Podcasts about cloud services

Form of Internet-based computing that provides shared computer processing resources and data to computers and other devices on demand

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Best podcasts about cloud services

Latest podcast episodes about cloud services

Cloud N Clear
HOW APPOMNI IMPROVES CLOUD SECURITY FOR SAAS COMPANIES / EP 147

Cloud N Clear

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2023 34:46


Packet Pushers - Network Break
Network Break 415: WAN Update Severs Microsoft Cloud Services; Intel To Wind Down Network ASIC Biz

Packet Pushers - Network Break

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 47:51


Take a Network Break! This week we discuss new capabilities in Juniper's Astra data center automation software; a major Microsoft outage that affected Outlook, Teams, and more; reports that Intel will discontinue selling the Tofino programmable ASIC; a heap of financial results; and more. The post Network Break 415: WAN Update Severs Microsoft Cloud Services; Intel To Wind Down Network ASIC Biz appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed
Network Break 415: WAN Update Severs Microsoft Cloud Services; Intel To Wind Down Network ASIC Biz

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 47:51


Take a Network Break! This week we discuss new capabilities in Juniper's Astra data center automation software; a major Microsoft outage that affected Outlook, Teams, and more; reports that Intel will discontinue selling the Tofino programmable ASIC; a heap of financial results; and more. The post Network Break 415: WAN Update Severs Microsoft Cloud Services; Intel To Wind Down Network ASIC Biz appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe
Network Break 415: WAN Update Severs Microsoft Cloud Services; Intel To Wind Down Network ASIC Biz

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 47:51


Take a Network Break! This week we discuss new capabilities in Juniper's Astra data center automation software; a major Microsoft outage that affected Outlook, Teams, and more; reports that Intel will discontinue selling the Tofino programmable ASIC; a heap of financial results; and more. The post Network Break 415: WAN Update Severs Microsoft Cloud Services; Intel To Wind Down Network ASIC Biz appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Emily Chang’s Tech Briefing
Microsoft plans to add AI chatbot to Azure cloud services

Emily Chang’s Tech Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 3:29


Microsoft says it plans to add the artificial intelligence chatbot Chat GPT to its Azure cloud services soon.  KCBS Radio's Holly Quan is joined by Bloomberg News reporter Dina Bass for more.   

InfosecTrain
Introduction and Benefits of Cloud Services | What is IT Cloud Services? | InfosecTrain

InfosecTrain

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 14:36


When people talk about "cloud services," they mean a wide range of services that companies and customers can get on demand over the internet. These services are made to make it easy and inexpensive to get to applications and resources without having to set up infrastructure or hardware on your own. The three service models in cloud are SaaS (Software as a Service), PaaS (Platform as a Service) and IaaS (Infrastructure as s Service). Thank you for watching this video, For more details or free demo with out expert write into us at sales@infosectrain.com Subscribe to our channel to get video updates. Hit the subscribe button above. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Infosectrain/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Infosec_Train LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/infosec-train/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/infosectrain/ Telegram: https://t.me/infosectrains

Cloud N Clear
HOW WORKSPAN CREATED A CO-SELLING PLATFORM FOR ISVs / EP 145

Cloud N Clear

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 26:05


When your passion becomes your work, true magic ✨happens. Amit Sinha, President & Co-Founder of WorkSpan, was so driven to improve the relationship between hyperscalers and customers that he dedicated his career to the success of WorkSpan. Nearly a decade later, WorkSpan is continuing to help ISVs harness the power of the #cloud to solve problems, improve and set partners up for success.

InfosecTrain
Top 10 Cloud Service and Advantages | Advantages of Cloud Computing | Infosectrain

InfosecTrain

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 13:53


Since cloud computing offers several advantages over on premise, it is widely used by businesses. In a research by the International Data Group, 69% of organizations said they already used cloud computing, and 18% said they planned to do so soon since it allows for quicker revenue growth. This data demonstrates how more and more technologically advanced companies and market titans are recognising the many advantages of the cloud computing movement. The use of cloud computing improves customer service for businesses and significantly raises total profit margins. Find out more about the advantages of cloud computing. Thank you for watching this video, For more details or free demo with out expert write into us at sales@infosectrain.com Subscribe to our channel to get video updates. Hit the subscribe button above. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Infosectrain/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Infosec_Train LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/infosec-train/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/infosectrain/ Telegram: https://t.me/infosectrains

InfosecTrain
Cloud Service and Deployment Models | Cloud Computing Deployment Models | InfosecTrain

InfosecTrain

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 16:36


Cloud provides its offerings in three service models and four deployment models. The three service models are SaaS (Software as a Service), PaaS (Platform as a Service) and IaaS (Infrastructure as s Service). The four deployment models are Public Cloud, Private Cloud, Hybrid Cloud and Community Cloud. Learn more about the service and deployment models of cloud. Thank you for watching this video, For more details or free demo with out expert write into us at sales@infosectrain.com Subscribe to our channel to get video updates. Hit the subscribe button above. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Infosectrain/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Infosec_Train LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/infosec-train/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/infosectrain/ Telegram: https://t.me/infosectrains

Ask the CIO
Puckett set Army well on path to deliver ‘common cloud services that people love'

Ask the CIO

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 46:16


Paul Puckett, the former director of the Enterprise Cloud Management Agency (ECMA) in the Army's CIO office, said the cloud is not only demonstrating value, but are also fundamentally changing the way that the Army looks at requirements, organizational alignment and incentive structures.

HCM Cloud Talk Radio
Cloud HCM Talk Radio – Support Skills-Driven Talent Management with Oracle Dynamic Skills

HCM Cloud Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 13:35


We are living in times of societal and technological transformation which, of course, also affects the work environment.  And as jobs are changing it's important to define and understand the skills needed to thrive in today's workplace and in the workplace of the future. Join us on Cloud HCM Talk Radio to hear Oracle's Christine Yokoi, Senior Director, Product Strategy and Anu Subramanian, Director of Product Management discuss how the power of AI can help HR leaders understand and act on the constantly changing skills landscape, and specifically how Oracle Dynamic skills can support them in this effort.

HCM Cloud Talk Radio
Cloud HCM Talk Radio – CY22: Payroll Year-end Final Readiness Planning: US, CAN, MX

HCM Cloud Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 39:11


It's that time of year again when Oracle Cloud HCM Payroll customers are working on their year-end program planning and scheduling processes.  Legislative Updates are being published, and deadlines are approaching. If you are an Oracle Cloud Payroll customer in North America and getting ready for your year-end activities, you'll want to listen in to this Cloud HCM Talk Radio Show with Oracle's Heather McAninch, Senior Principal Product Advisor and Randy Messer, Strategic Program Manager of the Cloud HCM Development Center of Excellence team to learn about important resources, best practices, tools and guidelines to help with your year-end readiness planning activities.

HighlightCast
Episode #24: Low-Code Partner Series - AWS

HighlightCast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 18:09


Highlight is a proud member of the AWS Partner Network. Adam McNair and Kevin Long sat down with Roman Zhelenko to discuss AWS, the use cases, the future of cloud services within the Federal sector. 

Hybrid Identity Protection Podcast
Cloud Services Access Challenges with Garret Grajek

Hybrid Identity Protection Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 22:43


The rapid proliferation of cloud services has opened doors to many advancements in the ways we work. Unfortunately, governance of access to those services has not kept pace. As a result, cyberattackers often have a field day once they gain entry to your hybrid identity environment. In this episode, Sean talks with Garret Grajek, CEO of YouAttest and founder and former CTO and COO of SecureAuth about the challenges—and importance—of implementing effective access governance.

IoT For All Podcast
How does AI Advance IoT Use Cases? | Everguard.ai's Sandeep Pandaya | Internet of Things Podcast

IoT For All Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 20:46


Sandeep begins by introducing himself, the company, and the backstory of the company. He then gives a high-level overview of the current state of AI and the leading use cases of adoption. Sandeep then focuses on the importance of AI and its ability to protect workers' safety. Ryan and Sandeep wrap up this discussion with a conversation around challenges to adoption and advice for companies looking to integrate AI into their business.Sandeep Pandya is CEO of Everguard.ai leading the way in the incorporation of wearables with computer vision, machine learning, and AI to make the world's industrial environments safer and more sustainable. Formed in 2019, Everguard.ai stemmed from Pandya's belief that the world is experiencing a technological renaissance and that the nexus of AI, digital connectivity, and information sharing will fundamentally reshape and improve how people and their communities sustain each other. Pandya is a technology veteran whose experience spans product introductions and innovations in semiconductors, connected devices, wireless infrastructure, cloud services, and novel AI/CV applications. His leadership has helped organizations of all sizes establish high-growth markets globally.Everguard's mission is to protect companies' most important assets — their people — with the first proactive technology solution dedicated to industrial sustainability. They're revolutionizing how heavy industry approaches worker safety, health, and welfare using AI technology to support companies in their missions to fulfill environmental, social, and governance (ESG) initiatives. Everguard.ai are the technologists behind Worker-Centric AI™, the world's first artificial intelligence platform to create a conscious environment powered by sensor fusion that senses distress and danger long before a human can. Worker-Centric AI™ ties together various industrial sensor technologies using sensor fusion, edge computing, and AI algorithms to enable them to perform in ways not possible independently. Everguard's enterprise solution, Sentri360®, utilizes Worker-Centric AI™ technology to create a Sentri Zone™ with workers at the center, continuously protecting them in the most complex industrial environments.

Klopotek Publishing Radio
International Literary Properties: More Options beyond Royalties – with Scott Hoffman

Klopotek Publishing Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 31:26


**Who You will Hear**Guest: Scott Hoffman (CEO of International Literary Properties)Co-host: Luna Tang (Cloud Service Delivery Manager at Klopotek)Co-host: Dwayne Parris (Senior Consultant at Klopotek) Purchasing rights of music works as a means of investment – as Michael Jackson did to the majority of the Beatles' catalog, is not a novel concept in the music publishing industry, yet in the book publishing world where people are reluctant to part with their copyrights, this concept still remains fresh and rarely-touched. Scott Hoffman and his team at ILP (International Literary Properties) not only think about it, but they also act on it. He tells us in the conversation how ILP was founded, how it works in partnership with various parties (publishers, authors, and literary agents), and how it has established its position in the value-added chain. With extensive real cases, he explains to us the ways that ILP makes long-term investments in literary estates (especially on backlists) and how they maximize the value of these time-honored works, as well as how these practices make ILP a meaningful complement to the value-added chain in rights management.For more information about ILP, the authors, and the great works it represents, please visit internationalliteraryproperties.com. Tell us what is going on with your publishing projects or business on Twitter (@Klopotek_AG), LinkedIn, or email us at podcast@klopotek.com.  For more information about the Klopotek software solution, please write to info@klopotek.com, or register to receive emails from us on technology innovations & events from Klopotek.* The views, information, or opinions expressed in the program are solely those of the individuals involved and do not necessarily represent those of Klopotek and its employees. It is the goal of Klopotek Publishing Radio to support cultural diversity, the exchange of opinions, and to create an environment where the conversation of a global publishing industry can thrive.

