flee the conversation, or else they freeze, and don't know what to say and don't know what to do. And so just being aware, and having compassion around the fact that that actually does happen to people. And it also knowing that we first of all, we don't all have the whole story, and probably never will. We need to be open to hearing people's stories and listening to people, and being open to hearing what they have to say, regardless of the color of their skin, where they come from, or whatever, without scaring them into silence. And we do that a lot. When it comes to the issue of race, you put some research to say something right away, somebody will jump on them. And you can't say that or you know, or whatever. And so it makes it difficult to have authentic conversations when we're not free to say what's in our hearts, and to express it our way. And one of the things that I talk about in the book are the languages of the caste system, because we live under a caste system and explain all that. It's not like the Indian caste system, this particular world. I'm sorry, Brandon Handley 37:00 lagosians. Just a new book, The new new book, you're talking about? No. Yeah. Yeah. Okay, here's Caracas. Milagro Phillips 37:07 Yeah, um, that in that caste system, because we all live under the same umbrella. But we've internalized that differently. And as a result of that, what happens is that people speak different languages. And we're all speaking English, but we're speaking it from a completely different perspective. And what often happens is, let's say, a politician makes a comment. A white male politician makes a comment to be specific, right? And a person of color will say, Well, that was really racist what that person just said. And watch fight flight or paralysis, right? So the politician immediately defend themselves. And if they can't defend themselves, they'll get somebody else to defend them. It's usually another white male politician who speaks his language, right? And that person will say, of course, he's not a racist. Here's what he said wasn't racist, blah, blah, blah, right. And, and of course, to them, it doesn't sound racist, because they speak the same language, the language of supremacy. And at that level, they can hear each other and they say, what they say about and in front of people of color, and they understand each other people of color, hear it from their filters, that says, Okay, this could be a dangerous situation for me, I need to be conscious of the fact that this person just made a racist comment. I'm not sure that I'm safe with that person. So they'll say what you just said was racist, but to the person, it doesn't sound racist, it wasn't great, blah, blah, blah, you know, and so everybody speaking from behind their filters of the caste system, which means that you can't hear people properly. And I want to I'm so sorry, apologize. I have to plug my computer in, which I did not do earlier. So I don't want to lose you. I am so sorry about this. Brandon Handley 39:07 Sorry, why you're doing that? I mean, I think that what made disarm somebody or in that conversation, like, what's some of the language we can use? is racism, even the right word? Or do you just feel uncomfortable? Right, what you're saying to me is just making me feel uncomfortable triggers, you know, makes me feel unsafe, right, is by saying something like that. Do you feel like that might open the dialogue a little bit differently? And, you know, I get what you're saying too, like, I'm a big I'm a huge believer in filters like we've we've all we've all got our own set of filters and, you know, kind of our heritage wherever we were brought up from we're coming with our own, you know, package of, you know, filter packets or right we all come with it and Depending on where we're at, and you know, so we got, you know, a couple of white politicians, and they say some stuff and you know, somebody audience, they're like, Yeah, I've heard some stuff like this before. And that's not the right thing to say. And I'm definitely uncomfortable in that, you know, but call it out is racist. It's kind of like what's getting shouted out? Or are they really saying, that makes me feel uncomfortable? Milagro Phillips 40:19 Well, you know, so here's the thing. Racism, when when you really understand it, when you're able to unpack it, what you realize is that it's not a character judgment, it's conditioning. So what you're really saying is, you're revealing your racial conditioning, maybe a longer way of saying it, but it's basically the same thing. Okay. And, and, but what that does, is it then brings to mind that where that person may be functioning from, is that, you know, 600 years of racial conditioning, which doesn't go away. You know, what if people have been integrating since the 1960s, versus verses hundreds of years of this stuff, right, and I'm talking institutionalized, so they were turning to law systemics, they were systems to support those laws internalized because you internalize the environment, you live it, and then you act it out with the other people in your life. Right. And so, when, when we are looking, and that's why I wrote the book, it's like, you know, having a consciousness that, yes, people will say these things, and they need them. And they don't even think there's anything wrong with saying those things. If they're on one side of the spectrum, from the other side of the spectrum. It sounds really ugly, right? And so those people will call you on it. If no one calls you on it, you will continue to do it. Because you're doing better. Or you may just be functioning out of maliciousness. But some people really don't know any better. Right? So Brandon Handley 42:07 Well, I mean, I'll tell you, I'll tell you this real quick, if you don't mind me jumping in, like, you know, so I'm up here in the Northeast Philadelphia area, born in San Francisco, you know, hippie parents growing up, and all that jazz, went down from the Philadelphia area to North Carolina, right outside of Raleigh Durham. And, you know, went hung out with some of my neighbors, we're all hanging out, we're drinking, we're having a good time eating chicken wings and hanging out. And my neighbor starts telling, like these really racist jokes, and I had to pause. It's like, dumbfounded. First of all, I was like, I can't believe like, this does not serve as like, guys. I don't know about you. But like, where I come from, we really don't talk like this. Right. Like, and it was just, to me, I was blown away by the fact that it's still so prevalent. Right? And of course, of course, right? Because as we're talking here, like, I'm not, I'm on the other side of it, right? Like, you know, again, I don't feel to see the impacts. And, you know, it's impossible for me to but it's not possible for me, of course, to have these conversations right with somebody else's experienced it and come at it from a place of compassion. But I just thought I'd throw that in there. Because again, like, wherever you're at, right now, let's say you're from the Northeast from California, or someplace where it's not as institutionalized as you're talking about, right, as it has been. And, you know, they're still holding on to it. It's kind of it's kind of mind boggling. Yeah. So I mean, I'm just I mean, I've experienced, at least again, from, from the old white guy perspective, like, you know, still still experiencing it. And it's, it makes me uncomfortable. So I again, I can only imagine being in a position where one of my co workers as matter of fact, he had bought some property, and he and his mixed race couple, and in North Carolina still had people were still giving them issues. And this is very recently, right. Within the past couple years, they bought some property, and there were some people that wouldn't stop hunting on that property. And they would tell them, they'd be like, Hey, we're our family did we're gonna keep doing it. You can't tell us that. Like, they tried to hold on to it for as long as they could. But like it's in the end, it made them feel uncomfortable, where they just sold the property. And that, to me was a tragedy, right? Like, where are we today that, that this is still a thing. And we want to call ourselves a progressive society. Milagro Phillips 44:30 That's why it's important for people to become race literate. Because when people understand and even if they continue to behave the same way, they're doing it from a conscious place. And when you're when you've got information and you're conscious, you have responsibility. You can choose to ignore that responsibility, but that doesn't mean that responsibility of your awareness goes away. So helping people to become race literate is extremely empowering. and race, literary literacy is the knowledge and awareness of the history of race and awareness that we are, we're all raised in a racial caste system. By the time children are three years old, they can tell you what caste system they belong to. Who are the good people in the back in the caste system? Who are the bad people? Three years old? They've already been racialized, you know? And so, what are we going to do today to change tomorrow, you know, we cannot if we continue to behave, and to do the same way, and to act out of ignorance, and not change our behavior, we're gonna continue to see the same thing for yet another generation, another generation and another generation, like, we have a responsibility to become as aware, and as knowledgeable as we can. And you know, the spiritual path is a path of awareness. We, it's about becoming conscious. It's about feeling things in our bodies, and experiencing them in our emotions, and being open to what that means to us. How does that make us feel? You know, because if it made us feel well, we'd have conversations with everybody in anybody about race, the fact that people are so uncomfortable with the conversation, it tells you, that's where the juice is, that's where the healing needs to happen. That's where the consciousness needs to shift. And ultimately, everybody wants to solve racism, like I said, from the intrapersonal perspective, coming from their heads. But if we don't become aware that it needs to take that 12 inch drop into our hearts, and then another 12 inch into our guts, so we know it, and we are aware of it. And we we realize that part of it is learning to walk in somebody else's shoes long enough to understand why they're hurting. That's when we start to shift. Brandon Handley 46:59 No, I love that. Oh, that. What would you suggest for somebody that's beginning to, you know, to to gain some race literacy? Like what are some of the first steps into into that? What do you recommend? Yeah, Milagro Phillips 47:13 so again, asking questions, doing research, looking into one's personal history, you know, why did your parents come here? What, you know, why are you here now? Right? Understanding that, looking at some of the, the history of Europe, really, and what was going on there that made people want to leave? in droves? Right? What, what are our connections to one another, in terms of being this one human family living on one global village? And what does that mean? And how do we care for one another compassionately? How do we do what we really, I really believe human beings came here, to be connected, to love each other, to learn from one another, to become more conscious together. And a lot of this stuff is keeping us from doing that work, which is the deeper work that we need to do. And so, for me, becoming race literates is the first thing stop being afraid of our history. It's ugly, it's nasty, it is what it is. But if we don't look at it, we keep repeating it. And we are worthy of having the power to create something new, instead of recreating the past and thinking we're creating something new, right. And so having an awareness of our history, allowing our hearts to open to all people, realizing that everyone, everyone on the planet deserves to thrive, and have the opportunity to do that. And so for me, this, this is about becoming conscious, and in really living from the depth of our hearts, not in the love and like kind of, you know, ignoring