Podcasts about glue

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

Non-metallic material used to bond various materials together

  • 1,342PODCASTS
  • 2,095EPISODES
  • 45mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Nov 30, 2021LATEST
glue

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about glue

Show all podcasts related to glue

Latest podcast episodes about glue

Mercedes In The Morning
MITM # 1528  The “Nail Glue”  One

Mercedes In The Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 107:46


6:00 –        Sounds In Your Home That Bug You 7:00 –        Best LV Residency, Old That Is New Again               8:00  –       Emergency Room Visits, Try It Tues: Gingerbread Cookie Kit Kat, Meeting Your Doppelganger 9:00 -       Feels Like A Work Out​ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Screaming in the Cloud
Keeping the Chaos Searchable with Thomas Hazel

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 44:43


About ThomasThomas Hazel is Founder, CTO, and Chief Scientist of ChaosSearch. He is a serial entrepreneur at the forefront of communication, virtualization, and database technology and the inventor of ChaosSearch's patented IP. Thomas has also patented several other technologies in the areas of distributed algorithms, virtualization and database science. He holds a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science from University of New Hampshire, Hall of Fame Alumni Inductee, and founded both student & professional chapters of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).Links:ChaosSearch: https://www.chaossearch.io TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by my friends at ThinkstCanary. Most companies find out way too late that they've been breached. ThinksCanary changes this and I love how they do it. Deploy canaries and canary tokens in minutes and then forget about them. What's great is the attackers tip their hand by touching them, giving you one alert, when it matters. I use it myself and I only remember this when I get the weekly update with a “we're still here, so you're aware” from them. It's glorious! There is zero admin overhead  to this, there are effectively no false positives unless I do something foolish. Canaries are deployed and loved on all seven continents. You can check out what people are saying at canary.love. And, their Kub config canary token is new and completely free as well. You can do an awful lot without paying them a dime, which is one of the things I love about them. It is useful stuff and not an, “ohh, I wish I had money.” It is speculator! Take a look; that's canary.love because it's genuinely rare to find a security product that people talk about in terms of love. It really is a unique thing to see. Canary.love. Thank you to ThinkstCanary for their support of my ridiculous, ridiculous non-sense.   Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Spelled V-U-L-T-R because they're all about helping save money, including on things like, you know, vowels. So, what they do is they are a cloud provider that provides surprisingly high performance cloud compute at a price that—while sure they claim its better than AWS pricing—and when they say that they mean it is less money. Sure, I don't dispute that but what I find interesting is that it's predictable. They tell you in advance on a monthly basis what it's going to going to cost. They have a bunch of advanced networking features. They have nineteen global locations and scale things elastically. Not to be confused with openly, because apparently elastic and open can mean the same thing sometimes. They have had over a million users. Deployments take less that sixty seconds across twelve pre-selected operating systems. Or, if you're one of those nutters like me, you can bring your own ISO and install basically any operating system you want. Starting with pricing as low as $2.50 a month for Vultr cloud compute they have plans for developers and businesses of all sizes, except maybe Amazon, who stubbornly insists on having something to scale all on their own. Try Vultr today for free by visiting: vultr.com/screaming, and you'll receive a $100 in credit. Thats v-u-l-t-r.com slash screaming.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. This promoted episode is brought to us by our friends at ChaosSearch.We've been working with them for a long time; they've sponsored a bunch of our nonsense, and it turns out that we've been talking about them to our clients since long before they were a sponsor because it actually does what it says on the tin. Here to talk to us about that in a few minutes is Thomas Hazel, ChaosSearch's CTO and founder. First, Thomas, nice to talk to you again, and as always, thanks for humoring me.Thomas: [laugh]. Hi, Corey. Always great to talk to you. And I enjoy these conversations that sometimes go up and down, left and right, but I look forward to all the fun we're going to have.Corey: So, my understanding of ChaosSearch is probably a few years old because it turns out, I don't spend a whole lot of time meticulously studying your company's roadmap in the same way that you presumably do. When last we checked in with what the service did-slash-does, you are effectively solving the problem of data movement and querying that data. The idea behind data warehouses is generally something that's shoved onto us by cloud providers where, “Hey, this data is going to be valuable to you someday.” Data science teams are big proponents of this because when you're storing that much data, their salaries look relatively reasonable by comparison. And the ChaosSearch vision was, instead of copying all this data out of an object store and storing it on expensive disks, and replicating it, et cetera, what if we queried it in place in a somewhat intelligent manner?So, you take the data and you store it, in this case, in S3 or equivalent, and then just query it there, rather than having to move it around all over the place, which of course, then incurs data transfer fees, you're storing it multiple times, and it's never in quite the format that you want it. That was the breakthrough revelation, you were Elasticsearch—now OpenSearch—API compatible, which was great. And that was, sort of, a state of the art a year or two ago. Is that generally correct?Thomas: No, you nailed our mission statement. No, you're exactly right. You know, the value of cloud object stores, S3, the elasticity, the durability, all these wonderful things, the problem was you couldn't get any value out of it, and you had to move it out to these siloed solutions, as you indicated. So, you know, our mission was exactly that, transformed customers' cloud storage into an analytical database, a multi-model analytical database, where our first use case was search and log analytics, replacing the ELK stack and also replacing the data pipeline, the schema management, et cetera. We automate the entire step, raw data to insights.Corey: It's funny we're having this conversation today. Earlier, today, I was trying to get rid of a relatively paltry 200 gigs or so of small files on an EFS volume—you know, Amazon's version of NFS; it's like an NFS volume except you're paying Amazon for the privilege—great. And it turns out that it's a whole bunch of operations across a network on a whole bunch of tiny files, so I had to spin up other instances that were not getting backed by spot terminations, and just firing up a whole bunch of threads. So, now the load average on that box is approaching 300, but it's plowing through, getting rid of that data finally.And I'm looking at this saying this is a quarter of a terabyte. Data warehouses are in the petabyte range. Oh, I begin to see aspects of the problem. Even searching that kind of data using traditional tooling starts to break down, which is sort of the revelation that Google had 20-some-odd years ago, and other folks have since solved for, but this is the first time I've had significant data that wasn't just easily searched with a grep. For those of you in the Unix world who understand what that means, condolences. We're having a support group meeting at the bar.Thomas: Yeah. And you know, I always thought, what if you could make cloud object storage like S3 high performance and really transform it into a database? And so that warehouse capability, that's great. We like that. However to manage it, to scale it, to configure it, to get the data into that, was the problem.That was the promise of a data lake, right? This simple in, and then this arbitrary schema on read generic out. The problem next came, it became swampy, it was really hard, and that promise was not delivered. And so what we're trying to do is get all the benefits of the data lake: simple in, so many services naturally stream to cloud storage. Shoot, I would say every one of our customers are putting their data in cloud storage because their data pipeline to their warehousing solution or Elasticsearch may go down and they're worried they'll lose the data.So, what we say is what if you just said activate that data lake and get that ELK use case, get that BI use case without that data movement, as you indicated, without that ETL-ing, without that data pipeline that you're worried is going to fall over. So, that vision has been Chaos. Now, we haven't talked in, you know, a few years, but this idea that we're growing beyond what we are just going after logs, we're going into new use cases, new opportunities, and I'm looking forward to discussing with you.Corey: It's a great answer that—though I have to call out that I am right there with you as far as inappropriately using things as databases. I know that someone is going to come back and say, “Oh, S3 is a database. You're dancing around it. Isn't that what Athena is?” Which is named, of course, after the Greek Goddess of spending money on AWS? And that is a fair question, but to my understanding, there's a schema story behind that does not apply to what you're doing.Thomas: Yeah, and that is so crucial is that we like the relational access. The time-cost complexity to get it into that, as you mentioned, scaled access, I mean, it could take weeks, months to test it, to configure it, to provision it, and imagine if you got it wrong; you got to redo it again. And so our unique service removes all that data pipeline schema management. And because of our innovation because of our service, you do all schema definition, on the fly, virtually, what we call views on your index data, that you can publish an elastic index pattern for that consumption, or a relational table for that consumption. And that's kind of leading the witness into things that we're coming out with this quarter into 2022.Corey: I have to deal with a little bit of, I guess, a shame here because yeah, I'm doing exactly what you just described. I'm using Athena to wind up querying our customers' Cost and Usage Reports, and we spend a couple hundred bucks a month on AWS Glue to wind up massaging those into the way that they expect it to be. And it's great. Ish. We hook it up to Tableau and can make those queries from it, and all right, it's great.It just, burrr goes the money printer, and we somehow get access and insight to a lot of valuable data. But even that is knowing exactly what the format is going to look like. Ish. I mean, Cost and Usage Reports from Amazon are sort of aspirational when it comes to schema sometimes, but here we are. And that's been all well and good.But now the idea of log files, even looking at the base case of sending logs from an application, great. Nginx, or Apache, or [unintelligible 00:07:24], or any of the various web servers out there all tend to use different logging formats just to describe the same exact things, start spreading that across custom in-house applications and getting signal from that is almost impossible. “Oh,” people say, “So, we'll use a structured data format.” Now, you're putting log and structuring requirements on application developers who don't care in the first place, and now you have a mess on your hands.Thomas: And it really is a mess. And that challenge is, it's so problematic. And schemas changing. You know, we have customers and one reasons why they go with us is their log data is changing; they didn't expect it. Well, in your data pipeline, and your Athena database, that breaks. That brings the system down.And so our system uniquely detects that and manages that for you and then you can pick and choose how you want to export in these views dynamically. So, you know, it's really not rocket science, but the problem is, a lot of the technology that we're using is designed for static, fixed thinking. And then to scale it is problematic and time-consuming. So, you know, Glue is a great idea, but it has a lot of sharp [pebbles 00:08:26]. Athena is a great idea but also has a lot of problems.And so that data pipeline, you know, it's not for digitally native, active, new use cases, new workloads coming up hourly, daily. You think about this long-term; so a lot of that data prep pipelining is something we address so uniquely, but really where the customer cares is the value of that data, right? And so if you're spending toils trying to get the data into a database, you're not answering the questions, whether it's for security, for performance, for your business needs. That's the problem. And you know, that agility, that time-to-value is where we're very uniquely coming in because we start where your data is raw and we automate the process all the way through.Corey: So, when I look at the things that I have stuffed into S3, they generally fall into a couple of categories. There are a bunch of logs for things I never asked for nor particularly wanted, but AWS is aggressive about that, first routing through CloudTrail so you can get charged 50-cent per gigabyte ingested. Awesome. And of course, large static assets, images I have done something to enter colloquially now known as shitposts, which is great. Other than logs, what could you possibly be storing in S3 that lends itself to, effectively, the type of analysis that you built around this?Thomas: Well, our first use case was the classic log use cases, app logs, web service logs. I mean, CloudTrail, it's famous; we had customers that gave up on elastic, and definitely gave up on relational where you can do a couple changes and your permutation of attributes for CloudTrail is going to put you to your knees. And people just say, “I give up.” Same thing with Kubernetes logs. And so it's the classic—whether it's CSV, where it's JSON, where it's log types, we auto-discover all that.We also allow you, if you want to override that and change the parsing capabilities through a UI wizard, we do discover what's in your buckets. That term data swamp, and not knowing what's in your bucket, we do a facility that will index that data, actually create a report for you for knowing what's in. Now, if you have text data, if you have log data, if you have BI data, we can bring it all together, but the real pain is at the scale. So classically, app logs, system logs, many devices sending IoT-type streams is where we really come in—Kubernetes—where they're dealing with terabytes of data per day, and managing an ELK cluster at that scale. Particularly on a Black Friday.Shoot, some of our customers like—Klarna is one of them; credit card payment—they're ramping up for Black Friday, and one of the reasons why they chose us is our ability to scale when maybe you're doing a terabyte or two a day and then it goes up to twenty, twenty-five. How do you test that scale? How do you manage that scale? And so for us, the data streams are, traditionally with our customers, the well-known log types, at least in the log use cases. And the challenge is scaling it, is getting access to it, and that's where we come in.Corey: I will say the last time you were on the show a couple of years ago, you were talking about the initial logging use case and you were speaking, in many cases aspirationally, about where things were going. What a difference a couple years is made. Instead of talking about what hypothetical customers might want, or what—might be able to do, you're just able to name-drop them off the top of your head, you have scaled to approximately ten times the number of employees you had back then. You've—Thomas: Yep. Yep.Corey: —raised, I think, a total of—what, 50 million?