Hybrid Identity Protection Podcast
Cloud Services Access Challenges with Garret Grajek

Hybrid Identity Protection Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 22:42


The rapid proliferation of cloud services has opened doors to many advancements in the ways we work. Unfortunately, governance of access to those services has not kept pace. As a result, cyberattackers often have a field day once they gain entry to your hybrid identity environment. In this episode, Sean talks with Garret Grajek, CEO of YouAttest and founder and former CTO and COO of SecureAuth about the challenges—and importance—of implementing effective access governance.

Win in STEM
STEM Career Paths: Cloud Service Improvement Engineer

Win in STEM

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 29:49


New episode loading!! This week we cover the career of a Cloud Service Improvement Engineer. This role can be found in almost any organization. Their job is to analyze and improve the processes of a business continually. They work closely with project managers and quality specialists to identify potential for improvement. Our special guest, Tega Eshareturi, is a Cloud Service Improvement Engineer with Oracle NetSuite. In this role he works on improving and reporting on the reliability and uptime of NetSuite services. He is responsible for multiple process improvement initiatives and projects. Prior to joining Oracle, Tega worked as a Government Financial Data Analyst at Lockheed Martin. He holds a Bachelors in Management Information Systems from Texas Southern University and will be pursuing his Masters in Computer Information Systems with a concentration in Data Science at the University of Houston Clear-Lake in the Spring. Tega is the founder of TechTuri, an organization to help people of color transition into tech by providing a hub that uses technology, data, and networking to help optimize your life. Tune in to learn more about what a Cloud Service Improvement Engineer does, work-life balance, and certifications needed to transition into this career! Get Connected with Tega Eshareturi: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tega-p-eshareturi-014002142/ Website: techturi.org Email: tegapeters11@gmail.com, techturi.org@gmail.com Questions or Feedback? Email: wininstempodcast@gmail.com Follow the podcast on IG: @thewininstempodcast Beats by Femi, IG: @fe.astro

HCM Cloud Talk Radio
Cloud HCM Talk Radio - Oracle Recruiting Cloud (ORC) and the new Recruiting Booster

HCM Cloud Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 29:51


HR leaders face many challenges in today's changing business environment.  It's important to identify talent, find ways to appeal to candidates, and hire efficiently.  At the same time the workforce is evolving, and career expectations are changing.  It's critical for HR leaders to have the right tools to engage with candidates and create a great candidate experience.  That's where Oracle Recruiting Cloud comes in. Join us on Cloud HCM Talk Radio to listen in to the discussion with Nagaraj Nadendla, Senior Vice President & General Manager, Oracle's Cloud Recruiting Products, to get the latest investment and business updates on Oracle Recruiting Cloud (ORC) and meet the new Recruiting Booster.

HCM Cloud Talk Radio
Cloud HCM Talk Radio - HCM Connections: Part of the employee experience platform

HCM Cloud Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 15:42


Employee Experience (EX) is a critical item on the agenda of business leaders in 2022.  That's because there's been a change in the workforce:  employees expect more from their employers than ever before.  They want to belong to a culture that invests in their growth and well-being, inside and outside of the office. Tune in to Cloud HCM Talk Radio to hear Floyd Teter, Oracle Senior Director, Cloud HCM Center of Excellence and Julian Challenger, Oracle Director, Product Management as they talk about how Oracle's HCM Connections can help sustain a culture that invests in employee growth and well-being.

This Week in Enterprise Tech (MP3)
TWiET 519: Do No Evil, CISO No Evil - Apple invests in satellite infra, cloud services security, CISO explained

This Week in Enterprise Tech (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 70:02


Apple invests in satellite infrastructure, securing cloud services, CISO role deep-dive, and more. Amazon debuts Sparrow, a new bin-picking robot arm Aiphone bug allows cyberattackers to literally open (physical) doors FLIR redesigned its thermal camera to work with any mobile device World's top chipmaker eyes Arizona for new $12 billion semiconductor plant Apple to spend $450M in satellite services for iPhone 14's Emergency SOS Amazon and Microsoft cloud leaks highlight lingering misconfiguration issues Fastly CISO Mike Johnson on the role of CISO (Chief Information Security Officer) and how it has evolved Hosts: Louis Maresca, Brian Chee, and Curt Franklin Guest: Mike Johnson Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-enterprise-tech. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: Melissa.com/twit itpro.tv/enterprise nordlayer.com/twit

This Week in Enterprise Tech (Video HD)
TWiET 519: Do No Evil, CISO No Evil - Apple invests in satellite infra, cloud services security, CISO explained

This Week in Enterprise Tech (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 75:37


Apple invests in satellite infrastructure, securing cloud services, CISO role deep-dive, and more. Amazon debuts Sparrow, a new bin-picking robot arm Aiphone bug allows cyberattackers to literally open (physical) doors FLIR redesigned its thermal camera to work with any mobile device World's top chipmaker eyes Arizona for new $12 billion semiconductor plant Apple to spend $450M in satellite services for iPhone 14's Emergency SOS Amazon and Microsoft cloud leaks highlight lingering misconfiguration issues Fastly CISO Mike Johnson on the role of CISO (Chief Information Security Officer) and how it has evolved Hosts: Louis Maresca, Brian Chee, and Curt Franklin Guest: Mike Johnson Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-enterprise-tech. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: Melissa.com/twit itpro.tv/enterprise nordlayer.com/twit

Futurum Tech Podcast
The Challenges of Cloud Transformation and How HPE GreenLake and PwC are Working Together – HPE Executive Insights Series

Futurum Tech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 30:03


In this episode of the Futurum Tech Podcast – Interview Series, part of the HPE Executive Insights Series, I am joined by Darren Perks, Global Hosting Infrastructure Operations Leader at PwC, and Vishal Lall, SVP & GM at HPE GreenLake Cloud Services Solutions, for a conversation focusing on modernization and business model challenges in the industry. In our conversation we discussed the following: Key objectives for the coming year for data centers and modernization Drivers for PwC's data center consolidation A look into PwC's modernization journey and how it reflects HPE's own journey Challenges of upgrading business models & expected outcomes Best practices from the modernization experience. This was an interesting conversation and one you don't want to miss. To learn more about HPE, check out their website here, and to learn more about PwC, check their website, here. Want to listen to the other HPE Executive Insights Series episodes? Tune in below. The Evolution of On-Premises Cloud Services with HPE GreenLake's Scott Ramsay – Futurum Tech Webcast Interview Series Capitalizing on Data to Drive Healthcare Insights – An HPE Executive Insights Series with Ashok Kurian, Texas Children's Hospital – Futurum Tech Webcast Interview Series

HCM Cloud Talk Radio
Cloud HCM Talk Radio - Empower Employee Experience using HCM Digital Assistant

HCM Cloud Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 31:18


AI-based digital assistants are great tools that provide opportunities to foster collaboration and enhance productivity in today's workplace. And this is where Oracle Digital Assistant (ODA) comes in. Join us on Cloud HCM Talk Radio to hear Sunil Kashyap, Oracle HCM Cloud Services Director, talk about empowering the Employee Experience using Oracle HCM Digital Assistant and discuss what's new with HCM skills and how they can help.

Dealer News Today Podcasts
“A lot of creative disruption happening” || Chris Sachno, Senior Vice President of E-Mobility, Cloud Services & Innovation, Karma Automotive

Dealer News Today Podcasts

Play Episode Play 56 sec Highlight Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 27:05


From the Oxfordshire, UK town where he grew up, Chris Sachno set out to explore the world, first earning his MBA from the Fuqua School of Business at North Carolina's Duke University, then making his way to Japan, originally intending to learn Japanese. Not only did he become fluent in the language, he also caught the technology bug and went on to help develop tech that has been used in products like the BlackBerry, the iPhone, and the Apple Watch. But it's not just mobile devices that Chris was interested in, and he was drawn to cars - this past June he joined Karma Automotive and has helped shape the technological profile of their vehicles.In this episode, Chris has a very long-distance chat with Derek D about how the current electric vehicle revolution is kind of a comeback, why the current era is ideal for experimentation in EV design, and the mind-boggling innovations that may come to electric cars in a mere 10 years or so. Plus, he talks about why speed, safety, and range are the top areas for EV improvement, how it felt the first time he drove Karma's flagship vehicle and the instant torque kicked in, and more.Chris Sachno | Karma AutomotiveEpisode Highlights:The famous Henry Ford quote Chris keeps back of mind when considering designWhat the original driving force for EVs was, and why environmental concerns and beyond still make it a factorThe reasons that adoption leads to adaptation for any new technology.Why Chris is passionate about a great experience for both drivers and passengers“If you're using your phone and an application crashes - okay, you start it up again. You don't want that to happen when you're doing 75 MPH on the highway.” — Chris Sachno|| Dealer News Today is a DCG Media production

Klopotek Publishing Radio
The Power of Having a Book: A Fresh Interpretation on Branding, Publishing, and Writing – with April O'Leary

Klopotek Publishing Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 26:41


**Who You will Hear**Guest: April O'Leary (Founder of O'Leary Publishing)Co-host: Luna Tang (Cloud Service Delivery Manager at Klopotek)Co-host: Dwayne Parris (Senior Consultant at Klopotek)One of the most common scenarios in traditional publishing is publishers do branding and marketing for authors and their upcoming works. But what if authors come in new and do not have an existing audience? April O'Leary offers one possible solution with her unique entrepreneurial path. As the founder of O'Leary Publishing, author of six books, host of the I'm Booked Podcast and a TED-style event Booked Naples, she says it all started when she saw “the power of having a book” and realized how a book can work as a tool to build up personal brands. She hosts authors on her podcast, gets them on stage for speaking and video-taping, and develops elevator talks for them – by all means getting authors trained and confident of talking about their works in front of the camera and behind the mic. She learned her way of publishing through her hands-on practice – what her authors really need and how to meet this need. For more valuable resources and information about O'Leary Publishing, you can check out their recent live events on teaching publishing and writing, watch The Booked Naples Speaker Series, follow the I'm Booked Podcast, or download the free publishing guide provided by O'Leary Publishing – The Influencer's Path to Successful Publishing.Tell us what is going on with your publishing projects or business on Twitter (@Klopotek_AG), LinkedIn, or email us at podcast@klopotek.com.  For more information about the Klopotek software solution, please write to info@klopotek.com, or register to receive emails from us on technology innovations & events from Klopotek.* The views, information, or opinions expressed in the program are solely those of the individuals involved and do not necessarily represent those of Klopotek and its employees. It is the goal of Klopotek Publishing Radio to support cultural diversity, the exchange of opinions, and to create an environment where the conversation of a global publishing industry can thrive.

