Podcasts about understandably

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Best podcasts about understandably

Latest podcast episodes about understandably

Las Doctoras Podcast
Ep. 42: Creating Space for Our Creativity to Shine

Las Doctoras Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022


Creativity. It's a huge part of our lives, and one that Dr. Renee and Dr. Cristina believe we all need to have more conversations around. Today, the two specifically zoom into priming our entire being to embody creative states. Believing that creativity requires everything in us—body, mind, and soul—in order for us to express it fully, Las Doctoras encourage us to see creativity as a holistic process that is just as powerful as a tool for meditation as it is a tool for productivity.Most of us think of creativity as a completely heady, utilitarian process. But if we allow creativity to stay in our heads, we experience those “blocks” and, eventually, burnout. We need to learn to step back and create ceremony around our work instead of obsessing over the actual doing of that work. Before writing, Las Doctoras like to meditate or simply move their bodies as a “warmup”, paving the way for flow.We decolonize our writing as we learn to step back and stop treating ourselves like a well-oiled machine every second of every day. This helps us release old messages and step into a new way of being.Dr. Renee and Dr. Cristina used to take artwork for granted. Understandably, our go-go-go culture conditioned us into thinking that art is a waste of time. They found, however, that doing art allows them to focus, integrate, and process. In fact, the growth they experience from doing art positively influences their work!Finally, Dr. Renee and Dr. Cristina invite us to name our process. Admit and embrace the fact that you need more space to doodle, more space to dance, more space to relax, so that you can get those creative juices to flow easier.We need to create spaces for us to create, to dream, to visualize. We need to stop thinking of these activities as things we're only supposed to do during our “downtime”, or on the weekend. Ultimately, once we embrace our process, life—including work—not only becomes so much more fun, but so much more fulfilling. And what's more important than that?Connect with Las Doctoras:Visit their website: www.lasdoctoras.net Follow them on Instagram: www.instagram.com/las.doctorasEnroll on our Sacred Writing Course: https://lasdoctoras.net/sacredwriting

Talk of the Devils - A show about Manchester United
West Ham Reaction: Live from Old Trafford

Talk of the Devils - A show about Manchester United

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 34:12


Ian Irving hosts The Athletic's podcast dedicated to Manchester United. This week, we're live from Old Trafford with club correspondent Laurie Whitwell and West Ham writer Roshane Thomas. Marcus Rashford scored the last-gasp winner that put United fourth in the Premier League going into what could, and maybe should, be a fruitful February for the team and interim manager Ralf Rangnick. Understandably, the feeling around the ground was more positive than it has been in quite some time with the fans in full voice. Amongst a few old favourites, the Stretford End belted out a fresh chant with a familiar tune.

Profit with Law: Profitable Law Firm Growth
How to Overcome Barriers With Effective Legal Marketing Strategies with Ken Hardison - 287

Profit with Law: Profitable Law Firm Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 52:33


Shownotes can be found at https://www.profitwithlaw.com/287.   There is no hard and fast rule in building a successful law firm. Understandably, it's inevitable for a firm to make rookie mistakes in the early stages of operation. Nonetheless, business owners should develop effective legal marketing strategies that cater to their firm after a series of trials and errors. Without dependable and enduring tools, a business may suffer a huge loss. In this episode, Ken Hardison joins Moshe Amsel to talk about his experience in establishing PILMMA and teaches us how lawyers can create a profitable practice for themselves. He also discusses the common mistakes entrepreneurs make that can hinder business growth. If you want to know about building a successful law firm, then this episode is for you! Resources mentioned:   New! Download the Action Guide for this episode  Episode 65 - Culture Not Important? Guess Again! with Eric Farber Join the Law Firm Growth Summit's Facebook community. Connect with Ken: LinkedIn | Email Grow your law firm with PILMMA. The Grow Your Law Firm Podcast Under Promise Over Deliver by Ken Hardison The Infinite Game by Simon Sineck Lawyer Ghost Calls Join our Facebook Community: https://www.facebook.com/groups/lawfirmgrowthsummit/   To request a show topic, recommend a guest or ask a question for the show, please send an email to info@dreambuilderfinancial.com.   Connect with Moshe on: Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/moshe.amsel LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/mosheamsel/

Lost In The Shuffle
Tap History Research Reflections

Lost In The Shuffle

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 20:40


Tap Dance History is one of the most heavily debated topics in the Tap Dance Community. Understandably so, because the Tap Dance Community is passionate about the culture and history of the art form bring honored and recognized. Join Hillary-Marie in this episode as she shares her heaviest hitting takeaways from one of a recent deep dive into Tap Dance History research for the iTap Teacher Certificate Program. From The Stono Rebellion of 1739, to The Negro Act of 1740, to Master Juba, often referred to as the “father” or “grandfather” of Tap Dance, this episode is filled with lessons learned, major takeaways, and more.

Get Lit
Ep 184: Revisiting Episode 20: When People Won't Take Action

Get Lit

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 20:34


In this episode, I'll discuss something leaders have to deal with at one point or another—what to do when people won't take action. Understandably, this is something many leaders find challenging. How exactly do you create that shift? How do you support the people you are leading so they can play the big game? What do you do to move the ball forward? You'll find the answer to those questions and more in this episode so make sure you tune in!

Nonprofit Leadership Podcast
How is cryptocurrency shaping the future of philanthropy? (Part one)

Nonprofit Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 28:25


Cryptocurrency is here to stay and it's coming to a nonprofit near you. Understandably, many of you might be very skeptical when it comes ...

Construction Law Today
Episode 23: Building Codes and Building Safety

Construction Law Today

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 29:16


On Thursday, June 24, 2021, Champlain Towers South, a 12 story residential condominium in the Miami suburb of Surfside, Florida collapsed killing 98 people. The incident is one of the greatest losses of life caused by a construction failure in the history of the United States.  There are numerous questions about what happened and why. Understandably, the matter is now the subject of extensive litigation. One fact that is known is that the structure met all applicable building codes in effect when the construction was completed. Join us for an instructive and interesting interview with Linda Pieczynski, noted author, instructor and former prosecutor of building code violations in a discussion of how and when building codes are enforced and the impacts and limitations of these codes in assuring safe construction.

Heavier Than I Look
Vanity Sizing & Clothing As Trigger

Heavier Than I Look

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 24:38


Vanity sizing is a phenomenon that explains size labels being labeled as smaller than their actual, true size. This is thought to preserve the dignity of smaller numbers, in which most customers feel more confident, given our society's overwhelming dependence on self-value defined numerically. Understandably, situations of ill-sizing can affect one's emotional well-being and self-esteem, especially if it is during a fragile state of attempted recovery. And especially if you might exist in a larger body, inflation sizing reflects the ideology that smaller bodies (and numbers for defining those bodies) are more desirable.   Bibliography (show notes): Clifford, Stephanie. “One Size Fits Nobody: Seeking a Steady 4 or a 10.” The New York Times, The New York Times, 25 Apr. 2011, www.nytimes.com/2011/04/25/business/25sizing.html. Dockterman, Eliana. “Clothing Sizes: How Vanity Sizing Made Shopping Impossible.” Time, Time, time.com/how-to-fix-vanity-sizing/. Dooley, Roger. “The Psychology of Vanity Sizing.” Forbes, Forbes Magazine, 29 July 2013, www.forbes.com/sites/rogerdooley/2013/07/29/vanity-sizing/?sh=6c0efae81e32. Kathleen, Author. “Apparently, Anyone Who Wears Clothes Is a Sizing Expert.” The Myth of Vanity Sizing, 21 June 2018, vanitysizing.com/journalists/apparently-anyone-who-wears-clothes-is-a-sizing-expert/#more-108. New Matilda. “Vanity Sizing: The Lie Harming Women's Health.” New Matilda, 15 Sept. 2015, newmatilda.com/2015/07/11/vanity-sizing-lie-harming-womens-health/#. O'Connell, Edaein. “The Deeply Negative Impact of Vanity Sizing.” Metro, Metro.co.uk, 6 Mar. 2021, metro.co.uk/2021/03/06/the-deeply-negative-impact-of-vanity-sizing-13988772/. Schrobsdorff, Susanna. “Fashion Designers Introduce Less-than-Zero Sizes.” Newsweek, Newsweek, 1 Dec. 2010, www.newsweek.com/fashion-designers-introduce-less-zero-sizes-112005. “Understanding Vanity Sizing.” SizeCharter, www.sizecharter.com/clothing-fit-and-measurement/understanding-vanity-sizing. Yazolino, Nicole, et al. “Vanity Sizing and Size Charts: A Brief History - Fit Analytics.” Fit Analytics Blog, 31 Mar. 2021, blog.fitanalytics.com/history-of-vanity-sizing-and-size-charts/. 

Wake up Castle Rock and America
God, please help me!”? Are you even in my home anymore?

Wake up Castle Rock and America

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 6:20


God, please help me!”? Are you even in my home anymore? please keep me in your prayers thank you     This past Sunday night, I got so frustrated with my son, I thought God was not in my home anymore and that he had abandoned me, and I even commented that Satan was in-complete attack mold. But I calmed down and asked God for His forgiveness: yes, I doubted: I felt abandoned by God in my time of great need while dealing with my frustration with family.  Even during this uproar mentally, I was asking God for help but not receiving what was asked for. Does this mean that God does not care or that He is ignoring my cries for help? When we cried out for Him, asking Him to stop the pain and suffering, and the family arguments, when I went to pick up my other son from his place of work, I asked God for the forgiveness of the statement I had made in an intense argument, I began to realize that I was communicating a universal desire to avoid hurt. That is not weakness, but it is human.   I began to research God's word: are you aware that The Bible records several testimonies of those who called out to God in a time of need and were met with silence at least for a while. Job is the most obvious example, as in his distress, he felt as if God were nowhere to be found: “If I go to the east, he is not there; if I go to the west, I do not find him. When he is at work in the north, I do not see him; when he turns to the south, I catch no glimpse of him” (Job 23:8–9). The psalmists also struggled with the feeling that God was not responding to their cries: “Why, LORD, do you stand far off? Why do you hide yourself in times of trouble?” (Psalm 10:1); “How long, LORD? Will you forget me forever? How long will you hide your face from me?” (Psalm 13:1); “Why do you hide your face and forget our misery and oppression?” (Psalm 44:24).   Jesus our Lord and Savior understands the mindset of not wanting to experience pain and suffering. In the Garden of Gethsemane, just before His arrest, Jesus asked His Father three times, “My Father, if it is possible, may this cup be taken from me.  Yet not as I will, but as you will” (Matthew 26:39) (also see Matthew 26:42 and Matthew 20:22). Though He asked for the “cup” to pass, Jesus asked with the condition “if it is possible.” Jesus was in complete submission to God's will and not His own. If His suffering was a part of God's will, then He was willing to accept that.   When we cry out, “God, please help me,” God hears us and always responds. He may not respond in the way you or I wish, but He responds, nonetheless. Understandably, when amid the throes of pain, suffering, and grief, family disputes and more it is difficult to see the wider perspective of God's plan, especially when we receive an answer of “no” or “not now.” But you and I can trust in God's sovereignty because you and I know He is good (Psalm 48:1; 95:3, 6). Even as we go through the trials, God gives grace (2 Corinthians 12:9). After Jesus' prayer in Gethsemane, “an angel from heaven appeared to him and strengthened him” (Luke 22:43).   Since God is omniscient, He is privy to details we cannot begin to understand, I know that I cannot. Psalm 147:5 says, “Great is our Lord and mighty in power; his understanding has no limit.” When we cry out to God, “Please help me,” He sees the heart and understands (Hebrews 4:15), and His response will always be out of love (Romans 5:8; Psalm 139:13–16). We can submit to His authority because He is trustworthy. Remember, God broke His silence and revealed Himself to Job in an unmistakable way (Job 38:1). And I know and believe that when I picked up my son God spoke to me through him. Also, I believe that when my wife asked the Holy sprit to calm me down as she laid hands on me, she asked Holy spirit to enter into this home it did perhaps not at that given moment, but it did.   Jesus assures us that God will only give us what is good and right in Luke 11:11–13, “Which of you fathers, if your son asks for a fish, will give him a snake instead? Or if he asks for an egg, will give him a scorpion? If you then, though you are evil, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will your Father in heaven give the Holy Spirit to those who ask him!” The God who keeps track of every sparrow cares about the details of our lives, too (Luke 12:5–6).   Since God knows what is best for our lives, He will not say “yes” to a prayer that goes against what is best. We may not understand or agree with the why of that response, but we can trust that God does and that His actions will redound to His glory and our ultimate good (Psalm 19:7; 2 Corinthians 4:7). Through painful moments in life, we can learn Christlikeness and glorify the Lord with our words and actions even through our suffering (Job 1:22; James 1:2–8; 1 Chronicles 16:28–29).   God responds to every call for help. But whether or not that answer is the one we most desire is up to God. God works for the good of those who love Him (Romans 8:28) and for His glory. We can trust that He will always respond to cries for help in accordance with His good and perfect will. Even when the psalmist was searching for a seemingly absent God, he chose to live by faith: “But I trust in your unfailing love; my heart rejoices in your salvation. I will sing the Lord's praise, for he has been good to me” (Psalm 13:5–6). So, I will live by faith trusting in the Lord: Lyrics from a song my mother sang: We've come this far by faith Leaning on the Lord Trusting in His Holy word He never failed me yet Oh' Can't Turn Around We've come this far by faith (Repeat) Verse Just the other day, I heard a man say He did not believe in God's word But I can truly say, the Lord has made a way He's never failed me yet Chorus Oh'Can't Turn Around We've come this far by faith

Unravelling with Tom & Pete
"Thank You For Taking Care of Sick People" (with Sarah Fifer)

Unravelling with Tom & Pete

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 58:20


On this episode of the podcast, we sit down with Tom's sister, Sarah Fifer. In addition to sharing how learning to listen to those who believe differently from her opened up her faith and her understanding of what the Church can and should be, Sarah also  gives us a glimpse into her experiences as a Physician Assistant in critical care through the COVID-19 pandemic. Understandably so, this pandemic has had a massive impact on her life, and it has given her a unique perspective on the Church that we (whether we're part of a local church right now or not) need to learn from. This is a truly important episode...especially as locally in Grand Rapids, MI, Spectrum Health (the largest hospital system in the area) has moved to "red status" for the first time since the start of the pandemic. Now more than ever, we urge you to check in with the folks in your circles who work in healthcare, to offer your care and support. As Sarah shares with us, daily holding the hands of people who breathe their last breath without any family members around them is changing the DNA of frontline healthcare workers forever. We have to take care of the people who have been taking care of us. _____Let's keep this conversation going!We'd love for you to share this episode with a friend, family member, or even an enemy. Listen to it together, talk about it together, and then tell us about your conversation. Also, join our Facebook group to find some fellow listeners to wrestle with these ideas further. Reach out to us with any thoughts, feedback, criticisms, what is helpful, what doesn't make sense, what you think we're totally wrong about, or what you'd love to hear on the podcast!IG - @UnravellingPodFB - facebook.com/groups/UnravellingPodEmail - UnravellingPod@gmail.com

Pariah Nation
S19EP3: Race and Power in the West Pt.1

Pariah Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 24:02


Decolonisation is an inherently violent process. It is a process that deconstructs the core of white identity and power. Understandably, such a process is therefore bound to be uncomfortable for many white institutions in the West to participate in. Emily and I, through drawing on our experiences and those of others, bring you this episode discussing the relationship between Race and Power in the West.

RLCC Podcast
God's word will endure always

RLCC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 39:27


People are concerned about the end times, especially when they think about their unsaved loved ones. They know that unbelievers will suffer the wrath of God on Judgment Day. Understandably, some Christians feel relieved knowing that they will be spared from all these. They believe that they will be "raptured" just before the Tribulation. But is this really God's plan? In the Book of Revelation, God shows us that the church is actually called to evangelize the world until the very end.

The Short Porch
Episode 302: We Are Completely All Over The Place

The Short Porch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 70:41


The offseason rumor mill continues to chug along, as the Yankees are still reportedly talking to the camps of both Carlos Correa and Corey Seager. In recent news however, Correa made some harsh comments towards Derek Jeter's defensive career, claiming Jeter did not deserve any of the Gold Glove awards he won. Understandably, many Yankee fans took exception to his quote and started to question whether Correa's villainous persona is something they want on the team. We also find out how desperate teams are during this year's pitching market, with Justin Verlander returning to Houston on a massive 1-year/$25 million gamble from the Astros, and the Angels signing Noah Syndergaard to a 1-year/$21 million dollar deal. Brett Gardner also reportedly wants to play again in 2022, making us seriously doubt that we'll ever get rid of this man from our lives. We also discuss the recent awards season, debating whether or not it was a good thing that Cole was snubbed for AL Cy Young and what it truly means to be an "MVP" of the league. Finally, we thought it'd be appropriate to comment on a certain Twitter "reporter" that got outed for sharing fake Matt Olson trade rumors in hilarious fashion, hopefully he never makes a resurgence. Outro Song: “Tropical House Music" via APM Music Library

The Tiff & Jack Show
146 - Empath Relationship Struggles, Solved

The Tiff & Jack Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 40:09


How would you like to have your Empath relationship struggles, solved? Yep, we know that as an Empath you're likely to struggle with feelings of “losing” yourself in a relationship because at all costs you want to keep the peace.  “No conflict” is your motto. Understandably so! You're highly sensory and that means you FEEL deeper than 80% of the population. And there's no bigger work than that of being in deep, committed, romantic relationship. Tiff & Jack have been together for 15 years, and it just keeps getting better-and-better. (That doesn't mean they don't have their “downs,” along with their “ups!”) If you're looking for simple ways to feel empowered every day in your intimate relationship . . . look no further.  ⬇️ EMPATH ASSESSMENT >>> click here TIFF & JACK FB EMPATH COMMUNITY >>> https://www.facebook.com/groups/connectedempath MAMA TIFF'S EMPATH CLEARING SPRAY >>> https://www.tiffandjackstore.com TIFF AND JACK INSTAGRAM >>> https://www.instagram.com/tiffandjack/ PODCAST SHOW NOTES >>> https://tiffandjack.com CONTACT US >>> https://tiffandjack.com/contact/  

Harvest Community Church (PCA) in Omaha, NE
“Confident Endurance” – Hebrews 10:19-39

