Podcasts about glue

Non-metallic material used to bond various materials together

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Best podcasts about glue

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Latest podcast episodes about glue

We Built A Thing
176 - Crayons in the Glue Gun

We Built A Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 59:19


In this episode, Mark sells a laser. Bruce makes a necklace holder for his daughter. Drew tries out a hand plane with a disposable blade. Plus, a ton more! Tersaknives.com : FISHER10 saves 10% on all RALI products This episode is sponsored by OneFinity CNC! We have partnered with them and would love it if you would go to their website and check them out: https://www.onefinitycnc.com/ (we don't have a coupon code at this time, but if you're able to mention that we sent you, it helps!) Become a patron of the show! http://patreon.com/webuiltathing OUR TOP PATREON SUPPORTERS: -YouCanMakeThisToo YT: http://bit.ly/38sqq7v -Tom's Woodwork-Tim Morrill-Brent Jarvis IG: https://bit.ly/2OJL7EV -Scott @ Dad It Yourself DIY YT: http://bit.ly/3vcuqmv-Broken Lead Woodworks IG: https://bit.ly/38vQij8 -Chris Simonton-Maddux Woodworks YT: http://bit.ly/3chHe2p-Ray Jolliff  -Ryder Clark-Wilker's Woodcraft -Deo Gloria Woodworks: https://www.instagram.com/deogloriawoodworks/ -Kris -Wayne's Woodshed -Brad Hoff -Tommy Trease -Will White-Byrom's Custom Woodworks New:-Kevin Ash Support our sponsors: MagSwitch: https://mag-tools.com -use code "WBAT" for 10% off SurfPrep: https://www.surfprepsanding.com/?aff=48  -use code "FISHER10" for 10% off RZmask: use code "FISHER10" for 10% off Bits & Bits: use code "FISHER10" for 10% off Starbond: use code "BRUCEAULRICH15" for 15% off Rotoboss: "GUNFLINT" Merlin Moisture Meters: "FISHER10" https://www.merlin-humidification.com/wood-moisture-meters Bidwell Wood & Iron/Atomic Finishes: "BRUCEAULRICH" for 10% off We Built A Thing T-shirts! We have two designs to choose from! (You can get one of these as a reward at certain levels of support) https://amzn.to/2GP04jf  https://amzn.to/2TUrCr2 ETSY SHOPS: Bruce: https://www.etsy.com/shop/BruceAUlrich?ref=simple-shop-header-name&listing_id=942512486 Drew: https://www.etsy.com/shop/FishersShopOnline?ref=simple-shop-header-name&listing_id=893150766 Mark: https://www.etsy.com/shop/GunflintDesigns?ref=search_shop_redirect Bruce's most recent video: https://youtu.be/SNe3zRm4_Dc Drew's most recent video: https://youtu.be/a1kq4VVhoRM Mark's most recent video: https://youtu.be/J0_nj9bD898 We are all makers, full-time dads and all have YouTube channels we are trying to grow and share information with others. Throughout this podcast, we talk about making things, making videos to share on YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, etc...and all of the life that happens in between.  CONNECT WITH US: WE BUILT A THING: www.instagram.com/webuiltathingWE BUILT A THING EMAIL: webuiltathing@gmail.com FISHER'S SHOP: www.instagram.com/fishersshop/ BRUDADDY: www.instagram.com/brudaddy/ GUNFLINT DESIGNS: https://www.instagram.com/gunflintdesigns Music by: Jay Fisher (Thanks, Jay!)

Curious Creatures
Jennifer Otter Bickerdike Pt. 2: Down At The Glue Factory!

Curious Creatures

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 29:28


Lol and Budgie Join Hands in 197940 Years Beyond Music = The Mystique of Creating Culture Two Drummers Drumming = Our Mutual BondA Gang of Starving Artists = Salt Scrub Therapy? Books and Records = Earth and IdentityArt and Money - Bad in Bed? Music as Religion and Revolution Budgie meets Francis Bacon in Harrods & Lucien Freud in NY?Another Green World just two beats away.Jen has a Sylvia Plath Pen and Ink(And we don't mean a Cockney Stink)What If?Jimi Hendrix outlived Club 27 The Grave of Jim Morrison had no GraffitiSartre and Simone de Beauvoir never met  WW2 never happened and The Berlin wall never existed Why We Need.Brass plaques for Berlin's Murdered Jews Thoughts of Our Fathers and how Europe changed.The Ability to Create from NothingKathryn Mannix and a Preparation for Dying.Is It Ever Enough? Budgie tried to leave music - but music wouldn't let go! 30 years of Reinventing Ourselves The Cult of Lol, The Cult of Lol, The Cult of Lol (‘tis a mighty fine thang thrice!)We knew Jen would make a Groovy Episode!In love with - ‘I'm Sticking with You' – The Velvet Underground - 1969 CONNECT WITH US:Curious Creatures:Website: https://curiouscreaturespodcast.comFacebook: @CuriousCreaturesOfficialTwitter: @curecreaturesInstagram: @CuriousCreaturesOfficialLol Tolhurst: Website: https://loltolhurst.comFacebook: @officialloltolhurst Twitter: @LolTolhurst Instagram: @lol.tolhurst Budgie: Facebook: @budgieofficial Twitter: @TuWhit2whooInstagram: @budgie646 Curious Creatures is a partner of the Double Elvis podcast network. For more of the best music storytelling follow @DoubleElvis on Instagram or search Double Elvis in your podcast app.

Bringin' it Backwards
Interview with gigi

Bringin' it Backwards

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 53:30


We had the pleasure of interviewing gigi over Zoom video!Breakout artist gigi gives a tour de force vocal performance on her new single, ”Figurines,” released today via Mogul Vision/Interscope Records. On the dreamy, self-penned track, which she recorded in Nashville, gigi examines mortality and the process of forging one's own path. Mike Zara and Aidan Hobbs produced and play on “Figurines,” combining haunting keyboards with plaintive guitar and adding accordion and saxophone as the song builds to an emotional close. “'Figurines' is about the circle of life, fear of death, and the lengths people go to immortalize themselves. There are many areas of my life I can point in my early development that have influenced this sort of existential thorn i have. Your brain is a hard drive and you can never erase anything from it. Your experiences are with you always but you can work past them. Writing about my fears of mortality help me come to terms with it myself,” said gigi. Born in New Jersey, raised in Florida and now based in Brooklyn, gigi is currently on her first national tour, providing direct support on Noah Cyrus' North American run. After sharing the track “Sometimes (Backwood)” on TikTok in 2021, she released the single independently. It racked up 18 million streams in the first six months and combined global streams now surpass 72 million. Hailing gigi as “one of Gen Z's breakout artists,” Medium tracked the song's organic growth in this feature, and said, “[‘Sometimes (Backwood)'] is a torrent of raw emotion…Let's see what gigi does next.” “Figurines” is the latest in a remarkable string of follow-up singles from gigi that include “The Man,” “When She Smiles” and “Glue.” Depicting the life of a queer twenty-something with raw honesty and all-enveloping beauty, the songs showcase her blunt yet tender poetry amid windswept landscapes of acoustic guitars, swooping strings and delicate reverb. We want to hear from you! Please email Tera@BringinitBackwards.com. www.BringinitBackwards.com#podcast #interview #bringinbackpod #gigi #SometimesBackwood #Figurines #NewMusic #zoomListen & Subscribe to BiB https://www.bringinitbackwards.com/follow/ Follow our podcast on Instagram and Twitter! https://www.facebook.com/groups/bringinbackpod

The CyberWire
Government security advisories, and the difficulty of recovering from ransomware attacks. Authority for offensive cyber under deliberation. Google wins Glupteba suit.

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 31:55


CISA and its partners issue a Joint Advisory on the Hive ransomware-as-a-service operation. Ransomware continues to trouble governments, internationally and at all levels. The US Defense Department may see enhanced authority to conduct offensive cyber operations. Russian attacks on Ukrainian infrastructure remain kinetic, as missiles show up, but cyberattacks don't. Kevin Magee from Microsoft about leveraging cybersecurity apprentices. Our guest is Paul Giorgi from XM Cyber describing creative attack path in enterprise networks.And, hey, glupost' [GLUE-post]–don't mess with Google's lawyers. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news briefing: https://thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/11/222 Selected reading. CISA Alert AA22-321A – #StopRansomware: Hive Ransomware. (CyberWire) #StopRansomware: Hive Ransomware (CISA) Vanuatu: Hackers strand Pacific island government for over a week (BBC News) Ransom attack cripples Vanuatu government systems, forces staff to use pen and paper (The Sydney Morning Herald) Ransomware incidents now make up majority of British government's crisis management COBRA meetings (The Record by Recorded Future) Suffolk County, N.Y., Hack Shows Ransomware Threat to Municipalities (Wall Street Journal)  Biden set to approve expansive authorities for Pentagon to carry out cyber operations (CyberScoop) Red Lion Crimson (CISA) Cradlepoint IBR600 (CISA) A ruling in our legal case against the Glupteba botnet (Google)

Video Game History Hour
Ep. 96: Margot Comstock - “The Glue” of the Early Apple II Era

Video Game History Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 68:26


Computer and video game historian, NYU assistant professor, and all-around rad friend of the show Laine Nooney discusses their recent article One of the most important women in Apple's history never worked for Apple. In this episode: Bitcoin, ham radios, VR, and the Apple II - it's all related; Softalk magazine; the 1977 Trinity; and ideation on the purpose of history. See more from Laine Nooney: Twitter: @Sierra_OffLine Podcast: Unboxing: https://anchor.fm/unboxingplayandprofit/ Book: The Apple II Age: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-apple-ii-age-laine-nooney/1142333554 Video Game History Foundation: Podcast Twitter: @gamehistoryhour Email: podcast@gamehistory.org Twitter: @GameHistoryOrg Website: gamehistory.org Support us on Patreon: /gamehistoryorg

Reason Together
165 - Would You Glue Your Head to a Wall for the Gospel?

Reason Together

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 46:50


Today on RTP — Are there similarities between climate activists and some Baptists? Also, when it comes to prophecy, is God making educated guesses? Then, do people need to renew their marriage after getting saved? Then in the aftershow, do we have guardian angels, and should we care?>>> Aftershow available for Elite Patrons only. Don't miss out — Become an Elite Patron!SHOW NOTES:“Reading Less, More — and Twice as Fast”Environmental Protesters Glue Themselves To FloorScripture Verses Cited: Matthew 18:10; Matthew 4:6; Daniel 10Your support helps us pay our podcast editor, blog editor, writers, and upgrade our site to offer merch. Become a PatronBuy a T-shirtLeave an iTunes ReviewDiscuss the EpisodeSubmit a Question, Feedback, or Topic SuggestionGet a Free Trial with Audible

Making It with Jon Davids
50 - Building an Empire with Logs, Glue, and Tape with Sheena Chandaria

Making It with Jon Davids

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 41:04


On today's episode, Jon chats with Sheena Chandaria, the VP of Sales and Corporate Affairs at Conros Corporation. We'll hear all about the second-generation business she runs with her that originated with her father building massive businesses in firelogs and glue sticks.  Visit JonDavids.com for more info. And follow Jon across social: Twitter | Instagram | LinkedIn

The Chris Plante Show
11-15-22 Hour 3 - Who Should Be Speaker?

