Podcasts about potentially

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  • 1,640PODCASTS
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  • Jun 27, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about potentially

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Latest podcast episodes about potentially

The Exceptional Sales Leader Podcast
Playing The Longer Game Is The Key

The Exceptional Sales Leader Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 16:38


If you have been in sales for any length of time, you would have come across the slick sales person and sales leader - constantly operating with a sense of urgency and focusing on closing, closing, closing. Whilst they are hungry to get the deals done, they also have more of a short term focus, almost instant gratification. If the deal can't be closed today, it won't be closed at all - move onto the next deal. And how does this make the potential customer feel? Potentially like a pawn in the salesperson's game, and unlikely to seek to engage in the future. We see this everywhere in society today - buy now, pay later, don't wait, get it now, whatever it takes. And we certainly see it in organisations where the senior leaders drive unrelenting focus on short term results, whether that be month to month or quarter to quarter. Why? In many cases, it is because their short term bonuses are linked to the short term results. Hence this drives behaviour. There is a different way and there is a better way.

Weekend Shows
Ken and Curtis- Has Rafael Devers leapfrogged Jayson Tatum as the biggest superstar in Boston?

Weekend Shows

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 40:47


Hour 1- Potentially the hour of lists… Ken comes up with a list of the Faces of Boston Sports and then changes the name about 16 times. Bradfo is in for Curtis and they discuss if Devers has leaped Jayson Tatum as the current face of Boston Sports.

FITSNews Week in Review
Contested Elections, Murdaugh Federal Future, Gubernatorial School Investigation- Week In Review 6/24/22

FITSNews Week in Review

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 28:23


Its been lonely here at FITSNews HQ this week with our founding editor Will Folks soaking up the rays (and possibly grease from fried fish). Easy, ladies In Will's absence we've pulled out all the stops to put together a great show for you. I'm most excited for you to see the special report put together by our researcher extraordinaire Jennifer Wood on the potential for federal involvement in the Murdaugh murders crime and corruption saga.But before we debut Jenn's special report I walk you through two other important developments: the fallout from last week's partisan primaries and a new way for the governor to hold Palmetto State school district leaders accountable.S.C. Attorney General candidate Lauren Martel led a “MAGA slate” protest of her partisan primary loss. Martel was soundly defeated in her bid against third-term incumbent attorney general Alan Wilson.Martel's protest was centered around the failure of election workers to be administered an oath required by law. While I am in support of following all laws that legitimize our elections, I characterized Martel's challenge as “frivolous” in this week's episode.I gave slightly more credence to house district 43 candidate Mark Corral, who announced late Tuesday night that he too was submitting a letter disputing the election. Unlike Martel, Corral lost by a far narrower margin of 139 votes (or 3.84 percent) to incumbent Randy Ligon.Corral protested the relocation of precinct polling places because he alleged that one location was moved outside of an adjacent precinct in violation of S.C. Code §7-7-910.Both Corral and Martel had to prove that their races would have turned out differently had the issues they cited not occurred, and none of the candidates who challenged their primary results were able to cross that evidentiary threshold in a hearing held before the S.C. GOP executive committee on Thursday evening.I then moved on to the run-off election in the Republican primary between candidates Ellen Weaver and Kathy Maness for the state superintendent of education position.Potentially more important for the day-to-day operation of S.C. schools is how governor Henry McMaster‘s investigation into  Richland School District Two proceeds in the coming weeks.Following months of allegations of improprieties by district leadership, the governor has formally requested that S.C. state inspector general Brian Lamkin investigate the district and provide him with a report of his findings.We end the episode with FITSNews researcher Jennifer Wood's special report on RICO charges and what would need to happen for them to be applied in the Murdaugh case.

Information Morning from CBC Radio Nova Scotia (Highlights)
Our house doctor talks about a potentially less invasive way to detect cancer

Information Morning from CBC Radio Nova Scotia (Highlights)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 8:02


There's a new, cutting-edge procedure to detect cancer. It's called a liquid biopsy. Dr. Peter Lin tells the CBC's Preston Mulligan how it works, and why it soon could become a go-to procedure in cancer medicine.

Podcasts Doug & Wolf
Wolf & Luke discuss the Suns potentially going after Eric Gordon

Podcasts Doug & Wolf

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 40:20


Luke and Kyle Vanden Bosch discuss the Suns' reported interest in Eric Gordon and who will be the next Keim time sign. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Doug & Wolf Show Audio
Wolf & Luke discuss the Suns potentially going after Eric Gordon

Doug & Wolf Show Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 40:20


Luke and Kyle Vanden Bosch discuss the Suns' reported interest in Eric Gordon and who will be the next Keim time sign. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Locked On Knicks - Daily Podcast On The New York Knicks
RUMOR: Are The New York Knicks The Favorite For Kyrie Irving? Should They Want Him? With Locked On Nets' Adam Armbrecht

Locked On Knicks - Daily Podcast On The New York Knicks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 39:39


Kyrie Irving is many things. One of the most skilled players to ever touch a basketball who scores effortlessly and has the ability to dominate on the biggest stages? Check. Potentially utterly destructive to a young locker room? Also check. Herein lies the conundrum the New York Knicks face when considering whether or not they should pursue Irving who according to reports is at somewhat of a standstill in contract negotiations with the Brooklyn Nets. Gavin Schall is joined by Locked On Nets Co-Host Adam Armbrecht to discuss if Irving's talent is worth the trouble, what the Knicks would need to give up to facilitate a potential trade, the state of both franchises and much more! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Pressing Pause
#101 The (potentially harmful) message of self-development books

Pressing Pause

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 13:10


The podcast has had a refresh! And I've kept what you love about it – bitesize episodes packed with insight and inspiration, tools and top tips on how you can bring more calm and joy into your day right now. For this episode we're looking at the message that you have to hit rock bottom before you can justify taking care of your own needs and wants.  In this episode I share: The external conditioning we're given that convinces us to struggle on The dangerous path that takes us down Why now is actually the ideal time to take action  Resources: This is your last chance to join The Calm Mind Club! The doors are open to new members until 30 June and they won't reopen again before the Club closes at the end of 2022. So to get six months access to the incredible wealth of resources and support click here to find out more and join  If you enjoy the podcast I'd love you to leave a review on iTunes so that others can find it too If you value what I share in the podcast, and elsewhere, you can buy me a virtual cuppa here 

Startup Savants
What is an Anti-CRM? with Reuben Swartz of Mimiran

Startup Savants

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 66:26


Reuben Swartz is the founder and CEO of Mimiran, a CRM (customer relationship manager) specifically designed for solo consultants. Reuben worked as a consultant himself and wanted a tool for managing clients. Although these tools were abundant for large enterprises, he could not find a tool that met his needs and was made for a one-man team. So, Reuben built the tool himself and created Mimiran. Episode Notes Reuben's story creating his own business [1:00]“There's a right tool for the right situation” so you don't need to compete with the multimillion dollar companies [3:31]The power of being authentic rather than mimicking other successful companies in the industry. Focus on helping others rather than selling [5:40]What is a CRM? [8:48]Reuben's anti-CRM is a tool entrepreneurs can use to easily track and manage sales and marketing information [12:10]Situate yourself in the market so that you can dominate a particular niche [18:45]If there isn't a tool out there that does it all, create it yourself [22:40]Narrowing your target audience and listening to their needs will help you create the best solution for the group you serve [32:35]Build a feedback loop with your customers to drive changes and establish priorities [35:12]Attempting to balance a new startup while starting a family [36:16]Pick an easy problem to solve [41:18]The decision to work as a one-man team [43:01]Mimiran is a lifestyle business. Reuben's family is his number one priority and his business is number two. [46:38]How is Mimiran funded? You don't need to be a unicorn business to find success and be happy [46:48]The danger of prioritizing money and prestige rather than finding joy in the work you do [48:43]Stop selling and focus on connecting and solving problems with others [51:34]Talk to the people who are most likely to buy what you are selling. Don't try to attract everybody [58:02]Potentially creating a CRM customized for individual niches [1:00:25]Reubens advice for entrepreneurs “find a niche and become the go-to person in that niche” [1:05:02]Get more exciting entrepreneur content and podcast exclusives on StartupSavant.com. Watch Startup Savant founder interviews on  YouTube!Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, and LinkedIn. 

JACC Speciality Journals
JACC: CardioOncology - Prevalence of Cardiovascular Disease in Patients With Potentially Curable Malignancies: A National Registry Dataset Analysis

JACC Speciality Journals

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 7:56


Wellington Mornings with Nick Mills
A potentially major conflict of interest by Grant Robertson

Wellington Mornings with Nick Mills

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 9:41


New Zealand Herald Wellington business editor Jenée Tibshraeny sheds some light on a potentially major conflict of interest created by finance minister Grant Robertson, and how the cost of importing petrol has hit a new record.LISTEN ABOVE 

Deliver The Profile
Deliver The Profile Episode 221: Chiraq

Deliver The Profile

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 78:27


The boys' trip to Chicago concludes in a weird episode about an unsub killing at the behest of an Internet radio show. Hey, we don't write this shit. Potentially more interesting is a subplot in which Rossi meets with his third ex-wife because she wants him to attend his daughter's wedding. The thing is, the husband to be might be an unsub in the making. Can Rossi stop the wedding in time? Seriously, we're doing this.

James Tylee from CyberFM
Jonny Fry / James Tylee of Digital Bytes by Team Blockchain on Cyber.FM featuring Brian O'Beirne Research Director Kasei PLC

James Tylee from CyberFM

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 52:41


Welcome to this week's edition of Digital Bytes. In this edition of Digital Bytes we have analysis on the following topics: NFTs and SSI: unlocking a new gaming experience - non-fungible tokens (NFTs) and self-sovereign identity (SSI) combined unlock a whole new gaming experience. In summary, NFTs are a fantastic way to capture uniqueness and scarcity, whereas SSI is perfect for storing and updating characteristics, especially when those characteristics are specific to the player. Here's how. Is blockchain technology changing the travel industry? - globally, the travel industry is the largest employer of any industry and, like many industries, has been embracing blockchain technology - driving greater efficiencies for the industry. Blockchains are currently being used to build decentralised platforms which help solve some of the challenges for the holiday sector and also provide an alternative to traditional online travel agencies. The impact blockchain technology has in the retail sector - reduced costs, increased transparency, improved security and faster transactions are some of the benefits that come with the inculcation of blockchain with the retail industry. Whilst some players in the industry are already toying with the technology, a few startups are looking at an outright change to what retail means - devoid of the problems facing the wider market. What impact will blockchain technology have on the retail industry in the coming years? Distributed networks and the growth of the stakeholder economy - existing models of decentralisation are mere waypoints in the evolution of more advanced blockchain architectures. Potentially, the endpoint of this evolution is distributed networks where the traditional structure of blockchain networks (with miners and validators performing consensus for end users) is collapsed into a more meritocratic network, with each user playing an active role in validating the network state. Once again thank you for your comments and feedback and do keep sending us suggestions of topics for us to cover in future articles. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jtylee/message

Steve and Ted in the Morning
Flooding at Yellowstone potentially affecting tourism

Steve and Ted in the Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 4:40


Fox News' Jeff Monosso joins Steve and Ted with the latest on national parks and flooding at Yellowstone.

