Podcasts about delving

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Best podcasts about delving

Show all podcasts related to delving

Latest podcast episodes about delving

MK - AREA10 ON AIR
AREA10 ON AIR - 025

MK - AREA10 ON AIR

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 59:19


One hour of hand picked selections from house music maestro and remix extraordinaire, MK! Expect fresh cuts and upcoming releases from himself, his record label, favourite producers and DJ friends. Delving in to house and techno, new and old, as well as showcasing his Track Of The Month, AREA10 Fire, From The Vault and exclusive Guest Mix each month. This is AREA10 ON AIR! 1)  Joshua & Lee Foss - My Humps [TOTM]2)   Dillion Nathaniel Feel Alright3)   Basement Jaxx - Romeo (wh0 Extended Festival Remix)4) Max Styler, Kyle walker - Give It Up [A10F]5)  Wait For Me “Soul Mate”6) Shermanology , Conquer Jones - Do Yo Dance7) Chez Damier - I Never Knew Love (MK Extended Mix) [A10FTV]8)   CID - Duro9)  Black V Neck - Like Whoa”10)  Sorley - Poison love220 Kidd GUEST MIX11) Honey Dijon - Not About You (KDA Legacy Extended Remix)12  Gorgon City - Body Language

Nick's Non-fiction
Nick's Non-fiction | The Nature of Fear

Nick's Non-fiction

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 50:57


Welcome back for another episode of Nick's Non-fiction with your host Nick Muniz! Fear, honed by millions of years of natural selection, kept our ancestors alive. Whether by slithering away, curling up in a ball, or standing still in the presence of a predator, humans and other animals have evolved complex behaviors in order to survive the hazards the world presents. Despite our evolutionary endurance, we still have much to learn about how to manage our response to danger. For more than thirty years, Daniel Blumstein has been studying animals' fear responses. His observations lead to a firm conclusion: fear preserves security, but at great cost. Delving into the evolutionary origins and ecological contexts of fear across species, The Nature of Fear considers what we can learn from our fellow animals Subscribe, Share, Mobile Links and Time-stamps below! 0:00 Introduction 3:40 About the Author 6:15 Ch1: A Sophisticated Neurochemical Cocktail 14:10 Ch2: Beware of Looming Objects 19:40 Ch3: Noise Matters 25:25 Ch4: Smells Risky to Me 31:05 Ch5: Be Very Aware 39:25 Ch6: Listening to Signalers 44:30 Ch7: Our Inner Marmot 50:30 Next Time & Goodbye! YouTube: https://youtu.be/pf_YIqy_vEY Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=44297973

In Your Pants with Dr. Susie G
The Truth of Male Sexual Desire

In Your Pants with Dr. Susie G

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 40:25


Dr. Murray uncovers how and when the shift happens when men say they don't feel “as much as a man as I used to,” and worry if their partner is thinking the same thing. Delving into the challenges of how men can be authentic in expressing their sexual desires when the chasm of expectations and standards keeps them hiding their true sexual health and concerns. Her favorite finding from the research was discovering how deeply men wanted to feel sexually desired, physically cared for, close to someone, and romantically wanted, despite being part of a culture that minimizes these sexual experiences, vulnerabilities, and intimate desires. Remembering that sex can be much more than penetration can open up that trust, emotional connection, and broader conversation to shift your sexual encounter into the experience you truly crave.2:00 Pivotal moments that sparked Dr. Murray research male sexual desire About the guest: Dr. Sarah Hunter Murray is a Registered Marriage & Family Therapist. She obtained her PhD in Human Sexuality from the University of Guelph (GWELF). Sarah is a regularly sought after sex and relationship expert and has been featured in numerous media outlets including Slate, Men's Health, HuffPo, and Cosmopolitan. She authors the popular Psychology Today blog: “Myths of Desire” and is also the author of the book “Not Always in the Mood: The new science of men, sex, & relationships.”Stay in touch and get in the know: https://drsusieg.com/stay-in-the-know-down-below https://www.instagram.com/dr.susieg/So, what's next:  Questions you want to ask, options you want to sort through, or deciding on what you should do? Schedule time to chat with me: https://drsusieg.com/pelvic-pain-specialist-15-minute-call Pelvic Pain Relief Program: learn about your body and concerns in the comfort and privacy of your own home. With video demonstrations of hands-on treatment techniques, lessons on the science behind why you hurt, and exercises that will help you navigate out of pelvic pain: https://drsusieg.com/pelvic-pain-in-men-online-programThis information is not intended to substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of a healthcare professional with any questions you may have regarding treatment, medications/supplements, or any medical diagnoses. This information is intended for educational purposes only and is in no way to substitute the advice of a licensed healthcare professional.

Mind the Shift
75. Breaking the shackles of the male gaze – Ninja Thyberg

Mind the Shift

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 80:44


One of the many planned questions I never ask in my pretty intense conversation with film director Ninja Thyberg is this: To state that gender and sexuality are just social constructs is to me like throwing all intuitive capability in the trash. Don't you sometimes feel we don't let ourselves be human in this politicized society? My guess is that Ninja would partly agree but also not quite understand what I mean. The hot spots of our conversation have to do with our somewhat different views on the significance of biology (and/or nonphysical aspects) vs social structures. But differences in points of view make for an interesting human encounter, right? Ninja Thyberg is an intelligent, brave and curious person who very early in life began pondering sexuality and gender roles. She wanted to explore the drivers behind pornography, for instance. After a series of acclaimed short movies, her first full length movie, ”Pleasure”, premieres in theaters across Europe this fall. It is about a 19-year-old Swedish girl who goes to Los Angeles to try to become the next big star in the porn industry. The film is partly brutally realistic. Although it does not show explicit sex (and the only full frontals are of men) it stil contains several crude scenes. ”Pleasure” has many layers, and despite the rawness of the industry that is arguably what many viewers would expect, it also shows the friendship, drive and humor that exists among the female stars, and also an everydayness and kindness. Ninja says she almost regrets that she portrayed the porn industry in such a multifaceted way. Because almost everybody seems to like the film! ”And that's not only a good thing”, she says. ”I wanted to be nuanced, and maybe the film is too nuanced, so nobody is really provoked. Right now I'm just afraid it's going to be forgotten, like 'yeah, great film, very nuanced', and that's that”, Ninja says. I hardly think her worry is warranted. Thyberg was always drawn to the topic of pornography because it is taboo and nobody wants to talk about it. ”I have been provoked by the hypocrisy in our culture, where people watch so much porn and no one admits it. It takes place in a kind of parallel universe. It's like something that itches and the doctor says don't scratch, that makes me want to scratch it even more.” From there we venture into a more general gender discussion. ”Sexuality is built from the cultural context and that is constantly changing”, Ninja says. ”I know from my own experience that it is possible to change your sexuality. It is what your brain is used to.” I ask about some differences in sexuality that seem to be there, according to studies, like the ability to switch it off and on and how much it is visually oriented. Ninja modifies her view a bit and says we might be born with some differences on a group level. ”Fifteen years ago I thought everything was a social construct and that there were no biological differences. Now I realize it is a combination.” But she also says: ”Of course men are more visually oriented, because they are triggered visually by the male gaze everywhere.” Delving a bit deeper into this aspect, Ninja says that men who want sex but don't get it are more vulnerable than women who want sex but don't get it, and she has an interesting reasoning behind that. ”There are some privileges in being a woman in this culture that are seldom talked about in feminism”, she says. ”Things that male losers in the system don't have. If the feminist movement doesn't recognize this, the counter reactions from these men are just going to increase.”

New Books in Latin American Studies
Rachel Afi Quinn, "Being La Dominicana: Race and Identity in the Visual Culture of Santo Domingo" (U Illinois Press, 2021)

New Books in Latin American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 56:48


Dominican women being seen--and seeing themselves--in the media Rachel Afi Quinn investigates how visual media portray Dominican women and how women represent themselves in their own creative endeavors in response to existing stereotypes. Delving into the dynamic realities and uniquely racialized gendered experiences of women in Santo Domingo, Quinn reveals the way racial ambiguity and color hierarchy work to shape experiences of identity and subjectivity in the Dominican Republic. She merges analyses of context and interviews with young Dominican women to offer rare insights into a Caribbean society in which the tourist industry and popular media rewards, and rely upon, the ability of Dominican women to transform themselves to perform gender, race, and class. Engaging and astute, Being La Dominicana: Race and Identity in the Visual Culture of Santo Domingo (University of Illinois Press, 2021) reveals the little-studied world of today's young Dominican women and what their personal stories and transnational experiences can tell us about the larger neoliberal world. Rachel Afi Quinn is an associate professor in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Comparative Culture Studies at the University of Houston.  Reighan Gillam is an assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Southern California.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/latin-american-studies

New Books Network
Rachel Afi Quinn, "Being La Dominicana: Race and Identity in the Visual Culture of Santo Domingo" (U Illinois Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 56:48


Dominican women being seen--and seeing themselves--in the media Rachel Afi Quinn investigates how visual media portray Dominican women and how women represent themselves in their own creative endeavors in response to existing stereotypes. Delving into the dynamic realities and uniquely racialized gendered experiences of women in Santo Domingo, Quinn reveals the way racial ambiguity and color hierarchy work to shape experiences of identity and subjectivity in the Dominican Republic. She merges analyses of context and interviews with young Dominican women to offer rare insights into a Caribbean society in which the tourist industry and popular media rewards, and rely upon, the ability of Dominican women to transform themselves to perform gender, race, and class. Engaging and astute, Being La Dominicana: Race and Identity in the Visual Culture of Santo Domingo (University of Illinois Press, 2021) reveals the little-studied world of today's young Dominican women and what their personal stories and transnational experiences can tell us about the larger neoliberal world. Rachel Afi Quinn is an associate professor in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Comparative Culture Studies at the University of Houston.  Reighan Gillam is an assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Southern California.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Gender Studies
Rachel Afi Quinn, "Being La Dominicana: Race and Identity in the Visual Culture of Santo Domingo" (U Illinois Press, 2021)

New Books in Gender Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 56:48


Dominican women being seen--and seeing themselves--in the media Rachel Afi Quinn investigates how visual media portray Dominican women and how women represent themselves in their own creative endeavors in response to existing stereotypes. Delving into the dynamic realities and uniquely racialized gendered experiences of women in Santo Domingo, Quinn reveals the way racial ambiguity and color hierarchy work to shape experiences of identity and subjectivity in the Dominican Republic. She merges analyses of context and interviews with young Dominican women to offer rare insights into a Caribbean society in which the tourist industry and popular media rewards, and rely upon, the ability of Dominican women to transform themselves to perform gender, race, and class. Engaging and astute, Being La Dominicana: Race and Identity in the Visual Culture of Santo Domingo (University of Illinois Press, 2021) reveals the little-studied world of today's young Dominican women and what their personal stories and transnational experiences can tell us about the larger neoliberal world. Rachel Afi Quinn is an associate professor in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Comparative Culture Studies at the University of Houston.  Reighan Gillam is an assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Southern California.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

New Books in Caribbean Studies
Rachel Afi Quinn, "Being La Dominicana: Race and Identity in the Visual Culture of Santo Domingo" (U Illinois Press, 2021)

New Books in Caribbean Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 56:48


Dominican women being seen--and seeing themselves--in the media Rachel Afi Quinn investigates how visual media portray Dominican women and how women represent themselves in their own creative endeavors in response to existing stereotypes. Delving into the dynamic realities and uniquely racialized gendered experiences of women in Santo Domingo, Quinn reveals the way racial ambiguity and color hierarchy work to shape experiences of identity and subjectivity in the Dominican Republic. She merges analyses of context and interviews with young Dominican women to offer rare insights into a Caribbean society in which the tourist industry and popular media rewards, and rely upon, the ability of Dominican women to transform themselves to perform gender, race, and class. Engaging and astute, Being La Dominicana: Race and Identity in the Visual Culture of Santo Domingo (University of Illinois Press, 2021) reveals the little-studied world of today's young Dominican women and what their personal stories and transnational experiences can tell us about the larger neoliberal world. Rachel Afi Quinn is an associate professor in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Comparative Culture Studies at the University of Houston.  Reighan Gillam is an assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Southern California.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/caribbean-studies

New Books in African American Studies
Rachel Afi Quinn, "Being La Dominicana: Race and Identity in the Visual Culture of Santo Domingo" (U Illinois Press, 2021)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 56:48


Dominican women being seen--and seeing themselves--in the media Rachel Afi Quinn investigates how visual media portray Dominican women and how women represent themselves in their own creative endeavors in response to existing stereotypes. Delving into the dynamic realities and uniquely racialized gendered experiences of women in Santo Domingo, Quinn reveals the way racial ambiguity and color hierarchy work to shape experiences of identity and subjectivity in the Dominican Republic. She merges analyses of context and interviews with young Dominican women to offer rare insights into a Caribbean society in which the tourist industry and popular media rewards, and rely upon, the ability of Dominican women to transform themselves to perform gender, race, and class. Engaging and astute, Being La Dominicana: Race and Identity in the Visual Culture of Santo Domingo (University of Illinois Press, 2021) reveals the little-studied world of today's young Dominican women and what their personal stories and transnational experiences can tell us about the larger neoliberal world. Rachel Afi Quinn is an associate professor in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Comparative Culture Studies at the University of Houston.  Reighan Gillam is an assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Southern California.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

New Books in Sociology
Rachel Afi Quinn, "Being La Dominicana: Race and Identity in the Visual Culture of Santo Domingo" (U Illinois Press, 2021)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 56:48


Dominican women being seen--and seeing themselves--in the media Rachel Afi Quinn investigates how visual media portray Dominican women and how women represent themselves in their own creative endeavors in response to existing stereotypes. Delving into the dynamic realities and uniquely racialized gendered experiences of women in Santo Domingo, Quinn reveals the way racial ambiguity and color hierarchy work to shape experiences of identity and subjectivity in the Dominican Republic. She merges analyses of context and interviews with young Dominican women to offer rare insights into a Caribbean society in which the tourist industry and popular media rewards, and rely upon, the ability of Dominican women to transform themselves to perform gender, race, and class. Engaging and astute, Being La Dominicana: Race and Identity in the Visual Culture of Santo Domingo (University of Illinois Press, 2021) reveals the little-studied world of today's young Dominican women and what their personal stories and transnational experiences can tell us about the larger neoliberal world. Rachel Afi Quinn is an associate professor in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Comparative Culture Studies at the University of Houston.  Reighan Gillam is an assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Southern California.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