The Chris Plante Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 38:04


In hour 3, Chris talks about the Republicans and their leadership, with many not wanting Kevin McCarthy to be Speaker, and Mitch McConnell to be Minority leader in the senate.  Also, Chris tells some stories from the nation of Deutchland.  Military clothing that accidentally says SS on it, Glue protests and more... For more coverage on the issues that matter to you download the WMAL app, visit WMAL.com or tune in live on WMAL-FM 105.9 from 9:00am-12:00pm Monday-Friday.To join the conversation, check us out on twitter @WMAL and @ChrisPlanteShowSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Who's On Call?
Shoe, Glue, Two

Who's On Call?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 128:21


On this episode Alvaro shares his new found knowledge in raising chickens. We share tips for handling your morning wood. We wrap up with music to help your mood, teens talking back to adults, and how speaking spanish doesn't mean you're good at it --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/whosoncall/support

Gateway Christian Fellowship
”The Glue”

Gateway Christian Fellowship

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 31:11


 Sermon Podcast on Acts 2:42,  Pastor John Moropoulos at Gateway Christian Fellowship message on Acts 2:42 on Sunday, November 13th, 2022. Please visit our website at: https://gatewayak.com/

Overcrest: A Pretty Good Car Podcast
Magnus Walker / SEMA / Glue / Fake Manuals / More news

Overcrest: A Pretty Good Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 87:32


The guys talk news, and check in with Magnus Walker about his new exhibit at the Petersen Museum! Join the Drivers Club! www.overcrestproductions.com/driversclub Ford testing Geofencing speed control of vehicles Honda knows the magic of the manual cant be replicated New Porsche Taycan to have a zillion hp.  Toyota isn't “the man”, fights for motoring rights.  BMW introduces lipstick brand with new SUV.  Wants controversy People are gluing themselves to stuff a lot.      

Knowing God
094 - Love is the Glue

Knowing God

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 8:41


Of all the virutes Paul encourages us to put on, this is the most important. In fact, it holds all the rest of them together. In Colossians 3:14, he gives us the most pivotal virtue in any relationship.

Locked On Jazz - Daily Podcast On The Utah Jazz
The Utah Jazz are getting better, the offense is rolling. Kelly Olynyk is the glue. Lauri Markkanen's defense was impressive

Locked On Jazz - Daily Podcast On The Utah Jazz

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 33:29


The Utah Jazz are 9-3 after a blowout win over the Los Angeles Lakers who were without LeBron James. The signs all point to the Utah Jazz getting better each game. The offense has clicked in to another level. The players are getting more comfortable together and the coaches are getting more comfortable with the players and we are seeing the results. The Jazz are playing free, they are skilled at all positions and the head coach is pulling all the right levers it is a pretty fantastic combination. David Locke, the radio voice of the Utah Jazz and Jazz NBA insider, breaks down all the areas where the Jazz are looking improved. Locke also touches on how Kelly Olynyk acquisition in the off-season allowed the Jazz to build a roster that could play basketball and the defensive work of Lauri Markkanen. Locked On Jazz Podcast

Moms in Real Life
The Time When a Mountain Adventure and an Allergic Reaction Taught Savannah to Listen to her Daughters with Savannah Wolach

Moms in Real Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 62:11


In This Episode, We Talk About: Adventures in motherhood: the good, the bad, and the ugly. The best ways to stay organized, decorate your nails, get your kids to sleep without electronics, and more of our favorite mom hacks. Why we need to learn to listen to our kids and their instincts.   Resources + Links: A Good Girl's Guide to Murder by Holly Jackson   The Southern Book Club's Guide to Slaying Vampires by Grady Hendrix   Winter Street Series by Elin Hilderbrand   Illustrated Enneagram by Deanna Talwalkar   Local Woman Missing by Mary Kubica   https://www.redaspenlove.com/home/   Connect with Moms in Real Life on Instagram | @momsinreallifepodcast   Follow Stephanie and Katie on Instagram! Stephanie Nguyen | @modernmilk Katie Kunz | @kunzandcrew and @newbornlifecoach   WANT TO HAVE YOUR MOM STORY FEATURED ON THE PODCAST? Sent us an email at info@momsinreallife.com   Find out more on our websites https://www.modernmilk.com/ www.katiekunz.com Show Notes: How can listening to your little ones save your European vacation? In this episode, we are exploring all the adventures that come with being a mom along with guest Savannah Wolach, Stephanie's friend & fellow softball mom and director of operations at WealthPoint! As the mother of two older girls, Savannah shares a new perspective of motherhood and raising older children. Her mom story today is a lesson in how listening to your kids' gut instincts can save you a trip to the hospital (and $5,000)! Before we dive into that, we'll talk about the secret to getting your nails “done” without getting them done, mom hacks for organization, seasonal books to help you get excited for the upcoming holidays, and more. Finally, Savannah tells us about the time her summer adventure in Europe got interrupted by a Swiss mountain and an allergic reaction! Tune in for another week's adventure in motherhood! 0:01:40 What are our newest housing updates? 0:03:50 Say hello to Savannah, Stephanie's friend of 12 years, fellow softball mom, and director of operations at WealthPoint! 0:06:30 How did you get a more flexible work schedule? 0:09:15 What is your biggest working from home tip? 0:11:25 What is your family eating this week? 0:12:25 What is a simple recipe even kids will love to eat? 0:13:55 What two meals has Stephanie's family been loving? 0:15:55 What are you currently loving? 0:18:25 Glue-on nails versus sticker nails. 0:20:30 What is a dairy alternative for heavy whipping cream? 0:22:00 What are good eye make-up remover pads? 0:23:00 How has your family been sleeping recently? 0:27:00 Why do Katie's kids keep waking up during the night? 0:28:35 How has Stephanie's family sleep changed since moving back? 0:30:35 What have you been reading this season? 0:33:25 Why do you love reading so much? 0:35:00 What have you been watching lately? 0:38:20 The cutest enneagram book for your coffee table. 0:40:05 What has Stephanie been reading and watching lately? 0:41:40 What are your mom hacks for organization? 0:46:25 How can you get your kids to go outside? 0:47:10 How can a mini fridge make your life easier? 0:47:55 What happened during your summer trip in Europe? 0:50:50 What did you do when your youngest didn't want to go down the mountain? 0:55:45 How did dinner turn into a scary allergic reaction? 0:59:05 Why do we need to listen to our kids and their instincts?

Not Your Typical Doctors
The Glue of H2F: Why human performance needs Occupational Therapy with Dr. Justin Bolten, DOT & Dr. Catrinna Amorelli, DScOT

Not Your Typical Doctors

Play Episode Play 30 sec Highlight Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 48:34


The Glue of H2F: Why human performance needs Occupational Therapy with Dr. Justin Bolten, DOT & Dr. Catrinna Amorelli, DScOTJoin Doc's Sarah and Alyse for a great guest episode on Occupational Therapy and why it's such a vital part of human performance programming! In this episode we chat about: OT and it's broad scope in human performance. Is too small provider: client ratio a problem with HP programming?TURF TALKS and the power they hold!Can 'Stuffers' help spread the word of HPO?How one crucial role for a leader in HPO is being able to force multiply. What is missing in the current Human Performance team make ups for tactical?If you haven't considered an OT for your HP team, we hope this episode will make you re-think! Talk to ya later!Meet Our Guests:Justine Bolten is an Army Occupational Therapist. She graduated in 2013 from Western Michigan University in Interdisciplinary health care with a minor in holistic health and psychology. She received her doctorate in Occupational Therapy from Creighton University in 2018. Justine is stationed in NY and is currently working in the human performance realm with the Army's Holistic Health and Fitness Program.Catrinna Amorelli is from Mancos, Colorado and completed my Bachelor's of Science degree at Colorado State University. Her Masters in Occupational Therapy from the University of New England inPortland, ME. Shortly after the completion of her degree, she applied for the US Army Doctor of Science in Occupational Therapy (DScOT) through the Army and was accepted.  Her DSc program was at Fort SamHouston, TX and afterwards she went on to her first assignment in Vilseck, Germany. So far in her career she has been Chief of Occupational Therapy, a behavioral health role in a Combat and Operational Stress Control (COSC), and now at Joint-Base Lewis McChord, WA where she is a Mental Readiness Director for the Holistic Health and Fitness (H2F) team.  If you like what you hear, leave us a 5- star rating and subscribe! Find us on IG and LinkedIn @ Not Your Typical Doctors or reach out to us anytime through: notyourtypicaldoctors@gmail.com

Today's Homeowner Podcast
Tips | Applying Glue in Tight Spaces

Today's Homeowner Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 1:02


How can you get glue inside a tight crack? The answer is in your medicine cabinet! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Not All Heroes Wear Capes - A Mom Podcast
The Glue That Binds Family Together

Not All Heroes Wear Capes - A Mom Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 33:52


Do you ever wonder what it is that some families have that keeps them glued together? Join Tina and Britt with Special Guest, Zach Smith, as they unpack the things that have held our family together over the years. We are a blended family of six that are close-knit over the span of generations. What's the secret? Has it always been easy? Listen in and hear what that glue is. You can find Tina at RaisingKidsonYourKnees.org Follow us on Instagram @instagram.com/legacy_amompodcast A Flying Arrow Production

Command Your Brand
Jack Canfora | Sharing Stories Glue Cultures & Communities Together

Command Your Brand

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 28:13


About This Episode: John Lawrence ""Jack"" Canfora is an Award-Winning American playwright, actor, musician and teacher. After receiving his dramatic training at the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art, he began his career as an actor in regional theater, working mostly in Shakespearean roles such as Mercutio and Macbeth. He's been hailed by the Associated Press as “White-hot Entertainment” for his off-Broadway plays including Poetic License, Place Setting, and Jericho, a New York Times “Critics Pick.” He was nominated along with Edward Albee, Elaine May, and Teresa Rebeck for The Newark Star Ledger's Best Play, 2007. Jack is the recipient of two Edgerton Playwriting Awards, for Jericho (2010) and The Source (2018). He won the 2016 Webby Award for Best Writing in a Web Series. Jack is also the Artistic Director of New Normal Rep. Find out more about Jack at: "Websites: https://www.jackcanforawriter.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jack-canfora-6bb98672/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100063494893622 Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jackcanfora Twitter: https://twitter.com/JackCanfora Website: https://www.newnormalrep.org/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NewNormalRep Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newnormalrep Twitter: https://twitter.com/NormalRep YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCODsy6KqG1hDk8LMcB-nL_A" Check out our YouTube Channel: Command Your Brand - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfy2IETlyeKq62VHdcRN7aQ/

Music Raygun
Miniepisode: Respect for the Glue

Music Raygun

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 36:50


In this episode, Kirk and Paul talk seltzer and boy band boys. Then Kirk tries to win candy in the music trivia quiz.

Becoming Fully Human
32. Love as the Glutinum Mundi (Glue of the World) Ft. Geraldine Matus

Becoming Fully Human

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 80:13


This episode is all about love: how to prepare for it, how to honor it, how we most often destroy it, when to walk away from someone we love, and exploring the concepts of "the one" and monogamy vs. polyamory. Read the quote Geraldine read to us from her new book HERE and purchase a copy of her new book World's Geography of Love. You can also listen to the extended audio of my exploration into apologising to stay in somatic integrity HERE.

The Steve Witt Podcast
Food Is the Glue

The Steve Witt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 27:44


Food! There is so much significance, with food, throughout The Bible. We know that what we eat in the natural, either brings nourishment or can harm us. This week Steve talks about the Jewish feasts and how food is a centralizing component throughout the history of The Church. Come gather around the table, bring your appetite and listen up!

Runtime Rundown
The One About Being Glue

Runtime Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 52:51


In this episode, we cover Tanya Reilly's powerful talk - "Being Glue". Deep down, we all (hopefully) know there's a lot more to a successful software project than code. There are planning meetings, design reviews, architecture deep dives, getting buy-in from partner teams, and the list goes on. All of this is the glue that holds a team and their work together and someone needs to do it. But who should do it, and how do we properly reward them for doing it (spoiler: we get this part wrong a lot)? If you've ever done thankless work like this for your team, listen to this episode. If you have never done this kind of work for your team - also listen. There's a decent chance you're forcing someone else into it.

Oscar Mike
123. What if Jesus Sounded Like Buffalo Bill?

Oscar Mike

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 50:08


The boys eulogize the New York Yankees, discuss gluing themselves to things in protest, and ponder what historical figures really looked and sounded like.

