Podcast appearances and mentions of John Dewey

American philosopher, psychologist, and educational reformer

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John Dewey

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Best podcasts about John Dewey

Latest podcast episodes about John Dewey

Nature and the Nation
Review: Reconstruction in Philosophy by John Dewey

Nature and the Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 68:48


In this episode I look at the leftward direction of Pragmatism led by John Dewey, as outlined in his book Reconstruction in Philosophy, as well as his restatement of principles near the end of his life.

SGV Master Key Podcast
Daisy Flores - Tia Gladys social worker

SGV Master Key Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 53:34


Daisy Flores is the daughter of the manager and cook at Tia Gladys Restaurant in San Gabriel. While growing up helping her father and family with the restaurant she learned a wide array of life skills, without her being entirely conscious of it. While attending college Daisy found a new appreciation for her time growing up at the restaurant with all the ups and downs. Not only can she now recognize the skills that were acquired during that time but she also sees the beauty in how she grew up.Though Daisy still helps her father at Tia Gladys she spends the majority of her work time doing what she went to school for, Social Work. As a school social worker she helps teachers, children, and the family get the proper resources needed to grow._______________Music Podcast Intro and Outro Everyday, Jason Farnhmam, YouTube Audio Library Podcast Advertisement I love you, Vibe Tracks, YouTube Audio Library Sour Tennessee Red (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio Library Dewey, Cheedham, and Howe (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio Library Film Project Countdown.flac Copyright 2013 Iwan Gabovitch, CC-BY3 license

O Que é Tudo Isso?
Ep. 079 Estética pragmatista

O Que é Tudo Isso?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 61:16


Nesse episódio, a doutoranda Laura Elizia Haubert (mais informações em: http://lattes.cnpq.br/0255851984072020) fala sobre sua pesquisa focada na estética pragmatista de John Dewey. Ela reforça que o filósofo compreendia as experiências estéticas e artísticas para além das experiências das "belas artes" ou de museus, mas também como outras formas mais ordinárias de se relacionar com objetos artísticos ou estéticos. Além disso, ela salienta que tal modo de se compreender a arte é essencial para uma educação democrática e suas aplicações. Bibliografia indicada: Arte como experiência - John Dewey No perfil do Instagram da Laura, ela fala um pouco mais sobre o tema: @laura_eliza E nesse perfil você pode acompanhar um grupo de estudos que Laura irá conduzir: @adelinainstituto O “O Que é Tudo Isso?” agora é parte da Rede Colmeia Podcast's, mais informações em: https://colmeia.sul21.com.br/ Dúvidas críticas ou sugestões nos contate pelo oqueetudoisso@gmail.com, Você também pode nos seguir no Twitter (@OQTIPOD), instagram (oqtipod) e Facebook (o que é tudo isso podcast) Trilha: filmmusic.io "Great Times" de Sascha Ende (sascha-ende.de) CC BY 4.0 O presente trabalho foi realizado com apoio da Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior - Brasil (CAPES) - Código de Financiamento 001.

SGV Master Key Podcast
Paul Le Doux - Part 2: Magic of a soccer ball

SGV Master Key Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 50:38


Paul was born in Taos, New Mexico, and lived in Eastern Europe for two years from the age of 9. His family then moved to Dubrovnik, Croatia for a year and a half. When Paul was 19 he moved to Los Angeles with the dream of becoming an actor. After a year in the American Academy of Dramatic arts he left acting to become a youth soccer coach. At 30 years old he started his own business teaching children. Paul continues to work with children between the ages of 2 and 16. Paul has started a non-profit organization for underprivileged children. Recently he wrote and self published a children's book titled 'The Magical Soccer Ball'Non-Profit: Better Today Better TomorrowEmail: pablitoledoux@yahoo.comPhone: 626-376-0684__________ Music Podcast Intro and Outro Everyday, Jason Farnhmam, YouTube Audio Library Podcast Advertisement I love you, Vibe Tracks, YouTube Audio Library Sour Tennessee Red (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio Library Dewey, Cheedham, and Howe (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio Library Film Project Countdown.flac Copyright 2013 Iwan Gabovitch, CC-BY3 license

SGV Master Key Podcast
Ryan Christiansen - From gunshots to crickets in the night

SGV Master Key Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 61:55


Ryan Christiansen is the Self-proclaimed Queen of Direct Response Marketing.She was born and raised locally in North East Los Angeles. She is the proud founder and CEO of NINE2FIVE Marketing, a Traditional Marketing Agency. If you have driven down any of the main streets in Los Angles, chances are one of the bus ads you saw, was placed by NINE2FIVE Marketing. As of August 2022, N2F's clients are on 1/3 of the total buses throughout Los Angeles, the San Gabriel Valley, and the San Fernando Valley roads.With decades of experience, Ryan knows what it takes to run a successful campaign. From Radio to TV, Billboards, Bus ads, and even lead generation, N2F covers the bases. In a world that is constantly growing, and changing, so is Ryan. Ryan is currently expanding  NINE2FIVE's services, to include a full digital marketing team. A full-service ad agency, providing the ultimate client experience has always been her vision and her passion.Ryan's daily inspiration comes from a famous American Country singer and icon, can you guess who?Hint: 9to5 (music note)Website: NINE2FIVEMARKETING.COMInstagram: nine2fivemarketing______________MusicPodcast Intro and OutroEveryday, Jason Farnhmam, YouTube Audio LibraryPodcast AdvertisementI love you, Vibe Tracks, YouTube Audio LibrarySour Tennessee Red (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio LibraryDewey, Cheedham, and Howe (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio LibraryFilm Project Countdown.flac Copyright 2013 Iwan Gabovitch, CC-BY3 license

SGV Master Key Podcast
Brandon Rogers - YouTuber from the law office

SGV Master Key Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 68:55


Brandon Rogers is an American comedian, actor, director, and writer. He was born on August 3rd, 1988 in Hayward, California. He was fascinated by cinema and acting at a very young age and decided to become an actor around the age of nine. After completing high school, he attended college in San Francisco. Before making his way down to LA, Brandon attended many film festivals in the Bay Area. In 2006 he created his own YouTube channel which has now amassed over 6 million subscribers.While Brandon was growing his YouTube channel he worked for the Law Offices of Scott Warmuth (now WarmuthLaw) as their video producer. It was during those years under Scott Warmuth that Brandon found his style of video comedy and that his videos started going viral. As his channel was doing so well Brandon decided to leave the law office and become a full-time YouTuber with the support of his coworkers at the office.Today Brandon is not only a YouTuber but also a writer and voice actor for the animated show ‘Helluva Boss.' In 2023 Brandon will be going on a new comedy tour featuring himself and his characters.Linktree: linktree.com/brandonbored______________MusicPodcast Intro and OutroEveryday, Jason Farnhmam, YouTube Audio LibraryPodcast AdvertisementI love you, Vibe Tracks, YouTube Audio LibrarySour Tennessee Red (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio LibraryDewey, Cheedham, and Howe (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio LibraryFilm Project Countdown.flac Copyright 2013 Iwan Gabovitch, CC-BY3 license

Nature and the Nation
Review: Pragmatic Naturalism by S. Morris Eames

Nature and the Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 70:34


In this episode I return to the topic of the philosophical pragmatism of William James, John Dewey and others with a review of Pragmatic Naturalism, an Introduction by S. Morris Eames, with a special focus on the affinity between pragmatism and evolutionary theory.

SGV Master Key Podcast
Natsumi Saeki - Feeding Ducks: a family business

SGV Master Key Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 55:54


Natsumi Saeki is the owner of Ducks Restaurant located in San Gabriel. She is the daughter of founding owners of the restaurant. She went to San Gabriel High School and graduated from Cal State Long Beach (CSULB) with a Bachelor in HealthCare Administration. During her time in school she played basketball and volleyball. After college when it became apparent that her parents needed to rest from the family business, Natsumi took over for them and continues the job of serving the community the food and taste that she, and many of the neighborhood families grew up with.Ducks restaurant first opened their doors in May of 1995 to expand the family tradition of ‘feeding the ducks.' Although they are famous for their Katsu-don, they do offer many traditional Japanese favorites like Tonkotsu Ramen, pork or chicken Cutlet Curry, Udon, Cold Soba, and Shrimp Tempura._________MusicPodcast Intro and OutroEveryday, Jason Farnhmam, YouTube Audio LibraryPodcast AdvertisementI love you, Vibe Tracks, YouTube Audio LibrarySour Tennessee Red (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio LibraryDewey, Cheedham, and Howe (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio LibraryFilm Project Countdown.flac Copyright 2013 Iwan Gabovitch, CC-BY3 license

SGV Master Key Podcast
Carlos Puente - Start with ad sales, become a magazine owner

SGV Master Key Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 53:57


Over the past 25 years, Carlos Puente has called the San Gabriel Valley home and instantly fell in love with the SGV.“I felt the passion that the SGV community has for their own individual cities but also the unity that all the cities have with each other. “He started CARDON Media in 2016 as a family-owned company with experience in sales, customer service, advertising and marketing. Their first  client was the long-established community newspaper Mid Valley News and represented them in the community handling all their distribution and sales. The next few years CARDON Media grew to represent other local newspaper covering 15 cities in the SGV.In 2018 CARDON Media published its own newspaper called “El Monte NOW” which later grew into the “San Gabriel Valley NOW” newspaper which published its last issue in 2021. The San Gabriel Valley NOW brand has grown into social media, radio and soon video streaming (Roku) and will start publishing the” San Gabriel Valley NOW” magazine and “SGV NOW $avings” Magazine this year (2022).Carlos Puente is currently on the El Monte/S. El Monte Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors and is the Ambassador Director for the Chamber. Instagram: sgv.nowWebsite: sgvnow.comWebsite: cardonmedia.comPhone: 626-238-4754__________ Music Podcast Intro and Outro Everyday, Jason Farnhmam, YouTube Audio Library Podcast Advertisement I love you, Vibe Tracks, YouTube Audio Library Sour Tennessee Red (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio Library Dewey, Cheedham, and Howe (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio Library Film Project Countdown.flac Copyright 2013 Iwan Gabovitch, CC-BY3 license