Healthcare IT Today Interviews
eClinicalWorks Invests $100 Million in Microsoft Cloud Services

Healthcare IT Today Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 19:31


As we continue to shift healthcare into a more digital world, it's important to have a reliable Cloud to back up and store all of the data and digital solutions. But how do you know which Cloud is the right one for your organization? eClinicalWorks (eCW) went through this process a couple of years ago and is so pleased with their decision to go with Microsoft Cloud that they are investing over $100 million in Microsoft's Azure cloud services. We sat down with Sam Bhat, Vice President of Sales and Co-Founder at eCW, to learn more about these decisions. Learn more about eClinicalWorks: https://www.eclinicalworks.com/ Find more great health IT content: https://www.healthcareittoday.com/

MSP 1337
Monitoring Cloud Services

MSP 1337

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 44:07


I always have wondered why we assume our end users know how to use the technology we provide them. The age old argument of 10% of the product's capability is actually used. I sit down with Charles Love to talk about all the interesting things that go on behind the scenes with end users. We spend a lot of time on a specific vendor or two but these are just to provide good examples.

Changing Channels with Larry Walsh
Google Cloud's Eric Buck on Distribution in Cloud Services

Changing Channels with Larry Walsh

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 28:22


Eric Buck, director of commercial partners and global distribution at Google Cloud, joins Larry Walsh to talk about the role two-tier distribution models and distributors play in aiding cloud service providers in engaging channels and supporting partners.   Technology is increasingly being delivered via the cloud and sold through subscription payment models. End customers — from SMBs to enterprises — appreciate the ability to acquire and utilize computing resources hosted in public cloud infrastructure and available from virtually anywhere.   The digitalization of computing infrastructure and resources has many channel pros questioning the necessity of selling cloud services through traditional two-tier distribution models. Without physical products that require warehousing and logistics support for fulfillment, cloud services seemingly negate the need for working with distributors to reach the channel and end customers.   Yet cloud service providers and cloud-based technology companies have discovered that bypassing distribution isn't necessarily the wisest choice. Distribution continues to play a vital role in helping vendors reach and influence partners, provide access to sales and technical support services, and enable transactions. From the perspective of partners, distribution is an aggregation point for different cloud resources, and distributors provide direction on what services to sell and how to make them work together.   Changing Channels asked Eric Buck, the director of commercial partners and global distribution at Google Cloud, to explain why even the hyperscale cloud service providers such as Google are working with distributors, the value and support they receive from distribution, and how vendors can measure the efficacy and return on investment they get by engaging a two-tier model.   Follow us, Like us, and Subscribe!  Channelnomics: https://channelnomics.com/   LinkedIn: https://bit.ly/2NC6Vli   Twitter: https://twitter.com/Channelnomics      Changing Channels Is a Channelnomics Production  Follow @Channelnomics to stay current on the latest #research, #bestpractices, and #resources. At @Channelnomics — the voice of thought leadership — we define #channel trends, chart new #GTM strategies, and #partner with industry leaders to champion #diversity in the channel.       Episode Resources  Host Larry Walsh: https://bit.ly/3beZfOa  Guest Eric Buck: https://www.linkedin.com/in/eric-buck-6213211/  In the Margins: https://tinyurl.com/2sun9z5s 

The Wizard of iPhone Speaks (20-22)
Episode 111: Our avatar today is FengShwi by shelf -- Every plastic bag is permanent trash (it lasts forever) We are slightly less durable.

The Wizard of iPhone Speaks (20-22)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 9:50


Vocal courtesy of Bellevue Presbyterian Church, used with permission.Join My Zoom — Are PodCast Tags  Necessary?  No, They are Vital Think Search Engine OptimizationIn this 45-minute conference, we identify & suggest those little internet squiggles which are so beloved of Search Engine Optimization & help others find your podcast. “We are all competing for a pixel of space in a crowded mind” Steve Woodruff.  Employing the proper tags will move you up in any search—45 minutes for $9.95 Register thru EventBrite.

L8ist Sh9y Podcast
Cloud Service Providers vs "The Supercloud"

L8ist Sh9y Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 61:18


How does the moniker Supercloud apply to how cloud providers are changing over time? Specifically when facing market pressures, trying to lock in, get bigger and become essential. Today we discuss the changing nature of service providers, specifically cloud providers. This topic has been coming up on Twitter, and I know you will find this conversation fascinating. It talks both about the hypothetical and very practical drivers behind concepts like supercloud. Transcript: https://otter.ai/u/MjuLlkt2JO095bMgPHi-rqeaqi8 Image: https://www.pexels.com/photo/flying-airplane-in-the-sky-12846027/

Rework
Leaving the Cloud

Rework

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 29:38


David Heinemeier Hansson, co-founder of 37signals, and Eron Nicholson, Director of Operations, discuss why 37signals is making the move away from the cloud.Show Notes: David's piece, Why We're Leaving the Cloud 0:59 - 37signals history with on-premise and cloud storage 8:26 - How cloud solutions don't necessary reduce operations teams costs 10:58 - What types of companies are the best fit for cloud solutions 14:14 - 37signals costs for cloud solutions and potential savings with on-premise options 15:25 - Advantages of working with on-premise storage companies that are similar in size to 37signals 20:08 - What the transition might look like, including timing 26:02 - Advice for medium-sized companies that might be thinking about making the switch

TechSperience
Episode 112: Hybrid Cloud Strategies for the Modern Data Center

TechSperience

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 38:54


Research by IDC show that 90% of enterprises around the world are relying on a mix of on-premises, or dedicated, private clouds, as well as public clouds, and legacy platforms to meet their infrastructure needs. Data center cloud solutions need to change as business needs fluctuate. This episode covers the best practices of a hybrid cloud strategy featuring experts from Intel and Connection. Host: James Hilliard Guests:  Vijay Bandari, Cloud Solution Architect at Intel Steve Fowler, Cloud Solution Architect at Intel Kiran Agrahara, Cloud Solution Architect at Intel Kevin Slate, Senior Director of Cloud Services and at Connection  

