Podcasts about Chichester

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Cathedral city in West Sussex, England

  • 230PODCASTS
  • 691EPISODES
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  • Jan 18, 2022LATEST
Chichester

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Best podcasts about Chichester

Latest podcast episodes about Chichester

LTB Podcast
#327 Greg Smith: Handling The Ebbs & Flows of Being a Personal Trainer

LTB Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 40:27


Greg Smith, owner of Core Results in Chichester, joins Stuart for today's episode. They discuss dealing with the ups & downs of being a PT, why he's stuck with PT for such a long time, his advice to a new trainer, approaching people on the gym floor, becoming financially literate and much more.     Find Out More About Greg: Website: https://www.coreresults.co.uk/  Email: greg@coreresults.co.uk   Find Out More About LTB: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/liftthebar/  Website: https://liftthebar.com/ 

Something Rhymes with Purple
Chum (Recorded live at Chichester Festival Theatre)

Something Rhymes with Purple

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 33:34


It's the second instalment from our live show at the Chichester Festival Theatre and in this episode Susie and Gyles take us through the revolving doors of the language of hotels. Gyles re-visits his days as an MP as we uncover the origin of the word ‘lobby' and Susie reveals the icy reason why at 15, she aspired to be a hotel manager! Fortunately for us, Susie instead decided to become a lexicographer and takes us on a few further visits to hostels and chamber chums with detours to pickets and prisons along the way. The 1000 strong crowd at Chichester put Susie and Gyles to the test with their questions (transcribed below) and came up with some very inventive definitions for Susie's Trio. Questions from the live audience - TRANSCRIPTION:  Sarah Brocker, - “Where does the word Trug for a garden basket come from?” David Lambert, Chichester - “What is the origin of the word ‘Flapjacket', it sounds as if it should be made of surgical steel doesn't it?" Audience member 3 - "At university, I used the word ‘somewhen', and people looked at me like I was stupid?" Audience member 4 - “How do you pronounce Gif?” A Somethin' Else production. To buy SRWP mugs and more head to.... https://kontraband.shop/collections/something-rhymes-with-purple If you would like to sign up to Apple Subs please follow this link https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/something-rhymes-with-purple/id1456772823 and make sure that you are running the most up-to-date IOS on your computer/device otherwise it won't work. If you would like to see Gyles and Susie LIVE and in person on our Something Rhymes With Purple UK Tour then please go to https://www.tiltedco.com/somethingrhymeswithpurple for tickets and more information. Susie's Trio: Griffonage - sloppy or careless handwriting Cachinnate - loud cackle Cancatevate - to heap stuff into a pile Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Don’t Give Up on Testicular Cancer
Taking Care of Life with Non-Traditional Yoga and Optimism – A Testicular Cancer Survivor's Story - Season 2, Episode 3

Don’t Give Up on Testicular Cancer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 38:16


Tim Kenny decided to take care of life after testicular cancer with a positive outlook and nontraditional yoga. Learn more about this home inspector and yoga instructor who talks about his approach to life in Chichester, England, UK.  His optimism provides insights valuable to everyone touched by cancer, and listeners will learn more about why he likes and teaches nontraditional yoga. Listen to Tim on the Don't Give Up on Testicular Cancer podcast from the Max Mallory Foundation.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/bePatron?u=60247613)

The Sport Psych Show
#170 Dr Oliver Runswick – Motor Development and Anticipation

The Sport Psych Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 70:25


I speak with Dr Oliver Runswick in this episode. Ollie is a Lecturer (Assistant Professor) in Performance Psychology at King's College London. His research focuses on understanding and enhancing learning and performance in domains including sport, dance, education, and the military. Prior to joining King's Ollie worked as a Senior Lecturer in Sport and Exercise Psychology and Programme Co-ordinator at The University of Chichester and as an Evening Lecturer in ‘The Brain: Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience' at Imperial College London. He has received a first-class BSc in Sport and Exercise Science from Swansea University, MSc in Human Movement Science from Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, PGCHE from St Mary's University, and PhD from Liverpool Hope University where he studied perceptual-motor skills based with St Mary's University's Expertise and Skill Acquisition Research Group.  

Grace Church - Bognor Regis Podcast
Come Together for Christmas: The Imperfectly Perfect Family (Ashley Kuchanny, recorded at Chichester)

Grace Church - Bognor Regis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021


Kings and prostitutes, murderers and worshippers, and some thoroughly unremarkable folk! This preach explores some of the incredible women and men who make up the family tree of Jesus Christ. We look at why God chose a family full of sinners and outsiders to bring his Perfect One into the world, and the brilliant news of what that means for us today.

Grace Church - Havant Podcast
Come Together for Christmas: God's Plan Coming Together (Guy Barton, Havant)

Grace Church - Havant Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021


God's plan for rescuing us was prepared from the beginning of time. A look at Jesus's family tree, a scriptural challenge and some colourful ancestors.

Grace Church - Chichester Podcast
Come Together for Christmas: The Imperfectly Perfect Family (Ashley Kuchanny, Chichester)

Grace Church - Chichester Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021


Kings and prostitutes, murderers and worshippers, and some thoroughly unremarkable folk! This preach explores some of the incredible women and men who make up the family tree of Jesus Christ. We look at why God chose a family full of sinners and outsiders to bring his Perfect One into the world, and the brilliant news of what that means for us today. 

Grace Church - Havant Podcast
Different Worship: Part 10: Different in… Commitment (Steve Blaber, Havant)

Grace Church - Havant Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021


Jesus' teaching in the Sermon on the Mount challenges us with three questions;  are you a true disciple, what are your foundations and who has ultimate authority in your life? Jesus does not want us to be in any doubt about where we stand before him.

Grace Church - Chichester Podcast
Different Worship: Part 10: Different in… Commitment (Steve Blaber, Chichester)

Grace Church - Chichester Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021


Jesus' teaching in the Sermon on the Mount challenges us with three questions;  are you a true disciple, what are your foundations and who has ultimate authority in your life? Jesus does not want us to be in any doubt about where we stand before him.

Grace Church - Bognor Regis Podcast
Different Worship: Part 10: Different in… Commitment (Steve Blaber, Bognor Regis)

Grace Church - Bognor Regis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021


Jesus' teaching in the Sermon on the Mount challenges us with three questions;  are you a true disciple, what are your foundations and who has ultimate authority in your life? Jesus does not want us to be in any doubt about where we stand before him.

Grace Church - Chichester Podcast
Different Worship: Part 9: Different in… Relationships (Joe Leach, Chichester)

Grace Church - Chichester Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021


Jesus calls his people to be brothers and sisters to one another, children of their Father in heaven, and wary of false prophets posing as sheep. In sum, his people are to do to others as they would have others do to them.

Grace Church - Havant Podcast
Different Worship: Part 9: Different in… Relationships (Joe Leach, Havant)

Grace Church - Havant Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021


Jesus calls his people to be brothers and sisters to one another, children of their Father in heaven, and wary of false prophets posing as sheep. In sum, his people are to do to others as they would have others do to them.

Grace Church - Bognor Regis Podcast
Different Worship: Part 9: Different in… Relationships (Joe Leach, Bognor Regis)

Grace Church - Bognor Regis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021


Jesus calls his people to be brothers and sisters to one another, children of their Father in heaven, and wary of false prophets posing as sheep. In sum, his people are to do to others as they would have others do to them.

Capes and Lunatics
Chichester Chats Ep #4: Daredevil #304

Capes and Lunatics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 4:57


Chichester Chats Ep #4: Daredevil #304 Welcome back to the Chichester Chats! In each episode Phil and Lilith chat with writer D.G. Chichester about one of his comic book stories.  This time the group discusses Daredevil #304 from 1992 featuring a different kind of Daredevil story. Show notes: Chichester Chats Ep #4: Daredevil #304 Find all of our Social Media here: https://linktr.ee/capesandlunatics Follow Phil Perich on Twitter: https://twitter.com/NIghtwingpdp  Follow Lilith Hellfire on Twitter: https://twitter.com/LilithHellfire Follow D.G. Chichester on Twitter: https://twitter.com/dgchichester Subscribe to D.G. Chichester's newsletter here: storymaze.substack.com Produced by: Capes and Lunatics Production Team: Phil Perich Support the Capes and Lunatics Podcast on Patreon www.patreon.com/capesandlunatics

Grace Church - Havant Podcast
Moses Set Free From His Past (Terry Virgo, Havant)

Grace Church - Havant Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021


Moses' response to the Lord's request to set his people free was full of doubt. Do we answer God in the same way sometimes? Terry looks at Exodus 4 to help us understand how we can be free from our past in order to say yes to God's will for our lives.

Grace Church - Bognor Regis Podcast
Moses Set Free From His Past (Terry Virgo, Bognor Regis)

Grace Church - Bognor Regis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021


Moses' response to the Lord's request to set his people free was full of doubt. Do we answer God in the same way sometimes? Terry looks at Exodus 4 to help us understand how we can be free from our past in order to say yes to God's will for our lives.

Grace Church - Chichester Podcast
Moses Set Free From His Past (Terry Virgo, Chichester)

Grace Church - Chichester Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021


Moses' response to the Lord's request to set his people free was full of doubt. Do we answer God in the same way sometimes? Terry looks at Exodus 4 to help us understand how we can be free from our past in order to say yes to God's will for our lives.

Principled
S6E11 | Is gamified learning really all fun and games?