Master Books Podcast
A Biblical Worldview of Education with Dr. Jason Lisle

Master Books Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 23:57


Dr. Jason Lisle joins the Master Books Podcast to discuss what really matters in education. His insights on instilling a biblical worldview in every subject with inspire every Christian parent to disciple their children through homeschooling. This episode is a replay of the Master Books Smarter Way to Homeschool 2022 Summit which you can watch for free at Master Books Academy. Recommended Resources: Introduction to Logic homeschool curriculum by Master Books Fractals: Creation's Secret Code Worldviews in Conflict Comparative Religions Show Highlights 2:30 - Science Glorifies God 3:13 - The Bible is true from the beginning 3:21 - The most important thing in education is to inculcate a Christian worldview 3:40 - The most important thing you can teach a child is to understand the Bible, to have respect for it and to obey God, to repent of your sins and trust in Christ as Lord and Savior. It is not an academic game for me. Souls are on the line.  4:35 - What is the biblical purpose of education?  4:48 - Education is supposed to be training people to think in a way that is consistent with God's character and act in a way that is consistent with God's character. 6:00 - Learning a trade or a skill is one of the ways we learn to think like God.  6:30 - In public schools, students are taught false information - information that is contrary to God's Words. 7:21 - We are NOT to embrace educational systems that are contrary to God's Word.  7:40 - Luke 6:41 says the pupil will be like the teacher.  8:00 - Master Books' mission is ink on paper to touch eternity. We work diligently to weave the gospel and the realities of God in every subject.  8:10 - Know the risks of having a "Chrisitan" homeschool curriculum that does not honor God as He truly is.  8:50 - All knowledge stems from God. (Colossians 2:3 - All the treasures of wisdom and knowledge are deposited in Christ.  Proverbs 1:7 -the fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge.) 9:18 - Public schools teach that God is irrelevant to knowledge. 9:48 - Every subject should be rooted in the character of God. 10:10 - From a biblical perspective, history is the unveiling of God's plan to save people unto Himself. 10:24 - God has built beauty into math. Math is the way God thinks about numbers. This is revealed in Dr. Lisle's book: Fractals. 11:25 - It is important to get a good curriculum because it also serves as a teacher. Make sure you get a good, God-honoring curriculum. 12:20 - Most students who graduate from a public school, leave with a secular worldview because the curriculum was secular and the majority of the students were also. 13:00 - Master Books provides the tools in the form of curriculum options to help homeschool families build a biblical worldview. 13:15 - Parents using Master Books homeschool curriculum are reporting that they are learning more about God as they teach. They enjoy learning about God together with their children. 13:50 - Imagine seeing God in every subject, in every year of your education. 14:20 - Parents work as a partner with Master Books homeschool curriculum in the mission of ink on paper to touch eternity. 14:45 - Logic is used to help build a biblical worldview and defend the Christian faith. Dr. Jason Lisle is the author of Introduction to Logic which is published by Master Books.  15:45 - Logic is how to use your mind properly 16:00 - John Dewey wanted American students to be secular. He wanted students away from their families that might teach Christianity and have them accept whatever the state says. 16:30 - God never gave the state authority to educate children. That is something that He gives to parents. Parents can delegate but only to a godly teacher - someone who is going to train them up in the fear of the Lord.  17:00 - Introduction to Logic by Dr. Jason Lisle is unique because it is thoroughly integrated into the Christian worldview which isn't seen in other curriculum.  17:14 - Logic is rooted int he nature of God. Students will recognize that they can either be rational and be a Christian or be a non-Chrisitan and be irrational.  17:40 - Rejection of Christianity is utterly irrational because laws of logics are rooted in the character of God. 18:15 - Over half of Introduction to Logic addresses the fallacies - identifying errors in reasoning which is a very valuable skill. 18:35 - Arguments against Christianity always have an error in reasoning in them. 19:09 - Next to the Scriptures, logic is the most important thing that can be taught. 19:25 - Logic is learning to think in a way that is more godly. It is training your mind in a way that is consistent with God's mind. 21:25 - The smarter way to homeschool is to homeschool your children to love and fear the Lord.  22:50 - Lay up your treasure in heaven where it lasts forever. One of the best gifts you can give your children is a godly education where they: learn to think rightly to the glory of God learn to love Him learn to love His Word and study it  learn to think and behave consistent with God's character

Floraisons
FACE AU MONDE-MACHINE #2. On ne naît pas anti-industriel, on le devient (avec PMO)

Floraisons

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 37:42


FACE AU MONDE-MACHINE est une série de podcasts techno-critique avec les Grenoblois de Pièces et main d'œuvre (PMO). Plongez dans la riche aventure intellectuelle et historique de l'écologie anti-industrielle grâce à cet entretien au long cours. floraisons.blog/face-au-monde-machine/ Épisode 2. Enquêter c'est chercher. Mao & John Dewey. Le plaisir intellectuel de reconstituer l'ordre caché derrière les apparences chaotiques. Du concret à l'abstrait, du particulier au général, des faits à la théorie. Se rendre intelligent par l'enquête critique, acquérir son autonomie intellectuelle et rayonner. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/floraisons/message

SGV Master Key Podcast
Carlos Aguilar - Philosopher in production

SGV Master Key Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 56:18


Carlos Aguilar is from La Puente, CA and is a multimedia producer, writer and content strategist with over 20 years experience creating content for broadcast and digital audiences.He wrote, directed and produced a series of documentaries on American Idol, NASCAR, The WWE and Oprah Winfrey. He served as Sr. Story Producer on Bristol Palin's Lifetime reality series and produced for the Daytime Emmys.Carlos has led the development and launch of celebrity and brand based content platforms, including Mariah Carey, Magic Johnson, Honda, Becky G and Steve Harvey. Additionally, he's developed content and strategy for Honda, California State Lottery, Kevin Hart's LOL Network and AT&T, to name a few.His writing on music, religion, education and youth culture has appeared in Christianity Today, Sojourners, Prism, Flama and the San Gabriel Valley Tribune. As a hip hop artist known as Bookworm Brown, he's performed across the US, Mexico, Guatemala, China and Japan. As publisher of the leading Latino fatherhood blog, BigBrownDad.com, Carlos speaks and writes about the humor and wisdom found in the challenges of modern day parenting.Carlos recently started Mestizo, a specialty coffee brand that infuses comedy and hip hop into their product offerings.Social Media: instagram.com/drinkmestizoWebsite: mestizo.coffeeBlog: bigbrowndad.com__________ Music Podcast Intro and Outro Everyday, Jason Farnhmam, YouTube Audio Library Podcast Advertisement I love you, Vibe Tracks, YouTube Audio Library Sour Tennessee Red (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio Library Dewey, Cheedham, and Howe (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio Library Film Project Countdown.flac Copyright 2013 Iwan Gabovitch, CC-BY3 license

SGV Master Key Podcast
Let's take a recap: Episodes 40 - 60

SGV Master Key Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 39:15


The hosts, Scott and Russell, are once again joined by Victoria to share some moments from each show that stood out to them. In this 3rd part of Review Time they go through Episodes 40 - 60, starting with Danny Woo all the way to Tomoko Hino.__________ Music Podcast Intro and Outro Everyday, Jason Farnhmam, YouTube Audio Library Podcast Advertisement I love you, Vibe Tracks, YouTube Audio Library Sour Tennessee Red (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio Library Dewey, Cheedham, and Howe (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio Library Film Project Countdown.flac Copyright 2013 Iwan Gabovitch, CC-BY3 license

Claro de Luna: libros & cultura
La psicología funcional de John Dewey

Claro de Luna: libros & cultura

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 3:03


Tomado de El Libro de la Psicología de Wade Pickren (Ed. Librero).

SGV Master Key Podcast
Sam & Bo Xu - Creating content outside the box

SGV Master Key Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 56:34


Sam & Bo Xu are twins from Xiamen, China. When the boys were nine years old their mother immigrated to America but due to some misfortune in the paperwork only Bo was able to go with her. Four years later Sam was able to join his family in Lemoore, CA. During High School Bo started up his YouTube Channel (bomiiao) posting some comedy skits. A turning point in their channel happened when they posted a different look at a trending video topic and it went virial. With the knowledge of how to create good content that people like to watch the boys took to TikTok with a passion. Sam was the one to make his own TikTok account first where he started to gain a lot of views. When Bo joined TikTok he started a fun competition between their accounts. Making use of the trends on TikTok they were able to grow their accounts to the point where they could take brand deals and support themselves. With the money they made posting content they bought their own place in the San Gabriel Valley and an apartment closer to the college they are attending.A push to think outside the box when it came to making content came when both Sam and Bo got banned from TikTok when they joined others in using a trending audio. From there they made other accounts as well as continuing to manage different company TikTok accounts. When Bo's new personal account was banned he decided to focus more on managing the accounts of different companies.TikTok: Dan Sports CardsTikTok: Grandpa So StrongYouTube: BomiiaoYouTube: Dan Sports Cards__________MusicPodcast Intro and OutroEveryday, Jason Farnhmam, YouTube Audio LibraryPodcast AdvertisementI love you, Vibe Tracks, YouTube Audio LibrarySour Tennessee Red (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio LibraryDewey, Cheedham, and Howe (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio LibraryFilm Project Countdown.flac Copyright 2013 Iwan Gabovitch, CC-BY3 license__________MusicPodcast Intro and OutroEveryday, Jason Farnhmam, YouTube Audio LibraryPodcast AdvertisementI love you, Vibe Tracks, YouTube Audio LibrarySour Tennessee Red (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio LibraryDewey, Cheedham, and Howe (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio LibraryFilm Project Countdown.flac Copyright 2013 Iwan Gabovitch, CC-BY3 license

SGV Master Key Podcast
Brian Fuller - IT guy out & about enjoying nature

SGV Master Key Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 60:40


Born in Pasadena, California, Brian Fuller has called the San Gabriel Valley home for most of his life.  An IT professional working for MSP, Impact Networking, Brian is employed as a vCIO for their client, Warmuth Law.  Information technology has been a career choice for him for over twenty years after graduating from USC with a B.S. in Business Administration.  Beyond the walls of academia and commerce, he enjoys the outdoors that bless the San Gabriel Valley area.  If not hiking in the hills of the Angeles National Forest above his childhood hometown of Altadena, it may be enjoying the manicured gardens of the Huntington Library in San Marino, Descanso Gardens in La Canada, and the Arboretum in Arcadia.  A fan of all things Pasadena, he is a volunteer known as a white suiter with the Tournament of Roses that holds the New Year's Day Parade and the famous Rose Bowl.  Seeking to accomplish a significant feat every year, Brian is currently completing his master's thesis in Geographic Information Science at his alma mater, USC.Email: bfuller@impactnetworking.comLinkedIn: brianmfuller __________MusicPodcast Intro and OutroEveryday, Jason Farnhmam, YouTube Audio LibraryPodcast AdvertisementI love you, Vibe Tracks, YouTube Audio LibrarySour Tennessee Red (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio LibraryDewey, Cheedham, and Howe (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio LibraryFilm Project Countdown.flac Copyright 2013 Iwan Gabovitch, CC-BY3 license

The Christian Worldview radio program
The Predictable Result of Educating Children Without God

The Christian Worldview radio program

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 54:00 Transcription Available


GUEST: ALEX NEWMAN, Journalist and Author, Crimes of the EducatorsIt's axiomatic—the one who teaches children is the one who shapes their worldview, and thus, society at large.The Bible assigns the teaching and training of children to parents. “Train up a child in the way he should go, even when he is old he will not depart from it” (Proverbs 22:6).But of course, God-rejecting man has a “better" idea—remove children from the (redefined) home to be indoctrinated by government “educators” for up to 40 hours each week from age four to 18. With a government that ignores the most important truth in life—God exists and has spoken in Scripture—how do you think that will turn out for the kids?Turns out, just as planned. John Dewey (1859-1952), considered the “Father of the Modern American Public Education System” said: “There is no God and there is no soul. Hence, there are no needs for the props of traditional religion. With dogma and creed excluded, immutable truth is also dead and buried.”In case you're not convinced, Dr. Chester Pierce, Professor of Education and Psychology at Harvard University, said at the Childhood International Education Seminar in 1973:“Every child who enters school at age 5 is mentally ill because he enters school with an allegiance toward our elected officials, our founding fathers, our institutions, the preservation of this form of government we have, patriotism, nationalism, sovereignty… All this proves that the children are sick, because a truly well individual is one who has rejected all those things and is what I would call the international child of the future.”Mission accomplished. Taxpayer-funded, federal government-mandated public education has shaped generations of the “international child” with unsuspecting parents losing almost all influence. The moral confusion that reigns in our children and nation today shouldn't be surprising.International journalist Alex Newman joins us for a second week on The Christian Worldview to discuss what government education has become and what Christian parents should do. Alex is the author Crimes of the Educators: How Utopians Are Using Government Schools to Destroy America's Children, CEO of Liberty Sentinel Media and a senior editor for The New American Magazine.-------------------------------Crimes of the Educators: https://amzn.to/3J1az0WLiberty Sentinel: https://bit.ly/3RRdBsNThe New American Magazine: https://bit.ly/3oo3ZrJ