Snarky Faith Radio
Squid Church

Snarky Faith Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 56:31


"We've Already Come Too Far To End This Now.” - Sang-Woo, Squid Game Squid Game is a popular Netflix series from Korea. It tells the story of debt-ridden individuals who are out of last chances when they receive a mysterious invitation to compete in the ultimate game of survival for possibility at a big cash payday and a reversal of fortune. The cutthroat game is ultimately for the viewing pleasure of the rich and powerful. It's a farcical, yet deadly look into the corrupt power structures that govern the world today and the lengths to which individuals will go to get ahead.   If Squid Game is a polemic tale about the moral corruption of society, why does it also seem so similar to the avarice, values, and aims of modern-day Christendom?  On today's show, we continue through Jesus' teaching from the Sermon on the Mount. Delving into topics like murder, adultery, and divorce should seem simple enough for the church, yet that's not what Jesus is doing in this scripture. He's pushing something new. Christ is reframing scripture in radically new ways to the contemporary culture. He's not talking about murdering, but about our aversion to love others. Christ is flipping religious norms as he presses his disciples and listeners to dig deeper.  Talk of adultery and divorce seem salacious and made of scandal, yet, Jesus makes them all about the value of the other in society. Here, Christ frames adultery as wrong because love is not predatory. Kingdom of God ethics are never about mere sin or feigning holiness; it's a press for a deeper understanding of what grace, love, equality, and compassion look like manifested in reality. In a time when much of Christendom seems to be drunk on seeking power, prestige, and perceived rightness, Jesus removes all of the bullshit. If we don't love, we don't know Him. Christianity was never about praying a prayer or solidifying your eternal destination; it's always rooted in sacrificial love and restoring dignity to those the world has forgotten.  Our modern-day Squid Church fueled by selfishness, judgment, piousness, and greed won't disappear anytime soon, but that's not the point. Christ called his disciples to a different way, and sometimes the pursuit of that way means walking away from unhealthy institutions, denominations, and churches for the glory of God - not despite it.  Sometimes the best way to win is to walk away from the game. Show notes Episode Timestamp: Notes on the show hiatus: 02:00 In the News: 10:00 Christian Crazy: 16:50 Main Conversation: 31:30 Book referenced: Taking Jesus at His Word: What Jesus Really Said in the Sermon on the Mount ~ Addison Hodges Hart Big thanks to these outlets that make the Christian Crazy possible: Right Wing Watch Christian Nightmares Friendly Atheist Come along for the ride as we skewer through life, culture, and spirituality in the face of a changing world. www.SnarkyFaith.com

Portico Church
The Great Tribulation Part 6 - Delving Into The Tribulation

Portico Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 50:00


Earth Ancients
Maja D'Aoust: Halloween, Familiars and the Spirit World

Earth Ancients

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 87:11


A comprehensive exploration of familiars and their many forms and powers• Explores witch's familiars in folklore, shamanic, and magical traditions around the world, including Africa, India, Scandinavia, ancient Greece, and China• Explains how familiars are related to shamanic power animals and how the witch draws on her personal sexual energy to give this creature its power• Examines the familiar in alchemical, Hermetic, and Egyptian magical literature, including instructions for procuring a supernatural assistantExploring the history and creation of a “witch's familiar,” also known as a spirit double or guardian spirit, Maja D'Aoust shows how there is much more to these supernatural servant spirits and guardians than meets the eye. She reveals how witches are not the only ones to lay claim to this magician's “assistant” and examines how the many forms of witch's familiars are well known in folklore throughout Europe and America as well as in shamanic and magical traditions around the world, including Africa, India, and China.The author explains how familiars are connected with shapeshifting and how the classic familiars of medieval witchcraft tradition are related to the power animals and allies of shamanic practices worldwide, including animal guardian spirits of Native American traditions and the daimons of the ancient Greeks and Romans. She examines the fetch spirit, also known as the fylgia in Scandinavian tradition, and how the witch or sorcerer draws on their personal sexual energy to give this creature its power to magnetize and attract what it was sent to retrieve. She looks at incubus, succubus, doubles, doppelgangers, and soul mates, showing how familiars can also adopt human forms and sometimes form romantic or erotic attachments with the witch or shaman.Reviewing alchemical, Hermetic, and Egyptian magical literature, including the nearly forgotten alchemical works of Anna Kingsford, D'Aoust explores their instructions for procuring the attention of a supernatural assistant as well as an extensive description of the alchemical wedding and how this ritual joins the magician and familiar spirit into a single unified consciousness. Exploring fairy familiars, she reveals how a practitioner can establish a “marriage” with a totemic plant or tree spirit, who, in return, would offer teachings about its medicinal and visionary powers.Delving deeply into the intimate relations of humanity with the spirit world, D'Aoust shows how forming connections with living forces other than human enables us to move beyond the ego, expand our magical abilities, as well as evolve our conscious awareness.Maja D'Aoust, known as the Witch of the Dawn, is a practicing witch and scholar of alchemy and occult lore. After completing her bachelor's degree in biochemistry, she studied Oriental medicine and acupuncture and later earned her master's degree in transformational psychology with a focus on shamanism, the I Ching, and ancestors. She is the author of A Witch's Bestiary: Visions of Supernatural Creatures, coauthor of The Secret Source, and creator of a Tarot deck, The White Witch Tarot. She lives in Los Angeles.

Smart Tech Today (MP3)
STT 102: Moving to Facebook's Meta-verse - Facebook's Connect Event, Wyze's new smart home products, more

Smart Tech Today (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 94:48


Delving into the Facebook Connect event and the announcement of Facebook's new name, detailing Wyze's new smart home products, and more. Facebook just revealed its new name: Meta Meta (Facebook) is retiring the Oculus brand Facebook says it doesn't want to own the metaverse, just jumpstart it Facebook teases 'Project Cambria' high-end VR / AR headset Active Pack accessories prepare your Oculus Quest 2 for sweaty VR workouts Facebook is adding a mixed reality platform to Oculus Quest Slack and Dropbox are coming to Oculus Quest Wyze announces several new products in honor of its 4th birthday Tesla's Sentry Mode now offers drivers a live view of their car Mercedes-Benz cars are getting Dolby Atmos in 2022 Mercedes' electric delivery van concept cleans the surrounding air Get Your Own Ghostbusters Proton Pack Canon's PowerShot PX Looks Like a Security Camera but Captures Precious Moments Instead of Crooks Raspberry Pi packs more power into its $15 Zero 2 W board McDonald's will sell McD Tech Labs to IBM Android 12 is so last week: Meet Android 12L, now in developer preview Picks of the week Matthew: Ember mug Mikah: The Spice House spices, blends, and extracts Hosts: Mikah Sargent and Matthew Cassinelli Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/smart-tech-today Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Show notes and links for this episode are available at: https://twit.tv/shows/smart-tech-today/episodes/102 Sponsor: UserWay.org/twit

Smart Tech Today (Video HD)
STT 102: Moving to Facebook's Meta-verse - Facebook's Connect Event, Wyze's new smart home products, more

Smart Tech Today (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 95:15


Delving into the Facebook Connect event and the announcement of Facebook's new name, detailing Wyze's new smart home products, and more. Facebook just revealed its new name: Meta Meta (Facebook) is retiring the Oculus brand Facebook says it doesn't want to own the metaverse, just jumpstart it Facebook teases 'Project Cambria' high-end VR / AR headset Active Pack accessories prepare your Oculus Quest 2 for sweaty VR workouts Facebook is adding a mixed reality platform to Oculus Quest Slack and Dropbox are coming to Oculus Quest Wyze announces several new products in honor of its 4th birthday Tesla's Sentry Mode now offers drivers a live view of their car Mercedes-Benz cars are getting Dolby Atmos in 2022 Mercedes' electric delivery van concept cleans the surrounding air Get Your Own Ghostbusters Proton Pack Canon's PowerShot PX Looks Like a Security Camera but Captures Precious Moments Instead of Crooks Raspberry Pi packs more power into its $15 Zero 2 W board McDonald's will sell McD Tech Labs to IBM Android 12 is so last week: Meet Android 12L, now in developer preview Picks of the week Matthew: Ember mug Mikah: The Spice House spices, blends, and extracts Hosts: Mikah Sargent and Matthew Cassinelli Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/smart-tech-today Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Show notes and links for this episode are available at: https://twit.tv/shows/smart-tech-today/episodes/102 Sponsor: UserWay.org/twit

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
Smart Tech Today 102: Moving to Facebook's Meta-verse

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 94:48


Delving into the Facebook Connect event and the announcement of Facebook's new name, detailing Wyze's new smart home products, and more. Facebook just revealed its new name: Meta Meta (Facebook) is retiring the Oculus brand Facebook says it doesn't want to own the metaverse, just jumpstart it Facebook teases 'Project Cambria' high-end VR / AR headset Active Pack accessories prepare your Oculus Quest 2 for sweaty VR workouts Facebook is adding a mixed reality platform to Oculus Quest Slack and Dropbox are coming to Oculus Quest Wyze announces several new products in honor of its 4th birthday Tesla's Sentry Mode now offers drivers a live view of their car Mercedes-Benz cars are getting Dolby Atmos in 2022 Mercedes' electric delivery van concept cleans the surrounding air Get Your Own Ghostbusters Proton Pack Canon's PowerShot PX Looks Like a Security Camera but Captures Precious Moments Instead of Crooks Raspberry Pi packs more power into its $15 Zero 2 W board McDonald's will sell McD Tech Labs to IBM Android 12 is so last week: Meet Android 12L, now in developer preview Picks of the week Matthew: Ember mug Mikah: The Spice House spices, blends, and extracts Hosts: Mikah Sargent and Matthew Cassinelli Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/smart-tech-today Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Show notes and links for this episode are available at: https://twit.tv/shows/smart-tech-today/episodes/102 Sponsor: UserWay.org/twit

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)
Smart Tech Today 102: Moving to Facebook's Meta-verse

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 95:15


Delving into the Facebook Connect event and the announcement of Facebook's new name, detailing Wyze's new smart home products, and more. Facebook just revealed its new name: Meta Meta (Facebook) is retiring the Oculus brand Facebook says it doesn't want to own the metaverse, just jumpstart it Facebook teases 'Project Cambria' high-end VR / AR headset Active Pack accessories prepare your Oculus Quest 2 for sweaty VR workouts Facebook is adding a mixed reality platform to Oculus Quest Slack and Dropbox are coming to Oculus Quest Wyze announces several new products in honor of its 4th birthday Tesla's Sentry Mode now offers drivers a live view of their car Mercedes-Benz cars are getting Dolby Atmos in 2022 Mercedes' electric delivery van concept cleans the surrounding air Get Your Own Ghostbusters Proton Pack Canon's PowerShot PX Looks Like a Security Camera but Captures Precious Moments Instead of Crooks Raspberry Pi packs more power into its $15 Zero 2 W board McDonald's will sell McD Tech Labs to IBM Android 12 is so last week: Meet Android 12L, now in developer preview Picks of the week Matthew: Ember mug Mikah: The Spice House spices, blends, and extracts Hosts: Mikah Sargent and Matthew Cassinelli Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/smart-tech-today Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Show notes and links for this episode are available at: https://twit.tv/shows/smart-tech-today/episodes/102 Sponsor: UserWay.org/twit

Total Mikah (Video)
Smart Tech Today 102: Moving to Facebook's Meta-verse

Total Mikah (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 95:15


Delving into the Facebook Connect event and the announcement of Facebook's new name, detailing Wyze's new smart home products, and more. Facebook just revealed its new name: Meta Meta (Facebook) is retiring the Oculus brand Facebook says it doesn't want to own the metaverse, just jumpstart it Facebook teases 'Project Cambria' high-end VR / AR headset Active Pack accessories prepare your Oculus Quest 2 for sweaty VR workouts Facebook is adding a mixed reality platform to Oculus Quest Slack and Dropbox are coming to Oculus Quest Wyze announces several new products in honor of its 4th birthday Tesla's Sentry Mode now offers drivers a live view of their car Mercedes-Benz cars are getting Dolby Atmos in 2022 Mercedes' electric delivery van concept cleans the surrounding air Get Your Own Ghostbusters Proton Pack Canon's PowerShot PX Looks Like a Security Camera but Captures Precious Moments Instead of Crooks Raspberry Pi packs more power into its $15 Zero 2 W board McDonald's will sell McD Tech Labs to IBM Android 12 is so last week: Meet Android 12L, now in developer preview Picks of the week Matthew: Ember mug Mikah: The Spice House spices, blends, and extracts Hosts: Mikah Sargent and Matthew Cassinelli Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/smart-tech-today Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Show notes and links for this episode are available at: https://twit.tv/shows/smart-tech-today/episodes/102 Sponsor: UserWay.org/twit

Today with Claire Byrne
Delving into our big emotions – Fear

Today with Claire Byrne

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 12:14


Prof. Ian Robertson, Emeritus Professor of Psychology at TCD, tells us about the emotion of fear

Real Kyper & Bourne
Delving Into the Blackhawks Report

Real Kyper & Bourne

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 69:12


Nick Kypreos and Justin Bourne continue the Chicago conversation surrounding the aftermath of the Jenner & Block report, and question Joel Quenneville's future behind the bench in Florida (00:34). After that, the guys shift to Toronto Maple Leafs talk and discuss the sense of fragility within the lineup (19:57). To add to the conversation, former […]