Principled

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 32:31


Abstract: Gamification involves more than just shooting lasers and collecting gold coins. When done well, it has the power to enhance learning experiences and influence the way people make decisions. In this episode of the Principled Podcast, LRN Learning Director Kai Merriott speaks with Johnny McMonagle, one of LRN's lead Creative Designers, about how to leverage gamification effectively when developing E&C training. Listen in as Kai and Johnny discuss the process of identifying the right opportunities for gamified learning, the importance of telling the right story with training material, and their favorite gamified elements—including a 3D-printer of doughnuts.   Featured guest: Johnny McMonagle brings over 20 years of experience in e-learning and instructional design to LRN. As Lead Designer, he leverages his graphic design and animation skills to develop interactive elements for training software that create more engaging learning experiences and encourage ethical behavior. He also works collaboratively with clients and internal stakeholders to ensure these learning products deliver effectively on key business objectives. Johnny specializes in drawing, illustration, and character and concept design. Prior to joining LRN, Johnny was the Lead Designer at Interactive Services, where he developed interactive training elements using Flash and Photoshop. Before that, he worked as a graphic designer at the e-learning company MindLeaders. Johnny received his diploma in classical animation at Ballyfermot Senior College in Dublin, Ireland.   Featured Host:  Kai has worked in learning management and instructional design since 2001 and has worked at LRN (formerly Interactive Services) since 2013. As a Learning Director, he designs creative learning programs that focus on changing behavior, with a particular focus on pushing visual design and creating compelling animations and videos. He also leads and monitors his team's instructional design approaches. Kai has designed training on a variety of topics within compliance—including diversity, code of conduct, information security, anti-bribery, and money laundering. He's also created training on brand awareness, systems training, social media policies, food safety, sales, customer service, and marketing. He has created these programs for companies all over the world including Bloomberg, Amex, Finra, Facebook, Kraft-Heinz, AIB, Johnson & Johnson, Deloitte, Morgan Stanley, Intel, BlackRock, State Street, BNY Mellon, and Colgate. Several of Kai's training programs and videos have won awards from Brandon Hall and other training institutions. He earned his MA in creative writing and BA in English at University of Chichester in Sussex.   Transcript: Intro: Welcome to the Principled Podcast, brought to you by LRN. The Principled Podcast brings together the collective wisdom on ethics, business and compliance, transformative stories of leadership, and inspiring workplace culture. Listen in to discover valuable strategies from our community of business leaders and workplace change-makers. Kai Merriott: When you hear the word gamification, what comes to mind? Do you think of shooting lasers and collecting gold coins or about influencing the way people make decisions? Too often organizations lean on gamification for the sake of making their ethics compliance program look more tech-savvy. So how can you ensure you develop gamification in a way that enhances training? Hello, and welcome to another episode of LRN's Principled Podcast, I'm your host Kai Merriott a learning director at LRN. And today I'm joined by Johnny McMonagle one of our lead creative designers for LRN, we're going to be talking about gamification in learning. So, Johnny, is a real expert in this space with more than 20 years of experience designing interactive graphic elements for e-learning and training software. So Johnny, thanks for coming on the Principled Podcast. Johnny McMonagle: Hey Kai, thanks for having me, looking forward to this discussion. Kai Merriott: So Johnny we've obviously worked together on many gamified learning projects in the past but just for the purposes of this conversation, how would you describe gamification and meaning the way that we talk about it? Johnny McMonagle: Yeah. I think our approach to gamification is to make our training a lot more engaging, it's going to stand out from your normal e-learning and normal training and that is going to look and feel very different. It's going to be engaging, it's going to be enjoyable and it'll be short to the point, but the experience will actually be a pleasurable one and that's where the element comes in, that it's not just education it's actually a fun thing to do. Kai Merriott: And these sort of gamified elements on top of that is in there so, well, it's fun and it's engaging but also it has game mechanics as well like I suppose scoring. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah, we do that. Apart from the visuals, you will look at a screen and you will see things that you'll see on an arcade game, you'll see a score, you'll see a play button, you might hear the music and the sound effects that you're used to from games and you'll know the second you sit down to do it you're not just clicking next, you're seeing the elements that go into making a game. Kai Merriott: So when I think about all the projects we've done together which have those gaming mechanics and the gaming elements, I kind of think that every gamified course has really two distinct elements that make it really sort of compelling and engaging and the first is I think a really good story from beginning to end, you put that story element in there that kind of drives you from one part of the learning to the next, but also really good interactivity. Let's start from the beginning in terms of, what do we actually think about first usually? Do we actually start with the story or do we start with what gaming elements can we put into this training? Johnny McMonagle: Yes. And I've seen that where I think we always start with the story because the story will drive everything. How do we get from A to B on your learning journey? What is it we're trying to do? So we start with a story and we'll tell the story and everything will evolve from there. For example, a recent course I did was on global trade and we said, well, what is the story here? The global trade it tells itself, you're going to go around the world, you're trading with different countries so we said, how are we going to make that work? And I said to the learning manager, I said, well, how about this? I found an image, it was a little plain going around the globe, I said, well, that's you, you're the character, and we're going to go from A to B and we're going to learn things as you go. Every destination is going to have a consequence and at the end of it you have learned something. And it led to itself that it looked like a game board, it felt like a game and every step of the way it felt you were learning but it was very game-like, and that was the story that led all of those decisions that we put into it and it worked very well. Kai Merriott: And I think if you were to try and do it the other way around, you kind of start, oh, we know we've got 10 gaming elements to choose from and now let's try and build a story from that, that just never works, does it? Johnny McMonagle: No, it's kind of working backwards where you're shoehorning just for the sake of it and I've seen it never gels, there are too many different elements just they don't work. We've seen that in putting sound effects into a quiz, it doesn't make it a game, it's just window dressing. I think it has to be more cohesive and it has to have a strong narrative and all the different elements from the visuals, the style of writing, the sound effects, it all has to tie in. And with the idea of gamification in your mind you have to think, does this play, does it feel like a game? I think that's what you're striving to do. Kai Merriott: Yeah. And I think it's funny you said earlier about, you can't just put sound effects on a quiz and call it a game, I think that's absolutely right. I think you start with that really strong story but then I think we do layer it with sound effects and I think we shouldn't forget that either. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah. I think sound effects are very important and they can really enhance the whole experience, it's just one of the many elements and it's a very rich element to have and it can add so much to the experience. We were saying before about sound effects in games, we hark back to the beginning of games, the arcade games again and we all respond to those. We know what a good sound sounds like and we know what losing a life sounds like just from our shared memories of arcade games and home video systems. These are common things that we all understand, we all can respond to and it really does enhance it but having it on its own you need to think of the other elements too and they all have to come together to make that cohesive game experience that feels like a game. Kai Merriott: Yeah, absolutely. And I'm thinking about the sound effects, I think we slightly age ourselves, don't we? When we talk about arcade games. Johnny McMonagle: This is true. Yes. Like the coin slot in the arcade. Because it's funny in saying that though, I think to this day we still harp back to the early Nintendos and we know what that sounds like. And even for people who've never played a game of any age, we go, yeah, I am now playing a video game. It is kind of a universal and nearly a timeless thing that we can all relate to it in the same way. Kai Merriott: Yeah. There's something almost instinctive about, you said earlier, about the noise that means you've won and the noise that means you've lost a life. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah. I think it's some sort of shared global experience that no matter where we're from we know what it sounds like. Even if it's a mobile game or a contemporary platform or whatever, we know that means you've just won something, that means you've lost something, it's kind of just a unit universal language. Kai Merriott: Yeah. And I think as well we're kind of lucky in the age we live in which is that mobile games are so popular because I think they also do the same thing. They're very arcade game-like, very bright and colorful and kind of a lot of sounds, lots of music to convey a particular emotion, what do you think about the use of music in games and how important is that? Johnny McMonagle: Yeah. The use of music can really enhance it and it's a very important thing to consider and it sets the tone for the whole experience. And again, there is the universal thing of we know exciting music to suit the tone if that's what you're aiming for, we know cinematic, we know that if we want this to be dark and somber that's what we do, as you would if you were scoring a piece for a drama you speak the same sort of language. It's funny you mentioned mobile gaming and the target audience for mobile gaming wouldn't be what you would normally think of gamers. And today's gamers I think most people think of people sitting with five monitors, they have the best chairs, they've all the gear, that's what gaming is, but there's also the mobile thing. So it's every walk of life will have this experience, you wouldn't think of them as your typical gamer but they will engage with this kind of game and they do, they wouldn't call themselves a gamer but they do play these games. And I think that's what we aim for is to say, well, what is it that engages the non-gamer to play a game? It's something that is appealing to people who don't play games, it's something that'll engage them, it's something that they want to come back to and that they'll respond to it positively. Kai Merriott: So you mentioned gamers with their five monitors and I think you're right, I mean, there's a real important distinction I think to be drawn here between what we do when we talk about gamified learning and the people who are obsessively gamers, or even just casual gamers but more of the console type gamers. I think ours seems to be more like the mobile games. Johnny McMonagle: I think so. It has to be much more direct, it has to be for somebody who's never played a game, who's aware what a game is. They look at it, they can tell immediately how to play the game, they go, there's the start button. Once they start playing they don't want rule books, they don't want all that, they want to get in and start playing and so from the get-go it should be intuitive, and if it isn't intuitive, if it takes too much explaining, then it's not working. It has to be an immediate thing for people who are time-poor, for people who, as I said, aren't gamers, they want to look at it and go, I like the look of this, I want to press that play button and after I press that play button I want to keep clicking things, I know what I'm doing all the way to the end of the game. Kai Merriott: Yeah. Let's talk a little bit about that, making it intuitive. Because again, probably showing my age, I remember the old days of you take home a game and it comes with a sort of novel-like instruction manual, I mean, they still does this now, right? There's a picture of a controller and there's 1,000 things around it telling you what each button does, but, I mean, we can't really do that in gamified learning, can we? Johnny McMonagle: No and nor do we want to. It's like, we don't have the time, we're too busy in our lives, we have too many things going on. We have this training set aside we want to get there immediately and say like, if it's too complicated you're just going to disengage with it, if you don't automatically immediately know what you're going to do then I think we're failing, that's what we come into. The mobile version is a strip down to the bare element of, what is a game? And it is, does it look good? Does it look like something I want to play? Will I understand it? Am I daunted by it? Then it's not working, does it look like something I can dive into? Then it is work. Kai Merriott: Yeah. I was thinking of Tetris actually and how much we all never had to learn Tetris. Johnny McMonagle: That's it. From the second you saw it on screen you knew what to do and, yeah, no rule books, no help button, no nothing. You go, I know what to do, and within seconds you learn, oh, I didn't get that right, you hear the sound, we can all hear it in our memories, that sound, and you get the little endorphins when you get it right and there's the little positive thing. And you get that within moments of picking it up for the first time and that's the beauty of a game like Tetris. As you, I don't think that anyone ever read how to play Tetris, I'd say they are few and far between, so that's what we are aiming for is that immediacy. Kai Merriott: Also, I think the simplicity of the gamification options. So if you think about what that means, well, we named a few already so for instance, you lose a life, you have three lives and you lose three and then you're kind of kicked out of the game, you could have what we call internally power bars which is health bars that go up and down as you go, whether you answer a question right or wrong, I mean, there's lots, lots, and lots and lots of different options. We also have branching which is another kind of a popular gaming thing that we do where if you get a question right then the story changes and it's different than if you get the question wrong and you go down a different path. So, so many options but we shouldn't use them all, should we? Johnny McMonagle: No, because then I think we're overcomplicating. Use it if there's a reason for it, if it helps the narrative of that story we talked about then absolutely. And I like the branching one and it, again, harps back to the old adventure games even in the books, here's your choice, and whatever one you make you go off in a different direction and you're controlling that. You'll always come to the whatever conclusion, we make sure they come to the conclusion they have to, but having that choice is a great thing. But as you say, we don't have to throw all the whistles and bells there all the time but whatever helps the narrative is what we're aiming for. Kai Merriott: So it's back to story again, isn't it? You choose it as it is. Johnny McMonagle: I think it is always about the story. Kai Merriott: Yeah. Because I think back to the course we did together and obviously, we were not going to name any particular client names, but we did one for the cybersecurity course we did, which was seen as being a game, everyone calls it a game, but it only really I think had one gamified option in there, maybe two. And I'm thinking of the one we did, it was a cybersecurity where it was all based around a 3D printing donut machine and you had four donuts I think and then if you answer a question wrong then you lose a donut and that was number one, and then number two was, I think there was a very small amount of branching in there. But even then it was just to show you a little different animation depending on whether you got it right or wrong. Johnny McMonagle: And that was it, it was very multimedia-rich. It was music, it was bright engaging graphics, it was animation, it was sound effects. And they were all matching, the music suited the primary colors, even the sound effects of the good and bad results that all came together very well and it all sounded like it all belonged as part of the same product and that was a very successful one. And again, the story was you're starting at the start, I think you were getting parts or ingredients, and everywhere along the way there was somebody trying to foil you and your job was to make sure you foiled that hacker. It was about cybersecurity so we invented this character who was trying to stop you on your way and it had a little sound effect, little evil cackle, and stuff like that. And it was a very engaging little game, it was very short but it got the point across, it was all about cybersecurity and all that entails, and it feels very well received. Kai Merriott: Yeah. I think it had one of the biggest take-ups of any training, not just gamified training but any training for that particular organization. Johnny McMonagle: That's right. And a lot of that was just the fun of it and was immediately easy to play, you got immediately from the start you go, I like these graphics, I like that music, there's the play button. And I think we made a short intro animation to tell you this is what's going to happen, watch out for whatever we call the baddie and now go, learn this here, he'll try to trip you up on the way but go and answer these questions. And behind all that, it is just an e-learning quiz, but with all these things around it, it's so much more engaging. And it just showed there with the take-up as people were coming back to do it again and talking about it, comparing high scores would be the old way of doing it, but it worked just very well. Kai Merriott: And I remember even though it was our training every time I went back to test the course during the production process I found myself getting drawn into it every time, I just kept playing it. Johnny McMonagle: I think I've done that too. In the current one I'm working on we've come up with a new way if you win, a different little game piece for every successful thing. And as we're developing it I found myself playing the game because there's the little reward of the endorphins, the little positive sound, and something glows or sparkles every time you get it right. And then they're going, yeah, bear with me I'm just playing this game, and that shows that it's doing its job. Kai Merriott: We touched upon earlier about, I think, particularly the cybersecurity one being a short game, because if you think again of gamers back to the five monitor guy, the games they play last for, I say not in one go but sometimes it is, 10, 20, 30 hours of gaming just in one game. We obviously can't get away with that, can we? Johnny McMonagle: No. And I think no matter how good it is and how engaging it is, I think brevity is the key, I think less is more because the novelty will wear off. I think there's no set limit about how long it should be but I think if you have too much of a good thing too, yeah, kind of enthusiasm wins. And I think for us as contemporary workers we don't have that hour, so if we can do it in half an hour or 45 minutes and they've enjoyed that very much, that's better than dragging it out and turning it into a chore. Kai Merriott: I think the key time is actually 20 minutes, but whether we actually achieve that, I don't know, that's the kind of the dream, the 20-minute game. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah. I think 20 minutes is a perfect round number, I think any longer than that then you are pushing it. I know it depends on the content, it depends on the partner, but ideally we'd be trying to say, no, trust us on this, keep it around to 20 minutes and everyone will enjoy that bit a whole lot more. Kai Merriott: And it's back to this - people being time poor, isn't it? Because games are seen as a bit of frivolity. And if we're saying to people, right, you're going to spend three hours on this game, well, I think you're right that they would get bored but also they just won't have the time. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah. And touching on that, the gaming frivolity, is we have to sell this idea that gaming isn't a waste of time, it isn't a distraction, and maybe it goes back to teaching children that learn through play. And I think we never grow out of that, we do enjoy playing, we enjoy games, but it's not frivolous because actually, we are learning through this. And for employees, for staff and all that, it isn't a waste of time at all, it's like, you must do this training and you're going to enjoy it and that's a nice thing for everybody. If you're going to enjoy the training then everybody wins. Kai Merriott: Yeah, absolutely. I think it seems to be not just in gamified learning but just in every kind of training that idea of people really not having much time trying to cut things down to the chase because this is not a university, they're not on three-year courses, they have 20 minutes to do a job and they need to learn how to do it quickly. Johnny McMonagle: Yes, absolutely. I think we can all find in our daily working lives we can put aside 20 minutes and we can justify that 20 minutes and we will learn something. I think it's looking at the modern workplace as well, we have to take in consideration that we just don't have the time. So I think we can all agree we can make time for 20 minutes and that would be our optimum amount of time. And if we're not achieving that in 20 minutes then maybe we're not doing it right. Kai Merriott: I think that's right. What I often do is when we look at the information that needs to be covered as part of this game, I try and sort of throw away everything that isn't related to the task in hand. I think that's true of e-learning in general, I think it's especially true of games that really should reflect the role that you're doing. So everything in that game should be practical knowledge that you can go away and do something with rather than something that's it's kind of just knowledge and awareness. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah, that's right. I think it's always focused on what it is, is the goal of this game, what is the endpoint of the story we're telling, and don't try to be all things to all men, don't try and overload it and just keep it to a thing. If they need more information they can always go to different resources but for our games, we have to just focus on it, keep it very direct to the point, here's what you're taking away from this game, from this training. There are other ways of delivering information but with a game, we keep focused on what we need to tell, what we need to impart. Kai Merriott: Yeah. So I think you did touch upon earlier about the kind of visual side of the game. So we talked about the music, the sound effects, and what about the visuals, the way it looks, how important is that to the game? Johnny McMonagle: Well, I think that's extremely important obviously as a graphic designer. One thing it is again, it's the universal language off game, it is, what does game mean to you? What does it mean to me, to the seasoned gamer, to someone who never plays a game? I say, if you're walking through the office you look over your colleague's shoulder and there's something on that screen that looks engaging and fun and doesn't look like your stack e-learning, it doesn't look like there are two people in business suits shaking hands and a bit of text, next screen, here's two different people in business suits doing something. And that's the kind of thing, it has to look better than that, it has to look, I say fun without saying frivolous, it has to be a lot more engaging. There has to be something that separates it from your usually learning and I think that could be elements on the screen where you've done something with the graphics, there's something different about it and it can be anything but it has to stand apart or other elements on the screen too like scoring or a meter or something like that where you're immediately going, what is that? So you know from a glance that's a game. Kai Merriott: Yeah. I think having its own unique identity. I always think of games like Candy Crush which it's not a game I particularly play, I don't think it's really marketed to people like me, but it's got such an identity and the color scheme and the noises, going back to sound effects again, it all says, this is a game that even the sound effects and the colors are going to get you as high as the sugar from the candy. Johnny McMonagle: Those endorphins again, it's that thing of going, yeah, I'm going to have fun playing this, it's going to put a smile on their face, I'm going to enjoy doing it. And that's again if you saw a picture of it, it doesn't even have to be a live version just a picture of it, you know that's a fun looking game, I'm going to enjoy spending time with this. And I think that's, yeah, we try to do that with our games, we try immediately to go, is this training? Because this looks like something fun. Kai Merriott: Yeah. And again, I think the visuals go back to the story again and say, what is the story? The story is X or Y, and then from there, you can kind of come up with a brand identity. Because I was thinking about back to our cybersecurity game with the 3D printing donut which is a mad idea, and I think I seem to remember back in the early days, the brand that was suggested that was floated around was actually quite almost movie-like and a little bit subdued and probably wouldn't quite have fitted the idea. Do you remember it? Johnny McMonagle: Yeah. I remember the brand in particular. Many partners they're very aware of their own brand and they want to see their own brand back at them with that, we kind of threw that through book out. We said, well, for this game you're going to get your loco and that's about it, we kind of rewrote it and they agreed that this was the way to go. Is that what you're referencing? Kai Merriott: That's right. And I think it was what we decided because I think we both said that the original brand was quite subdued given that the idea was so mad. So we kind of went for a much more pastly almost and I think it was basically Simpsons inspired brand because of the donuts, I suppose. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah, I think so. I think everyone now you see a donut with pink frosting on you think Homer Simpson, I think we all do. But that was a point, as we said, well, here's your color palette, blah, blah, blah, here and so on, but look at these visuals. And I think they came around very quickly and they said, no, this looks really nice, we get it, we're responding well to it so we don't need to stick with that. And they went for that mad idea, as you say, their brand palette didn't suit so it didn't take much convincing, it was a strong idea that worked. Kai Merriott: Yeah. And it really did and that's a project I'm very proud of as well. So I was thinking again of, going back to the gaming options, we touched upon those before, we talked about lives, we talk about scoring, but of course, when you're kind of coming up with this brand identity in this game, you don't really use terms like lives and percentages in scoring you again, presume do you want to tie that back to the story. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah, that's right. Because yeah, the use of lives and all it is going back to our arcade games but that was literally you had your three little characters and you lose a life. And then it depends on your story, that doesn't make sense for the stuff we've done, well, you're not actually losing a life. When we think, what are you gaining? What are you losing? And in that way then I say in global trade, we had a thing we said, well, if you go to a certain jurisdiction and you get this question right then your project goes ahead and you've done well. If you get the question wrong in this particular jurisdiction, there's going to be consequences maybe that's your project is delayed or you've actually broken some global trade thing, you're going to face legal sanctions and we tie that into the real-life, that training, they need to know this but we've made it a game and we go, there is a big legal sign coming up going, you're in trouble, or we go, you've got this right, here's a little trophy, with a sound effect, a little glow, it all ties back to what you were saying. Kai Merriott: Yeah. And like the lives turned into donuts, and another one we did quite recently was on agile at the agile process. So the original gaming option, if you like, was a meter that goes down, if it goes down to zero then you get kicked out of the game. Now, we didn't want to just call it a meter so we actually made it a race between two companies who were developing a very similar product. And so if you answer the questions correctly then the meter goes towards you and then if you answer incorrectly the meter goes towards the other company, the rival company. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah. And that was a clever use of a very standard functionality of your progress bar basically telling you, yeah, you've answered these right and every time you do it goes up and increments up to the right or vertically and that's standard. But we say, well, how does it tie into our story? And then we had one for alcoholic spur company and we got the same idea, on the left you have a glass with nothing in it, on the right you have a glass that gets full every time you get something right. It's the same principle of the progress meter but dressed up for gaming and for gamification and that's a simple little thing you can do to tie in the game and make it relevant, make it suit the context. And people will react to it a lot better than you boring zero to 100 that they're so used to seeing and it just doesn't feel like a game, it just feels like standard learning. Kai Merriott: It's that simplicity again. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah. It's something that you can respond to immediately, you don't overthink it. You could see it a glance I know what's happening here and you want to get up to the right and you want to get up to the top of the screen, you know every time you're getting something right it's going up in increments and you're enjoying getting it there and it's your mission to get it there. And if you get it wrong, if it says retry, you're going, of course, I'll retry, I've enjoyed that, I really want to get that glassful or win that contract or whatever it is, that donut machine. It's an easy win but give it some thought, tie it into the design of the whole thing, and again, back to your story, how does this help sell the story? Kai Merriott: Yeah, absolutely. Because we're not dealing with, going back to the five monitor guy, I like the five monitor guy that you came up with, going back to him, I mean, thousands and thousands of hours, millions of dollars spent on those sorts of games, it does not need to be complicated to be a game and I think we've proven that time and time again. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah, I think it is. It just uses the fundamentals of what a game is that we can all respond to, that we can all relate to, we know immediately what it is, we recognize it when we see it, we know what it is when we are playing it, we respond to it, we know what we're doing and we enjoy it and we want to play it. We enjoy doing it so much that we'll play it again, we'll come back to it if we don't do well, we play until we win it. Kai Merriott: And I was thinking of, if we were to create a game that absolutely breaks all the rules, so we were talking about things like we have a great story, we have really interactivity that kind of tells the story, it's nice and short, it has a really nice visual identity and it uses sound effects and music and, I want to say, in an appropriate way because we've talked a lot about the fun side of it, but actually it doesn't need to be fun, it can also be dramatic as well. But what would the worst gamified course you can think of look like do you think? Johnny McMonagle: Well, yeah, getting all those things wrong or even that they don't match, that the visuals don't match the sound effects, that the sound effects sound like they're from a completely different product, that the music it sets completely the wrong tone, things like going, well, why I press something, something odd happens, why did that happen? What do I do next? If you get lost anywhere in the middle of it, if you have any doubt what you're doing, if you have to be reaching for the help button you're not doing it well, we haven't done our job well, if someone has to go, how do I play this again? Or I can't remember what I'm doing, what's the point of this? Then we haven't done our job, that's where the simplicity comes into. And all the elements have to work together or else it's jarring and it feels off and all those things would make it to me just a bad game experience, would be bad training but as a game it just wouldn't work. Kai Merriott: Yeah. It seems that games are particularly unsympathetic when you get one element wrong. It's almost not too grand a point and it's almost like poetry where every word is absolutely key versus a novel where it doesn't matter if there's a few dodgy sentences in this, it's absolutely you find, but with games, everything has just to be perfectly in place. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah, no, absolutely. It all has to work together cohesively and the wheat from the chaff is just saying it just should work. And all these, we talked about all the different building blocks, say, that go into it, they all have to just keep it simple, does this element work with that element and all put together, is it doing what we plan to do? Well, somebody just comes and sits down beside you, will they be able to play this and will they enjoy it? Will they respond to it the way we want them to? And if we get all those things right anyone should be able to do that. Kai Merriott: Fabulous. I think we've basically covered everything that we need to cover today and I think we're running out of time anyway. So, Johnny, it's been great having you on the Principled Podcast, I hope you come back and speak with us again soon. Johnny McMonagle: Thanks Kai. Kai Merriott: Thank you all and thank you all for listening. My name is Kai Merriott, we'll see you on another episode of the Principled Podcast by LRN. Outro: We hope you enjoyed this episode. The Principled Podcast is brought to you by LRN, at LRN our mission is to inspire principled performance in global organizations by helping them foster winning ethical cultures rooted in sustainable values. Please visit us at lrn.com to learn more and if you enjoyed this episode subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, or wherever you listen and don't forget to leave us a review.

Ten Cent Takes
Issue 18: Horror Comics & Terror, Inc.