Harvest Community Church (PCA) in Omaha, NE

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021


Well, this morning we are returning to our study in the book of Hebrews. We will be in Hebrews chapter 10 versus nineteen through thirty nine. 19 Therefore, brothers, since we have confidence to enter the holy places by the blood of Jesus, 20 by the new and living way that he opened for us through the curtain, that is, through his flesh, 21 and since we have a great priest over the house of God, 22 let us draw near with a true heart in full assurance of faith, with our hearts sprinkled clean from an evil conscience and our bodies washed with pure water. 23 Let us hold fast the confession of our hope without wavering, for he who promised is faithful. 24 And let us consider how to stir up one another to love and good works, 25 not neglecting to meet together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another, and all the more as you see the Day drawing near. 26 For if we go on sinning deliberately after receiving the knowledge of the truth, there no longer remains a sacrifice for sins, 27 but a fearful expectation of judgment, and a fury of fire that will consume the adversaries. 28 Anyone who has set aside the law of Moses dies without mercy on the evidence of two or three witnesses. 29 How much worse punishment, do you think, will be deserved by the one who has trampled underfoot the Son of God, and has profaned the blood of the covenant by which he was sanctified, and has outraged the Spirit of grace? 30 For we know him who said, “Vengeance is mine; I will repay.” And again, “The Lord will judge his people.” 31 It is a fearful thing to fall into the hands of the living God. 32 But recall the former days when, after you were enlightened, you endured a hard struggle with sufferings, 33 sometimes being publicly exposed to reproach and affliction, and sometimes being partners with those so treated. 34 For you had compassion on those in prison, and you joyfully accepted the plundering of your property, since you knew that you yourselves had a better possession and an abiding one. 35 Therefore do not throw away your confidence, which has a great reward. 36 For you have need of endurance, so that when you have done the will of God you may receive what is promised. 37 For, “Yet a little while, and the coming one will come and will not delay; 38 but my righteous one shall live by faith, and if he shrinks back, my soul has no pleasure in him.” 39 But we are not of those who shrink back and are destroyed, but of those who have faith and preserve their souls. Hebrews 10:19-39, ESV This is the word of the Lord. A couple of years ago, a once famous pastor, someone who had published popular books, pastored a large congregation and and by all accounts, had an incredibly successful ministry, announced one day on social media that he was excommunicating himself from the church and from Christianity. Now to be excommunicated, if you're unfamiliar with that term, is the most severe form of church discipline that can be enacted in the church. When someone no longer cares to live like a Christian no longer believes the essence of what it means to be a Christian. Leaders in the church are sometimes forced to excommunicate someone, which means that their profession of faith is rendered null and void, and they're removed from membership in the church. So in announcing, this former pastor, that he himself was excommunicating himself from the church, he was announcing that he no longer believed the gospel, that he no longer wanted to live as a Christian, and he was therefore removing himself from the body of Christ. Now this was apparently the final step, although we still hold out hope for his repentance in a downward trajectory that was some years in the making. He had resigned from pastoral ministry some years earlier and ever since then had renounced much of what he had taught and published in his ministry. The edifice of his previous gospel of convictions slowly crumbled and then to cap it all off, he and his wife announced they were ending their marriage. Now, as you can imagine, this announcement that he no longer considered himself to be a Christian was both jarring and heartbreaking for those who knew him, but also for anyone who may have at one time simply benefited from his written ministry. Understandably, to have any influential Christian leader make shipwreck of their faith is going to leave a trail of debris in the wake. Unfortunately, this specific example isn't the first time, nor will it likely be the last time that something tragic like that happens in Jesus's church. I'm sure many of us, myself included, can cite examples in our own stories where a once influential Christian leader or teacher, someone who ministered to you even if only through their publications, made the decision that they were done with biblical and Orthodox Christianity. When those stories hit too close to home friends, they're understandably heartbreaking, upsetting, shocking, scandalous, and they may even elicit some self-reflection of our own. For example, we may ask ourselves that if someone like that, someone who seemed on the surface of things to have it all together could abandon the faith, well, then what hope do I have to persevere and the Christian life? Do they know something I don't? Maybe we even question how those stories reflect on God? Does God actually abandon his people? Well, I don't want to leave you in suspense on that last one, so no God doesn't abandon those who truly belong to him. The question of perseverance and endurance, how do we stay the course in the Christian life when we see people we love and admire head towards the exit door is what our author addresses in our passage this morning. He wants us to be aware of the sobering reality that apostasy, that is turning your back on your faith, sometimes happens in Jesus's church. As he issues this sobering warning about apostasy, he also wants to equip us as believers to live the Christian life with the necessary equipment to endure and persevere into the end. So our big idea this morning is this we have need of endurance. As we walk through this passage, we're going to take it in three chunks, basically following the three paragraphs as you see it divided up in the English Standard Version. First, we'll look at a charge to endure and versus nineteen through twenty- five second, a warning to endure and verses twenty-six through thirty one. Then finally, the way to endure in verses thirty-two through thirty-nine. 1. A Charge to Endure 2. A Warning to Endure 3. The Way to Endure. A Charge to Endure So first, a charge to endure. So if you scan the first seven verses of your passage or so, you may notice a couple of commands. Actually, I count three different commands, each of which begin with the phrase “Let us”. As we'll see in a moment, our author calls us to be earnest people as it pertains to our faith. He calls us as Christians for the sake of our perseverance, to be serious about truth, serious about spiritual disciplines, to take our faith seriously and to take the local church seriously as well. Before he does that, he starts in a really familiar place, if you've been plodding along in Hebrews with us. He rehearses for us, in summary form, everything that Christ Jesus has already done on our behalf. Now I think it would be easy at this point, especially because we've already heard such a long and beautiful exposition of Christ's person and work throughout the previous several chapters in Hebrews, to treat these first two or three verses or so as throwaway verses. Now maybe you're thinking to yourself at this point, goodnes, author of Hebrews whoever you are, just get to your main point. You've already told us this stuff about what Christ has done and who he is. Yet, far from being simply filler to transition us to the real meat of the passage, these verses, these first few verses are really important in the larger context of perseverance. Understand that when theologians talk about perseverance or endurance in the Christian life, they've traditionally distinguished between the grounds of our perseverance and the means of our perseverance. In other words, the first thing we have to know about perseverance and enduring in the Christian life is that it's first and foremost grounded and rooted in the work of God. He's the one who secures us. He's the one who holds us fast. Our perseverance and endurance doesn't depend on whether our affections for the Lord and the gospel ever ebb and flow, which they do indeed. Rather, perseverance depends on the Lord. This is why our author begins in the way he does within this larger context of perseverance before telling us what to do. He has to remind us, first and foremost, what Jesus Christ has already done. The first thing he tells us is that when Christ died for our sins, well, he went where you and I could not. Having done that, he has invited us as his people to follow on his coattails. You may recall that when we talked earlier, the last few sermons we've given in Hebrews, we noted that in the tabernacle, the earthly place of worship in the Old Testament, there was a big curtain, a big veil that closed off the most holy place on Earth from everything and everyone else. Remember that center room in the tabernacle and then later in the temple was considered to be the holiest place on Earth. It was where God's glory dwelt most powerfully on Earth, and therefore only the High Priest once a year was able to go past that curtain. He was the only one who was allowed to do it, and he was only able to do it once a year. In the New Testament, friends, in the gospel of Matthew, Mark and Luke, we learned that when Christ died, what happened to that curtain? Well, we learned that the curtain of the temple was torn in two. What's being communicated there is that access to God through Christ's life, death and resurrection is no longer limited and shadowy, like it was in the Old Testament. Rather, through, as our author puts it, the curtain of Christ's flesh, all who attach themselves to Christ by faith alone now have access into the heavenly places the place where Christ himself ascended after the resurrection, the place that the most holy place in the Tabernacle ultimately pointed to, and the place where our Lord Jesus Christ now reigns in glory. That's the second point our author makes in this opening few verses. Christ is the great high priest over the house of God. Christ opened the way of access for all of his people, and now he sits in heaven, where he reigns over his church and he preserves his people. Now, these opening three verses that we read are only a summary of everything that we've heard thus far about Christ's priestly work. Yet what they do is really important because they remind us of the privileges that we have as God's children, and ultimately they communicate what anchors us in the Christian life from start to finish is not us, it's not ourselves. It's not our work. It's Jesus Christ, the one who lived for us, the one who died for us, and the one who now reigns in the heavenly places for us. Now, in view of these grounds, our author gives three specific exhortations to tell us that there are certain means that we, as Christians, are called to lay hold of in our own lives for the sake of our perseverance. So what are some of the things he says? Well, this gets us to the commands in the first part of our passage, we're first in verse twenty-one. He calls his church to draw near with a true heart in full assurance of faith, with our hearts sprinkled clean from an evil conscience and our bodies washed with purer water. So what does it mean to draw near? Well, think about some of the really ordinary things that we're called to do in the Christian life as a people who have been washed and cleansed by the Holy Spirit and made new creatures. Well, we're called to pray to God when we're burdened. We're called to engage with God as in the study of his word. We do that both in private and we do that corporately as a church. Perhaps the chief expression of drawing near is when we come into the worship assembly and we hear and respond to the gospel and partake of the sacraments as well. In fact, one commentator notes that his first command to draw near encourages God's people, you and me, to a life of worship that includes private worship, worship at home, worship with our families, but at most certainly also includes corporate worship, worship with each other. That's why at Harvest, we call what we're doing right now the pinnacle of our week. Second, we're then urged to hold fast without wavering to the confession of our hope. Now, ultimately, this is an encouragement to know what you believe and why you believe it. In other words, can you articulate what the church has always confessed about Jesus in the gospel? Do you hold those truths to yourself? Can you defend those truths in the context of a world that often challenges truth? In short, this is an exhortation to take truth seriously and to constantly shore up the foundations of that truth for yourself by going again and again to the study of God's word, even being prepared in the process to make an argument for what we believe and why we believe it. Then third, our author instructs us to consider how to quote, “Stir up one another to love and good works and encourage one another regularly”. All of which suggests that we cannot neglect the local church. Now, when we tie these first three commands together, I think there's a strong sense in which this third command, this command to stir up one another also kind of draws all of the other commands together. When you think about it, you can't really draw near to God in corporate worship unless you're in the local church. You're going to have a really hard time holding fast to the truth if you're trying to live out your faith alone on an island. All of us then need the local church for the sake of our perseverance. Over the years, the various U.S. military branches U.S. Navy, Army, Air Force, and Marines have used a variety of marketing slogans to try to up their recruitment. Some of you can probably think of some off the top of your head. I think of the one that's been in play for the Marine Corps since 1977, “The Few, the Proud, the Marines”, something like that. One of the worst slogans that has ever come and gone was one that the U.S. Army rolled out in 2001. So leading up to this, the army did some research and found that many young people saw the army as a dehumanizing place where you would lose any sense of individuality. So to combat that perception, in 2001, the army rolled out its “Army of One” slogan. They wanted recruits to know that the individual is valued in the army. So that slogan played into that. It was an attempt to placate this perception that many young people at the time had about the army. By 2006, again, just five years later, that slogan was replaced by Army Strong. The “Army of One” marketing campaign was viewed pretty widely as a pretty big failure in the army recruiting process. Now it was viewed as a failure, but I don't think it takes much thought to understand why it was viewed as a failure. When you sign up for the army, you're also signing up to join a group of people where you have their back, they have your back, and you're working together with other people to accomplish a mission. There's a sense in which an army of one is even a contradiction in terms. So too, there's also a strong sense in which a Christian of one is a contradiction in terms too. Friends, understand that the good news of the gospel is that when Christ saves us, he saves us from a variety of things. He saves us from sin and death. He saves us from the power of our sin. He saves us from the devil. He also saves us into a people. His church is in the context of the local church, not where we lose our individuality, but where we receive the accountability that we all need to live lives that honor God. It's in the context of the local church where we put our gifts to use and serve each other. It's where we receive things like word and sacrament, means that God has promised to use for our spiritual nourishment. The author of Hebrews, is going to come around to this later in Hebrews 13 and tell us to submit to our spiritual leaders, something that we cannot do apart from the local church. So let me ask you this, are you committed to the local church? When I ask that, I don't mean, are you committed to the idea of the local church in the abstract? I mean, are you committed right now or are you in the process of being committed to the local church? You see, our passage encourages us to be committed to something very specific, flesh and blood people with real faces who have likewise been purchased by the blood of Christ. It urges us to commit to a specific people to regularly encourage those people and even to actively think about how to love other people in the church for their own spiritual good. There are a lot of reasons why it might seem reasonable to walk away from the church or neglect the church. The local church, after all, is a cauldron of sinners where we're constantly the sinned and the sinned against or the sinners and the sin against, and the local church forces us to deal with things that we'd otherwise like to avoid. There's a reason why John Calvin said, “They who depart from the church give themselves up to Satan.” Now, I understand that might sound strong to some of you, but Calvin is just reflecting what the Bible has to say about the tragedy when someone makes a shipwreck of their faith and either is excommunicated from the church or more often than not, excommunicates themselves from the church. That language that I just quoted from Calvin is actually the same language that the apostle Paul uses in 1 Timothy 1:20, to describe two specific people who made shipwreck of their faith and were excommunicated from the church. Being apart from the church trying to do spiritual life apart from the local church, friends, is not a good place to be. So rather than retreating from the church, the Bible would have it, and our passage specifically right here would have us lean into the local church to meet together in person regularly and encourage each other all the more in view of the eternity that awaits us. So this is the charge to persevere. First and foremost, rest in everything that Christ has done know that the security we have in the Christian life is anchored to the one who is exalted and reigns in the heavenly places. Christ has already done everything for our salvation. Then he calls us to something, he calls us to make use of things that he's left us with for our spiritual nourishment. Things like the local church to stay the course in the Christian life. A Warning to Endure Now that he's issued this charge, well, then he turns to consider what happens if somebody doesn't persevere in Christ. What happens if somebody walks away from Christ and walks away from the church for good? Well this leads to our second point, a warning to endure. When we turn to verse twenty-six, we are coming to the fourth of five worrying passages in Hebrews. If you recall, we've encountered a number of these warning passages elsewhere in Hebrews. It's a pretty typical characteristic of Hebrews to include these various warning passages, and these warning passages are intended at their heart to show us the importance of pursuing Christ throughout the entirety of our lives by holding out the consequences for giving up on our faith. In short, should we decide at some point in our lives to go on sinning deliberately after receiving the knowledge of truth? Well, our author tells us that judgment is what's going to result. Now, the first question we have to ask about this passage is who are those who are sinning deliberately after receiving a knowledge of the truth? Who are those people? Well, let's start with saying who those people are not. Understand that our author here isn't talking about the believer who struggles with sin. This isn't about the Christian who struggles with some sin, though continues to grieve it, to repent from it, seek accountability for it, and so on and so forth. We all struggle with sin, this passage isn't speaking about that kind of person. So let me encourage you from the outset that if there are particular sins besetting sins that you're struggling with right now, repent from them, seek accountability for them, keep pursuing Jesus in them. Also know and be encouraged that this passage isn't picturing or portraying you in your sin. Rather, the person in view here is what we would call an apostate. An apostate, according to our author, is a person who continually sins deliberately after being trained in the truth. This refers to a person who may have at one point or another professed faith in Christ, but who are now brazenly living life apart from Christ, apart from the church, and aren't in any way pricked by a sense of guilt. Later in the passage, this person is described as someone who, “Who has trampled underfoot the Son of God and has profane the blood of the covenant by which he was sanctified and has outraged the spirit of grace.” I'm quoting from verse 29 and the imagery here is quite vivid when you think about it. To trample underfoot is a statement of disdain and contempt, putting Christ underneath your foot. This is somebody the author of Hebrews, has labored so extensively and eloquently to exalt. Now Hebrews, you're now treating him as somebody lower than dirt, as if he's lower than dirt. Then to profane the blood of the covenant that plays off Old Testament sacrificial language, where Christ's blood is treated as common and unfit for sacrifice and to outrage the spirit of grace. Well, that's to treat with contempt the one who has graciously worked in their midst in the church. Our author, then, has in mind someone who was very much a part of the church. A member of the covenant community. Then at some point these people decide, for whatever reason, to reject Christ completely and happily entertain sin. Now, before we go any further, I want to drop two important theological anchors on this topic of perseverance, just so we don't get the wrong idea of what our author's communicating. The first thing we need to know about this wider theological conversation on perseverance and endurance is that this passage isn't teaching us that a believer, a true believer, could ever finally fall away. Now it is true that true believers could go through seasons of doubt or being given to sin here or there. Yet as Thomas Watson, Puritan, once wrote, “Though grace may indeed be shaken with fears and doubts, it cannot be plucked up by the roots.” Jesus gets at this too in John 10:27-28, where he tells us, 27 My sheep hear my voice, and I know them, and they follow me. 28 I give them eternal life, and they will never perish, and no one will snatch them out of my hand. John 10:27-28, ESV Now it is true that there may be people we walk with in the church who at one time or another seemed to be walking well, but then eventually make the decision to turn away from grace. If that continues indefinitely, well, that doesn't mean that person has lost their salvation theologically speaking. Rather, it means that they were never truly believers in the first place. This is John's evaluation of individuals who departed from Christ and from the church in his own day. In 1 John 2:19, he writes 19 They went out from us, but they were not of us; for if they had been of us, they would have continued with us. But they went out, that it might become plain that they all are not of us. 1 John 2:19, ESV All that being said, these warning passages in Hebrews, including this one in Hebrews chapter ten, are a means to jolt us to our senses, especially when we're entertaining sin. They aren't teaching that a true believer could ever lose their salvation. That's the first theological anchor to keep in mind. The second one I want to drop is this, there may be people in our lives, even right now who we can think of, who appear to have fallen away, who appear to be in this apostate kind of state. Yet that doesn't follow that they've done so conclusively. You see, we may know people who at present don't want anything to do with Christ and the church. People who are dabbling in sin and their present trajectory looks ominous, but we still hold out hope that they would one day return to Christ. We still pray for those people and even plead with them to come to their senses and as many opportunities as we have from our perspective, though, until death takes them, we can hold out hope for their repentance. If that doesn't happen well, it's then that our author has some hard things to say. So what happens then, according to our passage, for the one who walks down this road and who never turns back? Well, our author tells us that eternal judgment follows, in verse thirty, “the Lord will judge his people.” Now, recall that our author throughout Hebrews has been in conversation with the Old Testament. Specifically, he's been in conversation with the Old Testament ceremonies and sacrifices and he's constantly been comparing and contrasting that system to what Christ has done to show that Christ Jesus is better than anything has come before. To show he's superior to any of that stuff. Now in our passage, he draws another contrast to show that while the excellencies of Jesus Christ far surpass anything of the sacrificial system of the Old Testament, and the judgments do as well. Notice in verse twenty-eight that our author tells us what happened. He reminds us what happened in that sacrificial system when someone willfully broke the law of Moses, if there were two or three witnesses and you were found guilty of breaking the law of Moses and the Old Testament, what happened? You died, death, capital punishment. For the one who rejects Christ, the one that the entire Old Testament law and sacrificial system pointed to, the consequences are worse. It's an eternal death. In the mid 1800s, there was a Russian by the name of Fyodor Dostoyevsky, who published a book in English that we know as “Notes from a Dead House”. It was a book that recounted Dostoyevsky, his four year imprisonment in a Siberian labor camp, that is a gulag. Now, throughout Dostoyevsky, his book, he's constantly giving us windows into the state of mind of his fellow prisoners. At one point, he narrates for us just how difficult prisoners had it when they initially were sentenced to their prison term and had to begin their prison sentence. Now, typically, Dostoyevsky tells us that when a prisoner was already in prison for a bit, they tended to accept their sentences. Very few times that they ever try to escape from prison or anything like that. Yet before a prisoner came to trial, before a prisoner came to prison while they were still on trial, some would go to irrational lengths to postpone their prison sentences because they couldn't take what was about to happen to them. Dostoevsky tells us a story where someone was apparently sentenced at trial to serve a minimum period of time in a labor camp, three years or so. After the trial and before they were shipped off to this Siberian labor camp, they would somehow commit another crime so that they'd have to be retried again. They buy themselves a few days, maybe a few weeks. Even the trial would have to start again and they'd be sentenced again. Now, this was a completely irrational move because ultimately the prisoners were handed either double or triple their prison sentence in the process, but for them, as long as they could delay judgment for a day, for two days, for a week and buy some time to some of these prisoners, thinking irrationally, it just didn't matter. Well, friends understand that to step away from Christ, to reject the gospel, to uproot yourself from the people of God, the best you can hope for is to delay judgment. Any decision we make to embrace our sin and live our lives apart from Christ may be a temporary distraction and may allow us to do what our sinful hearts really crave. But in the end, judgment will come, and any decision we make apart from coming back to Christ and embracing the gospel once again is as irrational as the prisoners and Dostoevsky's day. Now, maybe you know someone right now, or maybe this would even describe yourself where you have one foot in the door and one foot out. Nobody really knows that except for you, and the way out is looking more appealing by the day. Now, to be sure, we all have spiritually dry seasons in our life, but one of the functions of this passage, as we've said before, is to jolt us awake and recognize that there are very real spiritual and tragic consequences for walking away from Christ. So if that's the path that you right now are thinking about entertaining, to whatever degree you might be entertaining it, let this warning passage push you back on course, back into the hands of the one who was already judged for the sin of his people in the person of Jesus Christ. Hear this warning passage as a means of grace for your perseverance, because that's what it's intended to do. Now that our author has spoken these hard but necessary words for us to cling to. He ends for us with more of a note of encouragement as he reminds us of the equipment that we need as we live out the Christian life and persevere to the end. He tells us that the equipment we need is actually quite simple. It's an abiding faith in the promises of God. The Way of Endurance So this leads to our third point, the way of endurance. Beginning in verse thirty-two, we see that our author calls his readers to recount the former days. We see that in your text, but what he has in mind here aren't the former days of the Old Covenant, not the former days of Moses, days he's already commented so extensively about. Rather, he calls his audience to reflect upon their own personal history when they face a lot of pressure to throw in the towel on Jesus and on the church. They're looking at the text. We hear that sometimes these Christians in their past were publicly exposed to reproach and affliction. Another verb here indicates that whatever they went through, and we're not entirely sure it probably involves some kind of public shaming or mockery. Then in addition to suffering themselves, our author tells us that they also stood by their brothers and sisters who also suffered. They were partners with those who were so treated. Perhaps this is one of the ways they encouraged each other. As the author of Hebrews would have us do back in verse twenty-five. Nevertheless, we then learn in our passage that these Christians also had to endure. Yet one more thing they had to endure the plundering of their property, either through imperial edict or mob rule or both. Now again, we don't really know, this is actually an interesting historical window into the audience, the original readers of Hebrews. We ultimately don't know the specific persecution in view, but we do know that throughout the latter half of the first century, especially in Rome, Christians often had to face these sorts of things. They were frequent targets of slander. The Roman historian Tacitus, who wasn't a Christian at all, set around this time that Christians were a people who were engaged in quote, “a deadly and dangerous superstition”. They were also arrested often for just being Christians. The same historian Tacitus also reports that Christians in his own day were arrested on trumped up charges, one of the charges being, “hatred of the human race”. Christians sometimes did have their property plundered. A few centuries later, a historian looks back on the latter half of the first century when Emperor Démission reigned and tells us that Christians, certain Christians, were exiled just for being a Christian. Then when they were exiled, their property was confiscated by imperial edict in the process. So Christians endured a lot. These Christians endured a lot. Whatever the specific situation viewing these Christians, how did they endure? They endured, but how did they endure? Well, look, they joyfully accepted the plundering of their property. They took it in stride. They joyfully accepted the sufferings that were thrown their way. So why in the world would a Christian do that? Why in the world would they just take something like that? Well, according to our author, they endured this way because they knew that they had a better possession and an abiding one. They endured the loss that they suffered because they were confident that there was so much more to be gained in Christ. In short, they endured in the past because they had a real and abiding faith in the promises of God. If you're looking at your passage, you'll notice that then in verses thirty-seven and thirty-eight our author cites another Old Testament text, something he often does in Hebrews, as we've seen a number of times. This time he cites from Habakkuk 2:4. Habakkuk is one of the minor prophets in the Old Testament, and he's picking up on something that Habakkuk wrote. It's fitting that our author would quote from Habakkuk at this juncture because the prophet Habakkuk, in his own day some six hundred years earlier from when the author of Hebrews is writing, knew all too well issues of suffering and injustice. He's also writing to the people of God about issues of suffering and injustice and how to deal with some of those things. So from Habakkuk, our author takes what he had to say some 600 years earlier and applies it to the situation of his readers in the first century. What does he have to say? Well, first he tells them that the coming one will come and will not delay. In short, he tells them to be encouraged because despite the sufferings and injustice that they're dealing with in the present, Christ Jesus really is coming again. Injustice and suffering will not be ignored. It will not have the final word because Christ is coming again to make all things new. While we wait for the God of justice to bring all things to right, which he will do when Christ comes again, how does he call his readers to wait in the present? How does he call us to wait in the present? Well, that's the next thing he tells us where in verse thirty-eight, we learn, “my righteous one shall live by faith”. Friends, when we face evil in this world that places the church in the crosshairs and when the church abroad suffers for their faith, like the original readers of Hebrews suffered for their faith, there's a lot that we wish that we had to navigate that context. Perhaps you wish you had rhetorical persuasion as we speak into an irrational world, or legal muscle to fight back against laws and statutes that target the church, or even security to protect ourselves just in case violence spills over into the church, as it often does for the persecuted church around the world. While there are merits to walking through this sinful world with that kind of wisdom, according to our author, at the end of the day, the equipment that we need above everything else is pretty simple. It's steadfast and abiding faith in the promises of God. It was by faith that these same Christians endured the struggle that they had to face in the past, and it's by the same faith that they and we will endure in the present. To cite the Puritan John Owen, “Sincere faith will carry people through all difficulties, hazards and troubles to the certain enjoyment of eternal blessedness.” So ask yourself, is the object of your faith Jesus Christ? Understand that we can look like Christians and talk like Christians all we want.That's not going to get you through the kind of trials that our author wants to prepare us for only a faith that's supplied by Christ and abides in. Christ is going to carry us through whatever we're called to walk through in the future. So do you have that kind of steadfast and abiding faith in the promises of God at the end of the day? Friends, this is the way to persevere. This is the way to endure, it's faith. Application So as we conclude our sermon and prepare to come to the table and taste and see that the Lord is good, let me leave us with this. Friends rest in the certainty of God's power to preserve his church and his people rest in the certainty of God's power to preserve his church and his people. We pilgrim through a world where there are many things that seem volatile, whether it's the experience of a Christian leader who once seemed like such a bulwark in the faith suddenly fail and in a way that no one would have predicted, to close personal friends slowly drifting from the faith they want shared in common with you, to even something more severe outbursts of persecution that often arise throughout the world against the church. It's hard to find one thing under heaven that we can rest upon with certainty. Yet the gospel reminds us that because we have a God who is unchangeable. When he says to his church, as he does in Philippians 1:6 that, ” he who began a good work in you will bring it to completion on the day of Christ Jesus.” Well, we can rest and we can rest in certainty that what he has promised to do. The God who is unchangeable in his being, his essence, and his promises is faithful to accomplish. So maybe you're worried about the church abroad right now, worried how the church in a place like Afghanistan could ever endure amidst the current persecution they're facing. Or you're worried about the church at home and worried about what the church in America could be facing in the future and what that would mean for you and me, what that would even mean for Harvest Community Church? Or maybe you're worried about your own perseverance or the perseverance of people you love who you see drifting right now, maybe even towards the exit door? Well, probably about those things, be wise in the way that you walk in the world and the way you counsel people in those things, but also rest above everything else in the fact that God, who is unchangeable, will by no means abandon his church, nor will he abandon his people. Pray with me. Gracious, Heavenly Father, Lord, you have given us some hard words to consider, but words that we need to hear. Words about what it means to persevere in the Christian life. Things that you call us to lay hold of for our own perseverance and endurance of the Christian life. Lord, we confess that in many ways we've neglected these very good things that you've given us as a grace for us to endure. Father, we pray that for any among us who might be drifting right now, Lord, that you would pull them back, pull them back to embrace things like the local church and the means of grace that you dispense in the local church. Pull them back to experience the grace of the fellowship of the saints. Lord, would you remind us as we face a volatile world and are faced with things that seem so uncertain in this world that you are the God who infallibly holds your church and holds your people fast? We ask all this in Christ's name. Amen.