How I Make Music
103 Among the Stars and Bones - Oliver Morris - Pandemonium

How I Make Music

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 16:34


Okay. The piece of music we're listening to in the background is called Pandemonium. It's a theme from Among the Stars and Bones, an audio drama about a team of xeno-archaeologists investigating alien ruins on a distant world. Today we'll break it down and get into why and how it was made. I love doing voiceovers. You're listening to How I Make Music, where audio drama composers get to tell their own stories. In this show, we break apart the music of fictional podcasts and take a trip into how it was made. My name is Oliver Morris. I'm a composer from Bedfordshire. And this is How I Make Music. Welcome back to How I Make Music, Pandemonium from this audio drama Among the Stars and Bones by me, Oliver Morris. Thanks for listening in.  1:36 ABOUT Among the Stars and Bones is a xeno-archaeological horror show. Chris, the writer, he was like you did the theme for Modern Fae and I was like yes I did. I didn't know a lot about it other than the fact that it was a xeno-archaeological horror show, which was just the best combination of words that I had heard in a pitch document ever, because you've got xeno for aliens and then archaeology. So I was very excited to make this piece of music that was going to build and grow along with the show. The show itself is about a bunch of xeno-archaeologists who get together to go investigate this ancient dead alien civilization. They find relics from it, and then they start to get convinced that the relics are controlling them in ways and it goes to some wild places for sure. Take us to outer space! Chris Magilton is the writer of Among the Stars and Bones. Oh no, wait, hold on. I've mispronounced that already. Go me. Chris Marlington Chris McClinton. Hold on. I feel really bad. Chris Magilton. Magilton. Magilton. Chris Magilton. Chris Magilton, the writer, and he also plays Ben on the show. I only know him as ‘ungodly hour' because that's the time that he always contacts me. Sorry Chris. 4:13 GETTING STARTED I own approximately 27 guitars. I play keys. I do at all. My intro into composing properly was for my podcast Kane and Feels, Paranormal Investigators. Kane and Feels, Paranormal Investigators, a horror noir audio fiction show. Which is just very funky from beginning to end. That's how I kind of got my start in composing. I'm a fiend. I just I make music. I can't stop. It's nicotine and music. Those are my two vices.  5:20 HALF LIFE GAME INFLUENCE When we started kind of composing, I asked Chris if there's anything he wanted it to sound like and he was like, well I do really like the Half-Life video games. I love the soundtrack of Half-Life, which are these wonderful, industrial synthetic beats. Play scientists with a crowbar, it's one of the more bizarre opening concepts to a thing. You're like hitting undead zombies with a crowbar. Delving into the back catalogue of that was joy. Doing that sort of initial kind of figuring out of what the sort of the timbre of the piece was going to be like. I'm a big fan of an Australian band called Pond, who wrote a song called Giant Tortoise. Huge, soul-evaporating baseline. And I was like, how soul-evaporating a baseline Can I come up with? 7:10 MARIMBA BITCRUSHER  The piece itself is a waltz. So it's in 123. So we had these piano lines. One of the piano lines we eventually switched over to a marimba. We used bit crushing on it until it sounded like something that a servo could sing something that a piece of machinery could sing. You can get like orchestras of servos now. Somebody will play Smells Like Teen Spirit on 50 dead hard drives from computers. Were sort of building up the rhythm section, trying to make it sound as digital as possible, trying to make it sound as kind of inorganic as possible. without actually succumbing to a boom clap. This hi hat that's just going to and a couple of little toms sound like they come straight from Kraftwerk. There we go! The German lads. 8:59 POINTILLISM We had this boom bap. I was inspired by pointillism. The art style where you kind of draw lots of little dots and then it creates a sort of grander picture from very simple, kind of movements of the pen. It's making beats but with the bare essentials of it, like making sure that you're not using too much or too little, just enough as much kind of reverb as one could legally get away with. The other bit was a sort of spaceship drone, which was just this big and low humming. And then the atonal bubbles. Big retro synth. I love this sound. This was the sound that came straight from Wolf 359 for me. Beautiful swirling. There's a bit of trepidation in that second chord. The big retro synth used to be a guitar part. But Chris's brother is in a shoegaze band and he was like ‘if I hear another second of shoegaze I'm gonna fall apart'. Which is kind of funny, because Pond is a shoegaze band and so I still took influences from shoegaze. I'm sorry Chris. Please forgive me Chris. I own 27 guitars, what can I say?  11:35 THREE THEMES  So when I was working with Chris, we came to it very quickly that we were going to need three themes. We're going to need one for the slow build, one for when it starts to get a bit wobbly, and then one for the final show. So initially, we called them Patience, Purpose and Fuck. We renamed Fuck to Pandemonium, which is the track that we're talking about today. The basis of all three of the tracks is very slow, meandering, bom, bom bom. We fiddled a lot with the the piano sound. Eventually we sort of stuck with this ba-da-da-dum-doo-doo-doo. Had a real sense of drama to it. And then I was like, I need something to really nail this home. I was just, you know, playing around with these big bass sounds and trying to get something. And then it was only when I put a phase distorter on it, that was when it all just came together. Basically, it was just wow. And like, even when it was like settled down, you could just hear it kind of humming and trying to escape its parameters! 13:37 TICKING  We'd had this ticking sound that had been going on throughout the whole piece. And we were like, right. Final Episode. Final stretch. The clock strikes 10. You've got to have that sound in there. So I think this is just the sound that I got from Freesound under Creative Commons zero. So shout out to Freesound for the majority of my professional career. I think that's everything. I think I've spoken more about this right now than I've ever thought about it.  14: 26 OUTRO That's about it for this week's episode. We'll listen to the full composition in just a moment. But before we do that, thank you for listening to How I Make Music. Catch new episodes on HowIMakeMusic.com or wherever else you listen to podcasts. We've been listening to the music featured in the audio drama called Among the Stars and Bones. To hear the full story or to check out my other work follow the links in the show notes. I recommend Kane and Fields. We video recorded this episode, much to my horror. Check it out and support the musicians of audio drama by becoming a patron at Patreon.com/HowIMakeMusic. And now, here's Pandemonium, the theme in its entirety. My name is Oliver Morris and thanks for listening to How I Make Music. Catch you next time

The Tales From Daekonia: A Dungeons and Dragons Podcast
Season 2 Episode 6: Mined Games

The Tales From Daekonia: A Dungeons and Dragons Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 166:06


Delving deeper into the mysterious and dangerous cave, the party investigates the potential source of the sea foam green gems. With many fights, rescues, and encounters ahead, will the party manage to find the source of the gems and who's behind the vast conspiracy?  --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/tales-from-daekonia/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tales-from-daekonia/support

Oh, My Health...There Is Hope!
Episode 250: Stepping Into Your Purpose with Ryan Haddon

Oh, My Health...There Is Hope!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 29:00


In this episode of Oh My Heath ... There's HOPE! Jana talks with Ryan Haddon. Ryan is a certified Life and Spiritual Coach, Clinical Hypnotherapist, and certified meditation teacher with over 16 years of experience with clients around the world. A sought-after public speaker for corporate retreats such as the international talent agency CAA, and wellness events for Visionary Women, as well as taught meditation for a U.S. government sector event. Ryan does private workshops such as “Stepping Into Your Purpose,” “The Work/Life Balance,” and “Finding Your Center.” She's also the in-house Life Coach at Kourtney Kardashian's website Poosh, where she has written more than 50 mind/body/spirit articles. She writes for other publications such as Mind Body Green, Authority Magazine, and Parents magazine. She has been on dozens of podcasts speaking about relationships, self-development, and a purpose-driven life. "Together, we clear what's no longer working and build a bridge to the life you're ready to start living." This 30-minute episode is on: 1) Learning one day to the next and thriving 2) Becoming that beautiful warrior woman 3) It starts with the relationship with ourselves 4) Delving into the unconscious mind 5) Finding a connection when you feel disconnected This episode is about: In this episode Jana and Ryan discuss learning one day to the next while thriving, becoming that beautiful warrior woman. It truly starts with the relationships we have with ourselves. Delving into the unconscious mind through hypnosis. Get in touch with Ryan Haddon: https://ryanhaddon.com https://www.instagram.com/ryan.haddon/ Get in touch with Jana and listen to more Podcasts: https://www.janashort.com/ Show Music ‘Hold On' by Amy Gerhartz https://www.amygerhartz.com/music. Free Gift: 5 Keys To Becoming The Next Influencer Free Video Series Are you ready to see just how powerful your business can be through storytelling? Grab my FREE video series outlining how you can become the next influencer through your powerful story. The upside is right; now, over 90% of businesses are online. On the downside to you is over 90% of businesses are currently online. If you want to stake your place in this crowded space, you need to stand out and be unique. Learn how to do just that for your brand and business. Grab your gift today: https://www.janashort.com/becoming-the-next-influencers-download-offer/ Connect with Jana Short: https://www.janashort.com/contact/

VINTAGE BOOKS
Delving into the art world. Julian Barnes and Celia Paul: Cape in Conversation

VINTAGE BOOKS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 38:19


This year marks 100 years of Vintage imprint Jonathan Cape. To celebrate, we've launched Cape in Conversation, a Vintage Books podcast miniseries which will see authors from across the generations and genres of Cape's list discuss their work and ideas, and give you a flavour of the many kinds of book and different voices that Cape publishes.Today, series host Shahidha Bari is in conversation with an artist who writes and a writer whose subject is often art, Celia Paul and Julian Barnes.You can find out about Celia Paul's work here: https://bit.ly/2XEZAqFAnd about Julian Barnes's work here: https://bit.ly/3B8PADQJulian recommends They Came Like Swallows by William Maxwell Celia Paul recommends The Great Gatsby by F Scott Fitzgerald Bookseller article on the history of Jonathan Cape: https://bit.ly/3wx4n9wHost Shahidha Bari is also a Jonathan Cape author – read more about her book and work as a journalist here: https://bit.ly/2RQpYuIThis was the final episode of Cape in Conversation; do go back and listen to the other episodes in the Vintage Books Podcast feed if you missed them.Stay tuned for the next episode of the Vintage Books Podcast. Follow us on Twitter @vintagebooks ᛫ Sign up to the Vintage newsletter to hear all about our new releases, see exclusive extracts and win prizes: sign up here See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Down To Business
Industry Review: Antique Dealers

Down To Business

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 18:16


Delving into the World of Antique Dealing with Bobby Kerr

Hall of Mears Podcast
Hall of Mears Podcast #47: Exclusive interview with Stu & Cathy Scheller

Hall of Mears Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 69:21


You've heard the sound bites, but we have the entire story! A Hall of Mears Podcast exclusive…the guys have a tell all conversation with Stu and Cathy Scheller. Delving into not only the current updates on their son, Lt Col. Stu Scheller Jr., but also give a contextual backstory as to what caused his admitted defiance and demands for accountability. While other media outlets have moved on, this story has just begun. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hall-of-mears-podcast/support

MK - AREA10 ON AIR
AREA10 ON AIR - 024

MK - AREA10 ON AIR

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 59:41


One hour of hand picked selections from house music maestro and remix extraordinaire, MK! Expect fresh cuts and upcoming releases from himself, his record label, favourite producers and DJ friends. Delving in to house and techno, new and old, as well as showcasing his Track Of The Month, AREA10 Fire, From The Vault and exclusive Guest Mix each month. This is AREA10 ON AIR! This month's show features a guest mix from SIDEPIECE 1) Chris Lorenzo Ft. High Jinx - California Dreaming [TOTM]2) The Weeknd - Glass Table Girls (Amine Edge & DANCE Edit)3) Denis Ferrer, James Yuill, Disciples - Whisper Feat. James Yuill (John Summit Remix)4) The Chemical Brothers - Hey Girl, Hey Boy (Will Clarke Remix) [A10F]5) DJ Susan - Secrets (Extended Mix) 6) Jamie Jones - Handy Work (Original Mix)7) Ellie Goulding - On My Mind (Mk Remix) [VTF]8) Lis Sarroca - Chamomile (Original Mix)9) Not So French - Soda Pop (Jaden Thompson Remix) 10) SIDEPIECE - Acrobatic (Martin Ikin Remix)SIDEPIECE - Guest Mix11) Elton John, Dua Lipa - Cold Cold Heart (Claptone Remix)12) Tita Lau - Into The Groove (Extended Mix)

Quarantined Comics
MY FRIEND DAHMER and KENT STATE... delving into the dark side of Americana

Quarantined Comics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 38:44


As a high schooler, the cartoonist Derf Backderf was part of a fan club that formed around one of his more eccentric friends: Jeffrey Dahmer, who eventually grew up to be one of America's most infamous serial killers. In "My Friend Dahmer," Backderf recounts what it was like growing up with Dahmer in that particular milieu, and tries to unravel the sequence of events that made Dahmer the monster he ultimately became. More recently, Backderf leant his storytellilng powers to unraveling the events that led to the shooting deaths of four students. In "Kent State: Four Dead In Ohio," Backderf traces the lives of the victims, and the political situation that eventually boiled over into violence. We'll take a look at both comics in this week's episode of Quarantined Comics.

ICT Pulse Podcast
ICTP 175: Delving into the Government of the Bahamas Digital Transformation Programme, with Michael Hamilton

ICT Pulse Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 51:02


Over the past several years, Caribbean governments have been engaged in public sector transformation programmes and initiatives to better leverage ICT. However, in many instances, the effort seems open-ended with few concrete outcomes, and the speed of change appears to lag behind that of the society. An exception appears to be the digital transformation programme of the Government the Bahamas, which has been realising a number of successes and milestone achievements. Michael Hamilton, the Programme Coordinator of the Digital Transformation to Strengthen Competitiveness programme for the Government the Bahamas discusses: the programme and what it hopes to achieve; some of its successes to date; how the success of the programme will be measured; and what new developments we should expect in the no-too-distant future.   Show notes and links to some of the things mentioned during the episode can be found at www.ict-pulse.com/category/podcast/ Do subscribe and leave us a review!   Music credit: Red Peas and Rice, Ray Holman Podcast editing support: Mayra Bonilla Lopez

WorldatWork's Work in Progress
Episode 132: A Breath of Fresh Air: Delving into Environmental-based Executive Incentives

WorldatWork's Work in Progress

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 31:28


We're joined by Donald Delves, Managing Director, North American practice leader, Executive Compensation at Willis Towers Watson, a leading expert on corporate governance and executive pay and performance. We discuss linking #ESG to executive incentive plans, focusing on environmental-based compensation: why boards and companies ought to take ESG measures seriously and how they need to “earn” their way into the incentive plan. We also coin a new word – fandextrous – to describe Don's highly unusual dual loyalty to both the Cubs and White Sox (he's a native Chicagoan). For more on ESG and Executive Compensation, visit https://zurl.co/sMnj 

The Belfry Network
GothCast: Valor Kand Era PT. 2

The Belfry Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 85:00


This reunion episode brings back Robbie Gore as the original GothCast duo break down some lesser talked about albums from the Valor Kand era of Christian Death. It's one of the more interesting eras of the group as two competing versions of the band were releasing material sometimes within the same year. They cover the albums Insanus, Ultio, Proditio, Misericordiaque (1990), Sexy Death God (1994), Prophecies (1996), and well…one more from 1998. This one gets a little strange, but that's nothing new to this podcast. Timestamps:14:50 Insanus, Ultio, Proditio, Misericordiaque (1990) 33:51 Sexy Death God (1994) 55:19 Prophecies (1996) 1:07:28 What the hell is this album? (1998) The EP Reverie by Robbie's band Delving:https://delvingmusic.bandcamp.com/album/reverie

Hear Ye, Hear Ye!
Oktoberfest and TRF's Themed Weekends | Episode 37

Hear Ye, Hear Ye!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 41:50


This week, we're joined by Alan Ward, Brewmaster and owner of Brigadoon Brewery, and Lauren Croft, assistant to the General Manager of TRF. Alan and Lauren delight us with their personal tales of joining our renaissance festival family as well as give us lots to look forward to when TRF begins on October 9th!  In this episode, the following tales are told: Delving into the history of Brigadoon Brewery Breaking down our upcoming weekend themes  Showcasing authentic recipes and historically accurate beer Learning more about costume contests and ways to win big  Getting ready to open the gates for the first weekend of TRF

Talk Ten Tuesdays
Outpatient CDI and Getting Back to the Basics

Talk Ten Tuesdays

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 57:14


Physician engagement, query productivity, and revenue integrity are some but not all of the activities that encompass today's outpatient clinical documentation integrity (OP CDI) arena, which continues to gain traction among America's hospitals and health systems.During an exclusive broadcast report, CDI expert Colleen Deighan will unveil a Talk Ten Tuesdays listener's survey on this topic, in which listeners are encouraged to participate. Delving into the survey responses, Colleen will join us on a biweekly basis through the end of the year, and share her knowledge and experience on how hospitals and health systems can determine where and how to focus their efforts to have the biggest impact.The live broadcast will also feature these other segments:The Coding Report: Laurie Johnson will report on the latest coding news.News Desk: Timothy Powell, compliance expert and ICD10monitor national correspondent, will anchor the Talk Ten Tuesdays News Desk.Tuesday Focus: Root operation control guidelines have changed during the last five years, and a new update will take place on Oct. 1, 2021. Senior healthcare consultant Kristi Pollard, director of coding quality and education with Haugen Consulting Group, will report on this topic while providing examples for reporting the control of bleeding.Special Report: The No Surprises Act, or the "balance billing rule" for emergent out-of-network services, saw a provider reprieve as it pertains to the Jan. 1, 2022 effective date,  as the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will delay certain provisions of the Act to allow for better infrastructure, interoperability, and communication between payors, facilities, and providers. Nationally recognized professional coder, auditor, and consultant Terry Fletcher will report the good news.TalkBack: Erica Remer, MD, founder and president of Erica Remer, MD, Inc., and Talk Ten Tuesdays co-host, will report on a subject that has caught her attention during her popular segment.

