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Composers Datebook
Bolcom's "View" on choral matters

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 2:00


Synopsis On today's date in 1999, the Lyric Opera of Chicago premiered a new opera by the American composer William Bolcom, based on “A View from the Bridge,” a powerful play by Arthur Miller. Now, not all stage plays “translate” well into opera, as Bolcom was well aware: “In theater, you have the text and then below it you have the subtext,” said Bolcom. “In opera it is pretty much the opposite, the subtext is what you are really dealing with first and foremost: big, raw emotions, which are supported by the text. In fact, Miller's play, although set in Brooklyn in the 1950s, has often been likened to a Greek tragedy, a theatrical form in which the chorus plays an important role. Bolcom saw that as a real opportunity: "If you are going to do an opera from a play, it better have a dimension that the play doesn't. In a play, you can't have your chorus speak because it is financially prohibitive: as soon as the chorus opens up its mouth the price goes up because of actors' equity. So, naturally one of the great resources of opera houses is an opera chorus, a resource you CAN use much more easily." Music Played in Today's Program William Bolcom (b. 1938) — A View from the Bridge (Lyric Opera of Chicago; Dennis Russell Davies, cond.) New World 80558 On This Day Births 1585 - Baptismal date of German composer Heinrich Schütz, in Bad Löstritz; 1835 - French composer, conductor and pianist Camille Saint-Saëns, in Paris; 1914 - American composer Roger Goeb, in Cherokee, Iowa; 1938 - Finnish composer Einojuhani Rautavaara, in Helsinki; 1940 - John Lennon (of the Beatles), in Liverpool, England; Deaths 1999 - Jazz vibraphone virtuoso, Milt Jackson, age 76, in New York City; He was a member of the famous Modern Jazz Quartet; Premieres 1826 - Rossini: opera, "The Siege of Corinth," at the Paris Opéra; 1891 - Dvorák: "Requiem," Op. 89, in Birmingham, England; 1896 - Dvorák: String Quartet No. 13 in G, Op. 106, in Prague, by the Bohemian Quartet; 1921 - Janácek: "Taras Bulba" (after Gogol), in Brno; 1955 - Shostakovich: Violin Concerto No. 1, by the Leningrad Philharmonic conducted by Yevgeny Mravinsky, with David Oistrakh the soloist; 1963 - Henze: Symphony No. 4 in Berlin, with the composer conducting; 1980 - Jon Deak: Concerto for Oboe d'amore and Orchestra, by the New York Philharmonic conducted by Zubin Mehta with Thomas Stacy as soloist; 1985 - Anthony Davis: opera "X: The Life and Times of Malcolm X," in Philadelphia; The opera's New York City Opera premiere occurred the following year on September 28, 1986; 1986 - Andrew Lloyd-Webber: musical "Phantom of the Opera," at Her Majesty's Theatre in London; The musical opened on Broadway at the Majestic Theater on January 26, 1988; 1987 - Corigliano: "Campane di Ravello" (Bells of Ravello) for orchestra (a birthday tribute to Sir Georg Solti), in Chicago, with Kenneth Jean conducting; 1992 - David Ott: Symphony No. 3, by the Grand Rapids (Michigan) Symphony, Catherine Comet conducting; 1997 - Robert X. Rodriguez: "Il Lamento di Tristano," by flutist Susan Morris De Jong and guitarist Jeffrey Van, at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis; 1999 - Bolcom: opera "A View From the Bridge," by the Lyric Opera of Chicago, Dennis Russell Davies, cond. 1999 - Michael Torke: symphonic oratorio "Four Seasons," at Avery Fisher Hall in New York, by soloists, chorus, and the New York Philharmonic, Kurt Masur conducting; Others 1973 - Leonard Bernstein gives the first of six lectures entitled "The Unanswered Question," as the Charles Eliot Norton Professor of Poetry at Harvard University. Links and Resources On William Bolcom

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 10.08.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 59:38