Screaming in the Cloud
The Evolution of Cloud Services with Richard Hartmann

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 45:26


About RichardRichard "RichiH" Hartmann is the Director of Community at Grafana Labs, Prometheus team member, OpenMetrics founder, OpenTelemetry member, CNCF Technical Advisory Group Observability chair, CNCF Technical Oversight Committee member, CNCF Governing Board member, and more. He also leads, organizes, or helps run various conferences from hundreds to 18,000 attendess, including KubeCon, PromCon, FOSDEM, DENOG, DebConf, and Chaos Communication Congress. In the past, he made mainframe databases work, ISP backbones run, kept the largest IRC network on Earth running, and designed and built a datacenter from scratch. Go through his talks, podcasts, interviews, and articles at https://github.com/RichiH/talks or follow him on Twitter at https://twitter.com/TwitchiH for musings on the intersection of technology and society.Links Referenced: Grafana Labs: https://grafana.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TwitchiH Richard Hartmann list of talks: https://github.com/richih/talks TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at AWS AppConfig. Engineers love to solve, and occasionally create, problems. But not when it's an on-call fire-drill at 4 in the morning. Software problems should drive innovation and collaboration, NOT stress, and sleeplessness, and threats of violence. That's why so many developers are realizing the value of AWS AppConfig Feature Flags. Feature Flags let developers push code to production, but hide that that feature from customers so that the developers can release their feature when it's ready. This practice allows for safe, fast, and convenient software development. You can seamlessly incorporate AppConfig Feature Flags into your AWS or cloud environment and ship your Features with excitement, not trepidation and fear. To get started, go to snark.cloud/appconfig. That's snark.cloud/appconfig.Corey: This episode is brought to us in part by our friends at Datadog. Datadog's SaaS monitoring and security platform that enables full stack observability for developers, IT operations, security, and business teams in the cloud age. Datadog's platform, along with 500 plus vendor integrations, allows you to correlate metrics, traces, logs, and security signals across your applications, infrastructure, and third party services in a single pane of glass.Combine these with drag and drop dashboards and machine learning based alerts to help teams troubleshoot and collaborate more effectively, prevent downtime, and enhance performance and reliability. Try Datadog in your environment today with a free 14 day trial and get a complimentary T-shirt when you install the agent.To learn more, visit datadoghq/screaminginthecloud to get. That's www.datadoghq/screaminginthecloudCorey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud, I'm Corey Quinn. There are an awful lot of people who are incredibly good at understanding the ins and outs and the intricacies of the observability world. But they didn't have time to come on the show today. Instead, I am talking to my dear friend of two decades now, Richard Hartmann, better known on the internet as RichiH, who is the Director of Community at Grafana Labs, here to suffer—in a somewhat atypical departure for the theme of this show—personal attacks for once. Richie, thank you for joining me.Richard: And thank you for agreeing on personal attacks.Corey: Exactly. It was one of your riders. Like, there have to be the personal attacks back and forth or you refuse to appear on the show. You've been on before. In fact, the last time we did a recording, I believe you were here in person, which was a long time ago. What have you been up to?You're still at Grafana Labs. And in many cases, I would point out that, wow, you've been there for many years; that seems to be an atypical thing, which is an American tech industry perspective because every time you and I talk about this, you look at folks who—wow, you were only at that company for five years. What's wrong with you—you tend to take the longer view and I tend to have the fast twitch, time to go ahead and leave jobs because it's been more than 20 minutes approach. I see that you're continuing to live what you preach, though. How's it been?Richard: Yeah, so there's a little bit of Covid brains, I think. When we talked in 2018, I was still working at SpaceNet, building a data center. But the last two-and-a-half years didn't really happen for many people, myself included. So, I guess [laugh] that includes you.Corey: No, no you're right. You've only been at Grafana Labs a couple of years. One would think I would check the notes for shooting my mouth off. But then, one wouldn't know me.Richard: What notes? Anyway, I've been around Prometheus and Grafana Since 2015. But it's like, real, full-time everything is 2020. There was something in between. Since 2018, I contracted to do vulnerability handling and everything for Grafana Labs because they had something and they didn't know how to deal with it.But no, full time is 2020. But as to the space in the [unintelligible 00:02:45] of itself, it's maybe a little bit German of me, but trying to understand the real world and trying to get an overview of systems and how they actually work, and if they are working correctly and as intended, and if not, how they're not working as intended, and how to fix this is something which has always been super important to me, in part because I just want to understand the world. And this is a really, really good way to automate understanding of the world. So, it's basically a work-saving mechanism. And that's why I've been sticking to it for so long, I guess.Corey: Back in the early days of monitoring systems—so we called it monitoring back then because, you know, are using simple words that lack nuance was sort of de rigueur back then—we wound up effectively having tools. Nagios is the one that springs to mind, and it was terrible in all the ways you would expect a tool written in janky Perl in the early-2000s to be. But it told you what was going on. It tried to do a thing, generally reach a server or query it about things, and when things fell out of certain specs, it screamed its head off, which meant that when you had things like the core switch melting down—thinking of one very particular incident—you didn't get a Nagios alert; you got 4000 Nagios alerts. But start to finish, you could wrap your head rather fully around what Nagios did and why it did the sometimes strange things that it did.These days, when you take a look at Prometheus, which we hear a lot about, particularly in the Kubernetes space and Grafana, which is often mentioned in the same breath, it's never been quite clear to me exactly where those start and stop. It always feels like it's a component in a larger system to tell you what's going on rather than a one-stop shop that's going to, you know, shriek its head off when something breaks in the middle of the night. Is that the right way to think about it? The wrong way to think about it?Richard: It's a way to think about it. So personally, I use the terms monitoring and observability pretty much interchangeably. Observability is a relatively well-defined term, even though most people won't agree. But if you look back into the '70s into control theory where the term is coming from, it is the measure of how much you're able to determine the internal state of a system by looking at its inputs and its outputs. Depending on the definition, some people don't include the inputs, but that is the OG definition as far as I'm aware.And from this, there flow a lot of things. This question of—or this interpretation of the difference between telling that, yes, something's broken versus why something's broken. Or if you can't ask new questions on the fly, it's not observability. Like all of those things are fundamentally mapped to this definition of, I need enough data to determine the internal state of whatever system I have just by looking at what is coming in, what is going out. And that is at the core the thing. Now, obviously, it's become a buzzword, which is oftentimes the fate of successful things. So, it's become a buzzword, and you end up with cargo culting.Corey: I would argue periodically, that observability is hipster monitoring. If you call it monitoring, you get yelled at by Charity Majors. Which is tongue and cheek, but she has opinions, made, nonetheless shall I say, frustrating by the fact that she is invariably correct in those opinions, which just somehow makes it so much worse. It would be easy to dismiss things she says if she weren't always right. And the world is changing, especially as we get into the world of distributed systems.Is the server that runs the app working or not working loses meaning when we're talking about distributed systems, when we're talking about containers running on top of Kubernetes, which turns every outage into a murder mystery. We start having distributed applications composed of microservices, so you have no idea necessarily where an issue is. Okay, is this one microservice having an issue related to the request coming into a completely separate microservice? And it seems that for those types of applications, the answer has been tracing for a long time now, where originally that was something that felt like it was sprung, fully-formed from the forehead of some God known as one of the hyperscalers, but now is available to basically everyone, in theory.In practice, it seems that instrumenting applications still one of the hardest parts of all of this. I tried hooking up one of my own applications to be observed via OTEL, the open telemetry project, and it turns out that right now, OTEL and AWS Lambda have an intersection point that makes everything extremely difficult to work with. It's not there yet; it's not baked yet. And someday, I hope that changes because I would love to interchangeably just throw metrics and traces and logs to all the different observability tools and see which ones work, which ones don't, but that still feels very far away from current state of the art.Richard: Before we go there, maybe one thing which I don't fully agree with. You said that previously, you were told if a service up or down, that's the thing which you cared about, and I don't think that's what people actually cared about. At that time, also, what they fundamentally cared about: is the user-facing service up, or down, or impacted? Is it slow? Does it return errors every X percent for requests, something like this?Corey: Is the site up? And—you're right, I was hand-waving over a whole bunch of things. It was, “Okay. First, the web server is returning a page, yes or no? Great. Can I ping the server?” Okay, well, there are ways of server can crash and still leave enough of the TCP/IP stack up or it can respond to pings and do little else.And then you start adding things to it. But the Nagios thing that I always wanted to add—and had to—was, is the disk full? And that was annoying. And, on some level, like, why should I care in the modern era how much stuff is on the disk because storage is cheap and free and plentiful? The problem is, after the third outage in a month because the disk filled up, you start to not have a good answer for well, why aren't you monitoring whether the disk is full?And that was the contributors to taking down the server. When the website broke, there were what felt like a relatively small number of reasonably well-understood contributors to that at small to midsize applications, which is what I'm talking about, the only things that people would let me touch. I wasn't running hyperscale stuff where you have a fleet of 10,000 web servers and, “Is the server up?” Yeah, in that scenario, no one cares. But when we're talking about the database server and the two application servers and the four web servers talking to them, you think about it more in terms of pets than you do cattle.Richard: Yes, absolutely. Yet, I think that was a mistake back then, and I tried to do it differently, as a specific example with the disk. And I'm absolutely agreeing that previous generation tools limit you in how you can actually work with your data. In particular, once you're with metrics where you can do actual math on the data, it doesn't matter if the disk is almost full. It matters if that disk is going to be full within X amount of time.If that disk is 98% full and it sits there at 98% for ten years and provides the service, no one cares. The thing is, will it actually run out in the next two hours, in the next five hours, what have you. Depending on this, is this currently or imminently a customer-impacting or user-impacting then yes, alert on it, raise hell, wake people, make them fix it, as opposed to this thing can be dealt with during business hours on the next workday. And you don't have to wake anyone up.Corey: Yeah. The big filer with massive amounts of storage has crossed the 70% line. Okay, now it's time to start thinking about that, what do you want to do? Maybe it's time to order another shelf of discs for it, which is going to take some time. That's a radically different scenario than the 20 gigabyte root volume on your server just started filling up dramatically; the rate of change is such that'll be full in 20 minutes.Yeah, one of those is something you want to wake people up for. Generally speaking, you don't want to wake people up for what is fundamentally a longer-term strategic business problem. That can be sorted out in the light of day versus, “[laugh] we're not going to be making money in two hours, so if I don't wake up and fix this now.” That's the kind of thing you generally want to be woken up for. Well, let's be honest, you don't want that to happen at all, but if it does happen, you kind of want to know in advance rather than after the fact.Richard: You're literally describing linear predict from Prometheus, which is precisely for this, where I can look back over X amount of time and make a linear prediction because everything else breaks down at scale, blah, blah, blah, to detail. But the thing is, I can draw a line with my pencil by hand on my data and I can predict when is this thing going to it. Which is obviously precisely correct if I have a TLS certificate. It's a little bit more hand-wavy when it's a disk. But still, you can look into the future and you say, “What will be happening if current trends for the last X amount of time continue in Y amount of time.” And that's precisely a thing where you get this more powerful ability of doing math with your data.Corey: See, when you say it like that, it sounds like it actually is a whole term of art, where you're focusing on an in-depth field, where salaries are astronomical. Whereas the tools that I had to talk about this stuff back in the day made me sound like, effectively, the sysadmin that I was grunting and pointing: “This is gonna fill up.” And that is how I thought about it. And this is the challenge where it's easy to think about these things in narrow, defined contexts like that, but at scale, things break.Like the idea of anomaly detection. Well, okay, great if normally, the CPU and these things are super bored and suddenly it gets really busy, that's atypical. Maybe we should look into it, assuming that it has a challenge. The problem is, that is a lot harder than it sounds because there are so many factors that factor into it. And as soon as you have something, quote-unquote, “Intelligent,” making decisions on this, it doesn't take too many false positives before you start ignoring everything it has to say, and missing legitimate things. It's this weird and obnoxious conflation of both hard technical problems and human psychology.Richard: And the breaking up of old service boundaries. Of course, when you say microservices, and such, fundamentally, functionally a microservice or nanoservice, picoservice—but the pendulum is already swinging back to larger units of complexity—but it fundamentally does not make any difference if I have a monolith on some mainframe or if I have a bunch of microservices. Yes, I can scale differently, I can scale horizontally a lot more easily, vertically, it's a little bit harder, blah, blah, blah, but fundamentally, the logic and the complexity, which is being packaged is fundamentally the same. More users, everything, but it is fundamentally the same. What's happening again, and again, is I'm breaking up those old boundaries, which means the old tools which have assumptions built in about certain aspects of how I can actually get an overview of a system just start breaking down, when my complexity unit or my service or what have I, is usually congruent with a physical piece, of hardware or several services are congruent with that piece of hardware, it absolutely makes sense to think about things in terms of this one physical server. The fact that you have different considerations in cloud, and microservices, and blah, blah, blah, is not inherently that it is more complex.On the contrary, it is fundamentally the same thing. It scales with users' everything, but it is fundamentally the same thing, but I have different boundaries of where I put interfaces onto my complexity, which basically allow me to hide all of this complexity from the downstream users.Corey: That's part of the challenge that I think we're grappling with across this entire industry from start to finish. Where we originally looked at these things and could reason about it because it's the computer and I know how those things work. Well, kind of, but okay, sure. But then we start layering levels of complexity on top of layers of complexity on top of layers of complexity, and suddenly, when things stop working the way that we expect, it can be very challenging to unpack and understand why. One of the ways I got into this whole space was understanding, to some degree, of how system calls work, of how the kernel wound up interacting with userspace, about how Linux systems worked from start to finish. And these days, that isn't particularly necessary most of the time for the care and feeding of applications.The challenge is when things start breaking, suddenly having that in my back pocket to pull out could be extremely handy. But I don't think it's nearly as central as it once was and I don't know that I would necessarily advise someone new to this space to spend a few years as a systems person, digging into a lot of those aspects. And this is why you need to know what inodes are and how they work. Not really, not anymore. It's not front and center the way that it once was, in most environments, at least in the world that I live in. Agree? Disagree?Richard: Agreed. But it's very much unsurprising. You probably can't tell me how to precisely grow sugar cane or corn, you can't tell me how to refine the sugar out of it, but you can absolutely bake a cake. But you will not be able to tell me even a third of—and I'm—for the record, I'm also not able to tell you even a third about the supply chain which just goes from I have a field and some seeds and I need to have a package of refined sugar—you're absolutely enabled to do any of this. The thing is, you've been part of the previous generation of infrastructure where you know how this underlying infrastructure works, so you have more ability to reason about this, but it's not needed for cloud services nearly as much.You need different types of skill sets, but that doesn't mean the old skill set is completely useless, at least not as of right now. It's much more a case of you need fewer of those people and you need them in different places because those things have become infrastructure. Which is basically the cloud play, where a lot of this is just becoming infrastructure more and more.Corey: Oh, yeah. Back then I distinctly remember my elders looking down their noses at me because I didn't know assembly, and how could I possibly consider myself a competent systems admin if I didn't at least have a working knowledge of assembly? Or at least C, which I, over time, learned enough about to know that I didn't want to be a C programmer. And you're right, this is the value of cloud and going back to those days getting a web server up and running just to compile Apache's httpd took a week and an in-depth knowledge of GCC flags.And then in time, oh, great. We're going to have rpm or debs. Great, okay, then in time, you have apt, if you're in the dev land because I know you are a Debian developer, but over in Red Hat land, we had yum and other tools. And then in time, it became oh, we can just use something like Puppet or Chef to wind up ensuring that thing is installed. And then oh, just docker run. And now it's a checkbox in a web console for S3.These things get easier with time and step by step by step we're standing on the shoulders of giants. Even in the last ten years of my career, I used to have a great challenge question that I would interview people with of, “Do you know what TinyURL is? It takes a short URL and then expands it to a longer one. Great, on the whiteboard, tell me how you would implement that.” And you could go up one side and down the other, and then you could add constraints, multiple data centers, now one goes offline, how do you not lose data? Et cetera, et cetera.But these days, there are so many ways to do that using cloud services that it almost becomes trivial. It's okay, multiple data centers, API Gateway, a Lambda, and a global DynamoDB table. Now, what? “Well, now it gets slow. Why is it getting slow?”