Essah's Way
Episode 105 | Delving Beyond the Obvious

Essah's Way

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 27:58


Episode 105. Dahlma Llanos-Figueroa reveals the importance of honoring her ancestors by writing about African roots and realities of Puerto Ricans. Dahlma Llanos-Figueroa was born in Puerto Rico and raised in New York City. She is a product of the Puerto Rican communities on the island and in the South Bronx. She attended the New York City public school system and received her academic degrees from SUNY at Buffalo and CUNY Queens College. As a child she was sent to live with her grandparents in Puerto Rico where she was introduced to the culture of rural Puerto Rico, including the storytelling that came naturally to the women in her family, especially the older women. Much of her work is based on her experiences during this time. The trade paperback edition of Daughters of the Stone was released in March 2019. The hardcover edition was shortlisted as a 2010 Finalist for the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize. In 2020 the self-published paperback edition won the 16th Annual National Indie Excellence® Awards for Multicultural Fiction. Awarded the 2021 NYSCA/NYFA Artist Fellow in Fiction, Dahlma's short stories have appeared in various anthologies and literary journals throughout the United States, Africa, and Brazil. The English and Spanish language editions of Dahlma's second novel, A Woman of Endurance will be released in March 2022. Since her retirement, Dahlma continues to dedicate herself to her writing, speaking engagements, and workshops. She resides in the Bronx with her husband, photographer Jonathan Lessuck. www.DahlmaLlanosFigueroa.com  Please consider donating to support the Essah's Way podcast. https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/essahsway

Harvard Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies
Timber and Forestry in Qing China, with Zhang Meng

Harvard Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 76:33


Speaker: Zhang Meng, Assistant Professor of History, Vanderbilt University Part of the Environment in Asia lecture series In the Qing period, China's population tripled, and the flurry of new development generated unprecedented demand for timber. Standard environmental histories have often depicted this as an era of reckless deforestation. The reality was more complex: as old-growth forests were cut down, new economic arrangements emerged to develop renewable timber resources. Timber and Forestry traces the expansion of an interregional trade network to cover the entire basin of the Yangzi River. Of driving concern were questions of sustainability: How to maintain a reliable source of timber across decades and centuries? And how to sustain a business network across a thousand miles? Delving into rare archives to reconstruct property rights systems and business histories, the book considers both the formal legal mechanisms and the informal interactions that helped balance economic profit with environmental management. This case from China has important implications for world-historical conversations on resource management, commercialization, and sustainable development. Meng Zhang (張萌) is Assistant Professor of History at Vanderbilt University. She received her B.A. in economics from Peking University (2010) and Ph.D. in history from UCLA (2017). Zhang is a historian of late imperial China, with particular interests in economic and environmental transformations and transnational dynamics in the rise of global capitalism. Her first book, Timber and Forestry in Qing China: Sustaining the Market (University of Washington Press, 2021), reveals the complex reality of timber trade and resource management during the flurry of commercial development in Qing China. She is working on a second project that follows the social life of edible bird's nests through the transnational construction of knowledge, desire, trade, and credit across early modern China and Southeast Asia.

Scandalous Podcast
Doc Coyle of Bad Wolves sets the record straight

Scandalous Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 114:52


One of the most cerebral interviews I've ever done. Delving far beyond the drama of Bad Wolves current events, although we cover that too. This is a celebration of setting the record straight on Tommy Vext, once and for all, answering all the questions. Simultaneously celebrating their triumphant, and inspiring jump start back to the head of the pack in the rock and metal industry, with their newest single, "Lifeline", album to follow titled "Dear Monsters" out 10/29. Bad Wolves is just one part of Doc Coyle, and we get to talk about it all! His beginnings in the metal and hardcore scenes in New Jersey with his band God Forbid. Playing and working besides legendary bands like Shadows Fall, ETID, Hatebreed & Terror. Playing in The Wedding Band with two of Metallica's memebers, Kirk Hammett & Rob Trujillo. Exploring mental psyches of different states, why we are the way we are.... Even the greatness of Papa Roach, and how they have consistently re-invented themselves year over year, Kanye, for or against... and more! Follow: https://www.instagram.com/doccoyle/ https://www.instagram.com/scandalousofficial/ https://www.instagram.com/badwolvesofficial/

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast
Delving into the world of Australia's Auslan interpreters

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 4:26


In the doom and gloom of the last two years, there has often been a glimmer of joy standing next to our leaders.

Blood Red: The Liverpool FC Podcast
Analysing Anfield: Kostas Tsimikas proving much more than an Andy Robertson back-up as Liverpool show 2019-20 vibes

Blood Red: The Liverpool FC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 53:08


With Liverpool marching on in the Premier League and the Carabao Cup, Josh Williams and David Hughes return with the latest Analysing Anfield podcast. Delving deep into the 3-0 win at home to Crystal Palace that kept the Reds level at the top of the league, and touching on the 3-0 win away to Norwich City that booked their place in the fourth round of the cup, our hosts pull out some very encouraging underlying numbers. They also focus on the form of Kostas Tsimikas, and the one area of his game where he could be an actual improvement on Andy Robertson, as well as set-pieces and why all the talk over signing another striker in the summer may have been misplaced. They then look ahead to this Saturday's trip to Brentford, whose numbers, approach and recruitment could well make it a more difficult match for Liverpool than most would expect. And there's also a quick preview of next Tuesday's Champions League clash at Porto.Get exclusive podcasts direct to your inbox every week for FREE by joining the Blood Red Club. Sign up at http://www.bloodredpodcast.co.ukWatch and subscribe to our Blood Red videos on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/BloodRedLiverpoolFCJoin our Blood Red podcast group on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1656599847979758/

MK - AREA10 ON AIR
AREA10 ON AIR - 023

MK - AREA10 ON AIR

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 58:17


One hour of hand picked selections from house music maestro and remix extraordinaire, MK! Expect fresh cuts and upcoming releases from himself, his record label, favourite producers and DJ friends. Delving in to house and techno, new and old, as well as showcasing his Track Of The Month, AREA10 Fire, From The Vault and exclusive Guest Mix each month. This is AREA10 ON AIR! This month's show features a guest mix from ACRAZE 1) MK - CHEMICAL (NIC FANCIULLI REMIX) [TOTM]2) RON COSTA - KOI (ORIGINAL MIX)3) SIMON DOTY - PARTY WITH A PURPOSE4) JADEN THOMPSON - CLOSER (THE MARTINEZ BROTHER & JESSE CALOSSO REMIX) [A10F]5) FELIPE FELLA - YOU KNOW ANYTHING 6) JAYDEE - PLASTIC DREAMS 7) HAPPYHEAD - DIGITAL LOVE THING (MK REMIX) [FTV]8) LEXLAY - JUST GROOVE (EXTENDED MIX) 9) QUBIKO - CONFUSED (EXTENDED MIX) 10) AMINE EDGE & DANCE - POP SMOKEACRAZE GUEST MIX11) YOLANDA BE COOL, DILLION NATHANIEL- BOLIVIAN SUNRISE12) MIGUEL BASTIDA - TIPYS AND TIPYS

New Books Network
Bruce Clarke, "Gaian Systems: Lynn Margulis, Neocybernetics, and the End of the Anthropocene" (U Minnesota Press, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 72:56


Often seen as an outlier in science, Gaia has run a long and varied course since its formulation in the 1970s by atmospheric chemist James Lovelock and microbiologist Lynn Margulis. Gaian Systems: Lynn Margulis, Neocybernetics, and the End of the Anthropocene (U Minnesota Press, 2020) is a pioneering exploration of the dynamic and complex evolution of Gaia's many variants, with special attention to Margulis's foundational role in these developments. Bruce Clarke assesses the different dialects of systems theory brought to bear on Gaia discourse. Focusing in particular on Margulis's work--including multiple pieces of her unpublished Gaia correspondence--he shows how her research and that of Lovelock was concurrent and conceptually parallel with the new discourse of self-referential systems that emerged within neocybernetic systems theory. The recent Gaia writings of Donna Haraway, Isabelle Stengers, and Bruno Latour contest its cybernetic status. Clarke engages Latour on the issue of Gaia's systems description and extends his own systems-theoretical synthesis under what he terms "metabiotic Gaia." This study illuminates current issues in neighboring theoretical conversations--from biopolitics and the immunitary paradigm to NASA astrobiology and the Anthropocene. Along the way, he points to science fiction as a vehicle of Gaian thought. Delving into many issues not previously treated in accounts of Gaia, Gaian Systems describes the history of a theory that has the potential to help us survive an environmental crisis of our own making. Tom Scholte is a Professor of Directing and Acting in the Department of Theatre and Film at the University of British Columbia located on the unceded, ancestral, and traditional territory of the Musqueam people. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Environmental Studies
Bruce Clarke, "Gaian Systems: Lynn Margulis, Neocybernetics, and the End of the Anthropocene" (U Minnesota Press, 2020)

New Books in Environmental Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 72:56


Often seen as an outlier in science, Gaia has run a long and varied course since its formulation in the 1970s by atmospheric chemist James Lovelock and microbiologist Lynn Margulis. Gaian Systems: Lynn Margulis, Neocybernetics, and the End of the Anthropocene (U Minnesota Press, 2020) is a pioneering exploration of the dynamic and complex evolution of Gaia's many variants, with special attention to Margulis's foundational role in these developments. Bruce Clarke assesses the different dialects of systems theory brought to bear on Gaia discourse. Focusing in particular on Margulis's work--including multiple pieces of her unpublished Gaia correspondence--he shows how her research and that of Lovelock was concurrent and conceptually parallel with the new discourse of self-referential systems that emerged within neocybernetic systems theory. The recent Gaia writings of Donna Haraway, Isabelle Stengers, and Bruno Latour contest its cybernetic status. Clarke engages Latour on the issue of Gaia's systems description and extends his own systems-theoretical synthesis under what he terms "metabiotic Gaia." This study illuminates current issues in neighboring theoretical conversations--from biopolitics and the immunitary paradigm to NASA astrobiology and the Anthropocene. Along the way, he points to science fiction as a vehicle of Gaian thought. Delving into many issues not previously treated in accounts of Gaia, Gaian Systems describes the history of a theory that has the potential to help us survive an environmental crisis of our own making. Tom Scholte is a Professor of Directing and Acting in the Department of Theatre and Film at the University of British Columbia located on the unceded, ancestral, and traditional territory of the Musqueam people. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/environmental-studies

New Books in World Affairs
Bruce Clarke, "Gaian Systems: Lynn Margulis, Neocybernetics, and the End of the Anthropocene" (U Minnesota Press, 2020)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 72:56


Often seen as an outlier in science, Gaia has run a long and varied course since its formulation in the 1970s by atmospheric chemist James Lovelock and microbiologist Lynn Margulis. Gaian Systems: Lynn Margulis, Neocybernetics, and the End of the Anthropocene (U Minnesota Press, 2020) is a pioneering exploration of the dynamic and complex evolution of Gaia's many variants, with special attention to Margulis's foundational role in these developments. Bruce Clarke assesses the different dialects of systems theory brought to bear on Gaia discourse. Focusing in particular on Margulis's work--including multiple pieces of her unpublished Gaia correspondence--he shows how her research and that of Lovelock was concurrent and conceptually parallel with the new discourse of self-referential systems that emerged within neocybernetic systems theory. The recent Gaia writings of Donna Haraway, Isabelle Stengers, and Bruno Latour contest its cybernetic status. Clarke engages Latour on the issue of Gaia's systems description and extends his own systems-theoretical synthesis under what he terms "metabiotic Gaia." This study illuminates current issues in neighboring theoretical conversations--from biopolitics and the immunitary paradigm to NASA astrobiology and the Anthropocene. Along the way, he points to science fiction as a vehicle of Gaian thought. Delving into many issues not previously treated in accounts of Gaia, Gaian Systems describes the history of a theory that has the potential to help us survive an environmental crisis of our own making. Tom Scholte is a Professor of Directing and Acting in the Department of Theatre and Film at the University of British Columbia located on the unceded, ancestral, and traditional territory of the Musqueam people. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books in Intellectual History
Bruce Clarke, "Gaian Systems: Lynn Margulis, Neocybernetics, and the End of the Anthropocene" (U Minnesota Press, 2020)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 72:56


Often seen as an outlier in science, Gaia has run a long and varied course since its formulation in the 1970s by atmospheric chemist James Lovelock and microbiologist Lynn Margulis. Gaian Systems: Lynn Margulis, Neocybernetics, and the End of the Anthropocene (U Minnesota Press, 2020) is a pioneering exploration of the dynamic and complex evolution of Gaia's many variants, with special attention to Margulis's foundational role in these developments. Bruce Clarke assesses the different dialects of systems theory brought to bear on Gaia discourse. Focusing in particular on Margulis's work--including multiple pieces of her unpublished Gaia correspondence--he shows how her research and that of Lovelock was concurrent and conceptually parallel with the new discourse of self-referential systems that emerged within neocybernetic systems theory. The recent Gaia writings of Donna Haraway, Isabelle Stengers, and Bruno Latour contest its cybernetic status. Clarke engages Latour on the issue of Gaia's systems description and extends his own systems-theoretical synthesis under what he terms "metabiotic Gaia." This study illuminates current issues in neighboring theoretical conversations--from biopolitics and the immunitary paradigm to NASA astrobiology and the Anthropocene. Along the way, he points to science fiction as a vehicle of Gaian thought. Delving into many issues not previously treated in accounts of Gaia, Gaian Systems describes the history of a theory that has the potential to help us survive an environmental crisis of our own making. Tom Scholte is a Professor of Directing and Acting in the Department of Theatre and Film at the University of British Columbia located on the unceded, ancestral, and traditional territory of the Musqueam people. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

Game Changer Mentality – Strategies and Tactics to Overcoming Obstacles to Achieve Your Positive Potential
Paul Rodney Turner On Reaching Peak Performance Through Food And Spirituality

Game Changer Mentality – Strategies and Tactics to Overcoming Obstacles to Achieve Your Positive Potential

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 53:09


Embracing the digital world is not entirely bad since many technological innovations today certainly make everyday life much more convenient. However, depending too much on it hinders us from reaching our peak performance and working through our souls. Delving into this topic with Rodney Flowers is Paul Rodney Turner, a former monk who now serves as the director of Food For Life Global. He shares the concept of building a more disciplined mindset through less violent diets and food yoga. Paul also talks about looking past the physical body and seeing everything as spiritual beings, contributing to the collective progress of humans as a global family.Love the show? Subscribe, rate, review, and share! http://rodneyflowers.com/

AFL Obsessed
Doctor's Orders

AFL Obsessed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 60:23


Delving into the life of a podcaster, reviewing the season and flag predictions with our special guest- Cheezo! Plus, who should get a premiership medal and the best kind of life advice.   Listen and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. Chat on twitter @aflobsessed or peep the Instagram page @aflobsessed for more content. Support the pod here. Click on message or + to leave a voicemail for the pod here.