SGV Master Key Podcast
Jesse James Youngblood - Building the body and capturing the actor

SGV Master Key Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 60:50


Jesse James Youngblood is a distinctive character actor known for his roles in 300 (2006), Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End (2007), Heathens and Thieves (2012), True Blood and Medium (2010). Including working with Clint Eastwood and the Coen brothers on films, Flags of Our Father (2006) and the Ballad of Buster Scruggs (2018). Which is not limited to numerous appearances spanning into television, movies and commercials. Jesse was born in Lubbock, Texas and when he was a young boy his mother moved to Whittier, California. Jesse's humble beginnings caused him to develop a philosophy of "Never Say Never." No matter how many people would tell him he could not do it, he constantly reached for the top. Jesse was a skinny little kid that focused on building up his mind, body and soul. He became interested in fitness and nutrition along with the arts and incorporated them into a successful bodybuilding career; including such titles as Mr. Los Angeles and Mr. California. During this part of his life he fine-tuned his commitment to work, dedication, motivation and discipline which has served him well in his acting career.Jesse believes in giving back to his community and has served the Inner City Youth Games with Arnold Schwarzenegger and more recently does motivational speaking for elementary school children and continues mentoring our youth through fitness and health programs that he develops. Over the last several years he has been invited to speak for the students at Sherman Native School in Riverside, California. Jesse's Native heritage, Yaqui descent, is a continued passionfor him and often involves teaching the values of his culture.Email: jesse@fitness4success.netPhone: 626-824-2833__________MusicPodcast Intro and OutroEveryday, Jason Farnhmam, YouTube Audio LibraryPodcast AdvertisementI love you, Vibe Tracks, YouTube Audio LibrarySour Tennessee Red (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio LibraryDewey, Cheedham, and Howe (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio LibraryFilm Project Countdown.flac Copyright 2013 Iwan Gabovitch, CC-BY3 license

The BreakPoint Podcast
Misunderstanding the Establishment Clause

The BreakPoint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 6:16 Very Popular


In response to the recent Dobbs decision and the Supreme Court's clear, consistent support for religious liberty throughout this term, many progressives are warning of an imminent “Christian theocracy.” Among the loudest voices predicting our collective doom are mainstream media outlets. For example, a recent story in Reuters claimed, “U.S. Supreme Court Takes Aim at Separation of Church and State.”   What's missing in virtually all of these pieces is a proper understanding of the “establishment clause.” The establishment clause is derived from the opening lines of the First Amendment which states, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof …” There are two ways this statement is commonly misunderstood.   First, it is often described as establishing a “wall of separation between church and state.” In fact, those words are found nowhere in the Constitution. The phrase actually was coined later in a letter by Thomas Jefferson. Second, and more importantly, it is assumed that if organized religion cannot be supported by the state, then secularism is somehow “neutral.” Thus, by default, anything goes as long as it's “secular.”  Understanding the historical context is essential. In the 18th century, an “established” religion referred to an official state church. In the U.S., individual states had already established churches, such as the Anglican Church in Virginia. The First Amendment specifically applied to Congress and prohibited a national church. To prefer the Anglican Church over the Congregationalists or Presbyterians would, at the time, mean alienating certain citizens and entire states. States continued to have established churches well into the 19th century.   In addition, the First Amendment was not intended to prohibit religious activities in governmental institutions. From the very beginning, Congress started each session with prayer. That continues today and is led by an official chaplain.   Our founding fathers, particularly James Madison, believed that religious liberty was an innate right, and inseparable from the freedom of conscience. He also believed that religion would better flourish in a free marketplace of ideas. That thinking was the basis for the free exercise clause.   This understanding of the freedom of conscience is the foundation for the other freedoms protected in the First Amendment. Without conscience rights, we cannot truly speak, write, assemble, or advocate freely from our deepest beliefs. That's why the freedom of religion is often called “the first freedom.” Its position in the Bill of Rights highlights its importance.  Although the rights of conscience should not be controversial, somehow, that's what they have become. How this happened is worth considering. By claiming secularism to be neutral, proponents of secularism ,as far back as the 19th century, attempted to broadly apply laws originally intended by Protestants to prevent Catholic schools from accessing state funds. In the 20th-century, secularists embraced the concept of “a living Constitution” in order to transform the meaning of the First Amendment, attempting to keep religious institutions from accessing state funds and allowing only “secular” views in the public arena.  Though many court cases illustrate this, among the more important was Torcaso v. Watkins (1961), which declared unconstitutional Maryland's requirement that officeholders state belief in God. Rather than ruling on the basis of Article VI, which prohibits religious tests for public office, the Supreme Court ruled on the basis of the establishment clause of the First Amendment and of the Fourteenth Amendment, which prohibits states from violating the rights guaranteed to U.S. citizens. The same line of reasoning has since been used to challenge prayers at public meetings, Bible studies in schools, and nativity scenes on public property. In the process, the First Amendment was turned on its head, taking a clause intended to keep the state from backing any one denomination and construing it to position the state in opposition to all organized religions.  In footnote 11 of the Torcaso v. Watkins decision, Justice Hugo Black listed secular humanism as one of a number of religions “which do not teach what would generally be considered a belief in the existence of God.” Calling humanism a religion was not outlandish.  For a century, humanists such as John Dewey and Julian Huxley had defined their beliefs as a religion. After all, secularism involves certain claims about the cosmos, existence, and human nature.   And yet in 1994, the Ninth Circuit Court ruled in Peloza v. Capistrano Unified School District that while “religion” should be broadly interpreted for free exercise clause purposes, “anything ‘arguably non-religious' should not be considered religious in applying the establishment clause.” In other words, secular organizations were able to play both sides, qualifying as a religion for the free exercise clause but free from constraints from the establishment clause.   To further determine whether religious activities could utilize public spaces, the Supreme Court derived the so-called “Lemon Test” in the case Lemon v. Kurzman (1991). According to this rule, a religious activity is only licit on public grounds if it performs a secular purpose, neither advances nor inhibits religion, and does not foster excessive government entanglement in religion. This test maintained an obviously secular bias: Secular organizations were not required to pass any tests to obtain access.  In the recent decision in the Coach Kennedy case, the Supreme Court continued its long-overdue corrections to the anti-religious way the First Amendment had been interpreted. Particularly by unequivocally tossing the “Lemon Test,” the Court has stopped the active suppression of religious beliefs and practice. We ought not fear an impending theocracy, but instead welcome a redress to the unjust and ahistorical understandings of religion. 

SGV Master Key Podcast
Ryan Asao - A young man networking in Real Estate

SGV Master Key Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 53:38


Ryan Asao is the best kept secret of the San Gabriel Valley. He is the epitome of what a Realtor should be. His #1 priority is his client. His open door policy makes him available to his client at any hour of the day. Ryan is personable, professional, and a pleasure to work with. Due to his kind demeanor and excellent communication skills, he makes the whole transaction a smooth and enjoyable experience for all involved. Specializing in entry level living, Ryan always treats his clients like he would want to be treated. He takes the time to explain the process to first time home buyers and is the person they can trust when making one of the most important investments of their life. Ryan also makes it his business to get his client top dollar for their property. He provides useful tips to increase the value of ones home and accentuate the homes best features. He takes great pride in his work and values his clients. When you work with Ryan Asao, expect the best and get more!Ryan is an influential and respected realtor in the San Gabriel Valley and surrounding area. He has served on numerous leadership committees and was the 2012 President of the Arcadia Association of Realtors. He has a passion for education and loves his realtor family. Aside from serving on the Board of Directors for the Arcadia Association of Realtors, Ryan has been very active with YPN (REALTORS Young Professionals Network) and was the Brainchild of the YPN Pledge, he serves as the Vice President of the Mt. SAC Foundation, Chair of the Young Executives Committee at the City Club of Los Angeles, serves on the Board of Directors for the California Association of Realtors, serves on the Board of Directors for the National Association of Realtors, and proud graduate of the National Association of Realtors Leadership Academy in 2018! Ryan takes every opportunity to grow as a realtor and attends several real estate workshops and conferences throughout the year. Working in the real estate business for as long as he has, Ryan knows the real estate market from the inside out and passes on that knowledge to his valued clients. He specializes in the real estate market of the San Gabriel Valley in Southern California. In his spare time, Ryan enjoys spending time with his three children, coaching soccer, networking, mentoring other realtors, volunteering at local charities, going to concerts, playing poker, and watching sports are other favorite past times. Ryan has built his business on relationships and he is number one in customer service with a huge emphasis on communication!Cell: 626-253-4557Email: ryan@thinkrelink.com__________MusicPodcast Intro and OutroEveryday, Jason Farnhmam, YouTube Audio LibraryPodcast AdvertisementI love you, Vibe Tracks, YouTube Audio LibrarySour Tennessee Red (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio LibraryDewey, Cheedham, and Howe (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio LibraryFilm Project Countdown.flac Copyright 2013 Iwan Gabovitch, CC-BY3 license

Philosophy of Education
The Tumultuous History of Active Learning: A conversation with Martin Bickman

Philosophy of Education

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 48:00


This week, we are joined by Professor Martin Bickman of the University of Colorado Boulder to discuss the American tradition of "active learning" and its relationship to John Dewey and the Transcendentalist movement. Professor Bickman specializes in American literature, composition, rhetoric, and pedagogy. Bickman has described his interest in student-centered education and participatory democracy in education in a recent autobiographical article, “Returning to Community and Praxis”. Bickman is also the author of the award-winning book, Minding American Education.

SGV Master Key Podcast
Tomoko Hino - A mixed Japanese making her own way

SGV Master Key Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 49:52


Josephene “Tomoko” Hino was born in Sasebo Japan. Her mother is Japanese and father is Black, French and Native American. She came to United States in 1989 at the age of 12. Tomoko went to Ramona Elementary and Alhambra High School located in the San Gabriel Valley. One of her teachers at Alhambra High School introduced her to considering being a “Makeup Artist” as a career.First, Tomoko went to Santa Monica College because she wasn't sure if her mother was going to approve of her studying makeup. Eventually, she decided that she wanted to go study makeup art at a school in Hollywood. After graduating, Tomoko went to Japan to be an assistant makeup artist and there she realized that she needed to learn hair as well. She came back to the U.S. to attend cosmetology school. During that time she had a job offer at a Japanese Nursing Home to work 8-5 and took night cosmetology classes. After graduating from the cosmetology school, she did some makeup jobs for Japanese commercials and assistant jobs here and there while also working at a hair salon. Shortly after she was offered to work again at a Japanese Senior Facility in Los Angeles.Tomoko met her husband through working at the senior facility. Together they had 2 kids. For about 10 years she stayed at home with her children, after which she went back to work at a Japanese Senior facility. Tomoko always wanted to get back into the profession, and with her supportive family and friends, she decided to open up her own head spa. She didn't want to part from her relationships with the Japanese seniors and she wanted to do her own profession. Her son ended up telling her to “Do both!” So today, she is working both jobs and really enjoying them.Location: 400 S Baldwin Ave #2005, Arcadia, CA 91007Website: aromaheadspa.comText to Schedule: 213-800-2328Instagram: @aromaheadspa__________MusicPodcast Intro and OutroEveryday, Jason Farnhmam, YouTube Audio LibraryPodcast AdvertisementI love you, Vibe Tracks, YouTube Audio LibrarySour Tennessee Red (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio LibraryDewey, Cheedham, and Howe (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio LibraryFilm Project Countdown.flac Copyright 2013 Iwan Gabovitch, CC-BY3 license

Podcasts – First Unitarian Society of Minneapolis
Independence is a State of Mind

Podcasts – First Unitarian Society of Minneapolis

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 22:33


Liberal religion in general and Humanism in particular have come in for a lot of criticism for being “individualistic.” This is a misunderstanding concerning what individual conscience means in the context of communal action. As the philosopher John Dewey put it, “A democracy is more than a form of government; it is primarily a mode… Read More »Independence is a State of Mind The post Independence is a State of Mind appeared first on First Unitarian Society of Minneapolis.

SGV Master Key Podcast
Alberto Martinez - Once a web designer, always in the web evolution

SGV Master Key Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 63:37


Alberto Martinez has helped achieve maximum marketing, digital, web and social media results by providing thoughtful leadership and hands on experience in web3, video and content production, web design/development, digital and traditional marketing, Local/SEO/SEM and creative services.What sets him apart from others is his hands-on, day-to-day experience in Entertainment, Social Media, Digital Marketing, Television/Radio integrations, Creative Direction, SEO/Web Development/Design, E-commerce, Graphic Design, Event Planning and Project Management.Last but not least, he is smart enough to know that he doesn't know everything… But he does know someone!Podcast: Pepe's Lab (YouTube)Twitter: @raptalkEmail: alberto@flourishprosper.netLinkedIn: Alberto Martinez Jr. (RapTalk)__________MusicPodcast Intro and OutroEveryday, Jason Farnhmam, YouTube Audio LibraryPodcast AdvertisementI love you, Vibe Tracks, YouTube Audio LibrarySour Tennessee Red (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio LibraryDewey, Cheedham, and Howe (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio LibraryFilm Project Countdown.flac Copyright 2013 Iwan Gabovitch, CC-BY3 license

The A&P Professor
Why A﹠P Faculty Need to Become Students | TAPP 117

The A&P Professor

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 39:03


Sure, we're all life-long learners. But taking an actual college course from time to time throughout our teaching career can have unexpected benefits. Olfactory adaptation helps a lot when visiting the zoo, of course, but how does it really work? Researchers have found some new answers. Did you know that cerebrospinal fluid affects the process of memory? It does and we'll find out how. 00:00 | Introduction 00:43 | Olfactory Adaptation 06:23 | Sponsored by AAA 07:06 | CSF and Cognitive Decline 10:57 | Sponsored by HAPI 11:47 | Enrolling as a Student in a Course 21:33 | Sponsored by HAPS 22:24 | Lessons from Being a Student 36:03 | Staying Connected ★ If you cannot see or activate the audio player, go to: theAPprofessor.org/podcast-episode-117.html

The Charlie Kirk Show
The Battle for the American Mind with Pete Hegseth

The Charlie Kirk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 38:48 Very Popular


Charlie welcomes Fox News Host, Pete Hegseth, and author of the new, critically important book, "The Battle for the American Mind: Uprooting a Century of Miseducation." Charlie and Pete discuss the status of American "miseducation" including the 1619 Project, CRT, social emotional learning, and the corruption of nearly every educational institution across the country. What do Francis Willard, the progressives of the early 20th century, John Dewey, and others have to tell us about the state of American education? Pete outlines how patriotic Americans and even the birth of "Make America Great Again" were born out the fumes of an educational system that no longer exists. Culturally and educationally, Pete outlines why the progressive left has moved ahead of where the culture currently stands, but that they are still pumping out future voters. So how do we stop the slide into cultural Marxism that is still running full steam ahead via the indoctrination of the next generation? Pete and Charlie break down the new educational "insurgency" and how the seeds of conservatives' own long march through the institutions has already begun. Plus, Pete and Charlie ask the provocative question: Is it time to engage in a tactical retreat and give up on government schools altogether?  Support the show: http://www.charliekirk.com/support See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Fresh Catch 2.0
A Heckler Society

Fresh Catch 2.0

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 33:02


Long before social media made it convenient and even normal to critique, attack, and lob judgement bombs on one another, comedians have had to deal with hecklers. So we who are being daily tenderized by the meat mallets endured from fellow citizens might give an ear to David, who simply says, "Welcome to my world." Unusual shout-outs surface when we all aspire to something good and true from life together. Bill Maher, for instance. And we each tipped our caps to John Dewey, though for different reasons.

SGV Master Key Podcast
Seiko Nagata - Auto education & service

SGV Master Key Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 48:05


Seiko is the owner of Seiko's Auto Service Inc in Monrovia CA since January 2014. The shop specializes in providing exceptional customer service along with high quality automotive service and repairs for Toyota, Lexus, Subaru, Honda and Acura vehicles. Seiko is a SGV native and was born and raised in Monterey Park. He attended El Repetto K-8 and Mark Keppel High School. He considers himself lucky to have attended Mark Keppel that still had automotive technology available as a class. This is where his passion for automobiles was ignited. Since then, he has worked at multiple locations throughout his career as an automobile technician. Two years of which he was able to train in Iwate, Japan. Since becoming a business owner, Seiko has realized that not only growing the business is important but also the next generation. The company has sponsor local middle school and high school Robotics teams and is open to training and growing future automotive technicians. Website: Seikosauto.comEmail: Seiko@seikosauto.comPhone: 626-359-0589Address: 804 E Huntington Dr. Ste A Monrovia CA 91016__________MusicPodcast Intro and OutroEveryday, Jason Farnhmam, YouTube Audio LibraryPodcast AdvertisementI love you, Vibe Tracks, YouTube Audio LibrarySour Tennessee Red (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio LibraryDewey, Cheedham, and Howe (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio LibraryFilm Project Countdown.flac Copyright 2013 Iwan Gabovitch, CC-BY3 license

Stand Up For The Truth Podcast
Russ Miller: Rewritten History, Deception In Education, Culture

Stand Up For The Truth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 53:31


We discuss what Russ Miller refers to as "Weapons of Mass Instruction," as he takes us back a few centuries through American history and what we rarely hear about the origins of our education system. Much has been said about the symptoms of decay and decline in public schools and culture we've been seeing for decades, but we how we got here is not often addressed. Daily podcast, relevant articles on issues pertaining to Christians and more can be found on Stand Up For The Truth.

Damn the Absolute!
S2E03 Literature Must Be an Unsettling Force for Democracy w/ Elin Danielsen Huckerby

Damn the Absolute!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 63:08


Whether it's theology, philosophy, politics, or science, it is not uncommon for people to believe their particular worldview has greater authority over others. This authoritarian approach to ideas implies that one person's representation of truth more closely and certainly reflects reality—they have the truth and we must submit to it.   Alternatively, pragmatists believe this abstract certitude leads to religious fundamentalism, philosophical dogmatism, political absoluteness, and rigid scientism.   For thinkers like the late-twentieth century philosopher Richard Rorty, language is an instrument for coordinating our efforts in addressing concrete issues we face in our lived environments.   He doesn't believe theology, politics, philosophy, or even science are about acquiring an accurate representation of reality. In fact, he rejects the notion that the nature of truth is one of language mirroring reality. Instead, he views language as a dynamic tool, not something that reproduces truth.   Often credited with rehabilitating pragmatism, Rorty encourages us to abandon these authoritarian approaches for what he calls a literary culture. While he holds that none of these disciplines have an epistemically privileged position from which they can determine which truth claims more closely represent reality, they each still play important roles in society.   In other words, each provides us with particular vocabularies with different uses. Their vitality resides in the way they empower us to describe and redescribe experiences in continually novel and fruitful ways.   Elin Danielsen Huckerby is a research fellow at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, associated with an EU-funded project on Inclusive Science and European Democracies. She recently graduated with a PhD from the University of Cambridge, where she worked on Rorty's uses of literature in his philosophical work.   She believes Rorty's literary attitude gives us more productive ways to move culture, science, and politics forward.     A few questions to ponder.   What is the role of literature in liberal democracies? What is moral progress for Rorty? How can liberal democracies benefit from embracing a more literary rather than scientistic culture? And, how worried should we be about Rorty's rejection of objective truth?   Show Notes Richard Rorty  The Takeover by Literary Culture: Richard Rorty's Philosophy of Literature by Elin Danielsen Huckerby (2021) "Rortian Liberalism and the Problem of Truth" by Adrian Rutt (2021) S1E20 Can Pragmatism Help Us Live Well? w/ John Stuhr (2021) S1E14 A Tool for a Pluralistic World w/ Justin Marshall (2021) S1E12 Philosophers Need to Care About the Poor w/ Jacob Goodson (2021) S1E07 Charles Peirce and Inquiry as an Act of Love w/ David O'Hara (2021) S1E06 Levinas and James: A Pragmatic Phenomenology w/ Megan Craig (2020) S1E01 Richard Rorty and Achieving Our Country w/ Adrian Rutt (2020) “The Power of One Idea” by Jeffrey Howard (2020) “The Pragmatic Truth of Existentialism” by Donovan Irven (2020) Richard Rorty: The Making of an American Philosopher by Neil Gross (2008) "Trotsky and the Wild Orchids" by Richard Rorty (1992) Contingency, Irony, and Solidarity by Richard Rorty (1989) Philosophy and the Mirror of Nature by Richard Rorty (1979)

The Ezra Klein Show
The Philosophers: America's philosophy, with Cornel West

The Ezra Klein Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 61:27 Very Popular


Sean Illing talks with Cornel West about the American philosophical tradition known as pragmatism. They talk about what makes pragmatism so distinctly American, how pragmatists understand the connection between knowledge and action, and how the pragmatist mindset can invigorate our understanding of democratic life and communal action today. Cornel West also talks about the ways in which pragmatism has influenced his work and life, alongside the blues, Chekhov, and his Christian faith. This is the third episode of The Philosophers, a new monthly series from Vox Conversations. Each episode will focus on a philosophical figure or school of thought from the past, and discuss how their ideas can help us make sense of our modern world and lives today. Host: Sean Illing (@seanilling), Interviews writer, Vox Guest: Cornel West (@CornelWest), author; Dietrich Bonhoeffer professor of philosophy & Christian practice, Union Theological Seminary References to works by American pragmatists:  Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882): "Self-Reliance" (1841) William James (1842–1910): Pragmatism: A New Name for Some Old Ways of Thinking (1907); The Varieties of Religious Experience (1902); "Is Life Worth Living?" (1895) Charles Sanders Peirce (1839–1914): "The Fixation of Belief" (1877) John Dewey (1859–1952): The Quest for Certainty (1929); "Emerson—The Philosopher of Democracy" (1903); The Public and Its Problems (1927) Richard Rorty (1931–2007): "Pragmatism, Relativism, and Irrationalism" (1979); "Solidarity or Objectivity?" (1989) Other references:  Cornel West Teaches Philosophy (MasterClass) The American Evasion of Philosophy: A Genealogy of Pragmatism by Cornel West (Univ. of Wisconsin Press; 1989) The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald (1925) Plato, Republic (refs. in particular to Book 1 and Book 8) The Phantom Public by Walter Lippmann (1925) Leopardi: Selected Poems of Giacomo Leopardi (1798–1837), tr. by Eamon Grennan (Princeton; 1997) "The Myth of Sisyphus" by Albert Camus (1942; tr. 1955) Democracy & Tradition by Jeffrey Stout (Princeton; 2003) Enjoyed this episode? Rate Vox Conversations ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ and leave a review on Apple Podcasts. Subscribe for free. Be the first to hear the next episode of Vox Conversations by subscribing in your favorite podcast app. Support Vox Conversations by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts This episode was made by:  Producer: Erikk Geannikis Editor: Amy Drozdowska Engineer: Patrick Boyd Deputy Editorial Director, Vox Talk: Amber Hall Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Nonlinear Library
EA - A Bird's Eye View of the ML Field [Pragmatic AI Safety #2] by ThomasWoodside

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 64:42


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: A Bird's Eye View of the ML Field [Pragmatic AI Safety #2], published by ThomasWoodside on May 9, 2022 on The Effective Altruism Forum. This is the second post in a sequence of posts that describe our models for Pragmatic AI Safety. The internal dynamics of the ML field are not immediately obvious to the casual observer. This post will present some important high-level points that are critical to beginning to understand the field, and is meant as background for our later posts. Driving dynamics of the ML field How is progress made in ML? While the exact dynamics of progress are not always predictable, we will present three basic properties of ML research that are important to understand. The importance of defining the problem A problem well-defined is a problem half solved. John Dewey (apocryphal) The mere formulation of a problem is often more essential than its solution, which [...] requires creative imagination and marks real advances in science. Albert Einstein I have been struck by how important measurement is... This may seem basic, but it is amazing how often it is not done and how hard it is to get right. Bill Gates If you cannot measure it, you cannot improve it. Lord Kelvin (paraphrase) For better or worse, benchmarks shape a field. David Patterson, Turing award winner Progress in AI arises from objective evaluation metrics. David McAllester Science requires that we clarify the question and then refine the answer: it is impossible to solve a problem until we know what it is. Empirical ML research, which is the majority of the field, progresses through well-defined metrics for progress towards well-defined goals. Once a goal is defined empirically, is tractable, and is incentivized properly, the ML field is well-equipped to make progress towards it. A variation on this model is that artists (writers, directors, etc.) come first. They help give ideas, and philosophers add more logical constraints to those ideas to come up with goals or questions, and finally scientists can help make iterative progress towards those goals. To give an example: golems, animate beings created from clay, were a common symbol in Jewish folklore, and at times could create evil. There are many other historical stories of automatons creating problems for humans (Pandora, Frankenstein, etc.). More recent stories, like Terminator, made the ideas more concrete, even as they included fantasy elements not grounded in reality. More recently, Bostrom (2002) recognized the possibility for existential risk from AI, and grounded it in the field of artificial intelligence. Since then, others have worked on concretizing and solving technical problems associated with this risk. For completeness, it's worth mentioning that sometimes through tinkering people find solutions to questions people were not posing, though many of those solutions aren't solutions for interesting questions. Metrics As David McAllester writes, machine learning and deep learning is fundamentally driven by metrics. There are many reasons for this. First, having a concrete metric for a problem is a sign that the problem has been compressed into something simpler and more manageable (see the discussion of microcosms below), which makes it more likely that progress can be made on it. By distilling a problem into a few main components, it is also far clearer when progress has been made, even if that progress is relatively small. Unlike human subjective evaluation, most metrics are objective: even if they do not perfectly track the properties of a system that we care about, it is obvious when somebody has performed well or poorly on an evaluation. Metrics can also be used across methods, which makes different approaches directly comparable rather than relying on many different measuring sticks. High-quality datasets and benchmarks ...

The Nonlinear Library
AF - A Bird's Eye View of the ML Field [Pragmatic AI Safety #2] by Dan Hendrycks

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 64:42


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: A Bird's Eye View of the ML Field [Pragmatic AI Safety #2], published by Dan Hendrycks on May 9, 2022 on The AI Alignment Forum. This is the second post in a sequence of posts that describe our models for Pragmatic AI Safety. The internal dynamics of the ML field are not immediately obvious to the casual observer. This post will present some important high-level points that are critical to beginning to understand the field, and is meant as background for our later posts. Driving dynamics of the ML field How is progress made in ML? While the exact dynamics of progress are not always predictable, we will present three basic properties of ML research that are important to understand. The importance of defining the problem A problem well-defined is a problem half solved. John Dewey (apocryphal) The mere formulation of a problem is often more essential than its solution, which [...] requires creative imagination and marks real advances in science. Albert Einstein I have been struck by how important measurement is... This may seem basic, but it is amazing how often it is not done and how hard it is to get right. Bill Gates If you cannot measure it, you cannot improve it. Lord Kelvin (paraphrase) For better or worse, benchmarks shape a field. David Patterson, Turing award winner Progress in AI arises from objective evaluation metrics. David McAllester Science requires that we clarify the question and then refine the answer: it is impossible to solve a problem until we know what it is. Empirical ML research, which is the majority of the field, progresses through well-defined metrics for progress towards well-defined goals. Once a goal is defined empirically, is tractable, and is incentivized properly, the ML field is well-equipped to make progress towards it. A variation on this model is that artists (writers, directors, etc.) come first. They help give ideas, and philosophers add more logical constraints to those ideas to come up with goals or questions, and finally scientists can help make iterative progress towards those goals. To give an example: golems, animate beings created from clay, were a common symbol in Jewish folklore, and at times could create evil. There are many other historical stories of automatons creating problems for humans (Pandora, Frankenstein, etc.). More recent stories, like Terminator, made the ideas more concrete, even as they included fantasy elements not grounded in reality. More recently, Bostrom (2002) recognized the possibility for existential risk from AI, and grounded it in the field of artificial intelligence. Since then, others have worked on concretizing and solving technical problems associated with this risk. For completeness, it's worth mentioning that sometimes through tinkering people find solutions to questions people were not posing, though many of those solutions aren't solutions for interesting questions. Metrics As David McAllester writes, machine learning and deep learning is fundamentally driven by metrics. There are many reasons for this. First, having a concrete metric for a problem is a sign that the problem has been compressed into something simpler and more manageable (see the discussion of microcosms below), which makes it more likely that progress can be made on it. By distilling a problem into a few main components, it is also far clearer when progress has been made, even if that progress is relatively small. Unlike human subjective evaluation, most metrics are objective: even if they do not perfectly track the properties of a system that we care about, it is obvious when somebody has performed well or poorly on an evaluation. Metrics can also be used across methods, which makes different approaches directly comparable rather than relying on many different measuring sticks. High-quality datasets and benchmarks concret...

Pints With Aquinas
Ab0rtion is Healthcare ... and other INSANE ideas w/ Steven Rummelsburg

Pints With Aquinas

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 204:12 Very Popular


Me and Steve will discuss Roe vs Wade, the insanity of being for child slaughter and how we got here. Join Us on Locals (before we get banned on YT): https://mattfradd.locals.com/ Hallow (Three Month's FREE!): https://hallow.com/mattfradd Exodus 90: https://exodus90.com/matt CITY OF TRUTH! Steven's Upcoming Newsletter: https://cityoftruth.lpages.co/join/ Book on John Dewey: https://www.amazon.com/John-Dewey-Decline-American-Education/dp/1932236511/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8 Steven is looking for Teachers: StThomasMoreFellows@rcab.org https://bostoncatholic.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6EvTqZ9MWm3Llum Rewire the West: https://www.youtube.com/c/RewiretheWest Homeschooling Resource: https://homeschoolconnections.com/

The Consortium Podcast
Ep. 36 - Why New England Needs Classical Education

The Consortium Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 61:52


This is Episode 36 of the Consortium Podcast, an academic audio blog sponsored by Kepler Education. In this episode, Sarah Abbott and Tim Knotts of the Classical Learning Consortium for New England join Scott Postma to discuss the need for classical education in New England. Given the number of Ivy League schools in New England, it is only obvious that it once was the epicenter for liberal education in the United States; In the 19th century, however, it became a leader in the push for the modern education of Horace Mann and John Dewey.  Learn why, like never before, New England needs Classical Christian Education. Listen in to a fascinating discussion about what classical education is, what the Classical Learning Consortium for New England is doing, and why Kepler Education is joining the CLCNE to host the New England Consortium of Classical Educators on July 15-16, 2022.   Learn more about or get tickets for the New England Consortium of Classical Educators.

Why Did Peter Sink?
Modern Religions

Why Did Peter Sink?

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 44:38


Many people today say they are unaffiliated, or don't have a religion. They are against organized religion, and distrust historic institutions or hierarchies, so they feel that they have no religion. But everyone has a religion. There may not be weekly meetings that are attended at traditional brick and mortar churches or mosques or synagogues or ashrams or hermitages or monasteries, but there are worship services that outperform traditional liturgies and there are pilgrimages that would rival the Canterbury Tales. People will drive across the country to see Mickey Mouse, or wait outside bookstores for the next Harry Potter book. They will meet up for costume and role playing parties where the fantasy is accepted as reality. They will sleep outside on concrete to get the next iPhone. They will fly ten thousand miles to hear the keynote speech from the Apple CEO. The sports pilgrimages that men make to football stadiums is spoken of with hallowed tones, as if to stand where Joe Montana or Joe Namath or Joe Theisman once threw a hail mary pass is a more highly regarded holy ground than where Gabriel said the actual words “Hail Mary, full of grace” to the Blessed Virgin Mary herself. As a non-believer, when I reviewed my worldview, I realized I'd found a similar replacement for what I'd had before in traditional religion, with curious parallels. A trick of the mind happens when we abandon our idea of religion. When we declare that we have “no religion,” we have already replaced our concept of religion with something different, but the parts are all there. To sum up the modern view that I held - my worldview that I felt had removed all religion - it went something like this: The universe was formed from a massive explosion of pre-existing matter, and gradually over time we evolved from single-celled organisms into fully sentient beings, assembled from far flung star parts and activated by solar power. Whether any pre-existing power or intelligence existed is unknown and unimportant. The creator acted as a clockmaker or artist, and he crafted 100 types of atoms and various physical laws to govern the universe, finely tuning key variables like gravity to keep the dance of atoms and chemistry valid throughout the ages. The laws governing the behavior of matter and energy cannot be broken; the creator cannot or chooses not to poke his finger into the game to disrupt nature and produce miracles. We inhabit a speck on a speck, known as the planet earth, which may be one of many habitable planets in the universe. Pursuit of knowledge and progress is the way, as knowledge is leading us toward a promised land of equality and plenty for all. Against the forces of superstition and ignorance, progress moved forward. From the first living organism, our earliest ancestor, until today, the accretion of knowledge is leading to higher life forms. This progress creates stepping stones of knowledge toward when we will be fulfilled in our understanding by advances in science, engineering, and technology. The rapid leap forward we are experiencing today should have, could have, and would have happened much sooner, but free thought was kept imprisoned by religious institutions until the age of the Enlightenment dawned on the dark ages. Embattled by its enemies, science has finally been unshackled to reveal the truth of the universe. We were only kept from this future by the backwardness of traditional culture, childish superstition, patriarchy, powerful institutions, and primitive tribal structures. In the near future, planetary death will occur through climate change unless we repent of our wasteful ways and adopt a purely rational, scientific view. Through green energy we will be saved. The day is near when we will be able to transfer our conscious mind into a digital immortality. One day we will escape death, shake off our bodies, and have limitless knowledge and pure freedom. Finally, in the distant future, the solar system will collapse, the sun will swallow the earth, and the universe will consume itself into a singular dense spot of matter, and explode once again to restart the cycle. This modern view has it all. By “all” I mean this worldview contains everything that constitutes a religion. I was taking part in a modern religion that has all the trappings of any religion that has ever existed. This modern religion also has its own vocabulary and language and revelations and sacrifices. The priests of this religion even have uniforms or vestments called lab coats and, in the software world, hooded sweatshirts. There are monks and priests in today's secular religion as much as there ever were in Islam, Buddhism, or Christianity. Not only that, but this “Scientism” has the key elements that form a creed: a beginning, an ending, a progression, a hero, a villain, and an apocalypse. I realize the word Scientism sounds strange, but what else could it be called? The only thing missing from it is God. But then it is we ourselves that take his place, so it certainly does have a god, but it's just an evolved ape who wears clothing and stares at screens all day. This realization was an unexpected discovery to me, but so obvious once examined and dissected. We cannot live without some kind of religion. Everyone walking this earth has a religion, whether he or she knows it or not. Consider how people will wait outside for three days for a Harry Potter or Star Wars movie, or will camp out all night on Black Friday for a sale. Consider just how devout members of the Democratic or Republican parties can be, how they will spend hours a day trumpeting the good of their own party while calling out the evil of the opposition. Monks could hardly show such dedication in a cloistered desert hermitage. Fashion and musicians and car companies and cosmetics and guns and pornography have their constant followers, ever faithful in defense. The willingness to defend these modern things makes traditional religious defenders and apologists appear to lack zeal in comparison. While I pretended not to have a faith, I most certainly did have a religion. We are wired for it, and if it's not Christianity or Islam or Buddhism, a religion will surface in something else, like money or health or technology or Harry Potter or socialism. Science, Post-Modernism, and Socialism are religions in disguise. The body itself can become a kind of religion. Literally, millions of devout gym members are attending their worship services on treadmills and leg press machines right now. Everyone is living according to some kind of ultimate faith, whether they admit it or not. As someone who once found that science and religion could not co-exist, I now reject that division. In fact, I find it to be the opposite, as faith and reason are both needed if wisdom is to be found. I've mentioned this several times, but faith and reason are the two wings that make us fly. A bird with one wing cannot leave the ground. To find meaning and purpose in this life we need both reason and faith. The imaginary battle of faith vs. science that has been heated and hammered into a modern worldview is pure invention, but children are being steered to believe that invention. Those driving us in this direction have a clear agenda, and they don't know it, but it's an agenda that will backfire. This way forward will backfire, because a worldview that lacks an ultimate meaning results in a lifetime of trying to fit square pegs into the God-shaped hole in the heart. There is another blowback that is coming, but this one is for those who guide children away from God, as words directly from Jesus stated plainly: “Things that cause sin will inevitably occur, but woe to the person through whom they occur. It would be better for him if a millstone were put around his neck and he be thrown into the sea than for him to cause one of these little ones to sin.” Note: this blowback is coming for those with and without faith. The first commandment of Jesus was to love God, thus the very first sin, the worst sin, is to reject God. American culture has fully adopted rejection of God, and I fell for this bait, hook, line, and sinker, for about fifteen years. Unfortunately, there is a blaring warning about this for our souls from Jesus, as teaching children to reject God or causing them to lose faith is called out specifically as a guaranteed path to hell. Turning away from God violates the first rule - not just the Old Testament rules - but of the two commandments of Jesus. The first sin in Genesis was a rejection of God, hence the name original sin. Funny how things all tie together in this strange book. This theme of “turning away” and “turning back” is a story arc, a loop, a core truth, a central point of it all. And of course, the point of the entire body of scripture and church and worship and faith is to remember to have humility before God. I don't think I know a single person who doesn't believe that “humility before God” sounds like a bad idea, and that includes atheists and scientists and rednecks and hippies. Most of the atheists I know say they don't believe in God, but scratching the surface a bit you come to realize that they mostly hate arrogance in religious people and, therefore, they hate God, as if God were some sidekick of a certain person, or group of people. This is an example of throwing out the baby Jesus with the bathwater. It can be a newsflash to some people that Jesus himself also hated religious hypocrites, which may shock people because they realize that they are not that far from God after all. That's the joke on us moderns who mock traditional religion and “organized” religion: we think we've shrugged off religion, like it was a dirty shirt, because we are now too smart, too busy, and too enlightened. But turns out that we had another shirt on underneath, with the same brand name, titled: religion. We run from one religion right into the arms of another religion. Why? Because we have no choice. We must. Our hearts require it. We cannot help it or hide from it. If we get rid of our Rosary we'll go find crystals and horoscopes. If we discard daily reading the Gospels, we'll do daily readings on politics or sports or technology. We want meaning. We need reasons for belief, and we need a sense of right and wrong, and like it or not, the built-in urge for religion surfaces in every person in all ages. This feature of human experience cannot be stifled, or not for long, and even when stifled it's still peeking out though we may be unaware. “God and country” provided the old banners that gave people meaning, and all of history has shown how those can be abused and twisted into cruel and unusual manifestations of evil. God, country, and even family are being replaced with a variety of distractions today, but this will not last long. A time of plenty and peace leads to diversion and distraction. The period of relative peace held now will fade, and along with it, so will these new religions. The new religions revolve around the individual. The old standards, with all their flaws, provided a sense of purpose and meaning in people's lives. The book of Genesis did not take shape by accident. It is the result of thousands upon thousands of generations of understanding how human life and society stay together. The story begins with God, then leads to a family, and finally that family forms a nation. Literalists miss this because they are not looking for it. This order matters, because as soon as we attempt to ignore God, we begin to destroy the family, and as the family goes, so goes any nation. The 20th century smashed the notion of national pride as always being a good thing, as disorder and death can drape itself under a flag. The nations of Germany, China, and the Soviet Union all tossed out God as the first casualty and followed that attempted murder with millions of actual murders of human beings. Today it's less fashionable to have national pride, but if you doubt that national pride still exists, you don't need to look for a redneck with a jacked up pickup on the gravel roads of America. Watch the opening of any World Cup soccer game, when the national anthem rings out for each team. Look at the faces of the players, eyes wet with tears, their cheeks and foreheads steeled like flint for the coming match, their arms linked in solidarity with teammates and somehow even the crowd. The bond of nationhood cements the people through the playing of the song. The crowd sings at the top of their lungs to give strength to the men on the pitch, like soldiers set to fight a 90 minute war by sport, as proxies for the hordes of citizens at home; to win glory for the symbol of their common flag; to bring honor to that shared patch of dirt that the nation calls its home, where all its dreams and feats and failures and hopes and history, good or bad, has tied them together. That nationalism and tribalism is very much still there, just as our sense of religion may appear hidden but is ever-present. National pride must be checked by the higher power of the divine, but whenever the policy of “God first” slips, nationalism becomes a brutal god, and so now we are rightfully wary of leaders who promise the moon and stars. Even family pride must be checked by the divine, or the same problem arises. Further yet, even when “God first” is replaced with “religion first” then the religion itself becomes a God, and God gets shoved to the side. This can happen with Catholics or Muslims or Jews. Anything replacing God marks the end of truth and results in guaranteed chaos, because there is no ultimate truth or justice. Nationalism is good, in the right dosage. Individualism is good, when kept beneath the Creator. Religion is good, when humility before God remains the focus. In other words, all of these things are good, when ordered correctly and not in themselves the ultimate goal. Religion is best when it does not wield state power, but rather acts as the moral compass of state power. This is why the arguments for religious freedom, from Tertullian and Justin Martyr to Thomas Jefferson and Dignitatus Humanae, remain critical for future generations, perhaps even more today than when those writers first shared their ideas. Any attempts at coercion of faith upon people will fail miserably, and cannot avoid devolving into a horrifying totalitarianism. This applies to nationalism, individualism, or religion. If this sounds like exaggeration, you need look back no further than 100 years at the many dictatorships and attempts to crush all forms of dissent. And again coercion has re-appeared, with its current manifestation in America taking up the banner of individualism as the ultimate good. The saying, “Those who don't know history are doomed to repeat it,” is not true. We will repeat history whether we know history or not. Today, politics and career often take a front seat over God, family, and flag, as we attempt to provide meaning through votes and jobs, and at our peril ignore the crusty old dangerous ways of nationalism and organized religion. The idea today is that we must smash the old. “Smash the patriarchy” is as meaningless a phrase as “Support the troops” or “Defund the police” but all of these work as slogans because of their vague intention and unfocused aim. All three of these slogans pretend to preach virtue, but only make the speaker feel superior for selecting a side. What we have today is a situation of personal feeling as truth, which means that we clamor for a stamp of approval for whatever is we want to do, and in doing so we deem our desires themselves to be good and just. Why? Because we want them. Whatever we want is right. At the end of the book of Judges, the final line matches our times today: “In those days there was no king; every man did what was right in his own eyes.” That is where we sit today, and history will play out what the old civilizations and peoples found out the hard way, from thousands of years of mistaken pathways through war and peace and seasons of change. In the book of Wisdom chapter two might have been written today, in our age of rising atheism and indifference, as the sacred writer uses the voice of the culture of the self to describe its beliefs. There is nothing new under the sun. The author of Wisdom states plainly what those without faith in God seek: to craft a world to satisfy delights and to never stop partaking of those delights, right up to the last day, since if there is no afterlife, judgement, or resurrection, then what else is there but food, drink, entertainment, and “fun”? Virtue is for suckers. For by mere chance were we born, and hereafter we shall be as though we had not been; Because the breath in our nostrils is smoke, and reason a spark from the beating of our hearts, And when this is quenched, our body will be ashes and our spirit will be poured abroad like empty air….Come, therefore, let us enjoy the good things that are here, and make use of creation with youthful zest. Let us have our fill of costly wine and perfumes, and let no springtime blossom pass us by…But let our strength be our norm of righteousness; for weakness proves itself useless. (Wisdom 2) This is summing up the “will to power” three thousand years before any German tackled it. All of this chapter of Wisdom sounds familiar today. We have middle-aged men gulping testosterone pills and protein shakes, worshipping the god of youth, with the enemy being old age. Marriages are sacrificed for pornography every day, as the sacred desires of our fickle minds must be satisfied. Technology is a god that promises to solve all of our problems, even though it actually created the problems that it now needs to solve (see: Climate Change, the threat of Nuclear War, Cyber attack, mega-earthquake from fracking, Coronavirus). Consumerism presses forward with the latest fads, gadgets, vehicles, and fashions to occupy our wants and desires. Rampant self-indulgence runs riot as “to each his own” plays out in real time before our eyes. Sin is seen as only that which could harm another, which is the masterstroke of our egos to allow us to keep us clinging to the seven deadlies because they only harm ourselves, and even self-harm is denied, as the addictions cut so deep that even senior men cannot give up habits that should have died as they passed adolescence into adulthood. At least the Greeks gave names to the gods. We pretend there is no god while we live out full lives worshipping them. Hephaestus, Zeus, Athena, Apollo, Dionysus, Aphrodite, Eros. I challenge you to watch TV ads and see if you can tell exactly which god is calling for worship in each commercial. There may be a good opportunity for a board game or Bingo cards for finding which Greek god is being dialed in each advertisement. This religion of “science” is not the only modern replacement for religion around, it's just one of the better and most complete candidates because it has a full cosmology. By definition it cannot extend into matters of faith and morality, but for many followers it does. The role of science is to observe and explain the natural world, but when it extends past that it becomes philosophy and often bleeds into religion. Our modern cosmology and understanding of the universe looks back on that of the book of Genesis with a sneer, but a thousand years from now it's just as likely that our understanding will look equally silly. Our concepts of black holes and quantum physics and string theory could sound as ludicrous as the “firmament” that held the waters above and below the earth. It's even possible that the firmament theory of Genesis will seem more wise, should the next round of cosmological definition be something completely strange to us moderns. But in either case, the structure of the universe that we “know” at different points in history tells us nothing about faith or morals, and advances in telescopes and computing cannot mine truth any better than the old thinkers and storytellers. Plato and Paul and Confucius and Buddha and Shakespeare and Dante have deeper insights into truth than all the scientists in history, even if they had never heard of calculus or chemistry. Science makes for a good religion because it can explain so many things, make sense of our world, and provide an answer for all questions. Ever since Voltaire's lifelong relentless attack on religion made headway, legions of science apologists stand at the ready to take up arms in defense of Nature to act as a check against the slightest whiff of religious fanaticism. It has become every bit as religious as religion, as can be seen in the long crusade of ink and letters from Voltaire to Karl Marx to Sigmund Freud to John Dewey. The claim is that we are creatures caught up in a cosmic accident, where knowledge can only be ascertained by the scientific method. Only what is observable, repeatable, and testable is real. Consciousness is merely a result of evolution. Our morality and stories are but guardians and guides for our own self-preservation, learned through a cruel history of pain and suffering. Art, literature, and religion are side-effects of overactive imaginations of weak and primitive tribes that invented magic, superstition, God, gods, and goddesses for psychological and sociological survival. This modern god of science has a scapegoat for blame, for redemption, for justification, just like the old religions. A religion must have an enemy, as all gods promise approval, cheerleading, and ultimately righteousness, which means someone else must lose. Christianity has the devil, The Fall, and Original Sin. There has to be a loser, an opponent; you cannot be a freedom fighter today without an oppressor. You cannot be freed without overcoming a master. For the modern gods, the enemy is still there if you look for it. The other political party must be wrong. The ravages of age and deterioration is to blame. Diet, sugar, fat, and high-fructose corn syrup are to blame. The anti-intellectuals are to blame. The hillbillies are to blame. The immigrants are to blame. The rich are to blame. Those on welfare are to blame. The capitalists are guilty, squeezing blood from the workers. No, the flip-side, the communists are causing the problem by killing all motivation. There is a hero and a villain. My favorite quote about the grand left-right argument of economics is from John Kenneth Galbraith who said, “In capitalism, man oppresses man. In communism, it's just the opposite.” While that is funny, it's also a true statement. But it's also worth noting that one of those ideologies has proven repeatedly to embrace wholesale slaughter of humans much more readily than the other, and I don't even have to mention which one for you to know the answer, and it is the same one that inherently denies God as one of its core tenets.And then there's the most popular villain of all: the Christians. Science fundamentalists tend to take aim most pointedly at Christians, and often Muslims, too, but in this cultural moment it is the Christians. Never mind that fact that modern science would not exist without Christianity, or that most of the great breakthroughs were made by God-fearing people. Let's set aside those minor names, like Mendel, Galileo, Kepler, Pascal, Boyle, Newton, Faraday, Mendel, Pasteur, Kelvin, and Einstein. Ignore those thinkers for a moment. Because there is some truth to the accusation of blame, of course, as many readily point at the Spanish Inquisition and behavior of “Christian” explorers in the New World that followed on Columbus' heels. Yes, Europe has horrific segments of history, as religions can be abused and twisted. For instance, read the letters of St. Bartolome de las Casas to hear about what Spanish wealth-seekers were doing to natives in the Caribbean, some under the banner of their supposed faith. It is revolting. Were it not for de las Casas writing in the 1520s to alert about the horrors of the Spanish running amok in the New World, the Church would not have written Sublimus Deus in 1537 condemning all enslavement and re-asserting the fact that natives are created in the image and likeness of God. And even then, could a letter from the Pope suddenly halt the evil of men running wild who want nothing more than gold, violence, and sex? No. But it does make me wonder how much longer and how much worse this state of butchery would have continued if no one like Bartolome de las Casas had been present to witness and report on the evils, because he was one of the few voices crying out from the literal wilderness of the New World. Unfortunately, this is not an isolated event in human history restricted to Europeans, as you can read stories of the gulags in Russia or the lengthy list of massacres in China or find numerous accounts of similar gruesome events coming from the Ottomans or Romans or Zulus or Mayans or Incas or Hawaiians or First Nations or literally any culture that ever existed, try as we might today to gloss over the shared flaw in our hearts, which has always been with humans wherever we have lived. Thanks to the 20th century, when nationalism and socialism reigned, Europeans lead in all body count statistical categories for brutality and inhumanity, but to assume that only one continent of people is capable of atrocity is to ignore reality and all of history. We want to plug our ears and close our eyes, but to pretend that one group of people has this flaw while other human groups do not carry this same disease is to bury our heads in the sands of a version of history that would be more aptly called fantasy.One undeniable fact is that as we gain knowledge and mastery over science and technology, we become increasingly deadly, as each invention increases the death toll, from the longbow, to the broadsword, to the stirrup for riding horses, to the musket, to the cannon, to mustard gas, to the atom bomb, to the inter-contintental-ballistic-missile, to biological weaponry, to whatever unexpected coming attack will slay our modern energy grids and supply chains and water supplies. The reason why is that with each advance, the greed of opportunity is seized by people. The question is always, “How can we make money or benefit from this new knowledge,” and rarely “Should we be doing this at all?” I have seen this firsthand in product meetings where the ability to do something is adopted, such as spy on shoppers, or install keystroke logging software, and the uneasy question usually arises about ethics from mousy engineers, but is quickly knocked down by an executive or manager who wants a good fiscal quarter. To observe this human tendency to exploit others does not require a war to observe. We are all seeking to find an advantage using whatever tool is available, just as a younger sister learns to cry tearfully to thwart a bullying older brother, because she learns it can summon a father or mother to arrest the bully. If the younger sister had a taser that proved more effective, they would just use that. Christians never needed any extra assistance from its own followers to earn the hatred of its enemies. No, they are hated even when they are preaching the Good News with humble hearts and mercy in mind. But rest assured, any atrocity or horror committed under the banner of professed Christians never came from Jesus Christ, the founder of the faith. Anyone who says it does, doesn't understand Jesus, and needs to start again on Matthew 1, verse 1 and proceed to John 21, verse 25. The evils people do in Jesus' name have never come from Jesus. This is something quickly forgotten. Whether or not those who acted in God's name as a wolf in sheep's clothing were true believers does not even matter, because the bloodstain remains. The wound of scandal brought by someone professing faith remains for a long time. The lion is supposed to lay down with the lamb, not eat it, no matter how delicious the lamb. The believer is supposed to give unto Caesar, not become Caesar. Christians in error have become the example held up in pop culture. Many TV shows today have the villain as a Christian. It's easy to see who the villain of American society is by watching movies or reading books from a specific year, as once the Soviets held all the roles of villains, then it was middle-eastern Muslims, and today it's almost entirely Christians. Yet Jesus still remains risen up, glorified, and no matter what evil men carry out, he himself can never be sullied. This is why Christianity can be stood up time after time, after every apparent deathblow. It rises again with Jesus himself. Because of the high standard set by Jesus, we can never live up to it, not fully, and often not even minimally. For this reason the sex abuse of children by Catholic clergy hurts all the worse, because Jesus' Church on earth is meant to be the keeper of the light of faith, and “the gates of hell shall not prevail against it,” yet for all the truth, beauty and goodness that the faithful see in our Church, in its essence and meaning, its buildings, its art, its Catechism, in the history, the mysteries of the Holy Mass, in the Sacraments, in the Rosary, in the Real Presence of the Eucharist, it hurts terribly when the attack comes from the Church itself, when trust has been eroded from the inside. Still the beauty of all those parts can never be destroyed or diminished, no matter how far fallen followers have gone in the ruination of their own souls. Betrayed trust among non-Christians brings bruises, but among the faithful, from inside, the betrayal gives a nearly fatal wound. The saying, “There is no honor among thieves” is meant to be intended for non-Christians, which is why the sex abuse scandal provides endless firepower for powerful guns aimed at the Catholic Church. For the billion people who have known and trusted good priests, this was especially painful, sometimes too hard for words, to the point that excuses were made, and sometimes even excuses for the excuses for the behavior, when there is no excuse that can be allowed. The pain of the victims supersedes all guilt and shame. But it was not God that committed the crimes, nor the Church, but corrupt men who abused their power and violated every precept of the faith and caused immeasurable scandal. For the many that would like to see the Church wither and die, thinking that this event will surely be the final death of Christianity, they will be sorely disappointed. Scandal has rocked the Church for 2,000 years and each of those looked like the last punch, but the Church will never die because it cannot die. I'm not claiming this to be arrogant. I'm not writing this to be rude. I'm saying it because it is a fact. In every age, Jesus somehow gathers a people to his Church.Every generation of humans rediscovers the power of the same man from Nazareth, over and over, again and again, because nothing comes close to its power, nothing touches the completeness of the life of Jesus, and nothing overcomes the resurrection once you come to believe it. Clearly, I have no right to speak for anything regarding the Church. I have no status. I'm not even a very good Catholic. I should probably just shut up and not share my opinion on these topics. But I know what I've found, and it's something quite different and far more meaningful and powerful than what my old religion of science could offer. This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.whydidpetersink.com

Mark Levin Podcast
Mark Levin Audio Rewind - 4/28/22

Mark Levin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 113:53 Very Popular


On Thursday's Mark Levin Show, the progressive movement is the application of Marxism to American society. Progressive intellectual John Dewey once wrote at great length about how well Stalin was doing with government-run education. Dewy felt that teaching subjects without a social purpose uniting children in support of their government. Dewey enjoyed the support of Democrats and Republicans like Teddy Roosevelt. The goal of the progressives has always been to control what is taught in the classroom and this is why small children are being indoctrinated against capitalism and success and to reject the family structure they come from. This is precisely what is taking place in our country today. Then, President Biden says that when your kids are in the classroom they're no longer your kids, in effect, suggesting that they now belong to the government and the teacher's union. Millions from the American Rescue plan went to schools for Critical Race Theory training in the name of the COVID pandemic. Kudos to all the parents and other citizens standing up against tyranny. Later, Sec. Mayorkas has proposed a 'disinformation governance board' at the Dept. of Homeland Security. All members of the free press should object to the creation of a government ministry of truth that decides what is true and what is false. All of this while the border remains open, and the economy shrinks by 1.4%. Afterward, filmmaker Dinesh D'Souza joins the show to discuss his latest film 2000 Mules which chronicles the actions of ballot mules delivering harvested ballots to COVID ballot boxes during the 2020 election. D'Souza explained how vote stash-houses work within leftwing democrat districts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

CrossPolitic Studios
Daily News Brief for Friday, April 29th, 2022 [Daily News Brief]