life kind of way, but really, by being conscious, and bringing that love and that light into all that is happening on our planet today. So that we can create something new to that to leave behind for the next generation. Brandon Handley 49:23 I think that's fantastic. And that that part where you're talking about the love and light, you know, and skipping the shadow, right? Really, it's what I just saw somebody call it spiritual bypassing recently, right? You know, kind of like just like, I'm like, I'm gonna go ahead and if if I just kind of hold this space, but we need to address the shadow, like you're talking about in your biography. I'm assuming that you touched on that and in your book. And again, the most recent book is called Milagro Phillips 49:50 cracking the healers code, prescription for healing racism, and finding wholeness. Brandon Handley 49:57 Great and you can find, you know, yours Barnes and Nobles. Yeah, that kind of thing. Right looking looking for that. Yeah. So awesome. I love it. And, you know, look, we, we've got a lot of work to do. Milagro Phillips 50:09 We can do it. It's one human family. Brandon Handley 50:12 Right. Hey, would you say that we're getting better? Milagro Phillips 50:14 I think we are because part of getting better is becoming conscious. Because when we just we can make different choices. You know. Brandon Handley 50:24 So I think and I actually want to jump all the way back to an area that you talked about, about the exhaustion part. Right. And I think that, I wouldn't say that, you know, again, coming from the white guy view, but you know, COVID Plus, like this heightened, you know, view on on the racism? I think the whole package, everybody's just exhausted in general, but not to fall asleep at the wheel, how can we, you know, how can we do it in a way that energizes us, right, how do you see a way that we can do that? Or is that just a finding a balance that? Yeah, Milagro Phillips 51:05 no, I, I really believe that. We can do this in a way that energizes us. I see, since the death of George Floyd. Every week, I was doing seminars up until this march on race literacy, and just, you know, getting the community to come in and have these experiences, like come in, I mean, unzoom, and have these experiences on a weekly basis. I'm now doing it on a monthly basis. The first, first Monday of the month, I do this lunch and learn so people can, you know, bring their lunch at work to their computer and join this conversation and learn some things I will often share something about, about some historical piece, and then we have discussions about how that history fits into today. How are we repeating that history today, what it looks like and feels like, also exercises, we always end with a meditation to really bring people back into balance before they go back to work. And in, you know, I have a series of programs that I do, I have a two day seminar that I do that I've been doing since 2020, since 2001, so it's 20 years old this year. And it's so powerful, and people always say that they just never see race the same way again, it helps them to heal all kinds of things with their, their own family. Because we use I take people through a universal process of healing that allows them to be able to do that, which is you know, a lot of the stuff that's, that's in the book. So, um, you know, so people can join these conversations to stay awake and stay aware. I know that there are times that people don't want to attend these things, especially white nails, because they feel like they're going to be the bad boy in the room kind of thing. You know, the one that everybody's looking at is, you know, I don't do that in my seminars, because what I'm aware of, is the fact that we've all been misinformed, and those who are misinformed, they're bound to miss create, and it doesn't matter your gender, it doesn't matter your sexual orientation, it doesn't matter the color of your skin, we have all when it comes to race and racism, all of us have been misinformed. And we can't blame people for that. But we can hold them compassionately responsible for their own ability and choices to change. Brandon Handley 53:29 That was fantastic. Those zoom calls the Lunch and Learns is that open to everybody has something, Milagro Phillips 53:36 you can go on my website and get information on that on that program. And it's open to the entire community. And I will continue to do that as long as I can. Brandon Handley 53:49 That's fantastic. That's great that that's available. Thank you for that. So logros at this point of the conversation I kind of look at like anybody tuning into this I mean, obviously you great conversation on the racism and we touched on the spirituality I look at this as a spiritual speed dating, right? Somebody is looking to like get the next fish will connect on this conversation. So I'm going to ask you a question. Basler espiritual black Bachelorette, a number one who to do to do? Move, I think you've already established that kind of like we are all one would you agree that you know kind of we are all one in one shape. Milagro Phillips 54:30 I mean, you know, we're all cousins, some of us 35th cousins and mother's 50th cousins, but we're all related. And we know that through the study of epigenetics, so that's already been established. It's no longer one of these. Oh, you're my spiritual sibling. And yes, absolutely. But you're also my physical sibling. Yeah. And so being aware of that is really important. Brandon Handley 54:56 Now Perfect, perfect. Whoo doo doo doo doo. To, what would you say is our greatest distraction Milagro Phillips 55:09 when it comes to this topic, everything in anything, you know, anything we could throw in the fire, so that we are now focused on the fire and we take our eyes off the ball, right? When it comes to race, because people don't really want to deal with it. It is uncomfortable for most people. And yet, as I said before, can you imagine if it's uncomfortable in a conversation versus being uncomfortable, because, you know, you're you're being beaten to death in the streets or shot or your family member at you've lost them because of this, right? So there are levels of discomfort, right. And some people are more uncomfortable than others, because they are living the violence. And so for those of us who are not, it's important that we show up, even with our discomfort, because we're always going to feel uncomfortable until we start showing up and learning what this is really about. Brandon Handley 56:07 That's fine. No, it's true. Right? There's always a willingness to to not be, you know, uncomfortable as quickly as possible. Right. And, and I can't think of too many topics that are more uncomfortable than Yeah, that's right. Even Even amongst friends. And, you know, just trying to again, you know, because I think sometimes you just feel like the bad guy, like you said earlier, like, you know, I don't know that I go into a room feel like the bad guy, or, you know, the one that's been called out, but it definitely, again, you know, just just wanting to do the right thing, even though I don't know what the wrong thing is. Yeah. Milagro Phillips 56:44 You know, and that's, that's a huge piece. It's like it is the not knowing what the wrong thing is, or, or what is really wrong here. Like, I'm just uncomfortable with this. And in those, there's those who can escape it, right? Because it's sort of like, oh, you know, I don't have to deal with that, right. And there are those who can't. And yet, there's something, you know, um, it's Bradshaw, that wrote in his book, family secrets about how there are secrets and families that people keep and their secrets and families where it's sort of like, people just don't talk about certain things, right. And, and yet everybody acts, reacts and interact out of the family secret, whether they know the secret or not, right. And that's what happens to us as a human family when it comes to this history. Like, we all know, something's off, right? We don't know quite what it is. So I'll give you an example of that. For the most part, people call Haiti, the poorest country in the world, or at least one of the poorest countries in the world. But no one ever talks about the fact that Haiti has been paying reparations to Frances 1825, when they set themselves free in 1804. And from slavery, and the French kept trying to go back in there to re enslaved them. And finally, they use the Doctrine of Discovery to get back in there, and to have them pay reparations all these years. Now, if you are so poor, you can't afford to do anything, let alone pay reparations, right. And so, you know, just the realization that there's so many natural resources on that island that, you know, people are still finding natural resources on those islands. And, you know, when we only tell one piece of the story, what happens is that people get hung up on that one piece. And yet, there's something in our hearts that kind of knows that something's off, you know, people are constantly being told those and $19 a month to support a child in Haiti, when in reality, if friends gave back even one part of all that they siphoned out of there, that island would not be poor, okay, they just would not be poor. And that is not the only place it's all of these places that have been colonized to the so called poor countries, which most of them have happened to have dictators, which I think is quite a coincidence. Right. And those of us who are spiritual know that there are synchronicities, right. And so, you know, so just having an awareness like we need an expanded awareness of this stuff, and not just go with Okay, the going story is, Haiti is a poor country. So you know, Hades, not a poor country. Haiti is a country that has been stolen from Okay, that is very different, because you don't steal where there's poverty, because I know the seal, right? Brandon Handley 59:42 No, no, you're right, right. You don't exploit Milagro Phillips 59:44 people, because they're poor. You exploit them because they have natural resources as a human being. All right. So we need to get really clear about what it is that we're talking about. When we're talking about this stuff, which is why I wrote that book. It's like, people need to get clear Let's let's have an honest, authentic conversation that goes beyond the rhetoric. Oh, it's it's this right like, okay, so why is it that way? You know, it's nuts. Right? Right. You'll, Brandon Handley 1:00:13 we'll be on the first layer go beyond that first layer, right? This, this is what I heard. This is what I was told. You know, why would somebody tell you that? Yeah, I'm kind of getting beyond that, for sure. For sure. It makes sense. I never knew, right? I never knew that I'm, you know, still paying France back. Right. And I think that that's crazy, right? Even Even, even the whole idea of you know, the British selling the Virgin Islands to the state. So to me, it's just boggle your mind. So snowballs my so Ragosa thank you so much for the conversation. I enjoyed it. I think that you know, you're obviously doing some great work. Excited for you to release your fourth book. Understand that you're working on the fifth. And where can we send people to find out more about Sure. Yeah, Milagro Phillips 1:01:01 so you can visit my website Milagros phillips.com. So it's just my name.com. And there's a lot of information on there. And as soon as this podcast is open for posting it on the website, so Brandon Handley 1:01:13 fantastic. Thanks again for being Milagro Phillips 1:01:17 so much. I Unknown Speaker 1:01:20 really hope you enjoyed this episode of the spiritual dove podcast. Stay connected with us directly through spiritual dove. CO You can also join the discussion on Facebook spiritual though, and Instagram at spiritual underscore Joe. If you would like to speak with us, send us an email Brandon at spiritual Co Co. And as always, thank you for cultivating your mindset and creating a better reality. This includes the most thought provoking part of your day. Don't forget to like and subscribe to stay fully up to date. Until next time, be kind to yourself and trust your intuition.