Tcast
Navigating the Dreamscape with Neuroscientist and Author, Sidarta Ribeiro

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 54:17


Why is there so much emphasis on the thoughts and actions that govern our day to day lives, but not as much on the ones that happen as we sleep?  It's difficult to understate the influence of modern technology because its effects are so tangible. We see how platforms like TARTLE are geared towards a clear end goal. We're connected to our smartphones and devices around the clock. But we seem to be forgetting about the first device and data set that we were given to work with: the human mind, and our subconscious. At most, dreams are an interesting icebreaker or topic for idle talk—but we think that they can mean something more. It is time to revisit how dreams can have an impact on the course of our lives, as well as that of the people around us.   Dreams: Our Most Ancient, Most Well-Developed Technology   Sidarta Ribeiro shared a personal experience with a fellow PhD candidate. One day, Sidarta Ribeiro needed a ride to the field center of Rockefeller University for an experiment. However, he was unable to push through with his activity because it was used by another candidate. This setback meant that he had to reschedule his experiment, which affected his productivity. Understandably, this affected Sidarta Ribeiro's perception of the person. He went to sleep feeling annoyed and irritated. However, he dreamt of a scenario where he angrily confronted the person and ended up getting physically hurt. When he woke up, he found himself in the right mindset and mood to peacefully discuss what happened with his colleague, and they made amends. This is a personal example of how dreams can be used to simulate instances of the future using references that we have made in the past. It can help guide us and give us insight. Giving the mind some space to process what has happened throughout our day can have some benefits for our wellbeing.   Bringing Back the Focus to the Self   Alex mentioned how, surprisingly, we only spend 55 percent of our lives awake. This means that if we don't pay attention to our dreams, we're missing out on almost half of our entire life experience In the modern world, there is a growing dichotomy between inner work and outer work that we need to bring our attention to— especially when we put so much value on what is external, but choose to forego focused introspection on the self. Sidarta Ribeiro pointed out that today's research into mental health and wellbeing appear to be closely intertwined with drugs that induce a dream-like state. This could be the first step in a collective effort to bring back emphasis on our subconscious. It's time to return to our inner world and start using dreams, one of our most ancient technologies, to our advantage once more.   Dreams as a Gamechanger Throughout History   The dream state has had a massive impact on the course of history. One solid example is the Oracle of Delphi, a widely revered high priestess of the Temple of Apollo who gave predictions and guidance to both individuals and city-states. Her words influenced the decisions of important figureheads such as Aegeus, the king of Athens; Croesus, the king of Lydia; and Alexander the Great, conqueror of the ancient world. Ancient and contemporary Mayan religion also posited that dreams are sacred, because they functioned as portals that helped an individual connect with their ancestors for guidance. The dream state is closely intertwined in the definition of spirituality across several religions and concepts of faith.  Today, the role that our dreams fulfilled in old societies is now being fulfilled by a variety of different mechanisms and technologies. Amidst all this progress, it's time to take a break and ask ourselves: do we like where we're going, now that we're leaving our subconscious in the dust?   Closing Thoughts: Human Progress Through the Dream State   We are consistently pressured to maximize our productivity and levels of efficiency. The technologies we develop are influencing us to think of our value according to the volume of our work. While our reliance on the dream state has, to a large extent, been diminished due to our increased proficiency in technical knowledge, we forget to ask ourselves about the implications of this change. It is undeniable that our subconscious has played a massive role—not just in the individual lives of ordinary people, but in the rise and fall of civilizations. The dream state is a data mine that we, as a collective, are slowly losing out on. It's an opportunity for introspection that can help us make better decisions. Most importantly, it helps us regulate our wellbeing through proper rest and recreation. What's your data worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Your Secret Is Safe With Me
Making Difficult Decisions

Your Secret Is Safe With Me

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 25:48


Dr. Marie Murphy is a Relationship Coach, specializing in helping people who are having affairs make decisions on how to move forward — without judgment. She has a Ph.D. in Sociology with an emphasis in Sexuality from the University of California, San Diego, and has been teaching sex education since her high school years. Dr. Murphy is also a yoga instructor and has previously taught meditation. In this episode… Does making a decision about your infidelity situation seem like an unfathomable problem? How can you make the best choice for yourself in the present moment? Understandably, many people do not want to face the consequences of their difficult choices. They tend to identify the uncomfortable emotions that come with these decisions as unfavorable — but Dr. Marie Murphy asks: what if these feelings aren't inherently negative? If you can recognize the inevitable discomfort of these emotions, you can make decisions that better align with your desires and priorities. In this episode of Your Secret is Safe With Me, Dr. Marie Murphy discusses how to deal with the difficult decisions in front of you. Listen in as Dr. Murphy talks about recognizing your present discomfort, honoring and cultivating your personal growth, and efficiently moving in the direction of your desires. Stay tuned.

Beltway Banthas: Star Wars, Politics & More
Named your fear must be, before banish it you can (Reflections on How The Force Can Fix The World)

Beltway Banthas: Star Wars, Politics & More

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 7:46


We live in a frightening time. Star Wars is steadfast in reminds us that Fear is the start of a road toward darkness. Fear leads to Anger, Anger leads to Hate, and Hate leads to Suffering. So says Yoda to a young Anakin Skywalker who admitted he missed his Mother. Understandably so, he was 9 years old and away from her and home for the first time in his life when he stood in the Jedi Council chamber on Coruscant. Surrounded by beady eyes and suspicion. What are you really afraid of? This is a meditation on FEAR, and you need to know your fear. name your fear and spend time reflecting on what it is that lies beneath the thing keeping you up at night. This is excerpted from the new book by Stephen Kent, How The Force Can Fix The World. Out on TUESDAY November 9th. Buy it here! https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08Y8LNNG8?tag=hacboogrosit-20

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.05.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 59:44