Ten Cent Takes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 95:44


Happy Halloween! We're joined by comics scribe Daniel "D.G." Chichester to talk about the history of horror comics, Marvel's return to the genre in the early 1990s, and the macabre anti-hero Terror (whom Chichester co-created).  ----more---- Issue 18 Transcript   Mike: [00:00:00] It's small, but feisty, Mike: Welcome to Tencent Takes, the podcast where we dig up comic book characters' graves and misappropriate the bodies, one issue at a time. My name is Mike Thompson, and I am joined by my cohost, the Titan of terror herself, Jessika Frazer. Jessika: It is I. Mike: Today, we are extremely fortunate to have comics writer, Daniel, DG Chichester. Dan: Nice to see you both. Mike: Thank you so much for taking the time. You're actually our first official guest on the podcast. Dan: Wow. Okay. I'm going to take that as a good thing. That's great. Mike: Yeah. Well, if you're new to the show, the purpose of our [00:01:00] podcast as always is to look at the weirdest, silliest, coolest moments of comic books, and talk about them in ways that are fun and informative. In this case, we looking at also the spookiest moments, and how they're woven into the larger fabric of pop culture and history. Today, we're going to be talking about horror comics. We're looking at their overall history as well as their resurrection at Marvel in the early 1990s, and how it helped give birth to one of my favorite comic characters, an undead anti-hero who went by the name of Terror. Dan, before we started going down this road, could you tell us a little bit about your history in the comic book industry, and also where people can find you if they want to learn more about you and your work? Dan: Absolutely. At this point, people may not even know I had a history in comic books, but that's not true. Uh, I began at Marvel as an assistant in the mid-eighties while I was still going to film school and, semi quickly kind of graduated up, to a more official, [00:02:00] assistant editor position. Worked my way up through editorial, and then, segued into freelance writing primarily for, but also for DC and Dark Horse and worked on a lot of, semi-permanent titles, Daredevil's probably the best known of them. But I think I was right in the thick of a lot of what you're going to be talking about today in terms of horror comics, especially at Marvel, where I was fiercely interested in kind of getting that going. And I think pushed for certain things, and certainly pushed to be involved in those such as the Hellraiser and Nightbreed Clive Barker projects and Night Stalkers and, uh, and Terror Incorporated, which we're going to talk about. And wherever else I could get some spooky stuff going. And I continued on in that, heavily until about 96 / 97, when the big crash kind of happened, continued on through about 99 and then have not really been that actively involved since then. But folks can find out what I'm doing now, if they go to story maze.substack.com, where I have a weekly newsletter, which features [00:03:00] new fiction and some things that I think are pretty cool that are going on in storytelling, and also a bit of a retrospective of looking back at a lot of the work that I did. Mike: Awesome. Before we actually get started talking about horror comics, normally we talk about one cool thing that we have read or watched recently, but because this episode is going to be dropping right before Halloween, what is your favorite Halloween movie or comic book? Dan: I mean, movies are just terrific. And there's so many when I saw that question, especially in terms of horror and a lot of things immediately jumped to mind. The movie It Follows, the recent It movie, The Mist, Reanimator, are all big favorites. I like horror movies that really kind of get under your skin and horrify you, not just rack up a body count. But what I finally settled on as a favorite is probably John Carpenter's the Thing, which I just think is one of the gruesomest what is going to happen next? What the fuck is going to happen next?[00:04:00] And just utter dread. I mean, there's just so many things that combined for me on that one. And I think in terms of comics, I've recently become just a huge fan of, and I'm probably going to slaughter the name, but Junji Ito's work, the Japanese manga artist. And, Uzumaki, which is this manga, which is about just the bizarreness of this town, overwhelmed with spirals of all things. And if you have not read that, it is, it is the trippiest most unsettling thing I've read in, in a great long time. So happy Halloween with that one. Mike: So that would be mango, right? Dan: Yeah. Yeah. So you'd make sure you read it in the right order, or otherwise it's very confusing, so. Mike: Yeah, we actually, haven't talked a lot about manga on this. We probably should do a deep dive on it at some point. But, Jessika, how about you? Jessika: Well, I'm going to bring it down a little bit more silly because I've always been a fan of horror and the macabre and supernatural. So always grew up seeking creepy media as [00:05:00] a rule, but I also loves me some silliness. So the last three or so years, I've had a tradition of watching Hocus Pocus with my friend, Rob around Halloween time. And it's silly and it's not very heavy on the actual horror aspect, but it's fun. And it holds up surprisingly well. Mike: Yeah, we have all the Funkos of the Sanderson sisters in our house. Jessika: It's amazing watching it in HD, their costumes are so intricate and that really doesn't come across on, you know, old VHS or watching it on television back in the day. And it's just, it's so fun. How much, just time and effort it looks like they put into it, even though some of those details really weren't going to translate. Dan: How very cool. Mike: Yeah. Jessika: Yeah. So, but I also really like actual horror, so I'm also in the next couple of days is going to be a visiting the 1963 Haunting of Hill House because that's one of my favorites. Yeah. It's so good. And used to own the book that the movie was based on also. And seen all the [00:06:00] iterations and it's the same storyline the recent Haunting of Hill house is based on, which is great. That plot line has been reworked so many times, but it's such a great story, I'm just not shocked in the least that it would run through so many iterations and still be accepted by the public in each of its forms. Mike: Yeah. I really liked that Netflix interpretation of it, it was really good. Dan: They really creeped everything out. Mike: Yeah. There's a YouTuber called Lady Night, The Brave, and she does a really great summary breakdown explaining a lot of the themes and it's like almost two hours I think, of YouTube video, but she does these really lovely retrospectives. So, highly recommend you check that out. If you want to just think about that the Haunting of Hill House more. Jessika: Oh, I do. Yes. Mike: I'm going to split the difference between you two. When I was growing up, I was this very timid kid and the idea of horror just creeped me out. And so I avoided it like the plague. And then when I was in high [00:07:00] school, I had some friends show me some movies and I was like, these are great, why was I afraid of this stuff? And so I kind of dove all the way in. But my preferred genre is horror comedy. That is the one that you can always get me in on. And, I really love this movie from the mid-nineties called the Frighteners, which is a horror comedy starring Michael J. Fox, and it's directed by Peter Jackson. And it was written by Peter Jackson and his partner, Fran Walsh. And it was a few years before they, you know, went on to make a couple of movies based on this little known franchise called Lord of the Rings. But it's really wild. It's weird, and it's funny, and it has some genuine jump scare moments. And there's this really great ghost story at the core of it. And the special effects at the time were considered amazing and groundbreaking, but now they're kind of, you look at, and you're like, oh, that's, high-end CG, high-end in the mid-nineties. Okay. But [00:08:00] yeah, like I said, or comedies are my absolute favorite things to watch. That's why Cabin in the Woods always shows up in our horror rotation as well. Same with Tucker and Dale vs Evil. That's my bread and butter. With comic books, I go a little bit creepier. I think I talked about the Nice House on the Lake, that's the current series that I'm reading from DC that's genuinely creepy and really thoughtful and fun. And it's by James Tynion who also wrote Something That's Killing the Children. So those are excellent things to read if you're in the mood for a good horror comic. Dan: Great choice on the Frighteners. That's I think an unsung classic, that I'm going to think probably came out 10 years too early. Mike: Yeah. Dan: It's such a mashup of different, weird vibes, that it would probably do really, really well today. But at that point in time, it was just, what is this? You know? Cause it's, it's just cause the horrifying thing in it are really horrifying. And, uh, Gary Busey's son, right, plays the evil ghost and he is just trippy, off the wall, you know, horrifying. [00:09:00] Mike: Yeah. And it starts so silly, and then it kind of just continues to go creepier and creepier, and by the time that they do some of the twists revealing his, you know, his agent in the real world, it's a genuine twist. Like, I was really surprised the first time I saw it and I - Dan: Yeah. Mike: was so creeped out, but yeah. Dan: Plus it's got R. Lee Ermey as the army ghost, which is just incredible. So, Mike: Yeah. And, Chi McBride is in it, and, Jeffrey Combs. Dan: Oh, oh that's right, right. right. Mike: Yeah. So yeah, it's a lot of fun. Mike: All right. So, I suppose we should saunter into the graveyard, as it were, and start talking about the history of horror comics. So, Dan, obviously I know that you're familiar with horror comics, Dan: A little bit. Mike: Yeah. What about you, Jess? You familiar with horror comics other than what we've talked about in the show? Jessika: I started getting into it once you and I started, you know, talking more on the [00:10:00] show. And so I grabbed a few things. I haven't looked through all of them yet, but I picked up some older ones. I did just recently pick up, it'll be more of a, kind of a funny horror one, but they did a recent Elvira and Vincent Price. So, yeah, so I picked that up, but issue one of that. So it's sitting on my counter ready for me to read right now. Mike: Well, and that's funny, cause Elvira actually has a really long, storied history in comic books. Like she first appeared in kind of like the revival of House of Mystery that DC did. And then she had an eighties series that had over a hundred issues that had a bunch of now major names involved. And she's continued to have series like, you can go to our website and get autographed copies of her recent series from, I think Dynamite. Jessika: That's cool. Mike: Yeah. Jessika: Nice. Mike: Speaking of horror comedy Elvira is great. Jessika: Yes. Mike: I recently showed Sarah the Elvira Mistress of the Dark movie and she was, I think really sad that I hadn't showed it to her sooner. Jessika: [00:11:00] That's another one I need to go watch this week. Wow. Don't- nobody call me. I'm just watching movies all week. Dan: Exactly. Mike: It's on a bunch of different streaming services, I think right now. Well it turns out that horror comics, have pretty much been a part of the industry since it really became a proven medium. You know, it wasn't long after comics became a legit medium in their own, right that horror elements started showing up in superhero books, which like, I mean, it isn't too surprising. Like the 1930's was when we got the Universal classic movie monsters, so it makes a lot of sense that those kinds of characters would start crossing over into comic books, just to take advantage of that popularity. Jerry Siegel and Joel Schuster, the guys who created Superman, actually created the supernatural investigator called Dr. Occult in New Fun Comics three years before they brought Superman to life. And Dr. Occult still shows up in DC books. Like, he was a major character in the Books of Magic with Neil Gaiman. I think he may show up in Sandman later on. I can't remember. Jessika: Oh, okay. Dan: I wouldn't be surprised. Neil would find ways to mine that. [00:12:00] Mike: Yeah. I mean, that was a lot of what the Sandman was about, was taking advantage of kind of long forgotten characters that DC had had and weaving them into his narratives. And, if you're interested in that, we talk about that in our book club episodes, which we're currently going through every other episode. So the next episode after this is going to be the third episode of our book club, where we cover volumes five and six. So, horror comics though really started to pick up in the 1940s. There's multiple comic historians who say that the first ongoing horror series was Prized Comics, New Adventures of Frankenstein, which featured this updated take on the original story by Mary Shelley. It took place in America. The monster was named Frankenstein. He was immediately a terror. It's not great, but it's acknowledged as being really kind of the first ongoing horror story. And it's really not even that much of a horror story other than it featured Frankenstein's monster. But after that, a number of publishers started to put out adaptations of classic horror stories for awhile. So you had [00:13:00] Avon Publications making it official in 1946 with the comic Erie, which is based on the first real dedicated horror comic. Yeah. This is the original cover to Erie Comics. Number one, if you could paint us a word picture. Dan: Wow. This is high end stuff as it's coming through. Well it looks a lot like a Zine or something, you know it's got a very, Mac paint logo from 1990, you know, it's, it's your, your typical sort of like, ooh, I'm shaky kind of logo. That's Eerie Comics. There's a Nosferatu looking character. Who's coming down some stairs with the pale moon behind him. It, he's got a knife in his hand, so, you know, he's up to no good. And there is a femme fatale at the base of the stairs. She may have moved off of some train tracks to get here. And, uh, she's got a, uh, a low, cut dress, a lot of leg and the arms and the wrists are bound, but all this for only 10. cents. So, I think there's a, there's a bargain there.[00:14:00] Mike: That is an excellent description. Thank you. So, what's funny is that Erie at the time was the first, you know, official horror comic, really, but it only had one issue that came out and then it sort of vanished from sight. It came back with a new series that started with a new number one in the 1950s, but this was the proverbial, the shot that started the war. You know, we started seeing a ton of anthology series focusing on horror, like Adventures into the Unknown, which ran into the 1960s and then Amazing Mysteries and Marvel Tales were repurposed series for Marvel that they basically changed the name of existing series into these. And they started doing kind of macabre, weird stories. And then, we hit the 1950s. And the early part of the 1950s was when horror comics really seemed to take off and experienced this insane success. We've talked about how in the post-WWII America, superhero comics were kind of declining in [00:15:00] popularity. By the mid 1950s, only three heroes actually had their own books and that was Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman. Which, I didn't realize that until I was doing research. I didn't, I just assumed that there were other superhero comics at the time. But we started seeing comics about horror and crime and romance really starting to get larger shares of the market. And then EC Comics was one of those doing gangbuster business during this whole era. Like, this was when we saw those iconic series, the Haunt of Fear, the Vault of Horror, the Crypt of Terror, which was eventually rebranded to Tales from the Crypt. Those all launched and they found major success. And then the bigger publishers were also getting in on this boom. During the first half of the 1950s Atlas, which eventually became Marvel, released almost 400 issues across 18 horror titles. And then American Comics Group released almost 125 issues between five different horror titles. Ace comics did almost a hundred issues between five titles. I'm curious. I'm gonna ask both of you, what [00:16:00] do you think the market share of horror comics was at the time? Dan: In terms of comics or in terms of just like newsstand, magazine, distribution. Mike: I'm going to say in terms of distribution. Dan: I mean, I know they were phenomenally successful. I would, be surprised if it was over 60%. Mike: Okay. How about. Jessika: Oh, goodness. Let's throw a number out. I'm going to say 65 just because I want to get close enough, but maybe bump it up just a little bit. This is a contest now. Dan: The precision now, like the 65. Jessika: Yes. Mike: Okay. Well, obviously we don't have like a hard definite number, but there was a 2009 article from reason magazine saying that horror books made up a quarter of all comics by 1953. So, so you guys were overestimating it, but it was still pretty substantial. At the same time, we were also seeing a surge in horror films. Like, the 1950s are known as the atomic age and media reflected [00:17:00] societal anxiety, at the possibility of nuclear war and to a lesser extent, white anxiety about societal changes. So this was the decade that gave us Invasion of the Body Snatchers The Thing from Another World, which led to John Carpenter's The Thing eventually. Um, and the Creature from the Black Lagoon. Hammer horror films also started to get really huge during this time. So we saw the beginning of stuff like Christopher Lee's, Dracula series of films. So the fifties were like a really good decade for horror, I feel. But at the same time, violent crime in America started to pick up around this period. And people really started focusing on juvenile criminals and what was driving them. So, there were a lot of theories about why this was going on and no one's ever really come up with a definite answer, but there was the psychiatrist named Frederick Wortham who Dan, I yeah. Dan: Oh yeah, psychiatrist in big air quotes, yeah. Mike: In quotes. Yeah. [00:18:00] Yeah. And he was convinced that the rise in crime was due to comics, and he spent years writing and speaking against them. He almost turned it into a cottage industry for himself. And this culminated in 1954, when he published a book called Seduction of the Innocent, that blamed comic books for the rise in juvenile delinquency, and his arguments are laughable. Like, I mean, there's just no way around it. Like you read this stuff and you can't help, but roll your eyes and chuckle. But, at the time comics were a relatively new medium, you know, and people really only associated them with kids. And his arguments were saying, oh, well, Wonder Woman was a lesbian because of her strength and independence, which these days, I feel like that actually has a little bit of credibility, but, like, I don't know. But I don't really feel like that's contributing to the delinquency of the youth. You know, and then he also said that Batman and Robin were in a homosexual relationship. And then my favorite was that Superman comics were [00:19:00] un-American and fascist. Dan: Well. Mike: All right. Dan: There's people who would argue that today. Mike: I mean, but yeah, and then he actually, he got attention because there were televised hearings with the Senate subcommittee on juvenile delinquency. I mean, honestly, every time I think about Seduction of the Innocent and how it led to the Comics Code Authority. I see the parallels with Tipper Gore's Parent Music Resource Center, and how they got the Parental Advisory sticker on certain music albums, or Joe Lieberman's hearings on video games in the 1990's and how that led to the Electronic Systems Reading Board system, you know, where you provide almost like movie ratings to video games. And Wortham also reminds me a lot of this guy named Jack Thompson, who was a lawyer in the nineties and aughts. And he was hell bent on proving a link between violent video games and school shootings. And he got a lot of media attention at the time until he was finally disbarred for his antics. But there was this [00:20:00] definite period where people were trying to link video games and violence. And, even though the statistics didn't back that up. And, I mean, I think about this a lot because I used to work in video games. I spent almost a decade working in the industry, but you know, it's that parallel of anytime there is a new form of media that is aimed at kids, it feels like there is a moral panic. Dan: Well, I think it goes back to what you were saying before about, you know, even as, as things change in society, you know, when people in society get at-risk, you know, you went to Invasion of the Body Snatchers, Right. Which is classically thought to be a response to communism, you know, and the feelings of communist oppression and you know, the different, you know, the other, and it's the same thing. I think every single one of these is just a proof point of if you want to become, suddenly well-known like Lieberman or Wortham or anything, you know, pick the other that the older generation doesn't really understand, right? Maybe now there are more adults playing video games, but it's probably still perceived as a more juvenile [00:21:00] thing or comics or juvenile thing, or certain types of movies are a juvenile thing, you know, pick the