The New Standard: A Steelers Podcast for A Steelers Nation
The New Standard: The Pickett Will Come Out Tomorrow !!!

The New Standard: A Steelers Podcast for A Steelers Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 58:52


Show Topics What's The Best Perspective to judge Kenny Pickett? Is the Coaching Staff Good Enough to develop Kenny Pickett? Is Matt Canada

4th and 32
Week 7 Recap: Take Matt Ryan to the Glue Factory

4th and 32

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 58:56


Ethan Seu, Michael Duane and Cole Smithson breakdown every game from Week 7. Look forward to more episodes coming soon. Thank you for listening, if you like the show check out our social media @4thand32podcast on Tik Tok, Instagram and Twitter. Check out our website 4thand32.com and please rate us, subscribe and share with your friends! Join the 4th & 32 family. 

Screaming in the Cloud
The Man Behind the Curtain at Zoph with Victor Grenu

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 28:28


About VictorVictor is an Independent Senior Cloud Infrastructure Architect working mainly on Amazon Web Services (AWS), designing: secure, scalable, reliable, and cost-effective cloud architectures, dealing with large-scale and mission-critical distributed systems. He also has a long experience in Cloud Operations, Security Advisory, Security Hardening (DevSecOps), Modern Applications Design, Micro-services and Serverless, Infrastructure Refactoring, Cost Saving (FinOps).Links Referenced: Zoph: https://zoph.io/ unusd.cloud: https://unusd.cloud Twitter: https://twitter.com/zoph LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/grenuv/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is brought to us in part by our friends at Datadog. Datadog's SaaS monitoring and security platform that enables full stack observability for developers, IT operations, security, and business teams in the cloud age. Datadog's platform, along with 500 plus vendor integrations, allows you to correlate metrics, traces, logs, and security signals across your applications, infrastructure, and third party services in a single pane of glass.Combine these with drag and drop dashboards and machine learning based alerts to help teams troubleshoot and collaborate more effectively, prevent downtime, and enhance performance and reliability. Try Datadog in your environment today with a free 14 day trial and get a complimentary T-shirt when you install the agent.To learn more, visit datadoghq.com/screaminginthecloud to get. That's www.datadoghq.com/screaminginthecloudCorey: Managing shards. Maintenance windows. Overprovisioning. ElastiCache bills. I know, I know. It's a spooky season and you're already shaking. It's time for caching to be simpler. Momento Serverless Cache lets you forget the backend to focus on good code and great user experiences. With true autoscaling and a pay-per-use pricing model, it makes caching easy. No matter your cloud provider, get going for free at gomomento.co/screaming That's GO M-O-M-E-N-T-O dot co slash screamingCorey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. One of the best parts about running a podcast like this and trolling the internet of AWS things is every once in a while, I get to learn something radically different than what I expected. For a long time, there's been this sort of persona or brand in the AWS space, specifically the security side of it, going by Zoph—that's Z-O-P-H—and I just assumed it was a collective or a whole bunch of people working on things, and it turns out that nope, it is just one person. And that one person is my guest today. Victor Grenu is an independent AWS architect. Victor, thank you for joining me.Victor: Hey, Corey, thank you for having me. It's a pleasure to be here.Corey: So, I want to start by diving into the thing that first really put you on my radar, though I didn't realize it was you at the time. You have what can only be described as an army of Twitter bots around the AWS ecosystem. And I don't even know that I'm necessarily following all of them, but what are these bots and what do they do?Victor: Yeah. I have a few bots on Twitter that I push some notification, some tweets, when things happen on AWS security space, especially when the AWS managed policies are updated from AWS. And it comes from an initial project from Scott Piper. He was running a Git command on his own laptop to push the history of AWS managed policy. And it told me that I can automate this thing using a deployment pipeline and so on, and to tweet every time a new change is detected from AWS. So, the idea is to monitor every change on these policies.Corey: It's kind of wild because I built a number of somewhat similar Twitter bots, only instead of trying to make them into something useful, I'd make them into something more than a little bit horrifying and extraordinarily obnoxious. Like there's a Cloud Boomer Twitter account that winds up tweeting every time Azure tweets something only it quote-tweets them in all caps and says something insulting. I have an AWS releases bot called AWS Cwoud—so that's C-W-O-U-D—and that winds up converting it to OwO speak. It's like, “Yay a new auto-scawowing growp.” That sort of thing is obnoxious and offensive, but it makes me laugh.Yours, on the other hand, are things that I have notifications turned on for just because when they announce something, it's generally fairly important. The first one that I discovered was your IAM changes bot. And I found some terrifying things coming out of that from time to time. What's the data source for that? Because I'm just grabbing other people's Twitter feeds or RSS feeds; you're clearly going deeper than that.Victor: Yeah, the data source is the official AWS managed policy. In fact, I run AWS CLI in the background and I'm doing just a list policy, the list policy command, and with this list I'm doing git of each policy that is returned, so I can enter it in a git repository to get the full history of the time. And I also craft a list of deprecated policy, and I also run, like, a dog-food initiative, the policy analysis, validation analysis from AWS tools to validate the consistency and the accuracy of the own policies. So, there is a policy validation with their own tool. [laugh].Corey: You would think that wouldn't turn up anything because their policy validator effectively acts as a linter, so if it throws an error, of course, you wouldn't wind up pushing that. And yet, somehow the fact that you have bothered to hook that up and have findings from it indicates that that's not how the real world works.Victor: Yeah, there is some, let's say, some false positive because we are running the policy validation with their own linter then own policies, but this is something that is documented from AWS. So, there is an official page where you can find why the linter is not working on each policy and why. There is a an explanation for each findings. I thinking of [unintelligible 00:05:05] managed policy, which is too long, and policy analyzer is crashing because the policy is too long.Corey: Excellent. It's odd to me that you have gone down this path because it's easy enough to look at this and assume that, oh, this must just be something you do for fun or as an aspect of your day job. So, I did a little digging into what your day job is, and this rings very familiar to me: you are an independent AWS consultant, only you're based out of Paris, whereas I was doing this from San Francisco, due to an escalatingly poor series of life choices on my part. What do you focus on in the AWS consulting world?Victor: Yeah. I'm running an AWS consulting boutique in Paris and I'm working for a large customer in France. And I'm doing mostly infrastructure stuff, infrastructure design for cloud-native application, and I'm also doing some security audits and [unintelligible 00:06:07] mediation for my customer.Corey: It seems to me that there's a definite divide as far as how people find the AWS consulting experience to be. And I'm not trying to cast judgment here, but the stories that I hear tend to fall into one of two categories. One of them is the story that you have, where you're doing this independently, you've been on your own for a while working specifically on this, and then there's the stories of, “Oh, yeah, I work for a 500 person consultancy and we do everything as long as they'll pay us money. If they've got money, we'll do it. Why not?”And it always seems to me—not to be overly judgy—but the independent consultants just seem happier about it because for better or worse, we get to choose what we focus on in a way that I don't think you do at a larger company.Victor: Yeah. It's the same in France or in Europe; there is a lot of consulting firms. But with the pandemic and with the market where we are working, in the cloud, in the cloud-native solution and so on, that there is a lot of demands. And the natural path is to start by working for a consulting firm and then when you are ready, when you have many AWS certification, when you have the experience of the customer, when you have a network of well-known customer, and you gain trust from your customer, I think it's natural to go by yourself, to be independent and to choose your own project and your own customer.Corey: I'm curious to get your take on what your perception of being an AWS consultant is when you're based in Paris versus, in my case, being based in the West Coast of the United States. And I know that's a bit of a strange question, but even when I travel, for example, over to the East Coast, suddenly, my own newsletter sends out three hours later in the day than I expect it to and that throws me for a loop. The AWS announcements don't come out at two or three in the afternoon; they come out at dinnertime. And for you, it must be in the middle of the night when a lot of those things wind up dropping. The AWS stuff, not my newsletter. I imagine you're not excitedly waiting on tenterhooks to see what this week's issue of Last Week in AWS talks about like I am.But I'm curious is that even beyond that, how do you experience the market? From what you're perceiving people in the United States talking about as AWS consultants versus what you see in Paris?Victor: It's difficult, but in fact, I don't have so much information about the independent in the US. I know that there is a lot, but I think it's more common in Europe. And yeah, it's an advantage to whoever ten-hour time [unintelligible 00:08:56] from the US because a lot of stuff happen on the Pacific time, on the Seattle timezone, on San Francisco timezone. So, for example, for this podcast, my Monday is over right now, so, so yeah, I have some advantage in time, but yeah.Corey: This is potentially an odd question for you. But I find an awful lot of the AWS documentation to be challenging, we'll call it. I don't always understand exactly what it's trying to tell me, and it's not at all clear that the person writing the documentation about a service in some cases has ever used the service. And in everything I just said, there is no language barrier. This documentation was written—theoretically—in English and I, most days, can stumble through a sentence in English and almost no other language. You obviously speak French as a first language. Given that you live in Paris, it seems to be a relatively common affliction. How do you find interacting with AWS in French goes? Or is it just a complete nonstarter, and it all has to happen in English for you?Victor: No, in fact, the consultants in Europe, I think—in fact, in my part, I'm using my laptop in English, I'm using my phone in English, I'm using the AWS console in English, and so on. So, the documentation for me is a switch on English first because for the other language, there is sometimes some automated translation that is very dangerous sometimes, so we all keep the documentation and the materials in English.Corey: It's wild to me just looking at how challenging so much of the stuff is. Having to then work in a second language on top of that, it just seems almost insurmountable to me. It's good they have automated translation for a lot of this stuff, but that falls down in often hilariously disastrous ways, sometimes. It's wild to me that even taking most programming languages that folks have ever heard of, even if you program and speak no English, which happens in a large part of the world, you're still using if statements even if the term ‘if' doesn't mean anything to you localized in your language. It really is, in many respects, an English-centric industry.Victor: Yeah. Completely. Even in French for our large French customer, I'm writing the PowerPoint presentation in English, some emails are in English, even if all the folks in the thread are French. So yeah.Corey: One other area that I wanted to explore with you a bit is that you are very clearly focused on security as a primary area of interest. Does that manifest in the work that you do as well? Do you find that your consulting engagements tend to have a high degree of focus on security?Victor: Yeah. In my design, when I'm doing some AWS architecture, my main objective is to design some security architecture and security patterns that apply best practices and least privilege. But often, I'm working for engagement on security audits, for startups, for internal customer, for diverse company, and then doing some accommodation after all. And to run my audit, I'm using some open-source tooling, some custom scripts, and so on. I have a methodology that I'm running for each customer. And the goal is to sometime to prepare some certification, PCI DSS or so on, or maybe to ensure that the best practice are correctly applied on a workload or before go-live or, yeah.Corey: One of the weird things about this to me is that I've said for a long time that cost and security tend to be inextricably linked, as far as being a sort of trailing reactive afterthought for an awful lot of companies. They care about both of those things right after they failed to adequately care about those things. At least in the cloud economic space, it's only money as opposed to, “Oops, we accidentally lost our customers' data.” So, I always found that I find myself drifting in a security direction if I don't stop myself, just based upon a lot of the cost work I do. Conversely, it seems that you have come from the security side and you find yourself drifting in a costing direction.Your side project is a SaaS offering called unusd.cloud, that's U-N-U-S-D dot cloud. And when you first mentioned this to me, my immediate reaction was, “Oh, great. Another SaaS platform for costing. Let's tear this one apart, too.” Except I actually like what you're building. Tell me about it.Victor: Yeah, and unusd.cloud is a side project for me and I was working since, let's say one year. It was a project that I've deployed for some of my customer on their local account, and it was very useful. And so, I was thinking that it could be a SaaS project. So, I've worked at [unintelligible 00:14:21] so yeah, a few months on shifting the product to assess [unintelligible 00:14:27].The product aim to detect the worst on AWS account on all AWS region, and it scan all your AWS accounts and all your region, and you try to detect and use the EC2, LDS, Glue [unintelligible 00:14:45], SageMaker, and so on, and attach a EBS and so on. I don't craft a new dashboard, a new Cost Explorer, and so on. It's it just cost awareness, it's just a notification on email or Slack or Microsoft Teams. And you just add your AWS account on the project and you schedule, let's say, once a day, and it scan, and it send you a cost of wellness, a [unintelligible 00:15:17] detection, and you can act by turning off what is not used.Corey: What I like about this is it cuts at the number one rule of cloud economics, which is turn that shit off if you're not using it. You wouldn't think that I would need to say that except that everyone seems to be missing that, on some level. And it's easy to do. When you need to spin something up and it's not there, you're very highly incentivized to spin that thing up. When you're not using it, you have to remember that thing exists, otherwise it just sort of sits there forever and doesn't do anything.It just costs money and doesn't generate any value in return for that. What you got right is you've also eviscerated my most common complaint about tools that claim to do this, which is you build in either a explicit rule of ignore this resource or ignore resources with the following tags. The benefit there is that you're not constantly giving me useless advice, like, “Oh, yeah, turn off this idle thing.” It's, yeah, that's there for a reason, maybe it's my dev box, maybe it's my backup site, maybe it's the entire DR environment that I'm going to need at little notice. It solves for that problem beautifully. And though a lot of tools out there claim to do stuff like this, most of them really failed to deliver on that promise.Victor: Yeah, I just want to keep it simple. I don't want to add an additional console and so on. And you are correct. You can apply a simple tag on your asset, let's say an EC2 instances, you apply the tag in use and the value of, and then the alerting is disabled for this asset. And the detection is based on the CPU [unintelligible 00:17:01] and the network health metrics, so when the instances is not used in the last seven days, with a low CPU every [unintelligible 00:17:10] and low network out, it comes as a suspect. [laugh].[midroll 00:17:17]Corey: One thing that I like about what you've done, but also have some reservations about it is that you have not done with so many of these tools do which is, “Oh, just give us all the access in your account. It'll be fine. You can trust us. Don't you want to save money?” And yeah, but I also still want to have a company left when all sudden done.You are very specific on what it is that you're allowed to access, and it's great. I would argue, on some level, it's almost too restrictive. For example, you have the ability to look at EC2, Glue, IAM—just to look at account aliases, great—RDS, Redshift, and SageMaker. And all of these are simply list and describe. There's no gets in there other than in Cost Explorer, which makes sense. You're not able to go rummaging through my data and see what's there. But that also bounds you, on some level, to being able to look only at particular types of resources. Is that accurate or are you using a lot of the CloudWatch stuff and Cost Explorer stuff to see other areas?Victor: In fact, it's the least privilege and read-only permission because I don't want too much question for the security team. So, it's full read-only permission. And I've only added the detection that I'm currently supports. Then if in some weeks, in some months, I'm adding a new detection, let's say for Snapshot, for example, I will need to update, so I will ask my customer to update their template. There is a mechanisms inside the project to tell them that the template is obsolete, but it's not a breaking change.So, the detection will continue, but without the new detection, the new snapshot detection, let's say. So yeah, it's least privilege, and all I need is the get-metric-statistics from CloudWatch to detect unused assets. And also checking [unintelligible 00:19:16] Elastic IP or [unintelligible 00:19:19] EBS volume. So, there is no CloudWatching in this detection.Corey: Also, to be clear, I am not suggesting that what you have done is at all a mistake, even if you bound it to those resources right now. But just because everyone loves to talk about these exciting, amazing, high-level services that AWS has put up there, for example, oh, what about DocumentDB or all these other—you know, Amazon Basics MongoDB; same thing—or all of these other things that they wind up offering, but you take a look at where customers are spending money and where they're surprised to be spending money, it's EC2, it's a bit of RDS, occasionally it's S3, but that's a lot harder to detect automatically whether that data is unused. It's, “You haven't been using this data very much.” It's, “Well, you see how the bucket is labeled ‘Archive Backups' or ‘Regulatory Logs?'” imagine that. What a ridiculous concept.Yeah. Whereas an idle EC2 instance sort of can wind up being useful on this. I am curious whether you encounter in the wild in your customer base, folks who are having idle-looking EC2 instances, but are in fact, for example, using a whole bunch of RAM, which you can't tell from the outside without custom CloudWatch agents.Victor: Yeah, I'm not detecting this behavior for larger usage of RAM, for example, or for maybe there is some custom application that is low in CPU and don't talk to any other services using the network, but with this detection, with the current state of the detection, I'm covering large majority of waste because what I see from my customer is that there is some teams, some data scientists or data teams who are experimenting a lot with SageMaker with Glue, with Endpoint and so on. And this is very expensive at the end of the day because they don't turn off the light at the end of the day, on Friday evening. So, what I'm trying to solve here is to notify the team—so on Slack—when they forgot to turn off the most common waste on AWS, so EC2, LTS, Redshift.Corey: I just now wound up installing it while we've been talking on my dedicated shitposting account, and sure enough, it already spat out a single instance it found, which yeah was running an EC2 instance on the East Coast when I was just there, so that I had a DNS server that was a little bit more local. Okay, great. And it's a T4g.micro, so it's not exactly a whole lot of money, but it does exactly what it says on the tin. It didn't wind up nailing the other instances I have in that account that I'm using for a variety of different things, which is good.And it further didn't wind up falling into the trap that so many things do, which is the, “Oh, it's costing you zero and your spend this month is zero because this account is where I dump all of my AWS credit codes.” So, many things say, “Oh, well, it's not costing you anything, so what's the problem?” And then that's how you accidentally lose $100,000 in activate credits because someone left something running way too long. It does a lot of the right things that I would hope and expect it to do, and the fact that you don't do that is kind of amazing.Victor: Yeah. It was a need from my customer and an opportunity. It's a small bet for me because I'm trying to do some small bets, you know, the small bets approach, so the idea is to try a new thing. It's also an excuse for me to learn something new because building a SaaS is a challenging.Corey: One thing that I am curious about, in this account, I'm also running the controller for my home WiFi environment. And that's not huge. It's T3.small, but it is still something out there that it sits there because I need it to exist. But it's relatively bored.If I go back and look over the last week of CloudWatch metrics, for example, it doesn't look like it's usually busy. I'm sure there's some network traffic in and out as it updates itself and whatnot, but the CPU peeks out at a little under 2% used. It didn't warn on this and it got it right. I'm just curious as to how you did that. What is it looking for to determine whether this instance is unused or not?Victor: It's the magic [laugh]. There is some intelligence artif—no, I'm just kidding. It just statistics. And I'm getting two metrics, the superior average from the last seven days and the network out. And I'm getting the average on those metrics and I'm doing some assumption that this EC2, this specific EC2 is not used because of these metrics, this server average.Corey: Yeah, it is wild to me just that this is working as well as it is. It's just… like, it does exactly what I would expect it to do. It's clear that—and this is going to sound weird, but I'm going to say it anyway—that this was built from someone who was looking to answer the question themselves and not from the perspective of, “Well, we need to build a product and we have access to all of this data from the API. How can we slice and dice it and add some value as we go?” I really liked the approach that you've taken on this. I don't say that often or lightly, particularly when it comes to cloud costing stuff, but this is something I'll be using in some of my own nonsense.Victor: Thanks. I appreciate it.Corey: So, I really want to thank you for taking as much time as you have to talk about who you are and what you're up to. If people want to learn more, where can they find you?Victor: Mainly on Twitter, my handle is @zoph [laugh]. And, you know, on LinkedIn or on my company website, as zoph.io.Corey: And we will, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:25:23]. Thank you so much for your time today. I really appreciate it.Victor: Thank you, Corey, for having me. It was a pleasure to chat with you.Corey: Victor Grenu, independent AWS architect. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an insulting comment that is going to cost you an absolute arm and a leg because invariably, you're going to forget to turn it off when you're done.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

