Podcasts about SPS

  • 317PODCASTS
  • 1,180EPISODES
  • 52mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Dec 5, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about SPS

Show all podcasts related to sps

Latest podcast episodes about SPS

High-Fidelity Conversations
Standardized Patients | More than just a manikin for education with Sally Hinshaw

High-Fidelity Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 34:09


[S1 8] Sally Hinshaw is a local, professional Standardized Patient (SP). She's been assisting our Sim Lab for years in various healthcare scenarios as she pretends to be a patient for learners who require an extra dose of realism to help achieve the required goals. Listen in on this conversation with Sally to learn more about: What does a SP do? What kinds of scenarios does a SP help with? What are the advantages of using a SP vs. a manikin? How do I become a SP? Do I need to have a medical background to become a SP? Can I be a SP for virtual education? And more! Quick Links:More info on what a Standardized Patient is and related info: healthysimulation.com Do you have ideas for future guests or topics on this podcast? Maybe you have some thoughts on how to improve the show? If that sounds like you, take a moment to answer the 3 questions on our anonymous feedback survey!Podcast artwork was made with the awesome resources from CanvaMusic for the show was obtained from PixabaySpecial outro music was obtained from Pond5Email the show at hfconversations@gmail.com

Robotik in der Industrie
16 Roboter auf einer Steuerung

Robotik in der Industrie

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 31:59


Michael Garstenauer von Keba erklärt uns, wie sich die Steuerungswelt in der Robotik verändern wird. Sein Versprechen 16 Roboter auf einer Steuerung. Beim KEBA-System reicht ein einziger Schaltschrank für die gesamte Linie (SPS + Robotik) aus. Darüber hinaus ermöglicht das Feature „Multi-Rob“, dass bis zu 16 Roboter auf einer Steuerung betrieben werden können – selbst, wenn es sich um unterschiedliche Kinematiktypen handelt. Wie geht das? Wir sagen Danke zu unserem Partner, dem Deutschen Robotik Verband https://www.robotikverband.de Fragen oder Ideen zur Robotik in der Industrie? helmut@robotikpodcast.de oder robert@robotikpodcast.de

Jermination the Brand
S2E4: Highly Sensitive People w/ guest Shamicka Lisette

Jermination the Brand

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 59:50


Shamicka and I discuss our experience with being highly sensitive people.  Highly Sensitive People Facts •make up about 20% of the population.  •it's not ADHD nor ADD •it's a trait of SPS, sensory processing sensitivity •common to be extroverted & highly sensitive. •increased emotional sensitivity and strong reactivity to both external and internal stimuli •50% HSP 's are men •Genetic Trait You may be a HSP if, •You're highly intuitive  •you easily startled •you avoid violent TV shows, movies or the news •you've been called too sensitive or to get some thick skin  •you have a vivid imagination deep thinker •you struggle with setting boundaries •you dislike confrontation •you're overwhelmed by bright lights, strong smells, and large crowds •empathetic  •you notice the small things that others often miss Reach Jer'Maine @ www.jerminationcoachingllc.com (free workbook available for a limited time)  https://linktr.ee/Jermination Reach Shamicka Lisette FB & IG @ EmpressInnervisions LLC podcast: Talkyoshitsis https://empressinnervisions.com Resources: https://hsperson.com TED Talks on HSP https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qyk_nLkPM7E https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pi4JOlMSWjo --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jermination/support

Faculty Feed
Gender Diversity in Patient Simulation with Carrie Bohnert

Faculty Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 25:28


How do we represent diverse gender identities in patient simulation? This week we talk again with Carrie Bohnert, MPA, CHSE, who is the Director of the Standardized Patient Program at the University of Louisville School of Medicine. We discuss how standardized patient programs portray patients who are transgender and nonbinary for clinical skills training. Carrie describes some of her work showing inconsistency in how programs teach and assess skills for gender-affirming care, but all educators can be purposeful in supporting gender diversity in health professions education. Want to learn more? Look at the training resources discussed in the interview, including: the Fenway Guide, the AAMC competencies, and UofL's eQuality Toolkit clinical skills manual and free CME module. Listeners interested in patient simulation can learn more about Carrie's research exploring how simulation programs portray gender diversity, perspectivesof gender diverse SPs, and SP case resources for educators. Do you have comments or questions about Faculty Feed? Contact us at FacFeed@louisville.edu. We look forward to hearing from you.

KI in der Industrie
Control cabinets, connectors, PLCs and Industrial AI

KI in der Industrie

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 29:48


Most users know Phoenix Contact as a supplier for the control cabinet or as a PLC manufacturer. But the Blomberg-based company also wants to market AI models. Tom Hammerbacher explains to us how this is to be done. He is responsible for the Industrial AI division. In the podcast In the podcast, he explains to us how he and his team want to predict the customer's energy consumption, how he deploys AI at the customer's site and what role the PLC from Phoenix Contact plays in this. We also talk about model development in Blomberg and how the engineers test and use their technology in their own factory. The podcast is growing and we want to keep growing. That's why our German-language podcast is now available in English. We are happy about new listeners. We thank our new partner [Siemens](https://new.siemens.com/global/en/products/automation/topic-areas/artificial-intelligence-in-industry.html) [Our guest:] https://www.linkedin.com/in/tom-hammerbacher-82b879174/?originalSubdomain=de

SPS
Ep. 51: On the Brazilian & US Midterm Elections

SPS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 65:21


On this episode of SPS, Pamela first sits down with Platypus Brazilian members Paulo & Rosa. They comment on the election results, how the Left is responding to the return of Lula, and what the election of the Brazilian Workers Party means for the future of a socialist Left. In the second part, Platypus Oregon member Andony hosts a roundtable conversation on the U.S. Midterm elections with members from around the country. From New Hampshire, Walla Walla, Washington, Philadelphia, to Merced, California, we hear what our members have to say about the left's response and if there is anything for us to learn from this election. SPS is broadcasted on Apple Podcasts, Spotify & Soundcloud. If you like the episode, share it and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts. It helps us get the word out! I. Brazilian Election Segment Links: SPS Ep. 10: On Cynthia Nixon, the Brazilian elections, and Afrofuturism (Sept 2018) w/ Alex Hochuli https://soundcloud.com/platypus-affiliated-society/ep10 "What is political party for the Left?" With Leo Panitch, Jackie Barkley, Antoni Wysocki, and Carlos Pessoa (Platypus Review 74 | March 2015) https://platypus1917.org/2015/03/01/political-party-left-2/ How each party chose to express their support for Lula:  - PSTU (Unified Socialist Workers Party) - https://www.pstu.org.br/2o-turno-para-derrotar-bolsonaro-voto-critico-em-lula/ - PSOL (Socialism and Freedom party) https://psol50.org.br/psol-vai-ampliar-mobilizacao-no-2o-turno-para-eleger-lula-presidente/ - UP (Popular Unity) https://www.unidadepopular.org.br/2022/10/abaixo-a-fome-e-o-custo-de-vida-fora-bolsonaro/ - PCB (Brazilian Communist Party) https://drive.google.com/file/d/1SfR5ZYtBAVjgrgKGGlaKFMJE5PLZzBL0/view - PCO (Worker's Cause Party) https://causaoperaria.org.br/2022/a-contribuicao-do-pco-para-a-vitoria-de-lula/ Platypus in Brazil https://platypus1917.org/project/sobre/ https://platypus1917.org/project/o-que-significa-platypus/ plat brazil fb: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100083550673612 Panel: "A crise na Ucrânia e a Esquerda" (3/19/22) https://youtu.be/B_L_V80lXBA Platypus at the New School (NYC) fb: https://www.facebook.com/groups/thenewschoolplatypus New School link with all our activities: https://narwhalnation.newschool.edu/organization/platypus II. U.S. Midterm Election Segment Links: "Anti-fascism in the Age of Trump" panel at UCSC, 11/7/17: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lSuN5j3R6go "Perpetual motion machines: A response to Canel, Duhalde, and Horras” DL Jacobs (Platypus Review, September 2022): https://platypus1917.org/2022/09/01/perpetual-motion-machines-a-response-to-canel-duhalde-and-horras/ Anti-fascism in the Philippines: Back to the 1980s (Platypus Review, September 2022): https://platypus1917.org/2022/09/01/anti-fascism-in-the-philippines-back-to-the-1980s/ Articles in Jacobin re: U.S. Midterm Elections - https://jacobin.com/2022/11/krystal-ball-midterms-2022-rust-belt-john-fetterman-democratic-party - https://jacobin.com/2022/11/the-democrats-will-probably-lose-the-midterms-because-our-society-is-falling-apart - https://jacobin.com/2022/11/midterms-2022-progressives-democrats-abortion-student-debt-wages-health-care - https://jacobin.com/2022/11/midterm-elections-2022-progressive-health-care-reform-reproductive-rights

Robotik in der Industrie
Extended Reality für den Robotik-Vertrieb

Robotik in der Industrie

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 30:23


Endlich wieder Robotik-Podcast! Wir waren auf der SPS, auf der BAUMA und bei Agile und haben uns das neue Werk angeschaut. Unser Gast Dr. Eike Schäffer erklärt uns seinen Vertriebsansatz. Wir sagen Danke zu unserem Partner, dem Deutschen Robotik Verband https://www.robotikverband.de Fragen oder Ideen zur Robotik in der Industrie? helmut@robotikpodcast.de oder robert@robotikpodcast.de

Le Podcast Des Établissements Médico-sociaux
# 71 - Catherine CORNIBERT - La santé des soignants est dégradée !

Le Podcast Des Établissements Médico-sociaux

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 43:56


La santé des soignants est dégradée ! De nombreuses enquêtes montrent que 50% des soignants sont très proches de l'épuisement professionnel ou du burnout. La majorité de ces personnes ne savent pas vers qui se tourner, les soignants ne sont pas accompagnés. Cette situation date d'avant la crise sanitaire. Depuis la situation est pire. Une étude (ODOXA MHN) montre que 64% des professionnels de santé présentent des troubles du sommeil.  Une autre étude de la fédération nationale des étudiant(e)s en sciences infirmières précise que : 62, 3 % ne dorment pas assez 28,1% prennent des somnifères 80% ont des douleurs de TMS 30% prennent des antalgiques toutes les semaines 63,2% ont une activité physique mineure 61, 4 % ont une santé mentale dégradée 30% des étudiants prennent des anxiolytiques 80% des étudiants ont pensé à arrêter leurs études  Des chiffres dramatiques qui illustrent à quel point notre système de santé va mal. Il épuise les futurs professionnels ! Dans cet épisode, j'ai découvert l'association SPS. Dirigée par Catherine CORNIBERT, cette Association s'est donnée en 2015 la mission d'accompagner l'ensemble des soignants en souffrance psychologique. Tous les professionnels de santé et étudiants en santé peuvent appeler 24h/24, de manière anonyme et confidentielle, un numéro vert pour être immédiatement en contact avec un psychologue : 0 805 23 23 36 L'Association a développé une application gratuite pour améliorer l'accès à l'accompagnement : la possibilité de choisir le psychologue disponible pour un appel et accéder à des contenus. En parallèle de se soutient direct aux soignants, l'Association réalise des études pour comprendre les besoins des soignants, organise des colloques et des formations pour sensibiliser les professionnels aux signes de souffrance et propose des actions de prévention. De nombreux soignants sont épuisés, leur métier a un impact négatif sur leur santé. Ce sujet ne doit pas être tabou ! L'Association SPS, soutenue par de nombreux partenaires, apporte une réponse efficace pour prendre soin de nos soignants. Il faut relayer se message pour que l'application soit téléchargée de manière préventive par nos équipes. Avoir l'application dans son téléphone, c'est pouvoir se tourner vers un professionnel en cas de besoin. Vous trouverez toutes les informations nécessaires sur le site de l'Association : https://www.asso-sps.fr/ Il est possible de faire un don (défiscalisable) directement sur le site !!!