“Well, in that scenario, probably because of something underlying the cloud provider.” “And so now, you lose an entire AWS region. How do you handle that?” “Seems to me when that happens, the entire internet's kind of broken. Do people really need longer URLs?”And that is a valid answer, in many cases. The question doesn't really work without a whole bunch of additional constraints that make it sound fake. And that's not a weakness. That is the fact that computers and cloud services have never been as accessible as they are now. And that's a win for everyone.Richard: There's one aspect of accessibility which is actually decreasing—or two. A, you need to pay for them on an ongoing basis. And B, you need an internet connection which is suitably fast, low latency, what have you. And those are things which actually do make things harder for a variety of reasons. If I look at our back-end systems—as in Grafana—all of them have single binary modes where you literally compile everything into a single binary and you can run it on your laptop because if you're stuck on a plane, you can't do any work on it. That kind of is not the best of situations.And if you have a huge CI/CD pipeline, everything in this cloud and fine and dandy, but your internet breaks. Yeah, so I do agree that it is becoming generally more accessible. I disagree that it is becoming more accessible along all possible axes.Corey: I would agree. There is a silver lining to that as well, where yes, they are fraught and dangerous and I would preface this with a whole bunch of warnings, but from a cost perspective, all of the cloud providers do have a free tier offering where you can kick the tires on a lot of these things in return for no money. Surprisingly, the best one of those is Oracle Cloud where they have an unlimited free tier, use whatever you want in this subset of services, and you will never be charged a dime. As opposed to the AWS model of free tier where well, okay, it suddenly got very popular or you misconfigured something, and surprise, you now owe us enough money to buy Belize. That doesn't usually lead to a great customer experience.But you're right, you can't get away from needing an internet connection of at least some level of stability and throughput in order for a lot of these things to work. The stuff you would do locally on a Raspberry Pi, for example, if your budget constrained and want to get something out here, or your laptop. Great, that's not going to work in the same way as a full-on cloud service will.Richard: It's not free unless you have hard guarantees that you're not going to ever pay anything. It's fine to send warning, it's fine to switch the thing off, it's fine to have you hit random hard and soft quotas. It is not a free service if you can't guarantee that it is free.Corey: I agree with you. I think that there needs to be a free offering where, “Well, okay, you want us to suddenly stop serving traffic to the world?” “Yes. When the alternative is you have to start charging me through the nose, yes I want you to stop serving traffic.” That is definitionally what it says on the tin.And as an independent learner, that is what I want. Conversely, if I'm an enterprise, yeah, I don't care about money; we're running our Superbowl ad right now, so whatever you do, don't stop serving traffic. Charge us all the money. And there's been a lot of hand wringing about, well, how do we figure out which direction to go in? And it's, have you considered asking the customer?So, on a scale of one to bank, how serious is this account going to be [laugh]? Like, what are your big concerns: never charge me or never go down? Because we can build for either of those. Just let's make sure that all of those expectations are aligned. Because if you guess you're going to get it wrong and then no one's going to like you.Richard: I would argue this. All those services from all cloud providers actually build to address both of those. It's a deliberate choice not to offer certain aspects.Corey: Absolutely. When I talk to AWS, like, “Yeah, but there is an eventual consistency challenge in the billing system where it takes”—as anyone who's looked at the billing system can see—“Multiple days, sometimes for usage data to show up. So, how would we be able to stop things if the usage starts climbing?” To which my relatively direct responses, that sounds like a huge problem. I don't know how you'd fix that, but I do know that if suddenly you decide, as a matter of policy, to okay, if you're in the free tier, we will not charge you, or even we will not charge you more than $20 a month.So, you build yourself some headroom, great. And anything that people are able to spin up, well, you're just going to have to eat the cost as a provider. I somehow suspect that would get fixed super quickly if that were the constraint. The fact that it isn't is a conscious choice.Richard: Absolutely.Corey: And the reason I'm so passionate about this, about the free space, is not because I want to get a bunch of things for free. I assure you I do not. I mean, I spend my life fixing AWS bills and looking at AWS pricing, and my argument is very rarely, “It's too expensive.” It's that the billing dimension is hard to predict or doesn't align with a customer's experience or prices a service out of a bunch of use cases where it'll be great. But very rarely do I just sit here shaking my fist and saying, “It costs too much.”The problem is when you scare the living crap out of a student with a surprise bill that's more than their entire college tuition, even if you waive it a week or so later, do you think they're ever going to be as excited as they once were to go and use cloud services and build things for themselves and see what's possible? I mean, you and I met on IRC 20 years ago because back in those days, the failure mode and the risk financially was extremely low. It's yeah, the biggest concern that I had back then when I was doing some of my Linux experimentation is if I typed the wrong thing, I'm going to break my laptop. And yeah, that happened once or twice, and I've learned not to make those same kinds of mistakes, or put guardrails in so the blast radius was smaller, or use a remote system instead. Yeah, someone else's computer that I can destroy. Wonderful. But that was on we live and we learn as we were coming up. There was never an opportunity for us, to my understanding, to wind up accidentally running up an $8 million charge.Richard: Absolutely. And psychological safety is one of the most important things in what most people do. We are social animals. Without this psychological safety, you're not going to have long-term, self-sustaining groups. You will not make someone really excited about it. There's two basic ways to sell: trust or force. Those are the two ones. There's none else.Corey: Managing shards. Maintenance windows. Overprovisioning. ElastiCache bills. I know, I know. It's a spooky season and you're already shaking. It's time for caching to be simpler. Momento Serverless Cache lets you forget the backend to focus on good code and great user experiences. With true autoscaling and a pay-per-use pricing model, it makes caching easy. No matter your cloud provider, get going for free at gomemento.co/screaming That's GO M-O-M-E-N-T-O dot co slash screamingCorey: Yeah. And it also looks ridiculous. I was talking to someone somewhat recently who's used to spending four bucks a month on their AWS bill for some S3 stuff. Great. Good for them. That's awesome. Their credentials got compromised. Yes, that is on them to some extent. Okay, great.But now after six days, they were told that they owed $360,000 to AWS. And I don't know how, as a cloud company, you can sit there and ask a student to do that. That is not a realistic thing. They are what is known, in the United States at least, in the world of civil litigation as quote-unquote, “Judgment proof,” which means, great, you could wind up finding that someone owes you $20 billion. Most of the time, they don't have that, so you're not able to recoup it. Yeah, the judgment feels good, but you're never going to see it.That's the problem with something like that. It's yeah, I would declare bankruptcy long before, as a student, I wound up paying that kind of money. And I don't hear any stories about them releasing the collection agency hounds against people in that scenario. But I couldn't guarantee that. I would never urge someone to ignore that bill and see what happens.And it's such an off-putting thing that, from my perspective, is beneath of the company. And let's be clear, I see this behavior at times on Google Cloud, and I see it on Azure as well. This is not something that is unique to AWS, but they are the 800-pound gorilla in the space, and that's important. Or as I just to mention right now, like, as I—because I was about to give you crap for this, too, but if I go to grafana.com, it says, and I quote, “Play around with the Grafana Stack. Experience Grafana for yourself, no registration or installation needed.”Good. I was about to yell at you if it's, “Oh, just give us your credit card and go ahead and start spinning things up and we won't charge you. Honest.” Even your free account does not require a credit card; you're doing it right. That tells me that I'm not going to get a giant surprise bill.Richard: You have no idea how much thought and work went into our free offering. There was a lot of math involved.Corey: None of this is easy, I want to be very clear on that. Pricing is one of the hardest things to get right, especially in cloud. And it also, when you get it right, it doesn't look like it was that hard for you to do. But I fix [sigh] I people's AWS bills for a living and still, five or six years in, one of the hardest things I still wrestle with is pricing engagements. It's incredibly nuanced, incredibly challenging, and at least for services in the cloud space where you're doing usage-based billing, that becomes a problem.But glancing at your pricing page, you do hit the two things that are incredibly important to me. The first one is use something for free. As an added bonus, you can use it forever. And I can get started with it right now. Great, when I go and look at your pricing page or I want to use your product and it tells me to ‘click here to contact us.' That tells me it's an enterprise sales cycle, it's got to be really expensive, and I'm not solving my problem tonight.Whereas the other side of it, the enterprise offering needs to be ‘contact us' and you do that, that speaks to the enterprise procurement people who don't know how to sign a check that doesn't have to commas in it, and they want to have custom terms and all the rest, and they're prepared to pay for that. If you don't have that, you look to small-time. When it doesn't matter what price you put on it, you wind up offering your enterprise tier at some large number, it's yeah, for some companies, that's a small number. You don't necessarily want to back yourself in, depending upon what the specific needs are. You've gotten that right.Every common criticism that I have about pricing, you folks have gotten right. And I definitely can pick up on your fingerprints on a lot of this. Because it sounds like a weird thing to say of, “Well, he's the Director of Community, why would he weigh in on pricing?” It's, “I don't think you understand what community is when you ask that question.”Richard: Yes, I fully agree. It's super important to get pricing right, or to get many things right. And usually the things which just feel naturally correct are the ones which took the most effort and the most time and everything. And yes, at least from the—like, I was in those conversations or part of them, and the one thing which was always clear is when we say it's free, it must be free. When we say it is forever free, it must be forever free. No games, no lies, do what you say and say what you do. Basically.We have things where initially you get certain pro features and you can keep paying and you can keep using them, or after X amount of time they go away. Things like these are built in because that's what people want. They want to play around with the whole thing and see, hey, is this actually providing me value? Do I want to pay for this feature which is nice or this and that plugin or what have you? And yeah, you're also absolutely right that once you leave these constraints of basically self-serve cloud, you are talking about bespoke deals, but you're also talking about okay, let's sit down, let's actually understand what your business is: what are your business problems? What are you going to solve today? What are you trying to solve tomorrow?Let us find a way of actually supporting you and invest into a mutual partnership and not just grab the money and run. We have extremely low churn for, I would say, pretty good reasons. Because this thing about our users, our customers being successful, we do take it extremely seriously.Corey: It's one of those areas that I just can't shake the feeling is underappreciated industry-wide. And the reason I say that this is your fingerprints on it is because if this had been wrong, you have a lot of… we'll call them idiosyncrasies, where there are certain things you absolutely will not stand for, and misleading people and tricking them into paying money is high on that list. One of the reasons we're friends. So yeah, but I say I see your fingerprints on this, it's yeah, if this hadn't been worked out the way that it is, you would not still be there. One other thing that I wanted to call out about, well, I guess it's a confluence of pricing and logging in the rest, I look at your free tier, and it offers up to 50 gigabytes of ingest a month.And it's easy for me to sit here and compare that to other services, other tools, and other logging stories, and then I have to stop and think for a minute that yeah, discs have gotten way bigger, and internet connections have gotten way faster, and even the logs have gotten way wordier. I still am not sure that most people can really contextualize just how much logging fits into 50 gigs of data. Do you have any, I guess, ballpark examples of what that looks like? Because it's been long enough since I've been playing in these waters that I can't really contextualize it anymore.Richard: Lord of the Rings is roughly five megabytes. It's actually less. So, we're talking literally 10,000 Lord of the Rings, which you can just shove in us and we're just storing this for you. Which also tells you that you're not going to be reading any of this. Or some of it, yes, but not all of it. You need better tooling and you need proper tooling.And some of this is more modern. Some of this is where we actually pushed the state of the art. But I'm also biased. But I, for myself, do claim that we did push the state of the art here. But at the same time you come back to those absolute fundamentals of how humans deal with data.If you look back basically as far as we have writing—literally 6000 years ago, is the oldest writing—humans have always dealt with information with the state of the world in very specific ways. A, is it important enough to even write it down, to even persist it in whatever persistence mechanisms I have at my disposal? If yes, write a detailed account or record a detailed account of whatever the thing is. But it turns out, this is expensive and it's not what you need. So, over time, you optimize towards only taking down key events and only noting key events. Maybe with their interconnections, but fundamentally, the key events.As your data grows, as you have more stuff, as this still is important to your business and keeps being more important to—or doesn't even need to be a business; can be social, can be whatever—whatever thing it is, it becomes expensive, again, to retain all of those key events. So, you turn them into numbers and you can do actual math on them. And that's this path which you've seen again, and again, and again, and again, throughout humanity's history. Literally, as long as we have written records, this has played out again, and again, and again, and again, for every single field which humans actually cared about. At different times, like, power networks are way ahead of this, but fundamentally power networks work on metrics, but for transient load spike, and everything, they have logs built into their power measurement devices, but those are only far in between. Of course, the main thing is just metrics, time-series. And you see this again, and again.You also were sysadmin in internet-related all switches have been metrics-based or metrics-first for basically forever, for 20, 30 years. But that stands to reason. Of course the internet is running at by roughly 20 years scale-wise in front of the cloud because obviously you need the internet because as you wouldn't be having a cloud. So, all of those growing pains why metrics are all of a sudden the thing, “Or have been for a few years now,” is basically, of course, people who were writing software, providing their own software services, hit the scaling limitations which you hit for Internet service providers two decades, three decades ago. But fundamentally, you have this complete system. Basically profiles or distributed tracing depending on how you view distributed tracing.You can also argue that distributed tracing is key events which are linked to each other. Logs sit firmly in the key event thing and then you turn this into numbers and that is metrics. And that's basically it. You have extremes at the and where you can have valid, depending on your circumstances, engineering trade-offs of where you invest the most, but fundamentally, that is why those always appear again in humanity's dealing with data, and observability is no different.Corey: I take a look at last month's AWS bill. Mine is pretty well optimized. It's a bit over 500 bucks. And right around 150 of that is various forms of logging and detecting change in the environment. And on the one hand, I sit here, and I think, “Oh, I should optimize that,” because the value of those logs to me is zero.Except that whenever I have to go in and diagnose something or respond to an incident or have some forensic exploration, they then are worth an awful lot. And I am prepared to pay 150 bucks a month for that because the potential value of having that when the time comes is going to be extraordinarily useful. And it basically just feels like a tax on top of what it is that I'm doing. The same thing happens with application observability where, yeah, when you just want the big substantial stuff, yeah, until you're trying to diagnose something. But in some cases, yeah, okay, then crank up the verbosity and then look for it.But if you're trying to figure it out after an event that isn't likely or hopefully won't recur, you're going to wish that you spent a little bit more on collecting data out of it. You're always going to be wrong, you're always going to be unhappy, on some level.Richard: Ish. You could absolutely be optimizing this. I mean, for $500, it's probably not worth your time unless you take it as an exercise, but outside of due diligence where you need specific logs tied to—or specific events tied to specific times, I would argue that a lot of the problems with logs is just dealing with it wrong. You have this one extreme of full-text indexing everything, and you have this other extreme of a data lake—which is just a euphemism of never looking at the data again—to keep storage vendors happy. There is an in between.Again, I'm biased, but like for example, with Loki, you have those same label sets as you have on your metrics with Prometheus, and you have literally the same, which means you only index that part and you only extract on ingestion time. If you don't have structured logs yet, only put the metadata about whatever you care about extracted and put it into your label set and store this, and that's the only thing you index. But it goes further than just this. You can also turn those logs into metrics.And to me this is a path of optimization. Where previously I logged this and that error. Okay, fine, but it's just a log line telling me it's HTTP 500. No one cares that this is at this precise time. Log levels are also basically an anti-pattern because they're just trying to deal with the amount of data which I have, and try and get a handle on this on that level whereas it would be much easier if I just counted every time I have an HTTP 500, I just up my counter by one. And again, and again, and again.And all of a sudden, I have literally—and I did the math on this—over 99.8% of the data which I have to store just goes away. It's just magic the way—and we're only talking about the first time I'm hitting this logline. The second time I'm hitting this logline is functionally free if I turn this into metrics. It becomes cheap enough that one of the mantras which I have, if you need to onboard your developers on modern observability, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, the whole bells and whistles, usually people have logs, like that's what they have, unless they were from ISPs or power companies, or so; there they usually start with metrics.But most users, which I see both with my Grafana and with my Prometheus [unintelligible 00:38:46] tend to start with logs. They have issues with those logs because they're basically unstructured and useless and you need to first make them useful to some extent. But then you can leverage on this and instead of having a debug statement, just put a counter. Every single time you think, “Hey, maybe I should put a debug statement,” just put a counter instead. In two months time, see if it was worth it or if you delete that line and just remove that counter.It's so much cheaper, you can just throw this on and just have it run for a week or a month or whatever timeframe and done. But it goes beyond this because all of a sudden, if I can turn my logs into metrics properly, I can start rewriting my alerts on those metrics. I can actually persist those metrics and can more aggressively throw my logs away. But also, I have this transition made a lot easier where I don't have this huge lift, where this day in three months is to be cut over and we're going to release the new version of this and that software and it's not going to have that, it's going to have 80% less logs and everything will be great and then you missed the first maintenance window or someone is ill or what have you, and then the next Big Friday is coming so you can't actually deploy there. I mean Black Friday. But we can also talk about deploying on Fridays.But the thing is, you have this huge thing, whereas if you have this as a continuous improvement process, I can just look at, this is the log which is coming out. I turn this into a number, I start emitting metrics directly, and I see that those numbers match. And so, I can just start—I build new stuff, I put it into a new data format, I actually emit the new data format directly from my code instrumentation, and only then do I start removing the instrumentation for the logs. And that allows me to, with full confidence, with psychological safety, just move a lot more quickly, deliver much more quickly, and also cut down on my costs more quickly because I'm just using more efficient data types.Corey: I really want to thank you for spending as much time as you have. If people want to learn more about how you view the world and figure out what other personal attacks they can throw your way, where's the best place for them to find you?Richard: Personal attacks, probably Twitter. It's, like, the go-to place for this kind of thing. For actually tracking, I stopped maintaining my own website. Maybe I'll do again, but if you go on github.com/ritchieh/talks, you'll find a reasonably up-to-date list of all the talks, interviews, presentations, panels, what have you, which I did over the last whatever amount of time. [laugh].Corey: And we will, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:41:23]. Thanks again for your time. It's always appreciated.Richard: And thank you.Corey: Richard Hartmann, Director of Community at Grafana Labs. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an insulting comment. And then when someone else comes along with an insulting comment they want to add, we'll just increment the counter by one.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