other pick on it, hold it up as the weaponized, you know, piece, and suddenly you're popular. And you've got a great flashpoint that other people can rally around and blame, as if one single thing is almost ever the cause of everything. And I always think it's interesting, you know, the EC Comics, you know, issues in terms of, um, Wortham's witch hunt, you know, the interesting thing about those is yet they were gruesome and they are gruesome in there, but they're also by and large, I don't know the other ones as well, but I know the EC Comics by and large are basically morality plays, you know, they're straight up morality plays in the sense that the bad guys get it in the end, almost every time, like they do something, they do some horrific thing, but then the corpse comes back to life and gets them, you know, so there's, there's always a comeuppance where the scales balance. But that was of course never going to be [00:22:00] an argument when somebody can hold up a picture of, you know, a skull, you know, lurching around, you know, chewing on the end trails of something. And then that became all that was talked about. Mike: Yeah, exactly. Well, I mean, spring boarding off of that, you know, worth them and the subcommittee hearings and all that, they led to the comics magazine association of America creating the Comics Code Authority. And this was basically in order to avoid government regulation. They said, no, no, no, we'll police ourselves so that you don't have to worry about this stuff. Which, I mean, again, that's what we did with the SRB. It was a response to that. We could avoid government censorship. So the code had a ton of requirements that each book had to meet in order to receive the Comics Code Seal of Approval on the cover. And one of the things you couldn't do was have quote, scenes dealing with, or instruments associated with walking dead or torture, which I mean,[00:23:00] okay. So the latter half of the 1950's saw a lot of these dedicated horror series, you know, basically being shut down or they drastically changed. This is, you know, the major publishers really freaked out. So Marvel and DC rebranded their major horror titles. They were more focused on suspense or mystery or Sci-Fi or superheroes in a couple of cases, independent publishers, didn't really have to worry about the seal for different reasons. Like, some of them were able to rely on the rep for publishing wholesome stuff like Dell or Gold Key. I think Gold Key at the time was doing a lot of the Disney books. So they just, they were like, whatever. Dan: Right, then EC, but, but EC had to shut down the whole line and then just became mad. Right? I mean, that's that was the transition at which William, you know, Gains - Mike: Yeah. Dan: basically couldn't contest what was going on. Couldn't survive the spotlight. You know, he testified famously at that hearing. But had to give up all of [00:24:00] that work that was phenomenally profitable for them. And then had to fall back to Mad Magazine, which of course worked out pretty well. Mike: Yeah, exactly. By the end of the 1960s, though, publishers started to kind of gently push back a little bit like, Warren publishing, and Erie publications, like really, they didn't give a shit. Like Warren launched a number of horror titles in the sixties, including Vampirilla, which is like, kind of, I feel it's sort of extreme in terms of both sex and horror, because I mean, we, we all know what Vampirilla his costume is. It hasn't changed in the 50, approximately 50 years that it's been out like. Dan: It's like, what can you do with dental floss, Right. When you were a vampire? I mean, that's basically like, she doesn't wear much. Mike: No, I mean, she never has. And then by the end of the sixties, Marvel and DC started to like kind of steer some of their books back towards the horror genre. Like how some Mystery was one of them where it, I think with issue 1 75, that was when they [00:25:00] took away, took it away from John Jones and dial H for Hero. And they were like, no, no, no, no. We're going to, we're going to bring, Cain back as the host and start telling horror morality plays again, which is what they were always doing. And this meant that the Comics Code Authority needed to update their code. So in 1971, they revised it to be a little bit more horror friendly. Jessika: Scenes dealing with, or instruments associated with, walking dead or torture shall not be used. Vampires, ghouls and werewolves shall be permitted to be used when handled in the classic traditions, such as Frankenstein, Dracula, and other high caliber literary works written by Edgar Allen Poe, Saki, Conan Doyle, and other respected authors whose works are read in schools around the world. Mike: But at this point, Marvel and DC really jumped back into the horror genre. This was when we started getting books, like the tomb of Dracula, Ghost Rider, where will finite and son of Satan, and then DC had a [00:26:00] bunch of their series like they had, what was it? So it was originally The Dark Mansion of Forbidden Love, and then it eventually got retitled to Forbidden Tales of the Dark Mansion. Like, just chef's kiss on that title. Dan: You can take that old Erie comic and throw, you know, the Dark Mansion of Forbidden Love as the title on that. And it would work, you know. Mike: I know. Right. So Dan, I'm curious, what is your favorite horror comic or comic character from this era? Dan: I would say, it was son of Satan, because it felt so trippy and forbidden, and I think comics have always, especially mainstream comics you know, I've always responded also to what's out there. Right. I don't think it's just a loosening the restrictions at that point, but in that error, what's going on, you're getting a lot of, I think the films of Race with the Devil and you're getting the Exorcist and you're getting, uh, the Omen, you know, Rosemary's baby. right. Satanism, [00:27:00] the devil, right. It's, it's high in pop culture. So true to form. You know, I think Son of Satan is in some ways, like a response of Marvel, you know, to that saying, let's glom onto this. And for a kid brought up in the Catholic church, there was a certain eeriness to this, ooh, we're reading about this. It's like, is it really going to be Satanism? And cause I was very nervous that we were not allowed even watch the Exorcist in our home, ever. You know, I didn't see the Exorcist until I was like out of high school. And I think also the character as he looks is just this really trippy look, right. At that point, if you're not familiar with the character, he's this buff dude, his hair flares up into horns, he just wears a Cape and he carries a giant trident, he's got a massive pentacle, I think a flaming pentacle, you know, etched in his chest. Um, he's ready to do business, ya know, in some strange form there. So for me, he was the one I glommed on to the most. [00:28:00] Mike: Yeah. Well, I mean, it was that whole era, it was just, it was Gothic horror brought back and Satanism and witchcraft is definitely a part of that genre. Dan: Sure. Mike: So, that said, kind of like any trend horror comics, you know, they have their rise and then they started to kind of fall out of popularity by the end of the seventies or the early eighties. I feel like it was a definite end of the era when both House of Mystery and Ghost Writer ended in 1983. But you know, there were still some individual books that were having success, but it just, it doesn't feel like Marvel did a lot with horror comics during the eighties. DC definitely had some luck with Alan Moore's run of the Swamp Thing. And then there was stuff like Hellblazer and Sandman. Which, as I mentioned, we're doing our book club episodes for, but also gave rise to Vertigo Comics, you know, in the early nineties. Not to say that horror comics still weren't a thing during this time, but it seems like the majority of them were coming from indie publishers. Off the top of my head, one example I think of still is Dead World, which basically created a zombie apocalypse [00:29:00] universe. And it started with Aero comics. It was created in the late eighties, and it's still going today. I think it's coming out from IDW now. But at the same time, it's not like American stopped enjoying horror stuff. Like this was the decade where we got Friday the 13th, Nightmare on Elm street, Evil Dead, Hellraiser, Poltergeist, Child's Play, just to name a few of the franchises that we were introduced to. And, I mentioned Hellraiser. I love Hellraiser, and Dan, I know that you have a pretty special connection to that brand. Dan: I do. I put pins in my face every night just to kind of keep my complexion, you know? Mike: So, let's transition over to the nineties and Marvel and let's start that off with Epic Comics. Epic started in the eighties, and it was basically a label that would print, create our own comics. And they eventually started to use label to produce, you know, in quotes, mature comics. So Wikipedia says that this was your first editorial job at Marvel was with the [00:30:00] Epic Line. Is that correct? Dan: Well, I'll go back and maybe do just a little correction on Epic's mission if you don't mind. Mike: Yeah, yeah. Dan: You know, first, which is it was always creator owned, and it did start as crude. And, but I don't think that ever then transitioned into more mature comics, sometimes that just was what creator-owned comics were. Right. That was just part of the mission. And so as a creator-owned imprint, it could be anything, it could be the silliest thing, it could be the most mature thing. So it was always, you know, part of what it was doing, and part of the mission of doing creator-owned comics, and Archie Goodwin was the editor in chief of that line, was really to give creators and in to Marvel. If we gave them a nice place to play with their properties, maybe they would want to go play in the mainstream Marvel. So you might get a creator who would never want to work for Marvel, for whatever reason, they would have a great Epic experience doing a range of things, and then they would go into this. So there was always levels of maturity and we always looked at it as very eclectic and challenging, you know, sometimes in a good [00:31:00] way. So I'll have to go back to Wikipedia and maybe correct them. My first job was actually, I was on the Marvel side and it was as the assistant to the assistant, to the editor in chief. So I would do all of the grunt work and the running around that the assistant to the editor in chief didn't want to do. And she would turn to me and say, Dan, you're going to go run around the city and find this thing for Jim Shooter. Now, then I did that for about five or six months, I was still in film school, and then left, which everyone was aghast, you don't leave Marvel comics, by choice. And, but I had, I was still in school. I had a summer job already sort of set up, and I left to go take that exciting summer job. And then I was called over the summer because there was an opening in the Epic line. And they want to know if I'd be interested in taking on this assistant editor's job. And I said, it would have to be part-time cause I still had a semester to finish in school, but they were intrigued and I was figuring, oh, well this is just kind of guaranteed job. [00:32:00] Never knowing it was going to become career-like, and so that was then sort of my second job. Mike: Awesome. So this is going to bring us to the character of Terror. So he was introduced as a character in the Shadow Line Saga, which was one of those mature comics, it was like a mature superhero universe. That took place in a few different series under the Epic imprint. There was Dr. Zero, there was St. George, and then there was Power Line. Right. Dan: That's correct, yep. Mike: And so the Shadow Line Saga took his name from the idea that there were these beings called Shadows, they were basically super powered immortal beings. And then Terror himself first appeared as Shrek. He's this weird looking enforcer for a crime family in St. George. And he becomes kind of a recurring nemesis for the main character. He's kind of like the street-level boss while it's hinting that there's going to be a eventual confrontation between the main character of St. George and Dr. Zero, who is kind of [00:33:00] a Superman character, but it turns out he has been manipulating humanity for, you know, millennia at this point. Dan: I think you've encapsulated it quite well. Mike: Well, thank you. So the Shadow Line Saga, that only lasted for about what a year or two? Dan: Probably a couple of years, maybe a little over. There was about, I believe, eight to nine issues of each of the, the main comics, the ones you just cited. And then we segued those over to, sort of, uh, an omni series we call Critical Mass, which brought together all three characters or storylines. And then try to tell this, excuse the pun, epic, you know story, which will advance them all. And so wrapped up a lot of loose ends and, um, you know, became quite involved now. Mike: Okay. Dan: It ran about seven or eight issues. Mike: Okay. Now a couple of years after Terror was introduced under the Epic label, Marvel introduced a new Ghost Rider series in 1990 that hit that sweet spot of like nineties extreme with a capital X and, and, you know, [00:34:00] it also gave us a spooky anti heroes like that Venn diagram, where it was like spooky and extreme and rides a motorcycle and right in the middle, you had Ghost Rider, but from what I understand the series did really well, commercially for Marvel. Comichron, which is the, the comic sales tracking site, notes that early issues were often in the top 10 books sold each month for 91. Like there are eight issues of Ghost Rider, books that are in the top 100 books for that year. So it's not really surprising that Marvel decided to go in really hard with supernatural characters. And in 1992, we had this whole batch of horror hero books launch. We had Spirits of Vengeance, which was a spinoff from Ghost Rider, which saw a Ghost Rider teaming up with Johnny Blaze, and it was the original Ghost Writer. And he didn't have a hellfire motorcycle this time, but he had a shotgun that would fire hell fire, you know, and he had a ponytail, it was magnificent. And then there was also the Night Stalkers, [00:35:00] which was a trio of supernatural investigators. There was Hannibal King and Blade and oh, I'm blanking on the third one. Dan: Frank Drake. Mike: Yeah. And Frank Drake was a vampire, right? Dan: And he was a descendant of Dracula, but also was a vampire who had sort of been cured. Um, he didn't have a hunger for human blood, but he still had a necessity for some type of blood and possessed all the attributes, you know, of a vampire, you know, you could do all the powers, couldn't go out in the daylight, that sort of thing. So, the best and worst of both worlds. Mike: Right. And then on top of that, we had the Dark Hold, which it's kind of like the Marvel equivalent of the Necronomicon is the best way I can describe it. Dan: Absolutely. Yup. Mike: And that's showed up in Agents of Shield since then. And they just recently brought it into the MCU. That was a thing that showed up in Wanda Vision towards the end. So that's gonna clearly reappear. And then we also got Morbius who is the living vampire from [00:36:00] Spider-Man and it's great. He shows up in this series and he's got this very goth rock outfit, is just it's great. Dan: Which looked a lot like how Len Kaminsky dressed in those days in all honesty. Mike: Yeah, okay. Dan: So Len will now kill me for that, but. Mike: Oh, well, but yeah, so these guys were all introduced via a crossover event called Rise of the Midnight Sons, which saw all of these heroes, you know, getting their own books. And then they also teamed up with Dr. Strange to fight against Lilith the mother of demons. And she was basically trying to unleash her monstrous spawn across the world. And this was at the same time the Terror wound up invading the Marvel Universe. So if you were going to give an elevator pitch for Terror in the Marvel Universe, how would you describe him? Dan: I actually wrote one down, I'll read it to you, cause you, you know, you put that there and was like, oh gosh, I got to like now pitch this. A mythic manifestation of fear exists in our times, a top dollar mercenary for hire using a supernatural [00:37:00] ability to attach stolen body parts to himself in order to activate the inherit ability of the original owner. A locksmith's hand or a marksman, his eye or a kickboxer his legs, his gruesome talent gives him the edge to take on the jobs no one else can, he accomplishes with Savage, restyle, scorn, snark, and impeccable business acumen. So. Mike: That's so good. It's so good. I just, I have to tell you the twelve-year-old Mike is like giddy to be able to talk to you about this. Dan: I was pretty giddy when I was writing this stuff. So that's good. Mike: So how did Terror wind up crossing into the Marvel Universe? Like, because he just showed shows up in a couple of cameos in some Daredevil issues that you also wrote. I believe. Dan: Yeah, I don't know if he'd showed up before the book itself launched that might've, I mean, the timing was all around the same time. But everybody who was involved with Terror, love that Terror and Terror Incorporated, which was really actual title. Love the hell out of [00:38:00] the book, right. And myself, the editors, Carl Potts, who was the editor in chief, we all knew it was weird and unique. And, at one point when I, you know, said to Carl afterwards, well I'm just gonna take this whole concept and go somewhere else with it, he said, you can't, you made up something that, you know, can't really be replicated without people knowing exactly what you're doing. It's not just another guy with claws or a big muscle guy. How many people grab other people's body parts? So I said, you know, fie on me, but we all loved it. So when, the Shadowline stuff kind of went away, uh, and he was sort of kicking out there is still, uh, Carl came to me one day and, and said, listen, we love this character. We're thinking of doing something with horror in Marvel. This was before the Rise of the Midnight Sons. So it kind of came a little bit ahead of that. I think this eventually would become exactly the Rise of the Midnight Sons, but we want to bring together a lot of these unused horror characters, like Werewolf by Night, Man Thing, or whatever, but we want a central kind of [00:39:00] character who, navigates them or maybe introduces them. Wasn't quite clear what, and they thought Terror, or Shrek as he still was at that point, could be that character. He could almost be a Crypt Keeper, maybe, it wasn't quite fully baked. And, so we started to bounce this around a little bit, and then I got a call from Carl and said, yeah, that's off. We're going to do something else with these horror characters, which again would eventually become probably the Midnight Sons stuff. But he said, but we still want to do something with it. You know? So my disappointment went to, oh, what do you mean? How could we do anything? He said, what if you just bring him into the Marvel Universe? We won't say anything about what he did before, and just use him as a character and start over with him operating as this high-end mercenary, you know, what's he going to do? What is Terror Incorporated, and how does he do business within the Marvel world? And so I said, yes, of course, I'm not going to say that, you know, any quicker and just jumped into [00:40:00] it. And I didn't really worry about the transition, you know, I wasn't thinking too much about, okay. How does he get from Shadow Line world, to earth 616 or whatever, Marcus McLaurin, who was the editor. God bless him, for years would resist any discussion or no, no, it's not the same character. Marcus, it's the same character I'm using the same lines. I'm having him referenced the same fact that he's had different versions of the word terrors, his name at one point, he makes a joke about the Saint George complex. I mean, it's the same character. Mike: Yeah. Dan: But , you know, Marcus was a very good soldier to the Marvel hierarchy. So we just really brought him over and we just went all in on him in terms of, okay, what could a character like this play in the Marvel world? And he played really well in certain instances, but he certainly was very different than probably anything else that was going on at the time. Mike: Yeah. I mean, there certainly wasn't a character like him before. So all the Wikias, like [00:41:00] Wikipedia, all the Marvel fan sites, they all list Daredevil 305 as Terror's first official appearance in. Dan: Could be. Mike: Yeah, but I want to talk about that for a second, because that is, I think the greatest villain that I've ever seen in a Marvel comic, which was the Surgeon General, who is this woman who is commanding an army of like, I mean, basically it's like a full-scale operation of that urban myth of - Dan: Yeah. Mike: -the dude goes home with an attractive woman that he meets at the club. And then he wakes up in a bathtub full of ice and he's missing organs. Dan: Yeah. You know, sometimes, you know, that was certainly urban myth territory, and I was a big student of urban myths and that was the sort of thing that I think would show up in the headlines every three to six months, but always one of those probably friend of a friend stories that. Mike: Oh yeah. Dan: Like a razor an apple or something like that, that never actually sort of tracks back. Mike: Well, I mean, the thing now is it's all edibles in candy and they're like, all the news outlets are showing