—since then.Thomas: Uh, 60 now. Yeah.Corey: Oh, 60? Fantastic.Thomas: Yeah, yeah.Corey: Congrats. And of course, how do you do it? By sponsoring Last Week in AWS, as everyone should. I'm taking clear credit for that every time someone announces around, that's the game. But no, there is validity to it because telling fun stories and sponsoring exciting things like this only carry you so far. At some point, customers have to say, yeah, this is solving a pain that I have; I'm willing to pay you money to solve it.And you've clearly gotten to a point where you are addressing the needs of those customers at a pretty fascinating clip. It's bittersweet from my perspective because it seems like the majority of your customers have not come from my nonsense anymore. They're finding you through word of mouth, they're finding through more traditional—read as boring—ad campaigns, et cetera, et cetera. But you've built a brand that extends beyond just me. I'm no longer viewed as the de facto ombudsperson for any issue someone might have with ChaosSearch on Twitters. It's kind of, “Aww, the company grew up. What happened there?”Thomas: No, [laugh] listen, this you were great. We reached out to you to tell our story, and I got to be honest. A lot of people came by, said, “I heard something on Corey Quinn's podcasts,” or et cetera. And it came a long way now. Now, we have, you know, companies like Equifax, multi-cloud—Amazon and Google.They love the data lake philosophy, the centralized, where use cases are now available within days, not weeks and months. Whether it's logs and BI. Correlating across all those data streams, it's huge. We mentioned Klarna, [APM Performance 00:13:19], and, you know, we have Armor for SIEM, and Blackboard for [Observers 00:13:24].So, it's funny—yeah, it's funny, when I first was talking to you, I was like, “What if? What if we had this customer, that customer?” And we were building the capabilities, but now that we have it, now that we have customers, yeah, I guess, maybe we've grown up a little bit. But hey, listen to you're always near and dear to our heart because we remember, you know, when you stop[ed by our booth at re:Invent several times. And we're coming to re:Invent this year, and I believe you are as well.Corey: Oh, yeah. But people listening to this, it's if they're listening the day it's released, this will be during re:Invent. So, by all means, come by the ChaosSearch booth, and see what they have to say. For once they have people who aren't me who are going to be telling stories about these things. And it's fun. Like, I joke, it's nothing but positive here.It's interesting from where I sit seeing the parallels here. For example, we have both had—how we say—adult supervision come in. You have a CEO, Ed, who came over from IBM Storage. I have Mike Julian, whose first love language is of course spreadsheets. And it's great, on some level, realizing that, wow, this company has eclipsed my ability to manage these things myself and put my hands-on everything. And eventually, you have to start letting go. It's a weird growth stage, and it's a heck of a transition. But—Thomas: No, I love it. You know, I mean, I think when we were talking, we were maybe 15 employees. Now, we're pushing 100. We brought on Ed Walsh, who's an amazing CEO. It's funny, I told him about this idea, I invented this technology roughly eight years ago, and he's like, “I love it. Let's do it.” And I wasn't ready to do it.So, you know, five, six years ago, I started the company always knowing that, you know, I'd give him a call once we got the plane up in the air. And it's been great to have him here because the next level up, right, of execution and growth and business development and sales and marketing. So, you're exactly right. I mean, we were a young pup several years ago, when we were talking to you and, you know, we're a little bit older, a little bit wiser. But no, it's great to have Ed here. And just the leadership in general; we've grown immensely.Corey: Now, we are recording this in advance of re:Invent, so there's always the question of, “Wow, are we going to look really silly based upon what is being announced when this airs?” Because it's very hard to predict some things that AWS does. And let's be clear, I always stay away from predictions, just because first, I have a bit of a knack for being right. But also, when I'm right, people will think, “Oh, Corey must have known about that and is leaking,” whereas if I get it wrong, I just look like a fool. There's no win for me if I start doing the predictive dance on stuff like that.But I have to level with you, I have been somewhat surprised that, at least as of this recording, AWS has not moved more in your direction because storing data in S3 is kind of their whole thing, and querying that data through something that isn't Athena has been a bit of a reach for them that they're slowly starting to wrap their heads around. But their UltraWarm nonsense—which is just, okay, great naming there—what is the point of continually having a model where oh, yeah, we're going to just age it out, the stuff that isn't actively being used into S3, rather than coming up with a way to query it there. Because you've done exactly that, and please don't take this as anything other than a statement of fact, they have better access to what S3 is doing than you do. You're forced to deal with this thing entirely from a public API standpoint, which is fine. They can theoretically change the behavior of aspects of S3 to unlock these use cases if they chose to do so. And they haven't. Why is it that you're the only folks that are doing this?Thomas: No, it's a great question, and I'll give them props for continuing to push the data lake [unintelligible 00:17:09] to the cloud providers' S3 because it was really where I saw the world. Lakes, I believe in. I love them. They love them. However, they promote the move the data out to get access, and it seems so counterintuitive on why wouldn't you leave it in and put these services, make them more intelligent? So, it's funny, I've trademark ‘Smart Object Storage,' I actually trademarked—I think you [laugh] were a part of this—‘UltraHot,' right? Because why would you want UltraWarm when you can have UltraHot?And the reason, I feel, is that if you're using Parquet for Athena [unintelligible 00:17:40] store, or Lucene for Elasticsearch, these two index technologies were not designed for cloud storage, for real-time streaming off of cloud storage. So, the trick is, you have to build UltraWarm, get it off of what they consider cold S3 into a more warmer memory or SSD type access. What we did, what the invention I created was, that first read is hot. That first read is fast.Snowflake is a good example. They give you a ten terabyte demo example, and if you have a big instance and you do that first query, maybe several orders or groups, it could take an hour to warm up. The second query is fast. Well, what if the first query is in seconds as well? And that's where we really spent the last five, six years building out the tech and the vision behind this because I like to say you go to a doctor and say, “Hey, Doc, every single time I move my arm, it hurts.” And the doctor says, “Well, don't move your arm.”It's things like that, to your point, it's like, why wouldn't they? I would argue, one, you have to believe it's possible—we're proving that it is—and two, you have to have the technology to do it. Not just the index, but the architecture. So, I believe they will go this direction. You know, little birdies always say that all these companies understand this need.Shoot, Snowflake is trying to be lake-y; Databricks is trying to really bring this warehouse lake concept. But you still do all the pipelining; you still have to do all the data management the way that you don't want to do. It's not a lake. And so my argument is that it's innovation on why. Now, they have money; they have time, but, you know, we have a big head start.Corey: I remembered last year at re:Invent they released a, shall we say, significant change to S3 that it enabled read after write consistency, which is awesome, for again, those of us in the business of misusing things as databases. But for some folks, the majority of folks I would say, it was a, “I don't know what that means and therefore I don't care.” And that's fine. I have no issue with that. There are other folks, some of my customers for example, who are suddenly, “Wait a minute. This means I can sunset this entire janky sidecar metadata system that is designed to make sure that we are consistent in our use of S3 because it now does it automatically under the hood?” And that's awesome. Does that change mean anything for ChaosSearch?Thomas: It doesn't because of our architecture. We're append-only, write-once scenario, so a lot of update-in-place viewpoints. My viewpoint is that if you're seeing S3 as the database and you need that type of consistency, it make sense of why you'd want it, but because of our distributive fabric, our stateless architecture, our append-only nature, it really doesn't affect us.Now, I talked to the S3 team, I said, “Please if you're coming up with this feature, it better not be slower.” I want S3 to be fast, right? And they said, “No, no. It won't affect performance.” I'm like, “Okay. Let's keep that up.”And so to us, any type of S3 capability, we'll take advantage of it if benefits us, whether it's consistency as you indicated, performance, functionality. But we really keep the constructs of S3 access to really limited features: list, put, get. [roll-on 00:20:49] policies to give us read-only access to your data, and a location to write our indices into your account, and then are distributed fabric, our service, acts as those indices and query them or searches them to resolve whatever analytics you need. So, we made it pretty simple, and that is allowed us to make it high performance.Corey: I'll take it a step further because you want to talk about changes since the last time we spoke, it used to be that this was on top of S3, you can store your data anywhere you want, as long as it's S3 in the customer's account. Now, you're also supporting one-click integration with Google Cloud's object storage, which, great. That does mean though, that you're not dependent upon provider-specific implementations of things like a consistency model for how you've built things. It really does use the lowest common denominator—to my understanding—of object stores. Is that something that you're seeing broad adoption of, or is this one of those areas where, well, you have one customer on a different provider, but almost everything lives on the primary? I'm curious what you're seeing for adoption models across multiple providers?Thomas: It's a great question. We built an architecture purposely to be cloud-agnostic. I mean, we use compute in a containerized way, we use object storage in a very simple construct—put, get, list—and we went over to Google because that made sense, right? We have customers on both sides. I would say Amazon is the gorilla, but Google's trying to get there and growing.We had a big customer, Equifax, that's on both Amazon and Google, but we offer the same service. To be frank, it looks like the exact same product. And it should, right? Whether it's Amazon Cloud, or Google Cloud, multi-select and I want to choose either one and get the other one. I would say that different business types are using each one, but our bulk of the business isn't Amazon, but we just this summer released our SaaS offerings, so it's growing.And you know, it's funny, you never know where it comes from. So, we have one customer—actually DigitalRiver—as one of our customers on Amazon for logs, but we're growing in working together to do a BI on GCP or on Google. And so it's kind of funny; they have two departments on two different clouds with two different use cases. And so do they want unification? I'm not sure, but they definitely have their BI on Google and their operations in Amazon. It's interesting.Corey: You know its important to me that people learn how to use the cloud effectively. Thats why I'm so glad that Cloud Academy is sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense. They're a great way to build in demand tech skills the way that, well personally, I learn best which I learn by doing not by reading. They have live cloud labs that you can run in real environments that aren't going to blow up your own bill—I can't stress how important that is. Visit cloudacademy.com/corey. Thats C-O-R-E-Y, don't drop the “E.” Use Corey as a promo-code as well. You're going to get a bunch of discounts on it with a lifetime deal—the price will not go up. It is limited time, they assured me this is not one of those things that is going to wind up being a rug pull scenario, oh no no. Talk to them, tell me what you think. Visit: cloudacademy.com/corey,  C-O-R-E-Y and tell them that I sent you!Corey: I know that I'm going to get letters for this. So, let me just call it out right now. Because I've been a big advocate of pick a provider—I care not which one—and go all-in on it. And I'm sitting here congratulating you on extending to another provider, and people are going to say, “Ah, you're being inconsistent.”No. I'm suggesting that you as a provider have to meet your customers where they are because if someone is sitting in GCP and your entire approach is, “Step one, migrate those four petabytes of data right on over here to AWS,” they're going to call you that jackhole that you would be by making that suggestion and go immediately for option B, which is literally anything that is not ChaosSearch, just based upon that core misunderstanding of their business constraints. That is the way to think about these things. For a vendor position that you are in as an ISV—Independent Software Vendor for those not up on the lingo of this ridiculous industry—you have to meet customers where they are. And it's the right move.Thomas: Well, you just said it. Imagine moving terabytes and petabytes of data.Corey: It sounds terrific if I'm a salesperson for one of these companies working on commission, but for the rest of us, it sounds awful.Thomas: We really are a data fabric across clouds, within clouds. We're going to go where the data is and we're going to provide access to where that data lives. Our whole philosophy is the no-movement movement, right? Don't move your data. Leave it where it is and provide access at scale.And so you may have services in Google that naturally stream to GCS; let's do it there. Imagine moving that amount of data over to Amazon to analyze it, and vice versa. 2020, we're going to be in Azure. They're a totally different type of business, users, and personas, but you're getting asked, “Can you support Azure?” And the answer is, “Yes,” and, “We will in 2022.”So, to us, if you have cloud storage, if you have compute, and it's a big enough business opportunity in the market, we're there. We're going there. When we first started, we were talking to MinIO—remember that open-source, object storage platform?