KuppingerCole Analysts
Analyst Chat #145: How Does Using Cloud Services Alter Risk?

KuppingerCole Analysts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 25:00


The question whether using a cloud service alters risk is not simple to answer. Mike Small sits down with Matthias and explains, that every organization has its own set of circumstances, and the answer needs to take these into account. He explains the important factors to look at, and what organizations should understand when assessing their risks in a cloud and hybrid world. Cybersecurity Leadership Summit takes place on November 8 – 10 in Berlin and online. Join us there: https://www.kuppingercole.com/events/csls2022 Find more on our website: https://www.kuppingercole.com/ Feel free to contact us with questions! mr@kuppingercole.com

Late Confirmation by CoinDesk
THE HASH: Google Partners With Coinbase to Accept Crypto Payments for Cloud Services; CNN Ends its NFT Project

Late Confirmation by CoinDesk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 28:08


This episode is sponsored by ZenGo.The most valuable crypto stories for Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2022.Google will start accepting crypto payments for cloud services early next year. The tech giant said it will receive crypto payment via an integration with crypto exchange Coinbase. Plus, the state of the NFT market as CNN is "saying goodbye" to its Web3 project Vault.See also: Google Partners With Coinbase to Accept Crypto Payments for Cloud ServicesBlock Subsidiary Spiral, Mining Tech Firm Braiins Spearhead Push for Bitcoin Mining Upgrades-This episode has been edited by Nia Freeman.. Our executive producer is Jared Schwartz. Our theme song is “Neon Beach.”ZenGo crypto wallet is an on-chain crypto wallet with no private key vulnerability, leveraging advanced cryptography called MPC. Get started at ZenGo.com/HASH and use code HASH to get $20 back on your first purchase of $200 or more. Terms and conditions apply. See site for details.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed
Day Two Cloud 166: VMware: How Multi-Cloud Services Address Cloud Complexity (Sponsored)

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 47:00


Multi-cloud services are an emerging category of software designed to make your Dev and Ops teams' multi-cloud reality easier to cope with. Sponsor VMware stops by the Day Two Cloud podcast to talk about how the operational challenges of running workloads in a mix of public and private clouds and how its multi-cloud services initiative can help. The post Day Two Cloud 166: VMware: How Multi-Cloud Services Address Cloud Complexity (Sponsored) appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Day 2 Cloud
Day Two Cloud 166: VMware: How Multi-Cloud Services Address Cloud Complexity (Sponsored)