Sin censura, con Raúl Brindis
¡Feliz día internacional del hombre!

Sin censura, con Raúl Brindis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 61:54


Sin censura, con Raúl Brindis
Los olores que más te agradan y los que más detestas

Sin censura, con Raúl Brindis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 61:24


Este súper jueves platicamos del fascinante mundo de los olores. ¡Perfumes, comidas, flores, bebidas! aquellos olores que te agradan y también esos que ni siquiera puedes tolerar. ¿Cuál es tu fragancia favorita? ¿Qué olor detestas? ¿Sabías que el olfato nunca descansa? En ‘Casos y cosas interesantes' te lo contamos y te vas a sorprender.¡Escucha ya nuestro podcast y recuerda esos olores que han sido parte de tu vida!       

Sin censura, con Raúl Brindis
Recuerdos, travesuras y alegrías que vivimos en la escuela

Sin censura, con Raúl Brindis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 62:26


Nos fuimos al pasado y recordamos aquellos momentos que vivimos en la escuela. ¿Cuáles travesuras hiciste? ¿Aún platicas con tus compañeros de colegio? ¿Cuál es el recuerdo más vivido que tienes de aquella época? ¡En este episodio escuchamos tus travesuras en la escuela! También hablamos de la derrota de la selección mexicana ¿Cómo te apreció el partido contra Canadá? 