—We've run on our laptops, we run—this [unintelligible 00:25:04] Dr. Seuss thing—“We run over here; we run over there; we run everywhere.”But the honest truth is, you're going to go with the big cloud providers where the business opportunity is, and offer the same solution because the same solution is valued everywhere: simple in; value out; cost-effective; long retention; flexibility. That sounds so basic, but you mentioned this all the time with our Rube Goldberg, Amazon diagrams we see time and time again. It's like, if you looked at that and you were from an alien planet, you'd be like, “These people don't know what they're doing. Why is it so complicated?” And the simple answer is, I don't know why people think it's complicated.To your point about Amazon, why won't they do it? I don't know, but if they did, things would be different. And being honest, I think people are catching on. We do talk to Amazon and others. They see the need, but they also have to build it; they have to invent technology to address it. And using Parquet and Lucene are not the answer.Corey: Yeah, it's too much of a demand on the producers of that data rather than the consumer. And yeah, I would love to be able to go upstream to application developers and demand they do things in certain ways. It turns out as a consultant, you have zero authority to do that. As a DevOps team member, you have limited ability to influence it, but it turns out that being the ‘department of no' quickly turns into being the ‘department of unemployment insurance' because no one wants to work with you. And collaboration—contrary to what people wish to believe—is a key part of working in a modern workplace.Thomas: Absolutely. And it's funny, the demands of IT are getting harder; the actual getting the employees to build out the solutions are getting harder. And so a lot of that time is in the pipeline, is the prep, is the schema, the sharding, and et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. My viewpoint is that should be automated away. More and more databases are being autotune, right?This whole knobs and this and that, to me, Glue is a means to an end. I mean, let's get rid of it. Why can't Athena know what to do? Why can't object storage be Athena and vice versa? I mean, to me, it seems like all this moving through all these services, the classic Amazon viewpoint, even their diagrams of having this centralized repository of S3, move it all out to your services, get results, put it back in, then take it back out again, move it around, it just doesn't make much sense. And so to us, I love S3, love the service. I think it's brilliant—Amazon's first service, right?—but from there get a little smarter. That's where ChaosSearch comes in.Corey: I would argue that S3 is in fact, a modern miracle. And one of those companies saying, “Oh, we have an object store; it's S3 compatible.” It's like, “Yeah. We have S3 at home.” Look at S3 at home, and it's just basically a series of failing Raspberry Pis.But you have this whole ecosystem of things that have built up and sprung up around S3. It is wildly understated just how scalable and massive it is. There was an academic paper recently that won an award on how they use automated reasoning to validate what is going on in the S3 environment, and they talked about hundreds of petabytes in some cases. And folks are saying, ah, S3 is hundreds of petabytes. Yeah, I have clients storing hundreds of petabytes.There are larger companies out there. Steve Schmidt, Amazon's CISO, was recently at a Splunk keynote where he mentioned that in security info alone, AWS itself generates 500 petabytes a day that then gets reduced down to a bunch of stuff, and some of it gets loaded into Splunk. I think. I couldn't really hear the second half of that sentence because of the sound of all of the Splunk salespeople in that room becoming excited so quickly you could hear it.Thomas: [laugh]. I love it. If I could be so bold, those S3 team, they're gods. They are amazing. They created such an amazing service, and when I started playing with S3 now, I guess, 2006 or 7, I mean, we were using for a repository, URL access to get images, I was doing a virtualization [unintelligible 00:29:05] at the time—Corey: Oh, the first time I played with it, “This seems ridiculous and kind of dumb. Why would anyone use this?” Yeah, yeah. It turns out I'm really bad at predicting the future. Another reason I don't do the prediction thing.Thomas: Yeah. And when I started this company officially, five, six years ago, I was thinking about S3 and I was thinking about HDFS not being a good answer. And I said, “I think S3 will actually achieve the goals and performance we need.” It's a distributed file system. You can run parallel puts and parallel gets. And the performance that I was seeing when the data was a certain way, certain size, “Wait, you can get high performance.”And you know, when I first turned on the engine, now four or five years ago, I was like, “Wow. This is going to work. We're off to the races.” And now obviously, we're more than just an idea when we first talked to you. We're a service.We deliver benefits to our customers both in logs. And shoot, this quarter alone we're coming out with new features not just in the logs, which I'll talk about second, but in a direct SQL access. But you know, one thing that you hear time and time again, we talked about it—JSON, CloudTrail, and Kubernetes; this is a real nightmare, and so one thing that we've come out with this quarter is the ability to virtually flatten. Now, you heard time and time again, where, “Okay. I'm going to pick and choose my data because my database can't handle whether it's elastic, or say, relational.” And all of a sudden, “Shoot, I don't have that. I got to reindex that.”And so what we've done is we've created a index technology that we're always planning to come out with that indexes the JSON raw blob, but in the data refinery have, post-index you can select how to unflatten it. Why is that important? Because all that tooling, whether it's elastic or SQL, is now available. You don't have to change anything. Why is Snowflake and BigQuery has these proprietary JSON APIs that none of these tools know how to use to get access to the data?Or you pick and choose. And so when you have a CloudTrail, and you need to know what's going on, if you picked wrong, you're in trouble. So, this new feature we're calling ‘Virtual Flattening'—or I don't know what we're—we have to work with the marketing team on it. And we're also bringing—this is where I get kind of excited where the elastic world, the ELK world, we're bringing correlations into Elasticsearch. And like, how do you do that? They don't have the APIs?Well, our data refinery, again, has the ability to correlate index patterns into one view. A view is an index pattern, so all those same constructs that you had in Kibana, or Grafana, or Elastic API still work. And so, no more denormalizing, no more trying to hodgepodge query over here, query over there. You're actually going to have correlations in Elastic, natively. And we're excited about that.And one more push on the future, Q4 into 2022; we have been given early access to S3 SQL access. And, you know, as I mentioned, correlations in Elastic, but we're going full in on publishing our [TPCH 00:31:56] report, we're excited about publishing those numbers, as well as not just giving early access, but going GA in the first of the year, next year.Corey: I look forward to it. This is also, I guess, it's impossible to have a conversation with you, even now, where you're not still forward-looking about what comes next. Which is natural; that is how we get excited about the things that we're building. But so much less of what you're doing now in our conversations have focused around what's coming, as opposed to the neat stuff you're already doing. I had to double-check when we were talking just now about oh, yeah, is that Google cloud object store support still something that is roadmapped, or is that out in the real world?No, it's very much here in the real world, available today. You can use it. Go click the button, have fun. It's neat to see at least some evidence that not all roadmaps are wishes and pixie dust. The things that you were talking to me about years ago are established parts of ChaosSearch now. It hasn't been just, sort of, frozen in amber for years, or months, or these giant periods of time. Because, again, there's—yeah, don't sell me vaporware; I know how this works. The things you have promised have come to fruition. It's nice to see that.Thomas: No, I appreciate it. We talked a little while ago, now a few years ago, and it was a bit of aspirational, right? We had a lot to do, we had more to do. But now when we have big customers using our product, solving their problems, whether it's security, performance, operation, again—at scale, right? The real pain is, sure you have a small ELK cluster or small Athena use case, but when you're dealing with terabytes to petabytes, trillions of rows, right—billions—when you were dealing trillions, billions are now small. Millions don't even exist, right?And you're graduating from computer science in college and you say the word, “Trillion,” they're like, “Nah. No one does that.” And like you were saying, people do petabytes and exabytes. That's the world we're living in, and that's something that we really went hard at because these are challenging data problems and this is where we feel we uniquely sit. And again, we don't have to break the bank while doing it.Corey: Oh, yeah. Or at least as of this recording, there's a meme going around, again, from an old internal Google Video, of, “I just want to serve five terabytes of traffic,” and it's an internal Google discussion of, “I don't know how to count that low.” And, yeah.Thomas: [laugh].Corey: But there's also value in being able to address things at much larger volume. I would love to see better responsiveness options around things like Deep Archive because the idea of being able to query that—even if you can wait a day or two—becomes really interesting just from the perspective of, at that point, current cost for one petabyte of data in Glacier Deep Archive is 1000 bucks a month. That is ‘why would I ever delete data again?' Pricing.Thomas: Yeah. You said it. And what's interesting about our technology is unlike, let's say Lucene, when you index it, it could be 3, 4, or 5x the raw size, our representation is smaller than gzip. So, it is a full representation, so why don't you store it efficiently long-term in S3? Oh, by the way, with the Glacier; we support Glacier too.And so, I mean, it's amazing the cost of data with cloud storage is dramatic, and if you can make it hot and activated, that's the real promise of a data lake. And, you know, it's funny, we use our own service to run our SaaS—we log our own data, we monitor, we alert, have dashboards—and I can't tell you how cheap our service is to ourselves, right? Because it's so cost-effective for long-tail, not just, oh, a few weeks; we store a whole year's worth of our operational data so we can go back in time to debug something or figure something out. And a lot of that's savings. Actually, huge savings is cloud storage with a distributed elastic compute fabric that is serverless. These are things that seem so obvious now, but if you have SSDs, and you're moving things around, you know, a team of IT professionals trying to manage it, it's not cheap.Corey: Oh, yeah, that's the story. It's like, “Step one, start paying for using things in cloud.” “Okay, great. When do I stop paying?” “That's the neat part. You don't.” And it continues to grow and build.And again, this is the thing I learned running a business that focuses on this, the people working on this, in almost every case, are more expensive than the infrastructure they're working on. And that's fine. I'd rather pay people than technologies. And it does help reaffirm, on some level, that—people don't like this reminder—but you have to generate more value than you cost. So, when you're sitting there spending all your time trying to avoid saving money on, “Oh, I've listened to ChaosSearch talk about what they do a few times. I can probably build my own and roll it at home.”It's, I've seen the kind of work that you folks have put into this—again, you have something like 100 employees now; it is not just you building this—my belief has always been that if you can buy something that gets you 90, 95% of where you are, great. Buy it, and then yell at whoever selling it to you for the rest of it, and that'll get you a lot further than, “We're going to do this ourselves from first principles.” Which is great for a weekend project for just something that you have a passion for, but in production mistakes show. I've always been a big proponent of buying wherever you can. It's cheaper, which sounds weird, but it's true.Thomas: And we do the same thing. We have single-sign-on support; we didn't build that ourselves, we use a service now. Auth0 is one of our providers now that owns that [crosstalk 00:37:12]—Corey: Oh, you didn't roll your own authentication layer? Why ever not? Next, you're going to tell me that you didn't roll your own payment gateway when you wound up charging people on your website to sign up?Thomas: You got it. And so, I mean, do what you do well. Focus on what you do well. If you're repeating what everyone seems to do over and over again, time, costs, complexity, and… service, it makes sense. You know, I'm not trying to build storage; I'm using storage. I'm using a great, wonderful service, cloud object storage.Use whats works, whats works well, and do what you do well. And what we do well is make cloud object storage analytical and fast. So, call us up and we'll take away that 2 a.m. call you have when your cluster falls down, or you have a new workload that you are going to go to the—I don't know, the beach house, and now the weekend shot, right? Spin it up, stream it in. We'll take over.Corey: Yeah. So, if you're listening to this and you happen to be at re:Invent, which is sort of an open question: why would you be at re:Invent while listening to a podcast? And then I remember how long the shuttle lines are likely to be, and yeah. So, if you're at re:Invent, make it on down to the show floor, visit the ChaosSearch booth, tell them I sent you, watch for the wince, that's always worth doing. Thomas, if people have better decision-making capability than the two of us do, where can they find you if they're not in Las Vegas this week?Thomas: So, you find us online chaossearch.io. We have so much material, videos, use cases, testimonials. You can reach out to us, get a free trial. We have a self-service experience where connect to your S3 bucket and you're up and running within five minutes.So, definitely chaossearch.io. Reach out if you want a hand-held, white-glove experience POV. If you have those type of needs, we can do that with you as well. But we booth on re:Invent and I don't know the booth number, but I'm sure either we've assigned it or we'll find it out.Corey: Don't worry. This year, it is a low enough attendance rate that I'm projecting that you will not be as hard to find in recent years. For example, there's only one expo hall this year. What a concept. If only it hadn't taken a deadly pandemic to get us here.Thomas: Yeah. But you know, we'll have the ability to demonstrate Chaos at the booth, and really, within a few minutes, you'll say, “Wow. How come I never heard of doing it this way?” Because it just makes so much sense on why you do it this way versus the merry-go-round of data movement, and transformation, and schema management, let alone all the sharding that I know is a nightmare, more often than not.Corey: And we'll, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:39:40]. Thomas, thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. As always, it's appreciated.Thomas: Corey, thank you. Let's do this again.Corey: We absolutely will. Thomas Hazel, CTO and Founder of ChaosSearch. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast episode, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this episode, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment because I have dared to besmirch the honor of your homebrewed object store, running on top of some trusty and reliable Raspberries Pie.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The Fifth Hour with Ben Maller