Day 2 Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 47:00


Multi-cloud services are an emerging category of software designed to make your Dev and Ops teams' multi-cloud reality easier to cope with. Sponsor VMware stops by the Day Two Cloud podcast to talk about how the operational challenges of running workloads in a mix of public and private clouds and how its multi-cloud services initiative can help. The post Day Two Cloud 166: VMware: How Multi-Cloud Services Address Cloud Complexity (Sponsored) appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe
Day Two Cloud 166: VMware: How Multi-Cloud Services Address Cloud Complexity (Sponsored)

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 47:00


Multi-cloud services are an emerging category of software designed to make your Dev and Ops teams' multi-cloud reality easier to cope with. Sponsor VMware stops by the Day Two Cloud podcast to talk about how the operational challenges of running workloads in a mix of public and private clouds and how its multi-cloud services initiative can help. The post Day Two Cloud 166: VMware: How Multi-Cloud Services Address Cloud Complexity (Sponsored) appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Demand Gen Visionaries
Building High Impact Partner Ecosystems with Suresh Sathyamurthy, CMO of SingleStore

Demand Gen Visionaries

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 40:29


This episode features an interview with Suresh Sathyamurthy, CMO of SingleStore. SingleStore helps businesses adapt more quickly, embrace diverse data and accelerate digital innovation by operationalizing all data through one platform. Prior to SingleStore Suresh held various product and marketing leadership roles with industry leaders like Microsoft, Palo Alto Networks, and Dell EMC helping build and grow emerging businesses in areas of Security, Data Platforms, and Cloud Services.On this episode Suresh shares his insights into building high-impact partner ecosystems, ways to demonstrate value to your customers, and secrets to non-intrusive marketing.---“You have to focus on fewer, bigger partners at scale, so you can dedicate the time and energy with them. And then over time you're creating proof points and value that other partners are going to look at and say, I want to be a part of that story. Create the energy and evidence that you need for partners to want to be a part of your ecosystem.” - Suresh Sathyamurthy, CMO,  SingleStore---Episode Timestamps:*(02:18) - Suresh's role at SingleStore*(02:49) - Segment: Trust Tree*(08:05) - Targeting developers to try your product*(12:05) - Segment: The Playbook*(14:04) - Providing value to users of your product*(20:22) - The value of non-intrusive marketing*(17:35) - Building high impact partner ecosyetems*(37:32) - Segment: Quick Hits---Sponsor:Demand Gen Visionaries is brought to you by Qualified.com, the #1 Conversational Marketing platform for companies that use Salesforce and the secret weapon for Demand Gen pros. The world's leading enterprise brands trust Qualified to instantly meet with buyers, right on their website, and maximize sales pipeline. Visit Qualified.com to learn more.---LinksConnect with Suresh on LinkedInConnect with Ian on LinkedInLearn more about SingleStorewww.caspianstudios.com

TechCrunch Startups – Spoken Edition
With $17M in funding, Immerok launches cloud service for real-time streaming data

TechCrunch Startups – Spoken Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 4:05


In 2011, the Apache Software Foundation released Flink, a high-throughput, low-latency engine for streaming various data types.

Klopotek Publishing Radio
Episode 22. Reconsidering Your Book Publicity and Marketing Strategies: When to do What and How Much – with Sarah Russo

Klopotek Publishing Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 35:01


**Who You will Hear**Guest: Sarah Russo (Founder of Page One Media)Co-host: Luna Tang (Cloud Service Delivery Manager at Klopotek)Co-host: Dwayne Parris (Senior Consultant at Klopotek)For many authors and independent publishers, book publicity and marketing is always a huge arena hard to measure and predict: whether to hire a publicist for a forthcoming book, how much to invest, and what the return can be expected. In this episode, Sarah Russo, founder of Page One Media, joins us and answers a few critical FAQs from authors and independent publishers regarding book publicity and marketing strategies. Sarah talks about the work scope of a (freelance) book publicist, the timeline of a complete book publicity campaign, the collaboration between author, publisher, and book publicist, as well as how the emerging new media has been impacting how books get promoted and creating more opportunities for book selling.You can learn more about book publicity and services from the website of Page One Media. Its blog section also offers a lot of valuable advice for authors and independent publishers.Tell us what is going on with your publishing projects or business on Twitter (@Klopotek_AG), LinkedIn, or email us at podcast@klopotek.com.  For more information about the Klopotek software solution, please write to info@klopotek.com, or register to receive emails from us on technology innovations & events from Klopotek.* The views, information, or opinions expressed in the program are solely those of the individuals involved and do not necessarily represent those of Klopotek and its employees. It is the goal of Klopotek Publishing Radio to support cultural diversity, the exchange of opinions, and to create an environment where the conversation of a global publishing industry can thrive.

HCM Cloud Talk Radio
Cloud HCM Talk Radio - Extending HCM Cloud with HCM Journeys Booster

HCM Cloud Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 26:41


As Oracle Cloud HCM continues to evolve, how can you extend and automate HCM Journeys by easily connecting to third-party systems, applications, and business processes which is a capability not possible with other HCM provider applications? Tune in to Cloud HCM Talk Radio to hear Peter Squires, Oracle Senior Product Manager, as he shares his thoughts on the new HCM Journeys Booster product and what it means for your Oracle Cloud HCM implementation.

Raw Data By P3
Cloud Services Used to Be Really Dumb w/ Eric Vigesaa

Raw Data By P3

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 82:09


In today's episode, we welcome Eric Vigesaa of Microsoft to the show. This special guest has a decades-long relationship with our host.  According to Rob, Eric can always be counted on as a partner in cynical observations. Rob describes Eric as one of the rare breeds that enjoy the excitement of building an emergency solution. Someone who prefers a shorter distance between the software and the problem. The closer he is to impact, the more satisfying the solution becomes to him. Sardonically, Eric is also like the groundhog of Microsoft, emerging from IT, looking around, seeing the shadow, and returning back to IT: empowered, passionate, and skilled. Eric describes his non-IT time as an evolutionary course that allowed him to explore and grow his aptitude. Also in today's episode, Rob and Eric describe the beginning phase of Microsoft's shift to computing in the cloud and the project carnage in its wake. Promising projects suddenly found themselves on the road to nowhere and are now, nowhere to be found . . . with one popular exception: streamlined conditional formatting. That simplistic innovation not only made it out of the darkness to see the light of day but also became Rob's gateway drug to audience participation. Other innovations weren't so lucky. Eric and Rob describe what happened to a multitude of promising projects that were sliced, diced, julienned, and unable to survive cloud modernization at Microsoft. The history might pull you in, but it's the dry wit that will keep you through the end. As a bonus, today you also get at least one bad Star Wars joke . . . and don't forget, if you enjoyed this episode or the joke, please leave us a review on your favorite podcast platform and be sure to subscribe to get new episodes delivered to your inbox. Also in this Episode: The Software Hall of Fame, w/ Microsoft's Conor Cunningham Queen's Gambit Mike Tomlin Interview - Your teaching is failing Kill Bill Relief or Regret Power Pivot and Power BI: The Excel User's Guide to DAX, Power Query, Power BI & Power Pivot in Excel 2010-2016 - by Rob Collie The Cloud is Powered by People w/Jeff DeVerter The Evolution of SharePoint w/ Denise Trabona and Adam Harmetz Winchester Mystery House A Most Generous Mentor w/ Microsoft's Dany Hoter Skynet becomes Self-Aware Blade Runner - Tears in Rain

The Engineering Leadership Podcast
Customer narratives, business fluency & investing in developer experience w/ Marco Argenti #101

The Engineering Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 43:03


Customer narratives are a transformative tool to help you build successful products! Marco Argenti (CIO @ Goldman Sachs) explains how to develop these narratives as your team's guiding vision and help eng orgs better understand “the business” side of software. Plus we cover best practices for investing in developer experience, Goldman Sachs' transition to prioritize external developers, and the signs, signals and trends Marco's used to navigate his career across tons of different emerging technology fields.ABOUT MARCO ARGENTIMarco Argenti is the Chief Information Officer at Goldman Sachs. He is a member of the Management Committee, the Firmwide Technology Risk Committee, the Client Business Standards Committee, the Enterprise Risk Committee and the Global Inclusion and Diversity Committee. Mr. Argenti joined the firm as a Partner in 2019.Prior to joining Goldman Sachs, Mr. Argenti served as Vice President of technology of Amazon Web Services (AWS) since 2013, overseeing all aspects of the product lifecycle of Cloud Services, including strategy, business planning and developer engagement, and leading several AWS technology areas, such as mobile, serverless, Internet of Things, messaging, and augmented and virtual reality. Before that, Mr. Argenti spent several years at Nokia Corporation, where he was Senior Vice President and Global Head of Developer Experience and Marketplace from 2011 to 2013, with responsibility for Nokia's developer ecosystem and app store across the company's entire product portfolio.Earlier in his career, Mr. Argenti was a board member and Chief Executive Officer of internet and mobile company Dada S.p.A., as well as a board member, executive vice president of strategy development and chief technology officer of Canadian e-commerce solutions provider Microforum Inc., where he founded Internet Frontier Inc., an internet publisher and e-commerce retailer. He previously founded and sold Dreamware S.r.l., a software development firm, to Microforum Inc.Mr. Argenti serves on the Board of Directors of the Seattle Symphony Orchestra and the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, also known as PanCan. He is also a member of the Board of Trustees of Carnegie Hall."Today, the world is so complex that it's almost like an asteroid field and when you navigate an asteroid field, if you don't turn often, you're gonna be having some surprises and so that's why iteration is so important. You need to release sometimes multiple times a day because the world is changing in front of you and there are opportunities and obstacles that come all the time."- Marco Argenti   Our in-person conference ELC Annual returns 10/27-28!Learn from 60+ of the best engineering leaders in the industry / Critical insights on leadership, career and technology / Plus tons of experiences optimized for deep conversations & meaningful connections - all to help you build your support network!Don't miss out on being part of the biggest celebration of engineering leadership of the year!Grab your ticket HERE: sfelc.com/annual2022SHOW NOTES:Marco's leadership journey – as a CTO, VP of Tech, and beyond (2:39)Questioning biases & observing signals when predicting opportunities (8:41)How Marco used intuition & data when deciding to work with Goldman Sachs (10:10)Why engineers must understand business principles (13:46)Using customer narratives to create a guiding vision for eng teams (17:47)How to help eng orgs better understand the business metrics of software (22:01)Why Goldman Sachs transitioned to prioritizing its developer clients (25:39)Shifting the focus from internal developers to external developers (31:34)How the tech team navigated challenges during this transition (33:34)Rapid fire questions (36:43)

HCM Cloud Talk Radio
Cloud HCM Talk Radio - CY22 - Payroll Year-end Early Readiness Planning: US, CAN, MX

HCM Cloud Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 32:07


Are you an Oracle Cloud Payroll customer in North America and planning your calendar 2022 year-end payroll processes? Then you won't want to miss this Cloud HCM Talk Radio Show with Heather McAninch, Oracle Senior Principal Product Advisor, and Randy Messer, Oracle Strategic Program Manager, HCM Development as they provide expert guidance for preparing for year-end activities and talk about how to navigate the payroll processes and requirements, as well as best practices, tools and guidelines.