Keystroke Medium
Ep 6.27 - LIVE! Let‘s Talk About Writing - Part 2 w/ KC Ezell

Keystroke Medium

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 66:33


Let's talk about writing! Anything and everything is on the table! https://amzn.to/3zCsBRP Hosts: Josh Hayes, C. Steven Manley, Scott Moon Special Guest: Kacey Ezell 00:00 Opening remarks -Discord server is up! https://discord.com/invite/t96CVRD -Keystroke Coffee is live! https://keystrokemedium.com/product/keystroke-coffee/ -Use Plottr! https://plottr.com?ref=190 05:00 Weekly update—Fix My Stupid Edition Kacey: Cartwright's Cavaliers is out now! Still working in the Four Horsemen universe on a couple of projects, including Salvage Mother by Kevin Steverson and KC Ezell, out in September! Chuck: Working to finish Jack Dark #2. Extensively outlined Jack Dark #3. Finishing the last book of the Brace Cordova series. Josh: Started a new job last week which is ruining writing schedule. Skunks in cages. Has to change the name of the Sentinels name AGAIN! Got some feedback on a trad pub pitch. 20:30 Main Event— LIVE! Let's Talk About Writing - Part 2 w/ KC Ezell -Writers write, so you have to write. -Do the work! -Throwing away writing vs. putting away writing to find where the idea can be resolved. -POV choices and writing third person as first person to reduce filtering. -Delving into the emotion of writing. -Scott arrives! -Chuck's ‘Roll Tide' story. -What's a K pot? -Why write? -How to shape and form a critique group. -The best kind of feedback is ‘how you felt' vs ‘how it was written' -Writers conferences! 1:03:37 Closing remarks

You Are The Magic Pill
Billy Carson - Delving Deep into the Truth Part 1

You Are The Magic Pill

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 30:29


•   And I knew even as a kid, airplanes would take a long time across the horizon. So I started investigating and researching aerospace the next day and went to my elementary school, Rambo Park, took on all the Encyclopedia Botanica's on Interspace, and I literally started that day researching into aerospace and technology. So technology and aerospace came long before the ancient civilization stuff, and then from there, because we were so poor, where I grew up in Miami, I had sold all of my toys dooor to  door, just so I can have a couple of dollars in my hands, and I told my mom, don't buy me any more toys, just get me books. (8:39)•     I kept researching aerospace technology, and eventually I started realizing correlation between aerospace and advanced tech, or what we call advanced tech, and what appeared to be ancient construction sites were on the planet. The more I dug into it, I started realizing and getting into ancient tablets and realizing that these people were more advanced than us at one point. They were talking about some of the same things we're using today, they had back then, so I realized that we are just another cycle of civilization trying to build back up again. (11:39)•      Downloads are real, as you know, and we all get information from the ether that comes directly into our bodies, and DNA receives information on a Wi-Fi, that's real science, peer-reviewed science. We receive and send information directly from the DNA into space time and back down again, and every thought that exists and ever was thought, exists in spacetime all around us. It permeates the entire energy grid because distance is an illusion, you can download all the years it took me to get this knowledge, you can download that in one minute directly into your body. So the time that you start versus the time I started, we can all be on the same playing field, because consciousness doesn't see time, It doesn't see past president, future, it's all at once, and because the Akashic Records are real, because every thought exist in space time, because it leaves the skull goes out into the ether with the data on it, which was the thoughts, you can grab all those thoughts and bringing it into your body. (19:57)•   They're looking externally for everything, we've been taught and everything is on the outside, and so we look externally, we even want to blame outside exterior things. One of the biggest downfalls of religion is that it gives you this exterior entity to blame all your wrong doings on, so you blame everything on Satan, the devil, and then you go, Well, I can get away with this because all I have to do is just repent now I'm going to be forgiven anyway. And so again, that's more exterior of gratification or what ever you want to call it. And so we're programmed to keep searching outside and requiring outside to take care of instead of taking responsibility for our own thoughts and our own actions. (22:11)•   The chaos really is, people are full of trauma, and we're so full of the trauma and it fills up inside the body, just like you're filling up a glass of water, and when the water gets to the top of the rim of the glass, if you keep putting more water, what happens is, it spills over. The trauma in chaos in our body, it works the same way, so as we have this trauma, as we have all this chaos in our bodies, it begins to fill up, and when it gets to the top, it spills over into our exterior reality. (25:52)ABOUT BILLY:Billy Carson is the founder and CEO of 4BiddenKnowledge Inc, and the Best Selling Author of The Compendium Of The Emerald Tablets and Woke Doesn't Mean Broke.​Mr. Carson is also the founder and CEO of 4BiddenKnowledge TV, a new conscious streaming TV network, and is an expert host on Deep Space, a new original streaming series by Gaia. This series explores the Secret Space Program, revealing extraordinary technologies and their potential origins. Mr. Carson also serves as an expert host on Gaia's original series, Ancient Civilizations, in which a team of renowned scholars deciphers the riddles of our origins and pieces together our forgotten history documented in monuments and texts around the world. Mr. Carson appreciates the dedication and hard work it takes to accomplish great things. Recently, Mr. Carson earned the Certificate of Science (with an emphasis on Neuroscience) at M.I.T. and has a certificate in Ancient Civilization from Harvard University. Among his most notable achievements, Billy is the CEO of First Class Space Agency based in Fort Lauderdale, FL. Specifically, his space agency is involved in research and development of alternative propulsion systems and zero-point energy devices.FILMS & TV: ·      2019 Worlds Biggest Mysteries·       2019 UFOs The Lost Evidence·       2019 UFO's: Uncovering the Truth·       2018 Knowledge For Ascension With Billy Carson·       2017 What If ·       2017 DocUFObia·       2017 Ancient Civilizations ·       2017 Beyond Belief with George Noory·       2017 Life beyond Our Existence·       2017 Buzzsaw with Sean Stone·       2016 The Anunnaki Series·       2016 Deep Space·       2016 Baltic Sea Anomaly: The Unsolved Mystery·       2015 UFAH Favorites·       2012 Countdown to Apocalypse CONNECT WITH BILLY:Website: https://www.4biddenknowledge.comLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/billycarsonGaia: https://www.gaia.com/person/billy-carson4BiddenKnowledge TV: https://www.4biddenknowledge.tvSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/2qz6a42erIvThkmWsO96UE CONNECT WITH VICTORIA:Visit my website: www.youarethemagicpill.comFollow me on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/youarethemagicpill

The Innovative Mindset
How to Find the Poignant Story with Vanishing Postcards Host, Evan Stern