Finding Genius Podcast
How You Can Prepare Yourself For Potentially Unstable Societal Conditions

Finding Genius Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 41:17


In this episode, we chat with Joseph Lynch, the owner and CEO of Survival Living LLC. Survival Living is a company that is committed to equipping its clients with the skills necessary to face any uncertainties that the future may hold. As someone that has been interested in survival and self-sustainable living practices for most of his life, Joseph sits down with us to share his thoughts about the future stability of our society.  Listen in to hear about: Joseph's background, and what inspired him to prioritize survival and preparation strategies.  How to be prepared for the future by keeping a stock of particular items on hand. How you can adjust your habits to accommodate higher gas prices. A practical amount of food to have at the ready. Offer: This episode is sponsored by Viome. Use the code GENIUS to get an extra $20 off on Health Intelligence Test. Check it out now: Viome What are the benefits of preparing yourself for unstable economic conditions? Joseph Lynch is here to give us answers. To learn more about Joseph Lynch and Survival Living, visit survivallivingguide.com and youtube.com/c/SurvivalLiving. Episode also available on Apple Podcast: http://apple.co/30PvU9C

GlobalCryptoPress.com - Cryptocurrency News Live
As Bitcoin Mining Companies Enter 'Unprofitable' Territory a Potentially MASSIVE Profitable Play Opens Up...

GlobalCryptoPress.com - Cryptocurrency News Live

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 4:03


Cryptocurrency News Live and Breaking in Real-Time! Current crypto coin prices, analysis, and predictions from the Global Crypto Press Association. https://www.globalcryptopress.com/2022/06/as-bitcoin-mining-companies-enter.html tweetCORZwe even covered@TheCryptoPressBreaking Crypto NewsHomeherefacebooktwitterlinkedininstagrampinterestrsshere

Sustainable Winegrowing with Vineyard Team
137: The Pierce's Disease and Glassy-winged Sharpshooter Board

Sustainable Winegrowing with Vineyard Team

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 22:58


Invasive pests and diseases are a challenge for all grape growers. Research is vital to develop new strategies and solutions. The Pierce's Disease/Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter Board was established nearly two decades ago to allocate funding to the most promising research projects. Kristin Lowe, Research Coordinator at the Pierce's Disease and Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter Board and President of Vine Balance Consulting shares how projects are funded through a rigorous scientific review and screening panel. Also, learn about some of the most exciting projects including “pathogen confusion” to control Pierce's Disease from Dr. Steve Lindow and a gene editing technology for grapevines using plant protoplasts Dr David Tricoli. References: 89: New Pierce's Disease Vaccine (podcast) 2021 Pierce's Disease Research Projects at a Glance 2021 Pierce's Disease Research Symposium Proceedings 2021 Pierce's Disease Research Symposium session recordings 2022-07-16 Night Harvest Lighting & SWEEP Grants Tailgate About the PD/GWSS Board Biological Control of Pierce's Disease of Grape by an Endophytic Bacterium CDFA Pierce's Disease Research Symposium SIP Certified Sustainable Ag Expo November 14-16, 2022 Vine Balance Consulting Get More Subscribe wherever you listen so you never miss an episode on the latest science and research with the Sustainable Winegrowing Podcast. Since 1994, Vineyard Team has been your resource for workshops and field demonstrations, research, and events dedicated to the stewardship of our natural resources. Learn more at www.vineyardteam.org. Transcript Craig Macmillan  0:00  I'm your host Craig Mcmillan. And with me today is Kristin Lowe, president of Vine Balance Consulting, and research coordinator for the Pierce's Disease Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter Board. Welcome, Kristin.   Kristin Lowe  0:12  Thank you so much for having me.   Craig Macmillan  0:13  First off, can you tell us what is the Pierce's Disease and Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter Board or the PDGWSS? As I want to call it from now on?   Kristin Lowe  0:21  Absolutely. So the PDGWSS Board is a group of California growers or grower producers. There's 14 board members and also one public member. And their primary goal is to make sure that all of the assessment funds that are received to the board go to the most promising research for our most challenging pests and diseases today. Those that are designated as important problems.   Craig Macmillan  0:48  And so the funding comes from an assessment.   Kristin Lowe  0:50  That is correct. So the assessment, I believe, on average is about $1.50 per $1,000 of grapes in terms of value .The most, the cap is at $3 per 1000 grapes in value. But yes, that's collected every year and has been so since the board started back in 2001.   Craig Macmillan  1:13  What led to the creation of the board?   Kristin Lowe  1:15  Pierce's Disease. So. Well, I think anyone who's looked into the history of Pierce's Disease, so this is a bacterial disease, endemic to California, not not necessarily new to California, right. But what was new to California was not only the establishment, but the fact that the Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter started thriving down in Southern California. That is the vector for Pierce's Disease. That insect exists in parts of Mexico and also parts of Florida and the Southeast US. But it got to California, and it started doing really well to the point that Pierce's disease started taking off. This led to a lot of sad looking pictures of dead vines, lots of concern over lost acreage, and this would be during the late 1990s or so. And in response to this, industry leaders from all different groups came together. A combination of industry USDA, UC California researchers, CDFA, to create the Pierce's Disease Control Program. And that's got many facets, but one of it is the PDGWSS Board, which whose mission is to fund the most important research to combat Pierce's Disease, Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter and all the other pests that they've designated in their RFP.   Craig Macmillan  2:31  Yeah. And so the the mission is expanded now beyond just Glassy-Wing to a number of other invasive pests that correct?   Kristin Lowe  2:37  Yeah, it has it has. And there's, there's a clear path for that. And I think what really blew that open was the European Grapevine Moth. So another invasive pest species that showed up, oh, gosh, and I think that was somewhere around 2011 or so maybe a little bit before, but agriculture always has a new bad guy. And so we needed a way for the for the PDGWSS board to, you know, expand what it was going to fund in terms of research to deal with new problems and, and continuing ones that keep coming back.   Craig Macmillan  3:08  So what exactly is your role with the board?   Kristin Lowe  3:11  Sure. So, they put out a call for proposals for a research coordinator last year, and I got the job, very excited. And so my goal is to kind of basically help guide the program to make sure that what we're funding is really on point to, to our goal, on point to making sure that the research is heading in the right direction, it's we get continual progress, and is also able to collaborate with, you know, get foster collaboration with other agencies, we have this general sense that we've been going since 2001. And there's been a lot of really great research going on for Pierce's Disease. These days, our problems might be different. And so the RFP expanded, also to include grapevine viruses. And those seem to be a real multi headed monster, for the industry for many levels. So I think that while my overall goal is just to make sure that the research funding program is focused and relevant, we're starting to look a lot more closely at visruses.   Craig Macmillan  4:20  And RFPs  is Request for Proposals?   Kristin Lowe  4:22  Correct RFP is the request for proposals.   Craig Macmillan  4:25  Okay, so academics, scientists, will write up a proposal of what they want to do research wise, and they bring it to the board, and the board, evaluates them and decides, hey, would give some money to this, we'll give some money to that.   Kristin Lowe  4:39  Yes, absolutely. So we coordinate with other funding agencies and for the wine industry and actually for the whole wine and grape industry, not just in California, but in Oregon as well. And we all put out a request for proposals on the same date, December 1. And that after a couple months that closes and we look atthe proposals and they go through the PDGWSS Board, they go through scientific review, pretty stringent scientific review, and then also our research screening panel process. And ultimately, the Board makes the final decision on what gets funded within that year.   Craig Macmillan  5:14  Cool. So tell us about some of these projects. I mean, it's been 20 years. What's happened? What are some of the ones that you are excited about? Or remember are really proud of?   Kristin Lowe  5:23  Yeah, oh, there's so many. And I am I am so nervous about like glossing over things or missing details that I'm going to take this opportunity to tell everybody that there's some great resources on our website that you can, that you can look at to get more details. And that is cdfa.ca.gov/PDCP/research. And on there you can look at, there's a document that says projects at a glance, just great layman's layman person summaries of all of the research has been going on. There's our entire research symposium proceedings, and some recordings as well of   Craig Macmillan  6:05  Yes,   Kristin Lowe  6:06  ... recent one. So, you know, because this is public assessment money, this information should be available to everyone in the industry. So we work really hard to keep that website updated.   Craig Macmillan  6:16  And we will have links to all of those on the page.   Kristin Lowe  6:19  Okay, cool. Cool. Cool. Okay, so some science.   Craig Macmillan  6:23  Yes!   Kristin Lowe  6:23  Have you heard Dr. Steve Lindow talk about his work on Paraburkholderia?   Craig Macmillan  6:29  No, I haven't.   Kristin Lowe  6:31  You haven't? I thought he I thought he presented at this Sustainable Ag Expo a few years ago, but maybe I'm mistaken.   Craig Macmillan  6:37  No, he may have been I may not have been there.   Kristin Lowe  6:40  Yeah, yeah. So Dr. Steve Lindow, is at UC Davis. And he made a crazy exciting discovery, there is a endophytic bacteria called Paraburkholderia phytofirmans, I'll just call it like, Paraburkholderia. That's enough of a mouthful.   Craig Macmillan  6:57  That's enough, yeah.   Kristin Lowe  6:58  And it inhibits the movement of xylella fastidiosa. So of the Pierce's Disease controlling or the organism responsible for Pierce's Disease, within the vine. So this endophytic bacteria, if you put it in the vine, at the same time, that's Xylella, in there, it not only moves throughout the vine, so it becomes systemic, but it inhibits the movement of the pathogen. So this is kind of huge. This species has been looked at before for for other reasons. But what this basically is, we're hoping that it leads to, is an infield treatment with an endophytic bacteria. So his work has involved figuring out, first of all the mechanism. But second of all, the practical aspect of this, which is what I love about it. It seems to work best when the two organisms are there together. So there's a timing of you know, do we pre inoculate with endophytic bacteria, and then it gets Xylella. That works. Or if a vine has been infected with Xylella, and then you are able to treat it with a Paraburkholderia. It also helps to not only the reduce the Xylella count, but reduce symptoms.   Craig Macmillan  8:14  How do you introduce it this thing into the vine?   Kristin Lowe  8:18  Oh, right. Yeah, first of all, with a pinprick basically. So an inoculation, I don't think everyone out there is going to want to go through and inoculate every vine. So they are working on a sprayable formulation. And to be able to actually get that into the vine, as well. And it seems to work with certain types of surfactants. So that's kind of where that technology is at is, you know, how do we create, you know, how do we create a usable product with it? What's going to work the best in the field? What's, what's the most practical in terms of rate, and timing? And in getting the endophytic bacteria into the vines?   Craig Macmillan  8:54  That's, that's amazing. That's definitely amazing. Endophytic bacteria is something that lives inside the plant.   Kristin Lowe  9:00  Yes, it is naturally there, there are 1000s of them and 1000s have been tried to see if they first of all actually move throughout the plant rather than in just the place that you found them. And second, if they are going to work against any sort of pathogens. Yeah, an amazing discovery and work that's been going on for for years and is I believe, is finally in the stages of getting to field trials and seeing how it would work. But imagine if you could go out to your block that you know is going to get pressure every year and think that you could decrease that pressure with with a spray. Never, I mean PD kills vines, that's huge. And in areas with constant pressure, it kills just more and more every year. So to have that sort of infield treatment is pretty exciting.   Craig Macmillan  9:45  Is this the kind of project that would receive funding over many years or multiple years from the board?   Kristin Lowe  9:49  Absolutely. And I don't remember when it first started. Definitely preceded my time there, but I think I've been following it since at least 2016.   Craig Macmillan  9:52  Oh, wow. Okay.   Kristin Lowe  9:52  No, it takes time from you know, discovery not only to making sure it's going to work, and then and then there's all this stuff after to get it actually implemented. But most of these projects that are going to result in a long term sustainable solution, or long term projects, you need years of data to make sure that they're gonna work.   Craig Macmillan  10:17  Science takes time.   Kristin Lowe  10:19  It takes time. I know, we're always impatient about that. But it does definitely take time.   Craig Macmillan  10:25  And support.   Kristin Lowe  10:26  Yeah, yeah.   Craig Macmillan  10:27  What's, what's something else that you're excited about?   Kristin Lowe  10:30  Okay, another one that's pretty exciting and groundbreaking is work by Dr. David Tricoli. And he's at the UC Davis Plant Transformation Facility. Have you heard of him at all?   Craig Macmillan  10:42  No, no.   Kristin Lowe  10:43  Okay. So he's doing has done something that might sound simple, but it opens up a wealth of options for future research. He's developed a cell culture method for regenerating a grapevine from a cell Protoplast. So you might remember back from biology, major differences between animals and plants. Plants are surrounded by a cell wall, animal cells, plant cells. Animal cells are not. When some of the like gene editing technology is coming out that's happening in animal cells, it's a lot easier to do, because they don't have the cell wall. Previous to this work, no one's been able to regenerate a grapevine from just a Protoplast. Without a cell wall. What this work has done is enabled there to be a platform of getting a group of grape cells together, just their protoplasts without the cell wall, onto which you could potentially do CRISPR Cas9, or some of the other fast developing gene editing techniques that are out there.   Craig Macmillan  11:45  This this is a technology I've heard repeatedly, and I'm I have no idea what the acronym stands for. And I'm not really sure I understand what it does. So what is CRISPR? Yeah,   Kristin Lowe  11:55  and I'm not going to tell you exactly what the acronym stands for either. To me, but so Cas9 is is a gene editing technology that allows for very, very precise small changes in a gene or in a genome. Ultimately, when done for plants by multiple steps later, it can result in a plant that's retained this small edit, but has absolutely no foreign DNA. And unlike a traditional GMO, that would have external DNA from a plasmid or from some other plant, this one is I can kind of think of it as like a lucky or benevolent mutation occurred. And you can't tell but it was purposeful. And and the result is a different phenotype that, that you can see. CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing is it's been out there for a number of years now. But it's taken time for everyone to develop different platforms for which it could work. For plants, especially for plants that are always regenerated by cuttings. So we don't do crosses to get new grapes, we take cuttings, we need a platform to possibly be able to do this. What this work has done is developed that platform. Where it could go it completely depends you need to you need to know which you know which genes to edit, which ones are going to reduce, are going to result in a phenotype. Obviously, what's fascinating, or what's most interesting to me is disease resistance that's usually complex multigenic. So we're still a ways down there from coming up with a with a solution. But the fact that the platform was developed, was actually a major breakthrough.   Craig Macmillan  13:35  That's phenomenal. So that's research that was done. It's gonna open the door for new research?   Kristin Lowe  13:40  Potentially, exactly. I mean, you can hear about CRISPR-Cas9 and the news happening to everything else, but but not the crop you're interested in until someone figures out that they're all different. Right?   Craig Macmillan  13:52  Right, right. What, is their other pests that have come into the catalogue that you think are interesting in that people are doing interesting work on?   Kristin Lowe  13:59  Our most recent designated past is the Spotted Lantern Fly, we do not have that one yet. Depending on who you ask it seems inevitable that's making its way steadily west from Pennsylvania. And so that's one that the Board and has its eye on for for sure. But we don't have it yet, but we're accepting proposals for it. Because we're trying to be ready. It's actually pretty rare that you can eradicate a, an invasive pest. The fact that California did it with a European Grapevine Moth is it is an amazing example. What's next right? Yeah, so Spotted Lantern Fly is probably next on our horizon is being something that would certainly be problematic if it got here, and you know, trying to stay ahead about research to understand how it would and could be controlled.   Craig Macmillan  14:52  Does the does the board fund research in states other than Oregon and California?    Kristin Lowe  14:56  The board funds researchers. So we do have PIs from from out of state and from not from the West Coast. Absolutely. The Board funds projects, obviously, they have to have some applicability to what we're, what our problems are and what we're concerned with. But yeah, there's no real state, state by state guideline.   Craig Macmillan  15:16  Right. Right. Right. Well, you know, you mentioned the review process. I just want to shift gears to that. What are the boxes that need to be checked or the hurdles that need to be cleared to get a project funded? What are the what are the criteria that the board and the written in the reviewers are looking for?   Kristin Lowe  15:31  Oh, sure. Well, I believe it's even just out there when we send up the call for proposals. But it just basically has to be really good science. It needs to be well, you know, well justified that there's either preliminary data or an excellent premise from a different crop. Or another reason why this idea would work. There have to be sound and detailed materials and methods that are laid out there has to be good experimental design, especially when you get to the field level, right, proper controls, proper replication, the stats will have to work, right, all of those things, the budget needs to be reasonable, all those sorts of things for sure.   Craig Macmillan  16:09  Which reminds me how much money is available each year?   Kristin Lowe  16:12  It varies. So it will it will depend on on the assessment. And I'm not the numbers person, I'm more the idea person. But I yeah, I have something that could find a figure for you for later. But I think over the 20 years, I believe I read that we have had up to somewhere between 60 and 70 million. But that's not all straight for research. It also goes to the Person's Disease control program treatments for battling Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter outbreaks and some of those control.   Craig Macmillan  16:44  So what is the one thing related to this that you would recommend to our listeners? How can we how can we help?   Kristin Lowe  16:51  Oh, that's a great question. How can you help. Well, stay stay engaged. Make sure that everyone all the way up the chain knows what your problems are. And and what, you know what what you really need. This is grower money, that for this particular funding program, there are other agencies out there that are simply donation only, not for profit. But I would say, so this is assessment money so it's a little bit unique. But I would say in general, your problems are not unique. And, I mean, we all we're all dealing with some of the same problems. And we have to come together as an industry to, you know, industry to help solve them. A, stay informed, work with researchers. One of the hardest things is for researchers to find field trials or fields that will let them come do some experimentation. They're always looking for industry partners, as sources of sick vines, helping to track patterns, helping to try new technology, just to collect data. Collaborators like that are always needed.   Craig Macmillan  17:57   I think that's some great encouragement. I think that's a great message. Don't be afraid to be a collaborator.   Kristin Lowe  18:01  Yeah, yeah, absolutely. It gives you kind of a seat at the table. And researchers aren't growers. And so we need to have this kind of constant communication for there to be good outreach of what they found, to make sure it's applicable and that everyone understands it and and will adopt it too. The most frustrating thing is if something comes out, and people are slow to adopt it, even though it works. So staying informed about what's current, and what are what are new, good ideas.   Craig Macmillan  18:27  I think that's important. So pay attention.   Kristin Lowe  18:30  Yeah, get out there to grow our meetings and and industry meetings. And, yeah, a lot of these researchers do try very hard to do outreach. They hear you if you're if you're there and are showing up for the conversation.   Craig Macmillan  18:43  If I wanted to be a collaborator, how can I make myself available?   Kristin Lowe  18:46  Oh, gosh, that's a good question. Well, first of all, you would need to know what was going on. So you would need to need to, you know, go to meetings, listen to these people talk, you know, decide if you have similar problems. Almost all of them pass up their email and say, Look, yeah, I've got a place where I've got this, this issue going on. I've you know, been dealing with virus or I've been near dealing with Pierce's Disease. And do you need a field? You know, do you need data set? Some sort of field data or collaboration or a field site? Yeah.   Craig Macmillan  19:16  Well, that's fantastic. That's great advice. Where can people find out more about you?   Kristin Lowe  19:21  Oh, me personally? Okay, well, sure. I've been I started a consulting company almost 10 years ago, and my website is vinebalancedconsulting.com. I am largely based out of the Napa-Sonoma area, and keep in my toe in the research world because it's exciting. And viticulture is a science. That's one reason why I love it.   Craig Macmillan  19:44  It's nice to talk somebody loves science. Yeah. I love talking about science. It's so much fun. Well, I think it's time today I want to thank Kristin Lowe, who is the Research Coordinator for the Pierces Disease/Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter Board and President of Vine Balance Consulting. Check out the website we'll have links and notes of where to go and we look forward to talking to you again.   Kristin Lowe  20:08  You're most welcome. Thank you for the opportunity. Have a great growing season.   Transcribed by https://otter.ai