Alex Teichert stops by the Fifth Hour podcast. Alex is an integral part of the Fox Sports Radio Family, making Colin Cowherd, Rob Parker, Chris Broussard, Jason Smith and Mike Harmon sound good behind the scenes. The fellas cover an eclectic group of topics, everything from fast food, intermittent fasting, feeding ostriches, lama's and anime. Follow Alex on Twitter @Alex_Teichert / Download his podcasts: Weeb Nation Podcast & Shallow Oceans Podcast on all major platforms! Follow Ben on Twitter @BenMaller and listen to the original "Ben Maller Show,' Monday-Friday on Fox Sports Radio, 2a-6a ET, 11p-3a PT! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

TechFirst with John Koetsier
Can Unity make metaverse glue connecting millions of games?

TechFirst with John Koetsier

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 19:50


Unity might be better positioned than any other company to usher in the Oasis ... AKA the metaverse. 71% of the top thousand mobile games are made with the technology. Half of all mobile PC and console games are also made with Unity. Unity is inherently open, running on over 20 different platforms. The world's already there: 2.5 billion people are playing games built with Unity. So I'm wondering ... Unity has the planets, the rooms, the solar systems ... when is it going to build the galaxy, the corridors, the connections? In this episode of TechFirst I chat with Julie Shumaker, who leads growth at Unity. Links: Unity: https://unity.com Support TechFirst with $SMRT coins: https://rally.io/creator/SMRT/ Buy $SMRT to join a community focused on tech for good: the emerging world of smart matter. Access my private Slack, get your name in my book, suggest speakers for TechFirst ... and support my work. TechFirst transcripts: https://johnkoetsier.com/category/tech-first/ Forbes columns: https://www.forbes.com/sites/johnkoetsier/ Subscribe to the podcast: https://anchor.fm/techfirst Full videos: https://www.youtube.com/c/johnkoetsier?sub_confirmation=1 Keep in touch: https://twitter.com/johnkoetsier

Here We Are: What Makes Us Human
YFON: James Direen [Glue & Adhesives]

Here We Are: What Makes Us Human

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 28:17


This isn't just your normal sticky situation! Join us as we dive headfirst into all that is adherent and adhesive! You won't regret it!Check out Here We Are on Instagram, Facebook, or Patreon!

The Midday Show
Hour 4 - Kevin Huerter is the "glue" for Atlanta Hawks

The Midday Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 38:33


Atlanta Hawks head coach Nate McMillan joined the guys as his team is on a 5-game win streak. McMillan said Kevin Huerter is the "glue" that keeps the team together. Plus, Brandon Adams of DawgNation.com joined Andy and Randy as the No. 1 Bulldogs prepare for their regular season finale on Saturday against Georgia Tech. And the guys answer all you questions in 'Ask Me Anything.' See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Leaders in the Trenches
The Values of the Company are the Glue that Binds Us at Jeff Oskin at Forcivity

Leaders in the Trenches

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 20:05


Every leadership book agrees on one fundamental idea. The values of the company must be front and center every day. You may hear them say “operationalize your values” or “living your values,” either way, they are essential. Today's guest is Jeff Oskin, CEO at Forcivity. Inc Magazine ranked his company #359 on the 2021 Inc 5000 list. Forcivity is a full-service Salesforce Implementation and ISV partner, who can help you with anything from simple implementation to complex architecture. Jeff and I have a deep look at the values of the company and how they work to unite the team. When you have a values-driven organization, you have a more aligned group. Jeff believes wholeheartedly in the power of living the values of the company. Get the show notes for The Values of the Company are the Glue that Binds Us at Jeff Oskin at Forcivity Click to Tweet: Listening to a fantastic episode on Growth Think Tank featuring #JeffOskin with your host @GeneHammett https://bit.ly/gttJeffOskin #ValuesoftheCompany #GeneHammettPodcast #GHepisode816 #GTTepisodes #Podcasts #Inc2021 #ISVpartner Give Growth Think Tank a review on iTunes!

Woodshop Life Podcast
Episode 85 - Hinge Tips, Lumber Storage, Pocket Holes Need Glue? & MUCH More!

Woodshop Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 52:08


Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/woodshoplife   Sean 1)Wanted to start out by saying thank you for making my 30 min drive to and from work some of the most enjoyable and informative time of my day. My question is regarding lumber storage; I have a small one car garage shop that has a slight twist from the norm. Though it is a “garage” it is built over a basement and has a thick wooden floor. The basement space is unused and is connected to the basement of the house via a door. Do you guys think the atmospheric conditions in the basement would differ enough from the above garage space as to cause issues if I used it for my lumber storage area. My shop is well organized but pretty tight. I'll have storage in the shop for smaller wood and I have a dedicated shelve system under my miter saw station to store all the parts for a single project minus larger sheet goods. I want to use the basement to keep 200-300 board feet to allow it to acclimatize to my shop. Side note, the basement space under the garage has a small garage door for lawnmower storage so air transfer will be similar to the garage above. I know Guy I'll comment so here is the answer, no I don't park my car over the basement on the wooden floor. Thanks guys and keep up the great work. Brian 2) Hey guys, love the podcast. You guy's, all, have jointer/planers with carbide cutter heads. What kind of finish are you getting with these? Is scraping or sanding still needed for a final finish, or are your parts ready for finish? Are these cutter heads, all they are cracked up to be? Ken   Guy 1) Thanks the great podcast!  I've been catching up on them recently; not quite all the way though.  Haven't heard Guy use 'specificity' for a while, so if you could see to that I'd appreciate it! ;) This question is about pocket hole joints and the need for glue - or not.  Given that pocket hole joints most commonly involve butt joints, i.e. short grain to long grain, is it really worth adding glue to the mix?  Part of me wonders whether with plywood having alternating grain direction to the layers might offset that a little?  I realize that it probably doesn't hurt anything in the long run, but it seems like it just makes everything more slippery and difficult to align. What are your thoughts on this? Thanks and keep up the good work, Monte 2) I'm interested in what you'd recommend for a beginner-friendly spray finish setup for occasional use on projects ranging from small boxes on up to possibly cabinets - if it's even feasible for one setup to cover that kind of range.  If not, what would you recommend for one vs. the other. Thanks and keep up the great work, Monte   Huy 1) So it seems every time I install hinges there is some issue with them, whether it's a lid not closing flush, a door that swings open, or spacing around a door not being consistent. I will qualify that I rarely if ever use "quality" hinges. I'm more likely to use home center or the cheaper Rockler/Woodcraft options. Can you give any advice on having the best success with hinges? Both by hand and using power tools, please. I consider myself a decent woodworker but this continues to be an issue for me. Peter 2) I have been binge listening to your podcasts for the last several weeks and I am loving it. I love the format (especially compared to the other podcasts out there). I have learned a lot from listening to you as a new wood worker. I finally found and went to a hardwood dealer near me and bought some beautiful 5/4 and 8/4cherry. I put it on my lumber rack to acclimate to my shop. They are on a Bora horizontal rack. Do you recommend sticking them to allow air flow all around or should I just  stack one on top of the other? I look forward to your next show and hopefully I make it. Thanks, Jim  

gwot.rocks - God, the World, and Other Things!
The Glue That Holds the Goo Together

gwot.rocks - God, the World, and Other Things!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 21:55