Hacks & Wonks
Week in Review: November 18, 2022 - with Nicole Thomas-Kennedy

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 61:32


On this week's Hacks & Wonks, Crystal is joined by friend of the show, defense attorney, abolitionist and activist, Nicole Thomas-Kennedy! They start catching up with the Seattle City Budget. The City Council revealed their proposed budget earlier this week, and in general it proposes putting back funding for programs that were originally given fewer resources under Mayor Harrell's proposal - most notably restoring the raises for frontline homeless service workers, which were cut in Harrell's budget. The Council's proposal also uses JumpStart funds as originally intended, cuts ghost cop positions, and eliminates funding for the controversial ShotSpotter program. After the horrific incident last week that involved a shooting at Seattle's Ingraham High School, students staged a walkout and protest on Monday to ask city leaders for resources to help prevent gun violence. The students are asking for anti-racism and de-escalation training for school security, assault weapon bans, and more school counselors and mental health resources. What they have made clear they don't want is more cops in schools, but despite that Mayor Harrell and some of his advisory boards are advocating for an increased police presence in schools. Housing updates this week start with positive news: Mayor Harrell is asking for affordable housing to be exempt from the much maligned design review process. Allowing affordable housing to skip design review will encourage developers to build affordable housing, and will help us battle our housing shortage faster than we could otherwise. In frustrating housing news, KING5 released some upsetting reporting outlining some overt racial housing discrimination against Black families in Seattle, including one story about family who received a significantly higher appraisal when they dressed their home to look like it was owned by a white family.  Carolyn Bick from the South Seattle Emerald reported on potential City and State records laws violations by the Office of Police Accountability. The OPA has been manually deleting emails, or allowing them to automatically be deleted, before the two-year mark prescribed by City and State laws. It's another example of a city office failing to hold itself accountable to basic records standards.  The Seattle Department of Transportation seemed to once again be more responsive to concerns about administrative liability than community concerns about pedestrian safety amid rising fatalities. When locals painted an unauthorized crosswalk at the intersection of E Olive Way and Harvard, SDOT workers removed the crosswalk within 24 hours. This is happening while many people and business owners, most notably Councilmember Sara Nelson, have been placing illegal “eco blocks” without removals or consequences.  Finally, the Chair of Washington State Democrats is being criticized for threats to withhold resources against Washington House candidates if they showed support for nonpartisan Secretary of State candidate Julie Anderson. This is a high-profile extension of a question that party groups–big and small–are dealing with: how do we handle Democrats' support of nonpartisan or third party candidates?  As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Follow us on Twitter at @HacksWonks. Find the host, Crystal Fincher, on Twitter at @finchfrii and find today's co-host, Nicole Thomas-Kennedy, on Twitter at @NTKallday. More info is available at officialhacksandwonks.com.   Resources “City Council's ‘anti-austerity' budget package: Aiming JumpStart back where it belongs, preserving parking enforcement's move out of SPD, nuking ShotSpotter, and giving mayor his ‘Unified Care Team'” by jseattle from Capitol Hill Seattle Blog   “Morales Hopes to Resurrect Social Housing Amendment That Didn't Make Balancing Package Cut” by Doug Trumm from The Urbanist   Learn more about how to get involved in Seattle's budget season at this link.   “Care, Not Cops” by Hannah Krieg from The Stranger   “Seattle proposal would free affordable projects from design review — and give all developers path to skip public meetings” by CHS from Capitol Hill Seattle Blog   “After a low appraisal, Black Seattle family 'whitewashes' home, gets higher price” by PJ Randhawa from KING5   “Why housing discrimination is worse today than it was in the 1960s” by PJ Randhawa from KING5   “OPA May Have Broken City and State Records Laws By Not Retaining Emails” by Carolyn Bick from The South Seattle Emerald    “SDOT Decries Tactical Urbanism While Allowing Eco-Blocks All Over the City” by Erica C. Barnett from Publicola    “Rent a Capitol Hill apartment from one of these companies? You ‘may have rights under antitrust laws to compensation' as lawsuit alleges price-fixing violations in Seattle” by jseattle from Capitol Hill Seattle Blog “Scoop: State Democratic Party chair under fire for alleged threats” by Melissa Santos from Axios   Transcript [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington state through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening, and what you can do about it. Full text transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. Today, we're continuing our Friday almost-live shows where we review the news of the week with a cohost. Welcome back to the program, friend of the show, today's cohost: defense attorney, abolitionist and activist, Nicole Thomas-Kennedy. Hey. [00:00:54] Nicole Thomas-Kennedy: Hey - thanks so much for having me. It's great to be here. [00:00:57] Crystal Fincher: Welcome back. Great to have you back. So we have a few things going on this week. We will start with the Seattle budget. The mayor introduced his budget a few weeks back - this is now the Council, and the President of the Council, being able to introduce their own budget and their take on things. What did you see here that was notable? [00:01:21] Nicole Thomas-Kennedy: I think the things that were really notable were that JumpStart was headed back to where it was originally planned. That tax was created for affordable housing and things like that, and the mayor tried to take it a different direction that I don't think addresses the City's needs at all - so it was good to see that. Keeping - not giving SPD the money for those ghost cops - the officers that don't actually work there, that haven't actually worked there for a while - their salaries, SPD was allowed to keep for a long time, and so taking that away. And I think really most importantly - to me, given what I do - is taking out the money for ShotSpotter, which is something that the mayor has pushed really hard for, but has shown to not work and actually be detrimental to marginalized communities in other cities. And that was a million dollars, so it was great to see that taken out. [00:02:27] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, that was definitely an improvement, I think, in a lot of people's minds. That was something that did seem to be oddly championed by the mayor and very few other people, regardless of what their political orientation or leaning is. It is just something that - a decade ago, people were wondering if it had some potential, and then it was implemented in a number of cities with a number of very well-documented problems. One thing that it does not seem to be able to accomplish is to reduce gun violence, which is its ultimate goal. But it did introduce a lot of other problems. It was expensive. It seemed to increase surveillance and harassment, particularly of Black and Brown communities, without intervening or interrupting any kind of violence. And that is just an inexpensive and ineffective use of funds. Given a budget shortfall, it seems like we should not be wasting money on things that have proven not to work and not to make anyone safer. I think another notable difference in this budget, between the mayor's budget, was he had proposed a reduction in salary for some of the frontline workers for homelessness services and outreach services there. Those are critical positions and crucial to being able to address homelessness, reduce homelessness. A lot has been covered over the years across the country about how important having comfortable, well-paid frontline workers is so that they're not living in poverty, they aren't in unstable positions - creating a lot of turnover and uncertainty with the workers on the frontline - so that they do have the capacity and ability to do that kind of frontline outreach work and getting people into services that meet their needs. And so there was definitely a repudiation of the idea of reducing their pay and making sure that their pay will continue to rise with the cost of living and the Consumer Price Index. So that was nice to see. A few other things, like you talked about, just making sure that the JumpStart funds, which it seems now everybody is acknowledging, have been very helpful. And even people who previously opposed it are now backing its use to backfill their own plans. But really just making sure that it is spent in a way consistent with its original charter, basically. And so more of a right-sizing and being more consistent with the spending that Seattle voters have backed, that these candidates were elected and reelected with mandates to go forward with - that we're seeing that there. Moving forward here, there was just an opportunity for public comment earlier this year. There is one more opportunity for councilmembers to introduce amendments to this budget before it's going to be ultimately passed. So I encourage everyone, if you have thoughts about the budget, we'll include some links just explaining it. There was a really good Capitol Hill Seattle story just breaking down the budget and what's happening there to make sure we go there. But a few notable other investments from there include $20 million each year for equitable development initiative projects that advance economic opportunity and prevent displacement. $20 million Green New Deal investments each year, including $4 million to create community climate resilience labs. $4.6 million for indigenous-led sustainability projects and $1.8 million for community-led environmental justice projects. $9 million for school-based health centers, which is a really big deal, including a new $3 million across the biennium for mental health services in response to the demand for more health providers from teachers and students - we'll talk a little bit more about the student walkout and strike and their demands later in the show. Also created a combined total of $1.5 million for abortion care in 2023, to ensure access to reproductive care for uninsured people in Seattle. And a $253 million investment into the Office of Housing for affordable housing - and that's over $50 million more than the last budget for building rental housing, more supportive services, first-time ownership opportunities. I know a lot of people are also hoping that Councilmember Tammy Morales' proviso makes it back into the budget to support social housing and securing City-owned property for rental housing that has a much better shot of being able to be affordable for regular people working in the City, especially those who don't have six-figure incomes and can't afford a million dollar home. This is going to be crucial to making sure that we have dedicated land and space and capacity to build permanent affordable housing. [00:07:54] Nicole Thomas-Kennedy: Yeah, and I hope that makes it back in very - I really hope that makes it back in. The thing that I see with the Council's - what they're proposing to put back in, or the changes they're making from Harrell's budget - is most all of them address things that would enhance public safety. And when I hear about things like old technology that's been shown not to work, that gives more or giving more money to police or things like that, I think people think that that's about public safety, but it's not. Those are reactionary things, those are things that have been shown not to address the problems, we really do need to be looking at those upstream things like housing, helping marginalized communities, mental health - all of these things are things that are actually going to result in more safety for everyone. And so I'm happy to see that their proposals are addressing those things. And I hope that they make it into the final budget. [00:08:52] Crystal Fincher: I agree. And I also think that we saw - with just these past election results that we received - that residents of Seattle, really across the county, but especially in Seattle, once again, show through their votes for candidates who are talking about addressing root causes, the rejection of candidates for the Legislature for King County Prosecuting Attorney who were talking about punitive punishment-based approaches, lock-em-up approaches, which the city and the county continually have rejected. And I think voters are just at the point where they're saying, no, please listen - you have already increased funding for police, but we have these big gaps in all of these other areas that we need you to address and fill, and it's - just talking about police is doing the overall public safety conversation a disservice because it takes so many other things to make sure that we are building communities that are safer, and where fewer people get victimized, and where we are not creating conditions that cause disorder. And so I hope that they are listening. And I hope that that gives both the Budget Chair and councilmembers faith and strength and motivation to move forward with these kinds of investments in community - that center community and that center addressing the root causes of crime, preventing crime - which is the most important thing that we can do. I don't think anyone is looking around and saying - things are great, things are fine - but I think people are fed up with the inaction or bad action and ineffective action taken. So we will stay tuned and continue to report on that. [00:10:47] Nicole Thomas-Kennedy: Very helpful. [00:10:47] Crystal Fincher: We just alluded to, but talked about this week - following last week's shooting of an Ingraham High School student by another student - extremely extremely tragic situation - that student wound up dying. This is a traumatic thing for the school community to go through, for the entire community to go through. And we saw students walk out to cause awareness and with a list of demands. What were they demanding? [00:11:19] Nicole Thomas-Kennedy: I'm not going to get it perfectly off the top of my head, but they want more resources for students. They want more mental health care. They want access to those things. They want things that are preventative. They're not asking for punitive retribution or more metal detectors or cops in schools or something like that. They're asking for things that are actually going to be preventative, that are going to encourage the wellbeing of all students. And they know that that's what's going to keep them safe. And from what I've seen from SPS - they seem responsive to those demands in some way. It remains to see what will be actually followed through on. But the response I've seen so far from SPS, just being the parent of an SPS student, is that they are listening to what these kids are actually saying and what the data actually shows will make these kids safer. So I find that to be hopeful. I hope you can verbalize what their list of demands were more succinctly than that, because I don't want to misrepresent what they're saying at all. But when I read through what they were asking for and saw what they were asking for, it was all stuff that was aimed at prevention - because that's what - they don't want to be shot. And that's very valid. And they shouldn't have to worry about those things. And the things that have been implemented for years, like more police in school, those lockdown drills and things like that - it's not working. It's just like we were talking about with the budget stuff, we need to get to those root causes. [00:13:04] Crystal Fincher: You're exactly right. And what these students want really does, to your point, cover the gamut of preventative measures. So there are a few different things. One, they want the district to increase anti-racist and de-escalation training for any security at Seattle Public Schools. They also demand that the state update safe storage laws and ban assault rifles. Students asked the Council to reroute $9 million from SPD to pay for counselors. They want one counselor - to be paid a living wage - but at least at a ratio of 1 for every 200 students. Right now, the district is averaging about 1 for every 350 students, so that is a significant increase in counselors. But I don't think there is anyone here who does not acknowledge the need for more mental health resources for students. And this is especially pronounced in the middle schools across the district. So that is a pretty substantial one. They did say that they don't want cops in schools. They don't want the introduction of more guns, more people with guns in schools - but they want the things that will prevent them. They want mental health resources and community-based resources, therapy resources, and intentional de-escalation and communication training, DBT therapy training - really for students there, so they can figure out how to use words to disarm and de-escalate conflicts instead of getting physically violent, encouraging gun violence, that type of thing. They really want to - they understand that there's a gap with many kids that they're trying to navigate through and this is a normal thing for students anyway. We need to equip them with the tools to work through conflict, to work through their emotions, even when they're very big. They recognize that and they're calling for that. So these are all things that are backed by data and evidence, that have shown to reduce conflict, to reduce violence of all kinds, definitely gun violence. And that are evidence-based, have worked in other areas - pretty reasonable. And so there are a few areas where this could come from. They're certainly asking the Legislature for action, but also with the City and the mental health money. I think Teresa Mosqueda said that she was allocating $2 million and saying that's a down payment on what the students are asking for. Another source that was talked about by some people online was the Families & Education Levy in the City of Seattle, which is tailor-made for things like this. And so that, I think, should be part of this conversation going forward. But we absolutely do need more mental health resources in the schools. And we heard that post - as students were returning back to school after schools were closed due to COVID, and as they were returning, there were certainly a lot of parents who wanted to reopen schools, get their students back in there, but also talked about the challenges that students were dealing with - with anxiety and a range of mental health needs. They seemed to acknowledge that students, in connection with violent events happening and needing to deal with that - we need to figure out a way to get this done. I think the student demands are entirely reasonable and the entire community needs to listen. Now, one dimension of the story that we have seen, there was a story - and I forget at this point who came out with it - but it was like the district is exploring basically putting armed police officers back in school. Upon reading the story, it was like no, actually the district, no one in the district was considering that. The students specifically said they didn't want that. School board members said that they were not currently examining that. But it does seem like the mayor and some of his advisory boards are advocating for armed police officers to return to schools. It seems like the people directly impacted are saying, no, please no, again, not anymore. But the mayor has a different viewpoint here. How do you see that? [00:17:57] Nicole Thomas-Kennedy: First of all - yes, the student demands are very reasonable and it's, I don't know, I'm constantly impressed by youth - just how informed they are, the way they present their ideas, and just - they're deeply rooted in this. They are the ones that are impacted. We didn't have to deal with this growing up. I didn't have to deal with this growing up. I didn't have to deal with COVID. I didn't have to deal with the Internet. I didn't have to deal with guns in schools. This is new territory for these kids and they are the ones that are able to tell us what they need and they do so so well. And it is backed by data and research. And I think the mayor has suggested or wants to do this cops-back-in-school thing, but kids know this isn't what has made us safe. We have seen very, very good - horrible, tragic examples of how school resource officers fail to keep kids safe. And I think a lot of people's eyes have been open to that. And while I see the suggestion, I acknowledge the suggestion, I don't think it's serious. I don't think you can keep talking about more cops, more cops - putting more cops here - and be serious about safety. We know that doesn't work. And I think that there's enough kids, there's enough parents, there's enough people, there's enough people on the Council that know these things that - if he wants to push forward that kind of agenda, I think the pushback is going to be really big. And we can't keep pretending that that's the solution - I think that a lot of people are ready to stop doing that and to be able to push back. And I love this walkout. I think it's so encouraging that these kids are really pushing for what they know to be true. And they're not just sitting there saying, there's nothing we can do about it. They know that there's something they can do about it. So I think that's very encouraging. And I would expect that any sort of really serious pushing forward of that idea of more cops in school, I would expect there to be really very large community and student backlash to those ideas. [00:20:15] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, I think there would be pretty ferocious backlash to that. We will see how that proceeds and continue to keep you up to date on that. Now, something that Bruce Harrell announced this week, that actually seems like it's going to have a positive reception and that can move things in a positive direction - he's looking to exempt affordable housing from design review - from the much-maligned design review process. What's he proposing to do here? [00:20:47] Nicole Thomas-Kennedy: He's proposing sort of a moratorium on affordable housing projects having to go through design review. So if people don't know - design review is a lengthy process where there's - I'm doing air quotes - "community input" on housing design, and it really drags out housing projects for so long. If you see an empty lot and there's a billboard up that says that they're going to build a nine-story building with mixed use - there'll be commercial space on the bottom - and then nothing happens for years and years and years. There's a lot of reasons for that, but one of the primary ones is that really long design review process, which is shown not to be actually that democratic when it comes to the community. So exempting affordable housing from that is such a huge and awesome idea that I think someone said, why didn't we do this before when there was a homelessness crisis declared? Ed Murray could have done this when he declared that crisis, but instead that there's all these projects that are languishing and really upping the price for developers to even build these things. So I think there's - not only is it going to get affordable housing built more quickly if this is actually implemented, which I hope it is, but it's also going to make building affordable housing more attractive to developers because just having that land sit there and having those plans sit there for years and years - it makes it very expensive for developers to undertake projects. And when they do, they're going to want to get as much return on their investment as possible. And so you have to make up for those lost years of the land just sitting there. And so allowing this to go forward is going to provide more housing for the community, which we desperately, desperately need, but it's also going to encourage developers to build affordable housing over other types of housing. So I think this is fantastic and I really hope it goes through. [00:22:55] Crystal Fincher: I think it is fantastic. I think this is a good example of listening to the community. This is a win all the way across for developers who are trying to build projects more economically and more quickly, for just the community who is waiting for housing prices to be more affordable - and not just because interest rates are changing the equation for a lot of people, but to get more supply online quickly. And so this was done with Mayor Bruce Harrell and with Councilmembers Dan Strauss and Teresa Mosqueda. And it would begin a one-year interim period exempting affordable housing projects from design review and then use that trial year to conduct what Harrell says will be a full State Environmental Policy Act review of legislation to try and make this exemption permanent. And so it would permanently exempt, or they're hoping to permanently exempt, housing projects from design review - exempting housing projects that use the mandatory housing affordability program to produce their units on site for a two-year pilot and also allow other housing projects to choose whether to participate in full design review or administrative design review as a two-year pilot. So this is something that hopefully does get more affordable housing units online quickly, cut through the bureaucracy - so a positive development here and excited to see it. What I was not excited to see was a story on KING5 about one of the elements that is part of the wealth disparity, the wealth gap that we see. We've seen stories, sometimes from across the country, talking about whitewashing homes and homes owned by Black people getting lower appraisals than other homes for no other reason, seemingly, than that they're Black. And this happened with a Black family in Seattle who got an initial home appraisal - they had their family pictures in there, they had some African art up. The home was visibly owned by Black people. So with this, this family got an appraisal that was initially $670,000 - under the median home price in Seattle. They thought - well, that seems low, that seems out-of-spec for what we've seen others in this area. So they decided to take down their personal pictures. They put up pictures from a white family. They had a white friend stand in the house presented now as if it was owned by a white family. And instead of the $670,000 appraisal, they got a $929,000 appraisal. The only difference was that it was a home owned by a white person, that appeared to be owned by a white person, versus one that is owned by a Black person - right here in Seattle. What did you think of this? [00:26:09] Nicole Thomas-Kennedy: Personally, I was not surprised. I saw that this had happened in other areas. I think there was a famous example from a couple of years ago where the difference was half a million dollars. But I think that there's an idea that - in Seattle, we're so progressive, we're so liberal that this kind of thing doesn't happen here. And it does. And I think it's dangerous to think that it doesn't. I think that the Black community gets gaslighted a lot about these things when this is a really clear, very obvious example. But how many other times has this happened? Probably quite a bit. And it's really contributing to the wealth gap. And this is something that Black people have been saying for years has been happening. And it's just now starting to catch on. People are starting to catch on that this is a thing. And when I say people, I mean people who are not Black because they already know about this. But it's really starting to be something that's obvious, that's happening here, that's