Howard and Jeremy
HJS HR 1 - Is Jordan Poyer potentially the first of many familiar faces leaving the Bills soon?

Howard and Jeremy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 44:09


06-14 HJS HR 1 - Howard and Nate discuss the possibility of a large roster turnover on the horizon for the Bills.

Leafs Lunch
Mirtle on if the Leafs could potentially walk away from any of their RFAs

Leafs Lunch

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 13:30


The Athletic's James Mirtle joins Julia and Al's Brother to talk about if he thinks the Leafs will overhaul their goaltending, what it would cost Leafs to move Mrazek, if the Leafs will qualify all of their RFAs, and Justin Holl's future with the Leafs.

Blood Red: The Liverpool FC Podcast
Blood Red: Liverpool's €100m Darwin Deal Ahead Of Potentially Club-Record Signing & Erling Haaland Similarities

Blood Red: The Liverpool FC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 32:15


As Liverpool close in on a potential €100m club-record deal for Benfica forward Darwin Nunez, the Blood Red podcast reacts. Guy Clarke is joined by Ian Doyle, David Lynch and Tom Cavilla to analyse and debate the deal which is set to bring the Uruguayan to Anfield. On the day Erling Haaland is unveiled as a Manchester City player too, the panel debate the similarities between to Premier League giants both signing No.9s following their latest titanic title race. Enjoy.Get exclusive podcasts direct to your inbox every week for FREE by joining the Blood Red Club. Sign up at http://www.bloodredpodcast.co.ukWatch and subscribe to our Blood Red videos on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/BloodRedLiverpoolFCJoin our Blood Red podcast group on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1656599847979758/

Locked On MLB
Red Hot Braves and a Potentially Confusing NL Playoff Picture. Monday Crossover with Millard Thomas

Locked On MLB

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 36:27


The Red Hot Braves are starting to defending their title with an eye popping winning streak. Meanwhile the Guardians are also learning to win again. And David Ross, Cubs manager, was out of line conplaining about unwritten rules. It is a Monday Crossover with Millard Thomas Follow Millard on Twitter @creatorthomas 24 Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. LinkedIn LinkedIn Jobs helps you find the candidates you want to talk to, faster. Did you know every week, nearly 40 million job seekers visit LinkedIn? Post your job for free at LinkedIn.com/LOCKEDONMLB. Blue Nile Make your moment sparkle with jewelry from Bluenile.com, and LOCKED ON SPORTS listeners get $50 off purchases of $500 or more using code LOCKEDON. Athletic Greens To make it easy, Athletic Greens is going to give you a FREE 1 year supply of immune-supporting Vitamin D AND 5 FREE travel packs with your first purchase. All you have to do is visit athleticgreens.com/MLBNETWORK Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Planet Today
Wetlands vs. our changing climate, the USPS potentially increasing its electric truck fleet, & more! 