Revelation Chapter 17 is the most difficult chapter to understand in the book of Revelation, as far as I am concerned. This is a heavy subject, but in the end we finish on a high note. Stay with the message until the very end.#revelation #thegreatprostitute #theendtimes #thenendoftheworld Cut & Paste Personal Invitation to invite your friends to check out “gwot.rocks” podcast: I invite you to check out the podcast, “gwot.rocks: God, the World, and Other Things!” It is available on podcast players everywhere! Here is the link to the show's home base for all its episodes: http://podcast.gwot.rocks/ (Ctrl+click to follow the link) LIFE HELPSDONATE You can help support this podcast by clicking our secure PayPal account. For donation by check, make payable to Transform This City, P.O. Box 1013, Spring Hill, Tennessee, 37174. “gwot.rocks” is a ministry of Transform This City. gwot.rocks home page Transform This City Transform This City Facebook gwot.rocks@transformthiscity.org Thank you for listening! Please tell your friends about us! Listen, share, rate, subscribe! Empowering Encouragement Now segments are based in part on C.H. Spurgeon's Morning & Evening Devotions (public domain.)Unless otherwise noted, all Scripture quotations are taken from the Christian StandardBible®, Copyright © 2016 by Holman Bible Publishers. Used by permission. ChristianStandard Bible® and CSB® is a federally registered trademark of Holman Bible Publishers. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

the Joshua Schall Audio Experience
Black Rifle Coffee Company SPAC Merger (IPO) Breakdown

the Joshua Schall Audio Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 20:32


As the premium coffee market built by Starbucks matures, consumers are craving “a fresh set of brands.” To stand out, these coffee brands aren't attempting to take on the coffee giant directly, instead they're carving out unique niches to speak to certain demographics or geographies. With extremely strong founder market fit, Black Rifle Coffee Company looks to be in the early years of a long-term growth story. Black Rifle Coffee Company is veteran led and veteran controlled, with approximately 50% of its employees also being veterans or veteran's spouses. The mission of Black Rifle Coffee Company is to have a massive, positive impact in the veteran community and premium coffee and content will be that conduit to making it happen. This is the founding team's passion, and every decision is aligned to the mission. You can see how successful the coffee brand has been by looking at the top three reasons customers purchase Black Rifle Coffee Company products; (1) the company support for the military and veterans (2) has great tasting coffee (3) brand alignment with their values. Black Rifle Coffee Company has an exciting and growing brand, an early RTD coffee business with lots of wholesale growth runway, and an exciting experiential retail Outpost model. Glue all of that together with a fully aligned purpose-driven business strategy and a leadership team that has a relentless dedication to execution and it's hard to imagine anything less than positive results long-term to happen at BRCC. FOLLOW ME ON MY SOCIAL MEDIA ACCOUNTS LINKEDIN - https://www.linkedin.com/in/joshuaschallmba TWITTER - https://www.twitter.com/joshua_schall INSTAGRAM - https://www.instagram.com/joshua_schall FACEBOOK - https://www.facebook.com/jschallconsulting MEDIUM - https://www.medium.com/@joshuaschall

Jeep Talk Show, A Jeep podcast!
Episode 534 - Vets, Jeeps, Guns, and ...Glue?

Jeep Talk Show, A Jeep podcast!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 71:22


Josh talks about Stellantis Will Correct It's VOC Emissions. 50 CAL gun stolen from a Wilys Jeep. Wendy goes over her favorite things about Jeeping. Tony talks about getting his oil changed, it's more exciting than it sounds.

Dawg & Duck Show
Looks like I picked the wrong week to quit sniffing glue! (Plus- Surprise guest Mike Martin!)

Dawg & Duck Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 70:00


Husky Nation picked the wrong week to quit sniffing glue! Warren and Mark are joined by surprise guest Mike Martin (@howlinhusky) to discuss the unraveling of the Washington Husky Football program, the Husky Coaching Carousel and the most ominous quote by a doomed Husky Football Coach. In addition, we discuss the Oregon Ducks chances of running the table in March Madness like fashion, what's going on in the Pac 12 and why Former Husky Jim Mora Jr is now the Head Coach of the Huskies… but not the ones who wear purple and gold.

Global Trance Grooves - John 00 Fleming
John 00 Fleming presents JOOF Radio 024

Global Trance Grooves - John 00 Fleming

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 120:07


John 00 Fleming presents JOOF Radio 024 with guest Pablo Gargano (Italy) This month we're gathering for one of our deep heads down hypnotic therapy sessions with some outstanding music I've found for you. Sometimes you need to look closer to home for great music when I'm hunting, there's a few JOOF tracks here to give you an incite whats coming from the JOOF camp for the rest of 2021 and some gems too. The Italian legend Pablo Gargano takes on guest mix duties. *********************************************************** For JOOF merchandise and T-Shirts head to our shop here: https://john00fleming.tmstor.es *********************************************************** Tracklist: ---- John 00 Fleming ---- Killahurtz - Return to West on 27th (Luke Brancaccio & Gai Barone Remix) [Gureilla movement] John Dopping Feat Ebbe - The River Leads (Facade Remix) [JOOF Recordings] Enlusion — Crystaldee (Rick Pier O'Neil Remix) [Forescape digital] Amir Farhoodi - Shemroon [JOOF AURA] Jordan Gill & Whoriskey - Heaven [JOOF AURA] Basil O'Glue & Nomas - The First Deity Manu Riga & The Digital Blonde - ARTEEKA [JOOF Recordings] Dain - Red Lights (Basil O'Glue Remix) AUTOFLOWER, BRK (BR) - Interface Ninesh Babu-Tribe [JOOF Recordings] ---- Guest mix ---- Pablo Gargano (Italy)

ParentingAces - The Junior Tennis and College Tennis Podcast

Welcome to Season 10, Episode 46, of the ParentingAces Podcast, a proud member of the Tennis Channel Podcast Network. In this week's episode, Lisa talks with former ATP professional player and current ATP/Junior coach, Daniel Yoo, about how he uses his tour experience to help today's players reach their potential. Daniel Yoo is a South Korean tennis player who made his way to the US to train and eventually coach. Yoo reached a career high ATP singles ranking of 326 and a career high ATP doubles ranking of 425 before retiring from the professional tour. He is now living and working in South Florida, currently training and traveling with South Korean up-and-coming pro Soonwoo Kwon as well as assisting with junior development with coaches Todd Widom and Pierre Arnold at Todd Widom Tennis. Daniel is a firm believer in building trust with his players and feels that is an absolute precursor to success on and off the tennis court. He shares how he builds that trust with his players and their families and what may be missing from other player-coach relationships. He also discusses how his mandatory time serving in the Korean military shaped his approach to working with young players to develop the necessary skills for success. To reach Daniel, you can find him on Facebook here and on Instagram here. You can also email him directly at yootennis@gmail.com. As always, a big thank you to Morgan Stone, aka STØNE, for our intro and outro music this season. You can find more of his music at SoundCloud.com/stonemuzic. If you're interested in House Music, please be sure to check out his social media channels on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. If you're so inclined, please share this – and all our episodes! – with your tennis community. You can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes or via your favorite podcast app. If you haven't already, be sure to become a Member of ParentingAces by clicking here. And check out our logo'd merch in our online shop (Premium Members received FREE SHIPPING every day!). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Pest Geek Podcast Worlds #1 Pest Control Training Podcast
This Is Why We Use Glue Traps And Monitors To Trap American Cockroaches As Part Of Our Approach To Holistic Pest Control Management.

The Pest Geek Podcast Worlds #1 Pest Control Training Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 3:27


On today's edition, we discuss why we use glue boards and monitors as part of our holistic approach to integrated pest control management to gain control of a roach infestation. #pestcontroltraining #pestcontrol #pestcontrolservice #pest #termitecontrol #pestmanagement #bugs #pestcontrollife #antirayap #covid #termites #insects #bedbugs #rodentcontrol #pests #fumigation #rayap #exterminator #termite #ants #fogging #hunting #rats #basmirayap #pestfree… The post This Is Why We Use Glue Traps And Monitors To Trap American Cockroaches As Part Of Our Approach To Holistic Pest Control Management. appeared first on Pest Geek Pest Control Podcast .

Today's Homeowner Podcast
How to Glue Your Woodworking Project | Tips

Today's Homeowner Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 1:31


When working with a woodworking project it's not uncommon for it to split into some areas — even the tiniest of cracks. Here's how to get your wood glue in the smallest nooks and crannies!

Buy Box Bandits
Building The Largest Craft Glue Brand On Amazon

Buy Box Bandits

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 50:07


In this episode, we discuss how Matthew Turner went from fixing and flipping cell phones, to becoming a 7 figure seller on Amazon through Private label. Matthew discusses the importance of having a small, inner circle with you, and how to benefit from networking, and how he took his business and was even able to start a nonprofit from it!