The Produce Moms Podcast
EP189: Enhancing The Avocado Category With Tropical Avocados With Chris Gonzalez and Desiree Morales of WP Produce

The Produce Moms Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 22:24


“Usually when people think of avocados, they think of guacamole. Fortunately we have an avocado that's a little more versatile.” Chris Gonzalez (07:02 - 07:09)   Avocados have become household favorites in the United States, as of late. The small Hass avocado is the most popular, but to our neighbors in Latin America, the tropical avocado is the norm. WP Produce was founded to provide these avocados to Latin communities in the United States that are familiar with them.   Vice President of WP Produce, Desiree Morales grew up on tropical avocados and it led her father to start WP Produce in 1984. While working in retail markets for a chain in the United States he realized they didn't serve his community with the products he grew up with in Cuba. He then founded WP Produce to make those products accessible to other Latin consumers in the United States. He began with importing produce like avocados and payas from the Dominican Republic so people in his community would have foods they're familiar with. Years later, his family continues to run the company.   Vice President of Sales at WP Produce Chris Gonzalez is not only Desiree's cousin but a second generation grower as well. To Chris, the versatility of tropical avocados is key as you get more bang for your buck. One tropical avocado can be about the size of a softball and equal out to around four Hass avocados. The sizing is naturally larger with a creamier flavor, resulting from growing at a higher altitude. Tropical avocados also stay greener, longer.   “The main thing that consumers love about tropical avocados is the oxidation. It's much slower. It won't turn black as fast.” Desiree Morales (14:01 - 14:08)   Bringing tropical avocados to the United States is not about “taking over” the avocado market. Households are more familiar with the Hass avocado right now but tropical avocados bring with them different characteristics.    Chris and Desiree are proud to be able to provide tropical avocados year-round, coast to coast, a feat typically not seen in other produce markets. No one grows, sources, and ships more avocados than WP Produce.    You can find WP Produces' tropical avocados at Publix, Weggmens, Wal-Mart and Albertsons. If you can't find any locally, WP Produce recently launched a direct-to-consumer tropical fruit box. Everything in the boxes are packed at the WP Produce headquarters and shipped fresh.   How to get involved Join The Produce Moms Group on Facebook and continue the discussion every week!  Reach out to us - we'd love to hear more about where you are in life and business! Find out more here.    If you liked this episode, be sure to subscribe and leave a quick review on iTunes. It would mean the world to hear your feedback and we'd love for you to help us spread the word!

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2719 - CBO Score Purgatory

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 59:08


Sam and Emma break down what's to come in the week in news, from the reconciliation negotiations on the Hill, to updates on labor, the courts, and climate. They begin by covering the religious reaction to Universal Pre-K's non-discrimination requirement, and the news that September was a record-breaking month in terms of workers quitting jobs that simply did not appreciate their labor. They move forward to take on the upcoming Build Back Better bill, hopefully, to be signed in the coming days, and look through the new and old money piled into the investment in our public infrastructure, parsing through the policies around upgrading our electricity grid, interstate rails, broadband, climate resiliency, and “expanding transportation projects,” as well as getting into the incredible vagueness of those last two elements. Next, they look at the recent NYT report on a 2019 bombing in Syria in which the US massacred upwards of 80 women and children, before frantically working over the past two years to cover it up, as an Air Force lawyer unsuccessfully sought higher and higher backing for the necessary investigation. Sam and Emma look at the type of reporting that is relevant to this story, as well as what kind of reaction could be seen in the House and the Senate, and dive into the recent leak that surprised nobody, confirming that the Trump administration did, indeed, seek to undermine their own CDC as they attempted to manage their image in the run-up to the election. And in the Fun Half: Nomiki joins Sam and Emma as they discuss lead poisoning in US infrastructure, particularly in NYC, before Matty from Oregon calls in with one of the most interesting calls of the year, exploring his upbringing under a Right-Wing talk show host and how he and his siblings worked out of the shadows after leaving home. Laura Ingraham struggles to remember when her vaccine fear-mongering covered measles, and the MR crew discusses the insane stupidity of the Right's “coded language” from “Let's go Brandon” to Dick Morris having the gall to make fun of the genitalia in Pete Buttigieg's name. Manuel from the Dominican Republic also touches on the severe abuses of Haitian people in the DR's turn to the Right, plus, your calls and IMs! Purchase tickets for the live show in Boston on January 16th HERE! https://thewilbur.com/artist/majority-report/ Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here. Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ (Merch issues and concerns can be addressed here: majorityreportstore@mirrorimage.com) You can now watch the livestream on Twitch Check out today's sponsors: ZipRecruiter: Some things in life we like to pick out for ourselves - so we know we've got the one that's best for us - like cuts of steak or mattresses. What if you could do the same for hiring - choose your ideal candidate before they even apply? That's where ZipRecruiter's ‘Invite to Apply' comes in - it gives YOU, as the hiring manager, the power to pick your favorites from top candidates. According to ZipRecruiter Internal Data, jobs where employers use ZipRecruiter's ‘Invite to Apply' get on average two and a half times more candidates — which helps make for a faster hiring process. See for yourself! Just go to this exclusive web address, ZipRecruiter.com/majority, to try ZipRecruiter for free! MySolarNerd.com: There are a lot of homeowners that aren't aware of the solar options currently available. It is now possible to retrofit a home with solar panels for no money down. Most homeowners that switch over to solar see significant savings starting in their first year. This is possible thanks to the Solar Investor Tax Credit (going away soon). My Solar Nerd's mission is SIMPLE: Help you find the best solar program for your home and make the transition as EASY and SMOOTH as possible. Go to mysolarnerd.com and fill out the inquiry form now. Make sure you select Majority Report Listener for how you heard about My Solar Nerd to receive a $200 gift card upon installation! Support the St. Vincent Nurses today as they continue to strike for a fair contract! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere, at https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! Subscribe to Matt's other show Literary Hangover on Patreon! Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel! Subscribe to Brandon's show The Discourse on Patreon! Check out The Nomiki Show live at 3 pm ET on YouTube at patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada, at patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop

Sin censura, con Raúl Brindis
¡Moda que no incomoda! Los estilos y sellos personales al vestir

Sin censura, con Raúl Brindis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 58:52


Actualmente no hay un estilo de ropa especial y cada cual hace de su vestuario un sello personal. Este lunes platicamos sobre la ropa de género neutro, la ropa femenina y las prendas masculinas. ¿Con cuál ropa te gusta vestir? ¿Qué opinas de esta tendencia de ropa neutra?¡Vístete como deseas , vístete bien y escucha el podcast del Show de Raul Brindis, siempre va a estar de moda! 