Sins Of Omission: The AZT Scandal By Celia Farber Spin Nov. 1989 On a cold January day in 1987, inside one of the brightly-lit meeting rooms of the monstrous FDA building, a panel of 11 top Aids doctors pondered a very difficult decision. They had been asked by the FDA to consider giving lightning-quick approval to a highly toxic drug about which there was very little information. Clinically called Zidovudine, but nicknamed AZT after its components, the drug was said to have shown a dramatic effect on the survival of Aids patients. The study that had brought the panel together had set the medical community abuzz. It was the first flicker of hope - people were dying much faster on the placebo than on the drug.  But there were tremendous concerns about the new drug. It had actually been developed a quarter of a century earlier as a cancer chemotherapy, but was shelved and forgotten because it was so toxic, very expensive to produce, and totally ineffective against cancer. Powerful, but unspecific, the drug was not selective in its cell destruction.  Drug companies around the world were sifting through hundreds of compounds in the race to find a cure, or at least a treatment, for Aids. Burroughs Wellcome, a subsidiary of Wellcome, a British drug company, emerged as the winner. By chance, they sent the failed cancer drug, then known as Compound S, to the National Cancer Institute along with many others to see if it could slay the Aids dragon, HIV. In the test tube at least, it did.  At the meeting, there was a lot of uncertainty and discomfort with AZT. The doctors who had been consulted knew that the study was flawed and that the long-range effects were completely unknown. But the public was almost literally baying at the door. Understandably, there was immense pressure on the FDA to approve AZT even more quickly than they had approved thalidomide in the mid-60s, which ended up causing drastic birth defects.  Everybody was worried about this one. To approve it, said Ellen Cooper, an FDA director, would represent a "significant and potentially dangerous departure from our normal toxicology requirements."  Just before approving the drug, one doctor on the panel, Calvin Kunin, summed up their dilemma. "On the one hand," he said, "to deny a drug which decreases mortality in a population such as this would be inappropriate. On the other hand, to use this drug widely, for areas where efficacy has not been demonstrated, with a potentially toxic agent, might be disastrous."  "We do not know what will happen a year from now," said panel chairman Dr. Itzhak Brook. "The data is just too premature, and the statistics are not really well done. The drug could actually be detrimental." A little later, he said he was also "struck by the facts that AZT does not stop deaths. Even those who were switched to AZT still kept dying."  "I agree with you," answered another panel member, "There are so many unknowns. Once a drug is approved there is no telling how it could be abused. There's no going back."  Burroughs Wellcome reassured the panel that they would provide detailed two-year follow-up data, and that they would not let the drug get out of its intended parameters: as a stopgap measure for very sick patients.  Dr. Brook was not won over by the promise. "If we approve it today, there will not be much data. There will be a promise of data," he predicted, "but then the production of data will be hampered." Brook's vote was the only one cast against approval.  'There was not enough data, not enough follow-up," Brook recalls. "Many of the questions we asked the company were answered by, 'We have not analyzed the data yet,' or 'We do not know.' I felt that there was some promising data, but I was very worried about the price being paid for it. The side effects were so very severe. It was chemotherapy. Patients were going to need blood transfusions. That's very serious.  "The committee was tending to agree with me," says Brook, "that we should wait a little bit, be more cautious. But once the FDA realized we were intending to reject it, they applied political pressure. At about 4 p.m., the head of the FDA's Center for Drugs and Biologics asked permission to speak, which is extremely unusual. Usually they leave us alone. But he said to us, 'Look, if you approve the drug, we can assure you that we will work together with Burroughs Wellcome and make sure the drug is given to the right people.' It was like saying 'please do it.'"  Brad Stone, FDA press officer, was at that meeting. He says he doesn't recall that particular speech, but that there is nothing 'unusual" about FDA officials making such speeches at advisory meetings. "The people in that meeting approved the drug because the data the company had produced proved it was prolonging life. Sure it was toxic, but they concluded that the benefits clearly outweighed the risks."  The meeting ended. AZT, which several members of the panel still felt uncomfortable with and feared could be a time bomb, was approved.  Flash forward: August 17, 1989. Newspapers across America banner-headlined that AZT had been "proven to be effective in HIV antibody-positive, asymptomatic and early ARC patients," even through one of the panel's main concerns was that the drug should only be used in a last-case scenario for critically-ill AIDS patients, due to the drug's extreme toxicity. Dr. Anthony Fauci, head of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), was now pushing to expand prescription.  The FDA's traditional concern had been thrown to the wind. Already the drug had spread to 60 countries and an estimated 20.000 people. Not only had no new evidence allayed the initial concerns of the panel, but the follow-up data, as Dr. Brook predicted, had fallen by the waysite. The beneficial effects of the drug had been proven to be temporary. The toxicity, however stayed the same.  The majority of those in the AIDS afflicted and medical communities held the drug up as the first breakthrough on AIDS. For better or worse, AZT had been approved faster than any drug in FDA history, and activists considered it a victory. The price paid for the victory, however, was that almost all government drug trials, from then on, focused on AZT - while over 100 other promising drugs were left uninvestigated.  Burroughs Wellcome stock went through the roof when the announcement was made. At a price of $8,000 per patient per year (not including blood work and transfusions), AZT is the most expensive drug ever marketed. Burroughs Wellcome's gross profits for next year are estimated at $230 million. Stock market analysts predict that Burroughs Wellcome may be selling as much as $2 billion worth of AZT, under the brand name Retrovir, each year by the mid-1990s - matching Burroughs Wellcome's total sales for all its products last year.  AZT is the only antiretroviral drug that has received FDA approval for treatment of AIDS since the epidemic began 10 years ago, and the decision to approve it was based on a single study that has long been declared invalid.  The study was intended to be a "double-blind placebo-controlled study," the only kind of study that can effectively prove whether or not a drug works. In such a study, neither patient nor doctor is supposed to know if the patient is getting the drug or a placebo. In the case of AZT, the study became unblinded on all sides, after just a few weeks.  Both sides of the contributed to the unblinding. It became obvious to doctors who was getting what because AZT causes such severe side effects that AIDS per se does not. Furthermore, a routine blood count known as CMV, which clearly shows who is on the drug and who is not, wasn't whited out in the reports. Both of these facts were accepted and confirmed by both the FDA and Burroughs Wellcome, who conducted the study.  Many of the patients who were in the trial admitted that they had analyzed their capsules to find out whether they were getting the drug. If they weren't, some bought the drug on the underground market. Also, the pills were supposed to be indistinguishable by taste, but they were not. Although this was corrected early on, the damage was already done. There were also reports that patients were pooling pills out solidarity to each other. The study was so severely flawed that its conclusions must be considered, by the most basic scientific standards, unproven.  The most serious problem with the original study, however, is that it was never completed. Seventeen weeks in the study, when more patients had died in the placebo group, the study was stopped short, and all subjects were put on AZT, no scientific study can ever be conducted to prove unequivocally whether AZT does prolong life.  Dr. Brook, who voted against approval, warned at the time that AZT, being the only drug available for doctors to prescribe to AIDS patients, would probably have a runaway effect. Approving it prematurely, he said, would be like "letting the genie out of the bottle."  Brook pointed out that since the drug is a form of chemotherapy, it should only be prescribed by doctors who have experience with chemotherapeutic drugs. Because of the most severe toxic effects of AZT - cell depletion of the bone marrow - patients would need frequent blood transfusions. As it happened, AZT was rampantly prescribed as soon as it was released, way beyond its purported parameters. The worst-case scenario had come true: Doctors interviewed by the New York Times later in 1987 revealed that they were already giving AZT to healthy people who had tested positive for antibodies to HIV.  The FDA's function is to weigh a drug's efficacy against its potential hazards. The equation is simple and obvious: A drug must unquestionably repair more than it damages, otherwise the drug itself may cause more harm than the disease it is supposed to fight. Exactly what many doctors and scientists fear is happening with AZT.  AZT was singled out among hundreds of compounds when Dr. Sam Broder, the head of the National Cancer Institutes (NCI), found that it "inhibited HIV viral replication in vitro." AIDS is considered a condition of immune suppression caused by the HIV virus replicating and eating its way into T-4 cells, which are essential to the immune system. HIV is a retrovirus which contains an enzyme called reverse transcriptase that converts viral RNA to DNA. AZT was thought to work by interrupting this DNA synthesis, thus stopping further replication of the virus.  While it was always known that the drug was exceedingly toxic, the first study concluded that 'the risk/benefits ratio was in favour of the patient."  In the study that won FDA approval for AZT, the one fact that swayed the panel of judges was that the AZT group outlived the placebo group by what appeared to be a landslide. The ace card of the study, the one that cancelled out the issue of the drug's enormous toxicity, was that 19 persons had died in the placebo group and only one in the AZT group. The AZT recipients were also showing a lower incidence of opportunistic infections.  While the data staggered the panel that approved the drug, other scientists insisted that it meant nothing - because it was so shabbily gathered, and because of the unblinding. Shortly after the study was stopped, the death rate accelerated in the AZT group. "There was no great difference after a while," says Dr. Brook, "between the treated and the untreated group."  "That study was so sloppily done that it really didn't mean much," says Dr. Joseph Sonnabend, a leading New York City AIDS doctor.  Dr. Harvey Bialy, scientific editor of the journal Biotechnology, is stunned by the low quality of science surrounding AIDS research. When asked if he had seen any evidence of the claims made for AZT, that it "prolongs life" in AIDS patients, Bialy said, "No. I have not seen a published study that is rigorously done, analyzed and objectively reported."  Bialy, who is also a molecular biologist, is horrified by the widespread use of AZT, not just because it is toxic, but because, he insists, the claims its widespread use are based upon are false. "I can't see how this drug could be doing anything other than making people very sick," he says.  The scientific facts about AZT and AIDS are indeed astonishing. Most ironically, the drug has been found to accelerate the very process it was said to prevent: the loss of T-4 cells.  "Undeniably, AZT kills T-4 cells [white blood cells vital to the immune system]" says Bialy. "No one can argue with that. AZT is a chain-terminating nucleotide, which means that it stops DNA replication. It seeks out any cell that is engaged in DNA replication and kills it. The place where most of this replication is taking place is the bone marrow. That's why the most common and severe side effect of the drug is bone marrow toxicity. That is why they [patients] need blood transfusions."  AZT has been aggressively and repeatedly marketed as a drug that prolongs survival in AIDS patients because it stops the HIV virus from replicating and spreading to healthy cells. But, says Bialy: "There is no good evidence that HIV actively replicates in a person with AIDS, and if there's isn't much HIV replication in a person with AIDS, and if there isn't much HIV replication to stop, it's mostly killing healthy cells."  University of California at Berkeley scientist Dr. Peter Duesberg drew the same conclusion in a paper published in the Proceedings, the journal of the National Academy of Sciences. Duesberg, whose paper addressed his contention that HIV is not a sufficient cause for AIDS, wrote: "Even if HIV were to cause AIDS, it would hardly be legitimate target for AZT therapy, because in 70 to 100 percent of antibody positive persons, proviral DNA is not detectable... and its biosynthesis has never been observed."  As a chemotherapeutic drug, explained Duesberg, explained Duesberg, AZT "kills dividing blood cells and other cells," and is thus "directly immunosuppressive."  "The cell is almost a million-fold bigger target than the virus, so the cell will be much, much more sensitive," says Duesberg. "Only very few cells, about one in 10,000 are actively making the virus containing DNA, so you must kill incredibly large numbers of cells to inhibit the virus. This kind of treatment could only theoretically help if you have a massive infection, which is not the case with AIDS. Meanwhile, they're giving this drug that ends up killing millions of lymphocytes [white blood cells]. It's beyond me how that could possibly be beneficial."  "It doesn't really kill them," Burroughs Wellcome scientists Sandra Lehrman argues. "You don't necessarily have to destroy the cell, you can just change the function of it. Furthermore, while the early data said that the only very few cells were infected, new data says that there may be more cells infected. We have more sensitive detection techniques now."  "Changes their function? From what - functioning to not functioning? Another example of mediocre science," says Bialy. "The 'sensitive detection technique' to which Dr. Lehrman refers, PCR, is a notoriously unreliable one upon which to base quantitative conclusions."  When specific questions about the alleged mechanisms of AZT are asked, the answers are long, contradictory, and riddled with unknowns. Every scientific point raised about the drug is eventually answered with the blanket response, "The drug is not perfect, but it's all we have right now." About the depletion of T-4 cells and other white cells, Lehrman says, "We don't know why T-4 cells go up at first, and then go down. That is one of the drug mechanisms that we are trying to understand."  When promoters of AZT are pressed on key scientific points, whether at the NIH, FDA, Burroughs Wellcome or an AIDS organization, they often become angry. The idea that the drug is "doing something," even though this is invariably followed with irritable admissions that there are "mechanisms about the drug and disease we don't understand," is desperately clung to. It is as if, in the eye of the AIDS storm, the official, government-agency sanctioned position is immunized against critique. Skepticism and challenge, so essential to scientific endeavour, is not welcome in the AZT debate, where it is arguably needed more than anywhere else.  The toxic effects of AZT, particularly bone marrow suppression and anemia, are so severe that up to 50 percent of all AIDS and ARC patients cannot tolerate it and have to be taken off it. In the approval letter that Burroughs Wellcome sent to the FDA, all of 50 additional side effects of AZT, aside from the most common ones, were listed. These included: loss of mental acuity, muscle spasms, rectal bleeding and tremors.  Anemia one of AZT's common side effects, is the depletion of red blood cells, and according to Duesberg, "Red blood cells are the one thing you cannot do without. Without red cells, you cannot pick up oxygen."  Fred, a person with AIDS, was put on AZT and suffered such severe anemia from the drug he had to be taken off it. In an interview in the AIDS handbook Surviving and Thriving With AIDS, he described what anemia feels like to the editor Michael Callen: "I live in a studio and my bathroom is a mere five-step walk from my be. I would just lie there for two hours; I couldn't get up to take those five steps. When I was taken to the hospital, I had to have someone come over to dress me. It's that kind of severe fatigue... The quality of my life was pitiful... I've never felt so bad... I stopped the AZT and the mental confusion, the headaches, the pains in the neck, the nausea, all disappeared within a 24-hour period."  "I feel very good at this point," Fred went on. "I feel like the quality of my life was a disaster two weeks ago. And it really was causing a great amount of fear in me, to the point where I was taking sleeping pills to calm down. I was so worried. I would totally lose track of what I was saying in the middle of a sentence. I would lose my directions on the street."  "Many AIDS patients are anemic even before they receive the drug." Says Burroughs Wellcome's Dr. Lehrman, "because HIV itself can infect the bone marrow and cause anemia."  This argument betrays a bizarre reasoning. If AIDS patients are already burdened with the problems such as immune suppression, bone marrow toxicity and anemia, is compounding these problems an improvement?  "Yes AZT is a form of chemotherapy." Says the man who invented the compound a quarter-century ago, Jerome Horowitz. "It is cytotoxic, and as such, it causes bone marrow toxicity and anemia. There are problems with the drug. It's not perfect. But I don't think anybody would agree that AZT is of no use. People can holler from now until doomsday that it is toxic, but you have to go with the results."  The results, finally and ironically, are what damns AZT. Several studies on the clinical effects of AZT - including the one that Burroughs Wellcome's approval was based on - have drawn the same conclusion: that AZT is effective for a few months, but that its effect drops of sharply after that. Even the original AZT study showed that T-4 cells went up for a while and then plummeted. HIV levels went down, and then came back up. This fact was well-known when the advisory panel voted for approval. As panel member Dr. Stanley Lemon said in the meeting, "I am left with the nagging thought after seeing several of these slides, that after 16 to 24 weeks - 12 to 16 weeks, I guess - the effect seems to be declining."  A follow-up meeting, two years after the original Burroughs Wellcome study, was scheduled to discuss the long range effects of AZT, and the survival statistics. As one doctor present at that meeting in May 1988 recall, "They hadn't followed up the study. Anything that looked beneficial was gone within half a year. All they had were some survival statistics averaging 44 weeks. The p24 didn't pan out and there was no persistent improvement in the T-4 cells."  HIV levels in the blood are measured by an antigen called p24. Burroughs Wellcome made the claim that AZT lowered this level, that is, lowered the amount of HIV in the blood. At the first FDA meeting, Burroughs Wellcome emphasized how the drug had "lowered" the p24 levels; at the follow-up meeting, they didn't mention it.  As that meeting was winding down, Dr. Michael Lange, head of the AIDS program at St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital in New York, spoke up about this. "The claim of AZT is made on the fact that it is supposed to have an antiviral effect," he said to Burroughs Wellcome, "and on this we have seen no data at all... Since there is a report in the Lancet [a leading British medical journal] that after 20 weeks or so, in many patients p24 came back, do you have any data on that?"  They didn't.  "What counts is the bottom line," one of the scientists representing Burroughs Wellcome summed up, "the survival, the neurologic function, the absence of progression and the quality of life, all of which are better. Whether you call it better because of some antiviral effect, or some other antibacterial effect, they are still better."  Dr. Lange suggested that the drug may be effective the same way a simple anti-inflammatory, such as aspirin, is effective. An inexpensive, nontoxic drug called Indomecithin, he pointed out, might serve the same function, without the devastating side effects.  One leading AIDS researcher, who was part of the FDA approval process, says today: "Does AZT do anything? Yes, it does. But the evidence that it does something against HIV is really not there."  "There have always been drugs that we use without knowing exactly how they work," says Nobel Prize winner Walter Gilbert. "The really important thing to look at is the clinical effect. Is the drug helping or isn't it?"  "I'm living proof that AZT works," says one person with ARC on AZT. "I've been on it for two years now, and I'm certainly healthier than I was two years ago. It's not a cure-all, it's not a perfect drug, but it is effective. It's slowing down the progression of the disease."  "Sometimes I feel like swallowing Drano," says another. "I mean, sometimes I have problems swallowing. I just don't like the idea of taking something that foreign to my body. But every six hours, I've got to swallow it. Until something better comes along, this is what is available to me."  "I am absolutely convinced that people enjoy a better quality of life and survive longer who do not take AZT," says Gene Fedorko, President of Health Education AIDS Liaison (HEAL). "I think it's horrible the way people are bullied by their doctors to take the drug. We get people coming to us shaking and crying because their doctors said they'll die if they don't take AZT. That is an absolute lie." Fedorko has drawn his conclusion from years of listening to the stories of people struggling to survive AIDS at HEAL's weekly support group.  "I wouldn't take AZT if you paid me," says Michael Callen, cofounder of New York City's PWA coalition, Community Research Initiative, and editor of several AIDS journals. Callen has survived AIDS for over seven years without the help of AZT. "I've gotten the shit kicked out me for saying this, but I think using AZT is like aiming a thermonuclear warhead at a mosquito. The overwhelming majority of long-term survivors I've known have chosen not to take AZT."  The last surviving patient from the original AZT trial, according to Burroughs Wellcome, died recently. When he died, he had been on AZT for three and one-half years. He was the longest surviving AZT recipient. The longest surviving AIDS patient overall, not on AZT, has lived for eight and one-half years.  An informal study of long-term survivors of AIDS followed 24 long-term survivors, all of whom had survived AIDS more than six years. Only one of them had recently begun taking AZT.  In the early days, AZT was said to extend lives. In actual fact, there is simply no solid evidence that AZT prolongs life.  "I think AZT does prolong life in most people," says Dr. Bruce Montgomery of the State University of New York City at Stony Brook, who is completing a study on AZT. "There are not very many long-tern survivors, and we really don't know why they survive. It could be luck. But most people are not so lucky."  "AZT does seem to help many patients," says Dr. Bernard Bahari, a New York City AIDS physician and researcher, "but it's very hard to determine whether it actually prolongs life."  "Many of the patients I see choose not to take AZT," says Dr. Don Abrams of San Francisco General Hospital. "I've been impressed that survival and lifespan are increasing for all people with AIDS. I think it has a lot to do with aerosolized Pentamidine [a drug that treats pneumocystis carinii pneumonia]. There's also the so-called plague effect, the fact that people get stronger and stronger when a disease hits a population. The patients I see today are not as fragile as the early patients were."  "Whether you live or die with AIDS is a function of how well your doctor treats you, not of AZT," says Dr. Joseph Sonnabend, one of New York's City's first and most reputable AIDS doctor, whose patients include many long-term survivors, although he has never prescribed AZT. Sonnabend was one of the first to make the simple observation that AIDS patients should be treated for their diseases, not just for their HIV infection.  Several studies have concluded that AZT has no effect on the two most common opportunistic AIDS infections, Pneumocystic Carinii Pneumonia (PCP) and Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS). The overwhelming majority of AIDS patients die of PCP, for which there has been an effective treatment for decades. This year, the FDA finally approved aerosolized Pentamidine for AIDS. A recent Memorial Sloan Kettering study concluded the following: By 15 months, 80% of people on AZT not receiving Pentamidine had a recurring episode. "All those deaths in the AZT study were treatable," Sonnabend says. "They weren't deaths from AIDS, they were deaths from treatable conditions. They didn't even do autopsies for that study. What kind of faith can one have in these people?"  "If there's any resistance to AZT in the general public at all, it's within the gay community of New York," says the doctor close to the FDA approval, who asked to remain anonymous. "The rest of the country has been brainwashed into thinking this drug really does that much. The data has all been manipulated by people who have a lot vested in AZT."  "If AIDS were not the popular disease that it is - the money-making and career-making machine - these people could not get away with that kind of shoddy science," says Bialy. "In all of my years in science I have never seen anything this atrocious." When asked if he thought it was at all possible that people have been killed as a result of AZT poisoning rather then AIDS he answered: "It's more than possible."  August 17, 1989: The government has announced that 1.4 million healthy, HIV antibody-positive Americans could "benefit" from taking AZT, even though they show no symptoms of disease. New studies have "proven" that AZT is effective in stopping the progression of AIDS in asymptomatic and early ARC cases. Dr. Fauci, the head of NIH, proudly announced that a trial that has been going on for "two years" had "clearly shown" that early intervention will keep AIDS at bay. Anyone who has antibodies to HIV and less than 500 T-4 cells should start taking AZT at once, he said. That is approximately 650,000 people. 1.4 million Americans are assumed HIV antibody-positive, and eventually all of them may need to take AZT so they don't get sick, Fauci contended.  The leading newspapers didn't seem to think it unusual that there was no existing copy of the study, but rather a breezy two-pages press release from the NIH. When SPIN called the NIH asking for a copy of the study, we were told that it was "still being written." We asked a few questions about the numbers. According to the press release, 3,200 early AARC and asymptomatic patients were devided into two groups, one AZT and one placebo, and followed for two years. The two groups were distinguished by T-4 cell counts; one group had less than 500, the other more than 500. These two were then divided into three groups each: high-dose AZT, low-dose AZT, and placebo. In the group with more than 500 T-4 cells, AZT had no effect. In the other group, it was concluded that low-dose AZT was the most effective, followed by high-dose. All in all, 36 out of 900 developed AIDS in the two AZT groups combined, and 38 out of 450 in the placebo group. "HIV-positive patients are twice as likely to get AIDS if they don't take AZT," the press declared.  However, the figures are vastly misleading. When we asked how many patients were actually enrolled for a full two years, the NIH said they did not know, but that the average time of participation was one year, not two.  "It's terribly dishonest the way they portrayed those numbers," says Dr. Sonnabend. "If there were 60 people in the trial those numbers would mean something, but if you calculate what the percentage is out of 3,200, the difference becomes minute between the two groups. It's nothing. It's hit or miss, and they make it look like it's terribly significant."  The study boasted that AZT is much more effective and less toxic at one-third the dosage than has been used for three years. That's the good news. The bad news is that thousands have already been walloped with 1,500 milligrams of AZT and possibly even died of toxic poisoning - and now we're hearing that one third of the dose would have done?  With all that remains so uncertain about the effects of AZT, it seems criminal to advocate expanding its usage to healthy people, particularly since only a minuscule percentage of the HIV-infected population have actually developed ARC or AIDS.  Burroughs Wellcome has already launched testing of AZT in asymptomatic hospital workers, pregnant women, and in children, who are getting liquid AZT. The liquid is left over from an aborted trial, and given to the children because they can mix it with water - children don't like to swallow pills. It has also been proposed that AZT be given to people who do not yet even test positive for HIV antibodies, but are "at risk."  "I'm convinced that if you gave AZT to a perfectly healthy athlete," says Fedorko, "he would be dead in five years."  In December 1988, the Lancet published a study that Burroughs Wellcome and the NIH do not include in their press kits. It was more expansive than the original AZT study and followed patients longer. It was not conducted in the United States, but in France, at the Claude Bernard Hospital in Paris, and concluded the same thing about AZT that Burroughs Wellcome's study did, except Burroughs Wellcome called their results "overwhelmingly positive," and the French doctors called theirs "disappointing." The French study found, once again, that AZT was too toxic for most to tolerate, had no lasting effect on HIV blood levels, and left the patients with fewer T-4 cells than they started with. Although they noticed a clinical improvement at first, they concluded that "by six months, these values had returned to their pretreatment levels and several opportunistic infections, malignancies and deaths occurred."  "Thus the benefits of AZT are limited to a few months for ARC and AIDS patients," the Fench team concluded. After a few months, the study found, AZT was completely ineffective.  The news that AZT will soon be prescribed to asymptomatic people has left many leading AIDS doctors dumbfounded and furious. Every doctor and scientist I asked felt that it was highly unprofessional and reckless to announce a study with no data to look at, making recommendations with such drastic public health implications. "This simply does not happen," says Bialy. "The government is reporting scientific facts before they've been reviewed? It's unheard of."  "It's beyond belief," says Dr. Sonnabend in a voice tinged with desperation. "I don't know what to do. I have to go in and face an office full of patients asking for AZT. I'm terrified. I don't know what to do as a responsible physician. The first study was ridiculous. Margaret Fishl, who has done both of these studies, obviously doesn't know the first thing about clinical trials. I don't trust her. Or the others. They're simply not good enough. We're being held hostage by second-rate scientists. We let them get away with the first disaster; now they're doing it again."  "It's a momentous decision to say to people, 'if you're HIV-positive and your T4-cells are below 500 start taking AZT,'" says the doctor who wished to remain anonymous. "I know dozens of people that I've seen personally every few months for several years now who have been in that state for more than five years, and have not progressed to any disease."  "I'm ashamed of my colleagues," Sonnabend laments. "I'm embarrassed. This is such shoddy science it's hard to believe nobody is protesting. Damned cowards. The name of the game is protect your grants, don't open your mouth. It's all about money... it's grounds for just following the party line and not being critical, when there are obviously financial and political forces that are driving this."  When Duesberg heard the latest announcement, he was particularly stunned over the reaction of Gay Men's Health Crisis President Richard Dunne, who said that GMHC now urged "everybody to get tested," and of course those who test positive to go on AZT. "These people are running into the gas chambers," says Duesberg. "Himmler would have been so happy if only the Jews were this cooperative." 

Daily Emunah Podcast - Daily Emunah By Rabbi David Ashear

I read a mashal which conveys a very important lesson. A tree was once asked how come when it gets hit by an ax, we don't hear any cries coming from it. Yet, when the very same ax hits a pole made out of metal, there is a very loud cry that can be heard from a distance. The tree answered, “The reason is because I am wood and the ax is metal and we have no connection with each other, so the pain it tries to inflict upon me doesn't hurt so much. But when metal hits metal, they are in the same family; they are brothers. And when a brother gives pain to a brother, it hurts so much more.” The Jewish People are one family, we are all brothers and sisters and, therefore, when one Jew hurts another, it's very painful. And when there's even a closer relationship, like a blood relative, the pain caused from a machloket can be unbearable. We are all yearning for Mashiach . Chazal have told us that machloket is holding him back and, unfortunately, there are still so many people that have animosity towards each other, especially amongst family members. There is always a reason why someone believes his situation is different and he is allowed to be in a machloket . And that is one of the reasons why we are still in exile. Many of the family disputes have resulted over monetary issues, whether it is a family business that broke up with one side feeling cheated, or a family member tampering with an inheritance, or family members being bitter that one of them has more than the others and is not helping the others who are in need, and the list goes on. We must constantly remind ourselves, no matter what the causes seem to be, our financial status is determined only by Hashem. Nobody could take money that is destined for us. Even when it seems that someone used his free will to take money that was supposed to be ours, it's not true. If we're meant to get it, Hashem will give it to us one way or another. No one can take what's ours. Our job is to use our emunah to always maintain peace and harmony. That is the goal – shalom. If we have to give up money to maintain shalom, it only makes the mitzvah that much greater. Giving up money for shalom is a great feat. If the money was meant for us, we'll get it back and if it wasn't meant for us, it wouldn't have stayed with us anyway. A man I know recently told the following personal story. When his father passed away, he and his siblings received a copy of the will. Regarding the estate, the father left an overwhelming majority of the money to this man, his son, while the other siblings were to divide the rest equally. He was the only boy, and he had multiple sisters. Understandably, all of the sisters and their families were very angry over this division and they had a lot of resentment toward their brother. He knew he was entitled to the money because that was the wish of his father, but he also knew that it would result in an everlasting family machloket . He said he had a big decision to make – take the money and lose his family or give away the money and keep his family. His father was a wealthy man and there was a lot of money at stake here. He decided that if he would have a family machloket , it would only cause the Shechina to become distant from them and without the Shechina , there would be no blessing in the money anyway. He hired a lawyer and redivided the entire estate equally, surrendering $7 million to maintain shalom. Today, he has a wonderful relationship with all of his siblings and their families. P.S. Within a year of his decision to give up that money, he made a business deal that earned him a totally unexpected profit of over $7 million. The way it happened made it so obvious that Hashem was blessing him for the efforts he made to maintain shalom. He tries to relate this message to as many people as he can – keeping shalom keeps the Shechina close to a person and with the Shechina we have beracha . Machloket drives away the Shechina and without the Shechina we have nothing. We could all internalize this lesson to try and bring about more peace between our brothers and sister in Klal Yisrael and, all the more so, in our immediate families.

Get Invested with Bushy Martin
191. Steve Baxter on investing in startups

Get Invested with Bushy Martin

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 78:10


We're taking the journey into the brave new world of startups and startup investing, continuing the conversation with successful startup founder, tech startup investor and Shark Tank star Steve Baxter. Last week we delved into the entrepreneurial world as we followed Steve's own journey to startup success and what it takes to be a successful entrepreneur.  This week we take this to the next level to consider what makes a successful startup and how you can go about evaluating and investing in them. According to recent research, the failure rate for a venture fund portfolio is 40% to 50% in a given year, and 90% of all companies invested in will not make it beyond the 10 year mark. So the notion that only one in 10 venture capital investments will succeed is industry expectation. But the 10% of companies that do make it big can return many thousands of percent to investors. Understandably, typical venture deals are structured over 10 years until exit. The ideal exit strategy is for the company to go public via an initial public offering (IPO), which can generate the out-sized returns expected from taking on such risk. Other exit strategies that are less desirable include being acquired by another company or remaining as a private, profitable venture. So as an investment class, startups are an area of big risks with the slim probability of big rewards. So how can investors be successful at the startup game? This is where Steve Baxter comes in. As you already know if you listened to last episode's part 1 chat, Steve became a celebrity startup investor as a Shark on the popular TV Show Shark Tank following his personal startup founder success with PIPE Networks, which was acquired for a whopping $373 million. Steve now runs TEN13, an investment syndicate platform for sophisticated investors to invest alongside him and the experienced Transition Level Investments team. Unlike many venture capitalists, Steve puts his own cash on the dash to the tune of an average of 15% to 20% of every seed deal. Enjoy startup investing insights from one of the best in the business. Steve's book recommendation: Ruins Of The Earth by Hopper and Chaney TEN13: So If you're a sophisticated investor looking to diversify your portfolio and invest in top calibre technology companies, reach out to Steve and his high calibre TEN13 investment team who undertake exhaustive due diligence before they invest. Get ‘Self, Health and Wealth' wisdom in your inbox: Join me and many other like minded investors in our Get Invested community right now.  I send a free and exclusive monthly email full of practical ‘Self, Health and Wealth' wisdom that our current Freedom Fighter subscribers can't wait to get each month. It's full of investment and lifestyle tips, my personal book recommendations, apps I use to enhance life and so much more. Just visit bushymartin.com.au and sign up at the bottom of the page … because this is just the beginning! Get Invested is the leading weekly podcast for Australians who want to learn how to unlock their full ‘self, health and wealth' potential. Hosted by Bushy Martin, an award winning property investor, founder, author and media commentator who is recognised as one of Australia's most trusted experts in property, investment and lifestyle, Get Invested reveals the secrets of the high performers who invest for success in every aspect of their lives and the world around them. Remember to subscribe on your favourite podcast player, and if you're enjoying the show please leave us a review. Find out more about Get Invested here https://bushymartin.com.au/get-invested-podcast/  Want to connect with Bushy? Get in touch here https://bushymartin.com.au/contact/  This show is produced by Apiro Media - http://apiropodcasts.com

Best Friends Club Podcast
S6 E21 The One Where Ross Meets Elizabeth's Dad

Best Friends Club Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 66:03


Yay Bruce Willis is here! We get to meet Elizabeth's dad, Mr. Stevens, aka Bruce Willis! Understandably, he does not like Ross. Ross tries to trick him into liking him by having his friends win Mr. Stevens over, and Rachel understood the assignment. Joey is enjoying lead actor life, and apparently it has already gone to his head because when he & the guy who controls the robot get off on the wrong foot, Joey says he's going to get him fired. Then Joey learns a little something about robots (not really). Meanwhile, Phoebe is writing a book about Mon...Martha and Chester. Join us for all the fun!