The Innovative Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 65:23


Vanishing Postcards host and storyteller Evan Stern on the importance of telling the stories from the places that are off the interstate. This episode is brought to you by Brain.fm. I love and use brain.fm every day! It combines music and neuroscience to help me focus, meditate, and even sleep! Because you listen to this show, you can get a free trial.* URL: https://brain.fm/innovativemindset If you love it as much as I do, you can get 20% off with this exclusive coupon code: innovativemindset   Born during the driving rainstorm that inspired Stevie Ray Vaughan to record the classic “Texas Flood,” Evan Stern is one of a proud few who can claim Austin as his legitimate hometown. Having caught the performing bug early on, he first gained attention at age 11 with a second-place finish in Austin's famed O. Henry Pun Off, and has since graced the stages of New York's Carnegie Hall and Lincoln Center. A graduate of Sarah Lawrence College and the British American Drama Academy, whether acting Shakespeare, or charming audiences with the turn of a Cole Porter phrase, Evan is first and foremost a storyteller, with a sincere love and appreciation for history, travel and the art of raconteurship. He is now honored to return to Texas for the first season of Vanishing Postcards, an ambitious project that represents a synthesis of these passions through the form of audio essay. Vanishing Postcards is a documentary travelogue in which listeners are invited on a road trip exploring the hidden dives, traditions, and frequently threatened histories that can be discovered by exiting the interstates. Named one of the Best Podcasts of 2021 by Digital Trends. Connect with Evan IG - @vanishing_postcards IG - @evansternnyc Podcast- https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/vanishing-postcards/id1544610020 Episode Transcript [00:00:00] Evan Stern: It's hard for me to really latch on one specific lesson that I have gained, but I do believe that. Everybody wants, ultimately wants to be heard. [00:00:18] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Hello and welcome to the innovative mindset podcast. I'm your host Izolda Trakhtenberg on the show. I interview peak performing innovators in the creative social impact and earth conservation spaces or working to change the world. This episode is brought to you by brain FM brain FM combines the best of music and neuroscience to help you relax, focus, meditate, and even sleep. [00:00:39] I love it and have been using it to write, create and do. Deepest work because you're a listener of the show. You can get a free trial head over to brain.fm/innovative mindset to check it out. If you decide to subscribe, you can get 20% off with the coupon code, innovative mindset, all one word. And now let's get to the show. [00:00:58] Yeah.[00:01:00] [00:01:02] Hey there. And welcome to the innovative mindset podcast. My name is Izolda Trakhtenberg. I'm your host, and I'm super thrilled that you're here. I'm also really excited and thrilled to talk about and meet this week's guest. Listen to this. Evan stern was born during the driving rainstorm that inspired Stevie Ray Vaughn to record the class. [00:01:22] Texas flood. I love that Evan stern is one of a proud few who can claim Austin. S's legitimate hometown that's the town is growing. So, wow. That's amazing how few people probably are from there. Having caught the performing bug early on. He first gained attention at age 11 with a second place finish in Austin's famed. [00:01:43] Oh, Henry punt off. And it says grace, the stages of new York's Carnegie hall and Lincoln center, a graduate of Sarah Lawrence college. American drama academy. Wow. Whether acting Shakespeare or charming audiences with the turn of a Cole Porter phrase, Evan is first and foremost, a storyteller, and [00:02:00] you know how close that is to my heart. [00:02:02] He's got a sincere love and appreciation for history travel and the art of a wreck on tour ship. He's now honored to return to Texas for the first season of vanishing postcards and ambitious project that represents a synthesis of these passions through the form of audio essay. Vanishing postcards is a documentary travel log in which listeners are invited on a road trip, exploring the hidden dives, traditions, and frequently threatened histories that can be discovered by exiting the interstates named one of the best podcasts of 2021 by digital trends, evidence here to talk about banishing postcards and everything else. [00:02:37] So amazing that he's doing Evan. Thank you so much for being there. Show welcome. [00:02:41] Evan Stern: Thank you so much for having me. It's a great honor. Oh, [00:02:44] Izolda Trakhtenberg: you're very sweet. So I I'm, this is such an exciting thing. Delving into the history of Texas. First of all, into the, into the storytellers of Texas into the dives and the honky-tonks of Texas as a travel log.[00:03:00] [00:03:00] But as a podcast, what, what inspired you to do this? What inspired you to go? You know what? I'm going to create this travel log. And I'm going to make it about my home state. What happened that you went, yes, I want to do this. [00:03:13] Evan Stern: Well, it was, it, it wasn't as if there was a lightning bolt of inspiration. It was a very kind of slow gradual process. [00:03:21] Um, and, and you told me, you know, a few years ago that right now I'd be working on a podcast. Um, you know, I might've said really. Um, but like, like so many though, I am one of those people who over the last 10 years just absolutely fell in love. Podcasting, um, and the, um, audio medium of storytelling, I think kind of the gateway drug for me, um, was years ago, I started listening to the moth, you know, just people getting up and telling personal stories without notes. [00:03:52] I, I just absolutely loved it. Um, then you start discovering, um, other programs, you know, like the, the kitchen [00:04:00] sisters and, and, and, and there's, you know, different, different stuff. I mean, there, there's a wonderful podcast about classic Hollywood called you must remember this. There's one about country music called cocaine and rhinestones, um, and around, and, you know, not too long ago as well. [00:04:18] Um, you know, the YouTube algorithm, uh, kept suggesting for whatever reason that I watched these, uh, travel blog, travel blog videos, and in watching them, I would never really see the way that I enjoy traveling represented. Um, I mean, certainly it's not always the case, but I think more often than not, when you, when you see videos of that nature, it's much less about the places themselves. [00:04:45] It's much more about the people saying, oh, look at me and how cute I am in this place. Um, and I just kind of gradually started thinking, you know, I wonder if there is something that, uh, that, that I can do. [00:05:00] Um, and initially I had this grand idea. That I wanted to do a show that was going to be a musical travel log of Mexico. [00:05:09] Um, you know, I'm, I'm immersed in the gig economy in New York, and I always try my best to get away January February just to, to escape the, the bitter cold of the winter. And, um, you know, Mexico is my happy place. It's, it's cheap, it's warm. Um, and so I initially had this idea that I was going to go, uh, kind of explore, use music as a portal to exploring the cultural, regional history of Mexico. [00:05:36] I was going to go to Vera Cruz that was going to where the tradition of, you know, and one a Watteau and, um, you know, in Monterey and the north. And I went so far as to, uh, produce a pilot episode, um, in Marietta Yucatan, um, about the tradition of the trophies that they have there. And it's one thing to, you know, when you're running an event, [00:06:00] Um, you know, you're thinking to yourself, oh my goodness, this is just going to be the best thing ever. [00:06:05] This is going to be amazing. And then you sit down and you listen to what you have spent months working on and you go, oh my goodness, I have missed the mark. So terribly. Um, it was a perfect lesson in show. Don't tell, I mean, w what happened was, is I talked all about the city of Marietta. It's about its history, this, that, and the other, but you didn't actually, um, when, when you were listening to it, I also learned pretty quickly that the, the human voice has such terrific color, shade, and nuance to it. [00:06:37] That if you have an actor come in, um, to a dub over, uh, you know, what was said in English, you just, you just lose so much. Um, and I realized pretty quickly that I needed to learn much more about audio production before tackling a project of that ambitious nature. And so I started thinking to myself, well, you know what. [00:06:59] Might [00:07:00] not be as exotic as Mexico, but if there's one thing I know it's that Texas people love to talk and they tell great stories. So in January of 2020, um, grab some equipments. Um, and I went back down to Texas to see what I could do. Um, really, it was just, uh, going to be kind of an experiment. Um, but it very quickly evolved into vanishing postcards. [00:07:26] Um, what happened was, is I took a look at what I was doing, um, and I realized that each episode was a snapshot of a different place. And if there was a thing that the place has had in common it's that you didn't know how much longer a lot of them were going to be around or that they were representative of broader cultural histories or traditions that. [00:07:52] You know, you, you just, they're kind of rare, um, in, in this kind of fast paced rapidly homogenizing [00:08:00] world. Um, and, um, since then it, it became, it it's, it's been an incredibly rewarding journey. Um, you know, as I maybe referenced earlier in, in many ways, it is kind of a 180 from a lot of the work I've previously done at the, at the same time. [00:08:17] Um, I feel that all of that work really kind of beautifully prepared me for it. Um, and having embarked on this journey, um, I ended up covering like about 1500 miles of, of Texas and, um, having embarked on this journey as a solo traveler, um, I'm now really grateful that the series is out in the world. Um, and I can invite, uh, you know, people like you and listeners really around the world, uh, to, to join me now and experience, uh, everything that I got to do. [00:08:49] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Wow. That's amazing. And it's incredible to me, what you just said about how you took everything that you had learned up until that [00:09:00] point and reframed it and repurposed it almost into this, this way of looking at your home state. And yet it is both technical and it takes a lot of artistry. And I'm wondering what, in, as part of, as part of doing this project, what did you learn? [00:09:21] What was the thing that stood out for you that you learned maybe about yourself or about the people in your state or about the places? What was the biggest thing you learned and how did it change you? [00:09:31] Evan Stern: Well, there's a lot, I mean, it's hard to, for me to really latch on one specific lesson that I have gained. [00:09:38] Um, but I do believe that. Everybody wants, ultimately wants to be heard. They, they really do. Um, and I mean, people often ask me, you know, w w w w when I first started doing this, it was, it was in January, 2020. It was before the pandemic hit. Obviously the pandemic changed, um, a [00:10:00] lot of what I could do. Um, but I was really the first episodes that you'll hear in the series. [00:10:05] I was really just kind of showing up at these places completely unannounced. Um, they really had no idea, um, that I was going to be there. Um, and it, it, people ask me, you know, did you meet resistance? We'll we'll really know. Um, everyone was, was intrigued. And for the most part, people were so honored that, you know, someone like me was taking an interest in their work, their place, uh, what they were doing. [00:10:35] Um, and I don't think too, I mean, Someone recently asked me too, that, that when they, you know, listen to the, to the series, you know, that, you know, they, they feel as if I'm able to, you know, extract these, these stories. And they said, well, how, how do you, how do you make this magic happen? And, well, the truth is is that you, you can't, um, there is nothing that you can do to you. [00:10:59] You never [00:11:00] really know what is is going to happen. Um, but the stories, if you just, if you start talking to people, um, you approach them with respect, empathy, and a willingness to listen. Um, and you ask them specific questions. Um, you just, you, you never know what you're going to. Um, and something that I tell anyone who's maybe interested in doing something like this. [00:11:29] Um, I will say that if you do want to, you know, get stories, you do want to ask people specific questions. Um, I would never go up to someone and just say, tell me about yourself. Um, I might say, um, before we get started, could you maybe describe for me your childhood home, you know, something like that. And, um, that really kind of opens up the door and we just kind of take things from there. [00:11:51] Yeah. [00:11:56] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Sorry. I'm taking all of that in. I like to take a pause to make sure [00:12:00] that I've, that I've understood everything. One of the things that I heard you say that really struck a chord with me was that it's about listening. And the other thing of course was asking those specific questions and. Were there any, and if so, what are they techniques that you use specifically as a, as a performer to help you with that part of it? [00:12:26] Evan Stern: Well, you know, I honestly, I think that, um, as I said so much of my experience, um, leading PR prepared me in, in leading up to this, um, and a big job that I've had for a number of years here in the city is it's a very, it's a very strange job. Um, I work as a, what is called a standardized patient, um, that is the medical schools, programs, hire actors to facilitate simulations [00:13:00] for, uh, medical interns and students. [00:13:03] Um, I have played all sorts of different cases. You'd never believe. I mean, they've had to diagnose me. I've been the graphic designer they've had to diagnose with cancer. Um, I have, uh, you know, I, I I've been the 19 year old crack addict who suffered a panic attack. You name it. I've I've had it. Um, but I have learned so much in, in working with these students in terms of how they build rapport and what works and what doesn't. [00:13:34] Um, I think it's amazing. How many people, uh, it can be applied to interview situations, whatever, um, you know, you give someone a microphone. Sometimes they just kind of become a completely different person. You know, they think that every question, you know, has to be probing and every question, you know, has to have weight, but you really just have to remember how you talk to people in your [00:14:00] everyday life. [00:14:02] You know, how do you introduce yourself to a stranger? Um, you know, you're just going to start talking to people, um, and you know, you, you read their body language and you, you really just it's about establishing trust. Um, and it, and I feel that people understand that. I don't think of myself as a journalist. [00:14:30] Um, I'll be the first to say that I think of myself as more of an essayist. I really think that a journalist job is to investigate a journalist job is to probe. I'm not really there to do that. I'm really there just to, you know, kind of have a conversation and, and enjoy the ride and see where that ride takes. [00:14:49] You know, I'm not, if someone tells me a tall tale, um, I'm not going to fact check that story. Um, but I think that people recognize [00:15:00] that. Um, and you know, I just think that, um, just, just really, like I said, just, just remembering how we relate to one another, uh, every day is, is just crucial. [00:15:15] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Yeah, you're talking. I mean, as you're talking, I'm going, he's, he's talking about integrity and authenticity, and those words are abandoned about aura a lot nowadays, but it really, it seems to me that that's, that that's what you, that, that that's what, what you were using, you know, using who you, who you were authentically to meet these people. [00:15:37] And I know you said that people asked you if you, if you met resistance, I'm wondering what was the most wild story you heard? [00:15:46] Evan Stern: Goodness. Oh, man, there, there were, there was, uh, so, so there's this teeny town called Castile, Texas that sits on the Western edge of the, uh, [00:16:00] the hill country. It's absolutely beautiful, very isolated. [00:16:04] The town has a population of six and, um, I don't even know if he's really there, mayor, I don't know if they actually have a mayor, but you know, the, the big local personality is Randy Love. Festi, uh, he's the owner of the Castille store. Um, I'll be releasing his episode in a, in a few weeks. Um, but, uh, when I was there, he told me that, uh, he had, uh, he, he, he, he took a trip to Cabo San Lucas with his girlfriend. [00:16:36] Uh, they saw this, uh, chicken in a bar and he said, you know what, I need a chicken for the store. So, um, you know, he bought this, uh, roof. For the store. And, um, he had this, uh, Billy Bass that was like, you know, one of those electronic things, you know, you clap your hands in the best wiggles. Well, um, one day as he tells [00:17:00] me, he looks over and, um, this rooster is having sexual relations with that bass. [00:17:05] So this thing he tells me became this huge sensation where people from all over the place started coming to town to see his rooster perform, you know, 12 times a day. And he was able to, uh, make hundreds of thousands of dollars in real estate deals that he was able to sell to the people who came through the store because of that rooster. [00:17:27] And then he proudly led me into the store where he showed me this. He, you know, he, he called the rooster cockroach. Yeah, and the rooster died. And after the rooster died, he had that. He took him to the taxidermists and, um, had him, uh, mounted and placed on top of his good friend, Billy the bass. And I've seen a lot of taxidermy in my day. [00:17:51] I don't think I have ever seen a stuffed rooster and I have certainly never seen a row stuffed rooster on top of a Billy Bass. I'll [00:18:00] tell you that right now. [00:18:02] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Wow. That is. Tall tale for sure. [00:18:10] Oh my goodness. I uh, wow. Yeah, yeah. I don't even, I'm like, whatever. How do I follow that up? I think, I don't [00:18:21] know. I did. I did, because you know, the thing, the thing about this is that anytime we tell stories or listen to stories, I think we're changed by them even if, even if it's, oh, that's just the most ridiculous thing I've ever heard. Your experience of life is, is, is changed in some way or another. So I guess I'm wondering, how have you been changed by doing this project? [00:18:45] Evan Stern: Well, It's in many ways, it's been a dive into the unknown, as I said, it's, it's very, it was all very new for me in the beginning. Um, I had to do a lot of learning and [00:19:00] I re I really had to put myself out there. Um, it definitely, um, tested the boundaries of my comfort, um, in a lot of ways. Um, you know, you really just have to, as I said earlier, you have to go up out there and just start talking to people. [00:19:16] Um, and I usually found that I was way more nervous than the people I was talking to. And, um, I was talking to someone else about this, um, experience. Someone said, and, you know, she asked me, she was like, well, how do you, where does that confidence come from? Where do you get that confidence? And I said, well, you know what? [00:19:36] I, I, I think I've discovered that confidence is kind of overrated. Um, because you can't just read a book or, you know, attend a three-day workshop, whatever, and magically have confidence. It just doesn't happen that way. Confidence happens as a result of experience. Um, it happens as a result of mistakes. Um, and, [00:20:00] um, I think. [00:20:02] I heard somewhere that, you know, what heroic act doesn't involve, just huge levels of vulnerability. Um, and so I, I think I have definitely grown in confidence as a result of all of this, but that really, uh, just is a by-product of, of the work itself and everything that, you know, has been asked of me to, to rise to this challenge [00:20:36] Izolda Trakhtenberg: and that in itself, the, the skills you've built, the ideas that you've gotten and, and brought to fruition is a big part of the change I would imagine. And I love, I'd love to discuss a little bit as you talk about this, what is the process? What was the creative process that goes in to making an episode to crafting vanishing posts? [00:20:59] Evan Stern: Absolutely. [00:21:00] So each, you know, obviously I do have each episode does have a subject that I am interested in delving into. Um, there are people that I want to meet, just so you know, so basically, um, a bit more about the show itself for, for those listening out there. So essentially listeners are invited to join me on a road trip. [00:21:23] And so each episode is produced in documentary style. So, you know, you're going to hear a lot of, it's not, you know, interview, it's not talk show, you're going to hear a lot of different voices. Um, you're going to hear some of my narration, um, and I really work hard to make it an immersive listening experience for those who, who are hearing the episodes. [00:21:49] Um, but basically the, the way that I constructed is, um, there are. And, uh, as I said, you know, each episode, there are certain issues that, that I'm looking at. [00:22:00] Um, and so I just go, I, I talk to people, um, and I assemble a number of interviews at the, at the places that I go to. Um, you know, I try to talk to the, uh, the owners. [00:22:14] I try to talk to the workers. I try to talk to the people who go to these places. Um, you're going to ask all of those people different questions. Um, but you're also, I think there, you know, you also want to, there are also some specific questions that I will ask all of them. Um, and then what I do is I, I come back home and I listened to all of the, um, I listened to all of the interviews and I extract, you know, the, the gold from each person I speak with, you know, I could very well talk to someone for like an hour out of that hour conversation. [00:22:51] I might just take, you know, Three minutes worth of, of nuggets or whatnot. Um, and then I, you know, I, I look at [00:23:00] everything that I have and I stepped back and I, I just kind of look for it, you know, that, what, what, what, what, what are the commonalities, what, what do people keep coming back to, you know, are there opposing views? [00:23:15] Um, and from there, I, I just kind of take these nuggets and I weave together a story out of all of that. Um, I really let my subjects kind of guide the way that the, the story moves and goes. Um, the, the most challenging job for me is in the writing process of pasting it all together. Um, everything has to have I learned, you know, for years, I, you know, I've, I've. [00:23:45] Did a lot of performing in the cabaret world. Um, and you know, even if you're just putting together a show, that's, that's really kind of, you know, a series of songs, what is said in between those songs is every bit as [00:24:00] important as the songs themselves and everything has to have architecture and a beginning, middle and an end. [00:24:06] Um, so the, the greatest challenge for me is about how I can link everything together, um, in the narration as part of a cohesive whole, um, you know, I think, but each episode, uh, you know, I, I never, totally, there are always things that I want to focus on, but you just never totally know where it's going to go. [00:24:27] And before each one, um, I always ask my God, is this going to work? Um, but some so far it's worked out okay, [00:24:38] Izolda Trakhtenberg: That moment of, oh, what if this is going to be a complete disaster? I know it well. Um, and it's, I'm so fascinated by what you're saying with respect to the storytelling, the beginning, middle and end, and the sort of the patter between songs in, in, in a cabaret show, all of, all of those things, those elements [00:25:00] of storytelling, what do you think is the result? [00:25:06] What is the most crucial thing to put into it? And what is the result? How do you, when do you feel like yes, it has worked as opposed to, oh, it's going to be a disaster. [00:25:16] Evan Stern: Well, as I said earlier, again, the most important thing is, is show don't tell, um, and what, what, what is always best for me is I try not to. [00:25:34] I try not to express too much in the way of, of opinion. Um, what, what is really magical though, is just when you have, when you're talking to someone and, you know, whether they realize it or not, they, they share and tell a story that just kind of beautifully encapsulates everything, you know, that, that just really explains the issue [00:26:00] without it, you know, at that point, the work for you is, is really done. [00:26:05] Um, but you know, kind of an example of, of something that, you know, I, I did that, that was a challenge, um, was, you know, I have an episode that's coming out in a bit where. I took a trip first to, to Brownsville, Texas, where I spoke with this man who is the last, uh, cook in the United States who was allowed to serve a barbacoa cooked barbacoa, as it was meant to be prepared, which means it's, it's cooked in a pit under the ground. [00:26:37] Um, and that's what he does. He, he, he's serving barbacoa out of what had been his childhood home. Um, there's a pit out back that's in the ground and, you know, that's where he cooks it. The reason that he's allowed to do it is because his father started it in 1956 and it's been going on for this long. And so I focused on him and I did a segment on him. [00:26:57] And then I went to San [00:27:00] Antonio and I, um, you know, met a cook there who, you know, talked about cooking up puffy tacos. And, um, it ended up, you know, she, her story went in a completely different direction. Um, I mean, her mother. Started this business out of, uh, out of a garage because it was her last hope. Um, she was an incredible woman, a revered figure in San Antonio, um, who, you know, was shockingly murdered. [00:27:28] Um, and she talked all about that and, and, and everything. And, and then, and how she like found forgiveness and was being able to move beyond and, you know, everything that her, how her mother prepared her and how her mother expressed love through, through cooking. And, um, I realized that, you know, on, on the surface, you know, these two stories, yes, they were about cooking, but they were very, very different. [00:27:55] But what, what is it that they had in common? I realized that, you know, [00:28:00] through their cooking, they were both expressing love. And for me, and that's how I brought the two together. [00:28:14] Izolda Trakhtenberg: I'm still thinking, sorry, it's a beautiful, uh, yeah. That notion of, um, cooking and, and healing through cooking and expressing love through cooking, but also expressing love for, I guess, the, the heritage and the inspiration for what they did is so important. And I'm wondering if you have someone or figures or people in, in your world. [00:28:45] Hoo hoo hoo. Does that for you? Who inspired you to do this? And if so, is it that same love, it sounds weird to say love connection, but is that connection one of love and respect? What [00:29:00] is it about the people or the images or, or the ideas that inspired you that comes from that place? [00:29:11] Oh, no you're [00:29:11] Evan Stern: thinking. Oh, no, of course, absolutely. I mean, [00:29:20] There. I mean, who can you say, can you just rephrase the question in a simple, in a simple one sentence in a simple one sentence for me? Can you say, say what you're getting at [00:29:30] Izolda Trakhtenberg: again here? Sure. I'm just wondering who inspired you throughout the journey? Are there any public figures or is there anybody in Texas? [00:29:37] Are there any people who made you go, ah, this is what I want. Well, [00:29:41] Evan Stern: what I can say is that if, if there is a bar that I am always working towards, you know, never, never met him personally. Um, but I am old enough to remember growing up on CVS. There was a man by the name of Charles Kuralt who would travel the [00:30:00] country and he would really just kind of share good news is, is what he was, is what he was doing. [00:30:07] And he. He, he never expressed anything in, in terms of, in, in, in showing these stories, he was able to present, you know, the best of people without really expressing anything in the way of judgment. And there are many situations throughout this process where I have asked myself, what would Charles Kuralt do? [00:30:32] Hmm. Um, and you know, I, I don't mean to, I'm not trying to compare myself to Charles Caroll. Um, in the least, you know, I have much more work to do, you know, before I feel like I can get people called him the Walt Whitman of American television. Um, but I can tell you that that is the bar that I am always working towards. [00:30:56] Um, and the greatest compliments that I have received, [00:31:00] um, you know, or when people have heard this series and said, oh, you know what, this reminds me of Charles Perrault. [00:31:08] Izolda Trakhtenberg: That's lovely. And I remember Charles Caroll also on like, uh, CBS Sunday morning or something like that. Yeah, yeah. Yeah. His stories were all, you know, when, uh, you were mentioning the idea of love and heart. [00:31:20] That's what I remember thinking about his stories was that they were always full of such quiet soul and heart. They didn't have to be huge stories, but they were, they always left me feeling better and always gave me something to think about. Well, yeah, [00:31:38] Evan Stern: go on. Go on. No, no, no, go ahead. Go ahead. Well, and I do believe that there is a great void of that when you look at our media landscape right now, and th there, there really