Get A Better Broadcast, Podcast and Video Voice
0304 – Grammar Glue Part 2

Get A Better Broadcast, Podcast and Video Voice

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 6:16


2021.10.31 – 0304 – Grammar Glue Part 2or – and and or are often two sides of the same coin. “And” is often giving additional information, whereas “or” usually suggests options or alternatives are available.In a simple ‘either/or' phrase, the “or” is often subdued, to allow the basic options either side to be coloured. “You can have chicken or fish”. But in a more complicated sentence, when there are two sets of options compared with two more you may want to highlight the “or” to be a ‘pivot point' in the options. Remember our holidaying friends who are working out where to go? “So if you want to go to the museum now I will meet you there, or come with me to the shop and we will go to the museum together”. of - “Some of the oil refineries in the Gulf have shut down ahead of the arrival of the hurricane.” [1] Hopefully, with what you know so far, you lifted “oil refineries”, “Gulf”, “shut down”, and “hurricane”. Now read this: “Emergency services in southern American states are bracing themselves for winds of up to 80 miles an hour, as Hurricane Pete heads their way. Ships in the Gulf of Mexico are in particular danger. Some of the oil refineries in the Gulf have shut down ahead of the arrival of the hurricane.” All I've done is added an extra two sentences to the start of the report, so some of what you previously highlighted as new information may now be old information, and so your intonation will change. If you lifted “Oil refineries”, “shut down” and “arrival”, but didn't stress “hurricane” or “Gulf” (old information), well done. Some people though will lift other ‘glue' words instead, such as “in” and “of” as in “Some of the oil refineries in the Gulf have shut down ahead of the arrival of the hurricane”. The thinking seems to be ‘I've talked about the hurricane and the Gulf, so I cannot stress those words again. I know, I'll stress the ‘in' and the ‘of'!' And sorry to say, after a while, the thought process is no longer necessary, because stressing prepositions becomes second nature. This is wrong. [1] Adapted from https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/here-is-the-news-im-stressed-out-hk9sccfdgsb and https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/are-bbc-newsreaders-guilty-of-mispronunciation-xn3n8d0r8jj Audio recording script and show notes (c) 2021 Peter Stewart Through these around-5-minute episodes, you can build your confidence and competence with advice on breathing and reading, inflection andprojection, the roles played by better scripting and better sitting, mic techniques and voice care tips... with exercises and anecdotes from a careerspent in TV and radio studios. If you're wondering about how to start a podcast, or have had one for a while - download every episode! And as themes develop over the weeks (that is, they are not random topics day-by-day), this is a free, course to help you GET A BETTERBROADCAST, PODCAST AND VIDEO VOICE. Look out for more details of the book during 2021. Contacts: https://linktr.ee/Peter_Stewart Peter has been around voice and audio all his working life and has trained hundreds of broadcasters in all styles of radio from pop music stations such as Capital FM and BBC Radio 1 to Heart FM, the classical music station BBC Radio 3 and regional BBC stations. He's trained news presenters on regional TV, the BBC News Channel and on flagship programmes such as the BBC's Panorama. Other trainees have been music presenters, breakfast show hosts, travel news presenters and voice-over artists. He has written a number of books on audio and video presentation and production (“Essential Radio Journalism”, “JournoLists”, two editions of “Essential Radio Skills” and three editions of “Broadcast Journalism”) and has written on voice and presentation skills in the BBC's in-house newspaper “Ariel”. Peter has presented hundreds of radio shows (you may have heard him on BBC Radio 2, BBC Radio 4, Virgin Radio or Kiss, as well as BBC regional radio) with formats as diverse as music-presentation, interview shows, ‘special' programmes for elections and budgets, live outside broadcasts and commentaries and even the occasional sports, gardening and dedication programmes. He has read several thousand news bulletins, and hosted nearly 2,000 podcast episodes, and is a vocal image consultant advising in all aspects of voice and speech training for presenters on radio and TV, podcasts and YouTube, voiceovers and videocalls. The podcast title refers to those who may wish to change their speaking voice in some way. It is not a suggestion that anyone should, or be pressured into needing to. We love accents and dialects, and are well aware that how we speak changes over time. The key is: is your voice successfully communicating your message, so it is being understood (and potentially being acted upon) by your target audience? This podcast is London-based and examples are spoken in the RP (Received Pronunciation) / standard-English / BBC English pronunciation, although invariably applicable to other languages, accents and dialects. Music credits:"Bleeping Demo" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/7012-bleeping-demoLicense: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license "Beauty Flow" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5025-beauty-flowLicense: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license "Envision" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4706-envisionLicense: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license "Limit 70" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5710-limit-70License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license "Rising Tide" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5027-rising-tideLicense: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license "Wholesome" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5050-wholesomeLicense: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Get A Better Broadcast, Podcast and Video Voice
0303 – 10 – Grammar Glue

Get A Better Broadcast, Podcast and Video Voice

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 6:02


2021.10.30 – 0303 – 10 – Grammar GlueConsider a dodgy phone connection and you can only hear some of what a friend is saying. You get the gist of the content from the meaningful words in the sentence: the words which actually are full of meaning, give detail and context and move the story along.Some words in a sentence don't add much information, they are there to give it structure and hold the important words together. They act as grammar ‘glue'. You can usually dampen down these delete-able words as by definition they are usually unimportant. Let's go through some of them.and – Some people see this word and highlight it every time. Go back and look at that sentence again and colour the word “and” and you'll realise how daft this is. Drawing attention to ‘and' gives the impression that each of the two words or phrases either side may be mutually exclusive, or the listener should presume that they usually are.“After the crash, police swept the road and opened it to traffic” – highlighting “and” gives the impression that the officers may usually do one of these jobs or the other, but not usually both.On occasion you do want to draw attention to ‘and' as we see from our airline example: “You cannot have chicken, fish and pasta” – but does this mean you could have both chicken and fish on the same plate...?Note that prepositions, words which describe a relationship between one item and another, are coloured very rarely. You do not order breakfast by asking for “egg and bacon, beans on toast and a cup of tea” but some readers use exactly that intonation. In this case the intonation goes hand-in-hand with the pronunciation of that three-letter word “and”:· The uncoloured, throwaway version is said ‘nd' or ‘n' – “Do you want bread n butter with your fish n chips?”· The coloured pronunciation rhymes with ‘sand' – “My friend is just having soup n a roll but I'm having soup n a roll and fish and chips”.It's the same with other words where colouring them changes how you say them: “Hey I said you could have a chip, not all of them” (where “a” is said “ay”) vs. “He went for a walk” (with “a” said like a short “er”), and it's similar with the word “an”.“The” can be said “thee” when you draw attention to it (“The presidents of the state's Rotary Clubs met thee President at the White House today”) and also perhaps uniquely changes how you say it depending on whether the word that follows it is a vowel or consonant.“The army and the navy are combining in a show of strength this weekend…”Didn't you automatically say “thee army” and “thuh navy”…? Audio recording script and show notes (c) 2021 Peter Stewart Through these around-5-minute episodes, you can build your confidence and competence with advice on breathing and reading, inflection andprojection, the roles played by better scripting and better sitting, mic techniques and voice care tips... with exercises and anecdotes from a careerspent in TV and radio studios. If you're wondering about how to start a podcast, or have had one for a while - download every episode! And as themes develop over the weeks (that is, they are not random topics day-by-day), this is a free, course to help you GET A BETTERBROADCAST, PODCAST AND VIDEO VOICE. Look out for more details of the book during 2021. Contacts: https://linktr.ee/Peter_Stewart Peter has been around voice and audio all his working life and has trained hundreds of broadcasters in all styles of radio from pop music stations such as Capital FM and BBC Radio 1 to Heart FM, the classical music station BBC Radio 3 and regional BBC stations. He's trained news presenters on regional TV, the BBC News Channel and on flagship programmes such as the BBC's Panorama. Other trainees have been music presenters, breakfast show hosts, travel news presenters and voice-over artists. He has written a number of books on audio and video presentation and production (“Essential Radio Journalism”, “JournoLists”, two editions of “Essential Radio Skills” and three editions of “Broadcast Journalism”) and has written on voice and presentation skills in the BBC's in-house newspaper “Ariel”. Peter has presented hundreds of radio shows (you may have heard him on BBC Radio 2, BBC Radio 4, Virgin Radio or Kiss, as well as BBC regional radio) with formats as diverse as music-presentation, interview shows, ‘special' programmes for elections and budgets, live outside broadcasts and commentaries and even the occasional sports, gardening and dedication programmes. He has read several thousand news bulletins, and hosted nearly 2,000 podcast episodes, and is a vocal image consultant advising in all aspects of voice and speech training for presenters on radio and TV, podcasts and YouTube, voiceovers and videocalls. The podcast title refers to those who may wish to change their speaking voice in some way. It is not a suggestion that anyone should, or be pressured into needing to. We love accents and dialects, and are well aware that how we speak changes over time. The key is: is your voice successfully communicating your message, so it is being understood (and potentially being acted upon) by your target audience? This podcast is London-based and examples are spoken in the RP (Received Pronunciation) / standard-English / BBC English pronunciation, although invariably applicable to other languages, accents and dialects. Music credits:"Bleeping Demo" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/7012-bleeping-demoLicense: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license "Beauty Flow" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5025-beauty-flowLicense: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license "Envision" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4706-envisionLicense: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license "Limit 70" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5710-limit-70License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license "Rising Tide" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5027-rising-tideLicense: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license "Wholesome" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5050-wholesomeLicense: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Modern Waiter Podcast
Shift Drinks Bonus Episode with Glue Guy (Ralph) and Smooth Guy (Roy)

The Modern Waiter Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 20:50


Shift drinks directly after our Vegas trip, I attempted to dry out and work my Sunday night shift. I failed at both. We are joined by Ralph (Glue Guy) and Roy (Smooth Guy). We change locations and record from Oceans 101 in Lauderdale by the Sea. They talk about what and who irks them at work... See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Today's Homeowner Podcast
Deciding What Type of Glue to Use | Tips

Today's Homeowner Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 1:31


What type of glue you use for a project does in fact matter. Listen to these tips to decide what type to use and when to use it!

Dad Tales
S2 Ep6 Let's glue our face to the floor!!

Dad Tales

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 43:23


Welcome back!! Sit back, relax and enjoy!! This week we are recording in a new studio and Leon seemed very quiet. Another unique fact from Leon! Let us know if you knew which was true! https://instabio.cc/20816N5u9cx Who has made this week's plonker of the pod??? One involved glue and another a radio DJ!!! But you'll have to listen to find out why!! We do appreciate all the feedback we get! So if you haven't already, don't forget to leave us a 5-star review and tell a friend!! Don't forget to head over to our YouTube channel to see our latest video, Jelly bean eating! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuyLNdkckOkQligJtlQ_wJg Whilst you are there, don't forget to turn on notifications and ring the bell to keep up to date with our latest videos! Get in touch and join in with our topics! Then send us a message via the following link. We are now in TikTok https://instabio.cc/20816N5u9cx

Horse Tip Daily
1404 by Purina: Composite & Glue On Horseshoes with Daisy Bicking

Horse Tip Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 15:09


Farrier Daisy Bicking discusses the most common uses for composite or glue on shoes.This episode brought to you by Purina Equine Senior and Senior Active Horse FeedsAdditional support by HRN AuditorsListen to more podcasts for horse people at Horse Radio NetworkThanks to today's tip contributor Daisy BickingLearn about advertising on Horse Tip Daily or any of the shows on the Horse Radio NetworkDownload the free Horse Radio Network App for iPhone or AndroidSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=87421)

All Shows Feed | Horse Radio Network
1404 by Purina: Composite & Glue On Horseshoes with Daisy Bicking

All Shows Feed | Horse Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 15:09


Farrier Daisy Bicking discusses the most common uses for composite or glue on shoes.This episode brought to you by Purina Equine Senior and Senior Active Horse FeedsAdditional support by HRN AuditorsListen to more podcasts for horse people at Horse Radio NetworkThanks to today's tip contributor Daisy BickingLearn about advertising on Horse Tip Daily or any of the shows on the Horse Radio NetworkDownload the free Horse Radio Network App for iPhone or AndroidSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=87421)

Moonman In The Morning Catch Up - 104.9 Triple M Sydney - Lawrence Mooney, Gus Worland, Jess Eva & Chris Page

A day of thrills, spills & climate bills. Plus the overused word that makes scomo sound like a broken record. Want more Moonman? Download the LiSTNR App for exclusive content and more.  #Comedy #Moonman See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Moonman In The Morning Catch Up - 104.9 Triple M Sydney - Lawrence Mooney, Gus Worland, Jess Eva & Chris Page

Who spilt it and why? Sydney's great spill fest. #Comedy #Moonman See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Emotional Optimism: Living in The Silver Lining Podcast
E056: Kindness Should Never Be Mistaken for Weakness

Emotional Optimism: Living in The Silver Lining Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 3:55


Kindness should never ever be mistaken for weakness. Whether we experience kindness, we deliver acts of kindness, or we witness other people being kind – we all get the same emotional payout. It's called feeling good. Here are some power takeaways from today's conversation: The science behind kindness Why kindness shouldn't be mistaken for weakness Kindness is the glue. Episode Highlights: The Science Behind Kindness Known as the hugging drug or the love drug, oxytocin is a type of hormone that gives us a sense of calm, confidence, and a sense of love. It creates safety and removes fear. This happens either when we are giving kindness, watching someone else be kind, or someone is kind to us. Kindness is Not a Weakness. Kindness should never ever, ever be mistaken for weakness. Nor should kindness just appear as a strategy that encompasses your well-being, nor a strategy at work or a sign you often see on the wall. It should be seen through your actions. Kindness and empathy guide us through failures and springboard us into innovation because they create a sense of true psychological safety. It gives you a sense of belonging and that someone has got your back. Kindness is the Glue! Every single organization benefits from fostering kindness actively and proactively. There's a domino effect that happens which is exponential. Whenever a person receives an act of kindness, they are more likely to pay back an act of kindness. And they pay it forward, whether with a stranger and whether it's as simple as holding the door for someone else. It leads to an expanded heart which leads to a feeling of generosity as well as a culture of generosity in the workplace. Kindness is the glue, hence, it should never be mistaken for weakness because, in truth, kindness is strength.