Brown & Black
Did Rosalia and The Weeknd's 'La Fama' Commit Cultural Appropriation?

Brown & Black

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 32:47


This week, Jack takes an issue with Rosalia and The Weeknd's new song - 'La Fama'. The song is a Bachata from the Dominican Republic, yet neither of them are from there. Is it then cultural appropriation? Mike responds. The guys also discuss writer/director Aaron Sorkin's comments about Javier Bardem's casting of Cuban Desi Arnaz in 'Being The Ricardo's'. Sorkin says, "Spanish and Cuban aren't actable." Is he right? Listen to the Brown & Black perspective on all of it. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Sin censura, con Raúl Brindis
¡Nuestras actrices y actores favoritos!

Sin censura, con Raúl Brindis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 60:35


Este viernes hablamos de aquella profesión que nos transporta a otros escenarios, recrea vivencias de la historia o la cotidianidad y le pone todo su empeño para dar credibilidad a las historias: Las actrices y los actores. ¿Cuál es para ti la actriz o el actor más fregón?Nos encontramos también en oración, deseando que la primera actriz mexicana Carmen Salinas  logre recuperar su salud. Definir cuál es el mejor actor de todos los tiempos es muy difícil, sin embargo, siempre tenemos uno preferido. ¡Escucha ya el podcast del Show de Raúl Brindis y descubre cuál es el más popular!

Off Topic/On Politics
Explaining the Cuomo transcripts and why they were released

Off Topic/On Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 32:47


Following a months-long investigation into the sexual harassment allegations against former Gov. Andrew Cuomo, New York Attorney General Letitia James released hundreds of pages of transcripts from the inquiry that culminated in his resignation. NY1's Zack Fink, Juan Manuel Benítez and Courtney Gross discuss the details of the transcripts and explain why they're significant. They also comment on Eric Adams's first week as mayor-elect. Besides traveling to Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic, the soon-to-be mayor also announced the co-chairs of his transition team. Plus, during an exclusive interview with NY1 in Santo Domingo, Adams weighed in on the state's bail reform laws, saying he would like to see some changes.

Designated Hitters: The Story of Israel Baseball
Series Finale: Team Israel vs. The World

Designated Hitters: The Story of Israel Baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 14:17


In the series finale, join Chana Weinberg to learn about Team Israel's wild and suspenseful journey throughout the Tokyo Olympic games as they battled, Korea, The United States, Japan, Mexico, and the Dominican Republic for Gold.   This limited-run podcast will tell the story of how a small country the size of New Jersey which features no professional baseball league managed to produce a world-class team that beat a string of baseball Goliaths to secure a trip to Tokyo. With unprecedented insider access to players, coaches, and managers, the show will tell the stories of the ragtag team of athletes -- some former Major Leaguers, some underdogs -- who managed to pull off one of the greatest upsets in modern sports history, touching on larger themes like faith, friendship, and nationhood. This is a production of SoulShop in partnership with the Israel Association of Baseball.

Sin censura, con Raúl Brindis
Todos los honores y agradecimientos para nuestro veteranos

Sin censura, con Raúl Brindis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 245:13


¡En este súper jueves lo arrancamos con fuerza, honor y valentía! Hoy homenajeamos en su día a los veteranos del US Army. Por eso los saludamos y reconocemos su patriotismo. ¿Cómo nació la celebración de este día tan importante? ¡Acá lo puedes escuchar! También te preguntamos si ¿alguna vez pensaste estar en la milicia? ¡El podcast de Raúl Brindis se viste de homenaje a nuestros veteranos, escucha ya toda la diversión, especialmente para ti!

Sin censura, con Raúl Brindis
Nostálgicos que aún tienen su número de teléfono fijo

Sin censura, con Raúl Brindis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 249:43


Con la llegada de los celulares y actualmente con los teléfonos inteligentes, los teléfonos fijos pasaron a la historia, sin embargo, hay quienes conservan sus números de siempre. ¿Eres uno de esos nostálgicos por tu línea fija? ¿Conoces el código de área de tu ciudad? ¿Cuántos años tienes con tu número? ¡En el podcast del Show de Raul Brindis nos gusta oírte y estar comunicados contigo!

New Books in Latin American Studies
Rachel Afi Quinn, "Being La Dominicana: Race and Identity in the Visual Culture of Santo Domingo" (U Illinois Press, 2021)

New Books in Latin American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 56:48


Dominican women being seen--and seeing themselves--in the media Rachel Afi Quinn investigates how visual media portray Dominican women and how women represent themselves in their own creative endeavors in response to existing stereotypes. Delving into the dynamic realities and uniquely racialized gendered experiences of women in Santo Domingo, Quinn reveals the way racial ambiguity and color hierarchy work to shape experiences of identity and subjectivity in the Dominican Republic. She merges analyses of context and interviews with young Dominican women to offer rare insights into a Caribbean society in which the tourist industry and popular media rewards, and rely upon, the ability of Dominican women to transform themselves to perform gender, race, and class. Engaging and astute, Being La Dominicana: Race and Identity in the Visual Culture of Santo Domingo (University of Illinois Press, 2021) reveals the little-studied world of today's young Dominican women and what their personal stories and transnational experiences can tell us about the larger neoliberal world. Rachel Afi Quinn is an associate professor in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Comparative Culture Studies at the University of Houston.  Reighan Gillam is an assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Southern California.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/latin-american-studies

New Books Network
Rachel Afi Quinn, "Being La Dominicana: Race and Identity in the Visual Culture of Santo Domingo" (U Illinois Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 56:48


Dominican women being seen--and seeing themselves--in the media Rachel Afi Quinn investigates how visual media portray Dominican women and how women represent themselves in their own creative endeavors in response to existing stereotypes. Delving into the dynamic realities and uniquely racialized gendered experiences of women in Santo Domingo, Quinn reveals the way racial ambiguity and color hierarchy work to shape experiences of identity and subjectivity in the Dominican Republic. She merges analyses of context and interviews with young Dominican women to offer rare insights into a Caribbean society in which the tourist industry and popular media rewards, and rely upon, the ability of Dominican women to transform themselves to perform gender, race, and class. Engaging and astute, Being La Dominicana: Race and Identity in the Visual Culture of Santo Domingo (University of Illinois Press, 2021) reveals the little-studied world of today's young Dominican women and what their personal stories and transnational experiences can tell us about the larger neoliberal world. Rachel Afi Quinn is an associate professor in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Comparative Culture Studies at the University of Houston.  Reighan Gillam is an assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Southern California.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Gender Studies
Rachel Afi Quinn, "Being La Dominicana: Race and Identity in the Visual Culture of Santo Domingo" (U Illinois Press, 2021)