is. [00:31:48] Um, we live in a horribly polarized, horribly divided age. Um, I, I do not believe that anything that we have lived through over the [00:32:00] last five, six years should be normalized. I will be the first to say that, um, But I do believe that, you know, the, the issues that we are wrestling with right now as a nation, uh, in the divisions that we're dealing with in terms of politics and race are completely unsustainable. [00:32:20] But at the same time, I do think that there is more that we have in common than what we've realized. And I do think that culture right now is one of those rare areas of agreement. And what this show is about celebrating is that culture, um, you know, culture provides opportunity for shared experiences and you know, that that's really kind of what I'm getting at with, with all of this. [00:32:53] Um, and, and additionally too, I mean, how can we expect for people in [00:33:00] our rural communities to appreciate what is good and beautiful about places like New York city or San Francisco, or even Austin for that matter, if we cannot appreciate what is good and beautiful about them, [00:33:22] Izolda Trakhtenberg: from what you just said, it feels like there's a sort of a, through the looking glass aspect to your show that you're inviting people to go on a journey with you to, to see these places or to listen to these, to these stories and to hear about them. When you do that, when you're in that space of inviting people on a journey, how do you decide which stories are the ones that are important to tell. [00:33:52] Evan Stern: Well, something that's important to me. Is that so often when we think about art and [00:34:00] culture, I mean, we think about palaces of civilization, like the mat, the British museum, the, the loop, but the truth is that art and culture is everywhere. And oftentimes some of the best of it comes from places that you're just not going to read about in glossy magazines. [00:34:20] You're not going to see about these places on Instagram. And it's really about exploring that, you know, Detroit gave us Motown, Clarksdale, Mississippi gave us the blues. Um, and, and for me, it's really kind of about seeking these, these places out. You know, if you read a, you know, if you read like a tourist guide book about Texas, they're going to tell you to go to the Alamo. [00:34:49] They're going to tell you to go to the river walk, do this, do that. Um, There's so much more to that. I mean, I had the [00:35:00] great honor of visiting a town called San Benito, um, which is about, you know, 15, 18 miles north of the border. Um, and you know, th this is, you know, if you look at this country, um, you know, the real Grandy valley, um, is just statistically, one of the, the poor regions, you know, there's been a lot. [00:35:21] Um, you know, uh, D population, you know, flight, whatnot, but this town of San Benito, um, was responsible for giving birth to the movement of music. Um, which is an incredible genre. Basically what happened is the, uh, the Mexican laborers down in south Texas, um, heard the music that was brought to the area by the checks, the Germans, they heard the Pocus, they heard the accordions, um, and they, they took that accordion music. [00:35:51] They took those polkas and they added their own lyrics and Spanish to them. They threw in guitar and they created this whole entire genre [00:36:00] of music. And, um, w w the story there is, is, is I knew that I wanted to. To do a piece, you know, on the border, you hear about the border a lot, um, in the news right now, but what is always lost in the noise surrounding all of that is the culture and the people who actually exist there. [00:36:19] Um, and I thought that kahuna really kind of provided a terrific, uh, opportunity just to explore kind of the beautiful th the, the beauty that exists there. And I heard that there was this museum in this town called the Texas kahuna music hall of fame. So I sent a message on Facebook. Um, I I'd heard that, uh, it was founded and owned by a man by the name of Ray Abila. [00:36:42] And a little while later, I got a call from his son, turned out, uh, that Mr. Abila, his father had died about seven months prior, but that if I wanted to go, um, visit the museum, that they would be honored to have me and I showed up. This museum, the small town in [00:37:00] Texas and the entire family was there because they wanted for me to know about their father. [00:37:07] Um, they wanted me to know about Cancun . Um, they found a, the president of a record label who specializes in this music so that he could be there with us too. And they had such pride and joy in, in sharing. And an honor that someone took the time to visit a place like, like San Benito. Um, it is an experience I will always treasure and never forget. [00:37:34] Izolda Trakhtenberg: That is so lovely. And I'm so glad that you got to tell that to, to tell that story, to show, to show, to sort of open the window, if you will, into San Benito and into this music. And I'm wondering something, this is a little off topic, but do you know who Alan Lomax was? I [00:37:54] Evan Stern: have heard the name. Um, please refresh my memory. [00:37:57] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Sure, sure. So he was an [00:38:00] ethnomusicologist and what he did with his whole career for 50 years, he traveled the world and he recorded music. And when video came along, video of mew, indigenous music, wherever he was, he tried to find the music from that place. And, uh, and there, when I worked at the national geographic site in many moons ago, he came over and he was like, Hey, I would love to put together a library that didn't happen with the geographic, but his daughter, after his death put up a website and there is a website that you can go and, uh, sort of see the music from anywhere. [00:38:35] You can hear the music from anywhere, you just type it in. And if it's there, if they got a recording of it, you'll be able to hear it. And so I'm wondering for posterity, what is your. W w w this library, if you will, that you're creating this travel log that you're creating in my mind, Alan Lomax, his version of it is providing us access to music from all [00:39:00] over the world that is, that could be lost. [00:39:03] And I'm wondering, what do you, what is your feeling about that with the stories that you're telling you mentioned earlier that these that's, their survival is not certain the different traditions and the, and even the, the, you know, the honky-tonks the places themselves, what are you going for here? What is your long-term vision for vanishing postcard? [00:39:24] Evan Stern: Well, so yes, so I'm collecting oral history and I, I think it is really important that we do have a record of it. Um, I think in some ways, uh, this is something perhaps of a bit of a call to arms. Um, you know, I, I want to say it's about shining a light on, you know, what is, what is still, what is still there. [00:39:47] Um, but we can still go to, but as I said, you know, some of this stuff might not be around for too much longer, so it's, it's really kind of about drawing attention to it so that we can preserve it. Um, you know, I look at my [00:40:00] hometown of Austin. Texas as a whole. Um, it is, it is changing at rapid pace. I don't think that change is something to be feared. [00:40:09] Um, in, in many ways I think it is something that, um, should be embraced, but we have to change and grow responsibly. Um, we have to ask, you know, why, w w what is it that people like about Austin? What is it about Texas that draws people there? Why do people keep coming? Um, and I do think that it is it's culture, and I believe that we, as a society need to do a lot more to protect the culture that surrounds us. [00:40:36] I mean, th th most of the places that I spotlight are small businesses and. You know, whenever a small business closes that, you know, has a great history behind it or fondness to it, you'll have all of these people come out of the woodwork saying, oh my goodness, this is horrible. This is the worst thing ever. [00:40:54] But my question always is, well, when was the last time you, you actually went there? Um, [00:41:00] I mean, it's really exhausting. It's a lot of hard work, um, to, to keep these places going. And if people get tired or they aren't making ends meet you, you can't blame them. Um, and this is an issue that you see happening in New York. [00:41:14] It's an issue you see happening in Texas, California, London, name it it's happening. Um, and so I do think that. You know, th th hopefully this series kind of makes people think, uh, a bit more about that. Um, and long-term, it is my hope, uh, that I can expand the map beyond Texas because, um, the, the issues that I feel are explored in this series are truly universal. [00:41:44] In fact, if you look at the analytics, um, most people tuning in and listening right now are actually listening from outside of Texas. Um, and so I think it's important to, uh, you know, I want to expand the map [00:42:00] and, um, you know, if I can do a part to draw attention to, you know, the, the, the beauty of a meal, American culture that surrounds us, um, you know, that's kind of what my goal is. [00:42:16] Izolda Trakhtenberg: And it's a great goal. And I'm so glad that you said that you eventually, cause that was going to be, my next question was, do you want to take it outside of Texas? And I mean, Texas covering Texas can be a lifetime's work cause it's such a big place with such a varied set of, of uh, peoples and cultures. [00:42:32] And yet I love the notion of, of that, what you said, finding those small businesses, finding those people, who aren't, the ones trumpeting themselves and giving them a chance to, to shine. I think that's amazing and wonderful that you're doing that. And I love the notion. And if you could. What would you go next? [00:42:53] Evan Stern: Uh, well, I, I have a dream. I would love to drive route 66 from Oklahoma to [00:43:00] California, and I would love to collect stories and oral histories along the way. Um, I think that route 66, so much of why, um, it kind of occupies this mythic status, um, is because of the timing. Um, you know, there were other highways that were built before or after there were larger ones. [00:43:19] Um, but I think, you know, if you journey route 60, I've never done it, but I, I have to think that if you drive route 66, I mean, you were following in the steps of the, the Okies who migrated to California because of the dust bowl and the great depression. Um, it was an incredible artery during world war II. [00:43:38] So there's that history as well. Um, then it kind of. You know, in encapsulates that golden age of American travel and in the late forties and fifties, then it was decommissioned. And, you know, there was a lot of abandonment that happened and kind of, what does that say? Um, you know, about the American dream, you [00:44:00] know, it was it, uh, and, and so there's a lot that I would like to explore and taking that journey, um, beyond that, I would also love to take a trip to Mississippi sometime, uh, something that fascinates me about Mississippi. [00:44:11] I think, um, the, the writer really Maura said that Mississippi is America's Ireland. Um, if you look at it, it has produced the most incredible Canon of just literary lions, um, William Fox. Um, Richard Wright, Eudora, Welty. Um, they were all Mississippians and Mississippi continues to produce an incredible writers there. [00:44:36] There's a wonderful storytelling tradition attached to Mississippi. Um, and I would love to see, uh, what, what I could get there. [00:44:47] Izolda Trakhtenberg: I love it. I think that's amazing. First of all, I'd driven along 66 and you will, you will love it. Love it, love it. And, uh, you know, Mississippi and the south in general [00:45:00] has a rich storytelling culture. I have every time I spend time in Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia, Florida, that, that part of the country there, if you, if you set a spell, you will, you will get amazing stories. [00:45:16] And often you don't, it doesn't take a lot of prompting. So I'm I'm you said earlier that, that it's just about sort of talking to people the way you would talk to them. The, I guess the question is, have you had people who just say Nope, Nope. Not doing it. And if so, what have you done if that particular story is important to you or do you just move on to the next person? [00:45:38] Oh, [00:45:38] Evan Stern: absolutely. Well, there, there is. Um, you know, so the. The third episode that you'll hear in the series. Um, I did at a honky-tonk called arche blue, silver dollar, um, in this town called Bandera, Texas. Um, it's a fantastic place. Um, again, it was pre pandemic. Um, so, you know, I showed up there unannounced and I really wanted to [00:46:00] talk to, uh, archi blue. [00:46:01] He's he's the owner, he's in his eighties. He performs there every Saturday night. Um, I thought, you know, th this guy is a legend. I've got to talk to him, got to talk to him. He wanted absolutely nothing to do with it. Wouldn't give me an inch refuse to let me record him. Um, and you know, he was cordial when I talked to him, we're talking, you know, you're one word answers, you try everything. [00:46:24] Um, but what happened is, is, uh, every, I, I talked to everyone. That I could find around him and everybody had a story about archi that they wanted to share and, um, what resulted in. And so his refusal became part of the story itself. Um, but in talking to everyone who knew and loved him and had stories to share about him, you really got a terrific, uh, portrait that wouldn't have existed. [00:46:56] Otherwise that that I think is entirely charming. [00:47:00] Um, and when that happened, I had to remind myself that one of my very, very favorite, um, essays of all time, uh, was written by, uh, gates Elise. Um, in 1965, he was given an assignment to interview Frank Sinatra for Esquire magazine and Frank Sinatra completely refused to talk to him. [00:47:23] Um, but what he ended up doing was he interviewed all the hangers on everyone in his, his entourage. And, uh, to this day, people say that it is the most realistic. Portrait of Frank Sinatra that has ever been captured. Um, and so I would recommend to anyone who finds themselves in that position to think of that story and, you know, maybe read that story, uh, because that's something that I draw tremendous inspiration from.[00:48:00] [00:48:03] Izolda Trakhtenberg: It's so interesting. I have a friend who, uh, who's a PR expert and she talks about the difference between marketing and PR Gloria, Charles, her name. And she says marketing is when you come to people and you say, Hey, I'm great. But PR is when someone else goes, you know what? That person they're great. And as long as it's someone you trust, it weighs more than if the person is trumping again themselves, you know? [00:48:31] And so there's something to what you said that kind of reminded me of that, that notion of the other people around Frank Sinatra or, or, or archi, uh, being the ones who tell their tale. And I, I guess I'm wondering within that, I've asked you about the wildest, what is the story that has touched you the most? [00:48:55] The one that made you go, ah, wow. I had no [00:49:00] idea. [00:49:02] Evan Stern: Well, for me, the, the episode that, that, that has the most personal heart for me, um, is, is the second one. What happened is I went to this dance hall. Um, I, I, I knew that I wanted to do a piece on dance halls. Um, in, in Texas, you know, everyone always talks, always writes about Greenhall or Lukin Bach. [00:49:27] You know, those are the big dance halls, but there are many, many, many more others out there. And there was one I discovered that I'd never been to called SEF Shaq hall. It's in this teeny community, um, called Seton, Texas. It's about eight miles outside of a town called temple. It's a community of about 40 people. [00:49:48] And, um, and there's this old dance hall there called SEF shuck hall. That is pretty much trapped in time. Um, by most accounts, it is now the oldest, [00:50:00] um, family run dance hall in Texas. You know, it's a family that, that owns it. This family has, has always owned and run it. And, um, I went there and I wanted to talk to its owner, Alice, who is 89 years old. [00:50:19] Um, and, uh, you know, I had actually called an advanced to ask if I could come and talk to her. She said, sure, well, I got there. And I said, well, I'm here to talk to Alice. And it turned out, you know, that morning she took a fall and they had to take her to the emergency room. Um, and you know, and it kind of, you know, you could feel the way. [00:50:41] In that situation, you know, what, what happens to this place? Um, you know, without, without Alice here. And I ended up talking to her daughter-in-law and son, um, and you know, they're, they're committed to keeping it going. Um, but you could feel like the, you [00:51:00] know, the, you know, I, I feel like that situation kind of infused the episode with, with weight. [00:51:06] Um, but beyond that, um, you know, I listened to, to what I had initially, and there was something missing. Um, I said to myself, I said, you know, I'm doing a lot of talking here. I'd like to find someone else who could do some, some talking for. Um, and there there's an association called the Texas dance hall preservation. [00:51:29] And I found the woman who was working at the time as their executive director, because I wanted to talk to her just to kind of get some more historic perspective on dance halls. You know, I was talking about the history. I think it's better if someone else can talk about the history, other than me, that actually knows more. [00:51:45] And, you know, I talked earlier about how, you know, you have those moments where someone just kind of, you know, tells a story or share something that just beautifully illuminates everything. And, um, [00:52:00] I was talking to her and I asked, I said, you know, there are so many causes out there in this world that are, that are worth devoting attention to. [00:52:09] I said, you know, why are dance halls important to you? And she said it was, it became an incredibly emotional interview that I was not expecting at all. But she said that, you know, those places have a lot of heart and that her fear was that we're getting away from that as a society. And, you know, she, you know, ends up crying. [00:52:34] She's saying, you know, these places, you know, people go there, you know, it's not just about the fun. It's, it's not just about the dancing. Um, it's about, you know, it's about cleaning the roof. It's about cleaning the toilet. And she says, I see so many people working so hard to keep these places going and, you know, and of course it is perfectly illustrated what the shoe lock family, you know, we're, we're [00:53:00] doing, you know, the, the, the daughter-in-law the son, you know, they, they work, you know, five days, they do not take days off. [00:53:07] You know, they have regular jobs that they keep Monday through Friday, and then they're there on the weekends. And, um, I think that it beautifully exemplified their story. In addition to just about every other person that I talked to in the series as a whole, [00:53:30] Izolda Trakhtenberg: that is beautiful. And I'm so grateful that you shared that, that moment of, of talking to her and also the story of. Dance halls in general or, or anything that we do because we love it. Um, you know, we, we do it because whatever it is, whatever that thing is that you do, because you love it. And particularly these places where one of the things that I think Evan, that, that you've highlighted, that I think is so [00:54:00] incredible is that you've taken, you've highlighted places that aren't going out for fame. [00:54:08] You know, these are people and places that are just living, doing their thing and living their lives day in and day out, year in and year out. And they're not going to be a celebrity. They're not trying to be world famous for example. And yet you've shown the light on them. And I think that's so it's powerful because of that, because they're living their lives and doing something hopefully that they love, like with the dance hall story. [00:54:35] And they're not looking for accolades and yet you've given them a platform. And I'm so grateful that you've [00:54:43] Evan Stern: done that. Well, I will say it's not even that. I think a lot of them as well, feel a responsibility to the people who go to these places, you know, like a dive bar, isn't just a place to grab a beer. [00:54:58] You know, a dive [00:55:00] bar represents an entire community. Um, you know, a dive bar, a dance hall. These are all places where people go to, to belong. That's that's, that's what, all of the, that's another through line that I think these places have in common, you know, whether it's a barbecue joint, a dive bar, a dance hall, people go to these places for community and for places to belong. [00:55:25] And I think that it's, it's, it's important to highlight that aspect as well. [00:55:31] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Absolutely. I agree. Yeah. Interestingly because people come and go, like you said, there are a lot of people who, who come to Texas, uh, especially Austin has, has ballooned. Uh, I guess the question that's come that's upper. Most of my mind right now is culturally the culture of places changes. [00:55:54] Right? And so, as the culture evolves, I [00:56:00] know that you're a lot of what vanishing postcards is about is, is capturing that before it goes away before it's no longer in its current form. Are there things that you've done that have been, uh, sort of in the process of changing or something is over and something new's coming to take its place? [00:56:21] And if so, what have those things been? [00:56:25] Evan Stern: Um, you mean my work or places I've been. [00:56:30] Izolda Trakhtenberg: I guess I'm not asking the question very well. I'm just wondering about culturally, your vanishing postcards project is focused on sort of the smaller, uh, heart, very heartfelt places in people in Texas now and perhaps, and perhaps hopefully someday elsewhere. [00:56:51] And as, as the culture changes in those places or for those dance halls, have you captured in any of the [00:57:00] episodes that you've done? That change taking place? Absolutely. [00:57:04] Evan Stern: Um, the, the very first place that I went to, um, was a bar called, uh, the, the dry Creek cafe. Um, it's been there for about 70 years. Um, it, when it first opened in the early 1950s, it really basically sat on the edge of the country. [00:57:22] Now, not only is it no longer country, um, it's now pretty much surrounded by mansion's. Um, it's now basically it's this ramshackle dilapidated dive that is surrounded by some of the priciest real estate in all of Texas. Um, but this bar has survived. Um, and I think it's one of the few places that you can go where you're reminded that, you know, before the tech, uh, millionaires invaded the Hills, the Hills were actually home to Cedar choppers, which was this, um, Appalachian subculture. [00:57:55] Um, and, uh, the, the very first person that I interviewed. [00:58:00] In, um, in Texas for the series was angel their bartender. Um, this was a tough day game, you know, raspy voice, you know, just changed smoker, you know, just, just fabulous, you know, just tough as nails, woman. Um, she was incredibly, um, reticent to, uh, to speak with me again, getting her to talk on the record and letting along to record her. [00:58:28] Um, just took every ounce of charm that I could possibly muster. But when she found out that I was okay with cussing, um, she opened right up. She let the F bombs fly. Um, we had a terrific time, um, and, uh, very sadly I think about, um, four months or so. Um, after I, I interviewed her, she died. Um, what was remarkable about angel is, um, as I said, the place opened in, um, I think it was 1950. [00:58:59] [00:59:00] Three. Um, she was only the third bartender to ever work there. Wow. Um, and so I'm incredibly grateful that I, you know, captured her, her voice and I have that record of her. Um, but you know, you have to ask, you know, when, when someone like that goes, you know, um, you know, what does that, how does that change a place? [00:59:22] You know, what does that do? I was actually just back in Austin last week. Um, and I went there to visit the place to, you know, just see if there was some additional footage I could get that would help bring the season two to a close, um, just to kind of see how that change had affected things. Um, and you know, so there, there are analogies, there, there are now like a few bartenders there who are like trading duties and whatnot. [00:59:48] Um, but I think what's kind of beautiful is that those who have filled in, you know, were all regulars, who, who knew and loved and cared about the bar. Um, [01:00:00] and, uh, you know, they dedicated a section of the bar to angel where they have, you know, her pictures and some things that she loved. Um, and, um, it was, it was just kind of interesting and reassuring to see, um, how, you know, yes, you know, when a beloved, you know, figured, uh, leaves, it's hard and it's challenging. [01:00:21] Um, but if the community is there. It will come. It will find a way to continue. At least for now. I'm grateful to see that, to know that the dry Creek is still there and that those who love it, um, are doing their part to, uh, to keep it going. [01:00:38] Izolda Trakhtenberg: I'm so glad to hear that story. That is wonderful. Evan. I want to thank you so much for taking the time to talk to me about this. [01:00:46] It's, it's such an important topic because it isn't one that, that we tend to focus on. So I'm really grateful that you took the time to tell me about vanishing postcards and to tell me about the culture and the people that you are, [01:01:00] uh, Capturing, if you will, for, for all of us, for all of us to enjoy. And I, and if you're listening to this, you need to go check out vanishing postcards. [01:01:08] I've listened to a few episodes and it's fabulous and amazing. Evan. If you wouldn't mind, I would love it. If you would give whatever social media. Uh, that you have so that if people want to find you, that they can. [01:01:22] Evan Stern: Absolutely. So the, um, you know, if you search, uh, vanishing postcards on Instagram, uh, you'll find it there. [01:01:29] Um, it also has a, a, a, a Facebook page, just search vanishing postcards. It should turn up. Um, you can also find me on Instagram as well. I'm at Evan stern NYC. Um, and, um, you know, I thank you so much and oh, and, but most important, most crucially, um, you know, please go find, listen to subscribe to vanishing postcards. [01:01:54] Um, since this is a podcast, uh, you know, whatever, you're listening to this on, I'm quite [01:02:00] confident that you'll find us there. We're on apple, we're on Spotify, we're on all the, uh, you know, whatever platform is out there. We're more than likely on, and I'd be most honored if you'd consider giving us a little. [01:02:12] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Awesome. And I will actually put all of that in the show notes so that if you're listening to this and you've seen the show notes, you'll be seeing the links to all of it. I just, people learn differently. So I like giving both the audio and the sort of, you can read it visual for it. Uh, Evan, again, I'm really grateful that you took the time to chat with me. [01:02:32] Me and I, I have one last question, if that's okay. Of course. It's a question I ask everybody who comes on the show and it's a silly question, but I find that it yields some profound results. Yeah. And the question is this, if you could sky write anything for the whole world to see what would you. [01:02:53] Evan Stern: What would I say for the whole world to see? [01:02:58] Oh my [01:03:00] goodness. Yeah. So I feel like I need to say something profound, like Buddha or something like that now, or Yoda. My goodness. [01:03:11] Izolda Trakhtenberg: I've had people say, eat your veggies. So it does not have to be, [01:03:16] Evan Stern: I mean, it is a cliche. Um, I've, I've heard it many times. Um, but I, I do believe that there is something to be said for the fact that if I were to write this in the sky, I would say luck is the result of preparation meeting opportunity. [01:03:34] I absolutely believe that to be true. Um, I always do my best to be, uh, you know, prepared and, uh, educate myself and, you know, and, and be ready so that, um, you know, when opportunity comes, you know, luck can, can happen. [01:03:53] Izolda Trakhtenberg: I love that. I think that's a great way to end this episode, Evan stern, you are fabulous, and I'm [01:04:00] so glad that you were here. [01:04:01] Thank you. This is the innovative mindset podcast. You have been listening to my wonderful conversation with Evan stern, who is the host of the vanishing postcards podcast, which of course, you know, you need to check out if you're liking what you're hearing, do me a favor, leave a review, let me know comment. [01:04:20] However you'd like to get in touch. I would appreciate it until next time. This is again, Izolda Trakhtenberg reminding you to listen, learn, laugh, and love a whole lot. [01:04:36] thanks so much for joining me today. I really appreciate you being here. Please subscribe to the podcast if you're new and if you like what you're hearing, please review it and rate it and let other people know. And if you'd like to be a sponsor of the show, I'd love to meet you on patrion.com/innovative mindset. [01:04:53] I also have lots of exclusive goodies to share just with the show supporters there today's episode was produced by [01:05:00] Izolda Trakhtenberg and his copyright 2021 as always, please remember, this is for educational and entertainment purposes. Only past performance does not guarantee future results, although we can always hope until next time, keep living in your innovative mindset.   * I am a Brain.fm affiliate. If you purchase it through the above links and take the 20% off, I'll get a small commission. And please remember, I'll never recommend a product or service I don't absolutely love!  