RNZ: Eating Fried Chicken in the Shower
Psychologist Sarb Johal: ‘Self-validation is glue for your identity'

RNZ: Eating Fried Chicken in the Shower

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 13:32


Psychologist and media commentator Dr Sarb Johal on validation and identity. Produced by Charlie Bleakley.

But Not All At Once
The Glue of Our Family: A Story of Down Syndrome with Katie Alice Walker

But Not All At Once

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 91:36


October is Down Syndrome Awareness Month, and today But Not All At Once dives into the story of Katie Alice Walker and her beautiful third baby, Jayne.Katie Alice walks us through the shock and grief of an unexpected diagnosis and the joy of meeting a child whose name has been spoken by an entire community in prayer.There's beauty to be found even in the uncertain, unforeseen and just plain hard; Katie Alice's words are a testament to that. Whether your family has faced similar news, you want to support a friend in the trenches, or you hope to be an example of inclusion in your community, this discussion is for you.A few books Katie Alice recommends:Authentically AddieYou're All Kinds of WonderfulDifferent - A Great Thing to Be!Almost Twins: A Story About Friendship and InclusionIf you're a parent who wants to connect with the Walkers, you can reach Katie Alice at @kacwalker on Instagram. As always, you can reach Anne at butnotallatonce.com or @butnotallatonce across social platforms. To support the podcast and hear monthly bonus episodes, subscribe to Patreon.com/ButNotAllAtOnce.If you enjoy But Not All At Once, would you please leave a five-star rating and review on Apple Podcasts? It elevates the podcast, gives potential guests a window into the show, and means the world!

Piffles Podcast
Piffles Podcast Episode 176 - Back To The Glue Factory

Piffles Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 47:50


Greg, Alex, and Steve Zoom in off the bye week and are joined by Postmedia's, Danny Austin to talk about the Stampeders resurgence, how much of an impact having both Duke Williams and Shaq Evans does to the Riders offense, and what the Trevor Harris trade means for both the Elks and the Als.   Plus Piffles Pickem and Piffles Memories. 

Currently Reading
Season 4, Episode 12: Book Gushing + Packing Your Non-Fiction November TBR

Currently Reading

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 54:31


On this week's episode of Currently Reading, Mary and Kaytee are discussing: Bookish Moments: indie bookstore moments for a day date and a meetup Current Reads: we both have books today that are contenders for favorite of the year Deep Dive: we talk about multiple categories of books that we have loved and think you might love for non-fiction November Book Presses: two more NF picks, both memoir As per usual, time-stamped show notes are below with references to every book and resource we mentioned in this episode. If you'd like to listen first and not spoil the surprise, don't scroll down!  New: we are now including transcripts of the episode (this link only works on the main site). These are generated by AI, so they may not be perfectly accurate, but we want to increase accessibility for our fans! *Please note that all book titles linked below are Amazon affiliate links. Your cost is the same, but a small portion of your purchase will come back to us to help offset the costs of the show. Thanks for your support!*   . . . . 1:26 Bookish Moment of the Week 1:43 - Boswell Books 3:30 - The Lincoln Highway by Amor Towles   3:33 - Garcia Street Books 5:18 Current Reads: 5:31 - Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon (Mary) 9:41 - The Very Nice Box by Laura Blackett and Eve Gleichman (Kaytee) 13:13 - Fat Chance Charlie Vega by Crystal Maldonado (Mary) 16:15 - Starfish by Lisa Fipps  16:38 - Redemption Point by Candice Fox (Kaytee) 19:56 - Magic Lessons by Alice Hoffman (Mary) 20:04 - Practical Magic by Alice Hoffman  20:07 - The Rules of Magic by Alice Hoffman 22:14 - The Book of Magic by Alice Hoffman 22:55 - All the Lonely People by Mike Gayle (Kaytee) 23:03 - Amy's Instagram @amyseptemberreads 26:06 - A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman 28:02 Deep Dive - Reads for Nonfiction November 31:01 - What Kind of Woman by Kate Baer 31:10 - I Hope This Finds You Well by Kate Baer 32:02 - A Thousand Mornings by Mary Oliver 32:17 - Great with Child: Letters to a Young Mother by Beth Ann Fennelly 33:04 - Braiding Sweetgrass by Robin Wall Kimmerer 33:07 - An Indigenious Peoples' History of the United States (The Young Reader's Version) by Debbie Reese 33:55 - An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States (Adult Version) by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz 35:04 - At Home in the World by Tsh Oxenreider 35:41 - Heating and Cooling by Beth Ann Fennelly 36:11 - Glitter and Glue by Kelly Corrigan  36:17 - Tell Me More by Kelly Corrigan 36:40 - I Have Something to Tell You by Chasten Buttigieg 37:38 - All Over the Place: Adventures in Travel, True Love and Petty Theft by Geraldine DeRuiter 38:08 - Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? by Mindy Kaling 38:11 - Why Not Me? by Mindy Kaling 38:44 - Know My Name by Chanel Miller 39:03 - Love Lives Here by Amanda Jette Knox 39:21 - Heavy by Kiese Laymon 39:32 - Born a Crime by Trevor Noah 39:48 - Here for It by R. Eric Thomas 40:22 - A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson 40:46 - Year of Yes by Shonda Rhimes 41:06 - Animal, Vegetable, Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver 41:23 - Tiny Beautiful Things by Cheryl Strayed 41:58 - Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson 42:11 - Evicted by Matthew Desmond 42:28 - The Sum of Us by Heather McGhee 42:49 - A Knock at Midnight by Brittany K. Barnett 44:18 - HRH: So Many Thoughts on Royal Style by Elizabeth Holmes 44:52 - Bad Blood by John Carreyrou 45:20 - Essentialism by Greg McKeown 45:22 - The Lazy Genius Way by Kendra Adachi 45:24 - Atomic Habits by James Clear 46:25 - Designing Your Life by Bill Burnett 46:49 - The Gifts of Imperfection by Brene Brown 46:51 - Braving the Wilderness by Brene Brown 47:16 - Burnout by Emily Nagoski 47:39 - Come As You Are by Emily Nagoski 48:21 - The Road Back To You by Ian Morgan Cron and Suzanne Stabile 48:32 - The Four Tendencies by Gretchen Rubin 48:57 - Reading People by Anne Bogel 49:33 - Megan notes that it was “only” 41 books. 49:47 Books We Want to Press Into Your Hands: 50:00 - My Life in France by Julia Child (Mary) 51:25 Sitting Pretty by Rebekah Taussig (Kaytee) 51:33 - Season 3: Episode 15 Connect With Us: Meredith is @meredith.reads on Instagram Kaytee is @notesonbookmarks on Instagram Mindy is @gratefulforgrace on Instagram Mary is @maryreadsandsips on Instagram currentlyreadingpodcast.com @currentlyreadingpodcast on Instagram currentlyreadingpodcast@gmail.com Support us at patreon.com/currentlyreadingpodcast

Bill Whittle Network
Culture Glue: How Broadcast TV Bound Us Together in a Way Cable and YouTube Never Can

Bill Whittle Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 4:31


Gilligan's Island, Star Trek, Welcome Back Kotter and other broadcast TV classics bound us together as a culture in a way that cable TV and streaming services like YouTube, Apple TV, Netflix, Hulu, and the rest, never can. It's not just the content of these old shows, but the fact that we all watched them at the same night, at the same time. Moving Back to America with Bill Whittle comes to you free twice weekly thanks to our Members , who fund this enterprise. Watch the full archive at https://BillWhittle.com (Become a Member and unlock exclusive access features when you click the big green button.)

SUPERIOR AUTO INSTITUTE MILLION DOLLAR PDR TRAINING PODCAST
SAI PDR PODCAST: Glue PullMini Course/ Repairs and Student Update

SUPERIOR AUTO INSTITUTE MILLION DOLLAR PDR TRAINING PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 21:40


Today we talk Gluepulling- new advances and basics as well as Recent Repairs and a Student Update   https://superiorautoinstitute.com

Junk Dilemmas: An Irvine Welsh Podcast

Part 2 of our discussion on the 2001 novel Glue by Irvine Welsh

Mystery Recipe
Week Two, Episode Two: Sandwich Glue

Mystery Recipe

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 26:32


Welcome back to Mystery Recipe! First, we'll power up your brain with this week's Tricky Trivia segment. Then, we've got an interview all about flavor profiles in Ask a Grown Up. Afterwards, Suzie and Andrea are back with more skills in How To Time.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly
Batteries are “the glue of the clean-energy economy”

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 34:11


We’ve gone from lead-acid batteries in our cars to the lithium-ion batteries that power our phones and devices in a relatively short amount of time. The next generation of batteries will need to be big enough to power homes, cities and our electrical grid because experts believe that’ll be key to our transition away from fossil fuels. “Batteries have really been called the glue of the clean-energy economy because … the wind doesn’t always blow, the sun doesn’t always shine … and so we need to have not only enough storage for the few minutes or the few hours between uses, but we need to be able to provide that super-high-reliability storage for hours, days, weeks and seasons,” said Dan Kammen, an energy professor at the University of California, Berkeley, and adviser for innovative energy solutions at the U.S. Agency for International Development. Our current go-to battery technology is lithium ion. But there are so many other technologies coming online that will become the core of our clean energy economy. On today’s show: one of the most hopeful climate-related deep dives we’ve had in a while. We’ll talk with Kammen about some of the latest battery technology and what it’s going to take to make it cheaper, greener and accessible to all. Side note: Molly Wood is doing a whole podcast on lithium batteries called “How We Survive.” Don’t forget to subscribe! In the news fix, we get hard numbers on how climate change is affecting people all over the world and explain the latest fight over vaccine mandates in Texas. Plus, a listener gives us a firsthand account of the oil spill off the coast of Southern California, and an answer to the Make Me Smart question that will get you thinking about your toothbrush. When you're done listening, tell your Echo device to “make me smart” for our daily explainers. This week we'll explain the global supply chain mess, a new form of advertising in the NBA, and the cult success of “The Rocky Horror Picture Show.” Also, don't forget to subscribe to our newsletter! You can find the latest issue here. Here’s everything we talked about today: “World's largest energy storage system completes Phase II in Moss Landing” from The Monterey Herald “The Battery Boom Will Draw $620 In Investment by 2040” from Bloomberg “Renewable energy: getting to 100% requires cheap energy storage. But how cheap?” from Vox “At least 85 percent of the world's population has been affected by human-induced climate change, new study shows” from The Washington Post “Texas Gov. Greg Abbott bans any COVID-19 vaccine mandates — including for private employers” from The Texas Tribune