YOU CAN Make a Living In The Music Industry Podcast
Season 4 - Episode 2: Pam Lewis - The Glue That Holds It All Together

YOU CAN Make a Living In The Music Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 62:00


  This week I'm talking with Pam Lewis of PLA Media in Nashville. PLA is a Public Relations company that gets their clients in front of audiences and consumers through public appearances on tv and in print.  Pam has an amazing history of being one of the people who launched MTV in the early 80s and also helped launch the careers of Garth Brooks and Tricia Yearwood. We are discussing the abilities you need to have to work for a PR firm as well as what it takes to start your own PR company.  Sponsors: Edenbrooke Productions - We offer consulting services and are offering listeners a 1-hour introductory special. To request more info on consulting services, email Marty at contact@johnmartinkeith.com.  In this episode we discuss: *A publicist (Public Relations) is the glue that holds it all together. *Helping launch MTV. *A publicist's job is to listen to the artist, hear your dreams and take them to the next level and make you a household name. *Publicists do press releases, promote concerts, booking events, finding endorsements, etc. *Publicists have to go through more levels of bureaucracy with major label artists. *Helping launch Garth Brooks and Trisha Yearwood's careers. *Starting an independent PR company called PLA Media.
*A good publicist helps connect the dots. *Looking for unique opportunities for clients, not the obvious ones. *Be Tenacious. *First thing to ask a publication is if they're on deadline. If they are don't bother them. *Find common ground with whoever is on the phone with you. *Our job is to create a buzz. *Rates to hire PLA Media start at $2000-2500 a month and go up from there. *It's best to do at least 3 months with PR to do as much as possible. *What it takes to start your own PR company. *Can you provide a valuable service to clients? *You have to have boundaries. *Learn how to work a room. *Be a good listener. *Learn how to talk on the phone. *www.plamedia.com   BIO: Pamela Lewis, a native of upstate New York, is an entrepreneur, preservationist, philanthropist and author. A graduate of Wells College with a B.A. in Economics/Marketing and a minor in French and Communications. Lewis spent a year in Paris studying at COUP (Center of Overseas Undergraduate Program) affiliated with The Sorbonne University. In New York City, she did additional graduate course work at Fordham University, The New York School for Social Research, The Publicity Club of New York and Scarritt Bennett. Lewis is also a graduate of University of Tennessee's Institute of Public Service Local Government Leadership Program (third level), of the Belmont University College of Business Administration's Scarlett Leadership Institute Mini Executive MBA program, of Leadership Music, of the Citizen's Police Academy and of the Leadership Middle Tennessee 2020 program. From 1980 to 1984, Lewis was part of the original publicity/marketing team of WASEC (Warner Amex Satellite Entertainment Company), a joint venture of Warner Communications and American Express, that launched MTV to the world. She also worked with MTV's sister cable channels Nickelodeon, The Movie Channel, and the Arts & Entertainment Network (A&E). Lewis was relocated to Nashville from New York City to accept the position of National Media Director at RCA Records helping to shape the careers of top country stars such as Dolly Parton, Kenny Rogers, The Judds, and Alabama. In 1985, Lewis opened her own PR firm, Pam Lewis and Associates (which later became PLA Media). In 1987, she formed award-winning Doyle/Lewis Management with partner Bob Doyle. The first client Lewis agreed to represent was an unknown Oklahoma crooner named Garth Brooks, who she worked with until 1994. Lewis also managed Trisha Yearwood‘s early career, landing her a record deal at MCA Records. Under Lewis' guidance, Yearwood released her debut self-titled album in 1991, becoming the first female country musician to sell one million records off her first single “She's In Love With The Boy.” The album went on to be certified double platinum, and Yearwood went on to win the Academy of Country Music award for Top Female Vocalist later that year. The two enjoyed a successful partnership which broke new ground in music winning all of the following: Performance Magazine's “Country Music Managers of the Year” two consecutive years '92 and '93, Pollstar Award “Personal Manager of the Year '92, Country Music Association's “Artist Manager of the Year”, SRO Award '01 (The first female executive to win this award), Nashville Business Journal's 40 Under 40 listing in '95 & '96, Who's Who in Executives, International Society of Poets Distinguished Member, Franklin Police Department Order of Excellence '15 & Tennessee Association of Museums Award in recognition of superlative achievement for publications PR kit. Eventually, Doyle and Lewis parted ways, and Pam turned her focus solely to PLA Media. In 2003, Lewis made her first foray into the world of politics running for office of alderman-at-large in Franklin, Tennessee. She won a four-year term, and was the only female on the board for two years. She also served as Vice Mayor for one year, and was elected to the Franklin Planning Commission and Historic Zoning Commission. In 2016, she was voted as a one of the top Female Entrepreneur by Your Williamson Magazine, and was invited to be part of the 2017-2018 class of Leadership Franklin. Lewis has served on or chaired multiple committees, including: The Tennessee State Museum, Tennessee First Lady Andrea Conte's You Have The Power, BRIDGES Domestic Violence Center, Sister Cities of Franklin, Battlefield Commission, mayor-appointed Franklin Housing Commission, Nashville Historic Commission, Historic Cemetery Commission, ARC Board and the Tennessee Preservation Trust. Her other community outreach efforts include historic preservation and green space causes, women and children's advocacy, educational scholarships, fair housing and environmental and animal rights protection. Since its inception, the Pam Lewis Foundation has given away a million dollars to numerous charities. She has been recognized for her business success/entrepreneurship, community outreach and preservation efforts by the Metro Nashville Historic Commission, Franklin Tennessee Heritage Foundation, African American Heritage Foundation, Tennessee State Museum and Tennessee Preservation Trust. In 2017, she produced a documentary of African American remembrances and contributions and was honored to give the commencement address at her alma mater Wells College, Aurora, New York in May 2017. She is a 2020 graduate of Leadership Middle Tennessee.