officially [00:42:00] branded edibles. Which, what daddy Warbucks mother fucker. Jessika: Mike knows my stand on this. Like, no, no, nobody is buying expensive edibles. And then putting them in your child's candy. Like, No, no, that's stupid. Dan: No, it's the, it's the, easier version of putting the LSD tab or wasting your pins on children in Snickers bars. Jessika: Right. Dan: Um, but but I think, that, that storyline is interesting, Mike, cause it's the, it's one of the few times I had a plotline utterly just completely rejected by an editor because I think I was doing so much horror stuff at the time. Cause I was also concurrently doing the Hellraiser work, the Night Breed work. It would have been the beginning of the Night Stalkers work, cause I was heavily involved with the whole Midnight Sons work. And I went so far on the first plot and it was so grizzly and so gruesome that, Ralph Macchio who was the editor, called me up and said, yeah, this title is Daredevil. It's not Hellraiser. So I had to kind of back off [00:43:00] and realize, uh, yeah, I put a little too much emphasis on the grisliness there. So. Mike: That's amazing. Dan: She was an interesting, exploration of a character type. Mike: I'm really sad that she hasn't showed back up, especially cause it feels like it'd be kind of relevant these days with, you know, how broken the medical system is here in America. Dan: Yeah. It's, it's funny. And I never played with her again, which is, I think one of my many Achilles heels, you know, as I would sometimes introduce characters and then I would just not go back to them for some reason, I was always trying to kind of go forward onto something new. Mike: Yeah. Jessika: Is there anything about Terror's character that you related to at the time, or now even. Dan: Um, probably being very imperious, very complicated, having a thing for long coats. Uh, I think all of those probably, you know, work then and now, I've kind of become convinced weirdly enough over time, that Terror was a character who [00:44:00] and I, you know, I co-created him with Margaret Clark and, and Klaus Janson, but I probably did the most work with him over the years, you know? So I feel maybe a little bit more ownership, but I've sort of become convinced that he was just his own thing, and he just existed out there in the ether, and all I was ultimately was a conduit that I was, I was just channeling this thing into our existence because he came so fully formed and whenever I would write him, he would just kind of take over the page and take over the instance. That's always how I've viewed him, which is different than many of the other things that I've written. Mike: He's certainly a larger than life personality, and in every sense of that expression. Jessika: Yes. Mike: I'm sorry for the terrible pun. Okay. So we've actually talked a bit about Terror, but I [00:45:00] feel like we need to have Jessika provide us with an overall summary of his brief series. Jessika: So the series is based on the titular character, of course, Terror, who is unable to die and has the ability to replace body parts and gains the skill and memory of that limb. So he might use the eye of a sharpshooter to improve his aim or the arm of an artist for a correct rendering. And because of the inability for his body to die, the dude looks gnarly. His face is a sick green color. He has spike whiskers coming out of the sides of his face, and he mostly lacks lips, sometimes he has lips, but he mostly lacks lips. So we always has this grim smile to his face. And he also has a metal arm, which is awesome. I love that. And he interchanges all of the rest of his body parts constantly. So in one scene he'll have a female arm and in another one it'll sport, an other worldly tentacle. [00:46:00] He states that his business is fear, but he is basically a paid mercenary, very much a dirty deeds, although not dirt cheap; Terror charges, quite a hefty sum for his services, but he is willing to do almost anything to get the job done. His first job is ending someone who has likewise immortal, air quotes, which involves finding an activating a half demon in order to open a portal and then trick a demon daddy to hand over the contract of immortality, you know, casual. He also has run-ins with Wolverine, Dr. Strange Punisher, Silver Sable, and Luke Cage. It's action packed, and you legitimately have no idea what new body part he is going to lose or gain in the moment, or what memory is going to pop up for him from the donor. And it keeps the reader guessing because Terror has no limitations. Mike: Yeah. Dan: was, I was so looking forward to hearing what your recap was going to be. I love that, so I just [00:47:00] want to say that. Jessika: Thank you. I had a lot of fun reading this. Not only was the plot and just the narrative itself, just rolling, but the art was fantastic. I mean, the things you can do with a character like that, there truly aren't any limits. And so it was really interesting to see how everything fell together and what he was doing each moment to kind of get out of whatever wacky situation he was in at the time.So. And his, and his quips, I just, the quips were just, they give me life. Mike: They're so good. Like there was one moment where he was sitting there and playing with the Lament Configuration, and the first issue, which I, I never noticed that before, as long as we ready this time and I was like, oh, that's great. And then he also made a St. George reference towards the end of the series where he was talking about, oh, I knew another guy who had a St. George complex. Dan: Right, right. Right, Mike: Like I love those little Easter eggs. Speaking of Easter eggs, there are a lot of Clive Barker Easter eggs throughout that whole series. Dan: [00:48:00] Well, That's it. That was so parallel at the time, you know. Mike: So around that time was when you were editing and then writing for the HellRaiser series and the Night Breed series, right? Dan: Yes. Certainly writing for them. Yeah. I mean, I did some consulting editing on the HellRaiser and other Barker books, after our lift staff, but, primarily writing at that point. Mike: Okay. Cause I have Hellraiser number one, and I think you're listed as an editor on it. Dan: I was, I started the whole Hellraiser anthology with other folks, you know, but I was the main driver, and I think that was one of the early instigators of kind of the rebirth of horror at that time. And, you know, going back to something you said earlier, you know, for many years, I was always, pressing Archie Goodwin, who worked at Warren, and worked on Erie, and worked on all those titles. You know, why can't we do a new horror anthology and he was quite sage like and saying, yeah. It'd be great to do it, but it's not going to sell there's no hook, right? There's no connection, you know, just horror for her sake. And it was when Clive Barker [00:49:00] came into our offices, and so I want to do something with Archie Goodwin. And then the two of them said, Hellraiser can be the hook. Right. Hellraiser can be the way in to sort of create an anthology series, have an identifiable icon, and then we developed out from there with Clive, with a couple of other folks Erik Saltzgaber, Phil Nutman, myself, Archie Goodwin, like what would be the world? And then the Bible that would actually give you enough, breadth and width to play with these characters that wouldn't just always be puzzle box, pinhead, puzzle box, pinhead, you know? And so we developed a fairly large set of rules and mythologies allowed for that. Mike: That's so cool. I mean, there really wasn't anything at all, like Hellraiser when it came out. Like, and there's still not a lot like it, but I - Jessika: Yeah, I was going to say, wait, what else? Mike: I mean, I feel like I've read other books since then, where there's that blending of sexuality and [00:50:00] horror and morality, because at the, at the core of it, Hellraiser often feels like a larger morality play. Dan: Now, you know, I'm going to disagree with you on that one. I mean, I think sometimes we let it slip in a morality and we played that out. But I think Hellraiser is sort of find what you want out of it. Right. You go back to the first film and it's, you know, what's your pleasure, sir? You know, it was when the guy hands up the book and the Centobites, you know, or angels to some demons, to others. So I think the book was at its best and the movies are at their best when it's not so much about the comeuppance as it is about find your place in here. Right? And that can be that sort of weird exploration of many different things. Mike: That's cool. So going back to Terror. Because we've talked about like how much we enjoyed the character and everything, I want to take a moment to talk about each of our favorite Terror moments. Dan: Okay. Mike: So Dan, why don't you start? What was your favorite moment for Terror [00:51:00] to write or going back to read? Dan: It's a great question, one of the toughest, because again, I had such delight in the character and felt such a connection, you know, in sort of channeling him in a way I could probably find you five, ten moments per issue, but, I actually think it was the it's in the first issue. And was probably the first line that sort of came to me. And then I wrote backwards from it, which was this, got your nose bit. And you know, it's the old gag of like when a parent's playing with a child and, you know, grabs at the nose and uses the thumb to represent the nose and says, got your nose. And there's a moment in that issue where I think he's just plummeted out of a skyscraper. He's, you know, fallen down into a police car. He's basically shattered. And this cop or security guard is kind of coming over to him and, and he just reaches out and grabs the guy's nose, you know, rips his arm off or something or legs to start to replace himself and, and just says, got your nose, but it's, but it's all a [00:52:00] build from this inner monologue that he's been doing. And so he's not responding to anything. He's not doing a quip to anything. He's just basically telling us a story and ending it with this, you know, delivery that basically says the guy has a complete condescending attitude and just signals that we're in his space. Like he doesn't need to kind of like do an Arnold response to something it's just, he's in his own little world moments I always just kind of go back to that got your nose moment, which is just creepy and crazy and strange. Mike: As soon as you mentioned that I was thinking of the panel that that was from, because it was such a great moment. I think it was the mob enforcers that had shot him up and he had jumped out of the skyscraper four and then they came down to finish him off and he wound up just ripping them apart so that he could rebuild himself. All right, Jessika, how about you? Jessika: I really enjoyed the part where Terror fights with sharks in order to free Silver Sable and Luke Cage. [00:53:00] It was so cool. There was just absolutely no fear as he went at the first shark head-on and, and then there were like five huge bloodthirsty sharks in the small tank. And Terror's just like, what an inconvenience. Oh, well. Mike: Yeah. Jessika: Like followed by a quippy remark, like in his head, of course. And I feel like he's such a solitary character that it makes sense that he would have such an active internal monologue. I find myself doing that. Like, you know, I mean, I have a dog, so he usually gets the brunt of it, but he, you know, it's, it is that you start to form like, sort of an internal conversation if you don't have that outside interaction. Dan: Right. Jessika: And I think a lot of us probably relate to that though this pandemic. Mike: Yeah. Jessika: But the one-liner thoughts, like, again, they make those scenes in my opinion, and it gave pause for levity. We don't have to be serious about this because really isn't life or death for Terror. We know that, and he just reminds us that constantly by just he's always so damn nonchalant. [00:54:00] Dan: Yeah. He does have a very, I'm not going to say suave, but it's, uh, you know, that sort of very, I've got this, you know, sort of attitude to it. Mike: I would, say that he's suave when he wants to be, I mean, like the last issue he's got his whiskers tied back and kind of a ponytail. Dan: Oh yeah. Jessika: Oh yeah. Dan: Richard Pace did a great job with that. Mike: Where he's dancing with his assistant in the restaurant and it's that final scene where he's got that really elegant tuxedo. Like. Dan: Yeah. It's very beautiful. Mike: I say that he can be suave and he wants to be. So I got to say like my favorite one, it was a visual gag that you guys did, and it's in issue six when he's fighting with the Punisher and he's got this, long guns sniper. And he shoots the Punisher point blank, and Terror's, like at this point he's lost his legs for like the sixth time. Like he seems to lose his legs, like once an issue where he's just a torso waddling around on his hands. And so he shoots him the force skids him back. [00:55:00] And I legit could not stop laughing for a good minute. Like I was just cackling when I read that. So I think all of us agree that it's those moments of weird levity that really made the series feel like something special. Dan: I'm not quite sure we're going to see that moment reenacted at the Disney Pavilion, you know, anytime soon. But, that would be pretty awesome if they ever went that route. Mike: Well, yeah, so, I mean, like, let's talk about that for a minute, because one of the main ways that I consume Marvel comics these days is through Marvel unlimited, and Terror is a pretty limited presence there. There's a few issues of various Deadpool series. There's the Marvel team up that I think Robert Kirkman did, where Terror shows up and he has some pretty cool moments in there. And then there's a couple of random issues of the 1990s Luke Cage series Cage, but like the core series, the Marvel max stuff, his appearance in books like Daredevil and Wolverine, they just don't seem to be available for consumption via the. App Like I had to go through my personal [00:56:00] collection to find all this stuff. And like, are the rights just more complicated because it was published under the Epic imprint and that was create her own stuff, like do you know? Dan: No, I mean, it wouldn't be it's choice, right. He's probably perceived as a, if people within the editorial group even know about him, right. I was reading something recently where some of the current editorial staff had to be schooled on who Jack Kirby was. So, I'm not sure how much exposure or, you know, interest there would be, you know, to that. I mean, I don't know why everything would be on Marvin unlimited. It doesn't seem like it requires anything except scanning the stuff and putting it up there. But there wouldn't be any rights issues. Marvel owned the Shadow Line, Marvel owns the Terror Incorporated title, it would have been there. So I'm not really sure why it wouldn't be. And maybe at some point it will, but, that's just an odd emission. I mean, for years, which I always felt like, well, what did I do wrong? I [00:57:00] mean, you can find very little of the Daredevil work I did, which was probably very well known and very well received in, in reprints. It would be like, there'd be reprints of almost every other storyline and then there'd be a gap around some of those things. And now they started to reappear as they've done these omnibus editions. Mike: Well, yeah, I mean, you know, and going back the awareness of the character, anytime I talk about Terror to people, it's probably a three out of four chance that they won't have heard of them before. I don't know if you're a part of the comic book historians group on Facebook? Dan: I'm not. No. Mike: So there's a lot of people who are really passionate about comic book history, and they talk about various things. And so when I was doing research for this episode originally, I was asking about kind of the revamp of supernatural heroes. And I said, you know, this was around the same time as Terror. And several people sat there and said, we haven't heard of Terror before. And I was like, he's great. He's amazing. You have to look them up. But yeah, it seems like, you know, to echo what you stated, it seems like there's just a lack of awareness about the character, which I feel is a genuine shame. And that's part of the [00:58:00] reason that I wanted to talk about him in this episode. Dan: Well, thank you. I mean, I love the spotlight and I think anytime I've talked to somebody about it who knew it, I've never heard somebody who read the book said, yeah, that sucks. Right. I've heard that about other things, but not about this one, invariably, if they read it, they loved it. And they were twisted and kind of got into it. But did have a limited run, right? It was only 13 issues. It didn't get the spotlight, it was sort of promised it kind of, it came out with a grouping of other mercenary titles at the time. There was a new Punisher title. There was a Silver Sable. There was a few other titles in this grouping. Everyone was promised a certain amount of additional PR, which they got; when it got to Terror. It didn't get that it like, they pulled the boost at the last minute that might not have made a difference. And I also think maybe it was a little bit ahead of its time in certain attitudes crossing the line between horror and [00:59:00] humor and overtness of certain things, at least for Marvel, like where do you fit this? I think the readers are fine. Readers are great about picking up on stuff and embracing things. For Marvel, it was kind of probably, and I'm not dissing them. I never got like any negative, you know, we're gonna launch this title, what we're going to dismiss it. But I just also think, unless it's somebody like me driving it or the editor driving it, or Carl Potts, who was the editor in chief of that division at that point, you know, unless they're pushing it, there's plenty of other characters Right. For, things to get behind. But I think again, anytime it kind of comes up, it is definitely the one that I hear about probably the most and the most passionately so that's cool in its own way. Mike: Yeah, I think I remember reading an interview that you did, where you were talking about how there was originally going to be like a gimmick cover or a trading card or something like that. Dan: Yeah. Mike: So what was the, what was the gimmick going to be for Terror number one? Dan: What was the gimmick going to be? I don't know, actually, I if I knew I [01:00:00] can't remember anymore. But it was going to be totally gimmicky, as all those titles and covers were at the time. So I hope not scratch and sniff like a, uh, rotting bodies odor, although that would have been kind of in-character and cool. Mike: I mean, this was the era of the gimmick cover. Dan: Oh, absolutely. Mike: Like,that was when that was when we had Bloodstrike come out and it was like the thermographic printing, so you could rub the blood and it would disappear. Force Works is my favorite one, you literally unfold the cover and it's like a pop-up book. Dan: Somebody actually keyed me in. There actually was like a Terror trading card at one point. Mike: Yeah. Dan: Like after the fact, which I was like, shocked. Mike: I have that, that's from Marvel Universe series four. Dan: Yeah. we did a pretty good job with it actually. And then even as we got to the end of the run, you know, we, and you can sort of see us where we're trying to shift certain aspects of the book, you know, more into the mainstream Marvel, because they said, well, we'll give you another seven issues or something, you know, to kind of get the numbers up. Mike: Right. Dan: And they pulled the plug, you know, even before that. So, uh, that's why [01:01:00] the end kind of comes a bit abruptly and we get that final coda scene, you know, that Richard Pace did such a nice job with. Mike: Yeah. I mean, it felt like it wrapped it up, you know, and they gave you that opportunity, which I was really kind of grateful for, to be honest. Dan: Yeah. and subsequently, I don't know what's going on. I know there was that David Lapham, you know, series, you did a couple of those, which I glanced at, I know I kind of got in the way of it a little bit too, not in the way, but I just said, remember to give us a little created by credits in that, but I didn't read those. And then, I know he was in the League of Losers at one point, which just didn't sound right to me. And, uh. Mike: It's actually. Okay. So I'm going to, I'm going to say this cause, it's basically a bunch of, kind of like the B to C listers for the most part. And. So they're called the Legal Losers. I think it's a really good story, and I actually really like what they do with Terror. He gets, she's now Spider Woman, I think it's, Anya Corazon, but it was her original incarnation of, Arana. And she's got that spider armor that like comes out of her arm. And so she [01:02:00] dies really on and he gets her arm. And then, Dan: That's cool. Mike: What happens is he makes a point of using the armor that she has. And so he becomes this weird amalgamation of Terror and Arana's armored form, which is great. Dan: Was that the Kirkman series? Is that the one that he did or. Mike: yeah. That was part of Marvel Team-Up. Dan: Okay. Mike: it was written by Robert Kirkman. Dan: Well, then I will, I will look it up. Mike: Yeah. And that one's on Marvel unlimited and genuinely a really fun story as I remembered. It's been a couple of years since I read it, but yeah. Dan: Very cool. Mike: So we've talked about this a little bit, but, so