happening everywhere. And there's all of these little things that happen to maintain that wealth gap - because it's the appraisal value, it's also Black homeowners being targeted for mortgage takeovers by banks, by realty companies. This is not something that a lot of white homeowners deal with - I think in one of the articles, a parent had died. And so then they kept getting calls from different groups asking to buy the home for cash and asking to do some sort of weird backhand reverse mortgage and things like - there's a lot of predatory things out there aimed at Black people and Black homeowners that white homeowners don't deal with. And I'm glad to see KING5 do this story. It's awful that it's happening, but I think the public needs to know that this is something that's happening and that in progressive Seattle, we are not - by any stretch of the imagination - immune to things like this happening on a regular basis. [00:28:23] Crystal Fincher: We are not at all immune. It impacts us in so many ways. Just where we still deal with the legacy of redlining and where Black people in Black communities have been. And then as there is this new displacement happening - that kind of difference in home valuation can very much determine whether that family can afford to buy again in Seattle or be forced out of Seattle. This is just such a major problem and just another manifestation of it here. So yeah, unfortunately not something that I found surprising, but just still really infuriating all the same. And I just hope more people wake up to see what's happening and engage in how they can help make this community more inclusive and do the work that needs to be done because there is work that needs to be done. [00:29:15] Nicole Thomas-Kennedy: Absolutely. [00:29:17] Crystal Fincher: Other news this week - the Office of Police Accountability may have broken records laws in what - how they've been operating. What happened here? [00:29:29] Nicole Thomas-Kennedy: So in this case, I believe Carolyn Bick from the Emerald had put in a public disclosure request for some emails. And what she got back from OPA was that they didn't retain it because they followed SPD's policy of record retention, which is different than the City's policy of record retention, which - they say they're part of SPD or they initially said they were a part of SPD, but they're not. They're not a law enforcement agency. They're a City agency. But I would like to point out one thing too - that the City's record retention policy is wild compared to other bigger entities. If you're a City employee, you're required to archive emails or communications that could be of public interest. So instead of automatically retaining everything and then deleting spam or needing this manual deletion, you have to manually save it. But what's in the public interest is huge. So there should be a default to be saving these things all the time. And of course, we've seen with other communications, like the mayor's texts or Carmen Best's texts, that absolutely those things should have been saved and they set them to delete instead. I think the argument here is about what is the record retention policy for OPA and it's just - it's just interesting that this is the Office of Police Accountability, but yet they're not accountable for their own record keeping. And then the City Attorney's Office said, we can't give you an answer to the question about, do they have SPD's retention policy or the City's retention policy? They said that calls for a legal opinion, so we can't give you one - which to me is just like, what do you do then? Isn't that your job - to make those determinations? So just another way that the Office of Police Accountability is - it's just an HR department for SPD. They just whitewash everything and put righteous complaints through a long bureaucratic process that they tell people to trust in, that ends at being a big old nothing - that even that process - that they can't keep correct records for. So it's shocking really just how much it is all the time that we're hearing about this stuff. [00:32:11] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, I think that's what is notable to me. It's just yet another thing from a body that is supposed to hold other entities accountable - and seems to have challenges doing that - just seeming to skirt accountability itself and being a hub of so much controversy. Just really makes you evaluate - what is the purpose, what is happening, what is going on? Are we doing more harm than good here? And it just seems like we don't ever receive answers, that there are very alarming things that happen. And the answers are to - well, we'll reshuffle some staff and we won't really address the substance of what happened. We'll just call it a day, wrap it up, put a stamp on it, and close it out. We just won't talk about it anymore. It's just - what is happening, why are we doing this? And jeez, if this is just going to be a farce, can we just save the money and do something else? Why are we investing in something that continues to break rules, and to seemingly break accountability processes? Just really confusing there. [00:33:30] Nicole Thomas-Kennedy: Yeah, very much so. [00:33:32] Crystal Fincher: Also really confusing this week - SDOT once again very quickly erased a crosswalk - a crossswalk that a community put up at a dangerous intersection, that is clearly an intersection where people are designed to cross - indicated by the curb cut and the ADA-compliant rumble strip. But it was a dangerous place to cross. It was a place where community had brought up concerns that had seemingly not been listened to or addressed. They decided, as has happened before in the City, to put up their own crosswalk to increase the safety of people who need to cross the street. And there are people who need to cross the street more safely. But once again, seemingly - within 24 hours, I think - SDOT appeared and took action, not based off of calls for increased safety and taking action to make this intersection more safe, but came and removed the paint creating the crosswalk, saying for reasons of safety and liability, they can't stand by and let the community paint a crosswalk, even if it is painted to standards. But they immediately removed it. And the new head of SDOT said, hey, we are trying to move in a new direction, but we can't. We'll never be comfortable with people painting their own crosswalks for liability reasons. And then receiving pushback from the community saying, we ask you to take action to make this more safe. You don't. People get killed on the street. People get run into and hurt. Our street designs are nearly exclusively car-centric in most of the City. So hey, neighbors took action to make the road safer for their neighbors, for kids who need to cross the street, for elderly people, disabled people who need to cross the street. And it just seems that the action comes when people take their own actions - [00:35:50] Nicole Thomas-Kennedy: Sometimes [00:35:51] Crystal Fincher: - to make the street safer. That will get resources out to remove it, but we don't seem to be wanting to deploy the resources necessary to make these intersections safer. How did you see this? [00:36:05] Nicole Thomas-Kennedy: Yeah, I applaud the effort of the community to make those streets safer. And I thought that the reasoning given - safety and liability - was thin. There's nothing about not having a crosswalk that makes it safer, obviously - that's what the community has been complaining about. And in terms of liability, it's always interesting to me that the liability that they're talking about is liability for a crosswalk that, "shouldn't be there," that they didn't sanction. But apparently there's no liability for people who are continually injured or killed in a place where the community has asked repeatedly for a crosswalk. And I think that it seems disingenuous to me. And yes, and it doesn't really mesh with the other things that they're talking about. So they can have someone come out and pressure wash off something that's supposed to be for community safety - like you said, for kids, for elders, for disabled people, for everyone - because we all walk if we're able. But the streets belong to everybody. But then they'll have someone come out and pressure wash this crosswalk off overnight. But at the same time, we have seen, for over a year, these ecoblocks, the big concrete blocks - that I think the most famous example of them is Councilmember Sara Nelson putting them around her business - so RVs, or people who are unfortunately having to live in their car, can't park near her business. Those are popping up all over the City now. And SDOT says, we're unwilling to pull people off safety projects to move those. But yet, they'll get someone out there overnight to erase something that's making public safety, but they won't do anything about these ecoblocks. And I think that's really another disingenuous argument, because there is more that they could be doing about that. There's ticketing. There's not just going and every day removing whatever's put there. There's a lot of things - there's fines, there's ticketing - that they could do to discourage this, and they're just not doing it. And to me, I think back to 2020 - when SPD built that ecoblock fort around the East Precinct and the West Precinct too. They built a little fort out of these City-owned ecoblocks around their precinct. And when there was things that ecoblocks were needed for, the City said, we don't have any more ecoblocks right now because they're being used for SPD's fort. And so now it seems like we have a glut of ecoblocks in the city - they're just everywhere. So I don't really understand where they're coming from. If they're not coming from SDOT, where are they coming from? And if they're not coming from SDOT and these are people buying ecoblocks and putting them there - on city streets - seems like it would be fairly advantageous for SDOT to go and pick them up. They're on public property. We didn't have enough of them before. Why not just collect them then? Or like I said, especially when they're on a private business, there's so much more the City could be doing about it. And obviously there's someone on the Council that does it. It's never been addressed. And it shakes, I think, people's faith and trust in City government and City agencies when they so clearly don't - their actions don't match up with what they're saying that they want to do. And so I expect more of these sort of crosswalks to pop up. And the community has been having these conversations with SDOT forever and nothing has happened. If this is what's moving the conversation forward, if this is what's creating safety - to me, that's the most important thing. People shouldn't be dying on the street. That's the most important thing. So whatever creates safety, whatever moves that conversation forward to protect people's lives, I think that's great that the community is doing that. I hope it pushes the conversation forward and really creates this infrastructure that we so desperately need. [00:40:45] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, I agree. I think those ecoblocks - some people I've seen refer to them now as Nelson blocks since Councilmember Sara Nelson, despite seeming acknowledgement that they are illegal, continues to use and deploy them and exclude others from public space that they are entitled to be in. And that just does not seem to be a priority, like some other things in this community that seemingly have lower costs or impacts. But just, yeah, that the responses don't seem to make sense. The interventions don't seem to be consistent. And I would really like to hear a coherent and consistent approach to safety in Seattle. Or at least start by understanding and acknowledging that what is happening is unacceptable. And instead of running to defend - and I understand that there are concerns about liability, that is a fact - but we do need to expand the conversation to - let's be not just concerned about getting sued, let's be concerned about one of the residents in the City, that we're responsible for, being killed. Because that is happening. And what are we doing to mitigate against that risk? - is really the bottom-line question I think people want some better answers to. [00:42:12] Nicole Thomas-Kennedy: Yeah, and they deserve them. [00:42:14] Crystal Fincher: They do. Another activity that maybe deserves - some Capitol Hill tenants are suing some landlords. What's happening here? [00:42:22] Nicole Thomas-Kennedy: So they are suing - there's, I don't know if people know this, but there are a few corporations, big housing corporations that own a lot of the housing in Capitol Hill and all around Seattle. And so many of them have started using an algorithm, through a company called RealPage, that collects all the information about whatever the company-owned property is, but then also all of the surrounding properties - to raise rents. So to tell landlords the maximum asking price that they can have for rent, based on what's going on around the city, around the neighborhood, from all this data from other places. And it's caused a lot of - and it's something that these big companies can hide behind for rental hikes too - they say, oh, a computer algorithm sets our rental prices and this is what it's set as. And RealPage CEOs have been very open about saying this is more than most landlords could ask for - I wouldn't feel comfortable as a human being asking for this rent, but it's set by a computer, so I can't do anything about it. And it's really caused rents around Seattle and Capitol Hill to skyrocket. There's many factors that go into skyrocketing rents, but this is absolutely one of them. And so the lawsuit is alleging illegal price fixing by these tenants, or by these landlords. And they're not the small mom-and-pop landlords that we're talking about. We're talking about the big housing conglomerates that own so much of our rental housing here in Seattle. And it alleges that it's basically illegal price fixing by having all of these groups that just continuously raise the rent - at the same time, along the same lines - and it's driving up prices everywhere. And I'm very happy to see this lawsuit personally. Rents are out of control in Seattle, and some of that is tied to supply, obviously. Obviously, there's no doubt about that. But what we don't need is businesses taking advantage of data aggregation to make rents go higher and higher and higher. And what I hear sometimes is - the market supports this. And I think that's a really misguided argument. People need housing. It's very, very dangerous to live on the street. Nobody's living on the street because that's a good time. No one's having an urban camping vacation out there in the middle of November. People don't want to live on the street. Housing - like food, like water - is something that we all need. So just because the market supports it doesn't mean it's affordable or good for the rest of the city. When people are paying 50% or 60% of their income to rent, that hurts everyone. That makes it - as food prices go up, as rent goes up, we have people that have to lean on social services. They have to go without things that are - really, it's a detriment to our entire community. So I'm very happy to see this lawsuit. Anything we can do to bring rents down and rebalance the - there's never going to be a full balance between landlord and tenant, obviously, but there needs to be some sort of rebalancing that's going on to make it so people can actually afford to live in this city. [00:46:01] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely. We still have areas in the state where people's rent can double. We still have areas just - where we are displacing people in the name of profit. And this is an essential need. This is something that people need to survive. We are seeing an explosion in homelessness because people cannot afford a place to live. Fundamental causes of homelessness are the inability to afford rent. People try and blame - people dealing with substance use disorder or people with mental illnesses - and those are issues and often become worse issues after someone is out on the streets because that is such a rough environment. But the biggest contributor is the inability to pay rent. And that's why we see other areas that have higher instances of people dealing with substance abuse, higher instances of people dealing with those issues - that don't have the degree of homelessness that we do in areas like Seattle, where things are just simply so unaffordable for so many. So we absolutely need to do that. To your point, we need more supply and action - to get more supply is great, but we aren't going to fully address this issue until we bring this landlord and renter situation into greater balance, until there are more rent controls, renter protections in place. That is also a necessary piece of this scenario. And taking this action is necessary - what we've seen has been predatory and has contributed to homelessness. And if we don't get a handle on this, we're not going to get more people housed anywhere around here. So I think this is a justified action. I think that - no, we actually need to stand up and say, you are not entitled to ever-escalating and increasing profits on the backs of people who are providing valuable services and who are valuable people in our communities. We just can't allow that to happen. It's not that - no one can make a profit, right? It's not that we're outlawing being able to be a landlord. But there are responsibilities that should come with that. This is not just a great area for profit and speculation. You're dealing with people in their housing, you're dealing with families in their housing. And there should be a greater amount of care and responsibility that we demand from that. So I am also happy to see this happening. [00:48:55] Nicole Thomas-Kennedy: Yeah. I also think it's important to realize that when there are so many housing - when there are so many landlords and companies raising these rents - like you said, they are also causing homelessness. These rising prices cause homelessness. So what is actually happening is they are externalizing the cost of homelessness to the community while they make ever greater profits. And as I really like to point out - that this is to the detriment of everyone. So it is the community that is paying for them to make ever greater profits. And that's what we're really talking about. It's not just, people should be able to make money - of course they should be able to make money - but this is something that you can't ignore. This is not like an expensive handbag. People need shelter. And so when we are talking about those things, there will be a community cost if those things aren't brought back in line. And it's important to recognize that the market can't fix all of this. There has to be something else when it comes to things that people - that are basic human needs. And I like the idea that housing is a human right. We need it. We can't live without it. And I think that more and more people are getting behind the idea of that - that housing is a human right, that we all deserve the dignity of living in a home. But I also hope people realize that it is these profiteering landlords that are externalizing the cost of their profits to the community. So yeah, I welcome this too. It's hopeful. [00:50:45] Crystal Fincher: It is. And the last thing we'll cover today - there was a story by Melissa Santos in Axios talking about the State Democratic Party Chair under fire for being a staunch defender of Democrats Steve Hobbs, and really discouraging and going after folks who endorsed non-partisan Julie Anderson and her race against Democrat Steve Hobbs for Secretary of State. You have Joe Fitzgibbon, who chairs the House Democrats Campaign Committee, saying that Tina made threats about withholding resources from Washington House candidates because Democratic House Speaker Laurie Jinkins supported the non-partisan candidate instead of the Democrat. And then you have folks - Tina Podlodowski, certainly, but also others saying that - hey, this is what happens in the Democratic Party. Either you back Democrats or you're not. You're free to support who you want, but not within the Democratic Party. How did you see this? [00:51:58] Nicole Thomas-Kennedy: I thought this was a kind of a nothing, really. She's the Chair of the Democratic Party. Think whatever you want about Democrats - the job of the chair of the Democratic Party - there's many things to it, but pushing forward Democrat candidates, Democratic candidates, and a Democratic agenda is what she does. And I was really surprised - the headline of the article, which I know is not written by the journalist, said something about "alleged threats," which makes it sound so much more intense than it was - I think that it's - we really need to get serious about politics and about what we're doing. Republicans are on board with just voting for whoever has an R by their name, and that's something that Democrats haven't necessarily been doing. They've been trying to do that, but they haven't necessarily done it. But to think that the Chair of the Democratic Party is not going to try to push hard for Democratic candidates - I just thought was ridiculous, really. It just seemed like an absurd story. I have a limited - I had a limited experience with politics, but from what I experienced - this was nothing. This was really not much compared to what actually goes on in politics. To me, this just seems like she's trying to get Democratic candidates in there, which is what she's doing, that's what she's supposed to be doing. So I thought it was a kind of a weird story - the way it was framed, the choice of using the word "threat" without really talking about, until much later in the story, about what those "threats" really were - which were not direct, and which were about using Democratic Party funds and resources. And those are things that she's responsible for. I just really thought it was a kind of a nothing of a story, really. [00:54:09] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, I think what made it a story was that you had a House leader making these accusations directly, and that's something that we don't really see that often. And I think just the - I think it is largely to be expected that a Democratic Party Chair is not going to be happy with the endorsement of a Democrat. I think what caused more of the question is not just saying, hey, Joe Fitzgibbon or Laurie Jinkins, you took this action, and therefore I'm not happy with this - with you - and maybe not supporting you, but the extension to Democratic candidates overall across the state, potentially, because of that. Which Tina Podlodowski and her team said wasn't serious and was par for the course, after being confronted with the existence of them, after I think initially saying that nothing was said. But then, I think this is interesting - not necessarily for this instance - although I do think there's a healthy conversation to be had about is holding the support of unrelated candidates fair play or not. But also just because it does talk about - in this instance, we're talking about a nonpartisan - some of these issues become very simple if we're talking about Republicans. They become a little more complicated when we talk about nonpartisans, when we talk about - especially in the Seattle area - folks from the DSA or People's Party, who may not label themselves as Democrats, but may be aligned on values. And so, is the Democratic Party a party of a label where just the - vote blue, no matter who - if they have a D by their name, great. Or is it a party of principles underneath that label, and you're more searching for someone who adheres to those principles, which may be someone who doesn't necessarily identify as a Democrat. I think that this conversation has been happening within local party organizations for a while, and different LPOs [Local Party Organizations] have come up with different stances themselves. Some are fine with endorsing folks outside of the party if they align on values, and others are very not fine with that. I think we see where Tina Podlodowski and the State Party is on that. But it is, it's not a straightforward equation. Because you do have these resources for the - it is the Democratic Party - doesn't prevent anyone from aligning with another party in doing that. Although that's a flip remark - if you're a Democrat or if you're a Republican, that alignment comes with significant resources that are available or not available with that. So I think, especially with those resources at stake, especially with candidates who may not be affiliated, I understand where people paused and said, wait, what is going on here? But I do think there's a bigger conversation to be had just within the party about - is it about a label? Is it not? Usually that's a much simpler equation when you get to a general election in a partisan race, but we had a situation with a nonpartisan running. And in Seattle - in city council races and other local races, we have situations where non-Democrats run, who are in the same place or further to the left of Democrats. So it just really depends here. But I think there is further exploration and conversation that needs to happen about this, even on the local level. [00:58:21] Nicole Thomas-Kennedy: Yeah, I think that's - those are all really good points. And I guess, when I was running, I saw people in the LDs going hard for Nikkita Oliver, who didn't identify as a Democrat. And a lot of non-endorsements of Sara Nelson, for instance, who was a Democrat. And to me, it seemed like there was robust conversation in the LDs and they did not all agree. And they did not all do the same thing. And I - yeah, I think there is room for conversation about that. To me, it just - I get a little bit - it seems very - what am I trying to think of? What am I trying to think of when something's pot-kettle-type thing - like the right does this stuff constantly. And there's a total double standard when it comes to liberals, Democrats, progressives, the left. And I ran in a race where my opponent was not nonpartisan, but presented themselves that way. And it's hard to know, as a voter, what you're truly looking at. And so I wish - yeah, I think there - I definitely agree there needs to be a more robust conversation. At the same time, I think the Chair of the Democratic Party should probably be - whoever the Democratic Party has endorsed would be like someone that they would be pushing forward. But yeah, it does get really murky. And you're right, it comes with a lot of resources and access to voter databases and things like that - that has been shared with some groups and not others. There is - it isn't a straightforward situation, like it is with the right, where it's just - he's the nominee, so that's who we vote for - which is also breaking down on the right, it seems like, because they seem like they maybe took that too far. But there's a lot of nuanced conversation that needs to take place. [01:00:28] Crystal Fincher: And with that, I thank you for listening to Hacks & Wonks on this Friday, November 18, 2022. Hacks & Wonks is co-produced by Shannon Cheng and Bryce Cannatelli. Our insightful co host today is defense attorney, abolitionist and activist Nicole Thomas-Kennedy. You can find Nicole on Twitter @NTKallday - that's NTK-A-L-L-D-A-Y. You can follow Hacks & Wonks on Twitter @HacksWonks. You can catch Hacks & Wonks on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever else you get your podcasts - just type "Hacks and Wonks" into the search bar. Be sure to subscribe to get the full versions of our Friday almost-live shows and our midweek show delivered to your podcast feed. Please leave us a review wherever you listen. You can also get a full transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced in the show at officialhacksandwonks.com and in the episode notes. Thanks for tuning in - talk to you next time. [01:01:19] Nicole Thomas-Kennedy: Thanks for having me - this was great.

IIoT Use Case Podcast | Industrie
#080 | (LIVE) Digitaler Zwilling Volkswagen: Einheitliche Datenmodelle schaffen Transparenz & Energiemonitoring | SPS-Special - IDTA & Volkswagen Sachsen

IIoT Use Case Podcast | Industrie

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 27:22


DIGITALER ZWILLING | VERWALTUNGSSCHALE | FERTIGUNG www.iotusecase.comVolkswagen treibt wichtige Meilensteine in Sachen Elektromobilität und Digitalisierung voran. Ein großer Meilenstein ist der Aufbau eines digitalen Produktzwillings im Werk Zwickau, um die größten (Energie-)Verluste in Prozessen der Fertigung zu identifizieren. Mit dieser Challenge sind sie nicht allein: Als eines der über 80 Mitglieder der Industrial Digital Twin Association e. V. (IDTA) standardisieren sie den digitalen Zwilling der Produktion.  Folge 80 auf einen Blick (und Klick):[07:38] Herausforderungen, Potenziale und Status quo – So sieht der Use Case in der Praxis aus[13:40] Lösungen, Angebote und Services – Ein Blick auf die eingesetzten Technologien[21:47] Ergebnisse, Geschäftsmodelle und Best Practices – So wird der Erfolg gemessenZusammenfassung der PodcastfolgeDiese Special-Folge LIVE von der SPS in Nürnberg dreht sich um den Digitalen Zwilling als Schlüsseltechnologie der Industrie 4.0. Der Digitale Zwilling verbindet physische Industrieprodukte mit der digitalen Welt. Für die erfolgreiche praktische Umsetzung und die internationale Verbreitung dieser Kerntechnologie ist ein gemeinsames Verständnis aller Beteiligten in Industrie, Verbänden und Forschung notwendig. Dieser Aufgabe hat sich die IDTA angenommen. Fertigungslandschaften – so auch das Volkswagen Sachsen Werk in Zwickau – sind geprägt von Neu- und Bestandsanlagen mit unterschiedlichstem Vernetzungsgrad. Um eine energiebedarfsgerechte Optimierung für das gesamte Werk durchzuführen, sind Daten aus vielen Anlagen und bisher die Umsetzung mehrerer Use Cases notwendig. Um Engineering-Aufwände zu sparen, braucht es ein Datenfundament mit gleichen Informationsmodellen für alle Geräte - Energieeffizienz durch Standards! Mit dem so genannten Asset Administration Shell (dt. Verwaltungsschale) eröffnet die IDTA als Nutzerorganisation diese Technologie nun für jedes Unternehmen.  Die Verwaltungsschale ermöglicht die Digitalisierung der energiebedarfsgerechten Produktion im Green- und Brownfield. Sie ist Informationsgrundlage für Digitale Zwillinge und kann im Rahmen der Energiebedarfsmessung Kosten im Shopfloor hinsichtlich Planung, Inbetriebnahme und Betrieb senken.   Doch was genau ist diese sogenannte Verwaltungsschale, wie funktioniert sie und welche Mehrwerte stiftet sie noch? Das erklären Dr. Christian Mosch (Geschäftsführer, IDTA) und Dr. Dirk Thieme (Head of New Mobility and Innovations, Volkswagen Sachsen GmbH) in Folge 80 des IoT Use Case Podcasts. -------Relevante Folgenlinks:Dr. Dirk Thieme (https://www.linkedin.com/in/dr-dirk-thieme-298859158/)Dr. Christian Mosch (https://www.linkedin.com/in/dr-christian-mosch-280693b6/)Ing. Madeleine Mickeleit (https://www.linkedin.com/in/madeleine-mickeleit/)

The Ari Hoffman Show
November 9, 2022: About Last Night...

The Ari Hoffman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 122:17


What the hell happened last night? Seattle Way - A teacher at SPS politicizes shooting tragedy for election day The Swamp- Biden reacts to the election results Woke report

Telecom Reseller
How to turn every conversation into an infinite source of revenue, Dubber Podcast

Telecom Reseller

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 6:54


“Once you understand what isn't working… the answer really becomes more clear,” says Michael Abenhaim, SVP of Americas Sales at Dubber. Abenhaim describes a seismic challenge facing the service provider community and discusses a path forward. Native services and applications offered at a higher margin and lower cost, underpinned with 100% customer ownership will, according to Abenhaim, deliver the differentiation SPs and customers are looking for, but without deep partnering this solution is still difficult to realize. “By making conversational intelligence native on their network, service providers set the building blocks in place to deliver unique and valuable intelligence back to their customers in ways others are not or cannot,” Abenhaim adds. In this podcast, Abenhaim opens the idea of conversational data as a place for providers to tap into, offering their customers an invaluable intelligence resource, and unlocking an underpenetrated revenue stream. Visit www.dubber.net

SBS Mongolian - SBS Монгол хэлээр
Өвлийн FIFA World Cup 2022| Сорилт ба Боломж

SBS Mongolian - SBS Монгол хэлээр

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 11:49


SPS телевизийн хөл бөмбөгийн тайлбарлагч Х.Амгалан Сиднэй хотод амьдардаг. Түүнтэй удахгүй эхлэх гэж буй FIFA World Cup 2022-ын тухай ярилцаж, энэ жилийн аваргын таамгийг нь сонслоо. Бас Австрали улсын Word Cup-д оролцож байсан түүх, туршлагыг эндээс сонсоорой.

The Jefferson Exchange
Therapist talks about handling senses that work overtime

The Jefferson Exchange

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 22:03


While the extra sensitivity can be distracting and upsetting, it can also lead to some intense euphoric experiences. Alane Freund is a therapist practicing in the Bay Area who works with people with SPS.

SPS
Ep. 50: The Cost of Living Protests, & Platypus on Sexual Liberation

SPS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 88:16


Our 50th anniversary SPS episode comes in two part. First, we cover the on-going cost of living protests organized by the Left in the U.K, Germany and Austria. Co-hosts Lisa and Andreas attended protests in Leipzig and Vienna, where they recorded soundbites and interviews with several leftist activists. Later, they discuss these interviews and the current crisis on the Left with SPS co-host Rebekah and former president of Platypus, Efraim C. -- both based in the U.K. In our Shit Platypus Does segment, Rebekah and Lisa sit down with our members Audrey and David to discuss how Platypus has hosted the conversation on sexual liberation & the Left. For that purpose they all went into our archive, our panel discussions, Platypus Review articles and SPS episodes, which we have created over the 15+ years of the Platypus Affiliated Society. Platypus on “Sex and the Left” Links: “#MeToo and the millennial sex panic”. Platypus Review 111.  November 2018. https://platypus1917.org/2018/11/02/metoo-and-the-millennial-sex-panic/ “Transgender liberation? A movement whose time has passed” . Platypus Review 111. November 2018. https://platypus1917.org/2018/11/02/transgender-liberation-a-movement-whose-time-has-passed/ “Which Way Forward for Sexual Liberation?” Teach-in at  The People's Forum in New York City. June 2022 https://youtu.be/ATCE8FQfTC4 “Sexual Freedom in Capital” Platypus Review 133. February 2021 https://platypus1917.org/2021/02/01/sexual-freedom-in-capital/ “Women the Longest Revolution (Frankfurt)” Panel transcription. Platypus Review 84. March 2016 https://platypus1917.org/2016/03/07/women-longest-revolution-frankfurt/

SPS STARcast Series
Bullying Prevention Month

SPS STARcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 27:28


S2, Ep. 2 of our SPS STARCast will feature our SPS Coordinator of School Counselors, Dr. Angela King, Ms. Cindy Devers, Social & Emotional Support Coordinator, and Ms. DaLea Sneed, School Counselor of Auxilary Programs. Discussion topics include identifying bullying in various forms, where parents/students can find resources for reporting bullying, how SPS implements bullying prevention and awareness, etc.

Stortingsrestauranten
#145 Shawarma ala Pollestad

Stortingsrestauranten

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 30:34


Senterpartiets Geir Pollestad gjester podkasten. Hvordan er overgangen fra offensiv opposisjonspolitiker til å nå være kongen av forsvarslinjen til regjeringen? Og hva skjedde egentlig med Sps egen podkast?En podkast av Henrik Asheim, Tina Bru og Peter Frølich Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Light Reading Podcasts
Omdia's Roz Roseboro: The complexities of public clouds for telcos

Light Reading Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 17:55


Roz Roseboro, principal analyst for Omdia, joins the podcast to discuss her research on service provider use of the public cloud and whether SPs should try to be more like the hyperscalers. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The O&P Check-in: an SPS Podcast
Managing a Family Owned O&P Clinic with Frank & Melissa Snell, Snell Prosthetics & Orthotics

The O&P Check-in: an SPS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 34:53


In this week's episode, we are joined by Snell Prosthetics & Orthotics' President and CEO Frank Snell, CPO, LPO, FAAOP, and his daughter Chief Financial Officer Melissa Snell, CFm. SPS Regional Sales Manager Christina Cox also stops by to chat with Frank and Melissa about the intricacies of managing a family owned O&P clinic. Click here to learn more about Snell Prosthetics and Orthotics. Click here to join our email list.Thank you Becker Orthopedic for sponsoring this episode! Click here to learn more about the Triple Action.  The Microprocessor promotion is back at SPS. From October 1 – December 31, 2022, purchase a qualifying microprocessor product and receive a Solo Stove Campfire! Learn more.  Visit spsco.com Also, email us!   The O&P Check-in is a bi-monthly podcast featuring the latest orthotics and prosthetics news, trends, best practices, regulations and policies. Designed for O&P professionals, join Brendan Erickson and Jacki Green as they interview guests and share the latest advancements in the industry. 

Pop & Mag’s Pinecast
Kernel Dev: Sizzle War

Pop & Mag’s Pinecast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 90:22


Dev from Sizzle Popcorn and Rockit Central stopped by to talk about his famous popcorn, how he got working with Theta, what's next, and much more. The Boys talk Tdrop, SPS, and Tigions drop amongst other hot issues and hot takes.

No deje de Hablar como Maule
La Historia continua Ledis & Katurra ❤️❤️

No deje de Hablar como Maule

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 54:49


- No hay trafico en SPS por el feriado morazanico 🚧🗺 - Canticos a los equipos ligas 🇮🇹 🇲🇽 🇫🇷 ⚽️ - La Fanny llega a trabajar pelada 👱‍♀

Rappin' With ReefBum
Guest: Dong Zou, AcroGarden

Rappin' With ReefBum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 121:12


Rappin' With ReefBum is a LIVE talk show with host Keith Berkelhamer and guests from the reef keeping community. In this episode I chat with Dong Zou from AcroGarden.Dong has a PhD in chemistry and worked for several pharmaceutical companies in various therapeutic areas, including anti-inflammatory, cancer, pain management and anti-infectious diseases. He developed his first interest in marine invertebrates when he was working as a post doc at the University of Virginia. Dong has been in aquarium hobby since he was in college and initially focused on keeping fancy designer goldfish and discus. He got into the saltwater hobby in 2004 after setting up his first marine fish tank for a Nemo and after he discovered the Boston Reefers Society. About 10 years ago he cofounded his first company on drug discovery. Soon after that, he was able to combine his passion for coral and his experience in the pharmaceutical industry and cofounded a new company, eCove BioMarine. This company focused on aquaculture coral for drug discovery and bone grafting. His current company, AcroGarden Inc, was then founded to hold the intellectual properties and to study coral farming. AcroGarden is now Dong's primary focus. The company produces aqua-cultured coral, mainly SPS, for the hobby.

Telecom Reseller
Service & Solution Providers – AI – ML Differentiation that Wins Deals, Podcast

Telecom Reseller

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022


“The real challenge is how do a I as an SP differentiate my services, how do I innovate on those services,” says Andy Lark, CMO of Dubber. Lark reflects on earlier tries of monetizing the network, which ultimately were expensive and lacked differentiation. Now, SPs are focusing on their core value: enabling conversations. “You need the magic in the network,” Lark adds, to capitalize on the services SPs already deliver and that sit right at the core of their offerings. In this podcast we learn about using ML and AI to create visibility into the conversations that the SP is already facilitating. Workflow automation, where conversations are captured into actionable data. “What I want is the major action items tagged for me,” says Lark. We discuss how AI and ML enable people to not just get a transcript of a meeting or a customer call, but to be given the exact things they need to glean from that call. We are moving from creating huge amounts of undigested and digestible data, to bite size pieces of data, and then on to being given exactly the bite size bits that we need to react, enabling a sale, improve customer service or get a jump on dispute resolution. Whereas some of this was available to giant firms, now SPs can offer this to their smallest clients. But we need to make sure that customers understand that they're not just getting a transcript but more of a roadmap for action. Imagine that for less than the cost of a cup of coffee we get quick meeting highlights, a customer satisfaction score and even a notice to check in with customers of note. Visit www.dubber.net  

Gung-Fu Super Bros. Podcast
Cheese Dawn-ish / RRR

Gung-Fu Super Bros. Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 96:32


The Super Bros. are back from their weekend trips. John and SPS bring you the latest news from the D23 Expo. Was it everything they dreamed of? Is there any new Star Wars or Marvel news you didn't already know of? Ivan and Enrique return from a spooky family trip to Universal Studios Hollywood Halloween Horror Nights. What house was the best this year? Did they get to ride the Terror Tram? What is the secret origin of the "cheese dawn-ish" The Super Bros. watched RRR this week? Is this the greatest Indian movie they have ever watched? Quite possibly. Bheem and Raju are best friends, revolutionaries, and rivals in the greatest bromance that's ever been told. After a girl is kidnapped by British Colonialists, the Shepard of a village (Bheem) travels undercover to the city to rescue her. Raju begrudgingly works his way up the Police Force to seek revenge for horrendous crimes against his village. Will both characters achieve their ultimate goals? How cool are the action scenes in this movie? Did this movie inspire Enrique to watch more beloved Indian movies? Still not a subscriber? You should. You may even get an underwater handshake for doing so. Want more Super Bros? www.linktr.ee/gungfusuperbros Our Socials: www.twitter.com/gungfusuperbros www.instagram.com/gungfusuperbrospod www.instagram.com/malofilms Leave us a voicemail at www.gungfusuperbros.com or on our Google Voice number 661-401-5941 to be part of our show. Don't forget to rate, review, or leave a comment on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or Google Podcasts. Like this video, smash the bell for notifications, and subscribe to us on YouTube! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Option Genius Podcast: Options Trading For Income and Growth

Allen: All right, everybody, welcome passive traders. I have one of my good friends with me today, Denny is going to be here. He's going to be talking about trading life in general, and everything that he's learned along the way. Denny, you know, we've, you've been in our programs for a little bit now we've seen your success. And I'm, we're friends on Facebook. So I see you with your posts from Hawaii, sitting on a beach house and all that and we're on the coaching calls, you're always you know, you're always making me jealous. You're always like, "well, I'm going to Hawaii next week, or I'm going on vacation. I'm going golfing". I'm like, Come on, man. So I'm glad that we finally got to talk, you know, thank you for thank you for taking the time to be out here and talk with us. And I can't wait to learn from you. Denny: Okay. Well, the way I you know, the way I originally got hooked up with you is I saw one of your marketing deals on the internet. And I thought, you know, well, you know, let's give this a look. And so I talked with Cory and and I said to her, hey, look, you know, I've got I said, I'd like an honest answer that if I come in and buy the program and everything, and I've got $10,000. Is it possible for me to make $2,000 a month on the $10,000? And she said, Well, we've got people doing it. She was very honest. You know, and then so so I got in on the oil deal. One. I think it's blank check trading is that was the oil is. And boy, I learned a whole lot. The first year, I was just sailing along making money hand over fist. And that was when oil was not very volatile. And it was just making, you know, moving sideways, which is perfect for if you want to trade oil futures, you know, it's perfect. Allen: Yeah. Yeah. All markets are our friend.  Denny: And, and then all of a sudden, oil shot up. And I think it was November two years ago might have been three. Now I know I've been doing it quite a while. All of a sudden, I went in. And I looked and the market had dropped. And I and I was in a position where I was going to end up getting a margin call. So I liquidated my position was $4,700 that day, and I'll be damned the next day, boom, it pops right back up. And that was the day after Thanksgiving. And then on the next call, you talked about the Friday after Thanksgiving is not a very high volume deal. And so one big guy in there can make the market he can make it drop, you can make it rise, and I fell prey to that because I didn't know but you know, you can learn from your mistakes. And I made made plenty of them. But now I make money every month. Allen: That 4700, did that wipe you out? Denny: Out? No, no, I had 10 Okay. Okay, so I started all back over. And it took me it took me damn near a year to get it to get it back. And in the meantime, you had your program on stocks. Okay, so I signed up for that. And I fooled around with the stocks for a while and I went back to oil because to me, it's a little more passive where I can put a trade on and I will look at it once a week you know, and I feel comfortable with it. But then what happened is we got get them the next chapter Benny Alan COVID here. And my advertising agency that I own I do direct mail advertising for automotive industry. And I don't know if you've been reading but the car dealers don't have any new cars. Allen: Yeah, they don't need advertising. Denny: So, I my business the first year of COVID was down 2,000,400 and some $1,000 Right now, the second year is about 2.8 million and now we're into the third year of the car shortage and so far this year I'm down $1,976,000 From where my normal years would be so I went from a mid six figure income guaranteed down I collected my Social Security check with my wife, okay. And so I go okay, let's start fooling around with your knowledge with oil and with stock options and get yourself a little income so I took $25,000 out of our savings account and put it into my tasty works account and I make on an average trading two ETFs and oil and I just started doing spreads on weekly options in oil and that I've been doing okay on it but you got to watch that a little quicker because you'll, you can get caught up in a margin call on everything pretty quick on that. But since I have no other job, okay, I can watch it. You know, I just make sure that that when I go to the golf course on my daily trip I've got my phone with me. And I can hop in on the tasty works phone app and protect myself if I need to. But what I learned most from you was paid.. Allen: So how are you doing there? So you're like, Okay, so you Alright, so I'm following the story. Right? So you were you were learning like, you've been in our program, I think two years. So three, three, okay, three. So you learn how to do the oil you were doing great. And then you had one bad day where it crashed and you basically went back to zero and you had to start over? Right so that at least you didn't lose it you had you know you get back your gains then you know COVID hit so you had to basically all hands on deck for the business trying to figure that out. Now you're at the point where like, okay, you know what, I got this stuff that I know how to do let me see if I can make some money on the side. So you've been trading oil you've been doing you said you doing 2 ETFs. So what are you doing on? Yeah, what type I do? I do SPX and (inaudible). So what strategy are you doing on those? Okay, well, Denny: Let's go back to my educational background. Okay. Okay. I have a master's degree in Environmental Engineering. My master's thesis was the statistical modeling of dam failures due to excess runoff. Okay, so I'm a numbers guy, a numbers game, I understand standard deviations, regression lines, Bayesian coordinates, you know, all of this fancy mathematics that all of these indicators that when they write them, you know, I know how they get there. So I started looking at the stuff and I started looking for patterns, because standard deviation and stuff like that is nothing other than patterns, okay, that create a probability statement of the same thing occurring, okay. So, I started looking and I found the correlation between the VIX that, you know, on the CMOE, right, the VIX, right? And what happens with it? And so, I take the VIX and say it was it traded at 2588 and open this morning at 2588. I can't I can't remember exactly what it is. I go in, and I divide the VIX by 16. Now, why do I divide by 16? Allen: I have no idea. Denny: There are 256 trading days in the market. Right? The square root of 256 is 16. Okay. So I take the 68 divided by 16. And that gives me a percentage that's 87% accurate as to the upward or downward movement of SPX or rut on a daily basis. From what it opens that not what it closed that yesterday. But when the opening bell dings like, this morning, yesterday, right? Close to 1806. Okay. But this morning, when the bell rang, it was 1843 just for a short period of time until the CPI stuff caught up in the rear end dropped out of it. Okay, right. But so what I do is I go in and take what it opens at, and take the percentage and what it opens at, say it's one point it was 1.61 today, so you take 1.61% of the opening bell, and you subtract that from what it opened that and you add it to what it opened that and you gives you a high and a low rate. Okay? Allen: Say that again, do make doing so. Okay. The VIX divided by 16. Okay, then what do you do that? Denny: Okay, you multiply that the 1.61% Okay? Times when it opened that, okay, and that comes out to roughly what, close to 30 bucks. I don't have my calculator here. Okay. So you would take, you would take it and if it opened at 1843, you take the 30 off of that, that would be 1813. And then you take the 1843 and add the 32, which would be 1873. So that means that you've got an 87 point something percent chance that the right is going to close somewhere between the 1813 and 1873. Okay, okay, so now, we wait until the Between 1030 and 11 o'clock central time, okay. And the reason that I wait until then, is if you look, the market goes in and opens it bounces up and down. And if it's on the way up between 1030 and 11 o'clock you have what what usually happens and happens most days is a mid morning reversal of some sort where people are in taking profits or, or getting rid of losses. So okay. And at that point, it gives you a direction of the momentum of the market for the rest of the day. And the rest of the day barring no news or anything, it pretty much goes sideways or slightly up or slightly down. And I go in and sell a put put spread or a call spread at the bottom or the top that was ranges away from the way the momentum of the markets going. And I do that on a daily basis. Allen: So if you think is going down you sell calls if you think it's going up you sell puts at the end of that range. So is that like you said 87% So what is that like as like one and a half standard deviation?  Denny: One and a half standard deviations?  Allen: Okay. All right. But but why do you do the VIX because what does the VIX have to do with the rut? The VIX is based on the VIX, SPX the VIX Denny: Gives you the volatility, the market as a whole. Allen: Right. But it has to do with the volatility of the SPX, the RUT has its own.. Denny: Okay, okay. But the RUT is based on 2000 stocks, okay. And vix takes into account the volatility of what's happening in the 2000 stocks, the Dow Jones and the standards and poors. The way they calculate the bets, Allen: Okay, because I thought the VIX was just only on the SPX the 500. The large ones. Denny: Yeah, yeah. Well, but it is, but they just weren't right. There's yeah, there's a there's a correlation between what's happening in SPX and what happens in RUT. Okay. Allen: Yeah, they're, yeah, okay. Right. They are correlated. So it just it just happened correlated workout, right?  Denny: And it's just and it's just like if you want to see what's going on with gonna happen for disaster time, with the SPX. Go in and look at what's going on with QQQ. If QQQ is dropping, you better watch yourself on the SPX, with about, I forget what percentage of the SPX is Fang stocks now? Right? Yeah. Okay. Allen: So how long? How long have you been doing this? Denny: I've been doing for about four months. Allen: Four months. Okay. And you back tested it? Denny: Yeah. Oh, yeah. I spent a couple, couple $100 and got some good back testing software and back tested it. And if you go through the thing and wins about 80 some percent of the time, okay. Allen: And how much are you trying to make on each trade? Denny: Okay, I'm trying to make 4% Three and a half to 4% on a trade, okay. Allen: And these are weekly trades or daily trades daily. So you want the SPX, Denny: The SPX, the SPX has a closing every day. Okay, Allen: So these are at the close. Yes. Okay. Denny: And the rut has Monday, Wednesday and Friday. So I only trade the rut on Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Allen: Cool. So now your results been so far? Denny: That I'm doubling my money every month. Allen: Wow. 100% every month? Denny:  When Putin cut the pipeline off, okay. And the market and the rear end fell out of the market that day. I was at my computer when it started happening. And I closed everything out. If if I hadn't closed it out, I probably would have lost about three or 4000 that day, but I don't you know, what I do, Allen is I take a future value calculator, okay. And if this month, I want to make $10,000. I plug in $10,000. And I put three and a half percent of $10,000 times 21 or 22 trading days. And I print it out. And it tells me how much I need to make each day in order for that to occur. And then I keep a spreadsheet that I'm plus or minus off of the predicted number that I was supposed to be asked. And I adjust my trading from there now like right now for this month. So far. I'm up 900 bucks as a closing day. So I'm actually today is the 13th. Yeah, and I'm actually to where the tweet where I should be on the 20th of them. month. Okay, so if I think the markets going to be a little volatile or, or there might be some bad news coming, I can lay off, okay, and skip a day and see what's happening. Okay. That's where what you taught me is the patience. Is that it? You don't have to do it every day. Allen: Right? Right. So okay, so you're saying that you're doubling to 25? Every every month or no, Denny: Not doubling how much I want to make God, I got 25 in there, but you're trying to make you want to make if I want to make 10 This month, I put 10 up. And with the whole idea that I'm could lose all 10,000 of it. Allen: Okay so you're only using 10. Denny: Yeah, but I'm only using 10. If I lose, I lose the 10 then, you know, I'm a big boy. You know, we try again next month. Allen: So like, today's the 13th, you're only up 900. So you still got a ways to go before you get to the goal. Denny: No, no, I'm up 900 over how much I should be up. Allen: So you've already made the 10. And you made another 900? Denny: No, no, no, no. Oh, hold on a second. Okay. Okay, I started out, okay, with 10,000 in the account, okay. And I go to a future value calculator and I plug in, say three and a half percent. Okay. And I plug in 21 days, okay. Yeah. Well, that'll, at the end of the month, if I do that I shouldn't have around $21,000. Okay. And what the future value calculator says is that on day two, I should have 10,300 and some dollars on it. Okay, and then day three, I should have close to 10 Seven. Okay. So I go down what the day is what it says where I should be to achieve the deal. And I'm up 900 Okay, over that. Allen: I say okay, okay. Okay, so you're on pace. You're better you're better than doing on pace to double Denny: Yeah, right. I'm, yeah, I do what's called a phase and betting deal. Okay. Yeah. And so.. Allen: So that's what you're doing on the SPX on the RUT, and you're also doing oil. So how do you put in oil? Denny: I don't know oil, I buy maybe two to three contracts okay of the weeklies now, okay, and do a credit spread on them and try to make, you know, 4 or 500 bucks on the credit spreads and let them expire worthless. Okay. And, and then and the only and I'm only trying that because I know how to make money doing the monthlies and, and getting in at 45 days and, and monitoring it. So I'm a natural born tanker. Okay. Right. And, and, and it can cost me money at times. Okay. But, you know, I guess I'm fortunate that I'm not looking where my next meal is coming from. Allen: Right. Cool. So like today, you know, we have SPX is down 4.3% Today, big moves, they move down. So I'm assuming based on what you said, when you got in on SPX had already started moving down, so you sold calls today? Denny: Yeah, I sold calls I sold about 4090 and 4095. Allen: Okay, and then basically, you didn't have any trouble today? Denny: No and yesterday, yesterday went up. Okay. But when I went when I entered it, it was going sideways. And it was more advantageous on the calls yesterday. So I sold 4185 and 4190 yesterday, okay. And, you know, they they expired worthless okay. Allen: And is there any time you do both puts and calls? Denny: Yes. Yep. It looks like it's going absolutely sideways. Like I say, enter my trade between 1030 and 11. And I usually go to the golf course about one o'clock. But before I go to the golf course, I pull my account up and I look at it and the pit looks like it's going sideways. Then I create an iron condor and I go in and sell puts. Allen: And then what about a stoploss you have any? Denny: Yeah, I put stop losses in on everything. Allen: What percent? Like how do you know when to get out? Denny: I put 40% Okay. Allen: So 40% loss. Denny: Yeah. Allen: Okay. Cool. And so you're pretty happy with that? Denny: Yeah, you know, until it burns me I guess I will you know, I'm waiting. I'm waiting for it. I'm you know, I've done this long enough now that I know that nothing is failsafe. Allen: No, but you're doing this in a time that it is pretty volatile. You know? I mean vix today was at 27. But yeah, even so the VIX is kind of low for what's going on and all the stuff that's happening with the Fed. And, you know, we're still in a bear market. So we're still getting these wild bull market, not not a bull market rally, but a, like a whipsaw rally to go up, and then we, we hit back down on a dime. And so it still it has been very up in Downy and so well, having a you know, the strategy that you're just like, hey, I'm not gonna, I'm just gonna play day by day and not worry about at night. I think that makes a lot of sense. Denny: Yeah. You know, and, you know, I am a very, very avid reader. Okay, so I read Barron's, I read the bestsellers, Business Daily, and stuff like that, not because I think that they are going to enlighten me on anything. But what I have read is, there's a lot of guys in there that tell us about the history of the market. Okay. And for every bear market, you know, usually lasts nine to 18 months. And there's usually four to five mini rallies in there that everyone is calling the bottom of the bear market, and then it drops again, you know, and so, if we understand that, you don't get too overly enthused with the rising SPX or a Dow. Allen: Yeah, yeah. It's, I mean, that comes with experience or like you said, you know, learning and education. Cool. So what do you see going forward? Like, what's, what's next for you? Denny: Man? You know, I just enjoy doing this stuff. You know, I mean, you know, I'm in the twilight twilight of my life. You know, I'm 76 years old. Man. I'm a real young 76. I mean, I'm very mobile. I play, play golf every day. Right now, while we're speaking. I'm in Duncanville, Texas at my grandson's tennis match. He just, he just won his doubles match. And so about a half hour he'll start playing singles. So we'll watch that but.. Allen: Yeah it's a little how, I tell you that. Denny: Yeah, 95 right now here but you know, my normal week is yesterday was Monday I was in junior high volleyball and Flower Mound, which is 30 miles away from where we live. But today I'm at varsity tennis in Duncanville. That's not bad. That's close to where I live. Tomorrow. I got off then Thursday. I got junior varsity tennis. That's a home meet. And then Friday night, I've got got varsity football and Flower Mound. Okay. That's almost every day of the week. I'm doing something with the grandkids. Allen: You're going golfing every day and you're still trading every day? Denny: Yeah, and I'm trading every day. No, and you know, thanks to you. You've shown me ways that I don't have to sit there and stare at a computer. To make money. Allen: Yeah, yeah. Yeah. No, that's not the I really like what you're doing. I like your style. You know, it's like, okay, you know, put a trade on, let it work, and then go enjoy my life. Denny: Yeah. Doesn't work. So what, you know, there's another day. Allen: Yeah, but the return is good enough that, you know, you get compensated, even if there are losses, the you're, you're playing with bigger numbers. So it's like, hey, if I can make 100%, then yeah, I can lose 20, 30, 40%. That's okay. Yes. Because I can still make much more than that, you know, in the stock market. They're like, Oh, wait, you know, you shouldn't lose more than five or 10% of your account? Well, you're only making 10% a year. So obviously, you don't want to lose more than that. But if the numbers are bigger than you can take bigger, bigger, bigger bumps, so.. Denny: And I'll tell you, I'll tell you what I use I still I still use your option trading Google Spreadsheet. Allen: For the credit spreads, yeah. Denny: Yeah, I use it every day. Allen: Yep, makes it simple, right? Just calculate Yeah. Denny: The only thing is I went in and change changed the 25% to 40%. Allen: But I like it because it's like simple, you know, and I'm sure people listening to this. They're gonna be like, Okay, what do I do again? So it's like, just gonna recap. You know, you wake up in the morning, you see where the SPX and the RUT are opening, right? Yeah, take a look at the VIX. You divided by 16 and then you add that.. Denny: That's your that's your percentage movement in the ETL. Okay, that's Allen: A percentage move of the SPS. Okay. So you multiply that percentage by the open. By the Open, and then that you find your range. Denny: That will give you the that'll give you the movement, which, so say it's 1843 and say, say your your divide by say, say it's say VIX is 32. Okay, okay. Okay, you divide by 16. That's two to 2%. Okay, so say.. Allen: Okay that's percentage. Okay, yeah. Denny: 2%. So say right, opened at 1800. Today, you take 2%, that's $36. So then you take 36 off of 1800. Okay. And, you know, that puts you down to 1764. And then you add 36 to the 1800. And that gives you 1836 yeah. Allen: We have a 87% probability of this range working out for the day, it's not for the month, whatever it is for the day. And that works out to be about 1.5 standard deviations. So we've got the range, that's about one and a half standard deviations, that's 87% probability about that. And for you, it's been working pretty good. And you set it at a 40% stop loss. Oh, and then the other thing is that you get into the trade about an hour and a half an hour, hour and a half after the market opens. And so.. Denny: And the reason of the hour, hour and a half is it took me a while to realize this, the market tends to at times gap up or gap down. Okay. And then about an hour to an hour and a half later, it kind of self corrects itself. Allen: Sometimes that Yeah, yeah. But they say, you know, the opening bell is usually amateur hour. And so yeah, I mean, I could have told you that I don't trade the first hour of the day, you know, markets open markets open about 8:30 here Central time, so I don't trade before 10 o'clock, which is exactly an hour and a half. So I do that.. Denny: Yeah, that's when I'm looking at the momentum indicators and everything.  Allen: And then you let your trades expire? Denny: Yes. Allen: Okay. So you got that going on. And then.. Denny: Well the good thing about it is trades good, you can't get out of it anyway, because you've made all your money by about two o'clock and go in and try to close the trades. It says that say you get the message just some of the bid ask or zero. Allen: So, okay, so you got that going on. And you got the oil, weeklies gone. So that keeps you busy. That keeps you diversified. You're making decent amount. You're happy. That's awesome. I love it. That's that's what this is all about, you know, Denny: Keeps going to Hawaii. Yeah. You know, Allen: Yeah life is good, right? You're hanging out with grandkids you got you still have the house in Hawaii, you go on vacations, everyone, wherever you feel like it. So I like it.. Denny: In two weeks. I'll be in New York City. Allen: That's great. Cool.  Denny: Going to see Billy Joel at Madison Square Garden. Allen: Very nice. So did you do any kind of trading before you came across us? Denny: Yes. And I lost my rear end. Allen: Oh, no, that's not good. Yeah. Denny: I was way too aggressive. Okay, and not patient. And that's when I was gonna get out of the equity market completely. When I saw your oil deal, okay. And, you know, and I figured I had a better chance at oil, because it's something that we all need. And it's something that's not going out of style. Even if we go to all electric cars. What people don't understand is that two thirds of the pharmaceuticals and all of the plastic comes tomorrow. And that's none that's going away. Nope. There's going to be a demand. Allen: Yeah. In fact, you know, even with everything with the more solar and the more wind power they bring on, the world is still using more oil now than we have, like 10 years ago, the demand continues to increase, just goes up and up and up every year. So yeah, it's not going anywhere, anytime soon. So we're going to continue to trade even if demand starts going down. It's such a big market that we'll be trading oil for, you know, for the next 20-30 years.  Denny: Yeah Allen: That's, I mean, it's a different so basically, the you are trading equities but then when you found out and you learn about how we sell options, that kind of really flipped the switch?  Denny: Yeah that intrigued me. Okay. First of all well, my background before I got into the advertising thing was I owned a car dealership. Okay, I owned a Ford dealership. If you know anything about car, guys, we're super aggressive and we love leverage. And when I saw options, and I saw the leverage available, I said, this is my ticket. Allen: So then, why are we still at 25,000? Why don't we go more? Denny: You know, I've got a, I've got a wife. Okay, that funny story, okay? All donations came in and bought me out. I guess it's 28 years ago now. And I got a very sizable check. And the day I got that check, my wife reached over and she grabbed that check. And she said, seed money only comes once in a lifetime. And this is going for our old age and for fun. I go, Okay. Well, one of the ways that I've stayed married 52 years, is that I always get the last word. "Yes, dear". So, she, in the money, she basically watches it, okay. And, and she thinks that, you know, a lot of what I'm doing, although I'm making money and stuff like that, on on a basis is a little bit too risky for her, her deal. And so that, you know, that's what she has given me to play with. Okay. Consequently, I have pointed out to her recently, that because of that money, she's not had to buy any groceries out of her retirement account. For her Social Security check. I played for all the plane tickets wherever we go. This trip to New York. I've got $1,000 in Hamilton tickets invested. And she didn't have to pay for any of that. So don't you think it's about time that we started looking at adding more to that, you know, so that I think by the end of the year, she might, you know, lead me forward a little bit more. Allen: Do you have other investments and stuff elsewhere? Yeah, yeah, money's coming in. So it's not like you need this to live off of   Denny: No, no, no, no. Man, like, it's like I said that when my COVID that stopped an annual mid six figure income. I mean, on a normal week, before COVID. I was, well, on a normal month, I was doing 800,000 to 1 million pieces of direct mail a month. But that so you know, it's a good sized business, okay. With annual revenues, anywhere from two and a half to three $3 million. And, and I'm a one man show. I have no employees in that business. You know.   Allen: So it's still running, you still run that business? Yeah.   Denny: Yeah. In fact, I just got a job today. I mean, you know, they're, they're doing  infrequent, you know, I mean, you know, I might have made 30,000 bucks for the whole year doing that, you know, which, you know, that used to be a week sometimes, you know,   Allen: You know, so let me ask you this. Are we going to see below MSRP prices anytime soon?   Denny: No, no, no.   Allen: How about MSRC? Like, I'm seeing prices that are like way above like, double MSRP. Yeah, I'm not paying.   Denny: As soon as the chip shortage is alleviated, and they start to get inventory sometime in the next 18 to 24 months. They'll have inventory again. Oh, wow. But I don't know if you've seen what's happened to the used car market?   Allen: No, it's taken off like crazy.    Denny: Yeah, I mean, you know, my wife has macular degeneration now. And so, leasing a car is unless you have a business purpose. leasing a car is a bad investment. Okay. My wife had macular degeneration, we didn't know if she was going to, they were going to be able to get it stopped and whether she was going to be able to continue to drive. So the car that I'm sitting in right now is her car. Okay. And we leased it, and it had a $21,000 residual on it at the end of the lease period. And we were, you know, we were gonna turn it in. And then I pulled up what the value on it was, the retail value on this car was 31,000. So I went down to the Ford dealership, and broken but check for the car. And they can't want me to lease another one. I know. Thank you, you know, and so and that's happened all throughout the industry. And it's consequently forced the US car prices way up. And so what's going to happen two fold things going to happen. Matt, real quick, I know that you know, either way saw your day on this, but this is interesting. Once the inventory, get levels get up, all these car dealers that have these massive use car inventories are going to have so much water in their inventory. And water is excess pricing to what the current market book value on the vehicles is. In other words, if you can't sell it for what you own it for, you're gonna lose money. Right? And, and a lot of these big-- you live in Houston, I live in Dallas, a lot of these big dealerships that have two and 300 guards in the ground, are going to have a million and a half to $2 million in water in their inventory. And they're going to have to get rid of them. Okay. And so the rear end will fall out of the used car market. And you know, so right now consumers are getting screwed on automobiles. But the dealer has his day of reckoning coming due.   Allen: Yeah, but if you need a car now, you're screwed.   Denny: You need a car now you're in trouble. A buddy of mine went looked at a Subaru Outback with 19,000 miles on it, that it was a year and a half old. And they wanted $35,000 for it.  Allen: Yeah, yeah, don't get in a wreck. I mean, my car I've been thinking about my wife is like, can you just get a new car, please? I'm like, No, I like it. You know, I'm trying to get it up to 200,000. You know, miles on it. Yeah, trying to get there. I mean, it's fine. It works. You know? It's comfortable. It looks fine. From the outside. Everything is comfortable. It works. You know, it's nice Toyota keeps running. But she's like, can you get some bigger? I'm like, Alright, so we looked around, and I'm like, Man, I don't want to pay this stuff. You know, it's not even. It's not like we can't afford the payment or anything. It's just from where it used to be to where it is. Now. There's no difference. The car is the same. You just charged me a whole lot more for no reason. Just because yeah, there's a you can. So yeah, yeah, no, I don't want to play that. Denny: Yeah, their day of reckoning is coming.  Allen: We'll be alright. Well, do you have any advice for our listeners, people that are learning and trying to figure out like you found your way, right, you found your niche in trading, and it took you I don't know how many years you were trading for two years. But how many years? Were you looking before? Before that? Denny: Oh five years, I probably probably five years before I found you. Okay. And two years, two years of.. Allen: Learning and testing Denny: Not doing what you told me to do. And getting and getting burned, to realize, to realize that the things that you teach patients, you know, just the little thing and Think or Swim your standard deviation deal, you know, saying, Oh, you've got a red line there. That's not good. You know, just those little things, you know. So the biggest advice, the best advice I could give to an individual, be patient. Don't try to hit homeruns. You know, the age old adage, pigs get fat, hogs get slaughtered, is so true. It's like one of my rules on the SPX. You know, a $5 spread. Okay, a $5 spreads on the SPX is 500 bucks. Okay. So if I'm trying to make 4% to 5% a day, that means I'm looking to get 20 cents. On my credit spread. That's it 20 cents. Okay. And if you look at what the delta is on that, it's usually 12 to 13, which puts me in a real advantageous position. You know, so don't get greedy. Just let time be. let time be your friend. Allen: Right? Yep. And that actually might be a shortcut for you. So you don't even have to worry about the VIX. You just go in to get the 12 Delta.  Denny: I'm in the process of doing about a year study on this, okay. Because I back tested it using the Delta. Okay. And some wild market swings, it comes out that it doesn't work out. Right. Okay. Yeah. Allen: But the thing is, it's hard to back test it because you're saying that you go in after looking at it visually and being like, Okay, I want to be on this side or I want to be on that side. You can't do that. Unless you do it manually yourself with a like a software that I like the one I use where you got to go in day by day by day. If you're one of those programs where you just put in the numbers and you Just let it run, it doesn't work. Denny: You've got to plug them in yourself. Yeah. And it's time consuming. Especially if you're doing dailies. Yeah. Because you got you got 256 for every year. Allen: Yeah. And I mean, like, you know, when we when we back test a new strategy, it's like I want to I want you know, a good 10 years of data, you know, I want to see the the ups and the downs and the flats and the recessions and the bulls market and everything. I want to know that it's going to work long term, not just for a couple because I've been burned on that too. You know, I, I back tested different strategies like the butterfly on McDonald's and a butterfly on a Walmart and they worked great for five years. For five years, they made money. I went in there with guns blazing. You know, I took like every money out of money I had at the time at $25,000 on one trade, just want Dre put it all and boom, blew up. And I'm like, what happened? Oh, my God, man. It was a fluke. I'm gonna do it again. Next month, next month, boom, blew up again. You know.. Denny: Those butterflies and iron condors look great. You sit there and you look at the leverage you've got on that you go, Whoa, you know, but you know, you got to think, why isn't everyone doing it? There's a reason. Allen: So, there's lots of little tweaks behind it. Yeah, yeah. This has been fun. Denny, I'm gonna let you go. I appreciate you. And if there's anything you need, please reach out to us. We're always here for you. And thank you for sharing your wisdom. Denny: Okay, well, you know, I mean, I just want to tell you and your listeners that your program has definitely taught me a lot and made me a lot successful. Faster than I ever would have been. Allen: That's awesome. That's good to hear. Make my day. I love it. I love it. JOIN OUR FREE PRIVATE FACEBOOK GROUP: https://optiongenius.com/alliance  Like our show? Please leave us a review here - even one sentence helps. Thank you!