Inspo Podcast
106. Why is my glue not lasting?!??

Inspo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 21:33


These tips might change everything about your retention, especially during the months where the season is changing in your town. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Chris Plante Show
10-24-22 Hour 3 - Glue and Potatoes, its the weather!

The Chris Plante Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 38:00


In hour 3, guest host Mike Opelka talks about climate protests in europe from Gluing their hands to a cold garage floor to throwing mashed potatoes at artwork, all of this is for the planet somehow... For more coverage on the issues that matter to you download the WMAL app, visit WMAL.com or tune in live on WMAL-FM 105.9 from 9:00am-12:00pm Monday-Friday.To join the conversation, check us out on twitter @WMAL and @ChrisPlanteShowSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Super Reformed Bros
Episode 24: Halloween, Glue, and Numbman!

Super Reformed Bros

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 56:29


In this episode we discuss Halloween and our opinions on it, glue(just listen), and we play a game of Would You Rather. As always we end with some WreckSomeMendations! If you would like to leave a voicemail: https://anchor.fm/alex-slater5/message Check out our website: Superreformedbros.com Check out our sponsor: Squatchaway.com Use the code SRB2022 to save 10% on your entire purchase!

Woodshop Life Podcast
Burned By Clients, Box Material, Glue Creep, & MUCH MORE!

Woodshop Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 54:49 Very Popular


Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/woodshoplife   Sean 1) Wanted to start off by saying how much I enjoy listening to all yall! Been learning quite a bit from the 3 of you. My question seems fairly simple but I know it can turn into a can of worms depending on who you ask. Anyways, considering the woods: Walnut, Red Oak, White Oak, Paduk, and other species similar to those listed. What would be each your top 3 finishes and why? Finished look that I'm not after is shiny or "plastic" looking. I feel it looks really tacky. I'm more towards flat and matte. Thanks for everything yall do! 2) Hello everyone, Wondering what materials you prefer using when building boxes? I see many people using BB ply but wondering if you prefer using solid wood over the ply (soft maple, poplar?). Thanks, Paul at Twin Lake Woodshop   Guy 1) I am a hobbyist woodworker and constantly battling kids' clutter and vehicles in my shop.  All my tools are mobile but, one challenge that I come across is finding level ground to set up my tools on.  My garage has a floor has a  drain in the center of it and the floors all slope inward accordingly making it difficult to set up level and flat,  ie: Dewalt Contractor saw and outfeed table.  Any suggestions that you may have other than re-pouring the floor or building it up would be greatly appreciated. Thanks again, and keep up the great work. Mike from Calgary Alberta Canada. 2) Just recently started listening to your podcast.  I was hoping you guys could discuss a topic I am wrestling with called glue creep.  Last year I completed 2 table top projects using Titebond 2.  1 project I used 8/4 white oak and the other was 8/4 hard maple (both dried ~14-17% MC in SE Indiana).  At the time of project completion, both tables were sanded smooth and finished (1 with a stain and water based poly, the other with briwax).  However, after a year I can feel the glue seam of both tables with my fingernail which I am learning is a condition called glue creep.  I am not sure if it is because the wood is shrinking and the glue isnt, or if the glue is expanding due to joint stress?  The joints seemed rather tight from the jointer and I used dowel rods (triton dowel joint tool) to align them.  Curious if its the glue or joint stress from either not tight joint faces or dowel rods that are not aligned perfectly causing joint stress.  I do find that some dowels are not perfectly aligned when I clamp because the tool has a ton of issues, I just recently bought a domino jointer XL so I hope this helps with alignment. I would like to know how to avoid this as it poses a threat to the quality of my project.  Thank you ! Ty   Huy 1)  I've had the bad fortune of being burned by a few clients, the common denominator in these experiences being that I either didn't ask the right questions or set the right expectations in the intake stage of the process. For instance, one client refused to pay the balance he owed on a Murphy bed because it took too long to finish. The reason it took so long, however, was that the bed I built for him was too big to fit up his staircase, so I had to build a second that could be assembled on site. On other occasions, I've had clients request a custom quote or design, then balk at the price and vanish on me, leaving me out several hours of work designing a piece I no longer have any intention of building. I'd love to hear what your intake process is from the moment you receive a request to when you start building so you can anticipate and sidestep potential issues such as these. I modify my intake questionnaire each time I have one of these experiences (e.g., charging a design fee, asking whether there's a clear path to the landing site, etc.), but I worry there's icebergs I don't see and would love to benefit from more knowledgeable peers. Thanks again, Patrick Bock PDB Creations 2) I recently finished a console table and had some questions about the joinery. The table and legs were 2-3/4” thick and 15” wide solid poplar. For the joinery I planned on using dowels and my mastercraft drill guide. My first plan was to use 3 each leg 1-3/8” diameter dowels but when I practiced the drilling with the guide I could not get repeatable 90deg holes. I ended up using a simple guide and drilling 1/2” dowels but still had some small issues with alignment so on the second leg I made a template and things went much smoother. Anyways I was wondering what you all would do without having a high end drill guide, drill press, or domino. The legs were to big for me to feel comfortable making a Traditional tenon on my contractor saw so that's why I went with the dowels. Anyways the table turned out great just trying to think of new ideas for next time.  Thanks in advance. Big fan of the show. Adam  

The Alan Cox Show
Veggie Fails/ Box Snores/ Killer Glue/ Snake On A Plane/ Bathroom Baller/ Mo Rocca/ Poundcake Sports Break/ Fly LAX

The Alan Cox Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 161:51


The Alan Cox Show
Veggie Fails/ Box Snores/ Killer Glue/ Snake On A Plane/ Bathroom Baller/ Mo Rocca/ Poundcake Sports Break/ Fly LAX

The Alan Cox Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 164:19


The Chris Plante Show
10-14-22 Hour 2 - Jan 6th hearing - a coup against Trump

The Chris Plante Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 37:44


In hour 2, Chris talks about news uncovered in the January 6th trial, that Trump had given the order to pull troops out of Afghanistan before he left office, and the military top brass just said no!  Also, silly british oil protests with Glue! For more coverage on the issues that matter to you download the WMAL app, visit WMAL.com or tune in live on WMAL-FM 105.9 from 9:00am-12:00pm Monday-Friday.To join the conversation, check us out on twitter @WMAL and @ChrisPlanteShowSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Friday Beers Podcast
Zach Sudfeld on Aaron Hernandez, The P Squad, and Being a Glue Guy

The Friday Beers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 95:42


-P Squad to big time NFL -Patriots vs. Jets -Bill Bellichick as a football coach -Rex Ryan's Foot Fetish -40 for 40 with Zach Sudfeld -Sudfeld as a rookie during the Aaron Hernandez case

Screaming in the Cloud
Dynamic Configuration Through AWS AppConfig with Steve Rice