Tcast
Why NGOs and Not-for-Profits Should Sign Up to Receive Funds from TARTLE

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 12:12


What Is Status Quo? While significant progress has been made in various private and corporate sectors, the social aspect of innovation has yet to reap the same magnitude of benefits with the help of technology and big data. Understandably, big tech struggles with their capacity to influence the social arena with the data that they have stored. Consider how much information on human trafficking, propaganda, and other crimes are siloed away across social media platforms. It is difficult to understand the depth of the impact that inaction has on these issues, but one thing is clear: inaction means more than just stagnancy. It is a step backward for social progress across several sectors, especially as we continue to grow in population and potential. The State of Social Innovation: In our current situation, charities and nonprofits push themselves forward by approaching potential donors for assistance. Due to a lack of mobility and flexibility, they are unable to access the full potential of their social efforts. The reality is that building a stable network of donors and stakeholders requires plenty of marketing leverage, availability, and resources — and sometimes, the best leads for driving social change are located across the globe. Better access starts with giving these organizations a safe, reliable, and efficient platform to share their work; something or someone that functions as the main focal point for the big problems of the world. Introducing the TARTLE Marketplace: We've enhanced the TARTLE Marketplace, bringing an altruistic arm to the space so that NGOs, nonprofits, and charities now have the place they need to campaign for awareness and funding.  TARTLE is invested in seeing bigger and better results from social efforts. While the pace of innovation we experience today is a phenomenon we should celebrate, we also acknowledge that this comes at a price: our responsibility to fight for a common good has also become more pressing and more evident. This is an emerging opportunity to become a part of something bigger and to be noticed in the way that these initiatives deserve to be noticed. What We Owe Each Other: With this in place, social organizations no longer need to go through tons of bureaucratic red tape or continue to milk the last funds out of the same donors everybody else in the area has approached. They have better access to concerned audiences and potential stakeholders who are interested in what they do and want to work on their mission. Conversely, having a space for these organizations makes change more accessible to the general public. We have the digital infrastructure necessary to support stable, secure connections between social initiatives and the rest of the world. Finally, the Marketplace opens up exciting new sources of income for NGOs and charities. It's not just about accessing donors and funding; it's also about the potential for these organizations to sell data packets on their areas of specialization. This new revenue stream has the dual effect of increasing the earning potential for specialists, as well as connecting these specialists to other professionals who are interested in what they know. Social problems can be difficult to solve because they are incredibly dynamic. These efforts require the involvement of numerous stakeholders and feedback loops, not just between nonprofits, but across government agencies and even private companies. The TARTLE Marketplace is an emerging platform that will solve the red tape caused by limited cooperation, data inequality, and poor IT resources. We do not profit from any information sold nor donations sent. Closing Thoughts: We aren't far from a future where we can predict, with perfect accuracy and precision, the trajectory, strength, and direction of major environmental catastrophes. Imagine the impact this would have on the efforts of non-governmental and governmental agencies alike. This could mean disseminating information and proactively setting up relief efforts, ensuring the safety of potentially displaced communities, and securing infrastructures well ahead of the catastrophe. We also envision a future where illicit activities, such as human trafficking, terrorist radicalization, and widespread discrimination can be actively profiled across the very same social media platforms we use to connect with our friends and family, empowering the organizations in charge to have a more active role in stopping these activities. In the current pandemic situation, we also hope for a world where we can use tech-powered initiatives to efficiently fund and procure vaccines, medical equipment, and healthcare campaigns for developing areas that may be left behind as efforts to curb the coronavirus are outrun by the disease's capacity to mutate and infect. These are the dreams that make the blood, sweat, and tears behind the data-driven TARTLE Marketplace worth fighting for.  What's your data worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Graceful Atheist Podcast
Mark Landes: Military, Deconversion and Humanism

Graceful Atheist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 64:49


My guest this week is Mark Landes, a former Army officer who is working toward becoming a humanist chaplain. Mark grew up in the United Methodist tradition. He went to West Point and became an officer in the Army. He wanted to become an Army chaplain. Mark's army career is a fascinating tale in itself. He was stationed in West Berlin shortly before the fall of the Berlin Wall. Then during the Gulf War he volunteered to go to Kuwait and experienced the first air raid of the Gulf War. Mark was also a gay man in the military before the time of “don't ask don't tell” when there were witch hunts to remove gay military members. He was investigated and removed with an “other than honorable” discharge. Understandably, Mark went through time of deep depression. To make maters worse when he returned to the states he joined a 12 step group that was in effect a group conversion therapy. It is during this dark time of his life that Mark began to question the reality of god. Through a years long process Mark deconverted eventually admitting to himself he no longer believed. Mark has since become a humanist celebrant and has made an attempt to get a Masters in Divinity to become a humanist chaplain. In this process he began his “theological anthropology” which has led him to tell his story. He now wants to get a Masters in Pastoral care and is hoping to create an “institutional chaplaincy” in the business world. This humanist journey began with him asking the question, “how can I make the world a better place?” Links Mark's Blog https://humanistchaplainjourney.blogspot.com/ Captain Cassidy https://gracefulatheist.com/2019/10/17/captain-cassidy-roll-to-disbelieve/ Sasha Sagan https://gracefulatheist.com/2020/02/06/sasha-sagan-for-small-creatures-such-as-we/ Interact Full show notes https://gracefulatheist.com/2021/10/24/mark-landes-military-deconversion-and-humanism/ Deconversion https://gracefulatheist.com/2017/12/03/deconversion-how-to/ Secular Grace https://gracefulatheist.com/2016/10/21/secular-grace/ Attribution "Waves" track written and produced by Makaih Beats https://makaihbeats.net/ Thanks to Logan Thomas for the new Graceful Atheist Podcast art work --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/gracefulatheist/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/gracefulatheist/support

Resilient & Rowdy
JASON RETURNS

Resilient & Rowdy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 33:11


TW This episode mentions human trafficking and grooming. Listener direction is advised. Welcome back! This episode is not a scary movie, it is reality. Jason Piccolo joins RNR to discuss human trafficking, grooming, and staying safe on social media. Understandably, this is an incredibly difficult and sensitive topic but it must be discussed in order to break the cycle. Anyone and everyone could learn a thing or two, whether you have children or not. Dr. Jason Piccolo (@DRJasonPiccolo) is a former Border Patrol agent, ICE special agent, and DHS supervisor. He is a former U.S. Army Captain (Operation Iraqi Freedom) and author of the recently released book Out of the Shadows: A Government Whistleblower's Firsthand Account of How the Protection Of Migrant Children Became A Political Firestorm. https://townhall.com/columnists/jasonpiccolo/ https://www.youtube.com/theprotectorshow https://jasonpiccolo.us --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

RT
Renegade Inc: ‘Trespass: Get off my land!'

RT

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 27:17


Understandably, whenever we hear “Get off my land” it's met with incredulity. But that phrase does depict the mindset of many landowners who go to extraordinary lengths to keep people off what they deem to be theirs… However without proper access to land we have no ability to have an intimate understanding of nature, or ourselves…so is it now time to reclassify trespass as a revolutionary act? Ross Ashcroft meets Nick Hayes, author of ‘The Book of Trespass' in Oxfordshire to discuss how land monopoly is at the root of social inequality in the UK.

The Informed Life
Sunni Brown on Deep Self Design

The Informed Life

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 31:17


Sunni Brown is a social entrepreneur who uses visual literacy, design thinking, and visual facilitation to solve complex problems. She's the author of The Doodle Revolution and co-author of Gamestorming. In this conversation, we discuss Sunni's current area of focus, which uses Zen Buddhism and design thinking to help individuals craft a more fulfilling and engaged life. Show notes Sunni Brown Deep Self Design Sunni on Twitter Sunni on LinkedIn Sunni on Instagram Sunni on Facebook The Doodle Revolution: Unlock the Power to Think Differently by Sunni Brown Gamestorming: A Playbook for Innovators, Rulebreakers, and Changemakers by Dave Gray, Sunni Brown, and James Macanufo Dave Mastronardi (LinkedIn) What is a multipotentialite? The Nexialist approach: Van Vogt and the idea that ‘specialisation is for insects' Sōtō Zen Zendō Reality distortion field _Liminal Thinking: Create the Change You Want by Changing the Way You Think_ by Dave Gray In defense of the visual alphabet by Dave Gray Design personas Kate Rutter (LinkedIn) Brené Brown Sesshin Double diamond diagram Some show notes may include Amazon affiliate links. I get a small commission for purchases made through these links. Read the transcript Jorge: Sunni, welcome to the show. Sunni: Thank you. Jorge: It's a pleasure having you here. For folks who might not know you, would you mind, please, introducing yourself? About Sunni Sunni: Oh, when you let me know that we were going to have to do that, I had this like moment of, oh God! How do you introduce oneself when you're a, like a... well, the new term is multipotentialite. Have you heard this obnoxious term? Jorge: No. Sunni: Well, it's like if you're a polymath, or if you just have multifaceted aspects of yourself. It's not easy to summarize who I am, what I do. So, I always dread the question. But there is a term floating around called multipotentialite, and it just means the person that has many skills and many things that they pursue and many things that they're interested in. There's a lot of neuro-diversity going on, so we're not easily put in a space. So, it's hard for me to summarize myself. But I would say what's useful for people to know for the purposes of this conversation is probably that... I'll just tell you my role. I am an author and a public speaker and a visual thinker, and a facilitator. Really, a sort of deep-dive facilitator. And a Zen student. And also what I call a Deep Self Designer. And a book coach. So as you can see, my friend, Dave Mastronardi, finally gave me language for this the other day. He goes, "you're just a creative with a capital C!" And I was like, "Cool, Dave, thank you! Because that kind of helps, you know?" It's like, I just am interested in a lot. Jorge: I don't like the word generalist because it implies like Jack of all trades, master of none. Sunni: Yeah, right! Jorge: I love this idea of multipotentialite. I recently heard the word "nexialist," which... Sunni: What is that? Like a person at the nexus of lots of things? Jorge: Doesn't quite roll off the tongue either. It comes from a sci-fi book, and I'll put a link in the show notes so that we don't have to go into it in too much depth here. But I think it's a similar idea, that you are driven by several different interests. Sunni: I love science fiction for that. They always give us language that we need, you know? Jorge: I feel like I want to explore several of the many... what's the plural of nexus? Is it nexuses? Or nexii? Sunni: Nexialisms! Jorge: Several of the different identities that you served us there. Or potentialities, maybe. You spoke of... well, let's, tackle two of them that I'm especially curious about. You mentioned that you're a Zen student and a Deep Self Designer. I don't know if you want to take those independently or if they somehow connect? Sunni: They do connect, actually. And it's cool that you alighted in on those two, because they're the... I think honestly, the most important ones that I do. And they have the most... they have the most liberating capacity of all the things that I do. And they do have intersections, absolutely. Zen Sunni: So, Zen is not something you can summarize really at all. It's such a deep and ancient lineage and an enormous body of practice. But what I find useful and what actually... it was sort of the groundwork for my pursuit of designing another method. And what it did for me was help me understand that the mind is a machine, and it has like projections onto reality all the time. And it has narratives and stories that it constantly creates and recreates and lives into. And they can be very confining, these perceptions of reality. And so when you run into some ideas about reality that are actually created by you, based on your history and your experience, if they cause friction for you, then there's a sort of place where you can redesign that intersection with reality to create a better reality for yourself. And I know that's like a lot to just unload in conversation, but Zen made just sitting, which is... I'm in what's called the Soto Zen lineage. So literally, you sit in meditation for hours. I mean, I probably sat for 10,000 hours easily, and - not easily, but difficult-ly. But we call it just getting on the cushion, right? So like you just take it there, and then you kind of watch what your mind is up to. And through that process, I learned how I trick myself, how I can have distortions in my belief systems. I think Steve Jobs used to call it a "reality distortion field." I think he was also a Zen practitioner. But that laid the groundwork for me to understand, "oh, I have a lot of agency and choice once I understand how my system works." And you know, like you're a systems thinker and a design thinker, so of course I was interested in that. And then I just went from that place and started to practice with different methods to support other people. Jorge: I'm reminded of our mutual friend Dave Gray's book, Liminal Thinking. Sunni: Oh, Yeah! It's so funny you said that. Because I have it, of course — I always will buy whatever Dave makes, but I haven't read it because I always have way too many books. But I understand kind of the vibe, and a lot of people, when I talk about this, they bring up his book, and I'm like, I should read that. Jorge: When I first read that, I remember asking Dave about it because I got the sense that there was a lot of Buddhism in... Sunni: Yeah, I don't know that Dave knows that he has a Buddhist aspect. I don't think he's a Buddhist practitioner. But I have found there are multiple people that actually arrive at some of these deep wisdoms because it's not... it's in reality. So, the Buddha was just describing reality. So, anyone can find their own path to that awareness. And so, yeah! It's funny to me when I work with people, and I go, "oh my God, that's like a very ancient principle that you stumbled upon," you know? So I think Dave must've done that too. Because he doesn't like go to the zendo, I'm pretty sure. Jorge: The path, it seems to me... and here I'm reflecting back to you what perhaps I layered through my own experience onto what you were saying, which is that we experience reality at various different levels. And if you step back far enough, you're able to contemplate the fact that much of what we experience is in some ways emerging from within us? Or at least the way that we're experiencing it is emerging from within us. Sunni: Well said! Beautifully said, yeah! Deep Self Design Jorge: I want to bring it back to this idea of Deep Self Design. What I'm projecting onto this or where I think that the two circles in the Venn diagram might overlap, is that, if you understand this - this fact that, much of what we are experiencing is emerging from within us - and you are someone who sees the world through the eyes of design, then perhaps you can do something about it, Sunni: You do a lot. Jorge: So what would you be able to do about it? Sunni: It's so funny, we're talking about this because last night I was having this conversation with my husband about workability. So everything... well, I won't make totalizing statements. I'll try to avoid them, but almost everything in your internal system is workable. Meaning that it all has plasticity and an adaptation capacity, or a significant amount of it. This is going to sound very hyperbolic, but the reason I have such confidence in the workability of the system is because I redesigned my own internal experience over the course of... it's been 15 years now. But the mind that I started with when I started investigating this practice and the mind I have now are entirely different planetary systems. And I have a complex trauma history, which is relevant because when you have a complex trauma history, you have a whole host of distorted ideas about reality, all of which are workable. And so, for me, it's like an actually hopeful message. It's like, "oh my God. Your backstory can be kind of f*cked up, you know?" And you can completely... as long as, to your point, it was a really important thing that you said Jorge, which was, "if you step back." So, you have to get some separation and observe, with compassion, your belief systems, and from that seat, it's like a gentle observation, then you have space with which to work. Often the traumatized brain is terrified of making that separation. It can be, for a variety of reasons. So, that's why it is a practice, and it's a patience game, often. But you can literally redesign your experience of yourself and of the world and of other people and of what's possible. And the energy that you liberate in that process is insane. It's absolutely insane how much energy you get when you untether yourself from a lot of distorted ideas about yourself in the world. And that's why I thought like, well, it's a design thinking challenge, you know? It's basically like internal system mapping and then giving people methodologies to support the spaces that they want to loosen up or soften. I'm very fortunate to have encountered great teachers, really extraordinary teachers, and I'm fortunate to have had the time and the passion to do a deep dive. But it's like that hero's journey where you go in, and you come out, and you're like, "well, I have something I could share." So, I'm still sorting out how to teach it, how to format it, how to design a methodology because it is not a small thing to try to do, but it's worth it. It's completely worth it to try. Jorge: It sounds empowering. Sunni: It's extremely empowering. Jorge: It sounds like a practice that restores perhaps a sense of agency where you're not buffeted by the contingencies of whatever happens in everyday life as much. Sunni: And it's so important! That message is so important because there are places you go that are scary. And there are fires you have to walk through. And you have to know that on the other side, not only will you be more free, but you'll be stronger. But you can't know that going in. Once you get your sea legs and you start to understand, "oh my God, this is like Jedi training!" then you can feel more confident about the outcome. But the early stages for most people is it can be absolutely terrifying. 100%. Absolutely true. I mean, that's why most people can't even sit in meditation, frankly because a lot of people do not want to sit with the content of their own mind. It's not something that we're encouraged to do, and it's not something that we're taught to do, and we don't know why we would do it. So we spend a lot of time avoiding that very thing. Understandably. I mean, I understand that instinct completely. It's... it's terrifying. But it's so freaking worth it. It's so worth it! There's no question about it. No question! And it improves your life, you know? It improves your relationships with yourself and other people. And really, your relationships are the most valuable thing you have. And your health, and maybe time, you know? So it's a significant process, but it's not necessarily for everyone. And probably you experienced this with your students. There's what I call a state of readiness, which means that they're willing to do the work. They're willing to be honest with themselves and others, and they're willing to address and hold space for really difficult content. And if I work with a person and it's very clear that they're not actually at that place, then they need to come back. They need to go and come back, you know? Because it's a thing. And then in Zen, the analogy is when you go to the zendo, and you knock on the door three times, and a monk opens the door, and they say, "go away!" You know? And they shut the door, and then you sleep out in the cold or whatever, and then you come again. You knock, and then the monk opens and says, "go away." So it's a way of saying, if you're not ready, don't bother! Don't come, you know? And that process is a person's individual journey, and you can't rush that for people. Starting the journey Jorge: You mentioned in your own journey having suffered complex trauma and without getting into it, just thinking that many of us - many folks listening - have... especially over the last year and a half... gone through some pretty traumatic experiences. And with the caveat that you just laid out that not everybody might be ready to undertake such a practice, but assuming that someone would be interested in at least trying to envision the path, where would they start? Sunni: So the chapter I was telling you I sent to Kate, there are writing exercises, and there are visual thinking exercises. And often, I will just say, you know, you're in a creation when your energy has become contracted, combative, tight — when you feel conflict, internally. Your body gives you all these signals that all is not well, and it can be a very subtle signal. Say you're in a restaurant, and a person walks in, and your stomach clenches. That's an indication. So, you start with noticing. Just pay attention to what is happening inside of your system because you have to understand that you are the reactor. And the stimulus is out there, but you are the reactor. And so, noticing it's a huge part of the practice — just to start there. It's like when I used to teach visual thinking — and I do occasionally sometimes, still — but the visual thinking alphabet that Dave created, Dave Gray. It's the basics. Just start with observing where these forms are and draw them on paper. Really, you've got to start at that place and notice if you judge it. Because a lot of people will be like, "oh, I should be more brave. Why did I get nervous when the boss came in?" Or whatever. We'll instantly have a reaction to our reaction. So just noticing that. So that's the start, right? And then once you have a relationship with your experience... so you're like, "man, every time my mom comes over, I want to argue! Like right away! I just want to argue with her," you know? So you're like, okay! And so, you notice that. So, you begin to take responsibility for what you're bringing, and that's why it's empowering. It's so fascinating how accountability is like not sexy, but I'm like, that's the greatest thing you can do because you're in charge of your life. You're driving your bus, you know? So, then there are exercises that I give people that are really simple. Like just notice that a part of you came online and wanted to argue with your mom. And then it's really like a design inquiry. It's like an investigation of, imagine that that's a persona. So, say that's a design persona. And I've taught it in this way in some keynotes and stuff. So, I depersonalize it, and I say, "just treat that like a persona or an avatar. And just like you would if you were anthropologically studying a user experience. But do it for your own self." Start to understand that persona and just give it some quality... I mean, it will name itself. That's what's so fascinating is that these personas, these internal personas — they give you information. They actually let you know because they're part of your brain. So, it's just about accessing that information that's in the brain. And I'm saying it trivially like it's just that. But it's all there, and so you just get curious. You just get curious and start finding out. And so, over time, I like to teach people to create like a constellation. Like a map of their internal system with all of these different personas so that they can relate to them differently. And when they do that, that's when it starts getting good. Jorge: All of a sudden, you start understanding the territory — I would imagine — when map-making. I wanted to clarify, you mentioned Kate, and you were talking about our mutual friend, Kate Rutter, who we were talking about before starting the recording. And you alluded to a chapter. Was that a chapter of a book that you're working on, or... Sunni's new book Sunni: Yeah, this book... So, as I mentioned earlier, I'm a book coach, and I'm obsessed with books. I could be wrong, but if I had nothing but time and money, I think books are all I would do. Just unpacking and looking at publishing, coaching writers, writing... That's all I would do. So, you know, I'm published twice, and we pitched this book, actually. It is the Deep Self Design book, and the title was called, The Only Way Out Is In. Like one of the original titles, The Only Way Out Is In. And then the... I can't remember the subtitle. I have like 4,000 subtitles. But, so we pitched it. So, it was actually in proposal form. When you want to pitch to a traditional publisher, you've got to get your book in a proposal that essentially describes the product for them. It's unfortunate, but for them, it's a product. And for you too, really. So, that... it was like 90 pages of just glory, you know, and it took me years. And so, anyway, the way it ended up, and I can tell that story — but at one point in the process, I said, "Kate, can I send you, like, chapter one? And you just see if it lands for you. Like, give me a reader reaction" And apparently, it turned some keys pretty quickly for her. Because she wrote me and was like... she'd had drawn a picture of one of her personas. And I didn't even ask her to do that. And it was called "The Aviator." And so, she learned about this part of her that like flies around and sort of conducts the situation and looks from a high level and is very functional, you know, high functioning part, persona. She just got it, you know? But she's really smart. So I was like, well... because you got to write to like an eighth-grader, right? That's the level of communication that you want in books, which is why Brene Brown's tone is so beloved. So, she just listed that chapter again, and I'm willing to share with anyone. I mean, people need to know how to do it. And so, the book was pitched to publishers, and there were 17 of them. And then like 12 of them wrote back, which is pretty good. And they all said the methodology was too complex for a typical reader. And I lost my mind because I had already simplified it so very much. That day, I was like standing in my neighbor's yard, and I was just like, "nooooooo!" Because it's hard to attract to the marketplace and to still deliver something really of high value. My God! It's exhausting. So, I have put it down for now. And I started working on another book about confidence because I was like, I can't. I can revisit this thing. I'm going to f*cking freak out. Yeah. But it'll emerge at some point. Taking your space Jorge: Well, I'm hoping that we'll be able to read the Deep Self Design book at some point. I'm wondering about something that you said, and again, trying to be kind of practical for the folks listening in and wondering about where we start. I would imagine that doing this sort of internal map that you're describing here is not something that we can do effectively amidst the hustle and bustle, right? And you spoke earlier about making space. And I just got back from a weekend of camping with my family, and we went pretty far out into the woods. And I was... yeah, it was nice, but I was still surrounded by devices, and I... Sunni: Oh! Jorge: I got into a little bit of a Twitter kerfuffle. Sunni: Oh no! Jorge: Right? And I'm bringing up the story to say: it's so hard for us these days to find this space to be with ourselves and to be introspective? And even if we are aware... Sunni: You have to take it. You have to take that space. Jorge: Well, how do we do it? Do you have any advice for folks wanting to take the space? Sunni: Well, yeah. When you do a Zen sesshin, you can't have books or paper or phones. And so, you've got to do like seven days of like 10 hours of meditation. So, that is sacred time — no question about it. But for a normal person, that's not going to be on their calendar. First, you have to understand that you probably have an addiction, right? If you can't remove yourself from an object for any chunk of time, that is actually an addictive relationship. So, that's serious shit, if you ask me. And I don't think it's a popular opinion. And I think that it's also true. So for me, just labeling it as an addictive relationship is step one. And then, you don't even want to go into, like, it could be an abusive relationship. We don't even have to talk about that, but that's in there too. So, you have to understand that. And you have to just understand what is in it for you to separate yourself from it and give yourself a path. So, can I separate from my phone for four hours? If you don't want to go cold turkey, just try for four hours and notice what happens in your system when you do that. And that's actually part of the practice for Deep Self Design anyway. So, you can be like, wow, I started having FOMO. Or, I start thinking that someone's going to be mad at me because I didn't respond to them. So, you get all kinds of information from just that short separation. And there's a lot of data around... Like it literally keys up your nervous system, being in a relationship with a digital object all the time. It keys up your nervous system. And so, actually to regulate your nervous system again, which is what camping is kind of for. Camping, when it's safe and beautiful... the point of it is to actually get you into a different state. To get your regulatory system in a different state so that you can enjoy your life and be present with your family and look at the sky and realize that you're part of... you are the sky, there's no difference between you and the sky, you just project that there is. And like, you know what I mean? So, you have to understand that that space is essential for your humanity and make it a priority. And you can tell people, I mean, there are ways to approach it that are gentle on other people. So you can let people know, "I'm going to go dark for 72 hours. You should know that." Or, "I'm going to go dark, and then I'm going to have one hour where I look at stuff," you know? You have to design it for your life and what's actually available for you. Sometimes people have sick parents at home or sick kids or whatever, but you have to start to understand the benefit of it. Because I think most people think it's just like something they would lose. Like, they wouldn't get... something taken away from them. And I'm like, "no! It's something you're giving yourself that is priceless." And you get amazing ideas. Like your productivity goes up. So, I call it going slow to go fast. Actually, I read this interesting Nietzsche quote, which I don't read Nietzsche a lot or anything, but as he said like great ideas are found when you're walking. And Steve Jobs was... Also, I'm not obsessed with Steve Jobs, but he did a lot of walking meetings. So, If you are a productivity junkie, going slow helps you go fast. And it actually frees up a lot of stuck tension in the body and stuck ideas that you can't get through, and it gives you solutions and ah-has and insights. So there are huge rewards in it anyway if you need it to be aligned with productivity. But it's like, dude, we're gonna die one day, Jorge. Like all of us! And the last thing I want to do is be like, "I spent my whole life on my iPhone!" That is like the worst thing that could happen. No! And it's like, if you mess it up, try it again. Just like don't give up, you know? Go camping again and have a new policy with your family. Get consensus around it, make an agreement, and just find other ways to occupy your time. But it's a practice, you know? Are you digging this? You're smiling. Putting it in action Jorge: I am. I'm smiling because I'm looking at the clock and thinking, oh man, we're running out of time, but I don't want to leave folks with, "we're going to die someday." So, I want to bring it back to... Well, you've mentioned two things. One is this idea of making space, which, as you were saying, in our modern world often entails not just space but also shielding ourselves from these potentially addictive devices. And then the technologies that they enable. And then there's this aspect of self-awareness through — you talked about map-making and using the lens of design to think of ourselves as personas. It sounds like those two are essential to getting kind of a read — it's almost like the first part of the double diamond diagram. But there comes this moment where we have to do the synthesis work in design, and we have to think through how we're going to move forward, what we're going to do about it. So, is there a step three here as well? Sunni: After synthesis? Jorge: No, after we've done the map and we have understood ourselves. Sunni: Yes. There's definitely a step three, which is what I would call the "befriending" step. So, you have your constellation of parts of you, like how many personas are in there, and there's an average, but it's kind of infinite when you go in too far. But the next step is basically finding your most active personas. Because, when you wake up, you... I have an active persona, which is like, "oh, I'm going to be really productive. I'm going to be very in touch with a lot of people. make sure that everyone is well-fed." You know, so I have like a kitchen/caretaker part. Like I have all these personas. So you can find the most dominant ones - the most operative ones. And then, and you start to learn about them. And then, but the ultimate goal is to make friends with them all. Even the parts of yourself that you do not like because what happens when you allow and support and befriend all of the aspects of yourself is that all of this internal tension that people experience... like people wake up with anxiety, you know, people wake up with self-criticism, et cetera. All of that energy stabilizes and is calm so that your experience relating to yourself is not fraught with tension anymore. So, you actually have to befriend them, like you would an external child or a person that you care about who lives outside. You do that work internally. And when you do, you spend a lot less time kicking your own ass. I mean, people kick their own asses constantly, you know? And it's like, I'm starting to understand why is that? And what's happening there, and how do you appreciate that you're doing that, but also let it know that you don't have to do that in order to be smart or in order to be productive, et cetera. So that is like the biggest step is to befriend all of your constellations on your map. And then from there, it's like flying, you know? It's like, there's nobody in the way. There's nobody in the way. I mean, there's life; there are institutions of life that are designed to oppress people. Those things are still there, but the way that we relate to them is very different, and that's why it feels so liberating. Closing Jorge: Well, that seems like a really good place to wrap it up. I'm sure that folks listening in are going to want to learn more. Where can they go? Sunni: Oh, they can go to deepselfdesign.com. And you're also helping me. Remember that I need to create these little tools that... I always create tools and methodologies. So, deepselfdesign.com is definitely the home page. And also, sunnibrown.com has a lot of content on it. They can follow me all over social media too. Jorge: Just not while you're camping. Sunni: Yeah, no way. You'll never see me on that. Yeah, no, that's me and mother earth when that's going on, for sure. Jorge: Well, fantastic. Thank you so much for being on the show. Sunni: Yeah, Thanks for having me. It's nice to see you. Jorge: Yeah, same here.