The Planet Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 29:31


Nick is back in the studio for his first episode since May 20!Matt and Nick talk about the results of No Mow May in the UK (‘It looks beautiful': UK gardeners on leaving lawns uncut for No Mow May | Gardens | The Guardian),The Rio Grande River drying up and its impact on local communities (The Vanishing Rio Grande: Warming Takes a Toll on a Legendary River - Yale E360),The USPS is reconsidering its decision to not buy many EVs (US Postal Service signals it will order more electric trucks | The Hill),And wetlands - another important puzzle piece in fighting climate change (Planting Wetlands Could Help Stave Off Climate Catastrophe - Eos)!

The Healthy Rebellion Radio
Protein For 2 Meals A Day, Erections, Functional Dyspepsia | THRR112

The Healthy Rebellion Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 30:11


Make your health an act of rebellion. Join The Healthy Rebellion Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here News topic du jour: Democratic Senators call on messaging apps WhatsApp, Telegram, and Signal to address “misinformation” Obesity in late adolescence and incident type 1 diabetes in young adulthood   Podcast Questions: 1. 2 Meals A Day [12:05] Ryan says: Huge fan of sacred cow. I like eating 2 meals a day but after listening to book I'm trying to increase my protein to 180 to 200 grams a day. I'm 6'1 210 lbs. Is it beneficial to eat 90 grams in each meal or is that two much for my body to process correctly for optimal absorption? Should I spread it out? Thanks 2. Putative blood flow issues [15:40] Charles says: Hi Robb and Nicki, long-time listener here. I have been following Robb since I was 18, almost ten years ago! Thank you for your work. Background: 6 feet tall, male, 142 lbs, 28 years old. Lenient paleo diet for almost 10 years supplemented with 0.5-1 packet LMNT daily depending on weather/exercise load, generally great sleep hygiene, devote a lot of effort to getting in the sun every day, weights 2x/week, 45 min bike ride at least 2x/week. Recent blood work came back excellent (just the standard LDL, HDL, Hem A1C, Vit D, thyroid stimulating hormone, hepatic enzymes). I do seem to have issues with circulation though, which I think may be related to the problem I describe below. My extremities go numb easily, and when it's cold I have a few finger tips that lose color/sensitivity for extended periods of time after the others have returned to normal temperature. The problem: My erections have decreased in strength noticeably in the past two years. The problem usually isn't so severe that it prevents sex (though a few times it has), but it certainly decreases its quality for both parties involved on a regular basis. Potentially relevant circumstances surrounding the problem: A little over two years ago (when the problem began) I ended a bad relationship, started a new **amazing** one, moved twice, had a very bad car accident, had a very bad cycling accident, lost my grandmother, helped my mother through a traumatic incident, etc. I'd like to point out that this was Winter-Summer 2020, need I say more? It was a whirlwind of a year. I dealt with it in healthy ways (amping up the exercise and protein consumption) and unhealthy ways (picking up a 1-2 drinks before dinner habit that I've since decreased to just on weekends; this decrease happened 6 months ago). Should I talk to a therapist instead of sending this in to a podcast? Probably, but why not both? I'm hoping you and Nicki might be able to connect some dots I haven't. 3. Functional Dyspepsia [21:36] Cristi says: I love your show and the dynamics between the two of you. I'd love to join "the rebellion" when I can afford it. What do we know in natural health about "functional dyspepsia?" I just had an upper endoscopy to diagnose the cause of a burning sensation in my stomach just under my right ribcage usually right after eating/while eating that seems to respond to an amount of food rather than any particular food. Before this, the gastro had me do a stool test that was negative for H. Pylori. They took biopsies during the upper endo, but the doctor says he doesn't expect to find anything. He said he saw irritation in the stomach lining and it was probably caused by "functional dyspepsia" which was an imbalance of acid in the stomach. He said the causes of this could be different things, including stress (which I admittedly have a lot of, but I do what I can to control it) and that otherwise, causes were unknown, but that I could just take Pepsid! How long? Oh, maybe forever...Needless to say, I'm not doing that. SO, if all I know is that the acid is "imbalanced," how do I balance it? At the risk of making this too much longer, my diet, exercise, and supplement regimen are all along the lines of what paleo-centric gurus recommend, so none of the other causes of this "disfunction" (NSAID use, fried/unhealthy fat foods, alcohol excess) make sense. I'm not celiac, but I don't eat gluten and dairy because they just don't feel great. I'm thinking of continuing to take probiotics and add a functional medicine supplement with aloe, licorice root, marshmallow root, NAD etc. to maybe calm the irritation? My only other thought is that maybe I've been taking too much of a natural allergy supplement that has quercitin (400 mg per two pills) -3 pills twice a day-but I doubt that's it, and after stopping it for five days before this procedure as they required, I really noticed my allergies kicking in. The problem is, I'm 5'5, 118-120, and closer to 118 with what I'm able to eat without feeling discomfort. I have to stop before I'm satisfied completely. I wake up at night hungry, and I can't go back to sleep, and I know 118 is too light for me. I weight train 3X per week, and I'm active all of the other days. I'm a highschool teacher, so I'm not really sedentary, either. I'm pretty low carb with starchy carbs (about a cup of sweet potato or rice) only included at dinner. THANK YOU!   Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don't. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes Transcript: The transcript for this episode can be found on its blog page at https://robbwolf.com/2022/06/10/protein-for-2-meals-a-day-erections-functional-dyspepsia-thrr112/

NASCAR America
Truex Jr. potentially retiring, McDowell turning the corner

NASCAR America

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 52:58


Rutledge Wood, Dale Jarrett and Nate Ryan give their thoughts about Ross Chastain's incident with Denny Hamlin, talk to crew chief James Small about Martin Truex Jr.'s potential retirement and host Michael McDowell to talk about his competitive season so far.

Wests Tigers Podcast
Episode 183: Wests Tigers Podcast 0183

Wests Tigers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 59:36


The Wests Tigers are back in action this Sunday at Campbelltown Stadium, taking on the injury-hit Sea Eagles.Ahead of that clash, there's plenty of Wests Tigers news and issues to discuss on this edition of the Wests Tigers Podcast.Eddie Otto and Garry Watson convene to discuss the latest on the vacant Wests Tigers coaching role.Who does it look like are the leading candidates at this point? Ciraldo? Payten? Hodgson? Morris? Kimmorley?There's also a look at why many Wests Tigers fans seem to be so upset about the decision to terminate Michael Maguire's contract.The boys also try to answer the question many people in Rugby League are asking, what is a development coach?James Tamou has come out with some interesting comments about our prospects of enticing Cameron Ciraldo to the club. Were these comments disloyal? Potentially damaging? Or just honest?Eddie and Garry have their say on that one.The quiz is back, this time centered around the history of Wests Tigers - Manly battles.And don't forget to get along to this Sunday's big pre-game Ambush event in Campbelltown!

The Big 550 KTRS
Antonio French: Potentially bigger fish

The Big 550 KTRS

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 9:17


The St. Louis Post-Dispatch columnist on City of St. Louis Mayor Tishaura Jones expecting more federal indictments from the latest local political scandal. Also, the potential consequences of not admitting to wrongdoing. Follow Antonio for more: https://twitter.com/AntonioFrench

Jodie & Soda
The Vaccinated Are Being Denied Access To Potentially Life Saving COVID Medication...

Jodie & Soda

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 5:06


Making headlines is the decision to allow the willfully unvaccinated to access potentially life saving COVID treatment, that the vaccinated are being denied. Are the vaccinated being punished by doing the 'right thing?' Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Aaron Torres Sports Podcast
Deshaun Watson mess, who could potentially replace John Calipari at Kentucky + Jon Scheyer continues to make big moves

Aaron Torres Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 58:37


On today's show, Aaron discusses the Deshaun Watson mess and what the NFL could do, a potential list of replacements for John Calipari at Kentucky, and historic (and game-changing) move for new Duke head coach Jon Scheyer. Here is a full rundown of today's show: The Deshaun Watson mess - and what the NFL should do (2:30): Aaron opens the show by discussing the Deshaun Watson mess, as a new accuser and a scathing New York Times report cast new light on this wild story. Will the NFL force Watson to miss more time as new information keeps coming out. Who could potentially replace John Calipari at Kentucky? (14:00): Next up, Aaron hits on the topic that everyone has asked him all off-season: Who could potentially replace John Calipari at Kentucky. After The Athletic (shout out Kyle Tucker!) put out its list, Aaron shares who he believes is realistic, and who isn't. Jon Scheyer continues to make huge moves (39:00): Finally, Aaron discusses the move that new Duke coach Jon Scheyer has hired a "general manager" to handle NIL for his program. What does it mean? How it will only help recruiting. Also, why Scheyer has done an incredible job adjusting to the new landscape of college sports so far. Today's episode is brought to you by DraftKings - new users can make a $5 moneyline bet on any team and if that team wins, you get $150 in free cash. It's the best deal going - courtesy of DraftKings! Today's show is also presented by Athletic Greens - for more information and a great deal, visit AthleticGreens.com/Emerging Make sure to... Follow on Twitter Follow on Instagram Follow on Facebook Follow on YouTube Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Bert Show
Kristin Feels Guilty For Potentially Missing This Moment In Her Son's Life

The Bert Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 8:01


Today is supposed to be a big day for Kristin's son Jimmy. He's going to his first music class with her husband. She's excited, but at the same time, she's feeling guilty. She explains... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/the-bert-show.

Communism Exposed:East and West
Chinese Fighter Jet Intercepted Australian Craft; Biden to Potentially Lift Trump China Tariffs

Communism Exposed:East and West

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 13:48


Chinese Fighter Jet Intercepted Australian Craft; Biden to Potentially Lift Trump China Tariffs

Ecomonics
How To Set Up A Business For Potentially Millions In Sales

Ecomonics

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 41:44


In today's episode, we are joined by Neil Twa, co-founder and CEO of Voltage Digital Marketing. Neil has been launching, operating, and growing private label e-commerce businesses for the last 9+ years.

Grant and Danny
Would you be alright with Ted Leonsis potentially buying the Nationals?