Finding Genius Podcast
Delving Into Human Pathology through the Avenue of Examining Animal Behavior and Illness with Barbara Natterson Horowitz

Finding Genius Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 46:05


What insight can be gained about humans by examining animals first? If groups of animals are vulnerable to specific factors, chances are, humans may be too. Press play to learn: What increased vulnerability in animals can tell us about humans If animals share behaviors with humans  How other species may be susceptible to breast cancer Barbara Natterson Horowitz, a cardiologist and evolutionary biologist at Harvard Medical School, shares her work examining the natural world and gaining insights into the human experience. Attempting to understand human health without examining that of animals and the planet tends to be relatively ineffective. However, by reviewing how disease and other processes emerge in other species, more can be learned about human vulnerability and how some negatives can be avoided.  By looking for other species that contain unique biology, there may be solutions to problems humans have been unable to solve. In the future, searching for plausible hypotheses is the primary goal of researchers in this field, hopefully leading to a rich source of insights. Visit bnatterson-horowitz.com for more information. Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: apple.co/30PvU9C

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2650 - The Disastrous Final Year of Donald Trump's Presidency w/ Carol Leonnig

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 67:33


Sam and Emma host Carol Leonnig, national investigative reporter at the Washington Post, to discuss her recent book she co-authored with Phillip Rucker, I Alone Can Fix It: Donald J. Trump's Catastrophic Final Year. They begin by stepping off Leonnig's and Rucker's previous work A Very Stable Genius, and how they were able to secure a sit down with Trump following his complete bashing of their last book. They look into his continued desire for an audience, not to mention an audience of his audience, and the maintenance of his three primary beliefs in his final year: that the 1/6 rioters were genuinely loving people, that BLM protesters were a clear existential threat, and that he, Donald Trump, was the clear winner of the 2020 election. Delving into the ladder, Sam, Emma, and Carol explore how Trump was able to convince both his base and himself of the election fraud, before moving onto his mishandling of the Coronavirus pandemic from the very start. They discuss his strategy of focusing on the battleground of the daily news cycle, taking every problem as a PR crisis, even as those close to him attempted to steer him towards practically tackling the pandemic to save his reelection. Carol then goes deep into the pressure on journalists, when it comes to Trump, to find the truth behind the truth, looking into what he and his administration actually believe, and why they genuinely take the actions they take, looking particularly into his clearing of Lafayette Square for a biblical photo op. They round out the interview by looking deeper into his administration, his enablers, and those that attempted to control his impulses, as well as the effect of his first three years on emboldening the worst of him. Sam and Emma conclude the free half by summarizing the vote-a-rama that took place on reconciliation, and Fox & Friends' realization that socialism is, indeed, popular. And in the Fun Half: Emma, Sam, and the MR crew chat about the over-saturation of media critique, the importance of a large-scale audience for MR, and follow up yesterdays “Ligma” variant discussion with an exploration of some of the worst, and best, of MR IMs. Then, a dear MR Discord Moderator calls in for some carpentry tips (surprisingly not asking Emma of Nazareth), before Sam and a caller talk civics versus ethics, and Chris from Minneapolis follows up a discussion on the Senate Dem's performative vote against “defund the police” by exploring what localities are actually doing, not just saying. Lastly, they look into the mob of parents chanting “child abuse” (unfortunately, not at themselves) at a Franklin, TN school board meeting on masks, plus, your calls and IMs! Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here. Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ (Merch issues and concerns can be addressed here: majorityreportstore@mirrorimage.com) You can now watch the livestream on Twitch Check out today's sponsors: Tushy: Hello Tushy cleans your butt with a precise stream of fresh water for just $79. It attaches to your existing toilet – requires NO electricity or additional plumbing – and cuts toilet paper use by 80% – so the Hello Tushy bidet pays for itself in a few months. Go to hellotushy.com/majority to get 10% off today! quip: quip mouthwash kills bad breath germs, helps prevent cavities, and leaves you feeling fresh thanks to a formula that gives your mouth everything it needs. Their 4X concentrate has fluoride, xylitol, and CPC, but they left out the artificial colors and stinging alcohol you'll find in a lot of other rinses.That's $5 off a Mouthwash Starter Kit, which includes a Refillable Dispenser and a 90-dose supply of quip's 4x concentrated formula, at getquip.com/majority5. Support the St. Vincent Nurses today as they continue to strike for a fair contract! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere, at https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel! Check out The Nomiki Show live at 3 pm ET on YouTube at patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Matt's podcast, Literary Hangover, at Patreon.com/LiteraryHangover, or on iTunes. Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada, at patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop Help Aamon Hawk Buy A Super Computer!