New Books in Gender Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 56:48


Dominican women being seen--and seeing themselves--in the media Rachel Afi Quinn investigates how visual media portray Dominican women and how women represent themselves in their own creative endeavors in response to existing stereotypes. Delving into the dynamic realities and uniquely racialized gendered experiences of women in Santo Domingo, Quinn reveals the way racial ambiguity and color hierarchy work to shape experiences of identity and subjectivity in the Dominican Republic. She merges analyses of context and interviews with young Dominican women to offer rare insights into a Caribbean society in which the tourist industry and popular media rewards, and rely upon, the ability of Dominican women to transform themselves to perform gender, race, and class. Engaging and astute, Being La Dominicana: Race and Identity in the Visual Culture of Santo Domingo (University of Illinois Press, 2021) reveals the little-studied world of today's young Dominican women and what their personal stories and transnational experiences can tell us about the larger neoliberal world. Rachel Afi Quinn is an associate professor in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Comparative Culture Studies at the University of Houston.  Reighan Gillam is an assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Southern California.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

New Books in Caribbean Studies
Rachel Afi Quinn, "Being La Dominicana: Race and Identity in the Visual Culture of Santo Domingo" (U Illinois Press, 2021)

New Books in Caribbean Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 56:48


Dominican women being seen--and seeing themselves--in the media Rachel Afi Quinn investigates how visual media portray Dominican women and how women represent themselves in their own creative endeavors in response to existing stereotypes. Delving into the dynamic realities and uniquely racialized gendered experiences of women in Santo Domingo, Quinn reveals the way racial ambiguity and color hierarchy work to shape experiences of identity and subjectivity in the Dominican Republic. She merges analyses of context and interviews with young Dominican women to offer rare insights into a Caribbean society in which the tourist industry and popular media rewards, and rely upon, the ability of Dominican women to transform themselves to perform gender, race, and class. Engaging and astute, Being La Dominicana: Race and Identity in the Visual Culture of Santo Domingo (University of Illinois Press, 2021) reveals the little-studied world of today's young Dominican women and what their personal stories and transnational experiences can tell us about the larger neoliberal world. Rachel Afi Quinn is an associate professor in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Comparative Culture Studies at the University of Houston.  Reighan Gillam is an assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Southern California.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/caribbean-studies

New Books in African American Studies
Rachel Afi Quinn, "Being La Dominicana: Race and Identity in the Visual Culture of Santo Domingo" (U Illinois Press, 2021)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 56:48


Dominican women being seen--and seeing themselves--in the media Rachel Afi Quinn investigates how visual media portray Dominican women and how women represent themselves in their own creative endeavors in response to existing stereotypes. Delving into the dynamic realities and uniquely racialized gendered experiences of women in Santo Domingo, Quinn reveals the way racial ambiguity and color hierarchy work to shape experiences of identity and subjectivity in the Dominican Republic. She merges analyses of context and interviews with young Dominican women to offer rare insights into a Caribbean society in which the tourist industry and popular media rewards, and rely upon, the ability of Dominican women to transform themselves to perform gender, race, and class. Engaging and astute, Being La Dominicana: Race and Identity in the Visual Culture of Santo Domingo (University of Illinois Press, 2021) reveals the little-studied world of today's young Dominican women and what their personal stories and transnational experiences can tell us about the larger neoliberal world. Rachel Afi Quinn is an associate professor in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Comparative Culture Studies at the University of Houston.  Reighan Gillam is an assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Southern California.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

New Books in Sociology
Rachel Afi Quinn, "Being La Dominicana: Race and Identity in the Visual Culture of Santo Domingo" (U Illinois Press, 2021)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 56:48


Dominican women being seen--and seeing themselves--in the media Rachel Afi Quinn investigates how visual media portray Dominican women and how women represent themselves in their own creative endeavors in response to existing stereotypes. Delving into the dynamic realities and uniquely racialized gendered experiences of women in Santo Domingo, Quinn reveals the way racial ambiguity and color hierarchy work to shape experiences of identity and subjectivity in the Dominican Republic. She merges analyses of context and interviews with young Dominican women to offer rare insights into a Caribbean society in which the tourist industry and popular media rewards, and rely upon, the ability of Dominican women to transform themselves to perform gender, race, and class. Engaging and astute, Being La Dominicana: Race and Identity in the Visual Culture of Santo Domingo (University of Illinois Press, 2021) reveals the little-studied world of today's young Dominican women and what their personal stories and transnational experiences can tell us about the larger neoliberal world. Rachel Afi Quinn is an associate professor in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Comparative Culture Studies at the University of Houston.  Reighan Gillam is an assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Southern California.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

Food Heaven Podcast
Wendy & Jess Catching Up and Property Update

Food Heaven Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 20:53


This past month has been a whirlwind to say the least. We have been knee deep in renovations/building, and so for the podcast this week, we play catch up on what's been going on in our lives, how our properties are coming along, recent travels to Hawaii and Dominican Republic and our BIG upcoming life plans. If you have any questions about property stuff, drop them below and we'll be sure to answer them!  In This Episode We'll Cover: Updates on our properties  What we've been doing to prep for guest arrivals Jess's big plans for relocating & MORE!  3 Ways You Can Support This Podcast: Rate Review Support our sponsors using our unique ‘HOOKUP' codes below For our resources and shownotes, visit foodheavenmadeeasy.com/podcast. Produced by Dear Media

Sin censura, con Raúl Brindis
Anécdotas e historias de los que choferean por las ciudades

Sin censura, con Raúl Brindis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 249:54


¡Este episodio se lo dedicamos a los taxistas, manejadores de Uber y Lyft! Con la llegada de la pandemia del Coronavirus, una de las principales fuentes de ingresos fueron los autos y la chofereada dentro de las ciudades. ¿Te gusta manejar? ¿Cuántas horas conduces? ¿Se gana bien en este oficio? De este y otros temas relacionados con nuestros amigos los choferes vamos a platicar.     