Grant and Danny

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 10:47


MPR News with Angela Davis
How to handle a third summer with COVID-19

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 47:38


We're heading into a third summer with COVID-19 and a lot of people are finding it hard to assess their risk in this new stage of the pandemic. Most of Minnesota, including the Twin Cities, seems to be coming out of a small surge, but cases are rising in southern Minnesota.  By now, two thirds of Minnesotans have had at least two doses of a vaccine. Even more have likely had the virus. The CDC estimated in April that almost 60 percent of people had been infected. Other studies put that number higher, and it's sure to have gone up with the recent waves of infection. But, we also know that being vaccinated or recovering from COVID-19 once doesn't protect people from getting it again. New strains keep popping up. Wastewater samples from the Twin Cities show that people now are spreading a third version of the omicron variant that hit in January.  More than ever, our individual risk of catching the virus or falling ill boils down to our individual situation. MPR News host Angela Davis spoke with Minnesota Health Commissioner Jan Malcolm and infectious disease expert, Dr. Greg Poland, about the risk of variants, masking advice, when to time a booster, new vaccines coming in the fall and how to cope with a virus that isn't going away.  Below are highlights from the show that have been edited for length and clarity. Listen to the full conversation by clicking the audio player above. When you look at the most recent number of cases in Minnesota, how do you describe what they show? How are we doing? Malcolm: It's even hard to count how many waves we've had now and some of the waves really never ended before the next one kicked in. Certainly, over the last couple of months, we've seen cases going back up but at a slower rate than we did with the original omicron strain in December and January. We've watched this kind of slow build. I think thanks to vaccination and boosting and treatments, hospitalizations have not risen to the same degree. Over the last week or two weeks, we've seemed to be stabilizing a bit. What about deaths? Malcolm: We have been grateful that we haven't seen as many deaths in this most recent wave. We've pretty much been in the single digits. Still, we've lost over over 12,600 Minnesotans over the last two years. Even when we're having five and 10 deaths a day, that's five and 10 too many. Dr. Poland, how about you? Are you seeing reasons for us to be optimistic now or not? What do you see in how we're doing right now as a state? Poland: We seem to be divided into two categories: People who believe in science, who believe in the effectiveness of public health measures. And those that don't. Those that I would say, sort of live in a world of hesitancy, doubt and rejection of the scientific method. And so, you see nationwide, it's almost hard to say, almost unbelievable, that since COVID started, one out of every 320 Americans is now dead of COVID. Over a million people, more than we had during the 1918 influenza pandemic. So, as a health care provider you're caught in this odd world where I go into a room and especially early on people were saying, “When can I get the vaccine?” Now we'd go into a room and say, “I notice you haven't had the vaccine.” (And they say) “I don't want that. That's dangerous.” The problem we're having now is really a complex matrix of time since last booster, the development of new variants and psychological human issues. “COVID fatigue,” as it's being called, should have no rational place in deciding what do I do to protect my life and the life of my family and my community members. And yet, in Minnesota and elsewhere, the majority of people are pretending that the pandemic is over. It is not. For example, during the omicron wave we've just come through, we had more people die in four months than we did with six months of delta last year. That's stunning. We should have learned as a population that wearing masks indoors makes a lot of sense. Social distancing makes sense. Getting my vaccine and my booster makes sense. And yet we've got a sizable minority that doesn't believe that and don't follow those recommendations. Caller question: Some in my family are getting over their first bout of COVID, but others in the same household continue to test negative. Why? And what should we do to stay safe this summer? Malcolm: The pattern of who gets it and who doesn't can be a mystery. One of the most important things that we can do at this point is to stay up to date with vaccines and the boosters. It's very clear now that these new variants can evade immune protection, whether that's from a prior illness or from a from a shot that has worn off. I really appreciate how Dr. Poland laid out the logic case. There's a lot of virus out there, certainly outdoor environments are much safer. But when you're in an indoor environment around other people, you might just as well expect to that you're going to encounter folks who are infectious. So stay up to date with those boosters and wear masks indoors. Poland: One thing to remember, when we talk about evasion of immune response, it's not that there's no protection, it's that each of these new variants requires higher levels of antibody to perform an actual lower level of neutralization. So your age, your medical condition, your genetic background, the time since your last vaccine and which variant is circulating, all play a complex role in in determining this. There's no strict time limit or time interval between when you got infected and when you get your booster. In general, I'd let you recover and wait a month or so and then get the booster as recommended. What do the new variants mean for our chances of getting reinfected? Poland: Let me be clear to the point of maybe being blunt: If you're not somebody who has been immunized or who's wearing masks indoors around people who are not your family, you will get infected, and you will get infected repeatedly as new variants arise. These variants will continue to arise as long as large numbers of people are getting infected. And that will occur through both mutation and what's called recombination. That is what these RNA viruses do. I've studied them for almost 40 years. And this is playing out exactly as you would predict, given the distortion of human behavior happening in the context of a worldwide pandemic. For people who have recovered from the virus recently, how long are we protected from getting it again? Poland: I could have told you the answer to your question with omicron, which is almost certainly what you got infected with. I don't know the answer to your question in the face of BA.2.12.1. I particularly don't know what the answer to your question is should BA.4 or .5, currently ravaging South Africa, spread here. It's changing so fast that it is almost impossible to develop the scientific data fast enough. How do we time our booster shots if you're trying to stay fully vaccinated? Poland: If you tested and it was positive, we would consider that the equivalent of a booster. Now, what's going to happen is sometime this summer, we are expecting a variant focus booster. That'll be important because for the second booster the recommendation is based on two pieces of data, both from Israel. One showing that (the variant focused booster) decreases the risk of death by about 78 percent. Now stop a moment to think about that. What that means is you reduce your risk from .1 percent to .03 percent. A measurable real difference, but a real fractional one. Why? Because you are gaining the value of the previous three doses that you got. It reduced the risk of severe or serious illness by about two-fold and moderate illness by about that same amount. But that effect only lasted four weeks, and by eight weeks was gone, highlighting the need for updated boosters, or so called variant focused boosters. Caller question: I was exposed to COVID, had a negative test, I've had one booster. What's my quarantine protocol? Malcolm: Those are difficult decisions. The abundance of caution is still advised even if you've tested negative. I'm guessing you used a rapid test, which are optimal when you use them for a couple of days in a row. Poland: If you have no fever or symptoms, then what I personally would do would be to consider going, but wearing a proper mask properly. Like a KN95, or 94. And wear it properly, crimped around your nose, no air spaces around your face, not below your nose, not below your chin, as you see so many people doing. And maintain some physical distance. That way, I think you're probably protecting other people should you be harboring an asymptomatic infection. Caller question: What's on the horizon for vaccines? Poland: We will likely have a vaccine recommendation for children down to six months. I can tell you definitively that, for example, Moderna has done studies looking at a combination COVID and influenza vaccine. The real triple winner is the idea of making a COVID, flu and RSV (respiratory syncytial virus) vaccine. All of those are being worked on. Whether they would get through the approval process in time for the beginning of this flu season is anybody's guess. We'll get them eventually but I don't know how quickly. What do you want people to know about long COVID? Malcolm: We're just now starting to get a little bit better data. Potentially, 20 plus percent of all people, depending on age and underlying conditions, who even who had a very mild case, can come down with long-term complications and a very confusing array of symptoms. I don't think we even know yet the full extent of organ damage and other things that might be happening. So there's a lot of work to do to support people who have long COVID and to support clinicians who are trying to help them. Certainly, a lot of the actual clinical research will be done at the national level, but here at the state level we are working get better educational information out there to folks about resources that might be able to help. Poland: We know that about 60 percent of the long COVID cases are in females. Why is there a disproportionality? We know that it is more likely to occur in young to middle ages, not so much in young kids. Not as common in elderly. We know severity has something to do with it. We know that it can be in part prevented by having gotten prior immunization. And the public does not understand this well, because they tend to track on “well, you know, my next door neighbor had it and she didn't die.” Here's the problem with that kind of thinking. The risk of a subsequent mental health diagnosis goes up 40 to 60 percent. The risk of subsequently developing Type 2 Diabetes, even after a mild case goes up 40 percent. The risk of some 20 different cardiovascular diseases for the next year goes up considerably. This is not a benign flu-like infection. It has consequences that we don't generally see. When will a vaccine be available for babies and toddlers? Poland: So the plan is that the FDA is going to meet in mid-June. They're going to review a Moderna and a Pfizer application. The Moderna application is going to request a 25-microgram dose that's one-fourth the adult dose, and there'll be two doses roughly a month apart. And this will be for kids six months to five years of age. Pfizer's going to ask for approval for a three-microgram dose. Remember, the adult dose is 30, so one-tenth of it. But they will get three injections at zero, three weeks and 12 or more weeks after the second dose for kids 6 months to 4 years old. The Moderna study, we don't have full data on, but it shows about a 40 to 50 percent reduction in symptomatic disease. The Pfizer data show about an 80 percent decrease in symptomatic disease, at least during the omicron outbreak. How either of these will operate in the face of future variants is unknown. If the FDA meets in mid-June and if they approve it. If it then goes to the CDC and the CDC approves it, by early July, kids would be able to get the vaccines and complete, at least in the case of Moderna, the full series, and in the case of Pfizer have the three doses prior to going to school. Caller question: Could I have my antibodies measured and use that as a marker of whether I am protected? Poland: The answer to that is generally no. And the reason for it is we don't know what level of antibody protects you against what complication of the disease or even against infection. Obviously, the higher the antibody level, the better. If there were no antibody or if it was very, very low, we might have some level of concern. But remember that that level of protection is going to vary by which variant you get infected with. So we do not have, the formal name for it is, a “correlative protection.” How has testing changed over the past few months? Malcolm: We do continue to offer both rapid testing and PCR testing at a number of state sites. We want to make sure that whether they're tests at pharmacies at health care providers, or other kind of community locations, that everybody around the state has access to tests. You are able to order online free tests from the federal government as well as from the state. And currently, while we're in a federally declared public health emergency, insurance companies have to cover the cost of tests without copayments, up to eight per month. And testing does remain important. People can protect themselves and others if they know their status before they are doing something social, are going to a big, eagerly awaited event. Testing continues to be one of the tools in the toolbox. It's good idea to have a supply of rapid tests at home for that kind of use. What can you tell us about the new antiviral medications? Poland: In terms of treatment, there are four things that can be used Paxlovid; remdesivir; which is administered intravenously; one monoclonal — we only have one monoclonal now that we can use to treat because the variants have outwitted it; and, then a third antiviral, Molnupiravir. Paxlovid is the one that you most hear about. There's difficulties in accessing it. I think we should make it easier. It's generally for people who are moderately to severely immunocompromised or people 65 and older who have a positive test and are at high risk of complications. You have to take it for five days. There's beginning to be some concern of so-called Paxlovid rebound, which means we may have to treat people longer than the normal five days. And the one difficulty with it that is there are a large number of medications, herbs and supplements, that you cannot be taking while you take Paxlovid. What's the value of it: about an 89 percent efficacy in preventing death and severe disease.