Insight of the Week
Sukkot and the War of Gog U'maggog

Insight of the Week

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021


The prophecy read as the Haftara for Shabbat Hol Ha'mo'ed Sukkot is from the Book of Yehezkel (chapters 38-39), and it foresees a series of major battles which will take place in the Land of Israel before the arrival of Mashiah. Yehezkel describes how two nations will fight against one another in the Land of Israel, though it will not directly involve the Jewish People. The Malbim (Rav Meir Leibush Wisser, 1809-1879), his commentary to Yehezkel, explains that these wars will be waged between the kingdoms of Edom (the kingdom founded by Esav) and Yishmael – meaning, between the western, Christian world, and the Arab world. This will occur, the Malbim writes, after the Jewish People return to the Land of Israel, and the kingdoms of Edom and Yishmael will fight against each other for control of Jerusalem. We see this prophecy's fulfillment gradually unfolding in our times, as the Jews have returned to the Land of Israel and established sovereignty there, and tensions are building between the West and the Arab world. This war will result in an enormous number of casualties, and will be followed by the arrival of Mashiah, who will bring peace and serenity to the world, and under whose kingship all mankind will recognize and serve the one, true G-d. The question arises as to why this prophecy is read on Sukkot. What connection is there between the war of Gog U'maggog and the festival of Sukkot? The answer is found in a remarkable observation made by the Gaon of Vilna (Rav Eliyahu of Vilna, 1720-1797) regarding the special sacrifices brought over the course of Sukkot. As the Torah outlines in Parashat Pinhas (Bamidbar 29), a large number of animals were offered as the Musaf sacrifices each day of Sukkot. These included a total of seventy bulls, which, our Sages teach, were offered on behalf of the seventy gentile nations. The sacrifices also included one goat brought each day of Sukkot as a sin-offering. The Gaon of Vilna noted that two different expressions are used to refer to these goats. The goat offered on the first, second and fourth days of Sukkot is referred to by the term "Se'ir Izim," whereas the goat offered on the third, fifth, sixth and seven days is called simply, "Se'ir." The Gaon explained that the word "Se'ir" on its own alludes to Esav, who was also called by the name "Se'ir." The term "Se'ir Izim," by contrast, refers to Yishmael. Now on the first, second and fourth days of Sukkot, a total of 35 bulls were offered (13 on the first day, 12 on the second, and 10 on the fourth). This same number of bulls were offered on the third, fifth, sixth and seventh days (11 on the third, 9 on the fifth, 8 on the 6th, and 7 on the seventh). The Gaon explained that all the gentile nations are aligned with either Edom or Yishmael, such that exactly half of the 70 bulls offered on Sukkot correspond to Edom, and precisely half correspond to Yishmael. Understandably, then, we read the prophecy of the war of Gog U'maggog on Sukkot – because the sacrifices offered on this holiday reflect the historical tension between the two kingdoms of Edom and Yishmael, who will wage this fierce battle. Our Sages have taught us that prophecies predicting blessing and prosperity will always be fulfilled, whereas prophecies of calamity and tragedy can be averted through Teshuba (repentance). It thus follows that the dreadful war of Gog U'maggog – which, according to some commentators, will result in 60 million casualties, and according to others, in the death of one-third of the world's population – can be avoided. By reaffirming our commitment to faithfully obey the Misvot, study Torah and perform acts of kindness, we will, please G-d, be worthy of protection from this war as well as from all crisis and hardship, Amen.

Being Human
#183 Trauma-Sensitive Yoga - with Jenn Turner

Being Human

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 56:27


> Sign Up For Our Newsletter: http://www.firsthuman.com/being-human-newsletter/This week's guest on Being Human is educator, mental health counsellor, yoga teacher and co-founder of the Center for Trauma and Embodiment (CFTE), Jenn Turner.Trauma is a pervasive aspect of all human experience. Understandably, it's one that no one wants to talk about, and yogis are no exception.Jenn's work is piercing this taboo in the yoga world. She's learning lessons about dealing with the impacts of buried pain that we can all apply in our lives, no matter our walk of life.We talk:The double-think of mainstream yogaShifting from didact to 'holder of space'Embracing the chaosWhy survivors must always be the authors of their healingThe essence of trauma-sensitive leadership Links:Jenn's WebsiteCenter for Trauma and Embodiment (CFTE)Embodied Healing - The Book

Being Human
#183 Trauma-Sensitive Yoga - with Jenn Turner

Being Human

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 56:27


> Sign Up For Our Newsletter: http://www.firsthuman.com/being-human-newsletter/This week's guest on Being Human is educator, mental health counsellor, yoga teacher and co-founder of the Center for Trauma and Embodiment (CFTE), Jenn Turner.Trauma is a pervasive aspect of all human experience. Understandably, it's one that no one wants to talk about, and yogis are no exception.Jenn's work is piercing this taboo in the yoga world. She's learning lessons about dealing with the impacts of buried pain that we can all apply in our lives, no matter our walk of life.We talk:The double-think of mainstream yogaShifting from didact to 'holder of space'Embracing the chaosWhy survivors must always be the authors of their healingThe essence of trauma-sensitive leadership Links:Jenn's WebsiteCenter for Trauma and Embodiment (CFTE)Embodied Healing - The Book

The Paper Fold
Robert Maricich, CEO, International Market Centers (IMC)

The Paper Fold

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021


Please welcome Robert Maricich, CEO of International Market Centers (IMC). Bob, as he prefers, is widely recognized as one of the home furnishings industry's most Innovative leaders — he founded and built IMC into an exhibition space powerhouse with more than 20 million square feet of world-class B2B exhibition space. Its campuses include both AmericasMart Atlanta and World Market Center Las Vegas, markets vital to the stationery and gift industries.When coronavirus halted everything, IMC surveyed 180,000 retailers to gage their needs. With guidance from health and elected officials as well as a top epidemiologist, IMC opened the AmericasMart campus June 8, and the World Market Center Las Vegas June 15. Everything is governed by IMC's Together Safely Master Plan, which details procedures for registration, sanitization, temperature monitoring, traffic and occupancy control, seminars, masks, etc. This is a four-phase reopening, however, and the plan is a living document, meaning it may change in our current fluid, unknowable climate.Understandably, it'll be a new market experience, and while IMC has been incredibly transparent throughout the process, it's a lot to process, so Bob's perspective is most helpful.**Thank You Sponsors**Please be sure to support these all-American, women-owned houses of paper.Girl w/Knife is your incredibly sharp new stationery BFF. Check out this award-winning, ultra-polished range that everyone's talking about — it slays on several brilliant levels!Kitty Meow Boutique was founded on the idea that your paper goods don't have to be a snooze fest. These stylish, laugh-out-loud selections are by turns sassy and sweet, all the while maintaining a consistent cool.

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast
1719: Meet BUX, Europe's Fastest-Growing Neobroker

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 26:27


Recent research by the Bank of Ireland reveals that many people have become accidental savers during the Covid-19 crisis. Understandably, half of those surveyed want to build up a rainy day fund for the future. Moreover, within today's climate of low interest rates and high living costs, many are considering investing as a way to make their money go further. Offering a new investment alternative for the Irish market, BUX, Europe's fastest-growing neobroker, officially launched its zero-commission investing app, BUX Zero, in Ireland this week, making it the first exclusively mobile platform to offer investing in the country. The arrival of BUX Zero in Ireland promises to make investing easier and more affordable through commission-free investing. In addition, BUX aims to remedy the findings that only 23% of people claim to have sufficient knowledge of markets and investment options. It is a platform that provides intuitive tools to start investing and educational content that helps users to invest responsibly. Yorick Naeff, CEO of BUX, joins me on the podcast to share the story behind the company. I also learn how BUX's flagship platform, BUX Zero, is making commission-free investing more accessible and allows users to invest in the companies they believe in.

Hyper Conscious Podcast
#723 - Some People's Advice Is Based On Their Fears

Hyper Conscious Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 25:15


In this episode, hosts Kevin Palmieri and Alan Lazaros talk about the importance of understanding that it's okay to not take advice from people who aren't exactly doing what you're doing. Understandably, they won't be giving you the advice you deserve because they are either fearful or they don't understand what you want to do. So if you're on a precipice, make sure you choose to listen to the right people.  Group coaching details: https://nextleveluniverse.com/group-coaching/We love connecting with you guys! Reach out on LinkedIn, Instagram, or via emailWebsite

Discover The Word Podcast - Discover The Word
17. What Does the Bible Say About Justice? | Discover the Word

Discover The Word Podcast - Discover The Word

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021 67:49


Justice. What comes to mind when you see or hear that word? We've heard a lot about justice recently, and have so many thoughts, ideas, images, assumptions, and expectations of what justice is and how it works. Understandably, that influences what we think when we read the word justice in the Scriptures. So, this week, the Discover the Word group would like to pause and act as if we've never seen the word before and see how we would define “justice” if we only had the Bible to shape our definition. Join the group as they explore together “What Does the Bible Say About Justice?”

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

How does the new Alzheimer's treatment drug affect our search for a cure? In the 90s, Alzheimer's researchers were full of optimism that they would find a cure for the disease. Genetic studies all pointed to one culprit—hard clumps of protein, called amyloid, that litter the brains of people with the disease. (Scott Small, MD, Columbia Medicine) More than thirty years later, we're still looking for a cure, a treatment, or even prevention. Much of the research is still focusing on amyloid and tau proteins, whose malformation are classic characteristics of Alzheimer's disease. But other factors likely play a role, including vascular health, inflammation, lifestyle, and possibly even viral causes. (Healthline Rachel Barclay) With the latest announcement of Biogen's drug, there is hope and controversy. There is not much evidence that it will work on most people with Alzheimer's; it needs to be started early in the disease and the cost is staggering. At this time, it appears the drug will only be made available to those patients in the earliest stages of the disease. Barriers? Cost is also a considerable barrier for many people. Medicare is the primary payment method for those with the disease, and the price will likely lead to further rationing of the treatment. The one bright spot that I see, this new possibility for treatment might get people diagnosed much earlier. I've gathered many opinions on this topic. Understandably, there are various them, but the underlying argument is this is only the first step. Edward Park of NeuroReserve thinks we'll end up with a drug and lifestyle cocktail. My guests in this episode are hopeful as well. Transcript Related Episodes: Could Cannabis be a Cure for Alzheimer's? A Ray of Hope? Stabilizing Cognitive Decline   SURVEY!! Share Your Opinion & Get A Chance at the Gift Basket   NeuroReserve - Helping Our Brainspan Match our Lifespan NeuroReserve - Helping Our Brainspan Match our Lifespan   Be sure to check out our website for more resources, partners, recipes, and more.  www.fadingmemoriespodcast.com Join Fading Memories On Social Media! If you've enjoyed this episode, please share this podcast with other caregivers!  You'll find us on social media at the following links. Facebook    Instagram    Twitter Subscribe to our YouTube channel. There you can see me in "action" and watch the bonus videos I share. Want to learn from Jennifer in person (or virtually)? Wherever you'd like a training session, Jen is available. Contact her at fadingmemoriespodcast@gmail.com

Firewhisky and Honey's Podcast
6.2 The Debt of Time: Understandably Bitter (Whinging IS Whining)

Firewhisky and Honey's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 55:34


Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Sunday, August 8, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsNineteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 116All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint DominicIf he hadn't taken a trip with his bishop, Dominic would probably have remained within the structure of contemplative life; after the trip, he spent the rest of his life being a contemplative in active apostolic work. Born in old Castile, Spain, Dominic was trained for the priesthood by a priest-uncle, studied the arts and theology, and became a canon of the cathedral at Osma, where there was an attempt to revive the apostolic common life described in Acts of the Apostles. On a journey through France with his bishop, Dominic came face to face with the then virulent Albigensian heresy at Languedoc. The Albigensians--or Cathari, “the pure ones”--held to two principles—one good, one evil—in the world. All matter is evil—hence they denied the Incarnation and the sacraments. On the same principle, they abstained from procreation and took a minimum of food and drink. The inner circle led what some people regarded as a heroic life of purity and asceticism not shared by ordinary followers. Dominic sensed the need for the Church to combat this heresy, and was commissioned to be part of the preaching crusade against it. He saw immediately why the preaching crusade was not succeeding: the ordinary people admired and followed the ascetical heroes of the Albigenses. Understandably, they were not impressed by the Catholic preachers who traveled with horse and retinues, stayed at the best inns and had servants. Dominic therefore, with three Cistercians, began itinerant preaching according to the gospel ideal. He continued this work for 10 years, being successful with the ordinary people but not with the leaders. His fellow preachers gradually became a community, and in 1215 Dominic founded a religious house at Toulouse, the beginning of the Order of Preachers or Dominicans. Dominic's ideal, and that of his Order, was to organically link a life with God, study, and prayer in all forms, with a ministry of salvation to people by the word of God. His ideal: contemplata tradere: “to pass on the fruits of contemplation” or “to speak only of God or with God.” Reflection The Dominican ideal, like that of all religious communities, is for the imitation, not merely the admiration, of the rest of the Church. The effective combining of contemplation and activity is the vocation of truck driver Smith as well as theologian Aquinas. Acquired contemplation is the tranquil abiding in the presence of God, and is an integral part of any full human life. It must be the wellspring of all Christian activity. Saint Dominic is the Patron Saint of: Astronomers Dominican Republic Saint of the Day Copyright Franciscan Media

Bharatvaarta
136 - ECommerce Policy Changes | Rajeev Mantri | Rameesh Kailasam | Policy | Bharatvaarta

Bharatvaarta

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 47:07


The new draft e commerce policy by the government will touch upon multiple aspects of the eCommerce business itself and has wide ranging consequences for all stakeholders involved. Understandably, there's a lot of debate, skepticism, on certain clauses of the policy. To make sense of all of these policy proposals and understand what is the right way to look at these circumstances. In this episode, we have Rajeev Mantri, investor, bestselling author and Managing Director at Navam Capital. He has appeared on many Bharatvaarta podcasts before, speaking about startups, policy, and related subjects. Joining him for the discussion is Rameesh Kailasam. He is the CEO of IndiaTech.org, a think tank and industry group setup to support Internet startups. Rameesh has over 2 decades of experience working with the industry and the government. He's also a regular columnist on Indian newspapers and appears on Indian television on policy discussions. We begin the episode by breaking down what the new reforms actually are, along with the overlap in jurisdictions between multiple ministries. Then, the guests deconstruct the effect of the proposed related party clause. They also addressed topics such as flash sales and deep discounting, redressal for grievances, and data protection. The guests also presented possible protection for small businesses and regulations for large players.