Software Defined Talk
Episode 376: Businesses that use computers

Software Defined Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 67:23


This week we discuss Japan's “war” on floppy disks, Twitter adds an edit button and Apple going all-in on eSIM. Plus, will the U.S. finally get instant bank transfers? Runner-up Titles They were already in the system. Headless Optimization Gone Amuck. While sitting on the toilet Extensive iPhone Carrying Strategy Breakdown. We need fanny packs (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L-SXfb0CJrE). All you have to do to know the problem is to hear the solution. Bring Paul Ford out of retirement. Great ideas, getting close Prevent the typo 73 SaaS Companies “Because, you know, Coté: I'm a pro.” That may be his family crest Rundown Checking on Digital Transformation Japan declares war on floppy disks for government use (https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2022/08/japan-declares-war-on-floppy-disks-for-government-use/?utm_source=substack&utm_medium=email) Instant Payments in the U.S.? (https://twitter.com/kelseyhightower/status/1567516269594955778) You Asked for It: Twitter's Getting an Edit Button (https://gizmodo.com/twitter-edit-button-test-1849484288) SaaS spend ratios on R&D/S&M/G&A (https://blossomstreetventures.medium.com/saas-spend-ratios-on-r-d-s-m-g-a-1a0b30931b0) Relevant to your Interests Netflix's Catch-22 Milestone (https://puck.news/netflixs-catch-22-milestone/) VMware Offers Sneak Peek at Tanzu App Platform (https://adtmag.com/articles/2022/09/01/vmware-offers-sneak-peek-at-tanzu-app-platform.aspx) VMware customers optimistically wait for Broadcom's impact (https://www.theregister.com/2022/08/31/vmware_broadcom_voxpop/) Ubiquiti Teaches AWS Security and Crisis Comms Via Counterexample (https://www.lastweekinaws.com/blog/ubiquiti-teaches-aws-security-and-crisis-comms-via-counterexample/) Rockstar programmer: Rivers Cuomo finds meaning in coding – TechCrunch (https://techcrunch.com/2020/11/25/rock-star-programmer-rivers-cuomo-finds-meaning-in-coding/) Microsoft: The deadline to get off Basic Auth is approaching (https://www.theregister.com/2022/09/05/microsoft_basic_auth_deadline/) 1 big thing: What's behind chip giants' lawsuit (https://www.axios.com/newsletters/axios-login-e0555ee3-649d-4437-85db-a04c411d9069.html?chunk=0&utm_term=emshare#story0) Cloudflare drops Kiwi Farms harassment site (https://www.axios.com/newsletters/axios-login-e0555ee3-649d-4437-85db-a04c411d9069.html?chunk=1&utm_term=emshare#story1) Open-source password manager Bitwarden raises $100M • TechCrunch (https://techcrunch.com/2022/09/06/open-source-password-manager-bitwarden-raises-100m/) AWS Preps ‘Bastion' Cloud Service for Advertisers (https://www.theinformation.com/articles/aws-preps-bastion-cloud-service-for-advertisers?utm_source=ti_app&ck_subscriber_id=512834888) The cloud computing giants are vying to protect fat profits (https://www.economist.com/business/2022/08/29/the-cloud-computing-giants-are-vying-to-protect-fat-profits?ck_subscriber_id=1141233388) Blackouts possible at height of California's heat wave Tuesday as grid struggles with record usage (https://www.sacbee.com/news/california/article265350931.html) For homesick Marylanders (https://twitter.com/SwingRhythm2/status/1567184158346067972) Google announces October 6th event to launch the Pixel Watch, Pixel 7, and new Nest devices (https://www.theverge.com/2022/9/6/23339303/pixel-7-pro-pixel-watch-made-by-google-hardware-event-october-6th) Isovalent Cilium Enterprise: For Kubernetes Networking & Security (https://isovalent.com/blog/post/isovalent-series-b/) Introducing Ambient Mesh (https://istio.io/latest/blog/2022/introducing-ambient-mesh/) Muck Rack scores one of the largest growth equity investments in PR tech (https://www.axios.com/2022/09/07/muck-rack-series-a-public-relations-tech?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter_axiosprorata&stream=top) Nonsense Southwest Pilot Threatens to Turn Plane Around if Unruly Passengers Keep AirDropping Nudes (https://gizmodo.com/southwest-airlines-airdrop-nudes-cabo-1849478920) New escape room just opened in town (https://softwaredefinedtalk.slack.com/archives/C5GPMBXQT/p1662487190760019?thread_ts=1590186505.165200&cid=C5GPMBXQT) Jaws is a box office hit again, 47 years after it first hit theaters (https://www.theverge.com/2022/9/5/23338141/national-cinema-day-jaws-box-office) Sponsors Teleport — The easiest, most secure way to access infrastructure. (https://goteleport.com/?utm_campaign=eg&utm_medium=partner&utm_source=sdt) Conferences DevOps Talks Sydney (https://devops.talksplus.com/sydney/devops.html), Sydney, September 6-7, 2022 Sydney Cloud FinOps Meetup (https://events.finops.org/events/details/finops-sydney-cloud-finops-presents-sydney-cloud-finops-meetup/), online, Oct 13, 2022 Matt's presenting KubeCon North America (https://events.linuxfoundation.org/kubecon-cloudnativecon-north-america/https://events.linuxfoundation.org/kubecon-cloudnativecon-north-america/), Detroit, Oct 24 – 28, 2022 SpringOne Platform (https://springone.io/?utm_source=cote&utm_medium=podcast&utm_content=sdt), SF, December 6–8, 2022 THAT Conference Texas Call For Counselors (https://that.us/call-for-counselors/tx/2023/) Jan 16-19, 2023 Listener Feedback Patrick tweeted about Birdnet (http://birdnetpi.com) and his 5-year-son likes the pictures SDT news & hype Join us in Slack (http://www.softwaredefinedtalk.com/slack). Get a SDT Sticker! Send your postal address to stickers@softwaredefinedtalk.com (mailto:stickers@softwaredefinedtalk.com) and we will send you free laptop stickers! Follow us on Twitch (https://www.twitch.tv/sdtpodcast), Twitter (https://twitter.com/softwaredeftalk), Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/softwaredefinedtalk/), LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/software-defined-talk/) and YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCi3OJPV6h9tp-hbsGBLGsDQ/featured). Use the code SDT to get $20 off Coté's book, (https://leanpub.com/digitalwtf/c/sdt) Digital WTF (https://leanpub.com/digitalwtf/c/sdt), so $5 total. Become a sponsor of Software Defined Talk (https://www.softwaredefinedtalk.com/ads)! Recommendations Brandon: **** FRAKTA IKEA Duffle Bag (https://www.ikea.com/us/en/p/frakta-storage-bag-for-cart-blue-90149148/) L.L.Bean Stowaway Pack (https://www.llbean.com/llb/shop/126140?page=llbean-stowaway-pack) Coté: Cavender's All Purpose Greek Seasoning (https://encyclopediaofarkansas.net/entries/cavenders-greek-seasoning-6923/). Photo Credits CoverArt (https://unsplash.com/photos/efoo8mqF22M) Banner (https://unsplash.com/photos/psDzkLlifxQ)

The FIT4PRIVACY Podcast - For those who care about privacy
Privacy Pros Talk Privacy - Tsvetina Lungarova and Punit Bhatia in The FIT4Privacy Podcast E068 (Full)

The FIT4PRIVACY Podcast - For those who care about privacy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 39:34


As privacy professional it is very challenging to explain to business professional about privacy and perspective on how they should prepare to any data breaches. But it is easier when privacy pros talk about privacy. In this episode, Tsvetina Lungarova and Punit Bhatia have a conversation about different topics in the privacy job. For example, they talk about privacy maturity models, data breaches and making privacy understandable to business. KEY CONVERSATION POINTS 00:00:00 Intro 00:02:03 GDPR In One Word “Consistency” 00:03:06 Journey to Field of Privacy 00:09:08 Privacy Maturity Model 00:16:43 Data Breach Experience 00:24:20 Privacy In Business Understandable Language 00:29:20 Question: Start Working In An Organization; What are the 3 things you need to do? 00:32:33 Question: Understand Difference Between Privacy and Security 00:37:57 Thank you ABOUT THE GUEST Tsvetina Lungarova - Information Privacy Professional with 360° Business Administration background (Business Process Management; Law; IT; Accounting; Facility Management; PR, Sales & Marketing) and PhD. candidate in Industrial Economics with research focus on Business Process Restructuring in SMEs triggered by GDPR in the context of Industry 4.0. In the past 15 years she has been deliberately building comprehensive BA profile through mapping of both education and practical experience in its key domains in various industries (Legal Services, Cloud Services, Real Estate, Event Management, FMCG, Engineering & Manufacturing). Within the context of the ongoing global digital transformation in the past couple of years she have leveraged on my BA expertise by building strong knowledge and competence in Privacy and Data Protection in local and international environment with special focus on privacy program management and breach response management. As founder of NeedUs she support responsible organisations to achieve Privacy and Data Protection DNA through infiltrating it in their processes and culture. ABOUT THE HOST Punit Bhatia is one of the leading privacy experts who works independently and has worked with professionals in over 30 countries. Punit works with business and privacy leaders to create an organization culture with high privacy awareness and compliance as a business priority. Selectively, Punit is open to mentor and coach privacy professionals. Punit is the author of books “Be Ready for GDPR” which was rated as the best GDPR Book, “AI & Privacy – How To Find Balance”, “Intro To GDPR”, and “Be an Effective DPO”. Punit is a global speaker who has spoken at over 30 global events. Punit is the creator and host of the FIT4PRIVACY Podcast. This podcast has been featured amongst top GDPR and privacy podcasts. As a person, Punit is an avid thinker and believes in thinking, believing, and acting in line with one's value to have joy in life. He has developed the philosophy named ‘ABC for joy of life' which passionately shares. Punit is based out of Belgium, the heart of Europe. RESOURCES Podcast https://www.fit4privacy.com/podcast Blog https://www.fit4privacy.com/blog YouTube http://youtube.com/fit4privacy --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/fit4privacy/message