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Virginia Water Radio
Episode 600 (10-25-21): The Wide Reach of Viruses, Including Through Water

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:50).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 10-22-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of October 25, 2021.  This episode is part of a series this fall about water connections to the human body and human biology.  We start this week with three mystery sounds, all related to a very numerous group of disease-causing, or pathogenic, microbes that have enormous impacts on human health.  Have a listen for about 20 seconds, and see if know this microbial group.  And here's a hint: big hits on social media are said to spread like this group. SOUNDS – ~19 sec If you guessed viruses, you're right!  You heard a person coughing due to a viral disease; handwashing, an important method of reducing viral transmission; and a spray bottle of isopropyl alcohol, an effective disinfectant against many kinds of viruses.  With attention focused this fall both on the COVID-19 coronavirus and the annual influenza virus season, we explore in this episode some basic information about viruses and some viral connections to water.  Here are 10 key points about viruses. 1.  Viruses are one of four groups of microbes responsible for human disease, along with bacteria, fungi, and protozoa, which are single-celled animals.  As a group, viruses are the smallest of these microbes, although some are larger than some bacteria. 2.  Viruses aren't made up of cells, but instead exist as particles composed primarily of molecules of protein and nucleic acids, that is, DNA or RNA.  They require a cellular host for reproduction, called replication. 3.  Viruses are more abundant than all of the cellular-based living things on earth. 4.  All living things are infected by viruses. 5.  Viruses don't always cause disease in infected hosts, but many kinds do cause significant diseases in humans, other animals, and plants. 6.  Viral disease can result from viruses taking over or inhibiting their host's cellular biochemical processes, or by cell destruction as new virus particles exit cells after replication. 7.  Depending on their type, viruses can be spread through air, in water, from surfaces, by animal vectors, or through exchange of blood or other body substances. 8.  Water-related spread of viruses can occur through water contaminated with human waste, and through animal vectors connected to water, particularly mosquitoes. 9.  Significant human diseases from water-borne viruses include intestinal disease, particularly diarrhea; hepatitis, or liver inflammation; inflammations of the brain, spinal cord, or heart; and possibly cancer.  Viral diseases spread by mosquitoes include Yellow Fever, Dengue, West Nile, and others. And last, but not least, handwashing with clean water and soap is important for reducing the spread of viruses through objects and surfaces—collectively called fomites—with which humans come into contact. Thanks to Freesound.org user n__audioman for making the coughing sound available for public use.  Here's hoping we all hear less of that sound and more of the handwashing and other preventative measures that keep viruses—water-borne and otherwise—somewhat at bay. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Thanks to Dr. Sally Paulson, Virginia Tech Department of Entomology, for her help with this article. The coughing sound was recorded by user n__audioman (dated December 14, 2015), and made available for public use by Freesound.org, online at https://freesound.org/people/n_audioman/sounds/331068/, under the Creative Commons Attribution License 3.0  For more information on Creative Commons licenses, please see https://creativecommons.org/licenses/; information on the Attribution License specifically is online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/. The handwashing and alcohol spraying sounds were recorded by Virginia Water Radio on October 21, 2021. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Female Aedes japonicus mosquito (also known as Ochlerotatus japonicas), photographed from a colony at Notre Dame University.  Photo by Frank Collins, accessed from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Public Health Image Library, online at https://phil.cdc.gov/default.aspx; specific URL for this photo was https://phil.cdc.gov/Details.aspx?pid=7886, as of 10-25-21.  According to CDC caption for this photo, this Asian mosquito, first collected in the United States in New York and New Jersey in 1998, is a suspected transmitter for West Nile virus. “Wash Your Hands in 24 Languages” poster from the Minnesota Department of Health, online at https://www.health.state.mn.us/people/handhygiene/wash/washyourhands.html. SOURCES Used for Audio John B. Carter and Venetia A. Saunders, Virology: Principles and Applications, Second Edition, John Wiley & Sons Ltd., Chichester, United Kingdom, 2013. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, “Tracking the COVID-19 Economy's Effects on Food, Housing, and Employment Hardships,” updated October 13, 2021, online at https://www.cbpp.org/research/poverty-and-inequality/tracking-the-covid-19-economys-effects-on-food-housing-and. Dorothy H. Crawford, Viruses: A Very Short Introduction, Second Edition, Oxford University Press, Oxford, United Kingdom, 2018. Aimee M. Gall et al., “Waterborne Viruses: A Barrier to Safe Drinking Water,” PLOS Pathogens Vol. 11, No. 6 (June 25, 2015), online at https://journals.plos.org/plospathogens/article/authors?id=10.1371/journal.ppat.1004867. Johns Hopkins University & Medicine/Coronavirus Resource Center, “Global Map,” online at https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/map.html. Microbiology Society, “Microbes and Disease,” online at https://microbiologysociety.org/why-microbiology-matters/what-is-microbiology/microbes-and-the-human-body/microbes-and-disease.html. Minnesota Department of Health, “Waterborne Illness,” online at https://www.health.state.mn.us/diseases/waterborne/index.html. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), “Global economic recovery continues but remains uneven, says OECD,” News Release, September 21, 2021. University of New Hampshire/Casey School of Public Policy, “COVID-19 Economic Crisis: By State,” by Michael Ettlinger and Jordan Hensley, October 1, 2021, online at https://carsey.unh.edu/publication/COVID-19-Economic-Impact-By-State. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “Chemical Disinfectants,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/infectioncontrol/guidelines/disinfection/disinfection-methods/chemical.html. U.S. CDC, “Mosquito-Borne Diseases,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/outdoor/mosquito-borne/default.html.  U.S. CDC, Principles of Epidemiology in Public Health Practice, Third Edition: An Introduction to Applied Epidemiology and Biostatistics, November 2011, “Glossary,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/csels/dsepd/ss1978/glossary.html. U.S. CDC, “Water-related Diseases and Contaminants in Public Water Systems,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/drinking/public/water_diseases.html. Virginia Department of Health, “Waterborne Hazards Control Programs,” online at https://www.vdh.virginia.gov/waterborne-hazards-control/. Water Quality Association, “Bacteria and Virus Issues,” online at https://www.wqa.org/learn-about-water/common-contaminants/bacteria-viruses. World Health Organization (WHO), “Waterborne Pathogens and Their Significance in Water Supplies” (table), online (as a PDF) at https://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/gdwqrevision/watpathogens.pdf. WHO, “Emerging Issues in Water and Infectious Disease,” 2003, online (as a PDF) at https://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/emerging/emerging.pdf. WHO, “Microbial Fact Sheets,” online (as a PDF) at https://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/dwq/GDW11rev1and2.pdf. For More Information about Water and the Human Body Isabel Lorenzo et al., “The Role of Water Homeostasis in Muscle Function and Frailty: A Review,” Nutrients, Vol. 11, No. 8 (August 2019, accessed online at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6723611/(subscription may be required for access). Mayo Clinic Health System, “Water: Essential to your body,” online at https://www.mayoclinichealthsystem.org/hometown-health/speaking-of-health/water-essential-to-your-body. U.S. Geological Survey, “The Water in You: Water and the Human Body,” https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/water-you-water-and-human-body?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Science” subject category. Following are links to other episodes on connections of water to human biology.  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in fall 2021; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes. Overview of water's roles in the body – Episode 592, 8-30-21.Disease: COVID-19 – Episode 517, 3-23-20 and Episode 519, 4-6-20.Disease: influenza – Episode 598, 10-11-21.Circulatory system connections to water – Episode 593, 9-6-21.Muscular system connections to water – Episode 596, 9-27-21,Neurological system connections to water – Episode 594, 9-13-21.Skeleton system connections to water – Episode 595, 9-20-21.Water intake and exercise – Episode 466, 4-1-19.Water thermodynamics – Episode 195, 1-6-14. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes 4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grade 6 6.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment, including that water is important for agriculture, power generation, and public health.6.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment, including that major health and safety issues are associated with air and water quality, Life ScienceLS.2 – All living things are composed of one or more cells that support life processes, as described by the cell theory, including that cell structure and organelles support life processes.LS.3     – There are levels of structural organization in living things, including that similar characteristics determine the classification of organisms.LS.10 – Organisms reproduce and transmit genetic information to new generations. BiologyBIO.4 – Bacteria and viruses have an effect on living systems. 2015 Social Studies SOLs United States History: 1865-to-Present CourseUSII.9 – Domestic and international issues during the second half of the 20th Century and the early 21st Century. Civics and Economics CourseCE.10 – Public policy at local, state, and national levels. World Geography CourseWG.2 – How selected physical and ecological processes shape the Earth's surface, including climate, weather, and how humans influence their environment and are influenced by it. Virginia and United States History CourseVUS.14 – Political and social conditions in the 21st Century. Government CourseGOVT.9 – Public policy process at local, state, and national levels.Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rdgrade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade.Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5thgrade.Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4ththrough 8th grade.Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school.Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school.Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school.Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school.Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th gradeEpisode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia's water resources, for 4th and 6th grade.CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:50).

new york food health science bay housing humans university agency asian female photo principles natural earth political state saunders audio college accent dark tech water web index organisation rain united states pond research global ocean government education economy budget public vol new jersey chesapeake snow reach environment dna viral organisms images skeleton johns hopkins university disease public policy crawford domestic depending languages freesound effects viruses msonormal stream oxford normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens bacteria arial united kingdom environmental times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading biology cdc entomology wide civics gall grade nutrients colorful tracking microbes chichester signature bio rna scales govt human body watershed transcript wg centers disease control significant virginia tech epidemiology neurological ls atlantic ocean glossary natural resources grades k oxford university press name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes applications water supplies wash your hands prevention cdc biostatistics msohyperlink dengue world health organization who oecd sections life sciences john wiley second edition public health practice stormwater infectious diseases yellow fever policymakers bmp john b emerging issues new standard acknowledgment minnesota department west nile policy priorities muscular microbiology society virginia department economic co notre dame university cripple creek cumberland gap news release sols aedes tmdl development oecd geological survey mayo clinic health system united states history vus circulatory living systems virginia standards water center contaminants audio notes covid-19
In Our Time: Philosophy
Iris Murdoch

In Our Time: Philosophy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 54:25


Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the author and philosopher Iris Murdoch (1919 - 1999). In her lifetime she was most celebrated for her novels such as The Bell and The Black Prince, but these are now sharing the spotlight with her philosophy. Responding to the horrors of the Second World War, she argued that morality was not subjective or a matter of taste, as many of her contemporaries held, but was objective, and good was a fact we could recognize. To tell good from bad, though, we would need to see the world as it really is, not as we want to see it, and her novels are full of characters who are not yet enlightened enough to do that. With Anil Gomes Fellow and Tutor in Philosophy at Trinity College, University of Oxford Anne Rowe Visiting Professor at the University of Chichester and Emeritus Research Fellow with the Iris Murdoch Archive Project at Kingston University And Miles Leeson Director of the Iris Murdoch Research Centre and Reader in English Literature at the University of Chichester Producer: Simon Tillotson

In Our Time
Iris Murdoch

In Our Time

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 54:25


Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the author and philosopher Iris Murdoch (1919 - 1999). In her lifetime she was most celebrated for her novels such as The Bell and The Black Prince, but these are now sharing the spotlight with her philosophy. Responding to the horrors of the Second World War, she argued that morality was not subjective or a matter of taste, as many of her contemporaries held, but was objective, and good was a fact we could recognize. To tell good from bad, though, we would need to see the world as it really is, not as we want to see it, and her novels are full of characters who are not yet enlightened enough to do that. With Anil Gomes Fellow and Tutor in Philosophy at Trinity College, University of Oxford Anne Rowe Visiting Professor at the University of Chichester and Emeritus Research Fellow with the Iris Murdoch Archive Project at Kingston University And Miles Leeson Director of the Iris Murdoch Research Centre and Reader in English Literature at the University of Chichester Producer: Simon Tillotson

In Our Time: Culture
Iris Murdoch

In Our Time: Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 54:25


Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the author and philosopher Iris Murdoch (1919 - 1999). In her lifetime she was most celebrated for her novels such as The Bell and The Black Prince, but these are now sharing the spotlight with her philosophy. Responding to the horrors of the Second World War, she argued that morality was not subjective or a matter of taste, as many of her contemporaries held, but was objective, and good was a fact we could recognize. To tell good from bad, though, we would need to see the world as it really is, not as we want to see it, and her novels are full of characters who are not yet enlightened enough to do that. With Anil Gomes Fellow and Tutor in Philosophy at Trinity College, University of Oxford Anne Rowe Visiting Professor at the University of Chichester and Emeritus Research Fellow with the Iris Murdoch Archive Project at Kingston University And Miles Leeson Director of the Iris Murdoch Research Centre and Reader in English Literature at the University of Chichester Producer: Simon Tillotson

Capes and Lunatics
Chichester Chats Ep #3: Terror Inc. #1-#5

Capes and Lunatics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 6:13


Chichester Chats Ep #3: Terror Inc. #1-#5 Welcome back to the Chichester Chats! In each episode Phil and Lilith chat with writer D.G. Chichester about one of his comic book creations.  This time the group discuss Terror Inc. #1-#5 from 1992 featuring an original Chichester character. Show notes: Chichester Chats Ep #3: Terror Inc. #1-#5 Find all of our Social Media here: https://linktr.ee/capesandlunatics Follow Phil Perich on Twitter: https://twitter.com/NIghtwingpdp  Follow Lilith Hellfire on Twitter: https://twitter.com/LilithHellfire Follow D.G. Chichester on Twitter: https://twitter.com/dgchichester Subscribe to D.G. Chichester's newsletter here: storymaze.substack.com Produced by: Capes and Lunatics Production Team: Phil Perich Support the Capes and Lunatics Podcast on Patreon www.patreon.com/capesandlunatics

Action and Ambition
Lavall Chichester is a Digital Marketing Expert Who Promotes Awareness, Creates Quality Leads and Increases Revenue

Action and Ambition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 28:33


Welcome to another episode of the Action and Ambition Podcast. Today's guest is Lavall Chichester, Founder at GrowthSkills.co, a learning platform and consultancy that assists brands in increasing revenue through Growth Marketing as well as skill training, developing, and hiring the best employees through their Learning IQ platform. They use SEO, Content Marketing, Paid Search, Paid Social, and email marketing to help you acquire clients and maximize their lifetime value. They specialize in digital cannabis and CBD marketing. He is also the CMO of JumpCrew and has more than 13 years of experience building digital marketing strategies for companies such as Western Union, Kaiser Permanente, Vitamin Water, and others. Lavall was named to AdAge's 2015 40 Under 40 list for growing MullenLowe Profero's search division into a multi-million dollar firm in less than a year. Let's listen to find out more!

Geek To Me Radio
264-PART 2- with Tom DeFalco-Paul Kupperberg, Howard Mackie, and D.G. Chichester

Geek To Me Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 48:08


In this 2nd part of a 2 part interview, comic writer, editor, and creator Tom DeFalco talks about Thor, Hasbro, collecting comics, and the crowdfunding campaign for his new book ‘The R.I.G.H.T. Project' with Ron Frenz and Sal Buscema. Also, James shares a roundtable interview from Terrificon with Howard Mackie, Paul Kupperberg, and D.G. Chichester. 0:00 SEGMENT 1: Tom DeFalco talks about his problems with the DC films, coming up with the Acts of Vengeance crossover, co-creating New Warriors, and creating the character of Thunderstrike Eric Masterson in the Thor comics. 10:45 SEGMENT 2: Tom DeFalco talks about which of his characters deserved to be more popular, working with Hasbro to create comics like G.I. Joe and Transformers, how he feels about his legacy, collecting things that he has worked on, hurricane Sandy wiping out most of his collection, his plans to attend future conventions, and how J. M. DeMatteis convinced him to start going to conventions. 20:43 SEGMENT 3: Tom DeFalco talks about the indiegogo campaign for the comic ‘The R.I.G.H.T. Project' that he is writing with Ron Frenz and Sal Buscema (https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/tom-defalco-ron-frenz-s-the-r-i-g-h-t-project), being too busy for social media, and his upcoming Archie project. 30:50 SEGMENT 4: Howard Mackie, Paul Kupperberg, and D.G. Chichester talk about being pigeon-holed by certain characters they have worked on, whether there was a real Marvel and DC rivalry, advice for aspiring writers, and which authors have inspired them. Thanks to our sponsors Marcus Theatres (https://www.marcustheatres.com/) and Historic St. Charles, Missouri (https://www.discoverstcharles.com/) Amazon Affiliate Link - http://bit.ly/geektome Buy Me a Coffee - https://www.buymeacoffee.com/3Y0D2iaZl Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/GeekToMeRadio Website - http://geektomeradio.com/ Podcast - https://anchor.fm/jamesenstall Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/GeekToMeRadio/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/geektomeradio Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/geektomeradio/ Producer - Joseph Vosevich https://twitter.com/Joey_Vee --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jamesenstall/support

The Daily Gardener
September 30, 2021 The Mysterious Coconut, Henry King, Helia Bravo Hollis, Edward Hyams, Jack Gilbert, Windcliff by Daniel J. Hinkley, and The Martian