Air Force Radio News
Air Force Radio News 08 November 2021

Air Force Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021


Today's Story: Training That Delivers Humanitarian Aid

Sin censura, con Raúl Brindis
Los rollos que te trae el cambio de horario en Estados Unidos

Sin censura, con Raúl Brindis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 249:12


The Nomad Capitalist Audio Experience
Six Countries Open without a PCR Test

The Nomad Capitalist Audio Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 7:46


Looking to travel with fewer restrictions? In this video, Andrew shares six countries that don't require a PCR test for you to enter. 1:20 Mexico 2:16 Colombia 3:01 Costa Rica 3:34 Dominican Republic 6:23 Slovakia 6:39 Romania https://nomadcapitalist.com/ Andrew Henderson and the Nomad Capitalist team are the world's most sought-after experts on legal offshore tax strategies, investment immigration, and global citizenship. We work exclusively with seven- and eight-figure entrepreneurs and investors who want to "go where they're treated best". Work with Andrew: https://nomadcapitalist.com/apply/ Andrew has started offshore companies, opened dozens of offshore bank accounts, obtained multiple second passports, and purchased real estate on four continents. He has spent the last 12 years studying and personally implementing the Nomad Capitalist lifestyle. Our growing team of researchers, strategies, and implementers add to our ever-growing knowledge base of the best options available. In addition, we've spent years studying the behavior of hundreds of clients in order to help people get the results they want faster and with less effort. About Andrew: https://nomadcapitalist.com/about/ Our Website: http://www.nomadcapitalist.com Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=nomadcapitalist Buy Andrew's Book: https://amzn.to/2QKQqR0 DISCLAIMER: The information in this video should not be considered tax, financial, investment, or any kind of professional advice. Only a professional diagnosis of your specific situation can determine which strategies are appropriate for your needs. Nomad Capitalist can and does not provide advice unless/until engaged by you.

DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast
115: Physicians and the Power of Mentorship

DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 27:14


“As busy as I am, I try to give 15, 10 minutes every week to someone because I recognize the power of that. And I recognize that I wouldn't be where I am if someone who was even busier than me didn't give me that 10 or 30 minutes.” -Dr. Umaru Barrie In today's episode, Coach Gabriella Dennery MD has a refreshing conversation with Dr. Umaru Barrie about his journey in medicine and all about how to benefit from mentorships to boost your progress in your personal, community service and professional life, as well as how to pay it forward and become a mentor. Dr. Barrie gives us an inside look at how he utilizes and has utilized  mentors in his personal life, education, community service, and professional career.  On a scale of 1 to 10, he ranks having mentors with an importance of 1000! Do you have a mentor/mentors? Is having a mentor something that you haven't previously considered, or are you unsure how to find the right mentor? Do you wish you were further along in reaching your targeted trajectory or wish you had help knowing how to go about reaching your goals? This episode shines a light on these topics and more. Tune in to learn how to start reaching your full potential today.  Umaru Barrie, a Sierra Leone/Guinean-American by way of Harlem, NY, is a 6th year combined Doctor of Medicine (M.D.)/Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) candidate at UT Southwestern Medical Center (UTSW) with a research focus on Molecular Microbiology and medical interests in Neurosurgery, Global Health, Academic Medicine and Molecular Microbiology. Prior to joining UTSW, he was a National Institute of Health scholar working under the mentorship of Dr. Desruisseaux at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, where he studied Chagas Disease and Malaria. During medical school, he served as medical class Co-President, Board of Directors of Student National Medical Association, Albert Schweitzer Fellow, Co-Director of National Future Leadership Project while maintaining active involvement in research publishing manuscripts in Neurosurgery, Academic Medicine, Community and Global Health. He has been fortunate to give back by co-founding numerous nonprofit organizations that raised money for humanitarian relief, providing uninsured patients with health literacy programs, creating relief projects to support Hurricane victims, delivering healthcare and medicines to underprivileged communities in the Dominican Republic, establishing programs for underrepresented minorities, and organizing research projects geared towards HIV/AIDS and Child Mortality in Uganda. He aspires to become the director-general of the World Health Organization (WHO).   You can find him on LinkedIn at: https://www.linkedin.com/in/umarubarrie/  Find full transcripts of DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast episodes on the DocWorking Blog  How many coaches do you think your favorite actors and athletes have worked with over the years in order to achieve such extraordinary success?   What if you had a team of trusted thinking partners, experienced coaches who have helped hundreds of physicians overcome obstacles and who know what works?    What if you were part of a community of like-minded physicians from across the nation, across specialties and career stages? Your collective brain trust, sharing ideas and experiences, so you would no longer feel like an island, surrounded by people yet alone?   What if you had small group coaching sessions, could interact with your coaches and community as often as you wish, and had virtual courses at your fingertips 24-7 that could help you with things like time and stress management, resilience, and mapping out your future to achieve what matters most to you?   What if you could have all of this for less than the cost of a single 1:1 coaching session per month?   DocWorking THRIVE is the Physician Coaching and Community Subscription Package that Guides You as a Doctor to Embrace Life in the way that is most meaningful to you, integrate that with your work so you can truly thrive, and be a valued member of our growing private community of doctors from across the nation. Join the DocWorking mailing list by clicking here.   At DocWorking, our specialty is Coaching Physicians to achieve the best in life and medicine.    Doctors devote their lives to caring for others. But does that mean they must sacrifice their own health and wellbeing? Absolutely not!   At DocWorking, we have developed a unique way to embrace it all.   The caring for others that you do so selflessly AND the caring for YOURSELF AND YOUR FAMILY that you crave in order to bring it all into the perfect balance specific to YOU.   What if we told you that you CAN have it all? The career you dreamed of when you decided to become a doctor AND the life outside of medicine that you desire?   DocWorking empowers physicians to get back on the path to achieving their dreams.   Ace the Boards and Max Your CME Preparing for your board exam or looking for a quick and convenient way to earn CME? Study for your board exam and fulfill your CME requirements with BoardVitals. BoardVitals is the leading online board review platform, with question banks and CME activities available in more than 50 medical and healthcare specialties.   Save Money Now: Refinance Your Student Loan Debt   Take Back Your Time: Get a Virtual Assistant Working in the medical field is fulfilling but it can also be exhausting. Physicians often sacrifice their personal time to carry out their duties. They want to go on vacations, start passion projects, or start side businesses but finding the time seems impossible. Recently, more and more physicians are giving outsourcing a try. Outsourcing allows you to delegate tasks to virtual assistants so you can free up your time and finally do whatever it is you've been wanting to do.   Become a Medical Legal Consultant We at DocWorking are excited to collaborate with Dr. Armin Feldman to bring you this opportunity to develop a side income or even a full time income while using your clinical skills!   Achieve Financial Independence with a Financial Planner/Advisor Change your trajectory: build financial independence and strength by working with our trusted resources. Working with a trusted financial planner and/or financial advisor can help you to create a specific plan that works for you. The right advisor can help you stay on track to reach your financial independence goal and your next vision.   Protect Yourself and Your Family with the Right Insurance Doctors and their families need many types of insurance–and inadequate coverage can cost you dearly. Connecting with trusted insurance professionals in your area is recommended to be sure you're appropriately covered.   Are you a physician who would like to tell your story? Please email Amanda, our producer, at Amanda@docworking.com to be considered. And if you like our podcast and would like to subscribe and leave us a 5 star review, we would be extremely grateful! We're everywhere you like to get your podcasts! Apple iTunes, Spotify, iHeart Radio, Google, Pandora, PlayerFM, ListenNotes, Amazon, YouTube, Podbean You can also find us on Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter.    Some links in our blogs and show notes are affiliate links, and purchases made via those links may result in payments to DocWorking. These help toward our production costs. Thank you for supporting DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast! Occasionally, we discuss financial and legal topics. We are not financial or legal professionals. Please consult a licensed professional for financial or legal advice regarding your specific situation.   Podcast produced by: Amanda Taran