Raspberries, ellagic acid reveal benefits in two studies Oregon State University, October 1, 2021.    Articles that appeared recently in the Journal of Berry Research report that raspberries and compounds present in the fruit could help support healthy body mass and motor function, including balance, coordination and strength.   In one study, Neil Shay and colleagues at Oregon State University fed mice a high fat, high sugar diet plus one of the following: raspberry juice concentrate, raspberry puree concentrate, raspberry fruit powder, raspberry seed extract, ellagic acid (a polyphenol that occurs in a relatively high amount in raspberries), raspberry ketone, or a combination of raspberry ketone and ellagic acid. Additional groups of animals received a high fat, high sugar diet alone or a low fat diet.   While mice that received the high fat and sugar diet alone experienced a significant increase in body mass, the addition of raspberry juice concentrate, raspberry puree concentrate or ellagic acid plus raspberry ketone helped prevent this effect. Of note, mice that received raspberry juice concentrate experienced gains similar to those of animals given a low fat diet. "We hope that the findings from this study can help guide the design of future clinical trials," Dr Shay stated.   In another study, Barbara Shukitt-Hale, PhD, and her associates at Tufts University's Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging gave 19 month old rats a control diet or a diet enhanced with raspberry extract for 11 weeks. Psychomotor behavior was assessed during week 7 and cognitive testing was conducted during weeks 9-10.   Animals that received raspberry performed better on psychomotor coordination and balance, and had better muscle tone, strength and stamina than those that received a control diet. "These results may have important implications for healthy aging," stated Dr Shukitt-Hale. "While further research in humans is necessary, animal model studies are helpful in identifying deficits associated with normal aging."       Massage doesn't just make muscles feel better, it makes them heal faster and stronger Harvard University, October 6, 2021 Massage has been used to treat sore, injured muscles for more than 3,000 years, and today many athletes swear by massage guns to rehabilitate their bodies. But other than making people feel good, do these "mechanotherapies" actually improve healing after severe injury? According to a new study from researchers at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), the answer is "yes." Using a custom-designed robotic system to deliver consistent and tunable compressive forces to mice's leg muscles, the team found that this mechanical loading (ML) rapidly clears immune cells called neutrophils out of severely injured muscle tissue. This process also removed inflammatory cytokinesreleased by neutrophils from the muscles, enhancing the process of muscle fiber regeneration. The research is published in Science Translational Medicine. "Lots of people have been trying to study the beneficial effects of massage and other mechanotherapies on the body, but up to this point it hadn't been done in a systematic, reproducible way. Our work shows a very clear connection between mechanical stimulation and immune function. This has promise for regenerating a wide variety of tissues including bone, tendon, hair, and skin, and can also be used in patients with diseases that prevent the use of drug-based interventions," said first author Bo Ri Seo, Ph.D., who is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the lab of Core Faculty member Dave Mooney, Ph.D. at the Wyss Institute and SEAS. Seo and her coauthors started exploring the effects of mechanotherapy on injured tissues in mice several years ago, and found that it doubled the rate of muscle regeneration and reduced tissue scarring over the course of two weeks. Excited by the idea that mechanical stimulation alone can foster regeneration and enhance muscle function, the team decided to probe more deeply into exactly how that process worked in the body, and to figure out what parameters would maximize healing. They teamed up with soft robotics experts in the Harvard Biodesign Lab, led by Wyss Associate Faculty member Conor Walsh, Ph.D., to create a small device that used sensors and actuators to monitor and control the force applied to the limb of a mouse. " The device we created allows us to precisely control parameters like the amount and frequency of force applied, enabling a much more systematic approach to understanding tissue healing than would be possible with a manual approach," said co-second author Christopher Payne, Ph.D., a former Postdoctoral Fellow at the Wyss Institute and the Harvard Biodesign Lab who is now a Robotics Engineer at Viam, Inc.  Once the device was ready, the team experimented with applying force to mice's leg muscles via a soft silicone tip and used ultrasound to get a look at what happened to the tissue in response. They observed that the muscles experienced a strain of between 10-40%, confirming that the tissues were experiencing mechanical force. They also used those ultrasound imaging data to develop and validate a computational model that could predict the amount of tissue strain under different loading forces. They then applied consistent, repeated force to injured muscles for 14 days. While both treated and untreated muscles displayed a reduction in the amount of damaged muscle fibers, the reduction was more pronounced and the cross-sectional area of the fibers was larger in the treated muscle, indicating that treatment had led to greater repair and strength recovery. The greater the force applied during treatment, the stronger the injured muscles became, confirming that mechanotherapy improves muscle recovery after injury. But how? Evicting neutrophils to enhance regeneration To answer that question, the scientists performed a detailed biological assessment, analyzing a wide range of inflammation-related factors called cytokines and chemokines in untreated vs. treated muscles. A subset of cytokines was dramatically lower in treated muscles after three days of mechanotherapy, and these cytokines are associated with the movement of immune cells called neutrophils, which play many roles in the inflammation process. Treated muscles also had fewer neutrophils in their tissue than untreated muscles, suggesting that the reduction in cytokines that attract them had caused the decrease in neutrophil infiltration. The team had a hunch that the force applied to the muscle by the mechanotherapy effectively squeezed the neutrophils and cytokines out of the injured tissue. They confirmed this theory by injecting fluorescent molecules into the muscles and observing that the movement of the molecules was more significant with force application, supporting the idea that it helped to flush out the muscle tissue. To pick apart what effect the neutrophils and their associated cytokines have on regenerating muscle fibers, the scientists performed in vitro studies in which they grew muscle progenitor cells (MPCs) in a medium in which neutrophils had previously been grown. They found that the number of MPCs increased, but the rate at which they differentiated (developed into other cell types) decreased, suggesting that neutrophil-secreted factors stimulate the growth of muscle cells, but the prolonged presence of those factors impairs the production of new muscle fibers. "Neutrophils are known to kill and clear out pathogens and damaged tissue, but in this study we identified their direct impacts on muscle progenitor cell behaviors," said co-second author Stephanie McNamara, a former Post-Graduate Fellow at the Wyss Institute who is now an M.D.-Ph.D. student at Harvard Medical School (HMS). "While the inflammatory response is important for regeneration in the initial stages of healing, it is equally important that inflammation is quickly resolved to enable the regenerative processes to run its full course." Seo and her colleagues then turned back to their in vivo model and analyzed the types of muscle fibers in the treated vs. untreated mice 14 days after injury. They found that type IIX fibers were prevalent in healthy muscle and treated muscle, but untreated injured muscle contained smaller numbers of type IIX fibers and increased numbers of type IIA fibers. This difference explained the enlarged fiber size and greater force production of treated muscles, as IIX fibers produce more force than IIA fibers. Finally, the team homed in on the optimal amount of time for neutrophil presence in injured muscle by depleting neutrophils in the mice on the third day after injury. The treated mice's muscles showed larger fiber size and greater strength recovery than those in untreated mice, confirming that while neutrophils are necessary in the earliest stages of injury recovery, getting them out of the injury site early leads to improved muscle regeneration. "These findings are remarkable because they indicate that we can influence the function of the body's immune system in a drug-free, non-invasive way," said Walsh, who is also the Paul A. Maeder Professor of Engineering and Applied Science at SEAS and whose group is experienced in developing wearable technology for diagnosing and treating disease. "This provides great motivation for the development of external, mechanical interventions to help accelerate and improve muscle and tissue healing that have the potential to be rapidly translated to the clinic." The team is continuing to investigate this line of research with multiple projects in the lab. They plan to validate this mechanotherpeutic approach in larger animals, with the goal of being able to test its efficacy on humans. They also hope to test it on different types of injuries, age-related muscle loss, and muscle performance enhancement. "The fields of mechanotherapy and immunotherapy rarely interact with each other, but this work is a testament to how crucial it is to consider both physical and biological elements when studying and working to improve human health," said Mooney, who is the corresponding author of the paper and the Robert P. Pinkas Family Professor of Bioengineering at SEAS. "The idea that mechanics influence cell and tissue function was ridiculed until the last few decades, and while scientists have made great strides in establishing acceptance of this fact, we still know very little about how that process actually works at the organ level. This research has revealed a previously unknown type of interplay between mechanobiology and immunology that is critical for muscle tissue healing, in addition to describing a new form of mechanotherapy that potentially could be as potent as chemical or gene therapies, but much simpler and less invasive," said Wyss Founding Director Don Ingber, M.D., Ph.D., who is also the Judah Folkman Professor of Vascular Biology at (HMS) and the Vascular Biology Program at Boston Children's Hospital, as well as Professor of Bioengineering at SEAS.   Vitamin E could help protect older men from pneumonia University of Helsinki (Finland), October 7 2021.    An article that appeared in Clinical Interventions in Aging reported a protective role for vitamin E against pneumonia in older men.   For the current investigation, Dr Harri Hemilä of the University of Helsinki, Finland analyzed data from the Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-Carotene (ATBC) Cancer Prevention Study conducted in Finland. The trial included 29,133 men between the ages of 50 to 69 years who smoked at least five cigarettes daily upon enrollment. Participants received alpha tocopherol (vitamin E), beta carotene, both supplements, or a placebo for five to eight years.   The current study was limited to 7,469 ATBC participants who started smoking at age 21 or older. Among this group, supplementation with vitamin E was associated with a 35% lower risk of developing pneumonia in comparison with those who did not receive the vitamin.  Light smokers who engaged in leisure time exercise had a 69% lower risk compared with unsupplemented members of this subgroup. The risk in this subgroup of developing pneumonia by age 74 was 12.9%.   Among the one-third of the current study's population who quit smoking for a median period of two years, there was a 72% lower risk of pneumonia in association with vitamin E supplementation. In this group, exercisers who received vitamin E experienced an 81% lower pneumonia risk.   Dr Hemilä observed that the benefit for vitamin E in this study was strongest for older subjects—a group at higher risk of pneumonia.   "The current analysis of individual-level data suggests that trials on vitamin E and pneumonia on nonsmoking elderly males are warranted," he concluded.       Toxic fatty acids to blame for brain cell death after injury New York University, October 7, 2021 Cells that normally nourish healthy brain cells called neurons release toxic fatty acids after neurons are damaged, a new study in rodents shows. This phenomenon is likely the driving factor behind most, if not all, diseases that affect brain function, as well as the natural breakdown of brain cells seen in aging, researchers say. Previous research has pointed to astrocytes—a star-shaped glial cell of the central nervous system—as the culprits behind cell death seen in Parkinson's disease and dementia, among other neurodegenerative diseases. While many experts believed that these cells released a neuron-killing molecule to "clear away" damaged brain cells, the identity of this toxin has until now remained a mystery. Led by researchers at NYU Grossman School of Medicine, the new investigation provides what they say is the first evidence that tissue damage prompts astrocytes to produce two kinds of fats, long-chain saturated free fatty acids and phosphatidylcholines. These fats then trigger cell death in damaged neurons, the electrically active cells that send messages throughout nerve tissue. Publishing Oct. 6 in the journal Nature, the study also showed that when researchers blocked fatty acid formation in mice, 75 percent of neurons survived compared with 10 percent when the fatty acids were allowed to form. The researchers' earlier work showed that brain cells continued to function when shielded from astrocyte attacks.  "Our findings show that the toxic fatty acids produced by astrocytes play a critical role in brain cell death and provide a promising new target for treating, and perhaps even preventing, many neurodegenerative diseases," says study co-senior author Shane Liddelow, Ph.D. Liddelow, an assistant professor in the Department of Neuroscience and Physiology at NYU Langone Health, adds that targeting these fats instead of the cells that produce them may be a safer approach to treating neurodegenerative diseasesbecause astrocytes feed nerve cells and clear away their waste. Stopping them from working altogether could interfere with healthy brain function. Although it remains unclear why astrocytes produce these toxins, it is possible they evolved to destroy damaged cells before they can harm their neighbors, says Liddelow. He notes that while healthy cells are not harmed by the toxins, neurons become susceptible to the damaging effects when they are injured, mutated, or infected by prions, the contagious, misfolded proteins that play a major role in mad cow disease and similar illnesses. Perhaps in chronic diseases like dementia, this otherwise helpful process goes off track and becomes a problem, the study authors say. For the investigation, researchers analyzed the molecules released by astrocytes collected from rodents. They also genetically engineered some groups of mice to prevent the normal production of the toxic fats and looked to see whether neuron death occurred after an acute injury. "Our results provide what is likely the most detailed molecular map to date of how tissue damage leads to brain cell death, enabling researchers to better understand why neurons die in all kinds of diseases," says Liddelow, also an assistant professor in the Department of Ophthalmology at NYU Langone. Liddelow cautions that while the findings are promising, the genetic techniques used to block the enzyme that produces toxic fatty acids in mice are not ready for use in humans. As a result, the researchers next plan is to explore safe and effective ways to interfere with the release of the toxins in human patients. Liddelow and his colleagues had previously shown these neurotoxic astrocytes in the brains of patients with Parkinson's, Huntington's disease, and multiple sclerosis, among other diseases.   Clinical trial for nicotinamide riboside: Vitamin safely boosts levels of important cell metabolite linked to multiple health benefits University of Iowa Health Care, October 3, 2021   In the first controlled clinical trial of nicotinamide riboside (NR), a newly discovered form of Vitamin B3, researchers have shown that the compound is safe for humans and increases levels of a cell metabolite that is critical for cellular energy production and protection against stress and DNA damage.   Studies in mice have shown that boosting the levels of this cell metabolite -- known as NAD+ -- can produce multiple health benefits, including resistance to weight gain, improved control of blood sugar and cholesterol, reduced nerve damage, and longer lifespan. Levels of NAD+ diminish with age, and it has been suggested that loss of this metabolite may play a role in age-related health decline.   These findings in animal studies have spurred people to take commercially available NR supplements designed to boost NAD+. However, these over-the-counter supplements have not undergone clinical trials to see if they work in people.   The new research, reported in the journal Nature Communications, was led by Charles Brenner, PhD, professor and Roy J. Carver Chair of Biochemistry at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine in collaboration with colleagues at Queens University Belfast and ChromaDex Corp. (NASDAQ: CDXC), which supplied the NR used in the trial. Brenner is a consultant for ChromaDex. He also is co-founder and Chief Scientific Adviser of ProHealthspan, which sells NR supplements under the trade name Tru NIAGEN®.   The human trial involved six men and six women, all healthy. Each participant received single oral doses of 100 mg, 300 mg, or 1,000 mg of NR in a different sequence with a seven-day gap between doses. After each dose, blood and urine samples were collected and analyzed by Brenner's lab to measure various NAD+ metabolites in a process called metabolomics. The trial showed that the NR vitamin increased NAD+ metabolism by amounts directly related to the dose, and there were no serious side effects with any of the doses.   "This trial shows that oral NR safely boosts human NAD+ metabolism," Brenner says. "We are excited because everything we are learning from animal systems indicates that the effectiveness of NR depends on preserving and/or boosting NAD+ and related compounds in the face of metabolic stresses. Because the levels of supplementation in mice that produce beneficial effects are achievable in people, it appears than health benefits of NR will be translatable to humans safely."   The next step will be to study the effect of longer duration NR supplementation on NAD+ metabolism in healthy adults, but Brenner also has plans to test the effects of NR in people with diseases and health conditions, including elevated cholesterol, obesity and diabetes, and people at risk for chemotherapeutic peripheral neuropathy.   Prior to the formal clinical trial, Brenner conducted a pilot human study -- on himself. In 2004, he had discovered that NR is a natural product found in milk and that there is pathway to convert NR to NAD+ in people. More than a decade of research on NR metabolic pathways and health effects in mice and rats had convinced him that NR supplementation had real promise to improve human health and wellness. After consulting with UI's institutional review board, he conducted an experiment in which he took 1 gram of NR once a day for seven days, and his team analyzed blood and urine samples using mass spectrometry. The experiment showed that Brenner's blood NAD+ increased by about 2.7 times. In addition, though he reported immediate sensitivity to flushing with the related compound niacin, he did not experience any side effects taking NR.   The biggest surprise from his metabolomic analysis was an increase in a metabolite called NAAD, which was multiplied by 45 times, from trace levels to amounts in the micromolar range that were easily detectable.   "While this was unexpected, I thought it might be useful," Brenner says. "NAD+ is an abundant metabolite and it is sometimes hard to see the needle move on levels of abundant metabolites. But when you can look at a low-abundance metabolite that goes from undetectable to easily detectable, there is a great signal to noise ratio, meaning that NAAD levels could be a useful biomarker for tracking increases in NAD+ in human trials."   Brenner notes this was a case of bidirectional translational science; having learned something from the initial human experiment, his team was able to return to laboratory mice to explore the unexpected NAAD finding in more detail.   Brenner's mouse study showed that NAAD is formed from NR and confirmed that NAAD levels are a strong biomarker for increased NAD+ metabolism. The experiments also revealed more detail about NAD+ metabolic pathways.   In particular, the researchers compared the ability of all three NAD+ precursor vitamins -- NR, niacin, and nicotinamide -- to boost NAD+ metabolism and stimulate the activity of certain enzymes, which have been linked to longevity and healthbenefits. The study showed for the first time that oral NR is superior to nicotinamide, which is better than niacin in terms of the total amount of NAD+ produced at an equivalent dose. NR was also the best of the three in stimulating the activity of sirtuin enzymes. However, in this case, NR was the best at stimulating sirtuin-like activities, followed by niacin, followed by nicotinamide.   The information from the mouse study subsequently helped Brenner's team design the formal clinical trial. In addition to showing that NR boosts NAD+ in humans without adverse effects, the trial confirmed that NAAD is a highly sensitive biomarker of NAD+ supplementation in people.   "Now that we have demonstrated safety in this small clinical trial, we are in a position to find out if the health benefits that we have seen in animals can be reproduced in people," says Brenner, who also is co-director of the Obesity Research and Education Initiative, professor of internal medicine, and a member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles Diabetes Research Center at the UI.   Protecting the ozone layer is delivering vast health benefits Montreal Protocol will spare Americans from 443 million skin cancer cases National Center for Atmospheric Research, October 7, 2021 An international agreement to protect the ozone layer is expected to prevent 443 million cases of skin cancer and 63 million cataract cases for people born in the United States through the end of this century, according to new research. The research team, by scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), ICF Consulting, and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), focused on the far-reaching impacts of a landmark 1987 treaty known as the Montreal Protocol and later amendments that substantially strengthened it. The agreement phased out the use of chemicals such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) that destroy ozone in the stratosphere. Stratospheric ozone shields the planet from harmful levels of the Sun's ultraviolet (UV) radiation, protecting life on Earth. To measure the long-term effects of the Montreal Protocol, the scientists developed a computer modeling approach that enabled them to look to both the past and the future by simulating the treaty's impact on Americans born between 1890 and 2100. The modeling revealed the treaty's effect on stratospheric ozone, the associated reductions in ultraviolet radiation, and the resulting health benefits.  In addition to the number of skin cancer and cataract cases that were avoided, the study also showed that the treaty, as most recently amended, will prevent approximately 2.3 million skin cancer deaths in the U.S. “It's very encouraging,” said NCAR scientist Julia Lee-Taylor, a co-author of the study. “It shows that, given the will, the nations of the world can come together to solve global environmental problems.” The study, funded by the EPA, was published in ACS Earth and Space Chemistry. NCAR is sponsored by the National Science Foundation. Mounting concerns over the ozone layer Scientists in the 1970s began highlighting the threat to the ozone layer when they found that CFCs, used as refrigerants and in other applications, release chlorine atoms in the stratosphere that set off chemical reactions that destroy ozone. Concerns mounted the following decade with the discovery of an Antarctic ozone hole. The loss of stratospheric ozone would be catastrophic, as high levels of UV radiation have been linked to certain types of skin cancer, cataracts, and immunological disorders. The ozone layer also protects terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, as well as agriculture. Policy makers responded to the threat with the 1987 Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, in which nations agreed to curtail the use of certain ozone-destroying substances. Subsequent amendments strengthened the treaty by expanding the list of ozone-destroying substances (such as halons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons, or HCFCs) and accelerating the timeline for phasing out their use. The amendments were based on Input from the scientific community, including a number of NCAR scientists, that were summarized in quadrennial Ozone Assessment reports. To quantify the impacts of the treaty, the research team built a model known as the Atmospheric and Health Effects Framework. This model, which draws on various data sources about ozone, public health, and population demographics, consists of five computational steps. These simulate past and future emissions of ozone-destroying substances, the impacts of those substances on stratospheric ozone, the resulting changes in ground-level UV radiation, the U.S. population's exposure to UV radiation, and the incidence and mortality of health effects resulting from the exposure. The results showed UV radiation levels returning to 1980 levels by the mid-2040s under the amended treaty. In contrast, UV levels would have continued to increase throughout this century if the treaty had not been amended, and they would have soared far higher without any treaty at all.  Even with the amendments, the simulations show excess cases of cataracts and various types of skin cancer beginning to occur with the onset of ozone depletion and peaking decades later as the population exposed to the highest UV levels ages. Those born between 1900 and 2040 experience heightened cases of skin cancer and cataracts, with the worst health outcomes affecting those born between about 1950 and 2000. However, the health impacts would have been far more severe without the treaty, with cases of skin cancer and cataracts rising at an increasingly rapid rate through the century.  “We peeled away from disaster,” Lee-Taylor said. “What is eye popping is what would have happened by the end of this century if not for the Montreal Protocol. By 2080, the amount of UV has tripled. After that, our calculations for the health impacts start to break down because we're getting so far into conditions that have never been seen before.” The research team also found that more than half the treaty's health benefits could be traced to the later amendments rather than the original 1987 Montreal Protocol. Overall, the treaty prevented more than 99% of potential health impacts that would have otherwise occurred from ozone destruction. This showed the importance of the treaty's flexibility in adjusting to evolving scientific knowledge, the authors said. The researchers focused on the U.S. because of ready access to health data and population projections. Lee-Taylor said that the specific health outcomes in other countries may vary, but the overall trends would be similar. “The treaty had broad global benefits,” she said.     What is Boron? The trace mineral boron provides profound anti-cancer effects, in addition to maintaining stronger bones. Life Extension, September 2021 Boron is a trace mineral found in the earth's crust and in water. Its importance in human health has been underestimated. Boron has been shown to have actions against specific types of malignancies, such as: Cervical cancer: The country Turkey has an extremely low incidence of cervical cancer, and scientists partially attribute this to its boron-rich soil.1 When comparing women who live in boron-rich regions versus boron-poor regions of Turkey, not a single woman living in the boron-rich regions had any indication of cervical cancer.2(The mean dietary intake of boron for women in this group was 8.41 mg/day.)  Boron interferes with the life cycle of the human papillomavirus (HPV), which is a contributing factor in approximately 95% of all cervical cancers.1  Considering that HPV viruses are increasingly implicated in head and neck cancers,3,4 supplementation with this ultra-low-cost mineral could have significant benefits in protecting against this malignancy that is increasing in prevalence. Lung cancer: A study conducted at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center between 1995 and 2005 found that increased boron intake was associated with a lower risk of lung cancer in postmenopausal women who were taking hormone replacement therapy. Prostate cancer: Studies point to boron's ability to inhibit the growth and spread of prostate cancer cells.  In one study, when mice were exposed to boric acid, their tumors shrank by as much as 38%.6 One analysis found that increased dietary boron intake was associated with a decreased risk of prostate cancer.7 Several human and animal studies have confirmed the important connection between boron and bone health. Boron prevents calcium loss,8 while also alleviating the bone problems associated with magnesium and vitamin D deficiency.9 All of these nutrients help maintain bone density. A study in female rats revealed the harmful effects a deficiency in boron has on bones, including:10 Decreased bone volume fraction, a measure of bone strength, Decreased thickness of the bone's spongy inner layer, and Decreased maximum force needed to break the femur. And in a study of post-menopausal women, supplementation with3 mg of boron per day prevented calcium loss and bone demineralization by reducing urinary excretion of both calcium and magnesium.8 In addition to its bone and anti-cancer benefits, there are nine additional reasons boron is an important trace mineral vital for health and longevity. It has been shown to:1 Greatly improve wound healing, Beneficially impact the body's use of estrogen, testosterone, and vitamin D, Boost magnesium absorption, Reduce levels of inflammatory biomarkers, such as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), Raise levels of antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, Protect against pesticide-induced oxidative stress and heavy-metal toxicity, Improve the brain's electrical activity, which may explain its benefits for cognitive performance, and short-term memory in the elderly, Influence the formation and activity of key biomolecules, such as S-adenosyl methionine (SAM-e) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), and Potentially help ameliorate the adverse effects of traditional chemotherapeutic agents. Because the amount of boron varies in the soil, based on geographical location, obtaining enough boron through diet alone can be difficult. Supplementing with low-cost boron is an effective way to maintain adequate levels of this overlooked micronutrient.