Japan By River Cruise
Biden Time! (w/Michelle Ye Hee Lee)

Japan By River Cruise

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 49:42


Joe Biden's Straight Talk Express comes to Asia! WaPo Bureau Chief Michelle Ye Hee Lee joins us to talk about what Biden took away from his time in Japan. If he's anything like most Americans, we're betting that list includes a Hello Kitty T-shirt and a fake sword.Ferris Wheel and Kintsugi River boats!Topics discussed on this episode include: How much we POTENTIALLY appreciate Elon Musk Bobby's BBQ shop gets even closer to completion Ollie rails against the propertied class Bobby's kids make relationship milestones Ollie at the Brighton Fringe The highs and lows of performing live comedy Why did that couple excuse themselves from Ollie's show mid-performance? Therapy and catharsis and the overlap between joke writing and self-analysis Metaphors about the wrong kinds of transportation Gratitude for our wonderful listeners Michelle's experience covering Biden's Asian Tour Michelle being super professional in the face of very silly questions IPEF: DON'T CALL IT A COME BACK How does Japan feel about the US walking out of TPP All things politics around Biden's Asia Trip North Korean Covid: What do we know? Japan opened for limited group tours, limited group tours open for Corona-infection Get access to the extras by supporting the podcast. Become a member at http://buymeacoffee.com. Extras this time include conversations about: How the pandemic turned Michelle's long-distance relationship into a long-distance marriage Bobby and Ollie's advice for surviving long-distance What it's like when you, as a journalist, become the focus of a piece of journalism How does Guam see its relationship with the mainland US/feel about mainland current events? US current events

DAT Poker Podcast
WSOP Days Away! Preview, Predictions, $25k Fantasy & High Stakes Poker - DAT Poker Podcast Episode #124

DAT Poker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 70:01


This Week On DAT Poker Pod: Daniel, Adam and Terrence are back with:   0:05 Intros 2:50 WSOP Around The Corner! Advice for newbies. 11:40 $25k Fantasy Draft and New Rule Proposals. 19:13 Will the down market affect WSOP turnout? 27:19 Fun player of the year hypothetical question for Terrence and Daniel. 35:05 Potentially banning the recently exposed alleged cheaters from the fantasy draft. 40:00 Daniels experience trying to teach Mike Matusow about GTO (Link to video referenced: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xr8Gam59S1U ) 41:05 Main Event Entries guessing/betting pool. 52:20 Catching up on High Stakes Poker hand reviews/topics.   Follow @DatPokerPod on Instagram Voicemail: 1.775.434.2932 Interact with us https://twitter.com/@ASchwartzPoker  https://twitter.com/@tchanpoker  https://twitter.com/@RealKidPoker  https://twitter.com/@ProducerRoss  Intro/Outro Music By: https://twitter.com/murphchops

RNZ: Checkpoint
Covid Minister details second booster shot for most at risk

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 6:07


Another jab is on the agenda for those most at risk of serious illness from Covid. The additional booster shot has been recommended by the Ministry of Health vaccine advisory group and is intended for the elderly, aged and disability care residents and severely immunocompromised people over the age of 16. Potentially that is several hundred thousand people - but the final list is yet to be decided. The booster will be given six months after the last one. Covid Minister Chris Hipkins talks to Lisa Owen.

Handel 45-Minute Morning Show
Texas Governor Abbott Under Fire, CA's Potentially New COVID Wave and Tightening the Loose Gun Laws

Handel 45-Minute Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 46:30


Bill Handel talks about Texas Governor Greg Abbott being heckled by opposing candidate Beto O'Rourke yesterday at a conference. Might it be time to put the masks back on in California? A new wave threatens to hit the reset button. And U.S. gun laws are getting looser, not stronger, despite there being more mass shootings. What can be done?

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots
424: Boulevard with Matt Danna