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 35:54


About Steve:Steve Rice is Principal Product Manager for AWS AppConfig. He is surprisingly passionate about feature flags and continuous configuration. He lives in the Washington DC area with his wife, 3 kids, and 2 incontinent dogs.Links Referenced:AWS AppConfig: https://go.aws/awsappconfig TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at AWS AppConfig. Engineers love to solve, and occasionally create, problems. But not when it's an on-call fire-drill at 4 in the morning. Software problems should drive innovation and collaboration, NOT stress, and sleeplessness, and threats of violence. That's why so many developers are realizing the value of AWS AppConfig Feature Flags. Feature Flags let developers push code to production, but hide that that feature from customers so that the developers can release their feature when it's ready. This practice allows for safe, fast, and convenient software development. You can seamlessly incorporate AppConfig Feature Flags into your AWS or cloud environment and ship your Features with excitement, not trepidation and fear. To get started, go to snark.cloud/appconfig. That's snark.cloud/appconfig.Corey: Forget everything you know about SSH and try Tailscale. Imagine if you didn't need to manage PKI or rotate SSH keys every time someone leaves. That'd be pretty sweet, wouldn't it? With tail scale, ssh, you can do exactly that. Tail scale gives each server and user device a node key to connect to its VPN, and it uses the same node key to authorize and authenticate.S. Basically you're SSHing the same way you manage access to your app. What's the benefit here? Built in key rotation permissions is code connectivity between any two devices, reduce latency and there's a lot more, but there's a time limit here. You can also ask users to reauthenticate for that extra bit of security. Sounds expensive?Nope, I wish it were. tail scales. Completely free for personal use on up to 20 devices. To learn more, visit snark.cloud/tailscale. Again, that's snark.cloud/tailscaleCorey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. This is a promoted guest episode. What does that mean? Well, it means that some people don't just want me to sit here and throw slings and arrows their way, they would prefer to send me a guest specifically, and they do pay for that privilege, which I appreciate. Paying me is absolutely a behavior I wish to endorse.Today's victim who has decided to contribute to slash sponsor my ongoing ridiculous nonsense is, of all companies, AWS. And today I'm talking to Steve Rice, who's the principal product manager on AWS AppConfig. Steve, thank you for joining me.Steve: Hey, Corey, great to see you. Thanks for having me. Looking forward to a conversation.Corey: As am I. Now, AppConfig does something super interesting, which I'm not aware of any other service or sub-service doing. You are under the umbrella of AWS Systems Manager, but you're not going to market with Systems Manager AppConfig. You're just AWS AppConfig. Why?Steve: So, AppConfig is part of AWS Systems Manager. Systems Manager has, I think, 17 different features associated with it. Some of them have an individual name that is associated with Systems Manager, some of them don't. We just happen to be one that doesn't. AppConfig is a service that's been around for a while internally before it was launched externally a couple years ago, so I'd say that's probably the origin of the name and the service. I can tell you more about the origin of the service if you're curious.Corey: Oh, I absolutely am. But I just want to take a bit of a detour here and point out that I make fun of the sub-service names in Systems Manager an awful lot, like Systems Manager Session Manager and Systems Manager Change Manager. And part of the reason I do that is not just because it's funny, but because almost everything I found so far within the Systems Manager umbrella is pretty awesome. It aligns with how I tend to think about the world in a bunch of different ways. I have yet to see anything lurking within the Systems Manager umbrella that has led to a tee-hee-hee bill surprise level that rivals, you know, the GDP of Guam. So, I'm a big fan of the entire suite of services. But yes, how did AppConfig get its name?Steve: [laugh]. So, AppConfig started about six years ago, now, internally. So, we actually were part of the region services department inside of Amazon, which is in charge of launching new services around the world. We found that a centralized tool for configuration associated with each service launching was really helpful. So, a service might be launching in a new region and have to enable and disable things as it moved along.And so, the tool was sort of built for that, turning on and off things as the region developed and was ready to launch publicly; then the regions launch publicly. It turned out that our internal customers, which are a lot of AWS services and then some Amazon services as well, started to use us beyond launching new regions, and started to use us for feature flagging. Again, turning on and off capabilities, launching things safely. And so, it became massively popular; we were actually a top 30 service internally in terms of usage. And two years ago, we thought we really should launch this externally and let our customers benefit from some of the goodness that we put in there, and some of—those all come from the mistakes we've made internally. And so, it became AppConfig. In terms of the name itself, we specialize in application configuration, so that's kind of a mouthful, so we just changed it to AppConfig.Corey: Earlier this year, there was a vulnerability reported around I believe it was AWS Glue, but please don't quote me on that. And as part of its excellent response that AWS put out, they said that from the time that it was disclosed to them, they had patched the service and rolled it out to every AWS region in which Glue existed in a little under 29 hours, which at scale is absolutely magic fast. That is superhero speed and then some because you generally don't just throw something over the wall, regardless of how small it is when we're talking about something at the scale of AWS. I mean, look at who your customers are; mistakes will show. This also got me thinking that when you have Adam, or previously Andy, on stage giving a keynote announcement and then they mention something on stage, like, “Congratulations. It's now a very complicated service with 14 adjectives in his name because someone's paid by the syllable. Great.”Suddenly, the marketing pages are up, the APIs are working, it's showing up in the console, and it occurs to me only somewhat recently to think about all of the moving parts that go on behind this. That is far faster than even the improved speed of CloudFront distribution updates. There's very clearly something going on there. So, I've got to ask, is that you?Steve: Yes, a lot of that is us. I can't take credit for a hundred percent of what you're talking about, but that's how we are used. We're essentially used as a feature-flagging service. And I can talk generically about feature flagging. Feature flagging allows you to push code out to production, but it's hidden behind a configuration switch: a feature toggle or a feature flag. And that code can be sitting out there, nobody can access it until somebody flips that toggle. Now, the smart way to do it is to flip that toggle on for a small set of users. Maybe it's just internal users, maybe it's 1% of your users. And so, the features available, you can—Corey: It's your best slash worst customers [laugh] in that 1%, in some cases.Steve: Yeah, you want to stress test the system with them and you want to be able to look and see what's going to break before it breaks for everybody. So, you release us to a small cohort, you measure your operations, you measure your application health, you measure your reputational concerns, and then if everything goes well, then you maybe bump it up to 2%, and then 10%, and then 20%. So, feature flags allow you to slowly release features, and you know what you're releasing by the time it's at a hundred percent. It's tempting for teams to want to, like, have everybody access it at the same time; you've been working hard on this feature for a long time. But again, that's kind of an anti-pattern. You want to make sure that on production, it behaves the way you expect it to behave.Corey: I have to ask what is the fundamental difference between feature flags and/or dynamic configuration. Because to my mind, one of them is a means of achieving the other, but I could also see very easily using the terms interchangeably. Given that in some of our conversations, you have corrected me which, first, how dare you? Secondly, okay, there's probably a reason here. What is that point of distinction?Steve: Yeah. Typically for those that are not eat, sleep, and breathing dynamic configuration—which I do—and most people are not obsessed with this kind of thing, feature flags is kind of a shorthand for dynamic configuration. It allows you to turn on and off things without pushing out any new code. So, your application code's running, it's pulling its configuration data, say every five seconds, every ten seconds, something like that, and when that configuration data changes, then that app changes its behavior, again, without a code push or without restarting the app.So, dynamic configuration is maybe a superset of feature flags. Typically, when people think feature flags, they're thinking of, “Oh, I'm going to release a new feature, so it's almost like an on-off switch.” But we see customers using feature flags—and we use this internally—for things like throttling limits. Let's say you want to be able to throttle TPS transactions per second. Or let's say you want to throttle the number of simultaneous background tasks, and say, you know, I just really don't want this creeping above 50; bad things can start to happen.But in a period of stress, you might want to actually bring that number down. Well, you can push out these changes with dynamic configuration—which is, again, any type of configuration, not just an on-off switch—you can push this out and adjust the behavior and see what happens. Again, I'd recommend pushing it out to 1% of your users, and then 10%. But it allows you to have these dials and switches to do that. And, again, generically, that's dynamic configuration. It's not as fun to term as feature flags; feature flags is sort of a good mental picture, so I do use them interchangeably, but if you're really into the whole world of this dynamic configuration, then you probably will care about the difference.Corey: Which makes a fair bit of sense. It's the question of what are you talking about high level versus what are you talking about implementation detail-wise.Steve: Yep. Yep.Corey: And on some level, I used to get… well, we'll call it angsty—because I can't think of a better adjective right now—about how AWS was reluctant to disclose implementation details behind what it did. And in the fullness of time, it's made a lot more sense to me, specifically through a lens of, you want to be able to have the freedom to change how something works under the hood. And if you've made no particular guarantee about the implementation detail, you can do that without potentially worrying about breaking a whole bunch of customer expectations that you've inadvertently set. And that makes an awful lot of sense.The idea of rolling out changes to your infrastructure has evolved over the last decade. Once upon a time you'd have EC2 instances, and great, you want to go ahead and make a change there—or this actually predates EC2 instances. Virtual machines in a data center or heaven forbid, bare metal servers, you're not going to deploy a whole new server because there's a new version of the code out, so you separate out your infrastructure from the code that it runs. And that worked out well. And increasingly, we started to see ways of okay, if we want to change the behavior of the application, we'll just push out new environment variables to that thing and restart the service so it winds up consuming those.And that's great. You've rolled it out throughout your fleet. With containers, which is sort of the next logical step, well, okay, this stuff gets baked in, we'll just restart containers with a new version of code because that takes less than a second each and you're fine. And then Lambda functions, it's okay, we'll just change the deployment option and the next invocation will wind up taking the brand new environment variables passed out to it. How do feature flags feature into those, I guess, three evolving methods of running applications in anger, by which I mean, of course, production?Steve: [laugh]. Good question. And I think you really articulated that well.Corey: Well, thank you. I should hope so. I'm a storyteller. At least I fancy myself one.Steve: [laugh]. Yes, you are. Really what you talked about is the evolution of you know, at the beginning, people were—well, first of all, people probably were embedding their variables deep in their code and then they realized, “Oh, I want to change this,” and now you have to find where in my code that is. And so, it became a pattern. Why don't we separate everything that's a configuration data into its own file? But it'll get compiled at build time and sent out all at once.There was kind of this breakthrough that was, why don't we actually separate out the deployment of this? We can separate the deployment from code from the deployment of configuration data, and have the code be reading that configuration data on a regular interval, as I already said. So now, as the environments have changed—like you said, containers and Lambda—that ability to make tweaks at microsecond intervals is more important and more powerful. So, there certainly is still value in having things like environment variables that get read at startup. We call that static configuration as opposed to dynamic configuration.And that's a very important element in the world of containers that you talked about. Containers are a bit ephemeral, and so they kind of come and go, and you can restart things, or you might spin up new containers that are slightly different config and have them operate in a certain way. And again, Lambda takes that to the next level. I'm really excited where people are going to take feature flags to the next level because already today we have people just fine-tuning to very targeted small subsets, different configuration data, different feature flag data, and allows them to do this like at we've never seen before scale of turning this on, seeing how it reacts, seeing how the application behaves, and then being able to roll that out to all of your audience.Now, you got to be careful, you really don't want to have completely different configurations out there and have 10 different, or you know, 100 different configurations out there. That makes it really tough to debug. So, you want to think of this as I want to roll this out gradually over time, but eventually, you want to have this sort of state where everything is somewhat consistent.Corey: That, on some level, speaks to a level of operational maturity that my current deployment adventures generally don't have. A common reference I make is to my lasttweetinaws.com Twitter threading app. And anyone can visit it, use it however they want.And it uses a Route 53 latency record to figure out, ah, which is the closest region to you because I've deployed it to 20 different regions. Now, if this were a paid service, or I had people using this in large volume and I had to worry about that sort of thing, I would probably approach something that is very close to what you describe. In practice, I pick a devoted region that I deploy something to, and cool, that's sort of my canary where I get things working the way I would expect. And when that works the way I want it to I then just push it to everything else automatically. Given that I've put significant effort into getting deployments down to approximately two minutes to deploy to everything, it feels like that's a reasonable amount of time to push something out.Whereas if I were, I don't know, running a bank, for example, I would probably have an incredibly heavy process around things that make changes to things like payment or whatnot. Because despite the lies, we all like to tell both to ourselves and in public, anything that touches payments does go through waterfall, not agile iterative development because that mistake tends to show up on your customer's credit card bills, and then they're also angry. I think that there's a certain point of maturity you need to be at as either an organization or possibly as a software technology stack before something like feature flags even becomes available to you. Would you agree with that, or is this something everyone should use?Steve: I would agree with that. Definitely, a small team that has communication flowing between the two probably won't get as much value out of a gradual release process because everybody kind of knows what's going on inside of the team. Once your team scales, or maybe your audience scales, that's when it matters more. You really don't want to have something blow up with your users. You really don't want to have people getting paged in the middle of the night because of a change that was made. And so, feature flags do help with that.So typically, the journey we see is people start off in a maybe very small startup. They're releasing features at a very fast pace. They grow and they start to build their own feature flagging solution—again, at companies I've been at previously have done that—and you start using feature flags and you see the power of it. Oh, my gosh, this is great. I can release something when I want without doing a big code push. I can just do a small little change, and if something goes wrong, I can roll it back instantly. That's really handy.And so, the basics of feature flagging might be a homegrown solution that you all have built. If you really lean into that and start to use it more, then you probably want to look at a third-party solution because there's so many features out there that you might want. A lot of them are around safeguards that makes sure that releasing a new feature is safe. You know, again, pushing out a new feature to everybody could be similar to pushing out untested code to production. You don't want to do that, so you need to have, you know, some checks and balances in your release process of your feature flags, and that's what a lot of third parties do.It really depends—to get back to your question about who needs feature flags—it depends on your audience size. You know, if you have enough audience out there to want to do a small rollout to a small set first and then have everybody hit it, that's great. Also, if