Software Social
Decisions, Decisions

Software Social

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 33:25


Buy Michele's book! deployempathy.comMichele Hansen  0:00  Hey, welcome back to Software Social. This episode of Software Social is sponsored by Noko. When you're bootstrapping on the side, every free moment counts. But do you really know how you're spending those moments? Which days you're most productive? If your product has time sings that just don't pay. Here's one way to find out. Noko is a time tracker designed to help you learn from the time you track. And Noko makes it frictionless to give yourself good data to you can even log time directly from your GitHub commit messages. Try Noko today and save 15% off every plan forever. Visit NokoTime.com/SocialPod to start making your time work for you.Colleen Schnettler  0:50  So Michele, I went to purchase your book yesterday on Amazon. And I saw that it is the number one new release in business books.Michele Hansen  1:04  Is this research and development. But yes. And I The crazy thing is is you were the first person to notice like I didn't know that until you tweeted.Colleen Schnettler  1:15  Yes, that makes me so happy. So I was gonna text you but like my number one Google searches What time is it in Denmark? It was like 4am or something. So I was like, Okay, I'll just tweet about it. And she'll see it when she wakes up.Michele Hansen  1:29  Thanks. I remember seeing that. And I was like, oh my god. Um, yeah, that was really, really, really unexpected. It's been, it's been such a week.Colleen Schnettler  1:42  Yeah. So how many copies Have you sold? Okay, soMichele Hansen  1:46  on Amazon, including paperback and Kindle 47. And then I also closed the pre sale on Monday. And so that was 127 copies there. Wow.Colleen Schnettler  2:07  Yeah, that's a lot.Michele Hansen  2:09  Yeah. So yeah, like over 150. which feels, which feels pretty good.Colleen Schnettler  2:16  Um, and,Michele Hansen  2:20  but, yeah, I mean, and it's kind of fun seeing the orders from around the world, like, you know, like us, Germany, Japan, UK, Canada, Australia. Like, I mean, I know, there's a lot of places where Amazon isn't. And I don't have that data for the PDF version out in Brazil, too. But, you know, I mean, this. I feel like this whole book was, like people from around the world, most of whom I have never met and had never met before. were part of making this book happen of encouraging it and sharing the newsletters and replying to them and sharing their own stories with me about their experiences with talking to customers and what they've struggled with and what's worked for them. And I'm just, I'm just so moved. Like, it's just, yeah, it's been. It's been quite a week.Colleen Schnettler  3:21  Yeah, that's wonderful. I'm so happy for you. And I'm happy the launch has gone so well.Michele Hansen  3:27  Yeah, and I think it's not like a like a sort of a big bang launch. here because it is kind of summer and you know, things are moving a little slowly. And also doesn't, doesn't have to be it'd be a huge thing. But so right now, kind of focusing on trying to get reviews of the book on Amazon before I tried to do a Product Hunt launch. I think that's kind of like, I feel like good right now with like launching it with the people who have been along for the journey and supporting it. And, you know, someone actually sent me some like, little, like, formatting quirks they noticed in their version. And so I kind of want to get those ironed out. Before you know, bring the book to people who may not be so understanding of, you know, yeah, seeing that. Some stray formatting or whatnot. Um, yeah. Yeah.Colleen Schnettler  4:27  Does Amazon have analytics built in to their book publishing platform? Because you mentioned you could see where people were coming from?Michele Hansen  4:34  Yeah, actually, I can pull it up right now. So the whole that the KDP or Kindle Direct Publishing is what they call it. They have this little dashboard, so I can see that. Um, so yeah, there's been orders from US, UK, Germany, Japan, and Canada, and Brazil. And it tells me like, what day they're ordered on and then also the Kindle reading percentage. Which I guess they use to determine the quality of the book. So like when you did on a Kindle, Amazon is kind of creepily like tracking that and basically, you know, but like, basically people buy this book, and then they read 10 pages of it, and then they don't ever open it again. Amazon takes that as a signal about the quality of the book. Oh, yeah, I mean, so maybe like, people buy it just to like, have it just in case. But so but it can show me for example, that super creeped out by that,Colleen Schnettler  5:31  by the way, like gender weird. AndMichele Hansen  5:35  65 pages have been read. Total. And then I think it can also show me like the there's been 24 pages read today.Colleen Schnettler  5:47  So Wow, that's wild. I didn't know that.Michele Hansen  5:51  I feel a little so.Colleen Schnettler  5:52  Yeah, a little bit. So tell me about the feedback you've been getting from people have a lot of people have been reaching out to you to tell you, you know, give you feedback on their experiences with the book.Michele Hansen  6:01  Yeah, people have been so nice. Um, as I mentioned, a bunch of people were posting reviews, but I feel like you need more before I launch it on product times are kind of go on some big podcasts to promote it. Because like those people, they don't know me, they haven't been listening. They haven't been following along. Like, why the, you know, why the heck should they care who I am and what I wrote about, right. So, um, so yeah, people have been just so generous with their time and their energy of helping to get the word out about the book. And any, I've gotten nice emails from people, it's actually been kind of funny to get texts from my friends about it, because I haven't really talked about it much with like, my friends and family because it's not relevant to most of them. Like, I feel like, you know, I feel like I describe it. And I'm like, well, it's like, super nice. It's like how to, like, create software products and sell them and stuff like that. And Mathias is always like, no, everybody should have this book. It's so relevant. Everyone, like, you know, I there's like this little like group of like real estate agents in Canada who are really excited about it, for example. Um, and, um, but so like, even just getting texts from friends of mine, who I haven't really talked to about, it has been such a nice surprise, like, one of my friends sent me a picture of her two year old son flipping through it when it arrived. And apparently, he loves the duck on the cover. Totally warms my heart. But actually, oh, negative, um, there was somebody who tweeted something negative at me, like, what was it? They're like, like my first tweet, where I like tweeted out about how it was available on Amazon, this person that doesn't follow me, and I don't follow and tweeted that. They replied to me, and they said, aka manipulation for Dummies. And I like looked at it. I was like, really? Like, you come to like, somebody's like celebration of this, and you show up with negativity like that. And then I thought they made the wise decision and deleted it. So. Okay, um, yeah, it was like a little is a little weird. And I mean, it hasn't weighed on me too much. And I think it is a concern of mine. I have right that like, people will manipulate people with this. But I think like people who are manipulative, like, they have long figured out all of this and more, and they don't need an instruction manual. Like those people intuitively understand how to manipulate people and use it for their evil and they don't need instructions. So So mostly people have been, have been positive. And it's, yeah, it's, it's honestly gone. So much better than I ever could have hoped. And, really, it really never would have come to fruition. Never mind been like this, had I not done it in public and had it not started out, you know, as just a humble little newsletter. And, you know, I think if I had done the image I had in my head of what a writer does, which is sort of disappear into a cave for a year and not speak to anyone or, you know, like, see sunlight for that period of time. And then emerge with this, you know, glowing tablets of wisdom or whatever, like, I never would have published it. And I also don't think it would be getting received like this. And so I'm just, I feel like I keep repeating myself, but I'm just so grateful for how supportive people have been and how so many people around the world have contributed to this. Whether it was you know, leaving anonymous comments on those early drafts on help this book or You know, tweeting support or reading rough drafts, like, you know, reading reading copies of it, like writing reviews, like just all of that is just, it's it's really deeply moving. To me. That's wonderful. And your support to Coleen?Colleen Schnettler  10:20  I'm taking full credit. I've taken credit. I feel like this was my idea. I feel like when we started this podcast, I said, let me tell you how this is gonna end. Michelle's gonna write a book and I'm gonna launch a product. And here we are, we went to podcasting.Michele Hansen  10:34  Anyway, so speaking of that, I have to mention that today is the one year anniversary of our first episode.Colleen Schnettler  10:45  Oh my goodness, can you believe it's been a year?Michele Hansen  10:47  I can't. I cannotColleen Schnettler  10:50  unrelated to this where we like recap everything that is soMichele Hansen  10:59  I just can't believe it.I mean, it's, it feels like so long ago that we started with also doesn't feel like that long ago.Colleen Schnettler  11:16  Yeah, it doesn't feel like a year to me. I was kind of surprised when you mentioned that. I mean, we've come so far. I think we talked about it a little bit last week or the week before when I was kind of bemoaning how I feel like I'm moving really slowly. Um, but if you look at what you've accomplished over a year, like it's, it's really been significant.Michele Hansen  11:39  Yeah, and I mean, you know, talking about the book too, like Patrick McKenzie is talking about friend catchers of like, things that you do that, you know, get you get you friends, basically. And I feel like this podcast has been such an amazing friend Catcher in a year that has otherwise been quite lonely and difficult with the pandemic, to have this going on to not only like, sort of force us to keep talking to each other were like, just for like, we used to be basically neighbors and meet up at a local coffee shop. And then now we have a nine hour time difference between us like, we would not be talking this much like an actually talking and not just like texting had, like if we didn't have this podcast, and I'm grateful for that. And and I'm also so grateful for everyone who has kind of jumped on to this like weird little project of ours and and want to be a part of it. Yeah, yeah.Colleen Schnettler  12:42  It's cool. It's cool. Speaking of, I don't I haven't heard that term friend catcher's, but it made me think of something I wanted to talk to you about. So I have some friends who have a business, and I've been consulting for them for about six months. And yesterday, they offered to bring me in as a full partner. Oh, and I don't know what to do. I mean, I do know what I want to do. But it's it's like a lot. And I think that these kinds of opportunities. I knew these guys be independent of the podcast, but I definitely think like expanding my reach has helped bring more of these kinds of opportunities to my doorstep, which is really cool.Michele Hansen  13:24  Yeah.Colleen Schnettler  13:25  Yes. So so I don't know. So that's something I'm considering. If I go in with them, there'd be three of us, it'd be a company of three founders. They don't actually have a launched product yet. But they have they own the IP of something. They built at work that they want to spin off and turn into its own product.Michele Hansen  13:44  Is this like, an open source? Like, I know you're involved with a couple of things? I think I might know which one this is. But they have some like open source stuff going on? Is it that one?Colleen Schnettler  13:56  Yeah, it's that one?Michele Hansen  13:57  Ah, sorry. Oh, a little bit cryptic here.Colleen Schnettler  14:01  I don't know if I'm gonna say yes. So I don't want to. I don't want to like, name them yet. But um, it's a really cool opportunity. I am really, I think their product is spec. They're not it's not a product yet. But I think their IP is spectacular. And it's making waves to like, yeah, yeah, people are excited about it. What they're doing is really cool. And I love the idea of, as we've talked about, like going in with, with people, and I know these guys really well. So it's not like random people that I'd be starting a company with. Yeah, I love going in with people that are unknown quantity. So that's exciting. SoMichele Hansen  14:41  like, just sort of, like recap. So I mean, so so when we started this podcast, right, like you were working full time as a, you know, software consultants, and had clients and you wanted to start a SAS and then you sort of finally picked something and started launching that in September of last year, and then bi, which is simple file upload. And then by December, you had something that was logical, you got into the Roku marketplace, it went public and you're allowed to start charging for it in February, you've gotten to this about 1000. Mr. Mark at this point, now you've kind of switch gears a little bit, you're still doing that you recently took a full time job that you're working Monday through Thursday, to lower some of that stress of having clients and and have work be a little more predictable and give you that space to also to still work on your SAS but not have it have that pressure of bringing in your full time income. And so you can kind of just just like a little. So how would being a partner in this project change that? Like, what would things look like on a practical level?Colleen Schnettler  15:54  I think practically, I don't know. So those are the details I'm trying to work out right now. Like, what would that look like? What would my involvement be? with them and selling their product? I think part of the reason is so so I built as, as a consultant for them, I built out a Rails or Ruby on Rails version of this product. So they kind of the reason they're asking me is because the bulls evangelist or the person who sells it to the rails community, essentially, because they cover a different a different back end community with their expertise. So I think that is a big concern is can I do all the things? I mean, that's, that's what I have to figure out. And I know we talk a lot on this podcast about trying to balance all the things. I want to do all the things. I need to figure out if I can do all the things and I can take advantage of this opportunity.Michele Hansen  16:52  Yeah.Colleen Schnettler  16:53  Oh, it's interesting, because as when when we try to grow like this, we always say, oh, I'll just hire someone, it is really hard to just hire someone. I think to find good developers, when I can think of the contract developers I know that I would hire to work on simple file upload, I think of two people that I have worked with before. And both of those people are incredibly busy. You know, like, I think when it's when it's your product, because theoretically, I could hire more help on simple file upload. And then I could try this other role with these guys on their product. But I'm hiring someone. It's not easy, like it's not, you know, I think everyone who's tried to do this can attest to that, especially good contract developers.Michele Hansen  17:41  So I want to run through some hypotheticals with you, and you tell me how you're feeling about them. Okay. Number one, is, you have this this this job you're working on Monday through Friday. And then on nights, you work on tipo, file upload, and then on Fridays, you work on this other thing. Let's just picture that in our heads for a moment. How do you feel about that?Colleen Schnettler  18:12  I don't feel good about that. Okay. And I think I think part of the background for folks that, you know, I don't know why you would know my life story. So I taught myself to code while I was working full time and had kids. And that was freaking exhausting. Like for, I don't know, two years, every sit if you go back in my Twitter history, like I used to do that 100 days of code thing, like, maybe not two years, but like, at least a year. I mean, every single night, I would listen to the code newbies podcast while I did the dishes, so I'd get pumped up about learning to code. And then I go every night and I was exhausted. And it worked out great for me, like, you know, I am exactly where I wanted to be when I did that. But that was really exhausting. And I'm in this really comfortable place now. And I want to be successful in my SAS. That's important to me. But I don't want to do that again. Yeah, I mean, it's just not not where I am right now in my life. Like, I don't want to be a slacker, but I also don't want to work 12 hours a day.Michele Hansen  19:15  Yeah. Understandably. I mean, you you did that like, and you know how hard it is. And it makes sense that you would not want to go back to that. Yeah. Okay. Here's another hypothetical. You keep the the nine to five Monday to Thursday job. You list simple file upload on micro acquire and it fetches one of those insane multiples that people are getting for stuff making $1,000 a month I require right now. And then you work on this other thing on Fridays?Colleen Schnettler  19:52  Yeah, so I thought about that. I feel like simple file upload though, is going to be so successful because I feel Like, I don't know. So I don't want to do that. The thing is, I don't want to do anything. I don't want to take on too many things that I do them all poorly, right? That's important. And I keep thinking, like the people who get what they want, are really good at focusing and not getting distracted. The people who spread themselves too thin no one wins.Michele Hansen  20:18  I mean, it's one who runs a company has a podcast and just wrote a book. I beg to disagree.Colleen Schnettler  20:25  You did them all spectacular. I don't know about that. But you know. So I think that I, so I thought about selling simple file upload, but it's almost feature complete, it's pretty much feature complete, and it just makes me money. If I don't touch it, it's just, it's just growing. Like, it's like magic unicorn over there.Michele Hansen  20:48  I mean, we just described a like cash throwing asset that doesn't need a ton of work on it that people would want to buy.Colleen Schnettler  20:57  Well, that's true. I mean, you could say that's why someone would buy it, because it literally, but I could also I mean, it's, I could just leave it my thought. Okay, so my thought is, what if I just leave it? Like, it doesn't need, we've talked about a lot of things like, my sister is working on some marketing plans for it, get it feature complete, there's like one or two things I need to add. I could just let it make me money, right. I mean, it's just or, or I turned down this other opportunity. And I go all in, not all in I mean, I continue with plan a plan A, which is focus on simple file, upload and see if I can grow it faster, while having that comfort and security of the full time job.Michele Hansen  21:45  I don't know. Okay, before we sort of move into that, let's just run through the last hypothetical that I thought of, and there's probably more, but we'll just stick it out with this one. You keep going with the nine to five, Monday through Thursday job. You work on simple file upload on Fridays, and you turn down this offer to work with these people who you think are working on. Okay, I'm not going to bias your, your.Colleen Schnettler  22:16  Um, so that's a good option, too. I feel like Okay, so let's let me take a step back and acknowledge the incredible, amazing position I'm in where I'm like, Oh, I have all these amazing opportunities. I don't know which one to take. So that's pretty spectacular. So I'm pretty happy about all of my choices. I don't think I can make a wrong choice here. I want to go in with these guys. Because I want co founders, I've always wanted co founders. I know it's hard it can it can bring conflict, and it's harder, but it's I think will be way more fun. And I think their product is really cool. I think it might be cooler than my product specials. SoMichele Hansen  22:57  how does the thought of not working on that and walking away from it feel?Colleen Schnettler  23:03  I think I'll regret it. Because I think when they start selling their product, they're gonna be millionaires. Like no joke. I mean, I think I don't think it'd be bad though. Like, I don't think it's a bad choice to walk away. If I walk away, then they'll just keep keep on keep on in and I can, you know, cheer them on from the sidelines. And we could always decide later, you know, they don't haven't even launched their product yet. Like, just so you know, so we can always decide later, maybe in six months, I have more time. And they're like, Oh, we really need a salesperson. Now, if I come in later, they're not going to offer me a full third. I'm sure they'll be like, we'll give you x amount. But I don't think I'm shutting the door completely on that opportunity if I don't take it right now.Michele Hansen  23:47  So they're offering you a full third. Yeah,Colleen Schnettler  23:51  that isMichele Hansen  23:53  interesting. Um, you know, to the the, I feel like that sort of brings us back to the option of, you know, you have a full time job, which is paying you then you have this SAS that basically doesn't need any work from you, where you casually make $12,000 a year, like without doing a whole lot like no big deal. And then you spend your Fridays working on this other thing. And maybe sometimes you have to put in some hours on simple file upload or you've got some help from contractors. How does that option feel?Colleen Schnettler  24:27  That actually feels good to me. I mean, I, you know, I just, I want to make sure I'm putting good products out there in the world. So that is important to me to make sure that if I do something like that, that simple file upload is not getting the shaft because I feel that's my thing. And I feel very, very strongly about giving that product the time and attention it needs. But it is feature complete, almost. And so I could just let it ride, keep doing customer interviews. I mean what if I took the next six months Once you've been telling me to do this forever, instead of like, obsessing over what feature to add, I just talked to people, I just talked to my customers once a week, for six months, and then I have gathered, that doesn't take a ton of my time, couple hours a week, then I have gathered this amazing catalogue of data. And then who knows where everything will, will fall out in a period of time. And then after I've gathered this catalogue of data, I can decide what to do next with it.Michele Hansen  25:28  I mean, I'm an advocate of doing, doing the research and doing the work at the same time. And, and doing, you know, doing the research on an ongoing basis. And, you know, you don't have to wait until you have a pile of data to make decisions.Colleen Schnettler  25:43  I know, but I'm trying, I feel like you're telling me not to not to take on too much stuff. And just be aware of that, like, I feel like, that's the vibe I'm getting from you is you're like, I don't know, make sure you sort this out before you accept it.Michele Hansen  25:55  It seems like it's, it's, it's justifiably important to you to be conscious of your energy and how you're spending your time. And also this sort of like pride in your craft and what you're selling to people and making sure that when you're selling them something, you feel like it's worth that money that they're giving you and you are not content to just collect a check.Colleen Schnettler  26:18  Right. And I have to make sure it's good.Michele Hansen  26:21  And and this is something where it, maybe it is a little bit harder for me to say sort of intrinsically understand this because I have to have multiple things going on. You know, we are we are different people with different neurological systems. And I think you're afraid that if you take on, you know, these three things, that you're not going to be able to give any of them 100%. And, and, and that worries you and and you took this job for your family stability, you know, to as part of being a provider for your family. And it seems like you don't want to stress yourself to the point where your work performance suffers, or your performance on simple file uploads anytime you're so proud of it that you don't want to sell it.Colleen Schnettler  27:20  Yeah, I don't want to sell it because I'm so free, cuz you see the opportunity there too.Michele Hansen  27:25  But the same time, there's opportunity there. And the fact that the foundry really pioneered people like well absolutely buy it. And like it might help if you you know, you, you decided to go, you know, all in so to speak for your side project time on this other thing, and then you were sitting on, you know, I don't know, a casual, you know, $20,000 or whatever. Um, or more Actually, that's really low multiple, like, probably like 50 or $100,000. I would not be surprised if you fetch that. Gosh, seriously, like I've seen stuff like, what's our episode last week or a couple weeks ago about multiples? They're, like, absolutely bonkers multiples going for these, like sort of low MRR? sasses, like, under like, 10,000 a month, like even under 1000 a month. Like, like, I thought I saw one that was like 24 times revenue, which isColleen Schnettler  28:19  wow, like, That's crazy. Yeah.Michele Hansen  28:23  Now, if you're making 500 a month, like, but still that's like, that's a huge premium.Colleen Schnettler  28:29  That's a huge Yeah, I don't know, I think you're right about, I think you're absolutely right about. I don't want to sell it because I feel very, I mean, it's my you know, it's my baby, like, I feel very invested in it. I'm excited. It feels like I finally finally, after you and I have been talking for years about my ideas, I found something that's working. So I then with me, their product is really cool. But they don't I think their products gonna work. I mean, it's pretty well validated because people have paid them to build it and let them keep the IP, but at the same time, they aren't actually selling anything yet. So they really haven't seen. Although I think you're absolutely right. It's going to be a, you know, a home run success. My thing is already working. So, you know, I'm hesitant to sell something that's working if I could just let it chill and get to it when I have time.Michele Hansen  29:31  You know, I remember I felt that way about when we were talking about God Oh, at first because we had this mobile app that was like working we had ad revenue like it was it was making us money and, um, and we desperately like, needed that money. And, and then it kind of came up that we you know, we need a geocoding for it to keep it going. And it was like she you know, should we put the time into it to make that into a product? Or should we focus on the thing that's already making money and just like, let it be just sort of something internal. And I remember having a lot of discussions with Mateus about that. And I remember I was on the side of, let's do the thing that's already making money. Because we know that's working. And, you know, lo and behold that app, I think it may be grossed $10,000, in its two or three years of existence. And, you know, God makes more than a day. So, like,Colleen Schnettler  30:35  it's, you know, theseMichele Hansen  30:37  things are really hard to predict. Yeah, you know, you were saying of like, I think you're trying to tell me to do this. I'm not trying to tell you to do anything. I'm not here to tell you what to do. I'm here to help you think,Colleen Schnettler  30:50  think andMichele Hansen  30:53  I can't tell you what is going to be the right decision for you. I can't tell you what's going to leave you with the fewest regrets. Um, you know, there's this other option where like, you know, these guys, maybe it's worth saying to them, like, hey, like, I love to come on is as a full partner. Like, if you're okay with me, you know, splitting my time between this and simple file upload for a while, like, I'm not ready to decide on what I want to do a simple file upload.Colleen Schnettler  31:27  And,Michele Hansen  31:29  you know, because the thing about getting on something that you think is a rocket ship, like, there's no guarantees and like, rockets explode all the time. Like, yeah, they do. Yeah, like, and if you like, you know, and if you got, like,Unknown Speaker  31:44  you know, I don't know,Michele Hansen  31:47  little like propeller planes that next there that you know, is going to get you from A to B, like might not get you to the moon, but it's you know, going to get you a hop, skip and a jump away to where you want to be like, sometimes that's a little safer, you know? Yeah. And I mean, I think if you were saying I'm going to quit my job and simply file upload and work on this other thing, I would be like,Unknown Speaker  32:10  okay, let's, let's take a breath.Unknown Speaker  32:13  Um,Unknown Speaker  32:15  maybe you don't have to decide,Unknown Speaker  32:17  right? Yeah,Colleen Schnettler  32:19  yeah, I think more conversations. I think that's the right answer. I think I need to think a little bit. I liked your hypothetical. What does that look like?Michele Hansen  32:27  Yeah, just sort of went through it. Like, what are all different permutations?Colleen Schnettler  32:31  Yeah. Cool. All right. Well, tune in next week to find out what kylene has decided to do with her life again. Alright, so on that note, let's wrap up this week's episode of the software social podcast. Thank you so much for tuning in. If you enjoyed the show, please leave us a review on iTunes and we'd love to hear from you on Twitter.Michele Hansen  32:57  And thank you so much for listening. Whether this is your first episode you're listening to or You have been listening since the beginning. It really means a lot to both of us. And I keep wishing we could have like software, social con or something. We're just like, get together and hang out. Because I feel like that would be really fun. So yeah, thank you for listening.Transcribed by https://otter.ai