Marketplace All-in-One
Batteries are “the glue of the clean-energy economy”

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 34:11


We’ve gone from lead-acid batteries in our cars to the lithium-ion batteries that power our phones and devices in a relatively short amount of time. The next generation of batteries will need to be big enough to power homes, cities and our electrical grid because experts believe that’ll be key to our transition away from fossil fuels. “Batteries have really been called the glue of the clean-energy economy because … the wind doesn’t always blow, the sun doesn’t always shine … and so we need to have not only enough storage for the few minutes or the few hours between uses, but we need to be able to provide that super-high-reliability storage for hours, days, weeks and seasons,” said Dan Kammen, an energy professor at the University of California, Berkeley, and adviser for innovative energy solutions at the U.S. Agency for International Development. Our current go-to battery technology is lithium ion. But there are so many other technologies coming online that will become the core of our clean energy economy. On today’s show: one of the most hopeful climate-related deep dives we’ve had in a while. We’ll talk with Kammen about some of the latest battery technology and what it’s going to take to make it cheaper, greener and accessible to all. Side note: Molly Wood is doing a whole podcast on lithium batteries called “How We Survive.” Don’t forget to subscribe! In the news fix, we get hard numbers on how climate change is affecting people all over the world and explain the latest fight over vaccine mandates in Texas. Plus, a listener gives us a firsthand account of the oil spill off the coast of Southern California, and an answer to the Make Me Smart question that will get you thinking about your toothbrush. When you're done listening, tell your Echo device to “make me smart” for our daily explainers. This week we'll explain the global supply chain mess, a new form of advertising in the NBA, and the cult success of “The Rocky Horror Picture Show.” Also, don't forget to subscribe to our newsletter! You can find the latest issue here. Here’s everything we talked about today: “World's largest energy storage system completes Phase II in Moss Landing” from The Monterey Herald “The Battery Boom Will Draw $620 In Investment by 2040” from Bloomberg “Renewable energy: getting to 100% requires cheap energy storage. But how cheap?” from Vox “At least 85 percent of the world's population has been affected by human-induced climate change, new study shows” from The Washington Post “Texas Gov. Greg Abbott bans any COVID-19 vaccine mandates — including for private employers” from The Texas Tribune Read the transcript here.

WPMRR WordPress Podcast
E167 - Telling Stories that Close Deals (Chris Lema, Liquid Web)

WPMRR WordPress Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 41:33


In today's episode, we get to listen again to Joe's chat with Chris Lema, Liquid Web's Vice President of Products and General Manager at LearnDash. He is a well-known blogger and public speaker, and leads the product teams to develop and launch Managed WordPress and Managed WooCommerce product lines.   Chris enthusiastically talks about the concept behind BeachPress and CaboPress, and what can potentially happen in these meetings. He also tackled the growth of e-commerce, how WooCommerce as an open platform creates more opportunities for a lot of businesses, and providing customers hassle-free access to plugin updates on their sites.   Episode Resources: Chris Lema is on Twitter and YouTube Leaders Blog Liquid Web Leave an Apple podcast review or binge-watch past episodes Visit the WPMRR Community   What to Listen For: 00:00 Intro 01:48 What is BeachPress? 05:06 Be in a conversation with people in your circle 07:21 The CaboPress 12:31 Bringing SaaS people to CaboPress 14:47 SaaS platforms that do e-commerce 19:49 Looking at period over period growth 22:45 Partnership with Glue 27:01 The building blocks of a great storytelling 33:16 Fun stuff and new pricing at Liquid Web 35:18 Having e-commerce played out on open platforms 38:33 The ability to update plugins automatically 39:55 Find Chris online

Oh Brother
janky glue jig

Oh Brother

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021


Fall decorationsRepairing decorations Janky glue jig Washing pumpkins?Ethernet routing and internet speeds Wiggle the little thingBuying psychologyWhat makes a good scarecrow?Scareception! Biking is going well! Need Gooder news Part 3 Check out our other episodes: ohbrotherpodcast.comFollow us on InstagramCheck us out on Youtube

Daily Tech News Show (Video)
Don't Glue It; Screw It! – DTNS 4128

Daily Tech News Show (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021


Microsoft has now agreed to let independent third-party study the impact of making Microsoft devices easier to repair. Google SVP Hiroshi Lockheimer offers an invitation to Apple to help them implement RCS on the iPhone. CNET’s Brian Cooley notes that Michelin and GM plan to have airless tires available for street use as early as 2024. Starring Tom Merritt, Robb Dunewood, Len Peralta, Roger Chang, Joe, Amos MP3 Download Using a Screen Reader? Click here Multiple versions (ogg, video etc.) from Archive.org Follow us on Twitter Instgram YouTube and Twitch Please SUBSCRIBE HERE. Subscribe through Apple Podcasts. A special thanks to all our supporters–without you, none of this would be possible. If you are willing to support the show or to give as little as 10 cents a day on Patreon, Thank you! Become a Patron! Big thanks to Dan Lueders for the headlines music and Martin Bell for the opening theme! Big thanks to Mustafa A. from thepolarcat.com for the logo! Thanks to our mods Jack_Shid and KAPT_Kipper on the subreddit Send to email to feedback@dailytechnewsshow.com Show Notes To read the show notes in a separate page click here!

Daily Tech News Show
Don't Glue It; Screw It! - DTNS 4128

Daily Tech News Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 34:42


Microsoft has now agreed to let independent third-party study the impact of making Microsoft devices easier to repair. Google SVP Hiroshi Lockheimer offers an invitation to Apple to help them implement RCS on the iPhone. CNET's Brian Cooley notes that Michelin and GM plan to have airless tires available for street use as early as 2024.Starring Tom Merritt, Robb Dunewood, Len Peralta, Roger Chang, Joe.Link to the Show Notes.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Shop Talk Live - Fine Woodworking
STL251: Assume the glue is going to fail

Shop Talk Live - Fine Woodworking

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 59:12


This episode is sponsored by Festool 0:00 - Intro 1:52 - End grain glue myths! 21:34 - Joints in long runs of crown molding 32:43 - Segments 45:22 - Floating tenon joinery options We're hiring an assistant digital editor! Are you tech and web savvy? Are you passionate about woodworking? You might be the right person to bring a new voice to FineWoodworking.com. Head on over to www.taunton.com/careers/ for more info. Links from this episode can be found here - http://www.shoptalklive.com Sign up for the Fine Woodworking weekly eLetter - https://www.finewoodworking.com/newsletter Sign up for a Fine Woodworking Unlimited membership - https://www.finewoodworking.com/unlimited Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Shop Talk Live - Fine Woodworking
STL251: Assume the glue is going to fail

Shop Talk Live - Fine Woodworking

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 59:12


This episode is sponsored by Festool 0:00 - Intro 1:52 - End grain glue myths! 21:34 - Joints in long runs of crown molding 32:43 - Segments 45:22 - Floating tenon joinery options We're hiring an assistant digital editor! Are you tech and web savvy? Are you passionate about woodworking? You might be the right person to bring a new voice to FineWoodworking.com. Head on over to www.taunton.com/careers/ for more info. Links from this episode can be found here - http://www.shoptalklive.com Sign up for the Fine Woodworking weekly eLetter - https://www.finewoodworking.com/newsletter Sign up for a Fine Woodworking Unlimited membership - https://www.finewoodworking.com/unlimited Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Cast and Spear: Weekly Fishing Tips and Advice
E193: Inflatable Boat Manufacturing/Glue vs Welds/Materials

Cast and Spear: Weekly Fishing Tips and Advice

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 10:55


Today we have Alex Caslow (@RedBeardSails) the owner of Red Beard Sailing. We cover: Manufacturing considerations for inflatable boats PVC vs Hyperlon Welded vs Glued seams How to inflate Check Out Inflatable Catamarans: https://redbeardsailing.com Check out more from Cast & Spear: Subscribe to the Cast & Spear Podcast Check out our Weekly Fishing Newsletter Watch our YouTube videos Follow our Instagram Watch our TikTok videos Like our Facebook Page

STAB!
STAB! 270 – A Show Like Some Other Shows

STAB!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 52:10


No, you're in the right place, we know it's hard to tell at first, but, you are. In this pretty similar edition of the STAB! program, that one guy, host Jesse Jones, welcomes a familiar yet distinct enough panel of Sean Crandall, Stephen Ferris and Melony Ford to share their three recognizable takes on SNL, … Continue reading »

The Pest Geek Podcast Worlds #1 Pest Control Training Podcast
Testing Bait Placement On Glue Boards In Trash room Previously Sprayed With Pyrethroid against German roaches

The Pest Geek Podcast Worlds #1 Pest Control Training Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 0:35


On today's edition, we placed bait on 5 glue boards in a trash room previously sprayed with pyrethroid against German roaches. This is the first time we do this and as the trash room had already been sprayed we want to avoid contaminating the bait and give ourselves a week to see what the results… The post Testing Bait Placement On Glue Boards In Trash room Previously Sprayed With Pyrethroid against German roaches appeared first on Pest Geek Pest Control Podcast .

Business Sustainability Radio Show
Episode 321: How to use experiences as sticky glue with your customers.

Business Sustainability Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 24:47


Joe Pine is a pioneer in helping businesses think about experiences as being the reason your customers do business with you. Learn how you can learn to use experiences as the glue the keeps your customers coming back over and over again.

The Letters Page
Episode #188 - Creative Process: A Sticky Subject: All About Adhesivist

The Letters Page

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 77:34


Glue pun! Show Notes:  Run Time: 1:17:44 There is less history to this character than many, but that doesn't stop us! If anything, we're excited to build him out! Especially with all the great folks that have given to much to The Adhesivist. Not sure what I'm talking about here? Listen and find out! At the end of the episode, we talk about how the schedule is about to get weird: rather than the regularly scheduled Editor's Note #48, we'll have a interlude-type-thing, just for fun. Then, the NEXT week will be the Editor's Note, followed by Episode #189, though now off by a week. Which is OK! Everything will be fine! The Patreon supporters are already hard at work, voting for the episodes they want to hear in October AND November! If you're on the Letters Page Patreon, go vote now! And, if you're not a Patreon supporter, you can be, and immediately get access to that voting! What are you waiting for? Get in there! We'll catch you next time!

The Box of Oddities
BOX361: Eyelids Don't Like Glue

The Box of Oddities

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 34:10


Want to listen to The Box Of Oddities ad-free and early? Become a patron by joining The Order of Freaks!Can a vehicle be possessed? And yeah, we vote “no” to eyelid sewing. The haunted car that inspired a Stephen King story and the history of eyelashes in BOX361. It's like butter for your ears.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Jeselnik & Rosenthal Vanity Project
Nirvana Baby Penis Glue

The Jeselnik & Rosenthal Vanity Project

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 79:16


A Russian man mistook a man for a bear and killed him, a zoo banned a woman for having an affair with a chimp and a man died after gluing his penis shut because he forgot a condom.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.