you just have, you know, one or two developers, then feature flags are probably something that you're just kind of, you're doing yourself, you're pushing out this thing anyway on your own, but you don't need it coordinated across your team.Corey: I think that there's also a bit of—how to frame this—misunderstanding on someone's part about where AppConfig starts and where it stops. When it was first announced, feature flags were one of the things that it did. And that was talked about on stage, I believe in re:Invent, but please don't quote me on that, when it wound up getting announced. And then in the fullness of time, there was another announcement of AppConfig now supports feature flags, which I'm sitting there and I had to go back to my old notes. Like, did I hallucinate this? Which again, would not be the first time I'd imagine such a thing. But no, it was originally how the service was described, but now it's extra feature flags, almost like someone would, I don't know, flip on a feature-flag toggle for the service and now it does a different thing. What changed? What was it that was misunderstood about the service initially versus what it became?Steve: Yeah, I wouldn't say it was a misunderstanding. I think what happened was we launched it, guessing what our customers were going to use it as. We had done plenty of research on that, and as I mentioned before we had—Corey: Please tell me someone used it as a database. Or am I the only nutter that does stuff like that?Steve: We have seen that before. We have seen something like that before.Corey: Excellent. Excellent, excellent. I approve.Steve: And so, we had done our due diligence ahead of time about how we thought people were going to use it. We were right about a lot of it. I mentioned before that we have a lot of usage internally, so you know, that was kind of maybe cheating even for us to be able to sort of see how this is going to evolve. What we did announce, I guess it was last November, was an opinionated version of feature flags. So, we had people using us for feature flags, but they were building their own structure, their own JSON, and there was not a dedicated console experience for feature flags.What we announced last November was an opinionated version that structured the JSON in a way that we think is the right way, and that afforded us the ability to have a smooth console experience. So, if we know what the structure of the JSON is, we can have things like toggles and validations in there that really specifically look at some of the data points. So, that's really what happened. We're just making it easier for our customers to use us for feature flags. We still have some customers that are kind of building their own solution, but we're seeing a lot of them move over to our opinionated version.Corey: This episode is brought to us in part by our friends at Datadog. Datadog's SaaS monitoring and security platform that enables full stack observability for developers, IT operations, security, and business teams in the cloud age. Datadog's platform, along with 500 plus vendor integrations, allows you to correlate metrics, traces, logs, and security signals across your applications, infrastructure, and third party services in a single pane of glass.Combine these with drag and drop dashboards and machine learning based alerts to help teams troubleshoot and collaborate more effectively, prevent downtime, and enhance performance and reliability. Try Datadog in your environment today with a free 14 day trial and get a complimentary T-shirt when you install the agent.To learn more, visit datadoghq/screaminginthecloud to get. That's www.datadoghq/screaminginthecloudCorey: Part of the problem I have when I look at what it is you folks do, and your use cases, and how you structure it is, it's similar in some respects to how folks perceive things like FIS, the fault injection service, or chaos engineering, as is commonly known, which is, “We can't even get the service to stay up on its own for any [unintelligible 00:18:35] period of time. What do you mean, now let's intentionally degrade it and make it work?” There needs to be a certain level of operational stability or operational maturity. When you're still building a service before it's up and running, feature flags seem awfully premature because there's no one depending on it. You can change configuration however your little heart desires. In most cases. I'm sure at certain points of scale of development teams, you have a communications problem internally, but it's not aimed at me trying to get something working at 2 a.m. in the middle of the night.Whereas by the time folks are ready for what you're doing, they clearly have that level of operational maturity established. So, I have to guess on some level, that your typical adopter of AppConfig feature flags isn't in fact, someone who is, “Well, we're ready for feature flags; let's go,” but rather someone who's come up with something else as a stopgap as they've been iterating forward. Usually something homebuilt. And it might very well be you have the exact same biggest competitor that I do in my consulting work, which is of course, Microsoft Excel as people try to build their own thing that works in their own way.Steve: Yeah, so definitely a very common customer of ours is somebody that is using a homegrown solution for turning on and off things. And they really feel like I'm using the heck out of these feature flags. I'm using them on a daily or weekly basis. I would like to have some enhancements to how my feature flags work, but I have limited resources and I'm not sure that my resources should be building enhancements to a feature-flagging service, but instead, I'd rather have them focusing on something, you know, directly for our customers, some of the core features of whatever your company does. And so, that's when people sort of look around externally and say, “Oh, let me see if there's some other third-party service or something built into AWS like AWS AppConfig that can meet those needs.”And so absolutely, the workflows get more sophisticated, the ability to move forward faster becomes more important, and do so in a safe way. I used to work at a cybersecurity company and we would kind of joke that the security budget of the company is relatively low until something bad happens, and then it's, you know, whatever you need to spend on it. It's not quite the same with feature flags, but you do see when somebody has a problem on production, and they want to be able to turn something off right away or make an adjustment right away, then the ability to do that in a measured way becomes incredibly important. And so, that's when, again, you'll see customers starting to feel like they're outgrowing their homegrown solution and moving to something that's a third-party solution.Corey: Honestly, I feel like so many tools exist in this space, where, “Oh, yeah, you should definitely use this tool.” And most people will use that tool. The second time. Because the first time, it's one of those, “How hard could that be out? I can build something like that in a weekend.” Which is sort of the rallying cry of doomed engineers who are bad at scoping.And by the time that they figure out why, they have to backtrack significantly. There's a whole bunch of stuff that I have built that people look at and say, “Wow, that's a really great design. What inspired you to do that?” And the absolute honest answer to all of it is simply, “Yeah, I worked in roles for the first time I did it the way you would think I would do it and it didn't go well.” Experience is what you get when you didn't get what you wanted, and this is one of those areas where it tends to manifest in reasonable ways.Steve: Absolutely, absolutely.Corey: So, give me an example here, if you don't mind, about how feature flags can improve the day-to-day experience of an engineering team or an engineer themselves. Because we've been down this path enough, in some cases, to know the failure modes, but for folks who haven't been there that's trying to shave a little bit off of their journey of, “I'm going to learn from my own mistakes.” Eh, learn from someone else's. What are the benefits that accrue and are felt immediately?Steve: Yeah. So, we kind of have a policy that the very first commit of any new feature ought to be the feature flag. That's that sort of on-off switch that you want to put there so that you can start to deploy your code and not have a long-lived branch in your source code. But you can have your code there, it reads whether that configuration is on or off. You start with it off.And so, it really helps just while developing these things about keeping your branches short. And you can push the mainline, as long as the feature flag is off and the feature is hidden to production, which is great. So, that helps with the mess of doing big code merges. The other part is around the launch of a feature.So, you talked about Andy Jassy being on stage to launch a new feature. Sort of the old way of doing this, Corey, was that you would need to look at your pipelines and see how long it might take for you to push out your code with any sort of code change in it. And let's say that was an hour-and-a-half process and let's say your CEO is on stage at eight o'clock on a Friday. And as much as you like to say it, “Oh, I'm never pushing out code on a Friday,” sometimes you have to. The old way—Corey: Yeah, that week, yes you are, whether you want to or not.Steve: [laugh]. Exactly, exactly. The old way was this idea that I'm going to time my release, and it takes an hour-and-a-half; I'm going to push it out, and I'll do my best, but hopefully, when the CEO raises her arm or his arm up and points to a screen that everything's lit up. Well, let's say you're doing that and something goes wrong and you have to start over again. Well, oh, my goodness, we're 15 minutes behind, can you accelerate things? And then you start to pull away some of these blockers to accelerate your pipeline or you start editing it right in the console of your application, which is generally not a good idea right before a really big launch.So, the new way is, I'm going to have that code already out there on a Wednesday [laugh] before this big thing on a Friday, but it's hidden behind this feature flag, I've already turned it on and off for internals, and it's just waiting there. And so, then when the CEO points to the big screen, you can just flip that one small little configuration change—and that can be almost instantaneous—and people can access it. So, that just reduces the amount of stress, reduces the amount of risk in pushing out your code.Another thing is—we've heard this from customers—customers are increasing the number of deploys that they can do per week by a very large percentage because they're deploying with confidence. They know that I can push out this code and it's off by default, then I can turn it on whenever I feel like it, and then I can turn it off if something goes wrong. So, if you're into CI/CD, you can actually just move a lot faster with a number of pushes to production each week, which again, I think really helps engineers on their day-to-day lives. The final thing I'm going to talk about is that let's say you did push out something, and for whatever reason, that following weekend, something's going wrong. The old way was oop, you're going to get a page, I'm going to have to get on my computer and go and debug things and fix things, and then push out a new code change.And this could be late on a Saturday evening when you're out with friends. If there's a feature flag there that can turn it off and if this feature is not critical to the operation of your product, you can actually just go in and flip that feature flag off until the next morning or maybe even Monday morning. So, in theory, you kind of get your free time back when you are implementing feature flags. So, I think those are the big benefits for engineers in using feature flags.Corey: And the best way to figure out whether someone is speaking from a position of experience or is simply a raving zealot when they're in a position where they are incentivized to advocate for a particular way of doing things or a particular product, as—let's be clear—you are in that position, is to ask a form of the following question. Let's turn it around for a second. In what scenarios would you absolutely not want to use feature flags? What problems arise? When do you take a look at a situation and say, “Oh, yeah, feature flags will make things worse, instead of better. Don't do it.”Steve: I'm not sure I wouldn't necessarily don't do it—maybe I am that zealot—but you got to do it carefully.Corey: [laugh].Steve: You really got to do things carefully because as I said before, flipping on a feature flag for everybody is similar to pushing out untested code to production. So, you want to do that in a measured way. So, you need to make sure that you do a couple of things. One, there should be some way to measure what the system behavior is for a small set of users with that feature flag flipped to on first. And it could be some canaries that you're using for that.You can also—there's other mechanisms you can do that to: set up cohorts and beta testers and those kinds of things. But I would say the gradual rollout and the targeted rollout of a feature flag is critical. You know, again, it sounds easy, “I'll just turn it on later,” but you ideally don't want to do that. The second thing you want to do is, if you can, is there some sort of validation that the feature flag is what you expect? So, I was talking about on-off feature flags; there are things, as when I was talking about dynamic configuration, that are things like throttling limits, that you actually want to make sure that you put in some other safeguards that say, “I never want my TPS to go above 1200 and never want to set it below 800,” for whatever reason, for example. Well, you want to have some sort of validation of that data before the feature flag gets pushed out. Inside Amazon, we actually have the policy that every single flag needs to have some sort of validation around it so that we don't accidentally fat-finger something out before it goes out there. And we have fat-fingered things.Corey: Typing the wrong thing into a command structure into a tool? “Who would ever do something like that?” He says, remembering times he's taken production down himself, exactly that way.Steve: Exactly, exactly, yeah. And we've done it at Amazon and AWS, for sure. And so yeah, if you have some sort of structure or process to validate that—because oftentimes, what you're doing is you're trying to remediate something in production. Stress levels are high, it is especially easy to fat-finger there. So, that check-and-balance of a validation is important.And then ideally, you have something to automatically roll back whatever change that you made, very quickly. So AppConfig, for example, hooks up to CloudWatch alarms. If an alarm goes off, we're actually going to roll back instantly whatever that feature flag was to its previous state so that you don't even need to really worry about validating against your CloudWatch. It'll just automatically do that against whatever alarms you have.Corey: One of the interesting parts about working at Amazon and seeing things in Amazonian scale is that one in a million events happen thousands of times every second for you folks. What lessons have you learned by deploying feature flags at that kind of scale? Because one of my problems and challenges with deploying feature flags myself is that in some cases, we're talking about three to five users a day for some of these things. That's not really enough usage to get insights into various cohort analyses or A/B tests.Steve: Yeah. As I mentioned before, we build these things as features into our product. So, I just talked about the CloudWatch alarms. That wasn't there originally. Originally, you know, if something went wrong, you would observe a CloudWatch alarm and then you decide what to do, and one of those things might be that I'm going to roll back my configuration.So, a lot of the mistakes that we made that caused alarms to go off necessitated us building some automatic mechanisms. And you know, a human being can only react so fast, but an automated system there is going to be able to roll things back very, very quickly. So, that came from some specific mistakes that we had made inside of AWS. The validation that I was talking about as well. We have a couple of ways of validating things.You might want to do a syntactic validation, which really you're validating—as I was saying—the range between 100 and 1000, but you also might want to have sort of a functional validation, or we call it a semantic validation so that you can make sure that, for example, if you're switching to a new database, that you're going to flip over to your new database, you can have a validation there that says, “This database is ready, I can write to this table, it's truly ready for me to switch.” Instead of just updating some config data, you're actually going to be validating that the new target is ready for you. So, those are a couple of things that we've learned from some of the mistakes we made. And again, not saying we aren't making mistakes still, but we always look at these things inside of AWS and figure out how we can benefit from them and how our customers, more importantly, can benefit from these mistakes.Corey: I would say that I agree. I think that you have threaded the needle of not talking smack about your own product, while also presenting it as not the global panacea that everyone should roll out, willy-nilly. That's a good balance to strike. And frankly, I'd also say it's probably a good point to park the episode. If people want to learn more about AppConfig, how you view these challenges, or even potentially want to get started using it themselves, what should they do?Steve: We have an informational page at go.aws/awsappconfig. That will tell you the high-level overview. You can search for our documentation and we have a lot of blog posts to help you get started there.Corey: And links to that will, of course, go into the [show notes 00:31:21]. Thank you so much for suffering my slings, arrows, and other assorted nonsense on this. I really appreciate your taking the time.Steve: Corey thank you for the time. It's always a pleasure to talk to you. Really appreciate your insights.Corey: You're too kind. Steve Rice, principal product manager for AWS AppConfig. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment. But before you do, just try clearing your cookies and downloading the episode again. You might be in the 3% cohort for an A/B test, and you [want to 00:32:01] listen to the good one instead.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The Rants And Raves Podcast
Episode 151: Being Honest? Glue Guns and the 80's Both Suck