CrossPolitic Studios

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 16:14


They’re all our children… and more on today’s CrossPolitic Daily News Brief. My name is Toby Sumpter and today is Friday, April 29, 2022. President Biden said this week that children belong to teachers while they are being taught. https://twitter.com/bennyjohnson/status/1519459453195673600?s=21&t=PI9TybMKCoDwUzU8KYnADw Play full video “They’re not someone else’s children, they’re like yours in the classroom.” Now let’s be fair: maybe he’s just being sloppy with words, but this really isn’t far off from what government schools have been actually aiming for. John Dewey is the father of the modern government school system, and he was pretty giddy about the Soviet school system, which of course was thoroughly Marxist. The goal was to make children into good citizens of the state primarily, and that required minimizing the influences of families and churches. He and many other secularists believed that society was weakened by the diversity of families and churches, and he believed that the only way to have a strong, unified society was through a strong, unified, and uniform government education. This centralized unity also included doing away with the free markets of capitalism. And he said that the only way to undermine the capitalist system was to get rid of the emphasis primary schools placed on the development of high literacy and independent intelligence.” According to Dewey, “It is one of the great mistakes of education to make reading and writing constitute the bulk of the school work the first two years.” [4] And here we are. Right on schedule. And Republicans are still talking about giving them more money. Until Republicans determine to end socialist schools, they will not be able to stop CRT in public schools. Because… listen carefully: public schools are CRT. Government school are marxism in action. You can’t keep watering the seeds and complain when you keep getting the fruit. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ArOQF4kadHA 2:06-2:25 And of course the US Army is now involved in this as well: Transgender instructions for military Slides 26, 29 This ad is for those looking for something other than a four-year college degree. College is great! But it’s not for everyone. Cornerstone Work & Worldview Institute seeks to fill that gap. Their mission is to build kingdom culture in the workplace through their integrative program of worldview instruction and on-the-job skills training under the guidance of mentors. They offer courses in Bible, theology, and economics as well as business, project management, and marketing and more. They also provide their students with internships with one of their business partners so they can learn and gain practical skills. Cornerstone Work & Worldview Institute invites you to join their mission to provide Christians another educational opportunity. Together we can help our students grow confident in their faith and competent in their labor. Visit them at cornerstonework.org to learn more, to enroll, or to partner with them. Heather Scott on Idaho tax spending for Pride festivals Psalm of the Day: Psalm 66 https://www.christkirk.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/08-Psalm-66-Let-All-The-Earth-With.mp3 Play: 0:00-1:05 Amen. This is Toby Sumpter with CrossPolitic News. Remember you can always find the links to our news stories and these psalms at crosspolitic dot com – just click on the daily news brief and follow the links. Or find them on our App: just search “Fight Laugh Feast” in your favorite app store and never miss a show. If this content is helpful to you, would you please consider becoming a Fight Laugh Feast Club Member? We are building a cancel-proof Christian media platform, and we can’t do it without your help. Join today and get a $100 discount at the Fight Laugh Feast conference in Knoxville, TN Oct. 6-8, and have a great day.

Daily News Brief
Daily News Brief for Friday, April 29th, 2022

Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 16:14


They’re all our children… and more on today’s CrossPolitic Daily News Brief. My name is Toby Sumpter and today is Friday, April 29, 2022. President Biden said this week that children belong to teachers while they are being taught. https://twitter.com/bennyjohnson/status/1519459453195673600?s=21&t=PI9TybMKCoDwUzU8KYnADw Play full video “They’re not someone else’s children, they’re like yours in the classroom.” Now let’s be fair: maybe he’s just being sloppy with words, but this really isn’t far off from what government schools have been actually aiming for. John Dewey is the father of the modern government school system, and he was pretty giddy about the Soviet school system, which of course was thoroughly Marxist. The goal was to make children into good citizens of the state primarily, and that required minimizing the influences of families and churches. He and many other secularists believed that society was weakened by the diversity of families and churches, and he believed that the only way to have a strong, unified society was through a strong, unified, and uniform government education. This centralized unity also included doing away with the free markets of capitalism. And he said that the only way to undermine the capitalist system was to get rid of the emphasis primary schools placed on the development of high literacy and independent intelligence.” According to Dewey, “It is one of the great mistakes of education to make reading and writing constitute the bulk of the school work the first two years.” [4] And here we are. Right on schedule. And Republicans are still talking about giving them more money. Until Republicans determine to end socialist schools, they will not be able to stop CRT in public schools. Because… listen carefully: public schools are CRT. Government school are marxism in action. You can’t keep watering the seeds and complain when you keep getting the fruit. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ArOQF4kadHA 2:06-2:25 And of course the US Army is now involved in this as well: Transgender instructions for military Slides 26, 29 This ad is for those looking for something other than a four-year college degree. College is great! But it’s not for everyone. Cornerstone Work & Worldview Institute seeks to fill that gap. Their mission is to build kingdom culture in the workplace through their integrative program of worldview instruction and on-the-job skills training under the guidance of mentors. They offer courses in Bible, theology, and economics as well as business, project management, and marketing and more. They also provide their students with internships with one of their business partners so they can learn and gain practical skills. Cornerstone Work & Worldview Institute invites you to join their mission to provide Christians another educational opportunity. Together we can help our students grow confident in their faith and competent in their labor. Visit them at cornerstonework.org to learn more, to enroll, or to partner with them. Heather Scott on Idaho tax spending for Pride festivals Psalm of the Day: Psalm 66 https://www.christkirk.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/08-Psalm-66-Let-All-The-Earth-With.mp3 Play: 0:00-1:05 Amen. This is Toby Sumpter with CrossPolitic News. Remember you can always find the links to our news stories and these psalms at crosspolitic dot com – just click on the daily news brief and follow the links. Or find them on our App: just search “Fight Laugh Feast” in your favorite app store and never miss a show. If this content is helpful to you, would you please consider becoming a Fight Laugh Feast Club Member? We are building a cancel-proof Christian media platform, and we can’t do it without your help. Join today and get a $100 discount at the Fight Laugh Feast conference in Knoxville, TN Oct. 6-8, and have a great day.

Everyday Anarchism
Anarchism is...Deweyan Democracy with John McGowan

Everyday Anarchism

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 60:50


I'm joined by one of my dissertation directors, John McGowan, to discuss the philosophy of John Dewey in the context of anarchism. Dewey is today remembered as one of the premier advocates for democracy, and especially democratic education, in the entire history of the United States. And like his teacher William James and his collaborator Jane Addams, he seems more than a little anarchist to me. We'll see if John agrees. As always, you can find me at https://my.captivate.fm/www.everydayanarchism.com (www.everydayanarchism.com).

Online Great Books Podcast
#156- Dewey's "Challenge to Liberal Thought" Part 2

Online Great Books Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 73:45


This week, Scott and Karl finish their discussion of John Dewey's essay, "Challenge to Liberal Thought."  Written in his later life, Dewey expands on his criticisms of the Great Books of Western Civilization enterprise and a liberal arts education.  The duo agrees— this is shoddy work to say the least. At the end of their conversation, Scott says, “This is just not very good. I wonder, how did these people get the traction that they got? Why do our intellectual overlords keep telling us we need to read Dewey?"   Tune in to hear the rest of Scott and Karl's response to Dewey's essay.  Brought to you by onlinegreatbooks.com. 

Online Great Books Podcast
#155- Dewey's "Challenge to Liberal Thought" Part 1

Online Great Books Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 64:24


In the tradition of intellectual fairness, Scott and Karl read from someone they don't agree with this week. Toted as the 'King of Progressive Philosophers', John Dewey was an educational reformer active throughout the first half of the 20th century. He left a very significant, progressive mark on the public school system.  His essay "Challenge to Liberal Thought" can be found in The Later Works of John Dewey, Volume 15 which focuses on his writings between the years 1942 to 1948. This particular essay expands on his criticisms of the Great Books of Western Civilization enterprise and a liberal arts education.  Scott says, “This is a utopian, managerial approach to social sciences that's pretty gross.... If you've never read Dewey, this encapsulates progressives' whole attitude and approach to managing people." Tune in to hear Scott and Karl's response to Dewey's essay, and be sure to tune in next week for Part Two. Brought to you by onlinegreatbooks.com. 

SGV Master Key Podcast
Henry Lo - Mayor from the school board

SGV Master Key Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 57:53


Henry's history of public service spans over 20 years. In March of 2020, he was elected to the Monterey Park City Council, District 4, and made history as the City of Monterey Park's first openly gay Councilmember.  Previously, Henry served from 2003 to 2020 on the Garvey Elementary School District Board of Education. As a Board member, he co-founded the Garvey Education Foundation, which has raised community support for the schools in the district since its founding in 2007. As a proponent of creating collaborative relationships between public agencies, Henry's leadership helped to create an academic partnership between the Garvey Elementary School District and East Los Angeles College. Between 2016 and 2020, Henry was an appointed member of the City of Monterey Park Economic Development Advisory Commission in which he and his fellow commissioners provided input on how to improve the city's economic climate. Since 1999, Henry has been an advocate for our communities to the State of California having served as staff for several of the San Gabriel Valley's state legislators including State Senator Dr. Gloria Romero, State Assembly member Mike Eng, and State Assembly member Ed Chau.  Henry is the son of working-class immigrants who came to California seeking the American Dream. He grew up as a latchkey kid while both his parents worked and was the first in his family to attend college.  Henry received his Bachelor of Arts Degree in Government from Colby College, and a Master in Public Administration Degree from the California State University, Northridge.Henry's community involvement also spans his interest in civic affairs and progressive politics.  He was an elected delegate to the Los Angeles County Democratic Party from 2007 to 2020. Henry also served on the Boards of the Chinese American Citizens Alliance, Los Angeles Lodge; OCA-GLA; the Gay Asian Pacific Support Network (GAPSN); and, Asian Pacific Islanders for Human Rights (APIHR).  Henry has received recognitions from the Los Angeles County Democratic Party as the Pat Eastman 2020 Democrat of Year and 2010 Democrat of the Year, representing the 49th District; the Garvey Education Foundation for their 2017 Pioneer of Education Innovation Award; API-Equality LA for their 2017 Trailblazer Award; Stonewall Young Democrats for their 2016 Hero Award; the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association for their 2015 Outstanding Youth Award; and, Chinese-American Citizens' Alliance, Los Angeles Lodge, as a 2008 “Public Service” Awardee.Website: https://www.montereypark.ca.gov/917/City-Council__________MusicPodcast Intro and OutroEveryday, Jason Farnhmam, YouTube Audio LibraryPodcast AdvertisementI love you, Vibe Tracks, YouTube Audio LibrarySour Tennessee Red (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio LibraryDewey, Cheedham, and Howe (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio LibraryFilm Project Countdown.flac Copyright 2013 Iwan Gabovitch, CC-BY3 license

SGV Master Key Podcast
Glenn Evans - Part 3: Home-turf adventure

SGV Master Key Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 63:19


Glenn Evans is a Director of Photography and Adventure Camera man specializing in filming tv shows about Hidden Treasure, Ancient Architecture and Endangered and Exotic Animals. Glenn has filmed in 68 countries around the world for Discovery Channel, History Channel, Netflix, ABC and many other networks. Born in Oregon on a blueberry farm and leaving for California to work in the film and tv industry the camera has been Glenn's key to world travel and adventure. Website: www.glennlouisevans.comInstagram: cdog297__________MusicPodcast Intro and OutroEveryday, Jason Farnhmam, YouTube Audio LibraryPodcast AdvertisementI love you, Vibe Tracks, YouTube Audio LibrarySour Tennessee Red (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio LibraryDewey, Cheedham, and Howe (Sting), John Dewey and the 41 Players, YouTube Audio LibraryFilm Project Countdown.flac Copyright 2013 Iwan Gabovitch, CC-BY3 license

New Books in German Studies
René V. Arcilla, "Wim Wenders's Road Movie Philosophy: Education Without Learning" (Bloomsbury, 2020)

New Books in German Studies