THOSEGUYSYOUHATE
MINI-SESH: Tiler's Biggest Blunders

THOSEGUYSYOUHATE

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 35:55


"That Time that Tiler Fell in Love with a Prostitute" The guys pregame for this one by promoting a completely different podcast. For this Mini-Sesh the guys discuss the time that a 17-year-old Tiler got white-girl-wasted in the Dominican Republic and was led astray by a prostitute. The guys continue to use their platform to grow their cult... I mean "community". Tiler's bad at metaphors, Ryan wants to be the one that talks, and do you remember your first legal drink? They are THOSEGUYSYOUHATE! Support this podcast

Sin censura, con Raúl Brindis
Los dulces que no puedes dejar de comer

Sin censura, con Raúl Brindis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 244:39


¡Este súper jueves tenemos un episodio muy dulce, pues celebramos a las golosinas en su día! Cuéntanos cuál es tu dulce o golosina favorita. Después de Halloween el consumo de azúcar aumenta, y por eso te invitamos a cuidar la salud de tus chamacos y regular el consumo de dulces. Pero también queremos que nos platiques sobre esas golosinas que siempre te han gustado y no cambiarias por nada.

Sin censura, con Raúl Brindis
Amas de casa y mujeres empoderadas

Sin censura, con Raúl Brindis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 243:54


Uncut with Jay Cutler
Owners of NeverAsh Cigars Steve Rotondi and Tom Grilli discuss the cigar business, how they built their international relationships and their styles on Uncut with Jay Cutler

Uncut with Jay Cutler

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 69:11


Jay sits down with the owners of NeverAsh Cigars, Steve and Tom, to talk about the art of cigar making and how their business evolved organically from their love of cigars. Steve also jokes about the wild way he met his cigar affiliate in the Dominican Republic and how that lead to them creating their own cigar brand. Tom also discusses how he quit his full time IT job over the vaccine mandate, and decided to go all in on the cigar business to try and set an example for his daughter. Jay also wants to know about how the cigars are reliably sourced in the Dominican Republic, and Steve and Tom talk about their culture and how precise their cigar process really is regardless of how many cigars they order. They also talk about how their cigars are made, what goes into them and the great care and attention that the rollers pay to every cigar they roll. This is a huge show for cigar lovers!

The Cigar Authority
How Much Does It Cost to Get Into the Cigar Industry

The Cigar Authority

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 117:02


This week on The Cigar Authority Live from the Toscano Sound Stage in Salem, New Hampshire… What does it cost to make your own brand?  Is it worth it?  What else should you do?  Micky Pegg has been in the industry in lots of forms, Now a brand owner with All Saints Cigars, we will ask him this question as we pull back the curtain on costs! In the first hour we will smoke the new All Saints St. Francis Toro which was part of The Cigar Authority Care Package, while in the 2nd hour we will smoke something new that Dave brought back from the Dominican Republic. In the second if Dave make's it back in time we will be lighting up a test blend he brought back from the Dominican Republic as we continue to talk about cigar influencers. Join us for all of this and the usual suspects including the VS Question of the Week, Offer of the Day, Cigar News, The email of the week and a peek into the Asylum. The Cigar Authority is a member of the United Podcast Network and is recorded live in front of a studio audience at Studio 21 Podcast Cafe upstairs at Two Guys Smoke Shop in Salem, NH. As always you can find many of the cigars we smoke at https://www.2guyscigars.com. Never miss an episode by subscribing to the show via Apple Podcasts and Podbean.

FANTI
What Was Said!

FANTI

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 56:37


Jarrett's back from vacation where he got an acute case of the giggles, and passed them on to Tre'Vell. This week, they dive into the mailbag to respond to listener questions...and listener shade. Strap in, cause this episode covers A LOT of ground. Like, three whole continents worth of ground.  From the African continent, we hear from Akani who takes Jarrett & Tre'Vell to task for saying the COVID vaccine isn't as available “in Africa”. Lucas in Brazil laments that “coming out” is extra burdensome for intersectional folks like them who are transmasculine, non binary, aro, ace and gay. Plus, lots of listeners from the U.S. Episode Notes:We received a letter from an Ace/Aro-identifying fan. Don't know what those terms mean? Well, OULGBTQ + Society wrote definitions. Here is a list of episodes that Jarrett and Tre'vell recommend checking out after listening:Episode 45 - Freelancing In Beyonce's Gig EconomyEpisode 75 - Colorism: White Supremacy's Stank Ass Grandchild (ft. Jarrett Lucas)Episode 77 - Colorism Part 2 (ft. Portia Bartley)Episode 78 - No Cis-sies Allowed (ft. Da'Shaun Harrison), and after you listen don't forget to buy Da'Shaun's book Belly of the Beast: The Politics of Anti-Fatness as Anti-Blackness.Mentioned in the showDIS/Honorable Mentions HM: Elo Vegan Lifestyle is a beauty brand that is on a mission to make sustainability sexy AFHM: CBS News reported that a manslaughter conviction of a 21-year-old Oklahoma woman who suffered miscarriage sparked outcry HM: Quinton and Monroe's engagement video is so cuteOur Sponsors This WeekDipseaFor listeners of the show, Dipsea is offering an extended 30 day free trial when you go to Dipsea Stories dot com slash FANTI. Lumi LabsTo get free shipping & 30% off your first order… use code: FANTI. IGo ahead and @ usEmail: FANTI@maximumfun.orgIG@FANTIpodcast@Jarrett Hill@rayzon (Tre'Vell)Twitter@FANTIpodcast@TreVellAnderson@JarrettHill@Swish (Senior Producer Laura Swisher)@Rainewheat (Producer Lorraine Wheat)FANTI is produced and distributed by MaximumFun.orgLaura Swisher is senior producer and Lorraine Wheat is producer. Episode Contributors: Jarrett Hill, Laura Swisher, Tre'Vell Anderson, Lorraine WheatMusic: Cor.eceGraphics: Ashley Nguyen