The Rants And Raves Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 82:04


**Notes coming soon** Apologies, dp

Sweet Tea and DND
63: Rocs, Sovereign Glue, and World Building

Sweet Tea and DND

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 56:00


Have your players, immersed in a world of fantasy and magic, forgotten that gravity is still a thing on the material plane? Try a roc! Drop their asses off a mountain and laugh as they take 100d10 damage! And for the horny bards out there, may we offer you the oil of slipperiness? Or, did we swap it for a bottle of sovereign glue?Monster: Roc, MM pg 260Magic Item: Sovereign Glue, DMG pg 200Just the Tip: World Building with 2 DMsBook Recommendations: The Eververse Series and The Lost FleetSocial Media:WebsiteInstagramTwitterEdited and Produced by Zach W.Music: "Unholy Knight (Intro) and Realizer (Outro)" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Logo designed by Graphite the Dragon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Hard Factor
Miss USA Scandal Rocks The Internet & Morons Glue Themselves To A Picasso | 10.11.22

Hard Factor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 67:35


On today's episode…October is pitbull awareness month, Madonna just came out, CA man is in the soft corner, Russian missile strikes and hackers, treasure found in the UK, Miss USA scandal (00:23:05), beached whales in New Zealand, iPhone feature ruining police officers day, morons glue themselves to a Picasso (01:02:10) Watch Full Podcasts on Spotify and YouTube + Get Bonus Podcasts via Anchor and Patreon ☕ Cup of Coffee in the Big Time ☕ (00:04:50) - October is pitbull awareness month PSA (00:08:55) - Did Madonna come out of the closet? (00:11:00) - CA man suing Texas Pete hot sauce (00:14:40) - Russians hack airline websites (00:16:40) - Russian missile strikes (00:20:50) - Incredible treasure found under kitchen floorboards in the UK

Mason and Friends show
Episode 691: episode 691

Mason and Friends show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 44:39


www.TheMasonAndFriendsShow.com https://thejuunit.bandcamp.com/releases movie trivia, Celeb divorce, Tom Brady Ju opinion, Tiger's problem. no button hook, Giselle's kids, settled with Kobe, metal breath, stanking, Humming, screaming like a choir, reuse a fake tittie? limb replacement, capri sun style, camel hump bootie bottle, horse meat taco's., glue, moose beef, real gun needs, Idris Lion BS, spoiler alert, Lion was right, like the predator, Idris Missed, Tranq Dart,. Glue type? Glue bucket, the music of this episode@ https://open.spotify.com/playlist/2a37FxDHYo2YOLhpD0Mh4j?si=3362eecfe46347ef support the show@ www.patreon.com/MperfectEntertainment

Underemployed
65 - Glue Gals/Thems

Underemployed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 33:44


David and Jack want to buy the Phoenix Mercury, and they need your help (Hint: It involves giving them money). They also talk about the impact of Hurricane Ian, Aaron Judge's impact on the record books, the miracle run of Albert Pujols, them feeling not-optimistic about the Capitals and Lakers, Jack's experience at the state fair, Rihanna performing the Super Bowl halftime show (while John Cena got snubbed), Jack's anger at Joe Flacco getting benched, and more!

Today's Homeowner Podcast
Tips | Using the Right Glue

Today's Homeowner Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 1:00


Most projects require some type of glue at one point. Listen to learn which one to use and when.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

A List Podcast with A. Sherrod Blakely and Kwani  A. Lunis
Will Blake Griffin be the Glue Guy the Celtics Need?

A List Podcast with A. Sherrod Blakely and Kwani A. Lunis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 37:03


The Celtics have taken some big hits this off-season, one of the biggest being sudden injuries. Will Blake Griffin provide bulk in the front court the Celtics desperately need, or will his role be more impactful in the locker room?   A List Podcast w/ A. Sherrod Blakely & Kwani A. Lunis: Ep. 96   The A List Podcast is Powered by BetOnline.ag, Use Promo Code: CLNS50 for a 100% Welcome Bonus On Your First Deposit! The A List Podcast is Powered by Indeed! Start hiring RIGHT NOW with a 75$ SPONSORED JOB CREDIT to upgrade your job post at https://Indeed.com/ALIST !   The A List Podcast with Sherrod and Kwani, is available on iTunes, Spotify, YouTube as well as all of your podcasting apps. Subscribe, and give us the gift that never gets old or moldy- a 5-Star review - before you leave!   TIMESTAMPS: 1:08 - Celtics sign Blake Griffin  2:52 - Griffin could provide impactful leadership and bulk in the front court.  5:30 - Griffin's name recognition helps him fit in with other veteran players. 6:30 - Griffin's self-awareness will provide a smooth transition  7:45 - Griffin alludes to the media he's happy to be out of Brooklyn's drama  13:00 - What are some expectations for Griffin this year?  15:24 - Griffin has the right role-playing mindset  16:25 -  Griffin will have different impacts in the regular and post seasons  24:40 - Celtics blew out Hornets in the opening pre-season game, what did we learn? 25:25 - Sam Hauser showed his shooting potential is promising 26:35 - Some of the G-League guys showed roster potential  28:30 - Joe Mazzulla was solid in pre-season opener 32:10 - Grant Williams wasn't as impactful as possible in game 1 33:45 - Turnovers were concerning in game 1 

The Daily Zeitgeist
Good Day For Fascism = Good Day For Stonks!! 10.04.22

The Daily Zeitgeist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 66:02


In episode 1344, Jack and Miles are joined by comedian and co-host of Get Rich Nick, Nick Turner, to discuss… Fascism Has a Good Day In Brazil And the Market Approves, Majorly Tainted Goon is Now Just Leaning into the Paranoia, MORE OBSCURE SPORTS CHEATING and more! Fascism Has a Good Day In Brazil And the Market Approves Brazil girds for tight runoff vote after Bolsonaro's strong showing MORE OBSCURE SPORTS CHEATING LISTEN: Don't Say No by Speed, Glue & ShinkiSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Locked On Jazz - Daily Podcast On The Utah Jazz
An #askloj - What is the optimum starting lineup? Who is the glue guy? Why are we so excited for Walker Kessler?

Locked On Jazz - Daily Podcast On The Utah Jazz

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 36:51


It is an #askloj Friday edition of Locked on Jazz. What is the optimum lineup for the Utah Jazz this season. With the help of BBallIndex David Locke, radio voice of the Utah Jazz and Jazz NBA Insider, shows how each of the possible starting lineups for the Utah Jazz would look and where the Jazz might want to go with their lineups this season. Who will be the Utah Jazz glue guy this upcoming season? Why are we excited for Walker Kessler? A ton of great questions flow into the show todya about this season's Utah Jazz. 0:00: Introduction 3:00: Optimum lineups for the Utah Jazz 14:00: Birth Order impact 16:00: Biggest surprise 18:00: Why so excited for Walker Kessler 21:00: Is this the most atheltic team 24:00: Who is the glue guy 28:00: Oreo cookies 30:00: Who is part of the core 32:00: Hardy and Snyder Locked On Jazz Podcast

The Packfiller Cycling Podcast
The Worlds of Glue and Stink Bugs

The Packfiller Cycling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 79:14


All of the World RR recap, plus insight into the MVDP fiasco, AVV racing injured, and so much more. All while Paul glues some tires on. 

Mándarax
Evolución en las ciudades

Mándarax

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 68:31


En este episodio hablamos de cómo las ciudades son también ecosistemas en donde ocurren cambios ecológicos y evolutivos, y que ofrecen una gran oportunidad para el estudio del mundo vivo. Te contaremos de varios ejemplos de especies que se han adaptado en tiempo récord a la vida urbana, sobre la barrera geográfica que representa el metro, y de cómo sobreviven las hormigas al caminar en las banquetas tremendamente calientes. Finalmente les vamos a platicar del proyecto colaborativo más grande que ha existido en la biología evolutiva, GLUE, que trata sobre la evolución en ciudades. El extra para Patreons es sobre los amados/temidos mapaches y su relación con las urbes, donde les contaremos por qué son una especie tan exitosa en ciudades (aún más que en ambientes naturales).Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/mandarax

Lab Out Loud
Did you get all of your School Supplies?

Lab Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 29:01


Pencils. Notebooks. Glue sticks. Dry erase markers. Safety goggles. Tissues. As students returned to school this fall, they were asked to obtain numerous school supplies for their own use and sometimes for the entire classroom. When are school supplies necessary and when are they excessive? Dale and Brian discuss the topic of school supplies for all classrooms and particularly for the science classroom.   Show notes at: https://laboutloud.com/2022/09/episode-269-school-supplies/

Lehto's Law
Judge Prohibits Man From Possessing Glue Outside of His Home

Lehto's Law

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 12:37


Unless he has a note from his Probation Officer. Seriously. www.patreon.com/stevelehto

No Agenda
1480 - "Internet of Dogs"

No Agenda

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 184:57 Transcription Available Very Popular


No Agenda Episode 1480 - "Internet of Dogs" "Internet of Dogs" Executive Producers: Jack Wilson Dave Edwards, Sir ZH commenter Aaron Zide Jim Schneeberger, Baron Jimbabwe of Shatziland and Baroness Marianne Schneeberger Tom Pyburn Sir Render Chad Nolechek Shirley O'Brien Dame Wen of the Lakes Associate Executive Producers: David Bareus Marty Moskowitz Ryan & Rebecca Sean & Brittaney Arthur Saint Natalee Brown William Fankhauser Become a member of the 1481 Club, support the show here Boost us with with Podcasting 2.0 Certified apps: Podfriend - Breez - Sphinx - Podstation - Curiocaster - Fountain Title Changes Sir Sean Harrell -> Sir Sean, the Baron of KDH" (Kill Devil Hills, NC) Marianne Schneeberger (Damsel of Overcoming Disaster & Being the Glue that keeps the Family Together) Knights & Dames Ronda Pyburn -> Dame Ronda the Harpy Fun Killer Dave Edwards -> Knight ZH commenter Toby Trichell -> Sir Toby Trichell Art By: Capitalist Agenda End of Show Mixes: Lee O LaPuke - Jesse Coy Nelson - Sir Michael Anthony - Roland Gonzalez Engineering, Stream Management & Wizardry Mark van Dijk - Systems Master Ryan Bemrose - Program Director Back Office Aric Mackey Chapters: Dreb Scott Clip Custodian: Neal Jones NEW: and soon on Netflix: Animated No Agenda No Agenda Social Registration Sign Up for the newsletter No Agenda Peerage ShowNotes Archive of links and Assets (clips etc) 1480.noagendanotes.com New: Directory Archive of Shownotes (includes all audio and video assets used) archive.noagendanotes.com RSS Podcast Feed Full Summaries in PDF No Agenda Lite in opus format NoAgendaTorrents.com has an RSS feed or show torrents Last Modified 08/25/2022 16:42:24This page created with the FreedomController Last Modified 08/25/2022 16:42:24 by Freedom Controller