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 34:25


Matt Danna is the Co-Founder and CEO of Boulevard, which powers next-gen salons and spas. Its mission is to modernize the technology while improving the daily lives of professionals and the clients they serve. Chad talks with Matt about discovering a problem and then making the jump to working on it, overcoming hurdles in terms of continued growth, and deciding to invest in building their own hardware by creating Boulevard Duo: a point of sale credit card reader. Boulevard (https://www.joinblvd.com/) Boulevard Duo (https://shop.joinblvd.com/products/duo) Follow Boulevard on Twitter (https://twitter.com/joinblvd), Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/joinblvd/), Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/joinblvd/), LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/boulevard/), or YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCo9FyMtvqrDGHFl797iOhww). Follow Matt on Twitter (https://twitter.com/mattdanna) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/mattdanna/). Follow thoughtbot on Twitter (https://twitter.com/thoughtbot) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/150727/). Become a Sponsor (https://thoughtbot.com/sponsorship) of Giant Robots! Transcript: CHAD: This is the Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots Podcast, where we explore the design, development, and business of great products. I'm your host, Chad Pytel. And with me today is Matt Danna, the Co-Founder and CEO of Boulevard, which powers next-gen salons and spas. Matt, thank you so much for joining me. MATT: Thanks so much for having me, Chad. Great to be here. CHAD: One of the things that I was interested in learning about Boulevard is it's a large product that does a lot for salons and spas. And so, I'm interested in talking with you about the process of getting to where you are today. But why don't we get started by giving folks an overview of everything that Boulevard does for salons and spas? MATT: Yeah, absolutely. So Boulevard offers what we think is the first and really only business management platform that's really focused around the client experience. We work with businesses that help all of us look and feel our best. And it's a really special industry to be powering where there's a really close sense of that human touch and that human element. We try to use technology to help automate and relieve the day-to-day operations as much as we can for these businesses so that they can focus on providing that world-class client experience and deepening relationships with their clients. CHAD: And tactically, that's online booking, scheduling, payments, schedule management, all that kind of stuff that goes into running. MATT: Yeah, absolutely. So it goes all the way from, like you said, scheduling to we are a fully integrated payments solution to even have time clock kind of commission reporting. And so it really goes from managing everything front of house all the way through back of house. And happy to share more about how we ended up building such a wide and deep product because it's definitely an interesting story. CHAD: So you were not in the salon industry prior to Boulevard, is that right? MATT: That's correct. CHAD: So, how did you end up getting brought into this industry? MATT: So the founding story...so my background is in software engineering, but I ended up turning much more into a designer over time. So I've been naturally drawn to building technology for creative individuals. And so, at my last startup, which was called Fullscreen, it was a startup here in LA. We were helping YouTube creators make better content online, helping them monetize on YouTube, understand their audience. And this was in the days where YouTubers couldn't monetize directly. They needed to go through a network. And so, we created this proprietary technology offering that really helped them understand how to build their audience and further monetize. So the original founding story was that I met my co-founder of Boulevard at Fullscreen. His name is Sean Stavropoulos. And I was the VP of Product. He was the VP of Engineering. And the kind of inception moment was that there was this week where Sean's hair was a complete disaster. CHAD: [chuckles] MATT: And as a great colleague, I was making fun of him [laughs] and telling him like, "Dude, you need to go get a haircut." And he said to me that he kept forgetting to call his salon during the day to make an appointment, and at night when he remembered to do those types of things, the salon is obviously closed. And we were just thinking how much friction there was as a client of these businesses in the booking process and that we didn't understand why you had to do basically so much work in order to be a client. It just was incongruent with what was going on in other industries and kind of restaurants and everything going through this digital transformation. Our hypothesis was that they must still be on pen and paper; they haven't adopted technology yet, and that's why you need to call to make an appointment. And we started thinking a lot about this problem and started obsessing over it. [laughs] And there was a weekend that we were hanging out, and we ended up walking into a few different salons and spas in a neighborhood that we were hanging out. And we did a bunch of research and asked them a lot of questions. We said we were UCLA students working on a research project. CHAD: [laughs] MATT: Which was a pretty smart move because everyone loves talking to students, and we weren't trying to sell them anything. We were trying to learn more. And so, a good research tip is just to state you're always a student. And we ended up learning. And we were super surprised that they were all using technology. All the technology that these businesses were using were also capable of online booking. And so we were like, "Okay, none of this makes sense. Like, you're making your customers call you, but you have these capabilities." We were like, "Do you need help embedding it into your website? Like, why don't you use online booking" And their answer would be, "We absolutely cannot use online booking, no way," which made us even more curious. And so what we ended up learning was that self-care businesses, you know, salons, spas, nail salons, you name it, they're generally running on pretty thin profit margins like in the 5% to 10% neighborhood because their labor costs are so high relative to their sales. And the other important piece that we learned was that the front desk has outsized control over the revenue that the business makes simply by how they place appointments on the calendar. And so when you call to make an appointment, they're looking up to see if you have a client file, to see if you've been there before, what services did you get? Who were they with? How long exactly did they take? They're also looking to see when they could fit you in. And they're doing double booking, triple booking whenever possible so that staff can be with multiple clients at once and double up. And then they're also making sure there are no gaps between appointments. And so they're doing basically this yield optimization, schedule optimization on the fly. And none of that was taken into account if customers self-booked using any of the solutions available on the market. And so we thought that seems like a straight-up technology problem to solve that these businesses needed an online booking solution so customers can have that convenience and self-booking whenever they want. But it also needs to take into account some of that business logic that the front desk follows so that they don't get gaps in the day and have a really sub-optimal and inefficient calendar. And so that's where we thought we could provide some particular value that would be unique in the industry. And that was what we focused our MVP on, was that very thing, having an intelligent scheduling solution. CHAD: It seems like it's a pretty big leap for the director of product and director of engineering at a startup to discover a problem like this and then actually make the jump to working on it [laughs] and making it real. Was there something in particular that happened? Why did you do that? [laughs] MATT: Yeah, I mean, we had a, you know, being executives at the startup and really loving the team, loving what we were doing, our mission. But I think one of the motivators and catalysts was when we were doing this field research. And we ended up going out to a couple of hundred businesses over the course of several weekends to learn even more about this problem area. But one of the things that was so evident and clear was that all of the technology in the market that these customers, these businesses were using, they were negative NPS scores. They were like, "Oh, we use, you know, X, Y, or Z solution, and we really don't like it. It's so hard to use." You would see the red in their eyes when they would talk about this technology." And we're like, "There's something very powerful here." And we weren't exactly sure at the time was it legacy technology not keeping up with modern needs of these businesses and the growing expectations from end consumers, or was it user error problems? And we had come to the conclusion that it was really a lack of innovation in the market from existing vendors. And that got us particularly excited, and we formed a lot of conviction, so much conviction that we made the leap to start working on this. So we transitioned out of our full-time executive day jobs, and we ended up doing a little bit of consulting work while we were doing a lot of product discovery. So for about six months, we were doing three days a week on Boulevard and a couple of days a week on consulting. So it was a nice little part-time way to keep paying the bills but also then be able to spend a significant amount of our brain space thinking about this opportunity and what problems we wanted to solve. CHAD: So maybe I'm just off base here. And I'm not trying to get you to say that something was wrong at Fullscreen. But it strikes me there needed to be something going on, in my mind, maybe I'm off base, for you to even before deciding to make that leap, though, to spend your weekends going to salons and doing interviews. MATT: Yeah, I think this is how most companies are started is by founders who are trying to solve a problem that they're exposed to. So everyone is always trying to build companies that are solutions for problems that they have. And we just, I think, got excited by this problem. And my background being in building technology for the creative individuals, like, I got really, really excited. And Sean took some convincing that this was worth it and that this could be a thing. CHAD: Was it an aspiration for you to find something that you could use to found your own company? MATT: No, no. CHAD: And then why were you doing it? [laughs] MATT: I think it felt like the right thing to do. I never considered myself an entrepreneur, and I really still don't. I think of myself as a builder, and I love building things. And this was in a way for us to think about, like, oh, let's build a company and turn this into a massive business. We saw that there was a particular pain point that was experienced from both consumers and businesses and that we could provide something special. It felt like it was something that only we saw, which I think made it feel even more compelling to work on. And so we didn't know if we were crazy at first. We always had this question of like, why hasn't anyone figured this out? This seems so obvious. I still don't know why we're the only ones that have any type of kind of logic on top of the schedule in that sense. But we saw it as a unique opportunity to build something really special and provide a lot of value to consumers and businesses. CHAD: Well, that's super interesting. So once you decided and you started working on Boulevard, how did you decide what to focus on first? And how did you set your market for what the first version was going to be or a target for what the first version was going to be? MATT: So, we focused on the businesses that had a front desk. So those are generally the ones that really struggled with getting the most out of every minute possible in the day. And so we focused on what were typically mid to upper market single locations to start, and we got introduced to a salon owner through a mutual friend. They were based in New York, and it was just a two-person salon. And so, we built our MVP to be able to support their day-to-day functions. And they were using some other system, so we kind of had to get to a place where there was general feature parity to support them. So we built up the features that we needed, and then we launched them, transitioned them off their previous solution. And then we did all this in person and then hung out with them for about a week or two after to babysit the system, make sure there weren't problems. We were iterating in real-time. Sean and I were releasing code. And from there, we got an intro to our second customer through another mutual friend. CHAD: How long did it take you from when you started to when it was live in that first salon? MATT: It took about nine months. CHAD: And were you self-funding that based on the consulting that you mentioned? MATT: Yeah, self-funding. And then, after we launched with the first business, Sean and I actually both liquidated our 401Ks. And we didn't have the time to continue to consult. So we bootstrapped the company and put our life savings into it once we had traction from our first couple of customers. And that's when we started to hire our first employees to help us continue to accelerate development and that kind of thing. CHAD: So again, liquidating your 401k is a pretty big step. MATT: Yep. CHAD: Did you try to do external fundraising before doing that? MATT: No. At that point, not yet. We wanted to really validate the concept on our own dime. And then, when we had paying customers and a decent customer base, we did a friends and family round. And then, once we achieved a certain milestone, we joined an accelerator, which is based in Los Angeles called Luma Launch. And we were part of that accelerator for about six months. And then we raised our series seed following that. We went from liquidating our savings, living like college students, ramen noodle budget-type to once we felt good about the value we were providing, had the case studies and the customer feedback, and had a pretty awesome MVP to show to investors; that's when we decided to fundraise. CHAD: How nervous were the two of you? MATT: Very nervous. [laughter] I mean, it's one of those both of us come from really, really humble families, and there was no safety net. And so we were all in. And I think often from when there's a lot of constraints; you have to find creativity. We were all in. We were working all the time on this, really gave it everything we had. And in hindsight, it was a good decision. But it could have easily been a terrible decision. [laughs] CHAD: I mean, this is one of the things with founding stories is we talk to the people who are successful. [laughs] So, would you recommend this path to other people? MATT: I think if it's something where you could see providing unique value to the world and that you have lots of validation from real people, not just your friends but from prospective customers...it was when we were talking to real businesses where they would say, "This is something we would use and pay for." And so, after hearing that dozens and dozens of times, that matched with the negative NPS scores with their current solutions. That's where we were like, "This can be something pretty special." So I wouldn't recommend building in isolation and making that leap of faith without really doing your diligence on the opportunity. But yeah, I think everyone, at some point, if they have an idea or a problem they want to solve, should give it a go. Mid-Roll Ad: I wanted to tell you all about something I've been working on quietly for the past year or so, and that's AgencyU. AgencyU is a membership-based program where I work one-on-one with a small group of agency founders and leaders toward their business goals. We do one-on-one coaching sessions and also monthly group meetings. We start with goal setting, advice, and problem-solving based on my experiences over the last 18 years of running thoughtbot. As we progress as a group, we all get to know each other more. And many of the AgencyU members are now working on client projects together and even referring work to each other. Whether you're struggling to grow an agency, taking it to the next level and having growing pains, or a solo founder who just needs someone to talk to, in my 18 years of leading and growing thoughtbot, I've seen and learned from a lot of different situations, and I'd be happy to work with you. Learn more and sign up today at thoughtbot/agencyu. That's A-G-E-N-C-Y, the letter U. CHAD: That first customer that you were building the replacement for, were you charging them? MATT: No, we were not. CHAD: Are they paying now? MATT: They are, they are, very little. CHAD: Okay. [chuckles] MATT: They're a small business and have been staying super successful. And so, in the earliest days, the learnings and feedback matter a lot more than revenue, and so you optimize for that as opposed to the economics. And so for us going and working on location at these businesses and they're paying us essentially in the learnings and teachings of helping us understand and absorb ourselves in this industry, and working as front desk and doing the jobs that all these professionals have to do. And so that's where we were able to build and get to a place where our product is really, really authentic. And it was from that first direct observation. CHAD: I've worked on products before where they're currently being done by people. They might have technology solutions in place, and they feel like there's no technology that will do this; we need to have a person being the one to do it. Because like you said, there's something special about a person doing it. And so sometimes those businesses, when they have a solution, even if they've properly solved it, there's a lot of resistance from customers who are very skeptical that the technology is going to be able to do it the right way. Have you encountered that? MATT: Absolutely. CHAD: How do you combat that? MATT: We iterated on, essentially, the objections. So the first objection was that "People can't book online because it's going to mess up my day." And so we created this what we call precision scheduling, where it does the optimization on the calendar. And then the next issue was that we started seeing some no-shows coming because I think there's this mental analog of if you miss an OpenTable reservation not as big of a deal. But in our industry that we're serving, if you miss a two-hour appointment, that professional is out a significant amount of their income for the week. And so that's where we actually started dipping our toes in payments, and we started requiring a credit card at the time of booking just to authorize the card and to hold the appointment. And so that objection of no shows we solved there. There was a lot of concern of like, "Hey, our customers are not going to know the right thing to book." And we have learned that customers actually are very savvy and that the clients deserve more credit than the professionals are giving them that if a woman gets a balayage, she knows it's a balayage. And so, usually, the way that we overcame that objection was we'd work with them and have best practices on menu design. But that they also then, when they're giving a service that they discuss what they actually did in that service so that the customer knows what to book next time if they want the same thing. And so that was kind of the pattern is like, build something, learn, iterate, and do it on location with these businesses so that we could see it firsthand in an unbiased way. And so that's really how we were able to build such a product with this amount of scale and overcome some of those initial objections. CHAD: Is it easier now that you have 2000-plus customers, some social capital out there? They can ask other people, "Is this working for you?" Is that easier now? MATT: Absolutely. Absolutely. One of the ways...we didn't have a sales team for a long time in our company, and we were actually under the radar. We were stealth, didn't announce anything about ourselves for the first three or four years. And so we were just very much focused on product development and building something that was incredible. And then we were really fed off of referrals and that word of mouth. So it's I think when you get a product that people love, they're going to tell their friends about it. And for us, that really helped accelerate our growth. CHAD: So yeah, so this was all taking place in what year? MATT: So we transitioned out of our last company and started doing part-time work in summer of 2015. And then, we officially launched our first customer in spring of 2016. CHAD: Cool. And I think that that is, you know, you didn't get to 2,000 customers overnight, right? You've been at this for a while. MATT: Yeah, the barrier to entry is very high in the market, and VCs called our type of opportunity a brownfield opportunity where there are a lot of legacy solutions in the market. And we compete with some companies that were actually started before I was born. CHAD: [chuckles] MATT: And so they've had many decades to build functionality into their platform that we need to get to some level of feature parity with in order to seamlessly transition them off of their previous solution to our platform. And it did take a significant upfront investment with product in order to get to be able to pay the price of admission and to be able to actually compete in the market. CHAD: So one of the things I'm curious about is, do you have a sense of what does the overall market looks like? I feel like there are probably lots of salons, spas, haircutting places. There are a lot of them all over the world. MATT: There are, yeah. So we believe that there are about 500,000 self-care businesses in the United States. CHAD: Just in the United States. MATT: Yeah, just in the United States. And the employee base in the labor market is about two to two and a half million professionals across all those businesses. CHAD: So, where do you think the hurdles in terms of continued growth are for you? MATT: So one of the areas that we focus on is...so all of these self-care businesses are about 90% similar in how they operate. And so we started in the hair salon vertical and then have expanded into many adjacent verticals over the course of the past few years. We really tried to make sure that we had really, really strong product-market fit in the hair salons, which is the biggest self-care market, and before we expanded into, say, nail salons. When expanding into adjacent verticals, there's some functionality that is unique to those verticals. And so, for example, one of our recent verticals that we expanded into is med spas. And the way that med spas charge for their services is generally based on the products that are used, and so if you buy 100 units of Botox, they charge a per-unit fee. And so that was something that was pretty unique to the medspa market that doesn't exist in other self-care markets. And so vertical expansion is a vector of growth for us and then segment expansion. So we started with the single location, very small businesses. And then we have worked our way up to enterprise where we're powering chains and franchises of hundreds of locations. And then the other aspects kind of the third vector of growth is the different product sets and functionality that we are releasing to our customers. So continuing to develop the platform but also look at different opportunities where we can provide outsized value by developing it ourselves. CHAD: So we could literally talk all day, and I could talk to you about scaling and product and everything. But one thing I'm interested in before we wrap up is I think it's really special to found a company with a designer, a product person, and an engineer. And I can tell even just by looking at the site and the product that you very highly value design and creating a product that people love to use. MATT: Absolutely. CHAD: How does that lead you to creating Duo, which is a point of sale card reader? MATT: One of the things that we saw in the market was this real importance in service design so what information is showing when to the users of our technology. So there's that aspect of what's the overall experience? Then there's the product design; how easy is it to use? And how quickly can new employees, new front desk staff, how quickly can they get ramped up and start using the system? Do they need two weeks of training? And for us, we try to make it as intuitive and as familiar as possible. And then we look to see how else can we extend design? And one of the complaints that we always received from customers was that hardware options were always pretty ugly, that all of them look dated like the kind of hardware that you use at a supermarket. And they wanted something that was more sleek and that they weren't ashamed to have on their countertop for checkout. And so that's where we decided to invest in building our own hardware. And that was particularly exciting for us. So it's been really, really well-received from our customers. And it was a really fun project to work on. Getting into the hardware space is always challenging. But as a designer, it was super cool to build something that became physical for the first time in my life. CHAD: Does the logic that led to you creating Duo eventually lead you to creating an entire hardware point of sale system? MATT: We're assessing all opportunities. There's this interesting moment happening in the payments space where like Apple, you know, announced that I think they're piloting now that you won't need hardware in order to accept credit card payments on the iPhone. CHAD: You'll just be able to do it right against an iPad. MATT: Exactly. So I think there's a real question as to what is the...and I'm sure this is something that folks like Square are thinking about, that have really best in class hardware is like what does the future of hardware look for fintech companies? And is it just going to fold into the actual devices, or will you continue to need standalone readers? That's something that we're constantly thinking about and keeping smart on the latest developments in that. But our expertise and what we love is building incredible software. Hardware was that area that we saw that we could provide unique value, but our goal is to always be a software company. You generally don't make much money off of the hardware piece in this business. CHAD: Now, how personally involved were you in the hardware project? MATT: I was very involved, potentially too involved. [laughs] CHAD: As a founder, when new projects come up like this that maybe you're interested in, how do you either hold yourself back or not hold yourself back from being involved in them? MATT: I think when the company is venturing into new territory, entirely new like uncharted waters, that's when it's valuable for me or any founder to get really, really smart on what's the opportunity, what's the risks, all that kind of stuff. In this case, my experience working at our initial customers for the first couple of years of our business was really, really impactful. And so our Duo captures...and the reason why it's called Duo is because it's a countertop, but also you can take the top off, and you can do an in chair checkout. So you could bring it over to the customer, and they can check out right while they're in the chair as an express checkout. And so those types of things I learned while being on location working at these businesses. And so I was providing a lot of the guidance and conceptualizing how we could think about what the hardware offering would be that would be unique to us, and collaborated with our head of design and then an industrial designer to get the proof of concept there. CHAD: And you said, "Potentially too involved," so why did you say that? [laughs] MATT: I think as a founder, you are always trying to figure out what altitude are you flying at. And there are some things that you will need to dive in and be very hands-on. And then there are other times just to guide and support and coach. And I think for this because it was a new project, I was particularly excited to be able to get into hardware because that was a first for me that I was involved in all aspects of it. But it was a lot of fun. CHAD: Awesome. Well, Matt, thank you so much for stopping by and sharing with us. I really appreciate it. I'm sure the listeners do too. If folks want to find out more about Boulevard, about joining the team, about becoming a customer, or just to get in touch with you, where are all the different places that they can do that? MATT: Yeah, absolutely. I think the best place is just on our website. We are hiring across all levels and all functions, especially on the product design and engineering side. And so our website is joinblvd.com, J-O-I-N-B-L-V-D.com. There's the about page, and it links out to my LinkedIn. So if anyone wants to connect and get acquainted, that's probably the easiest way to do it. CHAD: Awesome. Well, thanks again for joining me. I really appreciate it. MATT: Yeah, thanks so much. This was a pleasure. CHAD: You can subscribe to the show and find notes along with links for everything that Matt just mentioned and including a complete transcript of the episode at giantrobots.fm. If you have questions or comments, email us at hosts@giantrobots.fm. And you can find me on Twitter at @cpytel. This podcast is brought to you by thoughtbot and produced and edited by Mandy Moore. Thanks for listening, and I'll see you next time. ANNOUNCER: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success. Special Guest: Matt Danna.