The Week in Art
Jasper Johns: the retrospective in depth. Plus, Venice's tourism problem and Finnish artist Outi Heiskanen

The Week in Art

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 62:23


This week: Jasper Johns. Carlos Basualdo of the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Scott Rothkopf of the Whitney Museum of American Art talk to Ben Luke about their simultaneous shows of the 91-year-old artist, and taking a radical approach to a retrospective of a radical artist. Also this week: Venice's tourist problem. Are Venetian authorities subjecting tourists in Venice to unprecedented surveillance? We talk to Anna Somers Cocks, founder of The Art Newspaper and former chair of Venice in Peril. And in our Work of the Week, Aimee Dawson asks Marja Sakari, director of the Ateneum in Helsinki, about the Finnish artist Outi Heiskanen's Dream Play: Fleeting Virginity (1984), a key work in her retrospective at the Ateneum. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Geek In Review
The Legal Design Book with Astrid Kohlmeier and Meera Klemola

The Geek In Review

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 43:44


You have to appreciate a book that discusses Legal Design and puts design concepts into action by working with a fellow designer on the layout and functionality of the book itself. The results of The Legal Design Book: Doing Law in the 21st Century is both a great read for the content and the physical interaction with the book. Astrid Kohlmeier and Meera Klemola, Lawyers and Legal Designers, join us from Munich, Germany, and Helsinki, Finland respectively to discuss their motivation in writing a book designed to raise awareness of legal design concepts and tools to the legal industry. We define Legal Design and discuss the ten philosophies that legal design professionals need to understand as they implement these ideas and processes within their organizations. There is a role for legal designers within the industry, and it is one that we are constantly defining and redefining at the moment. And as we define it, we must be able to measure it and prove the value and return on investment as well. And the focus cannot simply be how lawyers and legal professionals apply Legal Design concepts, the legal user experience (LUX) must also be taken into account. Join us for this podcast user experience into the evolving area of Legal Design. Share with a friend If you like what you hear, please share the podcast with a friend or colleague. Contact Us Twitter: @gebauerm or @glambert. Voicemail: 713-487-7270 Email: geekinreviewpodcast@gmail.com. As always, the great music you hear on the podcast is from Jerry David DeCicca who 4th solo album just released a vinyl edition this month! A transcript is available on 3 Geeks' site.

The Jay Jay French Connection: Beyond the Music

This week's episode is another must-listen for all guitar enthusiasts. Jay Jay welcomes back Juha Ruokangas of Ruokangas guitars for part II of their conversation. Juha joins Jay Jay from Helsinki & they get right back into it, discussing everything from heat treatments and finishes, to the evolving quality of beginner guitars & the longevity of various guitar models. Juha discusses the differences between large-scale guitar manufacturers and boutique custom guitar builders, and every type of company in between. Hear first hand what it takes for him & his team to ensure the perfection of every single guitar they make, & what influences have gone into the designing of their 6 signature models - only on The Jay Jay French Connection: Beyond the Music! Be sure to check out Ruokangas Guitars remarkable guitar models & learn more about their company at https://ruokangas.com/

Knowing Animals
Episode 176: Vegan men and masculinities with Kadri Aavik

Knowing Animals

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 26:42


On this episode of Knowing Animals, we talk to Dr Kadri Aavik. Kadri is an Associate Professor of Gender Studies in the School of Governance, Law and Society at Talinn University in Estonia, as well as a postdoc in the Department of Cultures at the University of Helsinki in Finland. We discuss her paper “Vegan Men: Towards Greater Care for (Non)human Others, Earth, and Self”, which appeared in Men, Masculinities, and Earth, a collection edited by Paul M. Pulé and Martin Hultman, and published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2021. This episode of Knowing Animals is brought to you by the Australasian Animal Studies Association and the Animal Publics book series from Sydney University Press.

Bitch no Filter
There once was a Bitch From Helsinki

Bitch no Filter

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 61:38


But are you funny or nah --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Expat Heroes
Trouver un emploi en Finlande: mission impossible?! Marianne nous raconte!

Expat Heroes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 47:57


La Finlande attire pour sa qualité de vie. Quand on y vient en touriste, on est surpris -et rassuré- de voir que tout le monde parle anglais en Finlande. Mais pour y travailler, il est indispensable de parler finnois. Marianne est venue rejoindre son mari à Helsinki en février 2019. Elle s'était fixée 6 mois pour trouver un emploi de graphiste, métier qu'elle exerçait déjà en France. Elle aura mis 1 an et demi avant de sécuriser un poste dans une entreprise finlandaise.  Depuis l'appartement qu'elle vient d'acheter avec son mari, Marianne nous explique: les raisons de la méfiance des employeurs finois face aux profils étrangers; le parcours du combattant pour trouver un emploi; le programme d'intégration dont elle a bénéficié; les différences culturelles avec les finnois; les super pouvoirs acquis grâce à cette expérience; des conseils pour ceux qui vivent ou s'apprêtent à vivre une recherche d'emploi délicate à l'étranger.

Monocle 24: The Menu
In praise of home cooking

Monocle 24: The Menu

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 27:23


Top UK chef Ollie Dabbous's top tricks for elevating your cooking to another level. Plus: how Helsinki's Finnjävel restaurant won a Michelin star with its Finnish home-cooking classics.

Pointe To Rise
REPLAY | Suvi Honkanen | Ballet & the Emotional Demands

Pointe To Rise

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 64:21


Low Tide Boyz
Mel Bartow's Epic Swedish Adventure

Low Tide Boyz

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 59:36


Welcome to episode ninety of the Löw Tide Böyz - A Swimrun Podcast!On the show this week we have a long-time friend of the show, Mel Bartow, on to chat. She is part of the California Swimrun crew and she recently traveled to Sweden to race ÖTILLÖ, The Swimrun World Championship with her race partner, the one and only, Andy Hewitt. She shares her amazing experience with us on the show!But first... Training UpdateIt's race week!!!! Ödyssey Swimrun's Orcas Island is this Sunday and we can't wait to get up to Orcas Island and take on the super challenging long course. We're as trained up as we're going to get but we feel ready to take on the challenge.ShoutoutsThis week we're shouting out our wives. We literally wouldn't be able to do this show and/or travel to races without their support. We know that it's tough on them to handle everything around the house and deal with the kids while we are out in the woods tethered together and whatnot and we are full of gratitude for their support and love.Feats of EnduranceThis week's winner is Bas Bood from The Netherlands. He raced Swimrun Lauwersoog over the weekend and put in a really good effort out there. Strong work Bas!Bonus winner this week is our friend Carolyn for running her first half marathon since giving birth to her beautiful daughter. Awesome job!Check out and join our Strava Club and join Swimrunners from around the world as they train for Swimruns and stuff.This Week in SwimrunWe've got something new for everyone this week. We're calling it “Race Director Reports” and our first installment is with our friend and co-founder of EX Swimrun, Nicholas Roman. He joins us to talk about last weekend's EX21 event.In other Swimrun news, the 5th edition of the Urban Swimrun Challenge took place over the weekend in Düsseldorf, Germany. It's cool to see this type of urban format and the race looked like it was a lot of fun.The Folkhälsan Swimrun went off without a hitch on Saturday in Finland. This event is an ÖTILLÖ merit race and took place about 40km outside of Helsinki. Shoutout to friends of the show Nicolas Remires and “Beek” Tarayao (of Team Envol Baywatch) for winning the race! Finally, Backwaterman Swimrun took place in Austria. The races start and end in front of ​​Ottenstein Castle looks awesome! Shoutout to friends of the show Åsa and Henrik (A.K.A., the Swimrun Pappa) for finishing first place in the mixed team category of the 36km Marathon course. Strong work!That's it for this week. Be sure to tip us off if there's any news that you would like for us to share on the show.UpdatesOur new merch is here! Check out our latest ways for you to show your Low Tide Pride in our shop!If you're racing Orcas Island and aren't sure what to do kit-wise, make sure to check out our latest episode of Gear Talk with the Swimrun Labs where we discuss gear considerations and tactics for the race.Mel Bartow's Epic Swedish AdventureIt was awesome to get Mel's experience of her trip to Sweden for the World Championship. Her enthusiasm for Swimrun is infectious and she got us even more stoked to try to qualify for the original Swimrun. This interview is solid gold! Enjoy.That's it for this week's show. If you are enjoying the Löw Tide Böyz, be sure to subscribe to the show on your favorite podcast player and leave us a five-star review. You can find us on Apple Podcast, Spotify, Google Podcast, and on YouTube. You can also follow our meme page on Instagram. Email us at lowtideboyz@gmail.com with any feedback and/or suggestions. Finally, you can support our efforts on Patreon…if you feel so inclined.Thanks for listening and see you out there!-  Chip and Chris

PRI: Arts and Entertainment
Helsinki's mayor thinks English should be the city's official language

PRI: Arts and Entertainment

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021


The mayor of Helsinki says the Finnish capital should declare itself an English-language city to try and attract more foreign workers. Not everyone is impressed with the mayor's proposal.

The Art Angle
How Facebook and the Helsinki Biennial Share a Vision for the Art World's Future

The Art Angle

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 38:48


Some of the most impactful stories to surface this past year have revolved around three major issues affecting the world as a whole: there's a worsening climate emergency, a global health crisis and—in the fold—a breakneck acceleration of technology that's increasingly entangling itself into every aspect of our lives. When it comes to the art world, we can probably agree it's time to ask some hard questions. Should there be so many art events? How should we gather? Do we need to experience art in person to understand it? During lockdowns around the world over the last 18 months, we've been learning just how fluidly art can transition into the digital realm—and how clumsy a failed attempt can be. Among the art events that managed to pull off successful ventures this year is the first edition of the Helsinki Biennial, which took on these questions. Taking place on an island off the coast of the capital of Finland, the exhibition, called “The Same Sea,” meets our collective moment, exploring concerns around our interconnectedness, nature, and sustainability. And it's not just in theme: the Helsinki Biennial is calculating and trimming its climate footprint every step of the way with a goal of becoming the first carbon neutral biennial by 2035. In the middle of a pandemic and rising temperatures, 41 artists are presenting works that carefully consider the surroundings of Vallisaari Island and an array of plants and creatures that populate it. To reach a wider audience when travel is both restricted and carbon-intensive, the biennale, which is on view until September 26, has partnered with Facebook Open Arts to explore how technology might help connect audiences with artworks peppered on the island. This week, we're thrilled to welcome Maija Tanninen, director of the forward-thinking Helsinki Biennial and the Helsinki Art Museum, and Tina Vaz, Head of Facebook Open Arts, to discuss the Helsinki Biennial's unique approaches to greening a biennial, and how technology can be used to bring us closer to nature in meaningful ways. If you enjoy this conversation, please join our panel conversation, “Helsinki Biennial and Facebook Open Arts – Future Visions / Art & Tech”—which will be available to watch on our Facebook page on September 22.

PRI's The World
Two governments claim to run Myanmar

PRI's The World

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 46:15


Two governments claim to run Myanmar. Will the United Nations accept Myanmar's widely despised military regime or will it recognize a new revolutionary government that has massive public support? Also, Finland has two official languages: Finnish and Swedish. Now, the mayor of Helsinki wants to declare the capital an English-language city, but not everyone agrees. And renowned soccer player Cristiano Ronaldo is one of the world's most physically fit athletes. Ronaldo's clean-food living has inspired his fellow players to skip dessert on at least one occasion. 

Composers Datebook
María Joaquina de la Portilla Torres

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 2:00


Synopsis Today's date marks the birthday in 1885 of María Joaquina de la Portilla Torres, in the Mexican state of Guanajuato. Under her married name of Maria Grever, she became the first female Mexican composer to achieve international fame. She composed her first song at age four, studied in France with Claude Debussy among others, and at 18, one of her songs sold 3 million copies. At age 22, she married Leo A. Grever, an American oil company executive, moved to New York City, and by the 1930s was composing for Paramount and 20th Century Fox films. Her best-known song is probably "What A Difference A Day Makes" (originally "Cuando vuelva a tu lado"), written in 1934. Her songs have been recorded by singers ranging from the Andrews Sisters and Frank Sinatra to Dinah Washington and Aretha Franklin to Plácido Domingo and Juan Diego Flórez. “I am interested in Jazz and Modern Rhythms,” said Grever, “but above all, in Mexican Music … There is such a cultural richness in Mexican Music, its Hispanic and indigenous origins ... It is my wish and yearning to present these native rhythms and tunes from a real perspective, but with the necessary flexibility to appeal to a universal audience." Music Played in Today's Program María Grever (1885 – 1951) – Júrame (Juan Diego Flórez, tenor; Fort Worth Symphony; Miguel Harth-Bedoya, cond.) Decca 4757576 On This Day Births 1737 - Austrian composer Johann Michael Haydn, in Rohrau; He was the younger brother of Franz Joseph Haydn (b. 1732); 1760 - Italian composer Luigi Cherubini, in Florence (although August 14 is occasionally cited as his birthdate); 1910 - American composer and eminent theatrical conductor Lehman Engel, in Jackson, Miss.; 1910 - Swiss composer Rolf Liebermann, in Zurich; Premieres 1854 - Bruckner: Mass in Bb ("Missa Solemnis") in St. Florian, Austria; 1952 - Frank Martin: Concerto for Harpsichord, in Venice; 1954 - Britten: opera "The Turn of the Screw," in Venice at the Teatro La Fenice; 1968 - Shostakovich: String Quartet No. 12, in Moscow, by the Beethoven Quartet; 1978 - Barber: Third Essay for Orchestra, by the New York Philharmonic conducted by Zubin Mehta; 1994 - Richard Danielpour: Cello Concerto, commissioned and performed by San Francisco Symphony conducted by Herbert Blomstedt, with soloist Yo-Yo Ma; 1996 - Stockhausen: "Freitag aus Licht" (Friday from Light), at the Leipzig Opera; 1997 - Saariaho: "Graal Théâtre" (chamber version), in Helsinki, by the Avanti Ensemble and violinist John Storgards. 2002 - David Amram: Flute Concerto ("Giants of the Night"), in New Orleans by the Louisiana Philharmonic conducted by Klauspeter Seibel, with James Galway the soloist; 2002 - Colin Matthews, Judith Weir, Poul Ruders, David Sower, Michael Torke, Anthony Payne, and Magnus Linberg: "Bright Cecilia: Variations on a Theme by Purcell," at Royal Albert Hall in London, with the BBC Symphony, Leonard Slatkin conducting; This set of orchestral variations on a Purcell theme was commissioned by BBC Music magazine to celebrate its 10th anniversary; Others 1731 - J.S. Bach performs organ recitals in Dresden on Sept. 14-21; 1741 - Handel finishes scoring his famous oratorio, "Messiah," begun on August 22 (The entire work was composed in a period of 24 days); These dates are according to the Julian "Old Style" calendar (Gregorian dates: Sept 2 to Sept. 25); 1914 - W. C. Handy copyrights his most famous song, "The St. Louis Blues"; 1973 - The Philadelphia Orchestra gives a concert in Beijing, the first American orchestra to perform in Red China; Eugene Ormandy conducts symphonies by Mozart (No. 35), Brahms (No. 1) and the American composer Roy Harris (No. 3).

tbs eFM The Steve Hatherly Show
0911 Superlingo Saturday (English in Helsinki & Taiwan)

tbs eFM The Steve Hatherly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 29:40


Mastering Finland
#63 Empowering Internationals & Communities with Ronny Eriksson

Mastering Finland

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 42:59


In this episode, Petra talks to Ronny Eriksson, a 25-year-old serial entrepreneur and storyteller based in Helsinki, co-founder of the "Norders", a creative agency and community, host of the "New Nordic Wave of Change" podcast, as well as part of the "ReformMigri" team. Ronny focuses on helping companies and individuals, like international students, find their pathways, expand their network, and experience happiness within themselves. Listen to this episode and learn more about Ronny's projects like Ambition Africa, co-created with Peter Vesterbacka or Norders' academy and community, the importance of immigration, and hear some great tips on travelling in Finland. Links: Ronny's LinkedIn Norders

Finding Harmony Podcast
Where were you on 9/11, Hanne Sydanmaa?

Finding Harmony Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 75:28


It is with great pleasure we introduce to you the contagiously ebullient Hanne Sydanmaa from Helsinki, Finland. We asked Hanne to share a bit about the birth of Ashtanga Yoga in Finland, which continues to this day to have the most practitioners per capita over any other country in the world! We tried, in our way, to get Hanne to open herself to us… So that you could see the Real Hanne, with her zestful and sparkling personality. Alas, like all Fins, they are hard to coax out from their safe, cold, woodland, hidden away in a forgotten corner of the North. They are quite like the Children of the Forest in that regard who, with great mirth, created that calamity of White Walkers! So this tendency towards shyness is what we've learned about the Fins. And, is something we share with you here in today's episode. We learn about Hanne's prior occupation as a flight attendant, her family, and her youth; how she learned Ashtanga yoga, and how her body collapsed on her in the middle of 3rd series. After only a few years of practice, Hanne had to go back to square one, and relearn this practice in a completely different way than the rest of us. This is a very special episode that will help anyone dealing with injury or looking for hope in how to rehabilitate their body and practice. Now you will find Hanne handstanding all over the world, teaching pilates, and enjoying ballet classes - just for fun! When the question came up "Where were you on 9/11?" we explored our stories and how that fateful day changed our collective history forever. Not only will September 11th never be forgotten, but it is also Saraswathi's birthday. Twenty years ago she was celebrating her 60th birthday in New York City when the towers fell, which means this year she turned 80 years old! Thank you so much to all who follow us and listen to these stories that we share in our living historiography of our Ashtanga Culture. We adore you and hope they continue to enrich your days and lives! FIND OUT MORE ABOUT HANNE - INSTAGRAM I FACEBOOK I WEBSITE - https://hanneyoga.com/ Be sure to register for Harmony's FREE Breathwork Masterclass - http://www.harmonyslater.com/free-breathwork-master-class The Finding Harmony Podcast is hosted, edited and produced by Harmony Slater and co-hosted by Russell Case. A big heart of thanks to our friends, family, and students from around the world, who've generously supported this podcast through your comments, sharing, and financial donations. If you've enjoyed today's podcast, please consider supporting our future episodes by making a donation. Every little bit goes a long way and we are immensely grateful for any and all of your support. Make A Donation - http://www.harmonyslater.com/ Don't forget to subscribe and leave a review! ❤ Give us a 5★ rating! We love to read and respond to your comments - So drop us a note in the comments below and give us a shout out on IG! Opening & Closing Music by Nick Evans from the album “for Morgan.” Listen to the entire album on Spotify - Click Here.

FSR Energy & Climate
The CJEU's Judgment In The OPAL Case: Discussing The Scope Of Energy Solidarity

FSR Energy & Climate

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 51:03


In this podcast, Professors Kim Talus (Universities of Tulane, Eastern Finland and Helsinki), Dirk Buschle (Energy Community Secretariat, College of Europe), and Leigh Hancher (FSR, Tilburg University, and Baker Botts LLP) discuss the impact that the CJEU's recent recognition of energy solidarity as a justiciable principle of EU law will have on the future of EU energy law and policy.

Stories From Women Who Walk
60 Seconds for Motivate Your Monday: It Takes a Village - That Would be You!

Stories From Women Who Walk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 1:56


Hello to you listening in Helsinki, Finland!Coming to you from Whidbey Island, Washington this is 60 Seconds, your daily dose of hope, imagination, wisdom, stories, practical tips, and general riffing on this and that.I bet you've heard,”It takes a village to raise a child.” As the story goes a community of people must provide well for the children so they can grow in a safe and healthy environment. Today when we say, “It takes a village....” we mean that a group of people must work together to achieve a goal.Question: What if you could be - just for this week - your very own village - an entire community of you? To rely on all you have become in your life so far. Begin by gathering together your heritage, culture, ancestors, and experiences. Summon all the skills, assets, resources, creativity, stamina, imagination, integrity and so on to accomplish your project, your goal. And set your mind to it. Maybe it feels a bit daunting, but somehow empowering, too! This is the place to thrive together. Come for the stories - stay for the magic. Speaking of magic, I hope you'll subscribe, follow, share a nice shout out on your social media or podcast channel of choice, including Android, and join us next time! You're invited to stop by the website and subscribe to stay current with Diane, her journeys, her guests, as well as creativity, imagination, walking, stories, camaraderie, and so much more: Quarter Moon Story ArtsProduction Team: Quarter Moon Story ArtsMusic: Mer's Waltz from Crossing the Waters by Steve Schuch & Night Heron MusicAll content and image © 2019 - Present: for credit & attribution Quarter Moon Story Arts

Le Nouvel Esprit Public
Les primaires, machines à perdre ? / Déroute à Kaboul: vers une défense européenne ? / n°209 / 5 septembre 2021

Le Nouvel Esprit Public

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 63:47


Une émission de Philippe Meyer, enregistrée en public à l'Ecole alsacienne le 5 septembre 2021. Avec Matthias Fekl, Lucile Schmid, Richard Werly et Michaela Wiegel.LES PRIMAIRES SONT-ELLES DES MACHINES À PERDRE ?L'automne qui arrive pourrait s'annoncer comme la saison des primairesen vue des présidentielles de 2022. A droite, plusieurs candidats se sont déclarés en leur faveur : Valérie Pécresse, Michel Barnier, Philippe Juvin et Éric Ciotti. Mais Xavier Bertrand s'y oppose. Le 2 septembre, le président des Républicains, Christian Jacob a annoncé que « ce sont les militants qui trancheront lors du congrès le 25 septembre » si des primaires doivent avoir lieu et sous quelle forme. LR va donc procéder à une primaire de la primaire. La primaire d'Europe Ecologie-Les Verts (EELV) est déjà programmée et ses règles fixées. En septembre, elle sera numérique, faute de moyens pour l'organiser physiquement. Certains, au Parti socialiste, commencent à réclamer un processus similaire pour départager les candidats putatifs. Le premier secrétaire du PS, Olivier Faure, proposera une modification des statuts lors du congrès des 18 et 19 septembre à Villeurbanne pour réserver la primaire aux militants. La maire de Paris, Anne Hidalgo, en rupture avec les statuts du PS, a déjà fait savoir qu'elle n'était « pas favorable à un système de primaire ». Le 11 juillet, une démarche inédite et ouverte à tous, « La Primaire populaire » a été lancée par une poignée de citoyens engagés. Il s'agit d'un parrainage en ligne visant àfaire émerger une candidature commune à gauche. Sa particularité : les candidats ne choisissent pas de l'être. A l'origine, le système des primaires n'est pas dans la tradition politique française. Le premier à en avoir introduit l'idée fut Charles Pasqua en 1989, pour départager Valéry Giscard d'Estaing et Jacques Chirac. Ce n'est que depuis 2012, que le procédé a été fréquemment utilisé, à droite comme à gauche, avec des résultats mitigés : en 2012, il déboucha sur la sélection de François Hollande comme candidat du PS et de ses alliés, puis sur sa victoire finale. En revanche, en 2016 et 2017, les deux vainqueurs des primaires, à droite comme à gauche, François Fillon et Benoît Hamon, ne sont pas parvenus au second tour des présidentielles. Et le vainqueur de 2017 fut le candidat issu d'un gouvernement socialiste mais ayant fait le choix de se soustraire aux primaires de gauche, Emmanuel Macron... En août, la Fondation pour l'innovation politique a publié une étude des politologues Pascal Perrineau et Laurence Morel estimant que l'élection présidentielle de 2022 sera centrale pour l'avenir des primaires en France. Pour eux, « soit elles sont abandonnées avant d'être totalement entrées dans les mœurs, soit elles perdurent et un retour en arrière sera difficile. » Selon un sondage Ifop pour le Journal du Dimanche publié le 29 août, une majorité de Français se déclare en faveur de l'organisation de primaire : 59 % des personnes interrogées plaident pour l'organisation d'une primaire à gauche, et 58 % à droite.***APRÈS LA DÉROUTE ÉTATS-UNIENNE À KABOUL,Y AURA-T-IL UNE DÉFENSE EUROPÉENNE ?Le 2 septembre, les ministres de la Défense de l'UE ont évalué les premières conséquences du « fiasco » afghan et ils ont évoqué un nouveau format de projection. Il n'est pas ressorti de décision de leurs échanges à Kranj, en Slovénie, mais, selon les mots d'un diplomate européen, « la maturité collective s'accroît », en vue d'une autonomisation de l'Europe vis-à-vis de l'Otan et des Etats-Unis. Le président du Conseil européen Charles Michel avaitobservé : « l'Europe ne bouge que dans les crises. L'Afghanistan peut la réveiller. Le moment est venu d'être en mesure de la doter d'une force militaire capable de se battre si nécessaire. » Le chef de la diplomatie européenne Josep Borrell s'est exprimé dans le même sens, prédisant que « les prochaines crises seront en Irak et au Sahel ». Le concept d'une force dite de « première entrée » de plusieurs milliers de soldats, déjà avancé en mai dernier, a été de nouveau discuté, sans que soient évoqués ni chiffres précis, ni mode de décision d'engagement de ces troupes. Une des questions qui se posent est celle de l'unanimité. Compte tenu des traditions militaires et des sensibilités très différentes à travers le continent, l'on pourrait se diriger vers des coopérations renforcées ad hoc entre quelques Etats membres, en fonction des crises. Thierry Breton, commissaire au Marché intérieur, également en charge de la Défense et de l'Espace, estime que « l'Europe de la défense doit rentrer dans l'âge adulte » pour faire basculer le continent de « l'Europe marché » vers « l'Europe puissance ». Il propose de définir une doctrine européenne de sécurité et de défense pour établir les motifs d'intervention, un cadre institutionnel renouvelé qui inclurait un Conseil de sécurité européen et une force européenne de projection, qui impliquerait « un centre de commandement européen intégré ». Toutefois, les expériences passées ont montré que les meilleures idées ont du mal à se concrétiser. Les leaders européens avaient décidé, en 1999 à Helsinki, la création d'une force terrestre de 50.000 à 60.000 soldats qui n'a jamais vu le jour. Un système commun de groupements tactiques, composés chacun de 1.500 militaires, a été mis en place en 2007 pour répondre aux crises mais ils ne sont encore jamais intervenus car les gouvernements de l'UE n'ont pas pu se mettre d'accord sur la manière et le moment de les déployer. En 2018, les vingt-sept ont donné leur feu vert à une Initiative européenne d'intervention ainsi qu'à une implication croissante de l'Europe au Sahel et à la création d'un Fonds européen de défense doté de 8 milliards d'euros. Mais un certain nombre de pays, notamment en Europe orientale, craignent que l'édification d'une défense européenne ne se fasse au détriment de la relation avec le protecteur américain - et donc de leur sécurité.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

HappyToday - The Employee Experience Podcast
Recreating the IT walk-in experience through Virtual Tech bars, with Sophos

HappyToday - The Employee Experience Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 10:35


Do you have many people working in remote places where the IT walk-in experience is unavailable? Do some of you end-users feel like they are missing out on certain IT services that others are receiving? Sophos had this exact challenge. Specific end-users in remote locations, in countries where IT HQ was unavailable, were desperate to receive the walk-in experience for IT Incidents and Requests. After discovering this was a problem, Sophos worked on how to replicate this experience to all of their end-users - creating a Virtual Tech bar. Find out in this episode the challenges their end-users faced, the solution they implemented and how Sophos increased and maintained end-user Happiness. ------------------------------------------------- About HappySignals HappySignals is an Employee Experience Management platform for IT that makes experience data visible, understandable, and connected to operational data in IT, enabling enterprises to change their culture to be more open, outcome-focused, and data-driven. Established in 2014 and based in Helsinki, Finland, HappySignals discovers the experiences of over 2 million employees in 130 countries. Our customers have been able to make employees happier and increase productivity by 26% on average. ------------------------------------------------ Keep in contact Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HappySignalsLtd LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/happysignals/ Twitter: @HappySignalsLtd

Kubrick's Universe - The Stanley Kubrick Podcast
A Clockwork Orange with Shirley and Tony Jaffe

Kubrick's Universe - The Stanley Kubrick Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 76:20


Episode 47 : A Clockwork Orange with Shirley and Tony Jaffe Shirley Jaffe is a British actress who trained at the Central School of Speech & Drama in 1954. Among other early jobs, she was in the first British Theatre in the Round Company at Scarborough, with Stephen Joseph and later Alan Ayckbourn. Her film career began in the mid-'50s with Crime/Dramas The Passing Stranger in 1954, and The Secret Tent in 1956. Shirley was also a regular cast member of the long-running TV serial Emergency Ward 10 as Nurse Angela Foster in the late '60s, and in 1970 she appeared in Hammer's Taste the Blood of Dracula with the late great Christopher Lee. She appeared on television in the infamous Michael Jackson's Earth Song live performance at The Brits in 1996, and as a Greek nun in Little Britain Abroad. She's directed and acted in plays in Brighton, Edinburgh, The West End, and Helsinki festivals and recently played Irene in the award-winning British feature Ambleton Delight. She was nominated for a Star Award in the Brighton Fringe for her performance as "Nana" in the musical, Here Comes the Bride. More recently she appeared with her husband Tony in the music video to Spankox's “To The Club”. Her latest film is called Nurse Shirley Foster.  This is Kubrick's Universe and so…… in 1971 Shirley made an appearance in Stanley Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange, when she played a nurse who helps administer the first round of Ludovico's treatment to Alex DeLarge, of course played inimitably by Malcolm McDowell. Skybreak, the home she shared with her husband Tony, was also featured in the film, as the interior location for the scene in which Alex and his Droogs attack a writer and his wife (played by Patrick Magee and Adrienne Corri). Production Credits : Hosted by Jason Furlong / Researched and written by Stephen Rigg and Jason Furlong  / Theme written and performed by Jason Furlong / Produced and edited by Stephen Rigg / Contributions by Mark Lentz & James Marinaccio

Monocle 24: The Globalist
Tuesday 31 August

Monocle 24: The Globalist

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 60:00


The US withdraws from Afghanistan after almost 20 years; we discuss what lies ahead for Kabul. Also in the programme: Turkey and Greece's worry of a migrant wave, and why Helsinki may make English its third official language.

Museum Archipelago
95. The Museum of Technology in Helsinki, Finland Knows Even the Most Futuristic Technology Will One Day Be History

Museum Archipelago

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 11:31


In 1969, noticing that technological progress was changing their fields, heads of Finish industry came together to found a technology museum in Finland. Today, the Museum of Technology in Helsinki (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Museum_of_Technology,_Helsinki) is the only general technological museum in the country. But of course, technical progress didn't stop changing, as service coordinator Maddie Hentunen notes, and that can be challenging for a museum to keep up. In this episode, Hentunen describes the museum's philosophical stance on technology, how the museum balances industrial development with more open source design practices, and how the museum thinks about its own obsolescence. Topics and Notes 00:00 Intro 00:15 1969 in Technology 00:49 Maddie Hentunen 01:02 The Museum of Technology in Helsinki, Finland 02:34 The Museum's Building 03:51 Original Exhibits 04:50 Today's Exhibits 07:07 The Museum's Philosophical Stance on Technology 10:29 Outro | Join Club Archipelago

Fuera de Contexto - Podcast | Historias | Diseño
Las Investigaciones De Luis - El rol de los materiales en la producción del conocimiento

Fuera de Contexto - Podcast | Historias | Diseño

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 103:20


Luis Vega es un diseñador que explora y dedica su tiempo a la investigación a través del diseño. Entre otras cosas, este episodio exploramos las diferencias entre los diferentes tipos de investigación que utilizan al diseño como enfoque, exploramos el tipo de investigación que hace Luis y aprendemos más sobre el trabajo que está desarrollando actualmente en la Universidad de Aalto en Helsinki. Para conocer más sobre el trabajo de Luis visita: https://luis-vega.com https://www.aalto.fi/en/people/luis-vega

My Dear Kitchen In Helsinki
Interview With Amanda Hajnal On Slow Food Helsinki and Food System in Finland

My Dear Kitchen In Helsinki

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 68:59


My guest on the podcast today is Amanda Hajnal representing Slow Food Helsinki, one of the five local chapters of Slow Food International in Finland. In the episode, we first talked about the definition, the aims and the brief history of the slow food movement. Afterwards, we moved on to slow food Helsinki, and we spoke about their purposes, activities and members. In this part of the interview, we also talked about the local food system and the problems related to the food and food system in Finland and how slow food Helsinki approaches these issues. In the final part of the interview, we went back to the slow food movement in more detail. As usual, at the end of the episode, Amanda asked you, the listeners, a question! (Sound editing by my dear friend Ufuk Evcimen. Licensed music by Luca Palumbo.)

True Crime Finland
Episode 082 : Mikkelin panttivankidraama (Mikkeli hostage drama)

True Crime Finland

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 36:14


On the 8th of August in 1986, a man entered a bank office in Helsinki. With him, he had a sawn-off shotgun and a sports bag full of explosives. If you would like to help me with the costs of this podcast, you can do that on Patreon where you can donate as little as two dollars a month and in return, get exclusive access to ad-free and early episodes and other nice rewards. Visit the page at https://www.patreon.com/truecrimefinlandArt is by Mark PerniaMusic is "Night" by VVSMUSICPodcast swag store: https://www.redbubble.com/people/tc-finland/shop?asc=u Email: truecrimefinlandpod@gmail.com Website: https://truecrimefinland.squarespace.com Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/507039419636994/ Twitter & Instagram: tc_finland

D2R Podcast Network
The Rock Vegas Podcast - Dozer Some Big Titties In Helsinki, Georgia, Alaska

D2R Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 79:02


Dreem2Reality Entertainment presents The Rock Vegas Podcast.   On today's show: Ryan and Dave host! The guys start the show by watching some trailers for Infinite, iCarly, Spiral, Out of Death, Escape Room, Escape Room 2, and The Handmaids Tale. Then, the guys tackle some Rick and Morty Mad Lib jokes before jumping into an AGT update featuring Michael Winslow, Nick Diesslin, Pasha and Aliona, and Kevin Micoud. After that, the guys round out the show with a Mad Lib. Enjoy the eargasms!   Do you know how to read? Then, you should most definitely buy Dave's latest book, Love Me...Please, which is for sale on Amazon. Go to d2rpn.com, click the Amazon banner, search: Love Me...Please by Dave Block and buy it. (https://www.amazon.com/?ref_=assoc_tag_ph_1390604847723&_encoding=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&linkCode=pf4&tag=d2rpn-20&linkId=2dfed0cf338d959d501b4d77675de73f)   Do you have eyes and like to laugh? Then, be sure to check out The Rock Vegas Puppet Show on YouTube!! Don't forget to subscribe so you won't miss any future episodes. (https://tinyurl.com/rockvegaspuppetshow)   Please subscribe to the D2R Podcast Network on the Apple Podcast app and don't forget to rate and review while you're there. You can also find the D2R Podcast Network on any podcast streaming app. Just search: D2R PODCAST NETWORK and subscribe.   The guys would love to hear from you! Feel free to call the podcast hotline and have your voice heard on a future episode. Dial 872-242-8311 (USA-CHAT-311) and leave a message and we will play your voicemail and answer your questions live on an upcoming episode!   If you enjoy listening to The D2R Podcast Network, then spread the word to everyone you know. Your word of mouth is our best advertising method and we appreciate your support. Thanks for listening and share!

Brew Ha Ha Podcast
Anikó Lehtinen from Helsinki

Brew Ha Ha Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 28:41


Anikó Lehtinen is our guest on Brew Ha Ha with Steve Jaxon and Mark Carpenter today. We will talk about Sahti, the ancient Finnish national home brew style with Herlinda Heras in studio and with Anikó Lehtinen on the phone from Helsinki. But first, today's show has a couple of Preludes. Prelude No. 1: Chris DiMatteo has brought the audio of two old TV ads from the 1960s, for Italian Swiss Colony Wines, just to remind us of how awful the early tv commercials could be. There are plenty of cringe-worthy old beer ads too, and we will hear some of those soon. Prelude No. 2 Steve Jaxon remembers Tom T. Hall, who passed away just a few days before this episode was recorded. He wrote the song “I Like Beer” one of our unofficial anthems on Brew Ha Ha, and he also wrote the hit song Harper Valley PTA. Then at 6:46 the regular Brew Ha Ha episode starts. Our guest on Brew Ha Ha with Steve Jaxon and Mark Carpenter is Anikó Lehtinen, whom Herlinda Heras visited on her recent trip to Finland and Estonia. Anikó can be found on these social media platforms, here is her LinkedIn page, her Twitter account and her Instagram page. We record Brew Ha Ha in the 5:00 PM hour California time, and Anikó is 10 hours ahead where the local time is past 3:00 AM. Anikó Lehtinen is a journalist, radio producer and university lecturer who covers beer and other subjects. On her recent visit to Helsinki, Herlinda met Aniko, where they judged competitions together, visited breweries and met with brewers. While waiting to get a connection with Helsinki, we discuss the Sahti. This bottle that we are tasting is pasteurized, but mostly it is not pasteurized when it is brewed and served at home in Finland. It is a dark amber-colored uncarbonated brew that is flavored with juniper berry branches, or more recently, other flavors like birch and lingonberries. Mark notices that it is hazy and has no carbonation, so it is sold in milk cartons in Finland, because the package does not need to support the pressure of carbonization. Anikó describes how she got into the business of covering beer and the beverage business. She studied History at university and needed some work as a student, so she worked in some bars that served beer. Then she got an opportunity to build a training system at the biggest Finnish brewery. Here she got to know beer at all levels, including its styles and its history, and she finds it fascinating. Kipis! That's Cheers in Finnish. They are drinking the Sahti that Herlinda brought back, made by their friend Pekka. There are more than 120 breweries in Finland, mostly micro breweries, for a population of about 5.6 million, so beer is popular. Pekka did important work to preserve the habit of making Sahti, which Anikó describes.

HappyToday - The Employee Experience Podcast
#XLA - Traditional SLAs; Should I remove them?

HappyToday - The Employee Experience Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 16:23


Experience Level Agreements (XLAs) are the topic everyone's talking about. But does this mean you should be removing your ‘set in stone' SLAs and replacing them? SLAs have been labelled differently by ITSM thought leaders over recent years, bringing the question of whether or not they are serving a purpose to your IT organisation, or whether they are actually producing more harm than good. Sami, an avid supporter for removing SLAs, discusses with Pasi the importance of using the right metric for measurement - SLAs measure the process, XLAs measure the outcome and value. Furthermore, in this episode, we hear from Marte Thorbjønsen, the Director of IT Core Operations for Wilhelmsen group, and the decisions to remove SLA measurements from their Chat measurement. And if you thought that's all we could get into a 15-minute episode, we also hear from XLA Collab CEO, Alan Nance, discussing HappySignals Global IT Experience Benchmark report data on the impact of including rewards in your agreements with your Service Desk, instead of SLAs and sanctions. ------------------------------------------------- About HappySignals HappySignals is an Employee Experience Management platform for IT that makes experience data visible, understandable, and connected to operational data in IT, enabling enterprises to change their culture to be more open, outcome-focused, and data-driven. Established in 2014 and based in Helsinki, Finland, HappySignals discovers the experiences of over 2 million employees in 130 countries. Our customers have been able to make employees happier and increase productivity by 26% on average. ------------------------------------------------ Keep in contact Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HappySignalsLtd LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/happysignals/ Twitter: @HappySignalsLtd

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Cobras & Fire: Ron Keel Live At Rock N Pod 2021

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2021 64:35


Recorded live in Nashville Tennessee, the Metal Cowboy Ron Keel joins the program for a once in a lifetime event for Cobras & Fire. This one will make you smile. #ROCKNPOD From that first Steeler album to recent releases like “South X South Dakota” and “Fight Like A Band,” Ron Keel's 35-year career in entertainment has taken him from the concrete jungles of arena rock to the dirt roads of country music. Along the way, he has sold millions of albums and toured the world as both a heavy metal screamer (KEEL, Steeler, and a brief encounter with Black Sabbath) and a southern rock/outlaw country artist (with dozens of songs in major films and TV shows). For the past two decades, the Metal Cowboy has combined both genres, establishing a style and a persona which captures the heart and personality of this self-proclaimed rock n' roll outlaw.  Keel's legendary major label debut album THE RIGHT TO ROCK was produced by KISS' Gene Simmons – they went on to notch three albums on Billboard's Hot 100 as well as MTV and radio hits “The Right To Rock,” “Because The Night,” “Tears Of Fire,” “Somebody's Waiting,” and “Rock N Roll Outlaw.” Opening shows for Bon Jovi, Van Halen, Aerosmith, Motley Crue, Dio, Y&T, Queensryche and many more established a hard work ethic that remains strong today; the 2019/2020 World Tour included the Monsters Of Rock Cruise (Belize/Cozumel), Ron's first-ever tour of Australia, the Frontiers Rock Festival in Milan, Italy, the KISS & Rock N Roll Expo in Helsinki, Finland, casinos, fairs and festivals stateside, KEELFEST (featuring Keel, Ron Keel Band and Steeler) plus major bike events like the Sturgis Rally and Hot Harley Nights. After nearly three years hosting the “Streets of Rock & Roll” rock-and-talk syndicated radio show, Keel was handpicked to join a dream team of Midwest rock radio royalty on KBAD 94.5 FM, where Ron's “Mid-Day Mayhem” show skyrocketed to the top of the Neilson ratings for that region. He's now back on the “Streets Of Rock N Roll” with weekly broadcasts on PureRockRadio.net, TotalRock.com, 97Underground, Philly Rock Radio and RockRageRadio.com. As a songwriter, Ron has dozens of TV and film credits – major movies like “Men In Black II,” “Dolphin Tale,” “The Messengers” and many more – and his songs have been featured in hit TV shows like “X-Files,” “Desperate Housewives,” “The Simpsons,” “King Of The Hill,” and the Daytona 500 broadcast.  Ron Keel has worked hard to remain ahead of the curve, constantly re-inventing himself and evolving with the changes in the entertainment industry. His most recent venture is at http://patreon.com/ronkeel, where fans pay a monthly subscription fee and get all access to exclusive content and personal fan experiences. https://ronkeel.com/ https://nashvillerocknpodexpo.com/?fbclid=IwAR2KnIacEfN4GF8ch4ypH9W5AcE-3m_g_fBS72QFFGpyvq5XzKcQRCyTVUg Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Unstoppable Business Podcast
104 - Treat Your Startup Like A Marathon With Elina Arponen

Unstoppable Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 15:13


Quicksave Interactive is a new game studio in Helsinki, that recently raised $1.3 million to make HTML5-based social games to reach users on any platform. CEO Elina Arponen sits down with us to share with us why a startup is a marathon and not a sprint, the importance of timing when it comes to fundraising and the impact of talking to investors early on.

Kassenzone Podcast | Interviews zu den Themen E-Commerce, Handel, Plattformökonomie & Digitalisierung
K#354 Miki Kussi, CEO Wolt.com Besser & schneller als die Konkurrenz

Kassenzone Podcast | Interviews zu den Themen E-Commerce, Handel, Plattformökonomie & Digitalisierung

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 56:24


Miki Kussi hat mit seinem Unternehmen, Hauptquartier Helsinki, bereits über 700 Mio. Euro eingeworben und erobert mit seinem vertikal aufgestelleten Lieferdienst Stadt um Stadt, obwohl die Marktanteile eigentlich verteilit sein sollten. Warum ist das so? Warum funktioniert das inebsondere in Berlin so gut? Wie weit geht der Service bereits in Helsinki. Das alles gibt es im Podcast. Gardena Smart Produkte: https://www.gardena.com/de/produkte/smart/ Spryker Jobs: https://spryker.com/de/karriere/ Spryker On Air: https://spryker.com/de/onair/ Feedback zum Podcast? Mail an alex@kassenzone.de Disclaimer: https://www.kassenzone.de/disclaimer/ Alexander Graf: https://www.linkedin.com/in/alexandergraf/ https://twitter.com/supergraf Feedback zum Podcast? alex@kassenzone.de Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/KassenzoneDe/ Blog: https://www.kassenzone.de/ E-Commerce Buch: https://www.amazon.de/gp/product/3866413076/ Tassen kaufen: http://www.tassenzone.com

LeWimLex Show - E-Commerce Movers & Shakers
#55 Re-Inventing (Food) Delivery with Wolt Founder Miki Kuusi

LeWimLex Show - E-Commerce Movers & Shakers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 54:53


Nobody would have expected another "fight" for the food delivery customers in Berlin after the super expansive "the winner takes it all '' competition only some years ago. But here they are - Wolt - a unicorn from Helsinki, operating in over 20 countries with a verticalized delivery approach. They are winning market share with a superior customer experience. How are they able to do it? Will it be profitable? What will be the future of the “inner” city? Find all the answers in the podcast http://wolt.com http://spryker.com

Futucast
Mikko Kiesiläinen | Miten Helsinkiä tulisi kehittää? #204

Futucast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 60:41


Helsingin pormestari Juhana Vartiainen on nimennyt kaupungin historian ensimmäiseksi pääekonomiksi Futucastin friend of the show'n ja nykyisen triplavieraan, Vihreiden Mikko Kiesiläisen. Täydellinen tilaisuus kutsua Mikko uudestaan vieraaksi. Keskustelimme hänen kanssaan Helsingin kehittämisestä hänen tulevien kaupungin oman ekonomin lasien läpi, aiheista kuten Helsingin kehittämisestä, kaupunkikulttuurista, urbanisaatiosta, taloudesta, keskustasta, maahanmuutosta, Köpiksestä ja Tukholmasta, ja muista. ▶️ Jaksot videon kera Youtubesta: http://www.youtube.com/c/Futucastpodcast

Midnight Wisdom
Week 147: Dad and Jordan

Midnight Wisdom

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2021 3:12


I am replanning my trip to Vienna and Helsinki to go to Amman instead. It's a much better plan. 15.08.2021 Parents love us a lot, but sometimes people don't know how to love themselves.

New Books Network
Karen Sanctuaries: Memory, Biodiversity and Political Sovereignty

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 26:53


Seeds, plants and food can act as repositories of memory and identity, thus countering the alienation caused by displacement. How does this manifest in the case of Karen refugee communities across the world holding on to a connection to their homeland in Myanmar? And how is the Karen people's struggle for political sovereignty connected to global biodiversity and climate change issues? Terese Gagnon discusses these questions, as well as the role of the Karen territory as a biodiversity and political refuge, and how this has changed since the military coup in Myanmar in February 2021. Terese Gagnon is an incoming Postdoctoral Fellow on "Climate and Sustainability in Asia" at the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies. She holds a PhD in anthropology from Syracuse University. Her dissertation is about Karen food, seed, and political sovereignty across landscapes of home and exile. She is co-editor of the book Movable Gardens: Itineraries and Sanctuaries of Memory. Terese is in conversation with Quynh Le Vo, a master's student in environmental change and global sustainability at the University of Helsinki, who has recently spent a month in virtual residency at the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies. Previously, she has worked at the LSE Saw Swee Hock Southeast Asia Centre and at the Permanent Mission of Finland to the UN covering environmental and development questions. The Nordic Asia Podcast is a collaboration sharing expertise on Asia across the Nordic region, brought to you by the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (NIAS) based at the University of Copenhagen, along with our academic partners: the Centre for East Asian Studies at the University of Turku, Asianettverket at the University of Oslo, and the Stockholm Centre for Global Asia at Stockholm University. We aim to produce timely, topical and well-edited discussions of new research and developments about Asia. Transcripts of the Nordic Asia Podcasts: http://www.nias.ku.dk/nordic-asia-podcast About NIAS: www.nias.ku.dk Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Environmental Studies
Karen Sanctuaries: Memory, Biodiversity and Political Sovereignty

New Books in Environmental Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 26:53


Seeds, plants and food can act as repositories of memory and identity, thus countering the alienation caused by displacement. How does this manifest in the case of Karen refugee communities across the world holding on to a connection to their homeland in Myanmar? And how is the Karen people's struggle for political sovereignty connected to global biodiversity and climate change issues? Terese Gagnon discusses these questions, as well as the role of the Karen territory as a biodiversity and political refuge, and how this has changed since the military coup in Myanmar in February 2021. Terese Gagnon is an incoming Postdoctoral Fellow on "Climate and Sustainability in Asia" at the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies. She holds a PhD in anthropology from Syracuse University. Her dissertation is about Karen food, seed, and political sovereignty across landscapes of home and exile. She is co-editor of the book Movable Gardens: Itineraries and Sanctuaries of Memory. Terese is in conversation with Quynh Le Vo, a master's student in environmental change and global sustainability at the University of Helsinki, who has recently spent a month in virtual residency at the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies. Previously, she has worked at the LSE Saw Swee Hock Southeast Asia Centre and at the Permanent Mission of Finland to the UN covering environmental and development questions. The Nordic Asia Podcast is a collaboration sharing expertise on Asia across the Nordic region, brought to you by the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (NIAS) based at the University of Copenhagen, along with our academic partners: the Centre for East Asian Studies at the University of Turku, Asianettverket at the University of Oslo, and the Stockholm Centre for Global Asia at Stockholm University. We aim to produce timely, topical and well-edited discussions of new research and developments about Asia. Transcripts of the Nordic Asia Podcasts: http://www.nias.ku.dk/nordic-asia-podcast About NIAS: www.nias.ku.dk Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/environmental-studies

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 08.11.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 59:00


Pessimism of the Intellect, Optimism of the Will Bill Gates Partnered Chinese To Conduct Gain-Of-Function Research Delta Variant Far Less Deadly than Previous Variants, According to TrialSite Analysis CDC and Media Say 61% of Americans are Vaxxed, but Data Shows it is 32% What Will Segregated Society Look Like for the Unvaxxed? IPCC climate report: Profound changes are underway in Earth's oceans and ice – a lead author explains what the warnings mean Ohio judge orders man to get a COVID-19 vaccine as part of his sentence Youth, the pandemic and a global mental health crisis A Different World Order   Today's Videos 1.  Vaccine Stories  2. A MESSAGE TO THE EDINBURG CISD SCHOOL BOARD 3.AGUIRRE HAWAII COVID WHISTLEBLOWER 4. ARE PEOPLE DYING MISDIAGNOSED? DR. BRYAN ARDIS, DR. REINER FUELLMICH AND DR. WOLFGANG WODARG   Strawberries improve cognition in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of older adults Tufts University, August 8, 2021 According to news originating from Boston, Massachusetts, research stated, “Functional changes in the brain during ageing can alter learning and memory, gait and balance - in some cases leading to early cognitive decline, disability or injurious falls among older adults. Dietary interventions with strawberry (SB) have been associated with improvements in neuronal, psychomotor and cognitive functions in rodent models of ageing.” Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Tufts University, “We hypothesised that dietary supplementation with SB would improve mobility and cognition among older adults. In this study, twenty-two men and fifteen women, between the ages of 60 and 75 years, were recruited into a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in which they consumed either freeze-dried SB (24 g/d, equivalent to two cups of fresh SB) or a SB placebo for 90 d. Participants completed a battery of balance, gait and cognitive tests at baseline and again at 45 and 90 d of intervention. Significant supplement group by study visit interactions were observed on tests of learning and memory. Participants in the SB group showed significantly shorter latencies in a virtual spatial navigation task (P = 0.020,.p2 = 0.106) and increased word recognition in the California Verbal Learning test (P = 0.014,.p2 = 0.159) across study visits relative to controls. However, no improvement in gait or balance was observed.” According to the news editors, the research concluded: “These findings show that the addition of SB to the diets of healthy, older adults can improve some aspects of cognition, but not gait or balance, although more studies with a larger sample size and longer follow-up are needed to confirm this finding.” This research has been peer-reviewed.   Growing evidence of vitamin K benefits for heart health Edith Cowan University (Australia), August 10, 2021 New Edith Cowan University (ECU) research has found that people who eat a diet rich in vitamin K have up to a 34 percent lower risk of atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular disease (conditions affecting the heart or blood vessels). Researchers examined data from more than 50,000 people taking part in the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health study over a 23-year period. They investigated whether people who ate more foods containing vitamin K had a lower risk of cardiovascular disease related to atherosclerosis (plaque build-up in the arteries). There are two types of vitamin K found in foods we eat: vitamin K1 comes primarily from green leafy vegetables and vegetable oils while vitamin K2 is found in meat, eggs and fermented foods such as cheese. The study found that people with the highest intakes of vitamin K1 were 21 percent less likely to be hospitalized with cardiovascular disease related to atherosclerosis. For vitamin K2, the risk of being hospitalized was 14 percent lower. This lower risk was seen for all types of heart disease related to atherosclerosis, particularly for peripheral artery disease at 34 percent. ECU researcher and senior author on the study Dr. Nicola Bondonno said the findings suggest that consuming more vitamin K may be important for protection against atherosclerosis and subsequent cardiovascular disease. "Current dietary guidelines for the consumption of vitamin K are generally only based on the amount of vitamin K1 a person should consume to ensure that their blood can coagulate," she said. "However, there is growing evidence that intakes of vitamin K above the current guidelines can afford further protection against the development of other diseases, such as atherosclerosis. "Although more research is needed to fully understand the process, we believe that vitamin K works by protecting against the calcium build-up in the major arteries of the body leading to vascular calcification." University of Western Australia researcher Dr. Jamie Bellinge, the first author on the study, said the role of vitamin K in cardiovascular health and particularly in vascular calcification is an area of research offering promising hope for the future. "Cardiovascular disease remains a leading cause of death in Australia and there's still a limited understanding of the importance of different vitamins found in foodand their effect on heart attacks, strokes and peripheral artery disease," Dr. Bellinge said. "These findings shed light on the potentially important effect that vitamin K has on the killer disease and reinforces the importance of a healthy diet in preventing it." Dr. Bondonno said that while databases on the vitamin K1 content of foods are very comprehensive, there is currently much less data on the vitamin K2 content of foods. Furthermore, there are 10 forms of vitamin K2 found in our diet and each of these may be absorbed and act differently within our bodies. "The next phase of the research will involve developing and improving databases on the vitamin K2 content of foods. "More research into the different dietary sources and effects of different types of vitamin K2 is a priority," Dr. Bondonno said. Additionally, there is a need for an Australian database on the vitamin K content of Australian foods (e.g. vegemite and kangaroo). To address this need, Dr. Marc Sim, a collaborator on the study, has just finished developing an Australian database on the vitamin K content of foods which will be published soon. The paper "Vitamin K intake and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in the Danish Diet Cancer and Health Study' was published in the Journal of the American Heart Association. High BMI causes depression, both physical and social factors play a role University of Exeter (UK), August 9, 2021 A large-scale study provides further evidence that being overweight causes depression and lowers wellbeing and indicates both social and physical factors may play a role in the effect. With one in four adults estimated to be obese in the UK, and growing numbers of children affected, obesity is a global health challenge. While the dangers of being obese on physical health is well known, researchers are now discovering that being overweight can also have a significant impact on mental health.  The new study, published in Human Molecular Genetics, sought to investigate why a body of evidence now indicates that higher BMI causes depression. The team used genetic analysis, known as Mendelian Randomisation, to examine whether the causal link is the result of psychosocial pathways, such as societal influences and social stigma, or physical pathways, such as metabolic conditions linked to higher BMI. Such conditions include high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In research led by the University of Exeter and funded by the Academy of Medical Sciences, the team examined genetic data from more than 145,000 participants from the UK Biobank with detailed mental health data available. In a multifaceted study, the researchers analyzed genetic variants linked to higher BMI, as well as outcomes from a clinically-relevant mental health questionnaire designed to assess levels of depression, anxiety and wellbeing. To examine which pathways may be active in causing depression in people with higher BMI, the team also interrogated two sets of previously discovered genetic variants. One set of genes makes people fatter, yet metabolically healthier, meaning they were less likely to develop conditions linked to higher BMI, such as high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes. The second set of genes analyzed make people fatter and metabolically unhealthy, or more prone to such conditions. The team found little difference between the two sets of genetic variants, indicating that both physical and social factors play a role in higher rates of depression and poorer wellbeing. Lead author Jess O'Loughlin, at the University of Exeter Medical School, said: "Obesity and depression are both major global health challenges, and our study provides the most robust evidence to date that higher BMI causes depression. Understanding whether physical or social factors are responsible for this relationship can help inform effective strategies to improve mental health and wellbeing. Our research suggests that being fatter leads to a higher risk of depression, regardless of the role of metabolic health. This suggests that both physical health and social factors, such as social stigma, both play a role in the relationship between obesity and depression." Lead author Dr. Francesco Casanova, of the University of Exeter Medical School, said, "This is a robust study, made possible by the quality of UK Biobank data. Our research adds to a body of evidence that being overweight causes depression. Finding ways to support people to lose weight could benefit their mental health as well as their physical health." The study, titled "Higher adiposity and mental health: causal inference using Mendelian Randomisation," is published in Human Molecular Genetics.   Protective effects of saffron compound against amyloid beta-induced neurotoxicity Guangdong Medical University (China), August 4, 2021 According to news reporting from Dongguan, People's Republic of China, research stated, “Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a most common neurodegenerative disorder worldwide. Because of its complex pathogenesis, the prevention and therapies of AD still are a severe challenge.” The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from Guangdong Medical University, “Evidence suggested that crocin, the major component of saffron, exhibited neuroprotective effects in AD. As such, in this study, N2a/APP695swe cells were enrolled to investigate the effects of crocin on endogenous A beta-induced neurotoxicity. Crocin (100 and 200 mu M) could ameliorate cytotoxicity according to CCK-8 assay and reduce apoptosis in line with Hoechst 33,342 staining and Annexin V-FITC/PI double staining in N2a/APP695swe cells. Reduced ROS generation and elevated MMP were found in N2a/APP695swe cells treated with crocin (100 and 200 mu M). Additionally, crocin at concentrations of 100 and 200 mu M inhibited the release of cytochrome and attenuated caspases-3 activity in N2a/APP695swe cells. Furthermore, succinylation, crotonylation, 2-hydroxyisobutyrylation, malonylation, and phosphorylation were significantly reduced, while a slight increase of acetylation was found in 100-mu M crocin treated N2a/APP695swe cells.” According to the news reporters, the research concluded: “Taken together, crocin may be a promising natural product candidate for the effective cure of AD.” This research has been peer-reviewed.   Microbes have potential to reverse aging in the brain University College Cork (Ireland), August 10, 2021 Microbiome Ireland, a world leading SFI Research Centre, have found that aging-associated changes in the immune system of old mice were reversed by the transfer of gut microbiota from the young mice. The researchers saw improved behavior of older mice in several cognitive tests for learning, memory and anxiety. Credit: Clare Keogh Research from APC Microbiome Ireland (APC) at University College Cork (UCC) published today in the leading international scientific journal Nature Agingintroduces a novel approach to reverse aspects of aging-related deterioration in the brain and cognitive function via the microbes in the gut. As our population ages one of the key global challenges is to develop strategies to maintain healthy brain function. This ground-breaking  research opens up a potentially new therapeutic avenues  in the form of microbial-based interventions to slow down brain aging and associated cognitive problems.  The work was carried out by researchers in the Brain-Gut-Microbiota lab in APC led by Prof John F. Cryan, Vice President for Research & Innovation, University College Cork as well as a Principal Investigator at APC Microbiome Ireland  an SFI Research Centre,  based in in University College Cork and Teagasc Moorepark. There is a growing appreciation of the importance of the microbes in the gut on all aspects of physiology and medicine. In this latest mouse study the authors show that by transplanting microbes from young into old animals they could rejuvenate aspects of brain and immune function. Prof John F. Cryan, says "Previous research published by the APC and other groups internationally has shown that the  gut microbiome plays a key role in aging and the aging process. This new research is a potential game changer , as we have established that the microbiome can be harnessed to reverse age-related brain deterioration. We also see evidence of improved learning ability and cognitive function". Although very exciting Cryan cautions that "it is still early days and much more work is needed to see how these findings could be translated in humans".   APC Director Prof Paul Ross stated that "This research of Prof. Cryan and colleagues further demonstrates the importance of the gut microbiome in many aspects of health, and particularly across across the brain/gut axis where brain functioning can be positively influenced. The study opens up possibilities in the future to modulate gut microbiota as a therapeutic target to influence brain health" The study was led by co-first authors Dr. Marcus Boehme along with Ph.D. students Katherine E. Guzzetta, and Thomaz Bastiaansen. Even quick meditation aids cognitive skills Yale University & Swarthmore College, August 7, 2018  College students who listen to a 10-minute meditation tape complete simple cognitive tasks more quickly and accurately than peers who listen to a "control" recording on a generic subject, researchers at Yale University and Swarthmore College report. The study, published in the journal Frontiers of Neuroscience, shows even people who have never meditated before can benefit from even a short meditation practice. "We have known for awhile that people who practice meditation for a few weeks or months tend to perform better on cognitive tests, but now we know you don't have to spend weeks practicing to see improvement," said Yale's Hedy Kober, associate professor of psychiatry and psychology and senior author of the study. The research team headed by Kober and Catherine Norris at Swarthmore randomly divided college students into two groups. One group listened to a 10-minute recording on meditation prior to performing cognitive tests and the second group listened to a similarly produced tape about sequoia trees. Both groups were then given simple tasks designed to measure cognitive dexterity. Those who listened to the meditation recording performed significantly better, across two studies. There was one exception, however. Those who scored highest in measurements of neuroticism—"I worry all the time"—did not benefit from listening to the meditation tape. "We don't know if longer meditation sessions, or multiple sessions, would improve their cognitive scores, and we look forward to testing that in future studies," Kober said.   Physical activity protects children from the adverse effects of digital media on their weight later in adolescence University of Helsinki (Finland), August 9, 2021   Children's heavy digital media use is associated with a risk of being overweight later in adolescence. Physical activity protects children from the adverse effects of digital media on their weight later in adolescence. A recently completed study shows that six hours of leisure-time physical activity per week at the age of 11 reduces the risk of being overweight at 14 years of age associated with heavy use of digital media. Obesity in children and adolescents is one of the most significant health-related challenges globally. A study carried out by the Folkhälsan Research Center and the University of Helsinki investigated whether a link exists between the digital media use of Finnish school-age children and the risk of being overweight later in adolescence. In addition, the study looked into whether children's physical activity has an effect on this potential link. The results were published in the Journal of Physical Activity and Health. More than six hours of physical activity per week appears to reverse adverse effects of screen time The study involved 4,661 children from the Finnish Health in Teens (Fin-HIT) study. The participating children reported how much time they spent on sedentary digital media use and physical activity outside school hours. The study demonstrated that heavy use of digital media at 11 years of age was associated with a heightened risk of being overweight at 14 years of age in children who reported engaging in under six hours per week of physical activity in their leisure time. In children who reported being physically active for six or more hours per week, such a link was not observed. The study also took into account other factors potentially impacting obesity, such as childhood eating habits and the amount of sleep, as well as the amount of digital media use and physical activity in adolescence. In spite of the confounding factors, the protective role of childhood physical activity in the connection between digital media use in childhood and being overweight later in life was successfully confirmed. "The effect of physical activity on the association between digital media use and being overweight has not been extensively investigated in follow-up studies so far," says Postdoctoral Researcher Elina Engberg. Further research is needed to determine in more detail how much sedentary digital media use increases the risk of being overweight, and how much physical activity is needed, and at what intensity, to ward off such a risk. In this study, the amount of physical activity and use of digital media was reported by the children themselves, and the level of their activity was not surveyed, so there is a need for further studies. "A good rule of thumb is to adhere to the physical activity guidelines for children and adolescents, according to which school-aged children and adolescents should be physically active in a versatile, brisk and strenuous manner for at least 60 minutes a day in a way that suits the individual, considering their age," says Engberg. In addition, excessive and extended sedentary activity should be avoided.

Politicology
Directed Energy Attacks and Leadership Lessons with Marc Polymeropoulos

Politicology

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 58:14


To access this episode's Politicology+ segment and unlock more exclusive content, visit: https://politicology.com/plus Fmr. Senior CIA Official Marc Polymeropoulos and author of Clarity in Crisis: Leadership Lessons from the CIA joins Ron Steslow to discuss Havana Syndrome, his struggle for treatment, and what he learned about leadership in 26 years at the CIA.  (01:14) Marc's 26 year CIA career (03:40) “Easily the most terrifying night of my life”  (04:58) Moscow's motivation for directed energy attacks (09:56) The CIA's “call to arms” after the 2016 election (12:44) Fighting for treatment (16:29) Becoming a leader in times of crisis (25:03) What happened in Helsinki? (29:27) Morale—and dysfunction—through the Trump presidency (33:26) When former senior officials speak out, listen (36:46) Leadership principles versus the former president (41:00) Identifying leaders among political candidates (43:56) Protecting democracy domestically (48:30) Showing and sharing the world with Marc's family [Politicology+ Exclusive] Proliferation of nationalism overseas, and the American affinity for the authoritarian right // Unlock now and get exclusive content on your private podcast feed at politicology.com/plus Clarity in Crisis: Leadership Lessons from the CIA by Marc Polymeropoulos Politicology is supported by listeners like you. Pitch in now at https://politicology.com/donate. Follow Ron and Marc on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RonSteslow https://twitter.com/Mpolymer

Podcast Fandom
Episode 669: Money Heist: S1E1/S1E2

Podcast Fandom

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2021 28:10


Here's free access to the first two episodes of our Premium Money Heist (part 1) coverage. You can hear the rest of the season and more by subscribing to our Patreon. Stop me if you've heard this one before. Berlin, Tokyo, Helsinki, Oslo, Denver, Moscow, Nairobi, and Rio walk into the Royal Mint of Spain...

Earth Wise
Record Heat Across the Globe | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 2:00


While the Pacific Northwest was setting new records for high temperatures in June, many other places across the globe also experienced unprecedented heat.  Places in Russia and Scandinavia, including locations above the Arctic Circle, set new records for temperature. The heatwave in Europe was the result of a persistent northward bulge in the polar jet […]

Priorité santé
Priorité santé - Les amputations

Priorité santé

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 48:30


Jusqu'au début du XXème siècle, les amputations ont été pratiquées dans un contexte de risque vital pour sauver la vie du blessé. Aujourd'hui, les progrès de la médecine et de la chirurgie ont permis de limiter le  nombre de ces amputations, notamment en situation d'urgence. La décision n'est plus toujours le fait d'une nécessité absolue, mais peut éventuellement présenter un meilleur résultat fonctionnel. (Rediffusion) Comment se déroule une amputation ? Pourquoi les amputations sont-elles fréquentes chez les sujets diabétiques ? Qu'est-ce que la douleur du membre fantôme ? À quel moment doit-on débuter la rééducation ? Comment vivre avec une prothèse ? Dr Patrick Knipper, chirurgien spécialiste en Chirurgie plastique et en Chirurgie de la main à l'Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou de Paris. Président d'Interplast-France Chirurgie Sans Frontières, ONG de chirurgie réparatrice dans les pays en voie de développement Maurice Mabanza, prothésiste, directeur adjoint de CPH-KIKESA, centre professionnel pour handicapés. KIKESA signifie courage, force, détermination de vaincre un obstacle à Kinshasa en RDC Anareme Kpandressi, orthoprothésiste de formation, responsable pédagogique du Département de formation de l'École nationale des auxiliaires médicaux de Lomé (Enam) à Lomé au Togo et membre du Bureau fédéral de la Fédération africaine des professionnels de la réadaptation (FATO). L'École de Lomé est la seule structure de formation en Afrique francophone reconnue par la Société internationale des orthoprothésistes qui fabrique les prothèses dans différents services d'appareillage et de rééducation en Afrique Maëlle Lintz, amputée à l'âge de 14 ans à cause d'un cancer des os à la cheville. Elle a remporté 2 médailles de bronze, lors des European Para Youth Games en natation handisport à Helsinki, en Finlande.