The Jason Rantz Show
Hour 1 - Illegal Immigrants can get COVID relief money but you can't

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 41:42


What's Trending: undocumented immigrants are now able to receive COVID relief money, SPS does not know how its going to pay its teacher salary increase, the smoke is back in Washington and Boston school district does not want political items in the classroom. // Karinne Jean-Pierre was on TV talking about record inflation. // Rantz made a small business owner cry. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Energy in Action by MitoAction
Tara Zier - Stiff Person Syndrome Research Foundation and Finding Your Purpose

Energy in Action by MitoAction

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 33:25


PARENTS AS RARE - EPISODE 065 Tara Zier - Stiff Person Syndrome Research Foundation and Finding Your Purpose Tara Zier is a rare disease patient, mother and the Founder and President of The Stiff Person Syndrome Research Foundation, where the vision is that all people with Stiff Person Syndrome (SPS) receive a prompt diagnosis, compassionate care, effective treatments and a cure. The mission is to raise awareness of SPS, to support research for better treatments and a cure for SPS while strengthening the community through education and collaboration. EPISODE HIGHLIGHTS Can you share your rare disease story? I came into the rare disease space because I have a rare disease called Stiff Person Syndrome (SPS), which is a rare neurological disease with autoimmune features. I was diagnosed in 2017 after a three year long diagnostic odyssey, going from doctor to doctor and receiving misdiagnosis. What was it like to get your diagnosis? I was relieved to have an answer. There was a lot of pressure and anxiety around parenting my children and protecting them from trauma as I went through the diagnostic odyssey, so there was also relief from that. I moved into the education phase to learn about the disease and determine a comprehensive approach to healing and getting better, despite SPS being a progressive disease. How has your SPS diagnosis impacted your kids? My kids have a good recollection of what I was like before my diagnosis, so it was hard for me knowing they were witnessing the changes. We became closer through my diagnosis in a lot of ways and I'm honest with them about the unknowns so we can be grateful for each day. How did you communicate your diagnosis with your children? I relied on therapists to guide me on what to say and how to say it. I had to decide how much information to give them because the disease is a spectrum condition with different levels of disability. I had to be transparent about not knowing what the future looked like. I let them know that they could research, but that I preferred we do it together so we could talk about it. Can you share what The Stiff Person Syndrome Research Foundation is doing right now? We were fortunate to get the Chan Zuckerberg Rare As One grant, which offers three years of funding for organizational capacity for sustainability and networking. They also offer training and support across all facets of running a rare disease nonprofit. Since we've received the grant, we've expanded our board, brought on three members for our medical advisory board- all experts in SPS. We're currently in the process of developing our patient contact registry natural history studies. LINKS & RESOURCES MENTIONED The Stiff Person Syndrome Research Foundation https://stiffperson.org/ SPSRF on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/TheSPSRF SPSRF on Twitter https://twitter.com/TheSPSRF

The O&P Check-in: an SPS Podcast
So Kids Can Move Initiative with Nicole Ver Kuilen, Travis Ricks, and Jamie Brown

The O&P Check-in: an SPS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 34:41


AOPA Public Engagement Manager and Forrest Stump Co-founder Nicole Ver Kuilen and SPS Sales Account Managers Jamie Brown and Travis Ricks joins us to chat about the Hood to Coast relay. Their efforts helped kick start So Kids Can Move, a new state-based initiative advocating for children with limb loss and limb difference to have access to recreational prostheses.Support the So Kids Can Move initiative by making a donation today. Get involved in the So Kids Can Move initiative by emailing AOPA State and Federal Advocacy Manager Sam Miller. Read about the Hood to Coast relay.Learn more about Forrest Stump. Click here to join our email list. Thank you Trulife for sponsoring this episode! Learn more about the Trulife Pectus Orthosis. View the SPS updated digital shoe catalog. Visit spsco.com Also, email us!   The O&P Check-in is a bi-monthly podcast featuring the latest orthotics and prosthetics news, trends, best practices, regulations and policies. Designed for O&P professionals, join Brendan Erickson and Jacki Green as they interview guests and share the latest advancements in the industry. 

VOV - Sự kiện và Bàn luận
Tiêu điểm: Rà soát quy định của EU đối với sản phẩm biến đổi gen – Nâng cao hiệu quả xuất khẩu hàng nông sản sang EU

VOV - Sự kiện và Bàn luận

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 5:29


- Ngay khi Hiệp định thương mại tự do giữa Việt Nam và Liên minh châu Âu (gọi tắt là EVFTA) có hiệu lực, việc xuất khẩu các mặt hàng nông sản nói chung và hoa quả của Việt Nam nói riêng có nhiều thuận lợi. Những ưu đãi đặc biệt về thuế quan góp phần tăng khả năng cạnh tranh về giá, từ đó thúc đẩy kinh tế– xã hội phát triển. Tuy nhiên, sản phẩm của nước ta vẫn phải đối mặt với những tiêu chuẩn, điều kiện nhập khẩu khắt khe từ các nước thuộc Liên minh châu Âu (EU). Nhằm giúp các cơ quản quản lý, người dân cũng như các doanh nghiệp của Việt Nam hiểu rõ hơn về những quy định này, vừa qua, Dự án hỗ trợ liên quan đến thương mại dành cho Việt Nam (gọi tắt là ARISE+ Việt Nam) do Liên minh Châu Âu tài trợ đã phối hợp với Cục Bảo vệ thực vật, Bộ Nông nghiệp và Phát triển nông thôn tổ chức hội thảo: “Rà soát quy định của EU đối với sản phẩm biến đổi gen (GMO) nhập khẩu vào EU để đánh giá tác động của quy định đối với nông sản xuất khẩu của Việt Nam”. Hội thảo cũng là một phần hoạt động SPS 8 thuộc hợp phần SPS của dự án về các tiêu chuẩn vệ sinh dịch tễ và kiểm dịch động thực vật. Phản ánh của phóng viên Đài TNVN: Chủ đề : Rà soát, xuất khẩu, EU, biến đổi gen --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/vov1sukien/support

Hoot 'n' Holler: A Podcast About the Ozarks
Episode 96 - Tactical Goddess

Hoot 'n' Holler: A Podcast About the Ozarks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 71:36


The Queen is dead, Jan Morgan has a special treat for the ladies, SPS school woes, and the re-naming (or not) of a road in Fayetteville

Telecom Reseller
Empowering Enterprises – Revealing and Alerting using Voice Intelligence, Podcast

Telecom Reseller

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022


“We're in a really significant wave of change,” says Andy Lark, CMO of Dubber. As ever, according to Lark, the economics of change quietly move the more visible technology of change. The need for companies to grow revenue and to improve revenue, are causing them to look for, and in some cases, to allow for, technology advancements that can enable them to achieve their goals. In this podcast, Lark stresses the accessibility of those improvements and the centralist of the SP. Cloud communications, cloud computing, AI and ML, are delivering technologies that were once available only to the world's largest technology companies to now be available to the local veterinarian. “What if there was no gap,” speculates Lark about the way that sales teams often ignore sales tools such as CRMs. Events, ideas, and comments are literally lost, and a valuable, well-intentioned sales process is undermined. Now, according to Lark, there's the possibility of recording and capturing events, ideas, and comments in a way that really works with the personas of the people involved. SPs looking to monetize opportunities, need to take a close look at these possibilities for their customers. Lark tells us that productivity improvements can be sold but it must be tangible. Being able to give back a customer the lost time he now dedicates to making meeting notes is an example of this sort of offering real world gains. Visit www.dubber.net

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand
Nick Reed PODCAST 09.14.22 - White House Celebrates Inflation While Americans Struggle.

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 42:27


Hour 2 -  Good Wednesday morning! Here's what Nick Reed covers this hour: White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre insisted Tuesday both that inflation was “essentially flat” and that it was OK for President Biden to host a large celebration of his Inflation Reduction Act — even though annual inflation remains elevated at 8.3%. The Gini index, a common measure of the inequality between the lowest and highest earners in a society, rose in America for the first time in ten years, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau. The poorest 10% of households saw their real incomes decline to $15,660 at most in 2021, almost 4.5% less than they made in 2020, according to the Census Bureau. The richest 10% of households made 13.53 times as much, making at least $211,956, up from 12.9 times as much in 2020. ALSO -  School board member, Kelly Byrne, joins Nick Reed this morning: SPS parents, grandparents, and stakeholders, listen up! SPS is preparing the new strategic plan. EVERY decision the district makes is guided by this document. If you are wanting anything changed, this is where it happens. This strategic plan is only revised every 5 years. There's several ways that you can have your voice heard: go to one of the public input days today (09/14/22), tomorrow (9/15/22), and Thursday (09/22/22). These events will be held from 6-7 p.m. at the Kraft Administration Building - 1359 E. St. Louis St. You can also fill out the online form by CLICKING HERE. Kelly also wants to remind you that there will be another election coming up in April.

Neurology Minute
IVIg Maintenance Therapy in GAD+ Stiff-Person Syndrome

Neurology Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 3:09


Marinos Dalakas discusses his most recent publication with Neurology on IVIg efficacy in GAD65 positive SPS patients.  Show references: https://nn.neurology.org/content/9/5/e200011 This podcast is sponsored by argenx. Visit www.vyvgarthcp.com for more information.

The Nonlinear Library
LW - Solar Blackout Resistance by jefftk

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 4:35


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: Solar Blackout Resistance, published by jefftk on September 8, 2022 on LessWrong. Many houses have solar panels, but in a power outage almost all of them shut down. Especially with serious blackouts like Texas had or like Europe may have this winter, getting even minimal power during an outage is valuable. Designing residential grid-tied rooftop solar so that it only worked when the grid is up was a serious mistake that squandered what could have been a major benefit of putting panels on roofs. Let's fix this! When the grid goes down it's important that solar panels don't keep sending out power, which could shock utility workers fixing things. Having inverters shut themselves off is the easiest way to ensure that never happens, but it's not the only way: the inverter could disconnect from the grid while providing power just to the house. This would only work when the sun was shining, of course, and only when there was enough sunlight on the panels for what you were trying to run. A large system in a sunny area could be set up to try to power the whole house, while a less productive system might be set up to power a few priority circuits or even just a single outlet. Making systems work this way by default would have major advantages in a range of disasters. You would immediately have widespread distributed generation, and so many things rely on electricity: Communications. Really important for people to coordinate. Even just a small amount of power for recharging phones would go a long way. Medical devices. Many people rely on ventilators, powered wheelchairs, etc, and these generally only have a few hours of battery if the grid goes down. Refrigeration. Keeping food (and medicine) from spoiling. Heating. Even gas and oil heat need electricity for blowers, pumps, etc. and generally will not function at all when the power is out. Cooling. Fans, AC, etc. Combines especially well with solar, since cooling need is highest when available solar is highest. Pumps, tools, etc. Even more important during disasters. Looking ahead to likely winter power outages in Europe, and potential outages here if things get worse [1] it would be far better if these millions of rooftop solar installs were able to operate independently. You can install systems with batteries, which would be more robust than relying on however much power the sun happens to be producing at the moment, but large batteries are expensive and I'm not aware of anyone selling systems like this with small batteries. What if we used no battery? Electrically, this is pretty practical. When we got solar I thought about this a lot and we installed an SMA Sunny Boy with a "Secure Power Supply" (SPS) in the basement. It didn't end up costing much more: something like $250. Unfortunately these aren't allowed anymore for residential rooftop solar. Starting with the 2014 National Electrical Code (NEC) you need to have some form of rapid shutdown to protect firefighters in an emergency, and in the 2017 revision it got much stricter to where the SPS functionality would have to be completely redesigned to qualify. The only option now, as far as I can tell, is the recently released Enphase IQ8 Sunlight Backup. It's very expensive: I got some quotes and it added about $7k (23%). I think it's likely that this rule change didn't consider the resiliency downsides of prohibiting the current versions of these systems, and it would have been better to make the change over a longer period with more notice to manufacturers. For example, it took until December 2021 for the first NEC 2017 compliant backup system, the IQ-8 to come out, 5 years from code publication. One way to get most of the benefits of the code change without this particular harm would have been to offer a temporary exception for island-capable solar. My understanding is t...

Neurology® Podcast
IVIg Maintenance Therapy in GAD+ Stiff-Person Syndrome

Neurology® Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 22:47 Very Popular


Stacey Clardy interviews Marinos Dalakas to discuss his most recent publication with Neurology on IVIg efficacy in GAD65 positive SPS patients. Read the full article here in Neurology.   This podcast is sponsored by argenx. Visit www.vyvgarthcp.com for more information.

Neurology Minute
Stiff Person Syndrome - Part 1

Neurology Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 3:46


Dr. Scott Newsome discusses stiff person syndrome in part 1 of a 3 part series. This podcast is sponsored by argenx. Visit www.vyvgarthcp.com for more information.