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 16:15


Today in botanical history, we celebrate an old English poet, a Mexican botanist, and a British gardener and survivalist who was way ahead of his time. We'll hear an excerpt from a beautiful Jack Gilbert poem We Grow That Garden Library™ with a garden classic of our time from a contemporary garden expert. And then we'll wrap things up with a fun movie that featured a botanist. It debuted six years ago today in England.   Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart To listen to the show while you're at home, just ask Alexa or Google to “Play the latest episode of The Daily Gardener Podcast.” And she will. It's just that easy.   The Daily Gardener Friday Newsletter Sign up for the FREE Friday Newsletter featuring: A personal update from me Garden-related items for your calendar The Grow That Garden Library™ featured books for the week Gardener gift ideas Garden-inspired recipes Exclusive updates regarding the show Plus, each week, one lucky subscriber wins a book from the Grow That Garden Library™ bookshelf.   Gardener Greetings Send your garden pics, stories, birthday wishes, and so forth to Jennifer@theDailyGardener.org   Facebook Group If you'd like to check out my curated news articles and original blog posts for yourself, you're in luck. I share all of it with the Listener Community in the Free Facebook Group - The Daily Gardener Community. So, there's no need to take notes or search for links. The next time you're on Facebook, search for Daily Gardener Community, where you'd search for a friend... and request to join. I'd love to meet you in the group.   Curated News Is a coconut a fruit, nut, or seed? | Library of Congress   Important Events September 30, 1669  Death of Henry King, English poet. He served as Bishop of Chichester and was close friends with John Donne. He wrote, Brave flowers - that I could gallant it like you,  And be as little vain!  You come abroad, and make a harmless show,  And to your beds again.  You are not proud: you know your birth:  For your embroidered garments are from earth.   September 30, 1901 Birth of Helia Bravo Hollis, Mexican botanist. She was the first woman to graduate with a degree in biology in Mexico. By 29, she was curator of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (Mexico City) herbarium, where she studied cacti. Her work brought notoriety, and she became known as The Queen of the Cacti. She co-wrote her masterpiece, Las Cactaceas de México, with Hernando Sánchez-Mejorada. In 1951, she cofounded the Mexican Cactus Society, which planned to celebrate her 100th birthday in 2001, but she died four days shy of the century mark. In 1980, Monaco's Princess Grace Kelly, who was also fond of cacti, presented Helia with the second-ever Golden Cactus Award. Helia helped found the Botanical Gardens at UNAM, where she served as the director throughout the 1960s. Once, when a strike occurred at the gardens, she offset her workers' lost wages with her own savings. In 2018, Google commemorated Helia's 117th birthday with a Google Doodle. Online, there is a memorable image of  Helia dressed in a skirt and blazer - with a knife in her hand - and standing next to an enormous Echinocactus platyacanthus, aka the giant barrel cactus. In Mexico, where the cactus is a native, the hairs are harvested for weaving, and a traditional candy is made from boiling the pith. Today, the Helia Bravo Hollis Botanical Garden, with more than 80 species of Cactaceae, is found at the Biosphere Reserve of Tehuacán. Helia once wrote, My reason for living is biology and cacti.   September 30,  1910 Birth of Edward Solomon Hyams, British gardener, French scholar, historian, anarchist, and writer. He was a gardening correspondent for the Illustrated London News and The Spectator and various horticultural journals. After WWII, he lived a self-sufficient lifestyle at Nut Tree Cottages in Molash in Kent. He planted a small vineyard and later wrote The Grape Vine in England (1949). The following year, he wrote From the Waste Land (1950), which describes the transformation of three acres at Nut Tree Cottages into a market garden that generated food and income. In The Gardener's Bedside Book (1968), he wrote, I have never been interested in and am incapable of writing about the great hybrid garden tulips. I do not mean to condemn them or anything foolish like that; but one cannot be interested in every kind of garden plant, and that particular kind has never made any real appeal to me whatsoever. But the botanical species tulips are quite another matter.   Unearthed Words Love is like a garden in the heart, he said. They asked him what he meant by garden. He explained about gardens. "In the cities," he said, "there are places walled off where color and decorum are magnified into a civilization. Like a beautiful woman," he said. How like a woman, they asked. He remembered their wives and said garden was just a figure of speech, then called for drinks all around. Two rounds later he was crying.  ― Jack Gilbert, Ovid in Tears, The Dance Most of All: Poems   Grow That Garden Library Windcliff by Daniel J. Hinkley This book came out in 2020, and the subtitle is A Story of People, Plants, and Gardens. In this book, we learn about Windcliff - one of two magnificent gardens created by the plantsman, nurseryman, and plant hunter Dan Hinkley. (Dan also created Heronswood.) “These iconic gardens, and the story of how one gave rise to the other, are celebrated in Hinkley's deeply personal Windcliff. In a lively style that mingles audacious opinions on garden design with cautionary tales of planting missteps, Hinkley shares his infectious passion for plants.” In these pages, you will fall in love with Windcliff thanks to the gorgeous photography and fall even deeper in love hearing about the careful way Dan created Windcliff, from the exceptional plants he selected to his pragmatic garden advice. This book is 280 pages of creating a garden with a modern master who loves plants and is delighted to share his stunning garden with us. You can get a copy of Windcliff by Daniel J. Hinkley and support the show using the Amazon Link in today's Show Notes for around $22.   Today's Botanic Spark Reviving the little botanic spark in your heart September 30, 2015  On this day, The Martian, featuring Matt Damon as botanist Mark Watney premiered in England. In the movie, Mark is accidentally left on Mars and is forced to grow potatoes to stay alive until he is rescued.   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener. And remember: "For a happy, healthy life, garden every day."

Daily Prayer (Presbyterian Book of Common Worship)
September 25, 2021 Midday Prayer

Daily Prayer (Presbyterian Book of Common Worship)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 32:17


Midday Prayer for Saturday, September 25, 2021Brief Outline:Opening SentencesPsalm 149Old Testament: 2 Kgs. 11:1-21Ancient or Classic Prayer: Richard of Chichester (c. 1197-1253)Prayer for Various Occasions: For Deacons in the ChurchCollectThe Lord's Prayer ("debts")DismissalBONUS: 2 Kgs. 12:1 - 16:20This service is adapted from The Book of Common Worship: Daily Prayer, copyright (c) 2018 Westminster John Knox Press.Scripture quotations (except the Psalms and Canticles) are from the New Revised Standard Version of the Bible, copyright (c) 1989 by the Division of Christian Education of the National Council of the Church of Christ in the U.S.A."Aleluya" music by JosepMonter from PixabayCandle image by Myriams-Fotos from Pixabay

Capes and Lunatics
Chichester Chats Ep #2: Elektra - Root of Evil

Capes and Lunatics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 7:06


Chichester Chats Ep #2: Elektra - Root of Evil Welcome back to the Chichester Chats! In each episode Phil and Lilith chat with writer D.G. Chichester about one of his comic book creations.  This time the group discusses Elektra: Root of Evil #1-#4 from 1995! Show notes: Chichester Chats Ep #2: Elektra - Root of Evil Find all of our Social Media here: https://linktr.ee/capesandlunatics Follow Phil Perich on Twitter: https://twitter.com/NIghtwingpdp  Follow Lilith Hellfire on Twitter: https://twitter.com/LilithHellfire Follow D.G. Chichester on Twitter: https://twitter.com/dgchichester Subscribe to D.G. Chichester's newsletter here: storymaze.substack.com Produced by: Capes and Lunatics Production Team: Phil Perich Support the Capes and Lunatics Podcast on Patreon www.patreon.com/capesandlunatics

Capes & Lunatics: Sidekicks
Chichester Chats Ep #2: Elektra - Root of Evil

Capes & Lunatics: Sidekicks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 7:06


Chichester Chats Ep #2: Elektra - Root of Evil Welcome back to the Chichester Chats! In each episode Phil and Lilith chat with writer D.G. Chichester about one of his comic book creations.  This time the group discusses Elektra: Root of Evil #1-#4 from 1995! Show notes: Chichester Chats Ep #2: Elektra - Root of Evil Find all of our Social Media here: https://linktr.ee/capesandlunatics Follow Phil Perich on Twitter: https://twitter.com/NIghtwingpdp  Follow Lilith Hellfire on Twitter: https://twitter.com/LilithHellfire Follow D.G. Chichester on Twitter: https://twitter.com/dgchichester Subscribe to D.G. Chichester's newsletter here: storymaze.substack.com Produced by: Capes and Lunatics Production Team: Phil Perich Support the Capes and Lunatics Podcast on Patreon www.patreon.com/capesandlunatics

The Driven Chat Podcast
The Goodwood Revival with Bonhams

The Driven Chat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 64:52


This week Andy, John and Amy come to you from the hustle, bustle and magic of The Goodwood Revival Meeting in Chichester as guests of The Auctioneers, Bonhams.Recorded on Friday 17th (on the morning of the first day of the three-day event), Andy, John, and Amy sit in the auction surrounded by a collection of spectacular cars before enjoying a tour of some of the most iconic vehicles before they go under the hammer in the Bonhams Marquee.John and Andy both celebrated a birthday last week, and our friends at Partridge BMW arranged something special for the both of them... a 740Li and an M8 Competition. On the other hand, Amy turned up to the event with not one, not two, but three cars! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Capes & Lunatics: Sidekicks
The Devil You Know Ep #19: Daredevil #275 & #276

Capes & Lunatics: Sidekicks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 62:43


The Devil You Know Ep #19: Daredevil #275 & #276 Welcome back to The Devil You Know: The Daredevil Podcast! In this episode Phil and Lilith review Daredevil #275 & #276 (December 1989-January 1990) featuring Doctor Doom's plot to resurrect the murderous android Ultron to destroy Daredevil in this 2 part Acts of Vengeance tie-In story. Show notes: The Devil You Know Ep #19: Daredevil #275 & #276 Find all of our Social Media here: https://linktr.ee/capesandlunatics Follow Phil Perich on Twitter: https://twitter.com/NIghtwingpdp  Follow Lilith Hellfire on Twitter: https://twitter.com/LilithHellfire Follow D.G. Chichester on Twitter: https://twitter.com/dgchichester Subscribe to D.G. Chichester's newsletter here: storymaze.substack.com Produced by: Capes and Lunatics Podcast Production Team: Phil Perich Support the Capes and Lunatics Podcast on Patreon www.patreon.com/capesandlunatics

Piece by Piece: The Musical Theatre Talk Show Podcast

Joe Bunker is joined by cast & creatives from the 2021 Chichester Festival Theatre revival of South Pacific: Joanna Ampil (Bloody Mary); Director / Artistic Director of CFT Daniel Evans; Julian Ovenden (Emile de Becque) & Alex Young (Nellie Forbush). South Pacific - Part One features musical highlights from the 2008 Lincoln Center Production and the Chichester production itself, as well as two rounds of the PBP: South Pacific Quiz (QUIZ Nearly Was Mine!) You can find Piece by Piece on Facebook, Twitter & Instagram. You can also email us c/o piecebypiecetalkshow@gmail.com - we would love to hear your thoughts on the show!

Caged In Podcast
Coppola Connections 18: Prophecy (1979) Will Chichester

Caged In Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 82:19


This week I head down to the woods with my water testing kit and a belly full of anger to see just wants going on with that big bad pizza bear. Joining me for the ride is Will Chichester to talk all about John Frankenheimer's 1979 Eco-Horror, Creature Feature PROPHECY. The film stars Robert Foxworth, Armand Asante and this week's Coppola Connection, Talia Shire.Is this film streaming? CLICK HERE to find out.WILL on TWITTERSUPPORT CAGED IN on PATREONBUY ME A COFFEEBUY A PRINT NOW CAGED IN on TWITTERCAGED IN on INSTAGRAMCAGED IN on LETTERBOXDCAGED IN on FACEBOOKEMAIL CAGED IN NOWCaged In is apart of the Breadcrumbs Collective, head over to the WEBSITE to get all episodes of this show as well as other great shows. Get bonus content on PatreonSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/cagedinpod. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Haymarket Books Live
Reaction and Revolution: Responses to Domenico Losurdo's 'Nietzsche'

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 108:49


Join us for a discussion marking the paperback release of Domenico Losurdo's monumental study of Friedrich Nietzsche. ---------------------------------------------------- Recently translated into English by Gregor Benton, Losurdo's book is epic in scope, covering a wide range of philosophical and historical issues that not only situate Nietzsche in his 19th century context, but addresses some of the most burning theoretical and political issues of our times. Losurdo's Nietzsche represents one of the greatest examples of Marxist scholarship and criticism, and we will discuss the book's significance for not only how we see Nietzsche, but how we understand socialist theory today. Losurdo's Nietzsche shows us that the problems of the 19th century are not over yet. ---------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Harrison Fluss received his PhD in philosophy at Stony Brook University. He is a professor at Manhattan College, NYC and wrote the introduction to the English edition of Nietzsche, The Aristocratic Rebel. Benjamin Noys is Professor of Critical Theory at the University of Chichester. He is the author of The Persistence of the Negative, Malign Velocities, and the forthcoming The Matter of Language. Tijana Okić holds a PhD in Philosophy from the Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa. She is a longstanding activist of the “Committee for the Abolition of Illegitimate Debt” (CADTM), and is the editor of “The Lost Revolution: Yugoslav Women's Antifascist Front between Myth and Forgetting.” Her research includes issues of German Idealism, contemporary French philosophy, feminist philosophy, Marxism, the history of race and ethnicity, and the problems of memory in Yugoslav history. Daniel Tutt has degrees from American University and the European Graduate School. He is the author of the forthcoming book Psychoanalysis and the Politics of the Family: The Crisis of Initiationwith the Palgrave Lacan Series. His research is concerned with the intersection of contemporary politics, Marxism and Lacanian psychoanalysis. You can read his review of Losurdo's Aristocratic Rebel entitled “Nietzsche in His Time: The Struggle Against Socratism and Socialism” on the Historical Materialism website. ---------------------------------------------------- Order a copy of Nietzsche, The Aristocratic Rebel: https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/1565-nietzsche-the-aristocratic-rebel ---------------------------------------------------- Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/2sTqD62y2Do Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Capes & Lunatics: Sidekicks
The Devil You Know Ep #18: Daredevil #271-#274, Daredevil #33 (#645) NEW

Capes & Lunatics: Sidekicks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 61:35


The Devil You Know Ep #18: Daredevil #271-#274, Daredevil #33 (#645) NEW Welcome back to The Devil You Know: The Daredevil Podcast! In this episode Phil and Lilith review Daredevil #271-#274 (October-December 1989) featuring Daredevil's encounter with a feuding father/daughter, battles with the man known as Shotgun, and who is Number 9?  PLUS: A review of new issue Daredevil #33 (#645). Show notes: The Devil You Know Ep #18: Daredevil #271-#274, Daredevil #33 (#645) NEW Find all of our Social Media here: https://linktr.ee/capesandlunatics Follow Phil Perich on Twitter: https://twitter.com/NIghtwingpdp  Follow Lilith Hellfire on Twitter: https://twitter.com/LilithHellfire Follow D.G. Chichester on Twitter: https://twitter.com/dgchichester Subscribe to D.G. Chichester's newsletter here: storymaze.substack.com Produced by: http://www.southgatemediagroup.com Production Team: Phil Perich SUPPORT OUR SHOW BY SUPPORTING OUR SPONSORS Order our book Pod Life: Podcaster Stories orderpodlife.smgpods.com When you shop at Amazon.com using this link, every dollar you spend supports our podcast network and doesn't cost you a penny more. amazon.smgpods.com Support the Capes and Lunatics Podcast on Patreon www.patreon.com/capesandlunatics Support the Southgate Media Group on Patreon www.patreon.com/SouthgateMediaGroup

WKXL - New Hampshire Talk Radio
Feltes & Cail with State Senator John Reagan

WKXL - New Hampshire Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 45:19


State Senator John Reagan of Chichester who represents District 17. Senator Reagan addresses the issues involved in the legalization of cannabis and the recreational use of marijuana. Plus Amy Hall, Executive Director of Granite State Dairy Promotion.

Mission: Uplift
Episode 038 | Uplifting Faith | Gerard Long

Mission: Uplift

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 51:11


It is a great blessing to share today's episode with Gerard Long. It is a story of great suffering and simultaneously a story of great grace and faith. Gerard Long is an author and, pastor, who had a 30-year-year career in banking, was the National Director of Alpha USA for seven years, and is the Founder and President of a non-profit corporation, Awakening to God Ministries. In 2019, Gerard experienced a cardiac arrest and was pronounced dead twice in the span of 30 minutes. After coming back to life and recognizing the miracle He'd received, Gerard asked the question, “Why am I still here?” He sensed a divine calling to write his latest book, Living Hope, to share the treasures he discovered during a time of catastrophic suffering, including the suicide of his beloved son and, eight years later, the tragic death of his beautiful daughter. Gerard and his wife Jeannie recently moved from Malibu, California to Chichester, UK to care for Jeannie's 90 year-old-mum. I pray the Lord ministers to you and strengthens your faith through this powerful testimony of God's grace. Check out Uplifting Faith with Gerard Long… From the Show Living Hope by Gerard Long Alpha USA Scripture References Romans 11:36 2 Corinthians 6:10 Philippians 3:10 John 16:14 Romans 5:5 Hebrews 5:7-10 Hebrews 13:20-21 Hebrews 4:16 Ecclesiastes 3:11 James 4:14 Matthew 6:20 Mark 12:30-31 Matthew 28:18-20 Ephesians 2:10 John 17:4 Philippians 1:29 James 1:2-4 Matthew 9:36 2 Peter 3:9 Romans 8:17 John 16:33 2 Corinthians 1:3-7 Isaiah 61:1-4 John 4:34 2 Corinthians 12:9 Genesis 50:20 2 Corinthians 2:14 1 John 5:4 Connect with Gerard + Awakening to God Ministries! Website: www.awakeningtogod.org Instagram: @awakeningtogod Facebook: Awakening to God YouTube: Awakening to God Pinterest: ATG Ministries Twitter: @atg_ministries Let's Connect Facebook: Mission: Uplift Instagram: @missionuplift Website: www.missionuplift.co Patreon: Mission: Uplift Email: missionuplift@gmail.com Subscribe: Apple | Google | Spotify --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/missionuplift/message

Capes & Lunatics: Sidekicks
The Devil You Know Ep #17: Daredevil & Batman - Eye For An Eye

Capes & Lunatics: Sidekicks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 66:40


The Devil You Know Ep #17: Daredevil & Batman - Eye For An Eye Welcome back to The Devil You Know: The Daredevil Podcast! In this episode Phil and Lilith are again joined by legendary writer D.G. Chichester to review his Daredevil and Batman team-up tale, Eye For An Eye (January 1997).   Show notes: The Devil You Know Ep #17: Daredevil & Batman - Eye For An Eye Find all of our Social Media here: https://linktr.ee/capesandlunatics Follow Phil Perich on Twitter: https://twitter.com/NIghtwingpdp  Follow Lilith Hellfire on Twitter: https://twitter.com/LilithHellfire Follow D.G. Chichester on Twitter: https://twitter.com/dgchichester Subscribe to D.G. Chichester's newsletter here: storymaze.substack.com Produced by: http://www.southgatemediagroup.com Production Team: Phil Perich SUPPORT OUR SHOW BY SUPPORTING OUR SPONSORS Order our book Pod Life: Podcaster Stories orderpodlife.smgpods.com When you shop at Amazon.com using this link, every dollar you spend supports our podcast network and doesn't cost you a penny more. amazon.smgpods.com Support the Capes and Lunatics Podcast on Patreon www.patreon.com/capesandlunatics Support the Southgate Media Group on Patreon www.patreon.com/SouthgateMediaGroup

Inspired Money
An Actor's Spiritual Path to Success and Happiness with Linus Roache [replay]

Inspired Money

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 64:03


Golden Globe-nominated Linus Roache discusses money, growing up in a family of actors, the celebrity of his father William Roache, fulfillment, happiness, and more. Guest Biography Linus Roache is a British actor, probably best known for his roles as Michael Cutter on Law and Order and Thomas Wayne in Batman Begins. In 1975, Roache appeared in Coronation Street playing Peter Barlow, the son of his father's character Ken Barlow. Roache is also a past member of the Royal Shakespeare Company. Roache was born in Manchester, Lancashire, the son of Coronation Street actor William Roache and actress Anna Cropper. Roache was educated at Bishop Luffa School in Chichester, West Sussex and at the independent Rydal School in Colwyn Bay, North Wales. He studied acting at the Central School of Speech and Drama. Beginning in the 1990s, Roache began a career in film while remaining active in television and stage. In 1994, he received acclaim for his leading role in Antonia Bird's Priest. He is best known to US audiences as Dr. Thomas Wayne, father of Batman, in Batman Begins (2005) or as Executive Assistant District Attorney Michael Cutter in the American TV series Law & Order (2008–2010) and Law & Order: Special Victims Unit (2011–2012). In June 2010, it was announced that he would return to play Laurence Cunningham, alongside his father William Roache, in Coronation Street. In July 2010, he was cast in the HBO pilot The Miraculous Year. In April 2011, Roache was cast as the lead in the ITV mini-series Titanic, airing March–April 2012 to coincide with the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the ship. In February 2014, Roache debuted in season two of the popular TV series Vikings as England's King Ecbert. He is currently filming season 7 of Homeland, where he plays White House Chief of Staff, David Wellington. Show notes: http://www.inspiredmoney.fm/007 Links Homeland Coronation Street Linus Roache (IMDb) In this episode, you will learn: How to prepare for a performance. We non-actors can event benefit by these insights and routines because life is a grand performance! How you should not tie your self-worth to your work. We'll explore all sorts of things like wealth, fulfillment, and happiness. Linus is not just a great actor but after hitting many of his professional goals by age 30, he began to wonder if this is it? He took a break and explored the spiritual aspect of life that included meditating for at least 2 hours a day! So we'll explore this too. I think it's totally relevant because being healthy includes physical health, mental health, spiritual health, and financial health. Thanks for Listening! To share your thoughts: Leave a note in the comment section below. Share this show on Twitter or Facebook. To help out the show: Leave an honest review on iTunes. Your ratings and reviews really help, and I read each one. Subscribe on iTunes. Special thanks to Jim Kimo West for the music. Until next time!