Discovery
Whatever happened to…those Covid-19 stories

Discovery

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2021 53:28


Whatever happened to those sniffer dogs who were seeking out any passengers infected with Covid-19 at Helsinki airport? And did plans to sample sewage to spot outbreaks early prove successful? This week on The Evidence, we have listeners' questions about some of the clever ideas which were in the news early on in the pandemic but we haven't heard about for a while. Trials of treatments like the cheap steroid dexamethasone proved successful – but what about the anti-parasite medication, ivermectin, which has sparked fierce debate on social media? Because of its role in our body's immune system, researchers wondered if Vitamin D might be useful in preventing Covid infections or treating people in hospital. We hear about some of the flaws in those studies – and the role which genetics plays in how much Vitamin D there is in our bodies. Nasal sprays have been used for colds and flu to help shorten how long you are ill for and reduce the symptoms – can we achieve the same result for Covid infections by using a spray which contains seaweed? Vaccination is key to ending the pandemic – but have all of the vaccines bought by countries like the United States been used? And what will happen to any which are left over, can they be given to countries which desperately need them? Once enough people are vaccinated or have immunity from being infected we should reach the magical “herd immunity” level where there aren't enough people vulnerable to infection for Covid-19 to spread. We hear how new variants of the virus could mean that number will grow – making it more difficult to bring the pandemic to an end. Claudia Hammond's panel of experts will guide you through some of the ideas which have been tested like nasal sprays and nicotine patches – to separate the duds from the winners – as well as highlight others which could still prove to be promising. Claudia's expert panel includes global health epidemiologist from the University of Boston, Professor Matthew Fox; from The Netherlands Professor Marion Koopmans who's Head of the Erasmus MC Department of Viroscience in Rotterdam, who was a member of the WHO's mission to Wuhan in China earlier this year to investigate the origins of Covid-19; Vice Dean of the Faculty of Intensive Care Medicine Dr Danny Bryden, who's a Consultant at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals; medical journalist Clare Wilson from New Scientist Magazine. Produced by: Paula McGrath, Samara Linton and Maria Simons Studio Engineers: Jo Longton

Brew Ha Ha Podcast
Mark Carpenter in studio and Herlinda Heras in Helsinki, Finland

Brew Ha Ha Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 27:46


This week Brew Ha Ha is 2 parts. Mark Carpenter tells about his career with Anchor Brewing in San Francisco. Then Herlinda Heras is in Finland and calls us from Helsinki. Mark Carpenter begins his story with his quest for a more interesting career as a young man in San Francisco in 1971, and proceeds through his first encounter with owner Fritz Maytag, his fortuitous hiring, a description of the facilities, their brewing process, the success of Anchor Steam Beer and several other cool stories from those years. It's a great 9=minute summary of a very interesting story. At the 9-minute mark, Herlinda Heras joins Steve Jaxon and Mark Carpenter on the telephone from Helsinki, Finland. As Herlinda Heras calls in from Helsinki, Finland, it is the late afternoon California time so it is the middle of the night in Helsinki. Herlinda is there to be a judge in the Finland national brewing competition and also the Sahti competition. (Sahti is the old-time Finnish style of home brew.) She is enthusiastic about Finland for many reasons, including their social system as well as their brews. Russian River Brewing Co. is also open at both sites, in Santa Rosa on 4th Street and in Windsor. Herlinda brought a dry-hopped Pliny the Elder in a can, to Finland. She was at the Windsor location and a famous drag racer from NHRA was there with a race car for pictures.  Herlinda describes judging Sahti. It is the oldest brewing style in the world. Unfortunately Skype had glitches so the call is shortened. Harry Duke and Mark Carpenter then discuss the trends in beverages, including hard seltzer. Mark Carpenter remembers Zima, he mentions Bartles & James wine coolers. "They come and go," says Mark. He's not a fan. Harry mentions that some companies have continued to make them because they are easy to make. The success of the product depends more on marketing because the product is rather plain. AB has stopped making theirs. Mark Carpenter says that you never know what the next big thing will be. He suggests that lighter craft Pilsners may begin to appear. Possibly, part of the reason for that is that IPAs became such a contest in how much hop flavor you can put into the product. There would be a natural swing back in the other direction, from brewers that "... are all trying to out-hop each other." Liberty Ale and Sierra Nevada Pale Ale, and Hen House, are excellent alternatives. Mark's personal belief is that craft beer is here to stay. Once you drink those, you're not going back to the major brands. It's like getting into espresso coffee; you don't go back to regular coffee because there is too much flavor there. Mark would like to see the beers get down to about 5% alcohol. Beer drinkers like to drink volume but don't want to get inebriated. This is like English lagers, you can drink them and not get too intoxicated. Some brewers are also making non-alcoholic beers. Those are nice for people who like a refreshing beverage but don't want alcohol. Some of the "Daytime" beers (such as one by Lagunitas) are very popular. Harry points out that the flavor of the beer is what makes it, and domestic light beer have none. Once you get used to beer with a genuine flavor and body, you don't go back. This is why the major brewers are investing in craft beer. Mark Carpenter says that Coors' Blue Moon is an example of a good one, made by a major producer.

Un Mensaje a la Conciencia
Una medalla de oro obtenida y otra merecida

Un Mensaje a la Conciencia

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 4:01


(Día del Deporte Ecuatoriano) El 26 de julio de 1996, compitiendo en la marcha de veinte kilómetros de los Juegos Olímpicos celebrados en la ciudad de Atlanta, Georgia, en los Estados Unidos de América, Jefferson Pérez, cuencano de veintidós años, obtuvo la primera medalla olímpica en la historia del Ecuador, ¡y resultó ser la de oro! «No sé si voy a ganar, pero para no ganar tendrán que matarme», había dicho antes del inicio de la competencia. De ahí que el Presidente de la República lo declarara Héroe Deportivo Nacional, le otorgara dos condecoraciones y enviara al Congreso Nacional un proyecto de ley para darle una pensión vitalicia. Y por si eso fuera poco, en su honor se bautizó con su nombre un complejo deportivo en Cuenca, se le erigió una estatua en Guayaquil, y el gobierno ecuatoriano instituyó, desde 1997, el 26 de julio como el Día del Deporte Ecuatoriano.1 Sin embargo, esa no fue su primera medalla internacional. En el Mundial de Bulgaria de 1990 obtuvo la de bronce, y dos años más tarde ganó el título mundial juvenil en Seúl, Corea del Sur. Y la medalla de Atlanta tampoco habría de ser su última conquista de un título internacional. Fue tricampeón mundial en Francia 2003, en Helsinki 2005 y en Osaka 2007. Por eso en el 2007 la agencia Prensa Latina, la BBC de Londres y Fox Sports lo declararon el mejor deportista de Latinoamérica.2  Con semejante trayectoria de victorias merecidas, era de suponerse que al año siguiente Jefferson Pérez tendría la dicha de recibir su segunda medalla dorada olímpica. Pero en Pekín 2008 tuvo que conformarse más bien con la de plata, cediendo la de oro al ruso Valeriy Borchin. Y para colmo de males, debido a que se comprobó que Borchin abusaba de sustancias que le permitieron tomar ventaja ilegal en sus competencias, al atleta ruso lo despojaron de sus títulos mundiales de 2009 y 2011, ¡pero no de la medalla de oro de 2008! Así que, a pesar de lo ingenuo que es creer que Borchin no hizo trampa para superar a Pérez en Pekín, Borchin logró salirse con la suya y privar al consagrado atleta ecuatoriano de una merecida segunda medalla de oro olímpica.3 En síntesis, el lema triunfal de Jefferson Pérez Quezada es: «El día que comienzas a creer que lo imposible no existe, ese día empiezas a vivir.» Y la visión de la fundación que lleva su nombre consiste en ser propulsores activos de la construcción de una sociedad justa y equitativa en la que todas las personas, sobre todo niñas, niños y adolescentes de escasos recursos económicos, vivan y se desarrollen en un mundo más humano, solidario, sin discriminación, con igualdad de oportunidades, en un marco de formación y protección integral de derechos.4 No debiera sorprendernos entonces que Pérez manifieste que lo que sintió como resultado de su triunfo en 1996 «no fue una felicidad por haber ganado, sino una felicidad por haber encontrado una paz, por desarrollar el talento que Dios [le] dio»; y que también nosotros podemos lograr eso «[si tenemos] claro lo que [queremos] en la vida y [si tenemos] extremadamente claro que somos un instrumento con un talento que Dios nos dio para beneficio de los demás».5 Carlos ReyUn Mensaje a la Concienciawww.conciencia.net 1 «Ecuador recuerda 20 años de la hazaña olímpica de Jefferson Pérez», Diario El Universo, 26 julio 2016 En línea 16 marzo 2020. 2 Frank Maridueña, «La medalla de oro que merece Jefferson Pérez», Diario El Universo, 9 abril 2016 En línea 16 marzo 2020. 3 Ibíd. 4 Fundación «Jefferson Pérez Quezada» En línea 16 marzo 2020. 5 «Las vivencias de un campeón, Jefferson Pérez», Diario El Universo, 1 diciembre 2011 En línea 16 marzo 2020.

The Lindsey Elmore Show
Daily health choices of an Olympian | Bryan Clay

The Lindsey Elmore Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 47:32


Bryan Clay is a two-time Olympic Medalist, author, entrepreneur, husband and father of 3. A track and field athlete, he is known for his determination, dedicated work ethic, strong faith, and passion for giving back. During his time at Azusa Pacific University, he received 23 All-American honors and helped his team sweep the 2002 NAIA indoor and outdoor track and field titles. His exceptional skill and hard work took him to the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens, where he captured the silver medal, followed by winning the decathlon at the 2005 World Championships in Helsinki. Clay posted his third U.S. championship at the 2008 Olympic Trials and went on to the Beijing Games, where he won the gold medal and title of World's Greatest Athlete. For his efforts on and off the track, he has been recognized with numerous awards, including the 2008 Jesse Owens Award, the 2009 Jim Thorpe All-Around Award, and the 2011 Humanitarian of the Year Award. His book, ‘Redemption: A Rebellious Spirit, a Praying Mother, and the Unlikely Path to Olympic Gold,' tells the story of the most unlikely Olympic decathlete in history. More than just a sports memoir, the book details the drudgery, devastation and ultimate conversion that led him to become a world champion. Topics covered in this episode: • The mindset and the journey of a world class athlete. • Things that need to be put into place for success. • Pushing through adversity. • Lessons that shaped an Olympian's life. • About Eat the Frog Fitness To learn more about Bryan Clay and his work, head over to www.bryanclay.com, www.eatthefrogfitness.com & IG @bryanclay Oola is about making the commitment to change, and then going through the growth that it takes to change into a better person. It helps you set a series of small goals. To join our next meeting, head to www.lindseyelmore.com/oola Wellness Made Simple is a new subscription platform; a one-stop-shop for everything you need to know about how to course correct or how to prevent symptoms from happening in the first place. Head over to www.wellnessmadesimple.us to sign up today. We hope you enjoyed this episode. Come check us out at www.lindseyelmore.com/podcast.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Veg Out

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 161:07


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by talking with listeners about the rising death toll of unvaccinated Americans, and whether it's time for mandatory vaccines. Michael Curry explains how communities of color were disparately impacted by the COVID-19 crisis, and shares his thoughts on mandating vaccines. Curry is the president and CEO of the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers and a member of Governor Charlie Baker's COVID Vaccine Advisory Group. He's also a Member of the National NAACP Board of Directors, and the Chair of the Board's Advocacy & Policy Committee. Corby Kummer talks about the introduction of lab-grown foie gras, and the growing number of fine dining establishments eliminating meat from their menus. He also touches on non-compete agreements in the fast food industry. Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Rick Steves discusses catastrophic flooding in Germany, and measures to slow the effects of climate change in Europe. He also shares his experience visiting a working-class Helsinki sauna, calling for tourists to incorporate more local spots into their travels. Steves is an author, television and radio host and the owner of the Rick Steves' Europe tour group. You can catch his television show, "Rick Steves' Europe," weeknights at 7:30 p.m. on GBH 2 and his radio show, “Travel With Rick Steves,” Sundays at 4 p.m. on GBH. Revs. Irene Monroe and Emmett G. Price III share their thoughts on the treatment of Black academics in higher education across the U.S., focusing on the outcry following Price's dismissal from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary. They also talk about the NFL's decision to play “Lift Every Voice and Sing” before each game in the 2021-2022 season. Monroe is a syndicated religion columnist, the Boston voice for Detour's African American Heritage Trail, and a visiting researcher in the Religion and Conflict Transformation Program at the Boston University School of Theology. Price is the founding pastor of Community of Love Christian Fellowship in Allston. Together, they host GBH's All Rev'd Up podcast. Then, we ask listeners if they've switched to a plant-based diet. Profs. Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt weigh in on the state of democracy following restrictions on voting rights. They also talk about their recent Atlantic piece, “The Biggest Threat to Democracy is the GOP Stealing the Next Election.”Levitsky is the Director of the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies at Harvard University. Ziblatt is the Eaton Professor of the Science of Government at Harvard University. They're the authors of “How Democracies Die”. They're currently working on a follow-up of their book.

The Lawfare Podcast
Lawfare Archive: Julia Ioffe and Ian Bremmer on the Trump-Putin Summit

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2021 41:08


From the Lawfare Archive, July 17, 2018: U.S. President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin met in Helsinki for their first one-on-one summit, where the U.S. president said that he trusted the Russian president's denial of election interference over his own intelligence community. In the United States, furor followed on both sides of the aisle. To break down what happened and what it means, Alina Polyakova sat down with Julia Ioffe, correspondent at GQ and long-time Russia observer, and Ian Bremmer, president of the Eurasia Group, to talk about why nobody else was in the room with Trump and Putin during their over-two-hour, one-on-one meeting; what Russia's kompromat on Trump really might be; and whether this summit actually moved the needle in U.S.-Russia policy. What was gained and what was lost? Was this a win for Putin? An embarrassment for Trump? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.