Authentic Calm
Researching the Highly Sensitive Brain with Dr. Bianca Acevedo

Authentic Calm

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 52:26


Season 2 Episode 47 This week we are honored to be joined by Dr. Bianca Acevedo, a researcher at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and an editor and author of the “The Highly Sensitive Brain”. This has been a long-anticipated episode for Jessi as she has admired Bianca's work as a global leader in the field of Sensitive research for many years. Her research experience has brought her into partnership with monumental players such as Dr. Elaine Aaron in the study of high sensitivity. Bianca helps to deepen our understanding of ourselves through scientific explanation of the highly sensitive brain. She reminds us that our need to live differently is legitimate and backed by factual evidence. What does a positive environment for an HSP look like? How is our brain wired differently than the rest of the population? Are traits of an HSP genetic? Bianca walks us through this and more during this very informative and empowering conversation! Topics Discussed: How a highly sensitive brain interprets & reacts differently in everyday life. [00:10:00] How the traits of a highly sensitive person (HSP) & sensory processing sensitivity (SPS) differ from those on the autistic spectrum. [00:21:30] How and why our environment deeply impacts us as Sensitives. [00:46:50] Quotes: “HSP are perceptive. We attend to subtleties, we're cautious and reflective so we make great leaders. We are in tune with what other people need to succeed and thrive. So I say, go for it, put HSP in positions of power. When we do we will likely have people that are making careful decisions that benefit the greater good of society.” - Dr. Bianca Acevedo “HSP or those with SPS often seek out non-impulsive high sensation experiences. This means that they will book an exciting adventure but they won't do it without first doing some research.” - Dr. Bianca Acevedo Connect with Bianca: www.biancaacevedo.com Resources and links Mentioned: The Highly Sensitive Brain (Discount Code Neuro30) The Highly Sensitive Brain: An fMRI study of sensory processing sensitivity and response to others' emotions Sensory Processing Sensitivity Predicts Individual Differences in Resting Sensory Processing Sensitivity in the context of Environmental Sensitivity: A critical review and development of research agenda The Functional Highly Sensitive Brain: A review of underlying SPS and seemingly related disorders Sensory Processing Sensitivity and Childhood Quality Effects on Neural Responses to Emotional Stimuli Further Articles on the Topics Discussed: Psychology Today Blog The 3 Genes That Potentially Lead to High Sensitivity The Difference Between the Typical Brain & the Highly Sensitive Brain Episode Transcript Here Head to Mêrfleur Wellness to discover more. Support the show or buy Jessi a kombucha here! Follow along...

KIRO Nights
Hour One: Schools & Housing

KIRO Nights

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 34:42


SPS strike vote is pending this weekend//Ballard residents use planters to block RVs//California's new law to protect apps from putting kids in danger//WA loves our pumpkin spice more than any other state.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

SPS
V. Platypus European Conference (SPS Teaser)

SPS

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 15:28


This is a stand alone SPS segment to promote and introduce our fifth Platypus European Conference in Vienna, from 8 - 10 September, 2022. Lisa and Rebekah interview the lead organizers of the conference, Victor and Andreas. They talk about the different events of the conference and how they relate to its title "The Crisis of Society and the Left" as well as to our current historical moment of the death of the left. Here you can find all the information about the conference, the different events and how to participate: https://platypus1917.org/2022/06/08/platypus-european-conference-2022/ SPS is hosted by Pamela and Andreas, with original tracks by Tamas Vilaghy, and editing assistance by Michael Woodson and Tamas Vilaghy. Our Sh-t Platypus Does team is Lisa M. and Rebekah P. To learn more about Platypus, go to platypus1917.org

The Ari Hoffman Show
August 26, 2022: Inslee Copies Newsom's Homework

The Ari Hoffman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 124:16


Ari describes his education journey, highlighting the importance of personal responsibility when taking out student loans. Seattle Way - Teacher who was fired from SPS now in charge of professional development for the whole state Critical race theory and they are not even hiding it The Swamp- Zuckerberg claims FBI asked him to suppress the Hunter Biden laptop Woke report

KIRO Nights
Hour One: In Pursuit of Happiness

KIRO Nights

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 33:01


Seattle looks to make rules regarding food trucks permanent//SPS bus driver shortage//Research says your 40s are your unhappiest years//Is Seattle ready for an NBA team again?See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Self Publishing School : Learn How To Write A Book And Grow Your Business
SPS 172: Writing On Medium To Sell More Books & Grow Your Email List with Ayodeji Awosika

Self Publishing School : Learn How To Write A Book And Grow Your Business

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 43:51


Ayodeji Awosika is one of the top writers on Medium, a 3x author, TEDx speaker, and Self Publishing School student. In this interview, we talk about: -What is Medium & why you should (or shouldn't) start writing on Medium -Medium publications - what are they and how to use them -How Ayodeji made $10,000/month from Medium 16 months in a row - over $430,000 total - all from writing articles -40,000 email subscribers from Medium - how he did it -How to get more traction on Medium (ie. readers & followers) -How to turn Medium readers into subscribers and book buyers -Why Ayodeji decided to join SPS (and whether or not you should) This interview is a Masterclass in writing on Medium. Very interesting! Don't miss it. P.S. Schedule a book consultation with the SPS team to talk about your book and how we can help you like we did Ayodeji: self-publishingschool.com/apply

Off The Couch
Travis Soares on Setting the Sierra Peaks Section List FKT

Off The Couch

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 46:01


Established in 1955, the Sierra Peaks Section List includes 247 of the most prominent peaks scattered throughout California's Sierra Nevada Range. Reaching every summit is a lifetime's work for most, and up until recently, no one had completed the list within a calendar year. Far more complex than a thru-hike, the SPS List is an undertaking that requires a mix of skills and probably a fair amount of chance. So, we sat down with Travis Soares, who finished tagging all 247 peaks in a record 117 days earlier this month, to find out how much luck had to do with it. In the process, we talk about how the idea for the project came together; how things went, including close calls with the Mineral King Marmot and coming across wreckage from a plane crash; his relationship with his climbing partner for most of the project (and previous SPS List FKT-holder), Nathan Longhurst; and a whole lot more. TOPICS & TIMES:What is the Sierra Peaks Section List? (2:22)Travis' background (7:04)Logistics & planning (9:00)His relationship with Nathan Longhurst (14:10)Settling into the project (17:29)Raising money for the Bishop Paiute Food Sovereignty Program (20:03)The Palisade Traverse & the Mineral King Marmot (22:39)‘Crux' of the trip (24:40)Backcountry traffic (29:55)His gear setup (33:55)Dodging fire season (35:02)“What have you learned about yourself from this project?” (36:06)What's next? (42:17)RELATED LINKS:Travis and Nathan's SPS 2022 Website Donate to the Bishop Paiute Food Sovereignty Program OUR OTHER BLISTER PODCASTS:Blister PodcastGEAR:30Bikes & Big Ideas podcast Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Friends with Fantasy Benefits | Baseball
FWFB | Baseball - Episode 746

Friends with Fantasy Benefits | Baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 64:57


Episode 746- Stretch Run Strategies!Host: Justin Mason @JustinMasonFWFBCo-Host: Dave McDonald @RunDMCDNewsHere comes the late-season shoulder injury epidemicEovaldi to IL (shoulder/neck)Ashby to IL (shoulder)Vinnie P shoulder injuryEffross to IL (shoulder)Holmes returning soon - back to closing?Treinen on rehab assignment (shoulder) returning Sep 2Kimbrel may not be sole closer anymoreSeranthony to IL (triceps) - Robertson back to closing?Junis avoided major injury - could make next start SundayCody Morris dominating in minors since coming off ILReturn as reliever? Spot starts maybeKopech hamstring injury - got destroyed todayLuis Garcia (MI) set for rehab assignment tomorrow - returning Friday?Bryce Harper beginning rehab assignment tomorrow - back next weekKyle Hendricks done for the seasonKershaw 3 inning sim game - will return without rehab assignmentOber, Maeda, Grayson Rodriguez facing hitters this weekAlzolay beginning rehab assignmentOhtani stomach bug on track to make next start, hopefully return soonLooks like Laureano coming back around when he's eligible (oblique)Bohm leaves with undisclosed injuryDomingo German leaves start with calf injuryByron Buxton exits with hip injury (shock!)TopicsManaging with 6.5 weeks leftStill lots of time to make a big move in the standingsHave enough FAAB for final stretch - HUGELook into standings and figure out where you can move up (and down as well) the most and target those categoriesBe realistic - passing someone in SV with 20 more than you aint happening outside of extenuating circumstancesStudy your opponents' rosters and see where you can make up groundDid they lose a closer? Big injury recently? Big pick-up on Sunday?Lineups of teams out of playoff contentionSitting vets more/Giving more time to young guysEspecially with September call-upsLook at MarlinsStack lineup w/ players on playoff teamsStart pitchers vs bad non-contending teams because in Sep they're often VERY BAD. Lots of Wins to accumulateLook at SP schedules/drop guys with brutal schedulesLook for young players on non contenders who could be getting additional opportunities in SepShutting down SPs reaching IP limits on non-playoff teamsTime to micro-manageTake advantage of every single little thing you canAdd extra hitters to give yourself optionsPlay Splits, Maximize ABs, play hot hitters, sit/drop cold playersIf guys go to IL, drop them in most circumstancesIf someone is coming back in mid-September, move on - especially pitchers (need to ramp up, etc)Production NOW over potential production laterEARTH updateGLARF still on top4 points separates top 6 teams vying for 1stI'm down to $5 in FAABBARF still sucks but actually had a (very slight) rebound last weekNERF still 2ndSLARF/TARF still battling for 3rdRay Butler down to 3rd stillJeff Erickson still 1stRyan Venancio still 2nd

Politisk kvarter
Forskingspolitisk konkursbo

Politisk kvarter

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 15:13


Ola Borten Moe (Sp) meiner han har arva eit forskingspolitisk konkursbo frå forgjengaren Henrik Asheim (H). Mens Asheim meiner dagen i dag markerer Sps symbolpolitikk når Moe dreg for å opne studiesemesteret på Nesna på Helgelandskysten. Hør episoden i appen NRK Radio

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand
Nick Reed PODCAST 08.18.22 - Mo Conservative Caucus Group Disbands

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 41:20


Hour 1 -  Nick Reed talks about a variety of topics in the news, including: Sen. Bill Eigel, (R-Weldon Spring), along with four other Republican senators, Sen. Mike Moon (R-Ash Grove), Sen. Denny Hoskins (R-Warrensburg), Sen. Andrew Koenig (R-Manchester), and Sen. Rick Brattin (R-Harrisonville), released a letter Monday saying it's time for the Conservative Caucus group to disband. Legal experts say a decade-old case over audio tapes that Bill Clinton once kept in his sock drawer may have significant impact over the FBI search of Melania Trump's closet and Donald Trump's personal office. The Springfield News-Leader has a story about the Student African American Brotherhood and how the contract to expand within SPS was narrowly approved Tuesday in a 4-3 board vote. Nick reads through the entire piece and has several questions that the News-Leader failed to answer: What IS the Student African American Brotherhood and WHAT do they do?

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand
All Out Law PODCAST 08.13.22 - Back to School with Steve Makoski & Superintendent Dr. Lathan

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 42:15


Happy Saturday! SPS board member, Mr. Steve Makoski, fills in for Kyle Wyatt today. Here's what he covers: Superintendent Dr. Grenita Lathan joins Mr. Makoski this morning. She began her tenure at Springfield Public Schools July 1, 2021. SPS serves 24,000 students and employs about 3,500 individuals. What is a Title One status? Different events that SPS offers to help students.

SPS
Ep. 48: The Great Resignation & an Interview w/ Andy Gittlitz

SPS

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 68:32


On this episode of SPS, our resident financial guru sits down with Pamela to discuss the so-called Great Resignation, or “Big Quit”. They take up the concerns over birth rates & mental illness, as well as how social democratic policies naturalize the crisis of capital. In the second half of the episode, Pamela interviews Andy Gittlitz, cohost of the Antifada podcast and author of I Want to Believe: Posadism, UFOs and Apocalypse Communism. They discuss the trajectory of the millennial left, from the anti-war movement, through Occupy to BLM; and the obstacles to building an independent political party on the left. Links: Erin Hagood on Antifada Podcast (March 16, 2022) - https://fans.fm/p/21V7vzkhttps://fans.fm/p/21V7vzk
 Crisis in Ukraine, Platypus NYC - https://youtu.be/Uyoe5ml05LQ Chris Cutrone, "Dogmatization and Thought Taboos on the Left" in sublationmag.com (July 1, 2022) - https://www.sublationmag.com/post/dogmatization-and-thought-taboos-on-the-left Links from Andy Gittlitz - https://www.sm28.org/articles/on-the-war-in-ukraine-and-the-socioeconomic-struggles-to-come/ - https://www.patreon.com/theantifada - https://www.plutobooks.com/9781786806208/i-want-to-believe/ Conrad Hamilton, "Abortion, Capitalism, and Demographic Control" in sublationmag.com (May 17, 2022) - https://www.sublationmag.com/post/abortion-capitalism-and-demographic-control John D'Emilio, “Capitalism and Gay Identity” from Powers of Desire: The Politics of Sexuality, eds. Ann Snitow, Christine Stansell, Sharon Thompson (New York, 1983) - https://platypus1917.org/wp-content/uploads/readings/demilio_captialismgayid.pdf SPS is hosted by Pamela and Andreas, with original tracks by Tamas Vilaghy, and editing assistance by Michael Woodson and Tamas Vilaghy. Our Sh-t Platypus Does team is Lisa M. and Rebekah P. To learn more about Platypus, go to platypus1917.org

Self Publishing School : Learn How To Write A Book And Grow Your Business
SPS 167: Selling 40,000+ Books In Two Years As An “Unknown” Fiction Author…How I Did It with Barbara Hartzler

Self Publishing School : Learn How To Write A Book And Grow Your Business

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 36:44


Calling all fiction authors!! (or aspiring fiction authors) Today I'm joined by Barbara Hartzler. She's a successful fiction author, a former SPS student, and now a coach at Self Publishing School who's helped 100's of authors with their fiction books. In this interview, we talk about: -The “Tier 1” process - and why you should use it to launch (or relaunch) your book -What is a “trope”? And why you need to know these when writing fiction -How to get more reviews for your fiction books (and how to relaunch or launch your books successfully) -Should you launch a box set? (who and when?) - and the surprising advice you need to follow -Read through rate - what is it and why is it important for fiction authors? -What Barbara has learned from coaching 400 students in 1,400+ 1-1 coaching calls -The best advice for first time fiction authors (one thing she wishes she did sooner) If you're a fiction author, don't miss this interview! Grab a ticket to Author Advantage Live before prices go up here: AuthorAdvantageLive.com P.S. Want to be coached by Barbara with your book? Book a call with the team and join SPS here: self-publishingschool.com/apply

FTN Fantasy Baseball Podcast
Heading Into the Second Half with Paul Sporer

FTN Fantasy Baseball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 66:29


Paul Sporer (@sporer) catches up with Matthew Davis (@_mattywood_) to chat about recent news and notes along with the fantasy impacts. After that they talk about the difficulties of figuring out which pitchers to start this weekend. Paul and Matthew give you their favorite picks to finish with the most strikeouts and they get into World Series odds. The duo closes things out talking closer specs and injured players you should (or shouldn't) stash.Topics Include- News & Notes- Juan Soto sweepstakes?- Setting your SPs this weekend- Shohei Ohtani the pitcher - Strikeout Leaders- World Series odds- Closer specs- Stashing injured playersLink to Vlad Sedler's NL Second Half Predictions:https://www.ftnfantasy.com/articles/FTN/56288/fantasy-baseball-national-league-second-half-predictionsLink to Vlad Sedler's AL Second Half Predictions:https://www.ftnfantasy.com/articles/FTN/56258/fantasy-baseball-american-league-second-half-predictionsPlease subscribe/rate/reveiew