Geek To Me Radio
247-Celebrating ‘What If…' with Marvel Comics Editor Tom Brevoort

Geek To Me Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 52:51


Marvel Comics editor Tom Brevoort (https://tombrevoort.com/) joins James for the entire hour to co-host an episode celebrating the comics of “What If…” and the new show premiering on Disney+ on August 11th. 0:00 SEGMENT 1: Marvel Comics editor Tom Brevoort (https://twitter.com/TomBrevoort) celebrates the 60th anniversary of the 1st issue of “Fantastic Four”, Tom and James talk about their first issues of “What If…”, and Tom talks about being an intern at Marvel when the 2nd volume of “What If…” came out. 11:10 Writer/editor/artist Al Milgrom talks about “What If… Elektra Had Lived”, “What If… the DC Bullpen Became the Fantastic Four”, and what power he would like to have. 14:02 Tom Breevort talks about why the body count was always so high in “What If…” stories. 17:20 SEGMENT 2: Tom Brevoort talks about his top 3 “What If..” stories. 25:30 A caller talks about “What If...Captain America Fought in the Civil War”. 28:25 James' favorite story is “What If… Professor X Had Become The Juggernaut” 30:15 Artist Keith Williams (https://www.instagram.com/keithwilliamscomicbookart/) talks about his favorite stories that he worked on including “What If.. the Alien Costume Had Possessed Spider-Man”. 31:58 Dave from Cinephiles Assemble calls in. Check out his YouTube channel for his discussion with James about “What If…” (https://youtu.be/zieYh8gTQIg). 34:24 Tom Brevoort talks about a never used “What If…” story about The Avengers fighting Galactus. 37:06 SEGMENT 3: The Disney+ series will feature “What If… T'challa Became Star Lord” featuring Chadwick Boseman's final performance as Black Panther. 41:12 Writer D.G. Chichester (https://twitter.com/dgchichester) talks about “What If… The Kingpin Owned Daredevil” and one story that never saw the light of day. 44:03 Writer Frank Tieri (https://twitter.com/FrankTieri) talks about “What If… Spider-Man House of M”. 45:42 Tom Brevoort talks about how “What If…” stories are written, whether there will be new issues, and reprinting old issues. 48:29 Artist Lee Weeks (https://twitter.com/Inkdropinc) talks about “What If… Spider-Man Had Rescued Gwen Stacy” Thanks to our sponsors Marcus Theatres (https://www.marcustheatres.com/) and Historic St. Charles, Missouri (https://www.discoverstcharles.com/) Amazon Affiliate Link - http://bit.ly/geektome Buy Me a Coffee - https://www.buymeacoffee.com/3Y0D2iaZl Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/GeekToMeRadio Website - http://geektomeradio.com/ Podcast - https://anchor.fm/jamesenstall Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/GeekToMeRadio/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/geektomeradio Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/geektomeradio/ Producer - Joseph Vosevich https://twitter.com/Joey_Vee --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jamesenstall/support

Capes & Lunatics: Sidekicks
The Devil You Know Ep #16: Daredevil #163

Capes & Lunatics: Sidekicks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 39:21


The Devil You Know Ep #16: Daredevil #163 Welcome back to The Devil You Know: The Daredevil Podcast! In this episode Phil and Lilith review Daredevil #163 (March 1980) featuring Daredevil's attempt to stop the Hulk in defense of New York City. Show notes: The Devil You Know Ep #16: Daredevil #163 Find all of our Social Media here: https://linktr.ee/capesandlunatics Follow Phil Perich on Twitter: https://twitter.com/NIghtwingpdp  Follow Lilith Hellfire on Twitter: https://twitter.com/LilithHellfire Follow D.G. Chichester on Twitter: https://twitter.com/dgchichester Subscribe to D.G. Chichester's newsletter here: storymaze.substack.com Produced by: http://www.southgatemediagroup.com Production Team: Phil Perich SUPPORT OUR SHOW BY SUPPORTING OUR SPONSORS Order our book Pod Life: Podcaster Stories orderpodlife.smgpods.com When you shop at Amazon.com using this link, every dollar you spend supports our podcast network and doesn't cost you a penny more. amazon.smgpods.com Support the Capes and Lunatics Podcast on Patreon www.patreon.com/capesandlunatics Support the Southgate Media Group on Patreon www.patreon.com/SouthgateMediaGroup

Capes & Lunatics: Sidekicks
The Devil You Know Ep #15: Daredevil #247 & Daredevil #31 (NEW ISSUE)

Capes & Lunatics: Sidekicks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 56:43


The Devil You Know Ep #15: Daredevil #247 & Daredevil #31 (NEW ISSUE) Welcome back to The Devil You Know: The Daredevil Podcast! In this episode Phil and Lilith review Daredevil #247 (October 1987) featuring Daredevil and Black Widow against another super soldier and the demons in their own heads.  PLUS: a review of new issue Daredevil #31 and Phil and Lilith's desire for a new big street level Marvel crossover event. Show notes: The Devil You Know Ep #15: Daredevil #247 & Daredevil #31 (NEW ISSUE) Find all of our Social Media here: https://linktr.ee/capesandlunatics Follow Phil Perich on Twitter: https://twitter.com/NIghtwingpdp  Follow Lilith Hellfire on Twitter: https://twitter.com/LilithHellfire Follow D.G. Chichester on Twitter: https://twitter.com/dgchichester Subscribe to D.G. Chichester's newsletter here: storymaze.substack.com Produced by: http://www.southgatemediagroup.com Production Team: Phil Perich SUPPORT OUR SHOW BY SUPPORTING OUR SPONSORS Order our book Pod Life: Podcaster Stories orderpodlife.smgpods.com When you shop at Amazon.com using this link, every dollar you spend supports our podcast network and doesn't cost you a penny more. amazon.smgpods.com Support the Capes and Lunatics Podcast on Patreon www.patreon.com/capesandlunatics Support the Southgate Media Group on Patreon www.patreon.com/SouthgateMediaGroup

Capes & Lunatics: Sidekicks
Chichester Chats Ep #1: Punisher/Black Widow - Spinning Doomsday's Web

Capes & Lunatics: Sidekicks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 62:38


Chichester Chats Ep #1: Punisher/Black Widow - Spinning Doomsday's Web Welcome to the Chichester Chat's! In each episode Phil and Lilith chat with writer D.G. Chichester about one of his comic book creations.  This time the group discusses the Black Widow and Punisher team-up from the 1992 graphic novel Punisher/Black Widow: Spinning Doomsday's Web! Show notes: Chichester Chats Ep #1: Punisher/Black Widow - Spinning Doomsday's Web Find all of our Social Media here: https://linktr.ee/capesandlunatics Follow Phil Perich on Twitter: https://twitter.com/NIghtwingpdp  Follow Lilith Hellfire on Twitter: https://twitter.com/LilithHellfire Follow D.G. Chichester on Twitter: https://twitter.com/dgchichester Subscribe to D.G. Chichester's newsletter here: storymaze.substack.com Produced by: http://www.southgatemediagroup.com Production Team: Phil Perich Order our book Pod Life: Podcaster Stories orderpodlife.smgpods.com When you shop at Amazon.com using this link, every dollar you spend supports our podcast network and doesn't cost you a penny more. amazon.smgpods.com Support the Capes and Lunatics Podcast on Patreon www.patreon.com/capesandlunatics Support the Southgate Media Group on Patreon www.patreon.com/SouthgateMediaGroup

Capes & Lunatics: Sidekicks
The Devil You Know Ep #14: Daredevil #236

Capes & Lunatics: Sidekicks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 57:10


The Devil You Know Ep #14: Daredevil #236 Welcome back to The Devil You Know: The Daredevil Podcast! In this episode Phil and Lilith review Daredevil #236 (November 1986) featuring Daredevil and Black Widow vs the super soldier known as Hazzard in the aftermath of “Born Again”. Show notes: The Devil You Know Ep #14: Daredevil #236 Find all of our Social Media here: https://linktr.ee/capesandlunatics Follow Phil Perich on Twitter: https://twitter.com/NIghtwingpdp  Follow Lilith Hellfire on Twitter: https://twitter.com/LilithHellfire Follow D.G. Chichester on Twitter: https://twitter.com/dgchichester Subscribe to D.G. Chichester's newsletter here: storymaze.substack.com Produced by: http://www.southgatemediagroup.com Production Team: Phil Perich SUPPORT OUR SHOW BY SUPPORTING OUR SPONSORS Order our book Pod Life: Podcaster Stories orderpodlife.smgpods.com When you shop at Amazon.com using this link, every dollar you spend supports our podcast network and doesn't cost you a penny more. amazon.smgpods.com Support the Capes and Lunatics Podcast on Patreon www.patreon.com/capesandlunatics Support the Southgate Media Group on Patreon www.patreon.com/SouthgateMediaGroup

Capes & Lunatics: Sidekicks
The Devil You Know Ep #13: Daredevil #305 & #306 with D.G. Chichester

Capes & Lunatics: Sidekicks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2021 56:56


The Devil You Know Ep #13: Daredevil #305 & #306 with D.G. Chichester Welcome back to The Devil You Know: The Daredevil Podcast! In this episode Phil and Lilith are joined once again by friend of the show D.G. Chichester to discuss his Surgeon General story from Daredevil #305 & #306 (June-July 1992) guest starring Spider-Man. Show notes: The Devil You Know Ep #13: Daredevil #305 & #306 with D.G. Chichester Find all of our Social Media here: https://linktr.ee/capesandlunatics Follow Phil Perich on Twitter: https://twitter.com/NIghtwingpdp  Follow Lilith Hellfire on Twitter: https://twitter.com/LilithHellfire Follow D.G. Chichester on Twitter: https://twitter.com/dgchichester Subscribe to D.G. Chichester's newsletter here: storymaze.substack.com Produced by: http://www.southgatemediagroup.com Production Team: Phil Perich SUPPORT OUR SHOW BY SUPPORTING OUR SPONSORS Order our book Pod Life: Podcaster Stories orderpodlife.smgpods.com When you shop at Amazon.com using this link, every dollar you spend supports our podcast network and doesn't cost you a penny more. amazon.smgpods.com Support the Capes and Lunatics Podcast on Patreon www.patreon.com/capesandlunatics Support the Southgate Media Group on Patreon www.patreon.com/SouthgateMediaGroup

Un Mensaje a la Conciencia
«Los olores de mi valle»

Un Mensaje a la Conciencia

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2021 4:01


«Bajo la copa de un maquilishuat florecido yo contemplaba los celajes de la tarde y el abierto paisaje veranero, ahora convertido en estampa de oro.... Estaba en la edad en que nuestras emociones son más intensas, y en la que algunos cariños se nos convierten —de pronto— en verdaderos apasionamientos. »El cálido febrero me entregaba su fuego en muchos árboles, y las golondrinas de países extraños olvidaban sus viajes en las ramas de las antiguas ceibas.... »Siempre gocé los olores de mi valle como una bestia joven: el fino aroma de las flores y de las yerbecillas del suelo; la fragancia de la arboleda rumorosa, que llenaba mis pulmones de salud y mi cuerpo entero de deleite.... »En esos momentos vi que mi padre acababa de llegar a mi lado y que se sentaba sobre la yerba, apoyando su espalda en el tronco del maquilishuat. Sobre nuestras cabezas caían —como alas de mariposas— las flores que se iban desprendiendo de los ramilletes y que parecían rosadas nubes.... »... Él, silencioso,... se puso a contemplar la hermosura de aquella exuberante florescencia. Quedó como abstraído por un rato..., y luego, quizás por vaciar lo que tenía en su corazón, recitó en su propia lengua unos versos sonoros, que hasta muchos años después supe que pertenecían a la obra poética de Henry King, obispo de Chichester.... »¡Gallardas flores... si yo pudiera ser tan atrevido como [ustedes] y tan poco vanidoso!... [Ofrecen su] inocente espectáculo y luego [regresan] a [sus] lechos de polvo. No [tienen] orgullo porque [conocen su] origen: porque [saben] que [sus] bordados trajes son de polvo. [Obedecen] a los meses y a las edades, mientras yo me empeño en estar siempre en primavera. Mi destino no quiere saber de invierno, ni de muerte; ni siquiera pensar en estas cosas. ¡Ah, si yo pudiera contemplar mi nicho del suelo y sonreír, y ser tan feliz como [ustedes]! [Enséñenme] a mirar a la muerte sin temerla, reconociéndola tan sólo como una tregua. ¡Cuántas veces he visto [su] triste funeral y luego [su] frescura airosa! ¡Gallardas flores... [enséñenme] que mi aliento debe endulzar y perfumar mi muerte!... »Mi padre se puso de pie y buscó el camino que conducía a la casa. Yo le seguí con pasos de sonámbula, comprendiendo entonces —con mi corazón y no con mi intelecto— que la belleza era todo aquello... ¡aquello que acababa de mirar, de escuchar y de sentir!»1 En este capítulo de su obra autobiográfica Tierra de infancia, la autora salvadoreña Claudia Lars nos hace ver, con su hermosa prosa poética, lo estrecha y especial que es, para muchos, la relación entre padre e hija. Gracias a Dios, sobre todo para quienes nunca han disfrutado ni podrán jamás disfrutar de tal relación con su padre biológico, que nuestro Padre celestial anhela que nuestra relación con Él como hijos suyos sea tanto o más íntima todavía. Por eso su Hijo Jesucristo, al observar a su vez la conducta de las aves del cielo y la hermosura de los lirios del campo, nos asegura que a los ojos del Padre celestial no sólo valemos mucho más que las aves, a las que alimenta día tras día, pase lo que pase, sino también que Él hará mucho más por nosotros que por las flores, a las que viste con mayor esplendor que el hombre más rico del mundo.2 Carlos ReyUn Mensaje a la Concienciawww.conciencia.net 1 Claudia Lars, Tierra de infancia (San Salvador: UCA Editores, 1987), pp. 199‑201. 2 Mt 6:26-30

Capes & Lunatics: Sidekicks
The Devil You Know Ep #12: Daredevil Annual #5 (Atlantis Attacks Part 3)

Capes & Lunatics: Sidekicks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2021 52:17


The Devil You Know Ep #12: Daredevil Annual #5 (Atlantis Attacks Part 3) Welcome back to The Devil You Know: The Daredevil Podcast! In this episode Phil and Lilith review the third part of the Capes and Lunatics Sidekicks Atlantis Attacks crossover from Daredevil Annual #5 (1989) guest starring Doctor Strange and a mind controlled Spider-Man!  PLUS: Phil and Lilith review new issue Daredevil #30. Show notes: The Devil You Know Ep #12: Daredevil Annual #5 (Atlantis Attacks Part 3) Find all of our Social Media here: https://linktr.ee/capesandlunatics Follow Phil Perich on Twitter: https://twitter.com/NIghtwingpdp  Follow Lilith Hellfire on Twitter: https://twitter.com/LilithHellfire Follow D.G. Chichester on Twitter: https://twitter.com/dgchichester Subscribe to D.G. Chichester's newsletter here: storymaze.substack.com Produced by: http://www.southgatemediagroup.com Production Team: Phil Perich SUPPORT OUR SHOW BY SUPPORTING OUR SPONSORS Order our book Pod Life: Podcaster Stories orderpodlife.smgpods.com When you shop at Amazon.com using this link, every dollar you spend supports our podcast network and doesn't cost you a penny more. amazon.smgpods.com Support the Capes and Lunatics Podcast on Patreon www.patreon.com/capesandlunatics Support the Southgate Media Group on Patreon www.patreon.com/SouthgateMediaGroup

Hellraiser Podcast
Episode 64 - Interview with D.G. Chichester

Hellraiser Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2021 66:32


We have a chat with the co-creator and editor of the Hellraiser EPIC comics from the early 1990s, Dan "D.G." Chichester. We discuss how the project came about, working with Clive Barker, coming up with a Hellraiser "bible" for all the creators, and the epic journey that is The Devil's Brigade.  Follow us on Twitter @HellraiserCast Follow D.G. Chichester @dgchichester Follow D.G. Chichester's newsletter here

Caffeinated Comics on Radio Misfits
Caffeinated Comics – DG Chichester

Caffeinated Comics on Radio Misfits

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2021 67:13


Jon and the writer of “Daredevil: Fall From Grace” reconnect after working down the hall from each other. Dan (DG) talks about his days in the Marvel Bullpen working under Jim Shooter, the view from the inside during the 90s boom and transitioning from comic books to advertising. Plus, the Read more... The post Caffeinated Comics – DG Chichester appeared first on Radio Misfits.