Therapists In The Wild
28. Responding Skillfully to Feedback

Therapists In The Wild

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2021 55:35


In this month's episode of TITW, we address a therapy hot topic (and one that Liza and Molly discuss regularly with each other off-air): how to accept feedback in both personal and professional settings, especially when (you perceive) it is negative. We explain why feedback can feel so hurtful to receive, and, on the other side of the dialectic, why it is so often necessary for growth. We share examples from our own lives, particularly throughout our therapist training, of times when even the most upsetting comments have helped us evolve and move toward our values. Understandably, when Emotion Mind shows up, it can be easy to miss the "kernel of truth" in others' input on your behavior. Therefore, we discuss how to use DBT skills in the moment to stay mindful and effective rather than respond impulsively. We give tips on how to manage repetitive negative thoughts related to what was said, and how you might eventually respond once you are in Wise Mind. Finally, we address how to incorporate Self-Respect ("FAST") skills when responding to feedback, particularly if you disagree with the content or how it was delivered. We hope you enjoy and find this episode helpful! ...And speaking of feedback, we welcome your feedback and would love to hear from you! Please email us at TherapistsInTheWild@gmail.com and let us know how you've been enjoying Season 2 so far. If you'd like to support TITW, we would be very grateful for donations of any amount you feel comfortable via Venmo @MollyStDenis. If a donation is not possible at this time, you can still support our work by leaving a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. Thank you! *Check out our website at therapistsinthewild.com. And follow us on Instagram and Facebook @TherapistsInTheWild, and Twitter @TherapistsWild.

Chelsea FanCast
50 Years of Chelsea: 1975-76

Chelsea FanCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 79:17


The Chelsea FanCast looks back, season by season, to 50 Years of Chelsea history from 1970 to the present day. Stamford Chidge is joined by Jonathan Kydd and Mark Meehan to look back at the 1975-76 season. Chelsea find themselves in Division Two having been relegated the previous season. Eddie McCreadie is charged with rejuvenating Chelsea and this season is very much one of transition. McCreadie puts his faith in the youth, giving an 18 year old Ray Wilkins the Captaincy and bringing in players such as John Sparrow, Gary Stanley, Ian Britton & Teddy Maybank. In truth he had little choice as the Club had almost gone in to receivership over the summer.Understandably, Chelsea were consistently inconsistent, with very up and down league form which saw no wins in the last 9 games to finish in 11th; Chelsea's lowest ever league finish at that point.The high point of the season was perhaps also the low point as Chelsea lost 3-2 to Fedora wearing Malcolm Allison's Crystal Palace in the 5th round of the FA Cup. 55,000 crammed in to Stamford Bridge that day as Chelsea supporters sniffed some unexpected cup glory, but it was not to be. At least 3rd Division Palace reached the semi-final, ironically played at Stamford Bridge.But this season was arguably the making of one of the greatest home grown talents seen at the club; Ray Wilkins, who was the leading appearance maker (47) and top goal scorer (12).From here it could only get better… To help us celebrate 50 Years of Chelsea we've partnered with 3Retro who have a superb collection of Chelsea retro gear and are offering 10% OFF when you use the 3RETRO10 code and if you order over £50 of merch you get FREE UK delivery. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sales Maven
Creating A Safe Space In Sales: On-air coaching call with Jenn Trinidad

Sales Maven

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 39:32


Find out how to build trust with uncertain prospects that seem to abandon their interest in moving forward with you. Your very own sales maven, Nikki, is here to offer tips, techniques, and strategies to master your sales conversations. She'll be taking you with her as she gives live coaching advice to a client. Listen to real examples and strategies for getting prospects to complete the sales process on this episode of the Sales Maven Show. Today's episode is an on-air coaching call with a member of the Sales Maven Society, Jenn Trinidad. She is calling in from Honolulu, HI where she operates her digital business. Jenn runs a website called budgetdivas.com, which is a membership site for women interested in budget tips and financial freedom. Her business was inspired by her own journey of paying off $90k of debt in four years, with $41k of the $90k debt being paid in that last year. Jenn uses her expertise to help women manage their finances, and helps women hit goals quicker than expected. Jenn shares her pillars of finance and budgeting to create a good structure for money management. Not only does she help format the organization of finance and budgeting, she also makes a point to work on the mindset around how to interact with money. A key factor she talks about is being aware of the numbers. For example, a client originally predicted that they would complete their debt payment in 2023, and Jenn was able to create a plan that would complete the payment in 2021.  Understandably, Jenn is absolutely confident in the value she provides, but she noticed that some prospects weren't moving past their initial interest in her service. Nikki talks Jenn through how to get prospects through the sales staircase after initiating their curiosity. The conversation needs to focus on asking effective questions that lead prospects to engage with a service, as well as creating safety for prospects so they feel that they can comfortably reveal the most useful information for helping Jenn provide value to the prospect. Nikki wants to invite you to join the Sales Maven Society, don't miss this opportunity for you and Nikki to work together. Bring your questions, concerns, sales challenges, and she provides answers and guidance to boost your confidence. Join the Sales Maven Society here, click add to cart, and then checkout and use coupon code: 47trial to get your first month for $47.00!   In This Episode: [00:43] Welcome, and thank you for listening! [00:53] Today, our on-air coaching call is with Jenn Trinidad. [02:25] Jenn's service started from her own story of paying off $90k of debt. [03:58] Being observant and managing mindset obstacles changes the possibilities in how you can accomplish your budget goals. [06:11] Imagine the freeing feeling of hitting your goals quicker than you anticipated. [07:42] Jenn wants to discuss how to get prospects through the sales staircase after initiating their curiosity. [08:25] In the journey from curiosity to sale, follow the curiosity phase with an invitation. [10:51] Set a scheduled time when you are together with the prospect; that means “in the moment” you are talking. [13:23] Nikki talks about the questions that lead prospects to engage with a service. [16:13] Deal with uncertainty in prospects by giving assurance, and relieving the pressure of obligation. [19:02] Nikki gives an example of what happens when reconnecting with prospects that did not move forward. [22:07] Figure out what kind of content you can create that ties back to your main service, and amplifies your message. [24:25] Consider creating safety for prospects, in case they are experiencing embarrassment. [27:07] Nikki gives a hack for talking honestly without feeling too transparent.  [28:47] Emphasize your ability to help prospects see the blind spots you can address by using mindful language. [30:20] Nikki and Jenn agree that financial literacy would be great to learn earlier in life. [32:45] You should aim to complete the invitation and create safety for prospects. [33:54] Nikki explains that money doesn't need to be an uncomfortable topic. [35:31] Jenn shares what she likes about  the Sales Maven Society, and shares details about her membership site. [37:49] Thank you for listening. I am so grateful you are here!   Find Nikki: Nikki Rausch nikki@yoursalesmaven.com @yoursalesmaven Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | Instagram Sales Maven Society To download free Resources from Nikki: www.yoursalesmaven.com/maven   Find Jenn: Budget Divas Instagram | Podcast  

Secure Your Retirement
Renee Hillman – Buying and Selling Real Estate in a Hot Market

Secure Your Retirement

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 23:53


Do you have a plan to buy or sell a property in a hot market? Understandably, that you may want to invest in real estate in a hot market as part of your retirement planning or sell to invest elsewhere.  When consulting a realtor or a listing agent, you need to get clear with your needs to set the expectations and get through the process.  In this episode of the Secure Your Retirement podcast, we have Renee Hillman talk about what it takes to buy or sell a property in a hot market like Raleigh. Renee is a real estate broker/realtor out of Raleigh and enjoys helping people find their dream homes.  Listen in to understand the meaning of due diligence and how it applies in a hot real estate market.  In this episode, find out: The state of the real estate market today for both buyers and sellers. The low inventory and high pressure on the real estate market in Raleigh.  The benefits of having a well-fixed and maintained house to have a competitive advantage. How realtors are educating both buyers and sellers where the current market stands.  Why due diligence has become important in Raleigh's real estate market.  Understanding the property listing and appraisal in today's market.  Why you should first contact a local real estate expert to understand your market.  Tweetable Quotes: “Due diligence is the money seller gets to keep should you ever back out of the deal for any reason whatsoever.” “A listing agent isn't able to disclose any terms on an offer.” Get in Touch with Coach Chris: Website: https://hregsells.com/ (https://hregsells.com/)  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/reneesells/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/reneesells/)  Resources: If you are in or nearing retirement and you want to gain clarity on what questions you should be asking, learn what the biggest retirement myths are, and identify what you can do to achieve peace of mind for your retirement, get started today by requesting our complimentary video course, Four Steps to Secure Your Retirement! To access the course, simply visit https://pomwealth.net/3-keys-to-secure-your-retirementlp/ (POMWealth.net/podcast.)  To receive our free book, Get Off the Retirement Rollercoaster, leave a 5-star rating review on Apple Podcasts and send a screenshot to morgan@pomwealth.net.

Live Well Be Well
When clean eating goes to far

Live Well Be Well

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2021 59:59


What often starts with the pursuit of ‘healthy' eating, can turn into a very restrictive lifestyle and damaging consequences, resulting in nutrient deficiency, malnutrition and severe anxiety around food.   Orthorexia is based on behaviours that are ‘unhealthy' or ‘obsessive' around food. Understandably, orthorexia can be difficult too diagnose as we see a rise in the pursuit of healthy eating.  In today's episode I speak to Dr Rachel Evans, a chartered psychologist and has herself suffered from orthorexia and bulimia. Rachel speaks from her personal experience of her eating disorder and may be triggering for some people.  Show notes Host @sarahannmacklin |  www.sarahannmacklin.com |   Mental Health support @be_well_collective | www.bewellcollective.co.uk #LiveWellBeWell   Rachel Evans | @rachel.evans.phd     Links https://www.vogue.co.uk/beauty/article/stop-complimenting-weight-loss   https://christyharrison.com/book-anti-diet-intuitive-eating-christy-harrison   https://instagram.com/danaemercer?utm_medium=copy_link   Further support:   https://eating-disorders.org.uk/ https://www.beateatingdisorders.org.uk/  

Composers Datebook
Tower's musical "islands"

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2021 2:00


Synopsis The American composer Joan Tower says that explaining her own music is (quote) “sheer torture for me.” Understandably, she prefers to let her music speak for itself, and many of her works have simple generic titles like: “Piano Concerto” or “Concerto for Orchestra.” But audiences generally prefer more evocative titles, and on more than one occasion Tower has provided them.  On today's date in 1985, the Florida Orchestra premiered a piece by Tower entitled “Island Rhythms,” a celebratory work commissioned for the opening of Tampa's Harbour Island. Tower suggested that Caribbean music influenced the livelier outer sections of her new piece, and its central, slower section evoked the  image of an underwater swimmer rising slowly, but steadily towards the light. And for the St. Louis Symphony's oboist, Peter Bowman, Tower composed in 1989 an “Island Prelude,” for solo oboe and orchestra. When pressed to describe what sort of “island” she had in mind, Tower replied with (her) usual poetic eloquence: “The island is remote, lush and tropical with stretches of white beach interspersed with thick green jungle. Above is a large, powerful and brightly colored bird which soars and glides, … in complete harmony with its island home.” Music Played in Today's Program Joan Tower (b. 1938) — Island Rhythms (Louisville Orchestra; Lawrence Leighton Smith, cond.) Louisville 6 Joan Tower (b. 1938) — Island Prelude (Peter Bowman, oboe; Saint Louis Symphony; Leonard Slatkin, cond.) Nonesuch 79245

Jason Zuk, The Social Psychic Radio Show and Podcast
Forrest Rivers Discusses His Book, COVID 19 and Humanity's Spiritual Awakening

Jason Zuk, The Social Psychic Radio Show and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2021 59:00


Understandably, COVID 19 has been a harbinger of mass chaos and unspeakable tragedy for many people. However, Forrest Rivers, an author and inspirational speaker maintains in his newly released and highly uplifting book, COVID-19 and Humanity's Spiritual Awakening, that if we are able to still our minds and fully be with the immensity of this moment, we can start to see a different narrative emerging: one of hope, personal empowerment and spiritual awakening. Forrest's uplifting message is one that is desperately needed in these times of great suffering and division. Forrest became interested in the spiritual traditions of the Far East and began to immerse himself in the teachings of Buddhist, Hindu, and Taoist mystics and took the pen name Forrest Rivers in honor of the Earth and her profound healing power. Today, Forrest is a teacher of meditation and has started meditation gatherings at each of the schools that he has taught at during his over decade long run as a community college professor. Today, Forrest spends a great deal of his time guiding others to look within and become the best versions of themselves. In the very near future, it is his dream to start a wilderness retreat center that focuses on the spirit of service and inner work. Author Website:  ForrestRivers.com and COVID-19book.info

The First-Gen Lounge
Summer 2021: Session 171 (How to Bounce Back When Life Gives You Lemons with Tetnika Williamson)

The First-Gen Lounge

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2021 29:41


We've all heard this quote and even used it in our essays countless times: "When life gives you lemons, make lemonade." But what happens when real tragedy strikes? Understandably, sometimes it's a struggle to see a silver lining when life throws curveballs at you. But I will tell you this; it's crucial that you adapt as quickly as possible and look on the bright side instead of making pointless complaints. I see no point in whining about missed opportunities, past mistakes, and being upset when things do not go our way. Instead of focusing on the "lemons," change your mindset and focus on all the things you can do to salvage the situation. As a first-generation college graduate, I've learned that many different roads can lead to success. The world is full of opportunities; you just have to look a little harder than the rest. Check out the full session notes: www.evehudsonphd.com/2021/06/171 Track by The Boy: https://theboy.beatstars.com/music/tracks. Join The Evingerlean Worldwide Family: https://www.evehudsonphd.com/family/. Grab your #firstgen goodies: https://www.evehudsonphd.com/shop/. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Bible Thinker
20 Questions with Pastor Mike (Episode 34)

Bible Thinker

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2021 103:05


Question Time Stamps for Quick Reference:0:00 - Introduction 1. 0:52 {Offering Counsel in Difficult Situations} I’m in a master's program with Liberty University for clinical mental health counseling. During our training, we were asked how we would handle certain difficult situations, such as if a LGBTQ couple would request help strengthening their relationship, or request help advocating for adoption rights, or advocating for trans. people. Can you please give me some biblical principles to follow, to help me counsel these people in a caring way without condoning unbiblical behavior?2. 11:14 {Advice for a Difficult Marriage} Any advice on how to help a brother in Christ (who's also a preacher) not leave his marriage because he's miserable and he claims "God doesn't want him miserable"?3. 19:19 {Refuting JW Theology} A Jehovah’s Witness said that all the letters in the NT addressed to saints are for the 144,000 (example: Romans 1:7). How do I show that a saint is a believer, and that the NT should be applied to everyone?4. 26:00 {Does Modalism Jeopardize Salvation?} Does modalism lead to other fallacies? If someone believes in Christ except they don’t believe that Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are each distinct, could their salvation be in jeopardy?5. 30:00 {Witnessing to Abuse Victims} A friend was sexually abused by her family including her mother, foster family, the school priests, and her first husband. Understandably, she refuses to believe in any God. How can I witness to her?6. 33:22 {Are man-made Covenants Biblical?} Are man-made covenants for pastoral ordination biblical (specifically, covenants binding oneself to denominational doctrines and principles)? The Salvation Army requires this for their pastors.7. 37:19 {Should Believers Expect to Hear/Feel God?} I have never "felt"/"heard" from the Holy Spirit/God. I believe in and follow Jesus, but I feel like I am missing something. Should a Christian be literally hearing/feeling something from God?8. 45:23 {About the Overcomers in Rev.} What are your thoughts on the overcomers mentioned by Jesus in Revelation 3:5-12? Would you consider these to be believers in general, a specific group of believers, or some other group?9. 50:47 {Do Angels Sing?} Do angels sing? Or is worshipping via singing something unique to humanity? Thank you so much for your ministry. It really is encouraging for me and my wife. How can we be praying for you and your family?10. 54:22 {Can we find Proof of Jesus’ Existence?} I heard there are more proofs that Jesus is a real person than there are for people like King Tut, etc. is this true? If so, is there somewhere I can go to find those proofs?11. 1:01:02 {Is Satan an Actual “being”?} What would you say to the brethren that suggest that Satan is not actually a being? People argue that the OT doesn’t describe him as a singular being but something of the human mind.12. 1:03:44 {Same Spirit but Different Opinions?} Discerning the Spirit: I’m having a hard time understanding how Christians are all supposed to have the same Holy Spirit but we are so divided on so many issues.13. 1:06:30 {Bible Contradiction?} Can you explain the what appears to be contradiction in 1 Kings 7: 26 and 2 Chronicles 4:5, due to the different numbers?14. 1:12:59 {Jesus’ Genealogy/Lineage} How historically plausible is it that the Jesus‘ genealogies in Matthew and Luke authentically trace back to the Exile, Kind David, Abraham, and so on?15. 1:16:02 {About Same-Sex Attraction} As a Side B/Celibate same-sex attracted Christian, do you believe God can change my attraction to eventually desire to marry a woman?16. 1:21:21 {Encouragement through Chronic Illness} I’m newly diagnosed with a very debilitating chronic illness. How do I continue to serve the Lord in my role as a wife and mother and serve the body o

The Wellness Mama Podcast
447: Kambo Frog Medicine for Detox, Healing, and Trauma Release With Todd Shipman

The Wellness Mama Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2021 59:53


If you follow my Instagram, you already know that I’ve tried Kambo, a secretion from a poisonous Amazonian frog that actually has positive health benefits for humans. Understandably this raised a lot of questions from all of you, like “why would you do that?” and “what does it do?”. This episode goes deep on all …

The Ten Minute Bible Hour Podcast - The Ten Minute Bible Hour
0394 - Jesus' Death Finally Sinks In For His Friends and It's Understandably Tough

The Ten Minute Bible Hour Podcast - The Ten Minute Bible Hour

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2021 12:40


Thanks to everyone who supports TMBH at patreon.com/thetmbhpodcast You're the reason we can all do this together! Discuss the episode here Music written and performed by Jeff Foote.