Recode Media with Peter Kafka
Is Big Tech getting better about misinformation?

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 32:53


Lots of people will tell you that misinformation is a big problem online. But exactly what the problem is, and what tech companies can and should do about it, is up for debate. It's also what Bloomberg reporter Davey Alba covers every day. In this conversation, she talks to Recode's Peter Kafka about the recent massacre in Buffalo, which the shooter promoted on Discord and live-streamed on Twitch; copies of his manifesto and clips of the killing then migrated around the internet. All of which echoes a previous mass shooting in 2019. What, if anything, have the big tech companies learned about these kinds of attacks and how to respond to them? Then Alba talks about one of the latest problems platforms like YouTube and Facebook are grappling with: Potentially dangerous instructions about how to make your own infant formula, and whether those should stay online. Featuring: Davey Alba (@daveyalba), reporter for Bloomberg Technology Host: Peter Kafka (@pkafka), Senior Editor at Recode More to explore: Subscribe for free to Recode Media, Peter Kafka, one of the media industry's most acclaimed reporters, talks to business titans, journalists, comedians, and more to get their take on today's media landscape. About Recode by Vox: Recode by Vox helps you understand how tech is changing the world — and changing us. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Just a Little Podcast
Sorry Excuse For An Episode

Just a Little Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 2:54


Well...  Normally I put out an epsiode on Tuesday of each week; however, this week's episode is going to be a little delayed. Potentially till next week. Fingers crossed that's not the case. Since Megacon happened this week I was unable to record. Fear not. A new epsiode is in the near distance.   CHECK ME OUT!

Liberty Ballers: for Philadelphia 76ers fans
Sixers Daily with Jas Kang - Paul Hudrick on the Doc Rivers potentially going to the Lakers, Mattise Thybulle's future in Philly, Tyrese Maxey's value and Tobias Harris trade talk

Liberty Ballers: for Philadelphia 76ers fans

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 24:49


In this episode, Jas is joined by Paul Hudrick to discuss: *The persistent talk about Doc Rivers going to the Lakers *Mattise Thybulle trade discussions *Tyrese Maxey's value *Could Tobias Harris be trade this offseason? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Powerful Female Leaders Podcast
The Biggest Mistake That Is Potentially Slowing You Down

The Powerful Female Leaders Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 9:59


Getting quick wins in your business is a great to build confidence and momentum. But the actual gold resides when these quick wins are balanced with consistent and sustainable results over time. In today's episode, Ana explains why not getting long-term support is slowing you down from reaching your goals. Let us know what you think on Instagram at @powerfulfemaleleaderspodcast Support the show

The Sports Junkies
PGA Championship Weekend, Dan Snyder potentially forced out, GSW up 3-0

The Sports Junkies

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 43:03


5/23 Hour 1 1:00- Justin Thomas wins the PGA Championship over the weekend.  15:20- Jarret Bell released a story saying that the NFL is "counting votes" on potentially getting rid of Dan Snyder.  33:45- GSW up 3-0 against the Mavs. 

TIME's Top Stories
The Small, Local Election With Potentially Major Climate Change Significance

TIME's Top Stories

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 6:32


Next week's primary election in Georgia has made national news as a potential bellwether of how voters view former President Donald Trump and his false claims that the 2020 presidential election in the state, which he lost, was stolen. Far from the national news, lower down the ballot, that same election on May 24 will also help shape where and how the state gets its electricity—and by extension whether the U.S. meets its goals of cutting the emissions that cause climate change.

BSN Denver Nuggets Podcast
Everything you need to know about Tim Connelly potentially heading to Minnesota

BSN Denver Nuggets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 64:15


Adam Mares, Harrison Wind, Brendan Vogt and Eric Wedum react to the report that Tim Connelly is in talks with the Minnesota Timberwolves to potentially become their new president of basketball operations. What would Connelly leaving Denver mean for the Nuggets? For ownership? For Nikola Jokic? Also, is assistant coach Jordi Fernandez leaving for Sacramento a big deal? And Bones Hyland makes 2nd Team All-Rookie. Tim Connelly's offer: 4:00 Would you judge Tim Connelly if he left? 13:35 What would the organization look like if Connelly left?: 20:20 The Kroenke's vs the Timberwolves' new ownership situation: 27:00 What do you expect from the Kroenke's?: 29:25 Fallout if Connelly left: 34:24 What does this mean for Nikola Jokic?: 38:30 The history with Masai Ujiri: 39:48 Bones Hyland makes the rookie all second team: 49:00 Jordi Fernandez to the Sacremento Kings: 55:55 Ownership stake rules: 1:00:18 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Dial In with Jonny Ardavanis
The Tongue pt. 1

Dial In with Jonny Ardavanis

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 27:27


In this two part series, Jonny Ardavanis is going to discuss the power of the tongue. James 1:26 says: “if anyone thinks he is religious and does not bridle his tongue, his religion is worthless.” Potentially you haven't considered the massive significance of how you speak, write, and communicate, but the Bible says: “death and life are in the power of the tongue (Prov. 18:21).” https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCGB5fYWHTNemqp9aZC232eg (Watch Videos) https://www.jonnyardavanis.com (Visit the Website ) https://www.instagram.com/dialinpodcast/ (Follow on Instagram) https://twitter.com/Jonnyardavanis (Follow on Twitter)

Doug & Wolf Show Audio
Wolf & Luke discuss the Suns potentially adding a big name in the offseason

Doug & Wolf Show Audio

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 41:19


Wolf and Luke talk about the Suns potentially adding a star to their mix this offseason and the NBA Conference Finals' series.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Ken Carman Show with Anthony Lima
Sam Monson: Mayfield being forced essentially to sit around as somebody's backup is a potentially very toxic situation

The Ken Carman Show with Anthony Lima

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 13:04


Sam Monson on what could be next for Baker Mayfield. Why it's not good for Baker Mayfield to stick around Cleveland. Can Baker be put back together? What's next for Deshaun Watson? Will rust be a long-term issue for Watson? Listen to The Ken Carman Show with Anthony Lima weekday mornings 6-10am on Sports Radio 92.3 The Fan and the Audacy App!

Astonishing Legends
What it Wasn't - Or How I Learned to Stop Dismissively Categorizing Potentially Paranormal Events as Mass Hysteria

Astonishing Legends

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 177:18


Often when one hears about some group of people claiming to experience a highly strange event or similarly acting out in bizarre and irrational manners, it's easy and common to dismiss the episode as a case of "mass hysteria." Phenomena like the audience reaction to Orson Welles' War of the Worlds radio broadcast, "The Dancing Plague of 1518," the "Windshield-Pitting Mystery of 1954," and "The Mad Gasser of Mattoon" are considered by much of the public to be examples of mass hysteria. In the late 1930s and decades after, some sociologists used occurrences like those to help model their theory of "Social Contagion." Like the idea that one or several people claim to experience something unusual, others hear about it and start to see the same thing. Soon it all spirals into an epidemic of vast numbers of people all testifying to the same weirdness with no real, mystical cause. But is the potentially antiquated term of mass hysteria or even its modern descendant "mass psychogenic illness" accurate or helpful? When explaining how some collectives of people can declare to see the same impossible thing, or how communities usually react in predictable patterns when faced with the Fortean, are they all just "hysterical" or "ill?" Are these events all the same? With the Enfield Monster, sociologist David L. Miller used the incident as a case study for what seems a more suitable way to think about many of the stories we cover, not as contagion or hysteria, but as "Collective Action and Behavior." We may never know what these cryptic creatures and mysterious happenings genuinely are, but at least we can better understand how people react to them and each other when they show up. Regarding the experiencers, we can know what it wasn't. These are important considerations because, after all, what is the value to humans if a paranormal event occurs and no one is around to witness it? Visit our webpage for this episode for a lot more information!

Sacred Symbols: A PlayStation Podcast
#201: Embracing the Chaos

Sacred Symbols: A PlayStation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 260:25


The Embracer Group's appetite for developers cannot be satiated. The never-ending expansion of what is rapidly becoming gaming's largest publishing entity has gobbled up three more studios from rival Square Enix (as well as a bunch of IP) for cash money. Does this say anything about Embracer? Probably not. It seems like they'll buy just about anything, and $300 million is a small price to pay for more than 1,000 heads and 50 licenses, including Tomb Raider. This deal does, however, say something about Square Enix. Potentially many things, in fact. Refocused on western second party relationships and Japanese internal development, some think Square Enix is trimming the fat to be purchased itself. But does that make sense? We discuss this deal extensively. Other news this week include rumblings of a takeover at Ubisoft, the leak of some of PlayStation Plus' upcoming retro games, the surprising lawsuit that potentially puts Yuji Naka's epic failure Balan Wonderworld in context, and more. As always, we touch on plenty of listener inquiries too, including ones about Reggie Fils-Aime, a potential sequel to Death Stranding, the likelihood a Punisher game might someday appear, and so on. We're back in the saddle after a very successful 200th episode, and we hope you enjoy. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices