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Laboratory technique to multiply a DNA sample for study

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The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 12.02.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 58:59


Videos https://brandnewtube.com/watch/sonia-elijah-interviews-efrat-fenigson-from-israel_Ws1DDYkiqAOXdis.html     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GWN2PV4v0lk&t=8s   Researchers find new link between a disrupted body clock and inflammatory diseases RCSI University of Medicine and Health Sciences, November 25, 2021 New research from RCSI has demonstrated the significant role that an irregular body clock plays in driving inflammation in the body's immune cells, with implications for the most serious and prevalent diseases in humans. The circadian body clock generates 24-hour rhythms that keep humans healthy and in time with the day/night cycle. This includes regulating the rhythm of the body's own (innate) immune cells called macrophages. When these cell rhythms are disrupted (due to things like erratic eating/sleeping patterns or shift work), the cells produce molecules which drive inflammation. This can lead to chronic inflammatory diseases such as heart disease, obesity, arthritis, diabetes and cancer, and also impact our ability to fight infection. (NEXT) Social media tied to higher risk of depression Massachusetts General Hospital, November 23, 2021 The latest in a spate of studies investigating links between use of social media and depression suggests the two go hand in hand. The new study follows a yearlong look at social media use and onset of depression among nearly 5,400 adults. None reported even mild depression at the start. But in multiple surveys over 12 months, depression status had worsened in some respondents, the study found. The risk rose with use of three hugely popular social media sites: Snapchat, Facebook and TikTok. None showed any signs of depression at the first survey. But after completing at least one similar follow-up, nearly 9% showed a "significant" increase in scores for depression risk. (NEXT) Havacado or two. Study finds eating lots of the fruit has public health import Randomized controlled trial found that families with high avocado consumption self-reported reduced caloric intake and an overall healthier diet University of California at San Diego, November 29, 2021 In a novel study, researchers conducted a randomized controlled trial comparing the potential health effects between families that consumed a low allotment of avocados (three per week) and families that consumed a high allotment (14 per week) over six months. They found that the high avocado allotment families self-reported lower caloric consumption, reducing their intake of other foods, including dairy, meats and refined grains and their associated negative nutrients, such as saturated fat and sodium. (NEXT) Crabapple supplements could help cut cholesterol, China study discovers Crabapple extract has been show to lower cholesterol in obese mice which were fed a high-fat diet, researchers in China have revealed. Beijing and Shanghai universities, November 30, 2021 The study points out that statins are the major therapy for hypercholesterolaemia and for the prevention of atherosclerosis. However, there is some evidence to suggest that they may increase the risk of diabetes, muscle pain, liver damage and cause other side effects. Crabapple has long been used for the treatment of diarrhoea, indigestion and other digestive diseases in traditional Chinese medicine, and its antioxidant benefits have frequently been studied. (NEXT) Aerobic exercise preserves brain volume and improves cognitive function Wake Forest School of Medicine, November 30, 2021 Using a new MRI technique, researchers found that adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) who exercised four times a week over a six-month period experienced an increase in brain volume in specific, or local, areas of the brain, but adults who participated in aerobic exercise experienced greater gains than those who just stretched. (NEXT) Are you a morning or an evening person? It might be due to your gut bacteria University of Haifa (Israel), November 22, 2021 A new study by the University of Haifa reveals that certain gut bacteria differ between morning and evening people. It is already known that there are some genetic differences between larks and owls, but research in fruit flies in our laboratory inspired us to test the impact of gut bacteria on human chronotypes," says Prof. Eran Tauber. Fecal samples were collected from 91 individuals in order to extract and sequence the bacterial DNA. Analysis of the DNA sequences from each sample allowed identification of all gut bacterial species and quantify their abundance. The chronotype of the participants was determined based on their self-reported sleep times during the weekend (waking up without an alarm clock). (OTHER NEXT) Sonia Elijah interviews Efrat Fenigson from Israel Efrat Fenigson, a chief marketing officer and human rights activist from Tel Aviv, Israel, candidly speaks to Sonia about how 'Covid' has been marketed, as if it were a brand, by world governments and the mainstream media. She talks about the general protest movement in Israel and how it evolved from anti-corruption to anti-lockdown/green-pass demonstrations. She gives insight into the psychological state of fear that many Israelis are accustomed to living under making them compliant in obeying the draconian Covid rules and to not question the mass vaccine rollout. (NEXT) Foreclosure Looms for Homeowners Who Thought They'd Won, Thanks to Top New York Court Ruling Sam Mellings The City and New York Focus, November 30, 2021 Christine Fife was “speechless with joy” when she won her foreclosure case in January 2020, she recalled, believing her decade under threat of foreclosure in her Upper West Side condo was finally over. Now, though, Fife is once again facing the seizure of the apartment she has owned since 1990. In February 2021, New York's top court issued a decision that eliminated a path that New York homeowners had used for years to fight foreclosure. The decision in Freedom Mortgage Corporation v. Engel allowed Fife's lender to renew its foreclosure suit against her. “They said it was OK. How can they change their mind?” Fife asked during an interview with New York Focus and THE CITY. Across New York State, homeowners who believed that their cases had been settled in their favor are now once again facing foreclosure due to the Engel decision. Many are in danger of losing their homes, even as two bills aimed at protecting owners wend their way through the state Legislature. Case Reopened In New York, if a borrower misses a mortgage payment, the lender is allowed to demand the entire remaining balance immediately and then move to foreclose after 120 days, if the money owed remains unpaid.. But a lender must start the legal proceedings within six years of first demanding full payment, or the suit becomes invalid. Until recently, the clock kept ticking until the lender informed the borrower that they were no longer seeking foreclosure. In Fife's case, the lender had never done so. The bank sued Fife twice: first in 2010, a case the lender claims it later voluntarily withdrew, and again in 2017. Her lawyers, representing Fife pro bono, successfully argued that the bank's second foreclosure suit was barred by the six-year limit and got it dismissed. But the Engel decision changed the rules. The Court of Appeals found that voluntarily ending a foreclosure suit stops the clock on the six-year time limit — even if the homeowner is never notified. The court's ruling applies retroactively to any foreclosure cases ongoing or still open to appeal at the time the decision was issued. Following the ruling, many foreclosures that expired under the six-year limit have been reopened or appealed to higher courts. Holly Meyer, a Suffolk County lawyer who represented one of the defendants in the Engel case, estimated that the number of affected homeowners could be in the tens of thousands. Fife's was one of them. In April 2021, the bank moved to renew its foreclosure suit against her — and the trial judge cited the Engel ruling as a reason to rehear the case. “I was shocked at this decision, because I had put all my faith in [the foreclosure court's] initial decision, which was in my favor,” Fife said. With Fife's best defense gone, her hopes for avoiding foreclosure now appear slim, her legal counsel acknowledged. ‘Incompetently' Managed Loans It's not uncommon for lenders to allow their right to foreclose to expire, according to real estate lawyers. “There are millions of residential loans being serviced somewhat incompetently, so these things do sometimes slip between the cracks,” said Joshua Stein, a commercial real estate lawyer. Real estate industry supporters of the Court of Appeals' decision say it made little sense for a foreclosure case to fail because of what they consider a clerical error — one that basically lets borrowers shirk their debts. “The idea that you should still be at risk because you haven't repaid the money you borrowed doesn't strike me as egregious,” Stein said. Homeowner attorneys say that cases get dropped all the time in the legal system because of technical violations of procedural requirements, and that foreclosure cases should be no different. “If you have somebody on trial for murder, but you find that their constitutional rights were violated, they go free. It's the same thing here,” Meyer said. Chief Judge Conflicted? The day after the Court of Appeals ruled on the Engel case, the law firm Greenberg Traurig, which had represented two of the plaintiffs, cheered what it called a “ground shifting” victory for lenders. “Statewide application will likely protect billions in assets for mortgage holders,” its press release claimed. Chief Judge Janet DiFiore, who wrote the majority opinion in Engel, was a Greenberg Traurig client at the time that she ruled in favor of their bank clients in that and other cases, the New York Law Journal reported in April. The firm defended her in a suit brought by judges forced into retirement as a cost-cutting measure. Defense attorneys said they had not been informed of the potential conflict for the judge who ruled against their clients. “The law's not on our side anymore, and that means that there are a number of people who will be facing foreclosure when they wouldn't have faced it a couple of years ago,” Julie Howe, a senior staff attorney at the New York Legal Assistance Group, who is representing Fife pro bono, told New York Focus. Then-Governor Andrew Cuomo swears in Janet DiFiore as the new chief judge of the New York State Court of Appeals, Feb. 8, 2016. Governor Andrew Cuomo's Office Jacob Inwald, director of foreclosure prevention at Legal Services NYC, said many of the foreclosure cases affected by the Engel decision originally stemmed from the real estate crash of 2008 and freewheeling lending leading up to it. Fife, for instance, had borrowed $731,000 against her apartment in April 2007 to pay living expenses after a disabling injury and divorce. Monthly payments were nearly $5,000, with adjustable rate mortgage that started at 8% annual interest, potentially rising as high as 15%. “I didn't know anything about mortgages,” Fife said. “I was just so happy that I was able to live on another day. I was probably the easiest take on the block.” Within a year, the bank alleged that she had fallen behind on her mortgage payments — kicking off foreclosure proceedings that her loan's holder, Wilmington Trust Association, has resurrected more than a decade later. ‘It's Really Scary' Rockland County resident Susan Azcuy is in a situation similar to Fife's — believing that she'd survived foreclosure only to find the cloud hanging over her once again. For 23 years, Azcuy and her husband kept up with the mortgage payments on their house in Pomona, including a 2005 refinancing, for which she took on a debt of $210,000 at 5.75% interest. But in 2012, after Azcuy's husband was fired from his job, they missed a payment and their lender quickly moved to foreclose. The bank voluntarily withdrew the suit in March 2016 for technical reasons but did not notify Azcuy, refiling the case the next month. It went to trial in 2019, and Azcuy won, after a key prosecution witness failed to show up. ‘We're still struggling. I was very, very hopeful to be able to continue living here.' Before Engel, this would have been the end of the case, since more than six years had elapsed since the 2012 foreclosure suit. But thanks to Engel, the six-year clock restarted in 2016 — giving Azcuy's lender another chance to sue. Due to penalties and foreclosure fees, Azcuy now owes nearly $400,000, just shy of double the amount of the 2005 refinancing. Efforts to reach a settlement or a modification with the bank have been unsuccessful, according to Azcuy's attorney, Derek Tarson of the Legal Aid Society of Rockland County. If the bank brings another foreclosure lawsuit, which Tarson believes is likely, Azcuy will not be able to rely on the defense that more than six years have passed. “It's really scary. We're still struggling,” Azcuy said. “I was very, very hopeful to be able to continue living here.” Lawmakers Respond State lawmakers have introduced two bills seeking to reverse some of Engel's effects. One measure, sponsored by Sen. Kevin Thomas (D-Nassau) and Assemblymember Helene Weinstein (D-Brooklyn), would require lenders to inform borrowers if they withdraw their demands for payment, since that action serves to stop the clock on the six-year countdown. If lenders withdraw the lawsuit but fail to notify the borrowers, the clock would keep ticking — a return to the status quo before Engel. The bill would also forbid lenders from foreclosing if any part of the loan had previously expired — a measure that would bar reviving suits against homeowners like Fife and Azcuy. The legislature is also considering a second bill, sponsored by Sen. James Sanders (D-Queens) and Assemblymember Latrice Walker (D-Brooklyn). This bill would prevent lenders from discontinuing a demand for full payment, stopping the six-year countdown clock, without the consent of the borrower. The measure also would start the countdown from the time that a mortgage holder missed a payment. Though meant to protect homeowners, the Sanders-Walker bill could actually incentivize lenders to begin foreclosure more quickly, one foreclosure defense attorney told New York Focus. “If the clock is ticking, all plaintiffs are going to want to do is get their case started,” the attorney, who asked not to be named, said. Sanders rejected the critique. “I don't think that you can further incentivize the financial institutions” to foreclose after the leeway granted them by Engel, he said. Whether either of the bills would apply retroactively to homeowners like Fife and Azcuy is an open question. “It may not be able to help those, but it is our desire,” Sanders said. “We will get guidance on whether we can do that.” Sanders said that he has spoken to Gov. Kathy Hochul and legislative leaders about his bill, and while they have not endorsed it, he said they are open to supporting it. (A Hochul spokesperson said the governor “will review all legislation that reaches her desk.” “We are making excellent progress with both, and we expect good things in the coming days,” Sanders said. (NEXT) Israeli study says COVID shot efficacy decreases dramatically after 3 months, calls for boosters British Medical Journal, November 24, 2021 A study published by The BMJ today finds a gradual increase in the risk of COVID-19 infection from 90 days after receiving a second dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. The study was carried out by the Research Institute of Leumit Health Services in Israel. Israel was one of the first countries to roll out a large scale COVID-19 vaccination campaign in December 2020, but which has seen a resurgence of infections since June 2021. The findings confirm that the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine provided excellent protection in the initial weeks after vaccination, but suggest that protection wanes for some individuals with time. To do this, the researchers examined electronic health records for 80,057 adults (average age 44 years) who received a PCR test at least three weeks after their second injection, and had no evidence of previous COVID-19 infection. Of these 80,057 participants, 7,973 (9.6%) had a positive test result. These individuals were then matched to negative controls of the same age and ethnic group who were tested in the same week. The rate of positive results increased with time elapsed since a second dose. For example, across all age groups 1.3% of participants tested positive 21-89 days after a second dose, but this increased to 2.4% after 90-119 days; 4.6% after 120-149 days; 10.3% after 150-179 days; and 15.5% after 180 days or more. (NEXT) 31,014 Deaths 2,890,600 Injuries Following COVID Shots in European Database of Adverse Reactions as Young, Previously Healthy People Continue to Die Health Impact News The European Union database of suspected drug reaction reports is EudraVigilance, and they are now reporting 31,014 fatalities, and 2,890,600 injuries, following COVID-19 injections. A Health Impact News subscriber from Europe reminded us that this database maintained at EudraVigilance is only for countries in Europe who are part of the European Union (EU), which comprises 27 countries. The total number of countries in Europe is much higher, almost twice as many, numbering around 50. (There are some differences of opinion as to which countries are technically part of Europe.) Total reactions for the mRNA vaccine Tozinameran (code BNT162b2, Comirnaty) from BioNTech/ Pfizer: 14,526 deaths and 1,323,370 injuries to 20/11/2021 Total reactions for the mRNA vaccine mRNA-1273 (CX-024414) from Moderna: 8,518 deaths and 390,163 injuries to 20/11/2021 Total reactions for the vaccine AZD1222/VAXZEVRIA (CHADOX1 NCOV-19) from Oxford/AstraZeneca: 6,145 deaths and 1,075,335 injuries to 20/11/2021 Total reactions for the COVID-19 vaccine JANSSEN (AD26.COV2.S) from Johnson & Johnson: 1,825 deaths and 101,732 injuries to 20/11/2021 (NEXT) Censorship = dictatorship Dr. Jessica Rose, November 29, 2021 So the censorship continues. I did a very detailed and informative interview with Frank McCaughey of Ireland on the subject of the pointlessness, potential harms and dangers with mass injecting children during this ‘pandemic' with the known non-sterilizing COVID-19 injectable products. And it has been remove Let's check out what YouTube's Community Guidelines are, shall we? YouTube's Community Guidelines: These determine what content is allowed on YouTube and help make YouTube a safe place to foster community. A safe place to foster community, eh? What kind of community are you thinkin' ‘bout there, Youtube? A community akin to an enslaved, dead-eyed mass of hypnotized automatons? If I may: no thanks on that. I'd rather live on that cat Island. So, for those of you who didn't get to see the video (I imagine that is all of you since it was up for less than 24 hours), I talked at length about the ‘don't's of injecting pre-pubescent children with experimental products for which the ingredient list is a big secret for a ‘disease' that they do not succumb to. Ah, I see now. It was because I mentioned Ivermectin. Boy. Youtube. Get with the program! Read some studies for crying out loud! And update your censorship guidelines! Make them reflect the scientific truth and not the weird false dictates of singular beings who feast on the ‘community' to increase their ‘power'. Here's what I found in their COVID-19 medical misinformation policy. Treatment misinformation: Content that encourages the use of home remedies, prayer, or rituals in place of medical treatment such as consulting a doctor or going to the hospital Content that claims that there's a guaranteed cure for COVID-19 Content that recommends use of Ivermectin or Hydroxychloroquine for the treatment of COVID-19 Claims that Hydroxychloroquine is an effective treatment for COVID-19 Categorical claims that Ivermectin is an effective treatment for COVID-19 Claims that Ivermectin and Hydroxychloroquine are safe to use in the treatment COVID-19 Other content that discourages people from consulting a medical professional or seeking medical advice Ok. I want to work backwards through the italicized points, if I may. 1. Hey Youtube. I AM a medical sciences professional. This IS my consultation. Doesn't that make your dictate of discouraging ‘consulting a medical professional' moot? I am not only not discouraging this, in addition to encouraging this, I am this. 2. Hey Youtube. GET WITH THE PROGRAM. Ivermectin has been affiliated with Nobel-ity. It's not only been awarded a prize for its safe use as an anti-parastic for decades and been doled out to literally billions of people, (including pregnant women and children) with no ill effects, it's has an excessively successful safety profile as an off-label drug in the context of COVID-19.¹ 3. It has also been clinically-tested and proven effective in the context of COVID-19 as an off-label drug - which is more than we can say about the clot shots, eh?²³⁴⁵⁶⁷⁸⁹¹⁰¹¹ 4. Based on points, 1, 2 and 3, I would recommend the off-label use of Ivermectin. As a Medical Scientist. Oh and by the way, aren't you violating your own ‘Community Standards' with your point on a ‘guaranteed cure for COVID-19'? You guys are so sure that your injections are the only way to deal with this situation. Doesn't that imply that this guarantees a cure? No wait. It doesn't. But what it does do is set a precedent and instigate a thought: there will never be a cure for COVID-19. It's incurable. Which is: true. But it's also no worse than the flu in the non-vulnerable, which is most people. Including children. So we don't need to seek a ‘cure'. Just like we don't need to seek a ‘cure' for the common cold or the flu. That's one of the things that our bloody immune systems are for and very good it - preventing disease. Viruses are EVERYWHERE. ALL THE TIME. It's not a reason to freak out. Educate yourself and others on this. It about high time people learned that we are constantly engaging and have co-evolved with viruses and bacteria for the entirety of our existences. It's what we are.¹² Our genome is 7% retrovirus. If we attempt to destroy this magnificence then we are not only stupid, but we will be destroyed in turn. Leave the immune system alone. Or rather, optimize it. Be healthy. Avoid toxins. As much as you can. Pretty simple. So there you are Youtube. You have been brought up-to-date. Now, I don't like simply bitching about stuff, even though it does feel good, so I wanted to bring it to everyone's attention that you can fight to have your content re-instated once it has been removed. However, it is not a common occurrence to have a video re-instated once it has been censored. The ones that do get re-instated typically are ones that were erroneously taken down. I think that the Youtube overlords would argue that since they are paid to enforce the dictate narrative, they cannot stand behind science and truth, and therefore, I think they would hold fast to their ‘claims' that Ivermectin is dangerous and ineffective. (NEXT) Why aren't healthcare workers speaking out about the catastrophe caused by the vaccines? Steve Kirsch, November 23, 2021 Everyone thinks that if the jabs were really dangerous, doctors and other healthcare workers would be speaking out about it. They are wrong. Here are the four main reasons they do not speak out.Two important things you need to know: 1.All the kids were recently vaccinated. 2. Kids that age NEVER get tachycardia (i.e., the medical experts I've talked to have never seen it before in their careers). Here are some reasons very few people are speaking out: 1. Delegated trust. People trust their doctors, the doctors trust other doctors and ultimately the CDC. Nobody is independently verifying the CDC is telling the truth. Doctors are really really bad in critically reading scientific studies. Mask guidelines are the PERFECT example of this. There isn't any scientific proof (well-done randomized trial) that masks work. Yet very few question the narrative (and those that do are ostracized). So everyone basically goes with the flow and the whole thing is a positive feedback loop despite zero scientific basis. See my article Masks don't work and read the accolades in the Nature article. All these experts who hailed the study never read it with a critical eye and lack the skills to do so. This is how misinformation propagates. 2.Fear of job loss. Nobody wants to lose their job. Look what happened to Deborah Conrad and others who speak out. Fired within hours after speaking out. So the lab technicians who are now seeing kids with tachycardia just keep their mouth shut. They know something is very wrong, but their job is more important. Besides, if they spoke out, it wouldn't make any difference since they are just a lab technician. Doctors have a similar problem. The medical system, despite claims of physician autonomy, actually offers very little, as it takes very little to be thrown out of the system. Medicare, the FDA, a state medical board, a malpractice insurer, the DEA, a hospital medical staff, an employer - you only have to cross one of these to have your career ruined. Combine that with the idea that most physicians wouldn't be willing to stand against a medical establishment agency such as the CDC (the ones who will have long since been ostracized) and that to do so would require a huge amount of energy and time spent on medical paper research to make a case (and most docs don't have time for that) and that most of medicine is necessarily a form of group think anyway. Then add on to it that the policy makers in large medical corporations roles are more immediately to protect the interests of the corporation than to "save the world," and you arrive at our current situation. 3.Belief that COVID is even worse than the vaccine injuries. Many people are deceived by erroneous reports that the number of vaccine cases (e.g., of myocarditis) are occurring far less often now that the vaccines have been rolled out. Dr. John Su is the big culprit here because he's never told the world that VAERS is under-reported. The pediatric cardiologists know what is going on, but they aren't going to say anything due to #1. So I see doctors tweeting the myth that “sure, there is myo after the vaccine, but the rates due to COVID are worse so the vaccine is the better of the two options.” 4.Belief that the injuries are really rare. I know a doctor who treats vaccine injured patients. He has no clue whether these are every single vaccine injured patient in the US or he's only seeing a tiny fraction of the injuries. He believes he's seeing them all so writes it off as just “coincidence” and “bad luck” since if it was the vaccine, the CDC would have spotted it. 5. Cognitive dissonance/trust in authority figures. They are so convinced the vaccines are safe (since nobody else is speaking out), that any adverse events that happen must be due to something else. Positive feedback loop. 6.Belief that they can treat you for your vaccine side effects, but that they can't treat you if you have COVID. So lesser of two evils. And of course, they think no early treatments work, so they think they are doing you a favor by telling you to get the vaccine. 7.Belief that there is no viable alternative for treating COVID and that the vaccines work. So even 100,000 dead or injured people is better than 750,000 dead people from COVID. 8. Trust in the NIH and CDC. If it was a problem, the CDC would tell people. Telling people isn't their job. Their job is to follow the direction set by the experts. 9.Fear of being ostracized. People who do research fear if they speak out they would be labelled as anti-vaxers and their research would thus be discredited. 10.Critical thinkers have been fired. Hospitals and medical facilities have already fired vaccine hesitant employees per vaccine mandates thereby self selecting for vax believers. 11. They think that the side-effects show that the vaccine is “working.” This is more of a patient thing. It's how the patients look at their adverse events… as a positive thing. (You really can't make this stuff up.) 12.They are being paid to look the other way. The federal government gave “grants” (aka BRIBES) to hospitals and physicians to promote the vaccines. If they speak out against them now, the government will demand the grants are repaid. [A physician reported this to me on Telegram. You really can't make this stuff up.] 13. They will lose their research funding if they publish their results.

Jutranja kronika
Vlada zaradi koronavirsune različice omikron zaostrila pogoje za vstopanje v Slovenijo; danes o zaostritvi pogojev za obisk božičnih sejmov

Jutranja kronika

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 22:47


Vlada je na sinočnji dopisni seji zaradi zajezitve širjenja koronavirusa spremenila pravila za vstopanje v Slovenijo. Vsi, ki so bili v zadnjih 14-ih dneh v Južni Afriki, Lesoti, Bocvani, Zimbabveju, Mozambiku, Namibiji ali Esvatiniju, bodo morali ob prihodu v Slovenijo najprej opraviti PCR-test, nato pa oditi v obvezno 10-dnevno karanteno na domu. Po pričakovanjih pa naj bi vlada na današnji seji tudi zaostrila pogoje za izvedbo božičnih sejmov. V posvetovalni skupini vladi predlagajo tudi obvezno nošenje mask na območju sejma. Ostali poudarki oddaje: - Parlamentarni odbor za finance v drugem branju podprl spremembe zakona o dohodnini. - Za izvajanje kmetijske politike v obdobju od 2023 do 2027 skupno 310 milijonov evrov. - Notranji in pravosodni ministri Unije in Zahodnega Balkana o regionalnem sodelovanju in podpori približevanju balkanskih držav evropskim integracijam.

Thoughts on the Market
Special Episode: COVID-19 - Omicron Variant Causes Concern

Thoughts on the Market

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 9:22


Last week's news of the Omicron variant of COVID-19 has raised questions about transmissibility, vaccine efficacy, and virus mortality. Where does this variant leave us in the fight against COVID-19 and how are markets reacting?----- Transcript -----Andrew Sheets Welcome to Thoughts on the Market. I'm Andrew Sheets, chief cross asset strategist for Morgan Stanley Research.Matthew Harrison And I'm Matthew Harrison, Biotechnology AnalystAndrew Sheets And on this special edition of the podcast, we'll be talking about a new COVID variant and its impact on markets. It's Tuesday, November 30th at 2p.m. in London.Matthew Harrison And it's 9:00 a.m. in New York.Andrew Sheets So Matt, first things first, you know, we've seen a pretty major development over the American Thanksgiving holiday. We saw a new COVID variant, the omicron variant, kind of come into the market's attention. Can you talk just a little bit about why this variant has gotten so much focus and what do we know about it?Matthew Harrison Sure. I think there are probably three major factors that have driven the focus. The first thing is there was clear scientific concern because of the number of mutations in the variant. And specifically, there are over 50 mutations, 32 of which are in the spike protein region, which is where vaccines are targeted. And then a number in the receptor binding domain, which is where the antibodies typically tend to bind. So the antibodies that either vaccines or antibody therapies create. And what we know when we look at many of these mutations is they're present in other variants: gamma, delta, alpha, beta and we know that many of these mutations in a pair one or two have led to reduction in vaccine effectiveness. And so, when they're combined all together, from a scientific standpoint, people were very concerned about having all of those mutations together and what that would mean in terms of vaccine escape.Andrew Sheets So Matt, this is obviously a challenging situation because this is a new variant. It's just been discovered. And yet, you know, a lot of people are trying to figure out what the longer-term implications could be. So, you know, when you look at this with the kind of a limited amount of information, you know, what are the key characteristics that you're going to be watching that that you think we should care about?Matthew Harrison There are probably three things that I'm focused on and we can probably touch on in detail. So the first one is transmissibility, and the reason for that is if this variant overtakes Delta and becomes dominant globally, then we're going to care about the two other factors a lot more, which is vaccine escape and lethality. However, if it's not more transmissible than Delta and Delta remains the dominant variant, then this may be an issue in small pockets, but ultimately will fade and continue to be overtaken by Delta. And so that's why transmissibility is the primary focus. And so what do we know about transmissibility right now? We have a couple of pieces of information out of South Africa. The first is they have sequenced a number of recent COVID patients. And in those sequences, the vast majority or almost all of them have been Omicron. So that suggests that it is overtaking Delta. But again, sometimes sequence results can be biased because they're not a population sample and they're a selection of a certain subset of people. The second piece of information, which to me is more compelling, is I'm sure everybody's aware of the PCR tests. There's a certain kind of deletion here in this variant that that that you can pick up with a PCR test and so you can see the frequency of that deletion. And that that frequency has risen from about a background rate of about 5% in the last week and a half to about 50% of the PCR tests coming back suggestive of this variant in South Africa. And so that's a much bigger sample size than the sequencing sample size. And so that suggests at least in the small subset that you're seeing greater transmissibility compared to Delta. Now it's going to take time to confirm that. And now that we've seen cases globally in a lot of countries over the next week or two, everybody's going to be watching how quickly the Omicron cases rise compared to Delta to confirm whether or not it's more transmissible than Delta.Andrew Sheets This question of vaccine evasion. There's there has been some increased concern about this new variant that it might be able to evade vaccines. Why do people think that? And you know, how soon might we know?Matthew Harrison Why don't we start with the timeline, because that's the simpler part. The experiments to figure that out take about two weeks. And just so everybody has the background on this, you need to take the virus, you need to grow it up. And once you have a sample of it, then you take blood from people that have recovered from COVID and blood from people that have been vaccinated that are full of those antibodies. And you put them in the in the dish and you find out how much virus you kill. And that'll tell you how effective the serum from vaccinated or previously infected individuals are against the new variant. So that process typically takes about two weeks. So then why are people worried about vaccine evasion with this variant? Primarily because of the known mutations that it carries and the unknown mutations. And of the known mutations that it carries, it carries the same set of mutations as in beta, and the beta variant had significant vaccine evasion properties that never became dominant, but it did reduce vaccine effectiveness by about six-fold. And so, I think the concern is with those mutations, plus a range of other mutations known to have vaccine evasion properties, having them all together has really significantly increased concern about how much that may hurt the vaccine's ability to stop infection.Andrew Sheets And, Matt, so you talked about the importance of transmissibility, you know, you talked about some of the reasons why the concerns are higher around vaccine evasion with this variant. And the last thing you talked about was the lethality of this variant. And again, you know, what are you looking for there? Is there anything that concerns you with the information that we know and when might we know more?Matthew Harrison So this is the hardest question because as is typical, you get a lot of anecdotal reports about what's happening with recently infected patients, but it takes a while, on order of four to five weeks, to really understand if there is a significant difference in mortality or hospitalization. So we have very little information around those factors. You have seen in the capital region, in South Africa, where you've where you've seen these rising cases, a rise in hospitalizations, but we don't know if all those cases are Omicron cases or not. And we haven't seen mortality at all. But again, with recent infections, it usually takes four or five weeks to start to see the potential impact of those infections on mortality.Matthew Harrison And Andrew, I think one other thing which is important to mention is while we're while we're talking about severity of disease and lethality, we have to remember that in addition to vaccines, we do have now other effective treatments, including antibody therapies and oral therapies. And while some antibody therapies are likely not to work against Omicron, at least two or three of them are. And so you have you will have some effective antibody therapies. And then the oral therapies, given their mechanisms of action, should not be impacted. So we will have oral therapies in terms of treatment. So hopefully, even if we do get a scenario where there is significant impact on vaccine efficacy, this will not be like going back to the beginning of the pandemic, where we didn't have other effective treatments available.Matthew Harrison Andrew, unlike normal episodes, maybe it'll be my chance since the markets have been so volatile. How has this impacted your outlook on the markets in the near to medium term?Matthew Harrison I know inflation and the inflation debate and the impact of central banks on inflation has been a sort of key debate that I've heard you guys reflecting on.Andrew Sheets Yeah. So I think probably the thing I should say up front is at the moment, we don't think we have enough evidence around this variant to change our baseline economic forecast to change that optimistic view on growth. Now what it might change is some of the timing around it, and I think we saw a little bit of this with the Delta variant. Where, you know, that was a big development in 2021, you know, people didn't see that coming. And you know, if you step back and think about this year, the market was still good, yield still rose, there was a lot of market movement, very consistent with better economic growth if you take the year as a whole, even though you had this variant, but the variant did introduce some kind of twists and turns along the way. So you know, that's currently the way that we're thinking about this new omicron variant that it is not likely or we don't know enough yet to be confident that it would really change that economic outlook, especially because we think there are a lot of good reasons why growth could be solid, but it might introduce some near-term uncertainty. You know, the interesting thing about, as you mentioned, inflation is that it could affect inflation in both directions. It could cause inflation to be higher, for example, if it, you know, causes shutdowns in countries that are important for producing key goods. And you can't get the things that you want, and the price goes up. But it could also drive prices down. You know, on last Friday oil prices fell by over 10%. You know, that is a big part of inflation certainly as most people experience it. Gas prices will be lower based on what happened on Friday. So that can drive inflation down so it can cut both ways.Matthew Harrison Andrew, it's been great talking to you. Thanks for your thoughts.Andrew Sheets Matt, always a pleasure to talk to you.Matthew Harrison As a reminder, if you enjoy Thoughts on the Market, please take a moment to rate and review us on the Apple Podcast app. It helps more people find the show.

코리아헤럴드 팟캐스트
[팟캐스트] (432) ‘오미크론 유입 막아라' 정부 “남아프리카 8개국에서 오는 외국인 입국금지”/ BTS "한국 아티스트로서 보이지 않는 벽 느껴”

코리아헤럴드 팟캐스트

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 27:53


진행자: 홍유, Naomi Garyan 1. Korea bans foreign arrivals from eight African countries over omicron요약: ‘오미크론 유입 막아라' 정부 “남아프리카 8개국에서 오는 외국인 입국금지”[1] South Korea is implementing tougher entry rules for arrivals from eight African countries in response to omicron, a new and potentially more contagious variant of COVID-19 first identified in South Africa and Botswana, starting Saturday at midnight.*implement: (동사) 시행하다, (명사) 도구* in response to: ~에 응하여*contagious: 전염되는, 전염성의 [2] The Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency called an emergency meeting Saturday evening with 13 ministries and announced that all foreigners who have been in the newly listed African countries will be refused entry to Korea. The travel restrictions apply to South Africa, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Namibia, Lesotho, Eswatini, Mozambique and Malawi.*ministry: 정부의 각 부처 *refuse: 거절하다*restriction: 제한 [3] Korean citizens departing from the southern African countries will be required to quarantine at a government-approved facility for 10 days upon arrival, regardless of their vaccination status. *be required to: ~하라는 요구를 받다*regardless of: ~에 상관없이 [4] They will be asked to take a PCR test on the first, fifth and last day of quarantine and must be negative before they can be released.*be asked to: ~하라는 요구를 받다*quarantine: 격리기사 원문: http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20211128000131 2. BTS leader says he feels ‘invisible wall' for Korean artists요약: BTS "한국 아티스트로서 보이지 않는 벽 느껴[1] RM, leader of the K-pop sensation BTS, said Sunday (US time) he felt there is an "invisible wall" for Korean artists despite the group's back-to-back success in the global music industry.*back to back: 서로 등을 맞대고, 꼬리에 꼬리를 물고, 연이어*industry: 산업 [2] The remark was seen as referring to the group's failure to win nomination for the top four Grammys despite a series of dazzling successes, such as producing back-to-back Billboard Hot 100 chart-toppers and winning the coveted top honor at the American Music Awards.*refer to: 언급하다*dazzling: 눈부신, 휘황찬란한*coveted: 탐내던 [3] "We secured the AMAs' artist of the year and a Grammy nomination, which means a lot to an artist," he said during a press conference at SoFi Stadium in Los Angeles. "Still, I feel there is an invisible wall, such as our identity as an artist who began its career in South Korea and language limitations."*secure: (형용사) 안심하는, 안전한 (동사) 얻어 내다, 획득하다, 고정시키다*press conference: 기자회견 [4] Last week, the South Korean group won the artist of the year at the AMAs and earned a Grammy nomination for the second consecutive year after its back-to-back Billboard Hot 100 chart-toppers, including "Butter" and "Permission to Dance."*earned: 얻다, 받다*consecutive: 연이은기사원문: http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20211129000083See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

SuperFeast Podcast
#144 Sexual Activation and Feminine Embodiment with Eva Williams

SuperFeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 76:53


Eva Williams is the founder of Golden Lotus; A divine online portal of meditations, movement practices, and sexual/spiritual energy education designed to cultivate spiritual awakening, sexual activation, and embodied sovereignty. This episode explores rebirth and the unfolding of the sacred feminine through preparation and activation rituals, with a deep dive into birth and pregnancy. Tahnee and Eva journey into the numinous layers of Eva's healing work, her Golden Lotus portal, her focus on cultivating and purifying the body through ancient techniques, sexual embodiment, self-pleasure practices, and the many dimensions of birth work. A healer and teacher with over a decade of experience in bodywork, energy work, and feminine sexual cultivation techniques, Eva carries a depth of knowledge that women need now more than ever. Currently, the way most women in society birth is within the structure of an over-medicalised patriarchal system. Sacred feminine lineages of natural birthing wisdom have been at large, replaced with time constraints, interventions, inductions, and regulations; The antithesis of a naturally unfolding feminine space. How did we end up here? With so much of her work focused on this space and where sexual embodiment falls into birth, Eva discusses the importance of birth preparation; From detoxing, orgasms, and opening the pelvis to the deep work of trusting the body and baby to do what they instinctively know how to do. This conversation is a deep weaving of energetic, sexual, and birth culture healing; For all women, past, present, and future.   "Many people come into tantra with a concept of a partner base in mind. But the way I was trained, particularly with my teachers in this more Sufi tradition, I never went into any of this work looking for my sexuality. I never thought I would only work with women; I never thought I would be working with birth. That was not my aim; My aim was to heal people. I worked on everyone. Ultimately, I wanted to find God. I wanted a very deep spiritual experience or a series of those. And over time, that guided me in that direction.  But there was a level of care and sobriety cultivated within me before I was put on that path. And this level of deep devotion and sobriety to my self-development was paramount".   - Eva Williams     Tahnee and Eva discuss: Doula work. Ultrasounds. Inducing labour. Foetal monitoring. Dolphin midwives. Birth preparation. Empowered birth. Tantric practices. Devine Female Orgasm. Self-pleasure practices. Feminine embodiment. Female sexuality and birth. The pelvis is a fluid body. Somatics and embodiment. Time constraints placed on pregnancy and birthing.   Who is Eva Louise Williams? Eva Louise Williams is a healer and teacher with over a decade of experience in bodywork, energy work, and feminine sexual cultivation techniques. She began her journey at 18 learning reiki and pranic healing, before becoming initiated into Kriya yoga (the lineage of Babaji) at 20, then went on to study Shiatsu, Japanese Acupuncture, and Taoist sexual cultivation techniques. She began teaching others at 26 and received the transmission for Golden Lotus at the age of 29. She currently has over 10,000 hours of experience as a bodyworker and teacher. Eva is also a doula, a birth educator, and an RYT 500 in tantric Hatha and kundalini lineages. Golden Lotus was founded to both serve and lead female seekers towards awakening and remembering Self-love & trust. It is a series of teachings that cultivate spiritual and sovereign embodiment; the focus lies in stabilising, purifying, and awakening through ancient techniques and spiritual secrets taught through a state of ritual and Holy full-body Prayer.     CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ON APPLE PODCAST    Resources: goldenlotus.com Golden Lotus Instagram   Q: How Can I Support The SuperFeast Podcast? A: Tell all your friends and family and share online! We'd also love it if you could subscribe and review this podcast on iTunes. Or  check us out on Stitcher, CastBox, iHeart RADIO:)! Plus  we're on Spotify!   Check Out The Transcript Here:   Tahnee: (00:00) Hi everybody, and welcome to the SuperFeast Podcast. Today, I'm joined by Eva Williams. I'm really excited to have her here. I've been following her work online and she's really aligned with what we do at SuperFeast. She's an explorer of this wide world of Daoist medicine through the Japanese lineage, but also, she waves in, from what I can tell, you seem to bring in all these beautiful, different traditions, Sufism, Kriya yoga, different types of feminine embodiment, Pranic healing, that kind of stuff. So I'm really excited to have you here today. I'm really excited to share with our community your work.   Tahnee: (00:37) And if you guys are interested, we'll talk about it through the podcast, but Eva has a whole lot of resources on her website, courses you can do related to different aspects of a lot of the stuff we teach at SuperFeast. So thank you for joining us here today, Eva, it's such a pleasure to have you here.   Eva Williams: (00:53) My pleasure. Thank you so much.   Tahnee: (00:57) Yeah, I'm so excited. I think I first came across you on Instagram and I've had a look through what you offer. I know you haven't studied with Mantak, but it really seems aligned with a lot of the work that I learned through studying with him, the feminine work around energy cultivation. Obviously, you've studied Shiatsu and Japanese acupuncture. So you speak to the meridians and all those kinds of things. Would you mind telling us a bit about your journey here? How did you get to be offering Golden Lotus to the world?   Eva Williams: (01:30) Yeah, sure. All right. My journey's been quite interesting in terms of length because my mom is really into alternative medicine. I remember when I was six years old and I just had this incredibly bad tonsillitis, it was to the point where I was being taken out of school for days and days every week. And my mom noticed that I responded really, really well to the osteopath that she would take us to because she used to take us all three to the osteopath regularly. And so the osteopath said, "Look, this kid is responsive as hell. You should just take her to a cranial osteopath because that will help."   Eva Williams: (02:12) So I started going to this professional cranial osteopath when I was six, and it was the only thing that assisted, it was the only thing my body would really respond to. So really, from an early age, my mom knew that, particularly me, I think my brother and sister definitely as well, but particularly me, if anything would happen, like when I was 13 and I had anxiety, my mom was like, "Oh, we could put her on anti-anxiety or we could do reflexology with Bach flower remedies." And also, I had psoriasis, I had developed psoriasis when I was 13. And psoriasis, for those of you who don't know, is a skin issue, and it's one of these just really stubborn, autoimmune things.   Eva Williams: (02:55) Anything that's autoimmune is basically, no offence to all of the fantastic doctors and the medical community, but anything that's autoimmune is basically in the realm of, "We don't really know what the fuck is happening, so here's some steroids. That's where we're at." And so I started trying out these different things and some of them are called like bowel neurotherapies, which are where you'd have a salt bath and then UV light therapy or something like that. And there's not a lot of sun in the Netherlands where I was living at the time. So I started getting into this world where every time I'd be going to this clinic, I'd be checking out the cards on the notice board.   Eva Williams: (03:34) And there'd always be like random things like Karma healing or like emotional Chakra clearing. And one day I found this card and I was like, "This is so good." I walked around with this card for like a week or two, and then I called the person. And I remember, as soon as I called her, she was like, "Yeah, how can I help you?" I'm like, "Look, I don't really know what you do. Do you speak English? I don't really know what you do, but I feel really like this is something that I need to try." And she was like, "Hmm, no, you need Dini." I was like, "I'm sorry, have we even met? I'm trying to book an appointment with you."   Eva Williams: (04:04) And she was like, "No, you need Dini." I was like, "Oh, okay. I need Dini." And then this woman was this like 75-year-old woman who looked so young. And she was like, "How old do you think I am?" I'm like, "We've been through this before." She was just amazing. And she barely spoke any English. And I remember I was 15 when I first went to see her, and she did Meridian massage. She did Meridian clearing and healing. She was just a healer, so she would tell me a bunch of different things, and then she would do this work on me. She would tell me things that I look back on now, I'm like, "Dude, she was so on point."   Eva Williams: (04:44) But at the time, I was like, "What the fuck is she talking about?" She's like, "You're taking on a lot from your father." I'm like, "Okay."   Tahnee: (04:51) What does that mean?   Eva Williams: (04:51) Exactly. And now, I'm like, "I'm that person." But it was quite a unique experience. And I remember when she first read my astrology chart, she just looked at me. And it was very Dutch. The Dutch are very dry, they don't beat around the bush, they're very pragmatic and straightforward. And she was like, "Wow, that's not good." I was like, "Why are you doing this to me?" So she started saying to me really early on when I was 15, 16, I didn't like high school, so I left high school when I was 15 to teach myself. She started saying to me really regularly, "You have to promise me that you will do this work." She's like, "Do you think what I do is amazing?" I'm like, "I think it's pretty out there."   Eva Williams: (05:36) And she's like, "Okay, but what you are going to do is this, but much, much more." And she's like, "You have to promise me." And my mom taught me from when I was really young that a promise is a really strong word and you don't use it if you can't keep it. So I was like, "Far out, man, this is my life ahead of me and you want me to..., " But she sent me to some other people, liquid crystal healers and all sorts of things, so I was getting into some really bizarro stuff. And I wasn't telling my parents that much about this because it no longer had this homoeopathic application anymore. Now, it was just like, "Fuck it, I'm going to go on a journey and meet the [inaudible 00:06:07]. See you later."   Eva Williams: (06:08) I was getting into some really out-there stuff at like 16, 17, but it was, it was really amazing. So I followed that thread and I taught myself, I homeschooled myself. And I got into a really great university. And so I went to university, everyone told me people are more free thinking in university, etc, etc. And I thought, "Okay, great." But actually I didn't find that, I actually found that the institutionalised information had just become denser. I didn't find that people were more free thinking, I found that there were more presumptions. And especially for someone who didn't go through the IB or the international baccalaureate programme, it was really difficult for me.   Eva Williams: (06:51) I had some really awakening moments, just some really jarring stuff happened where I was like, "I don't think I really belong here." And my dad moved to India that year, and so my brother and sister and I all went to see him in India. My dad's a geologist, so all around the house, ever since we were little, we'd had tumbled rocks, amethyst, turquoise, this or that. So he was always teaching us about all these crystals. So when my brother and I got to India, we saw the tumbled rocks, these beautiful amethyst, and we both took one. We were like, "Let's go to the Himalayas."   Eva Williams: (07:28) He's like, "Yeah, let's learn yoga from a really old yogi." I was like, "Yeah, let's go do that." So and I was like, "Dad, I'm taking this rock with me." He's like, "If you take that, you're bringing it back. That's my rock." So I took this amethyst in my pocket and I went into the Himalayas. And I met a woman and she... I wanted to study Reiki, that was my thing. She just looked at me and she was like, "Hey, look, I'm going to give you these codes for all the different levels of Reiki, and then I need you to come back and I want you to teach my level two students." I'm like, "Lady, I just walked in here. I don't know what Reiki is yet."   Tahnee: (08:01) I've got to learn.   Eva Williams: (08:06) "I've got a nab at this, I had a dream on the bus. There's a lot going on right now. I don't think I'm ready to teach people something I haven't learned." But what she was picking up on was that I could touch people and feel what they were experiencing. So I came back the next day, and I was just putting my hands on people and I just explained what I could see or feel. And she's like, "You need to promise me ... " I was like, "You know what, I've heard all of this before, my friend. I have heard all of this before." So I went back to the Netherlands to university, and I was doing my 30 days. You have to do this self Reiki thing after you do Reiki.   Eva Williams: (08:45) And during that period of time, I was like, "I'm not meant to be an architect, I'm not meant to be doing what I'm doing. And so I need to go." And so I gave away everything I owned and I said to my dad, "I'm free again." And he's like, "Yeah, great. You left high school twice and now you're leaving an international honours university. This is a great run you're having over here. I hope you put my amethyst back."   Tahnee: (09:07) Yeah. So proud.   Eva Williams: (09:10) He's like, "You'll face... " I'm joking. And he was like, "Okay, look, you've always been who you are, no one's stopping that. But what are you going to do? You should have a bit of a plan." And I was like, "Yeah, well, what do I have to my name?" He's laughing. He's like, "What do you have to your name? You're a broke student. You have nothing but a ticket home to New Zealand that I will give you until you're 22." So I was like, "All right, great. I'll take it." So I went to New Zealand for three weeks and I went for a Reiki session. And this woman, she did that same thing, she's like, "You don't need me, you need Barbara and you need Jan."   Eva Williams: (09:43) And I'm like, "Okay, send me the names." So I started exploring all these different modalities of incredible light work, just incredible, incredible things while I was there. I go down to the ocean and dolphins would come and visit me, and then I'd go see the healers, and they're like, "You called those dolphins." I'm like, "Okay. All right. Let's calm down." But now I'm like, "We all call the dolphins." Now, I'm like, "Of course, I called the dolphins."   Tahnee: (10:07) They're our people.   Eva Williams: (10:08) My allies. They came to me in my hour of need. It was just a beautiful time. And then one day, in my heart, I just heard... I was waiting for that moment where you hear it from within, because I have a very active mind, so I can make up whatever I want to hear. But I heard Melbourne from my heart. And I was like, "Okay, that's where it's going to be." So I called my parents, I'm like, "I'm going to Melbourne." They were like, "Oh, thank God, she's got a plan." And I went there and I thought I was going to stay doing something graphic design or something design oriented, because that's a big part of my passion in life.   Eva Williams: (10:42) And I found the Australian Shiatsu College, and I found my shakes. I found my Sufi shakes. And once I found these two things, everything else fell in line. Yes, I was initiated into Kriya yoga over when I was 21, which was amazing. When I was 20, still finding my feet, I hadn't found the college yet, I hadn't found my shakes yet. I used to lie in my bedroom listening to singing balls. And that was this one guy who I just loved, very camp, but amazing, but just incredible sound healer, just such an amazing heart and soul. And he would just put all this water in a bow and he'd be like, "These are the dolphin's ball, the dolphins are coming to sing us."   Eva Williams: (11:26) And he would hit it and he would play it. And it was like, oh my God, this man, I don't even know where he comes from, but he's amazing." So one day I fell asleep, listening to this and I woke up and how you know YouTube just plays. And I saw this image on my screen, and I looked at it and it was this blue light and this golden man. And it just said, "The golden body of the Yogi." And I knew in that moment this is why I'm on the planet. This is why I'm on the planet. And so then I found out who that was, and that was an image of Babaji. And so then I found out about Kriya yoga.   Eva Williams: (12:00) And it's interesting because when I had looked for yoga schools in India years before, the only ones that I had found that I wanted to go to were the Kriya yoga schools. And so I became initiated into the Kriya yoga lineage of the Babaji and then his disciple Lahiri Mahasaya, and then Sri Yukteswar, and Paramahamsa Yogananda. And that was the beginning of things unlocking for me. And then I found Shiatsu in oriental medicine, and I went on to study Japanese acupuncture. And then I also found a teacher, a female teacher, and she did a beautiful mixture of yoga and Daoist work with the Jade egg. And then through the studies that I was doing and her even teaching in the same building, I just made this place my home and we'd get all these amazing international practitioners.   Eva Williams: (12:50) I found myself picking up exactly what I needed from that, including doula training and all sorts of things like this that were going on in the space. And then I worked at a Japanese bath house after I graduated for five years or so, I think it was, or something around that. And I really was so lucky because even if you want to rack up hours as a practitioner, it's very hard to find a place to be doing flat out work as Shiatsu practitioner just right out of school. But I was able to rack up at 10,000 hours really quickly in my first, I would say, first six or seven years of work.   Eva Williams: (13:27) And then I went to Bali, I got married. I went to Bali for a honeymoon, and then I just decided I was going to move to Dubai because it was something I really wanted to do. And then about a year into being in Dubai, I was just lying in the bathtub and I just had this full download through my body. And these images came to me and all this stuff and I was just being told what to do like, "You need to write this down, you need to go and get these things." And I was told to build out a whole altar. So I had this massive altar. And I was just sitting in front of it like, "Okay, I now live in a church. What next?"   Eva Williams: (14:06) My husband, he was in Iraq at the time, so he wasn't home. So I was like, "Nobody's going to know about my weird little mat?" And then when he came home, he's like, "That's a lot of candles. Do you need to light all of them at once? Are we doing a séance? What's happening here?" But as I was doing this, the spirits of these different plants I've been told to buy exactly 13 were coming to me, people were sending me things. I was finding things that I'd had in my library for a long time, I'd just never seen them with that particular glow or from that angle, that a transmission was coming through.   Eva Williams: (14:41) And I basically just sat down and I wrote the 10 transmissions of level one of Golden Lotus, which is the eight extraordinary vessels and the 12 main meridians. Unless you do a practitioner training, I don't do Triple Warmer and Pericardium. So it's basically just the five elements. So water, wood, earth, metal as it were, and fire. And then the eight extraordinary. But we do the Chong Mai twice because it has the main vessel and then two other vessels. And for the purpose of female sexual cultivation, it's important actually to separate those two. And then from there, it just started unlocking, like level two became the three gates of orgasm and just the content was just pouring down.   Eva Williams: (15:28) And it was a mixture between a really pure transmission I was being guided to and led to, and then a really deep weaving of just years and years. I'm very, very autodidactic because I didn't go to high school even, so my ability to sit and research and work if I have the impetus is quite high. If not, guess what?   Tahnee: (15:54) Very low. I can relate to that.   Eva Williams: (16:00) I'm like, "Let's have a show of hands." I'm pretty sure everyone's like, "Yeah, that's a... '' So I was able to just channel this, and then it just was really natural that these two modalities, the way it's structured is that the level one is really about working with the Yoni egg, so the Jade egg. It's really about clearing your own body, detoxing and recentralizing through the pelvis. So clearing trauma in the pelvis, opening the sensitivity of the pelvis, and really weaving in the whole rest of the body to a pelvic alignment. So beginning to really understand all of these different reflex zones that we have in the body that all relate to the pelvis.   Eva Williams: (16:43) And I don't just mean the internal reflex zones of the different organ systems, I also mean really beginning to explore somatically the balance between the sacrum and the buttock and the stone and the breasts, or how there's different alignments of your pelvis and your jaw and your mouth. And there's multiple different ways that we can set up these reflexologies that allow us to have a sense that we're hinging from the pelvis. So it's very much about coming into that, and it's not supposed to be... It's supposed to basically teach you how to come into contact with your own energy, to disperse it through your whole body so that you can actually have proper tantra experiences and also to self-regulate.   Eva Williams: (17:23) Because the level two work, it's almost like we go from a pelvic central model out to the body. And then the next level is all more explicit. So it's like self-pleasure practises. Or if we do like a retreat, we'll do some touch exchange practises. If you come to my clinic, I will do internal work at times, things like this. And so that's very triggering work. And I've seen, because I have been in many of these schools with sexual energy, the lack of self-regulation that is taught before highly activating practises come into play. And I didn't like that.   Eva Williams: (18:02) And so while I didn't necessarily plan the way that Golden Lotus was channelled, it is a very deep reflection of the beliefs in the general that I've taken, which is that we need to prepare our body before we do all this highly sexual activating practise. Because otherwise, I think one of the big things in the tantra communities and things that's happened is, it's just become all about sex dressed up as something spiritual, you know?   Tahnee: (18:26) Oh, I know.   Eva Williams: (18:28) You're like, "Really? I've never come across this before."   Tahnee: (18:31) I'm just laughing because I spent some time at Agama Yoga in Thailand I have never laughed so hard. We did a 10 day silent meditation and we were asked to abstain from sex for 10 days. And every day, someone would ask, "I really feel like I need to have sex today. Could I possibly not have... " I was like, "So you guys can't go 10 days without touching yourself or someone else." I've never seen anything like it. So if you love Agama, I found it a really toxic culture. It was almost high school. I was really shocked.   Eva Williams: (19:10) It's infamous. It's infamous for this. My teacher went there, one of my teachers was there and she told me all about it. And then even recently, I was sitting with a friend and I was mentioning some of these things, and she was like, "Oh my gosh. One time, when I was at the very beginning of my path, I went to this place." And as soon as she said it, I knew. I was like, "I know where you were talking about. I've never been there myself, but it's infamous."   Tahnee: (19:37) It was an experience. Yes, I hear you.   Eva Williams: (19:37) I think that this thing is also, I think a lot of people come into tantra with a concept of partner base in mind, and the way that I was trained, particularly with my teachers in this more Sufi tradition and things like this, I never went into any of this work looking for my sexuality. I never thought I would only work with women, I never thought I would be working with birth. This was not my aim. My aim was just to heal people. I worked on everyone. And ultimately, my aim was just to find God, I just wanted to have a very deep spiritual experience or a series of those. And so that over time guided into that direction, I just saw the level of care and sobriety that was cultivated within me before putting me onto that path.   Eva Williams: (20:30) The level of deep devotion and sobriety to my own self-development was paramount. And so there wasn't a sense of like there was a real sense that I wasn't allowed to just mess around, I wasn't allowed to just go to whatever workshop I wanted or something. I was really guided very strongly as to what is an integrity and what is not an integrity as far as transmissions go. And I'm very grateful for that. At least it worked for me within my system of integrity. So then basically it brought the birth of this beautiful work and I think that people love it when they do it, and I think people do feel that they can regulate themselves through it.   Eva Williams: (21:12) And that work for me, very, very naturally falls into birth work. If you are learning how to move and you're learning all these different ways of detoxing and opening your body and then you're learning these three gates of orgasm, which is very specifically sent into the pelvis, so then we are really going into the semantics of the pelvis alone. If you're doing all of that work, that is the birth prep is just extraordinary. And so I developed that into a birthing programme as well, because we need more of that. I think that you're not really taught how much prep goes into birth until you're pregnant.   Tahnee: (21:48) And it's really not a great time then to be exploring.   Eva Williams: (21:52) No. Not at all because it's traumatic.   Tahnee: (21:53) Because of your trauma.   Eva Williams: (21:53) You can definitely do some work on it then, but you need some guidance and holding through that because unwinding trauma can take a really long time, the somatic body's not quick   Tahnee: (22:10) Not fast, very slow.   Eva Williams: (22:17) It really likes to take its time.   Tahnee: (22:17) Oh man, it's so true. And I think what is so interesting about what you're speaking to though with coming into birth work, I know for me, I did muntuk's work and I was having internal work there and working with eggs and clearing those, that whole period of time was big for me. It was unpleasant in some ways and really beautiful and powerful in other ways. But I came to birth and I remember thinking like, "If I hadn't done that work, I wouldn't be able to hold myself through pregnancy and birth the way I've been able to, through pregnancy and birth."   Tahnee: (22:56) And you are speaking to this sense of sobriety and this sense of strength and just the ability to hold your own energy and read your own energy and tune into it, I think that's the piece for women going in and it's like, you're going to have people try and tell you things that you have to filter through, your truth filters. You have to make decisions around your sovereignty and around your care that you probably... These are big decisions and you don't have much context for them usually. I know for me even being fairly educated, there's just stuff I was like, "Do I have to do this? What are the rules?"   Tahnee: (23:32) And I think if you don't have that strong foundation, I think that's stuff golden lotus, it sounds like it just provides that container for women to start to build that trust in themselves so they can go and then really be open to what is honestly the most incredible experience you can have as a woman. I know woman choose not to birth, but for me, profound, but a lot of preparation too, I think in my experience.   Eva Williams: (23:58) I think it's really underestimated how much prep it takes. And I think it's also, to understand that you've got so much content that you want to read about the spiritual, about the physiological, but also how much you've got to inform yourself around just-   Tahnee: (24:13) Practical.   Eva Williams: (24:14) Yeah. Just random medical stuff, because we are taught to just, if someone's wearing a white coat, they know. They wouldn't suggest it if it wasn't for your best.   Tahnee: (24:23) Is that true?   Eva Williams: (24:23) That's not true. And it's sad. It's so sad to acknowledge that, but that's unfortunately the truth. And so I'm in the process of putting together a programme now which really takes people, basically it's like a month-by-month programme. So you can buy the modules as a month or you can buy them as a whole. And it's got workbooks and meditations. It addresses the emotional, the spiritual, how far along your baby is and where they're growing.   Eva Williams: (24:57) And it really also, for me, there's like this very strong concept of, you have the mother, you have the child, and then you have the mother-child unit, this third that's being generated and they call it mama toto in Swahili, this concept of the mother-child. And to build a bridge between these things because one of the things that I've noticed in for example, certain modalities like APA, like the pre and perinatal psychology, people who do fantastic work is that one of the main... how do I explain this for people who don't maybe come from this context? Someone asked me recently, how can you tell if your doula is a good doula? How can you choose a good doula?   Eva Williams: (25:44) How many stars are there in the sky, my friend? And then immediately it came to me, I know it really... And I realised that the doula that I really, we don't even call ourselves doula's anymore because we consider ourselves more birth keepers or birth workers because the work gets so close to midwifery at a certain stage that the idea that you are not advocating for a client or all these sorts of things, it doesn't have a place when you get to a certain level of birth work. And these women, all of them speak to the baby individually to the mother. And immediately I realise, "Oh, if your doula will have an individual relationship to the baby, as they do to you, but they are there for you, to me, that's a good doula."   Eva Williams: (26:38) And I know that sounds strange, but I come very much from this concept that the baby is always the most conscious being in the room, born or unborn. And so if we can begin to actually... What I would love for more women to know is that a lot of women really get bogged down with this idea like, "It's me, it's my body. Yes, my partner's helping me, but I have to carry this. I feel heavy, this baby's relying on me." And so there becomes almost a scarcity of this really deep sense of drudgery or something related, or just a deep sense of lack of support that becomes related to birth.   Eva Williams: (27:10) And one of the things that I think is really important for women to understand is neither on a physiological level, not spiritual level are you alone? This baby is the one that will release the hormone that will tell your body and your stomach when to dilate. This child will send stem cells to heal your body into your blood. This child is there for you, and this child is leading this labour actually. So this child is bringing you energy and bringing you protection, and bringing you gifts of healing. And this moment is actually for you, it's not happening to you, it's happening for you.   Eva Williams: (27:49) So the moment that that child is born is your rebirth as well, it is your moment to also let go and let something new come through. And I think that interconnection, that interplay is what allows women to not just trust their body, which is one of the thing that I wish more people could establish prior to falling pregnant, we should call it rising pregnant, "I rose pregnant."   Tahnee: (28:14) It's beautiful.   Eva Williams: (28:16) But also that they begin to trust not just their body, but the baby. So they're like, "Yeah, my body knows how to do this and this, baby's got this, I've got it. Our relationship got it and my body's got it. So this is what's going to happen." And just really leading from that place. And for many people, that might sound fantastical, but the more that we're going to understand birth, the more that we look at what's happening with the stem cells, the more that we look at the neurology and the physiology of labour itself and the more that if you have done that previously, you'll know that this is real, this is actually what's happening, that there is this very deep exchange of support.   Eva Williams: (28:56) And that's what I think is the most powerful thing is when a woman trusts so innately in her body and in the child that has chosen her to take this journey, that bond is what's leading the labour. I just think that that's very powerful. So the course that I've developed is to try to assist with that, and then obviously is also bringing different movements for different trimesters because different parts of the body obviously get affected at different times, and hypnobirthing scripts and of dolphin and whale stuff going on there, because you know, our allies.   Tahnee: (29:31) It's so funny all the stuff you're speaking about. With my daughter, she's five now, nearly five, but I had a dolphin come to me while I was pregnant with her in the water. And she had me through the whole pregnancy, guiding everything. I was doing body work at the time and I had this really strong download that I had to stop. And I remember contacting my teacher, who's the female teacher of Chi Nei Tsang from Mantak Chia. She was like, "If the baby's telling you to stop your stuff," and I had this golden thread with her and she was this little golden being, so probably about, I think around two dissolved completely. It got weaker and weaker over time. But just all of that stuff...   Tahnee: (30:17) And I had a lot of stuff going on in my life when I was pregnant with her and she just held me like I was... I remember thinking, "I should be really stressed out right now, but I feel really safe and really held through this." And it took me a little while to realise that that was her contributing that to my experience. And I think that trust is something she gave me, which I think is a really beautiful thing. I'm halfway through my pregnancy now, I'm four months, but this pregnancies been really different for me. So it's interesting. I'm interested to see how they play out, because I haven't had that same sense of baby protection or strong baby messages.   Tahnee: (31:03) But I'm interested in that space because I think it's hard to talk about that stuff as a woman, the midwives I had were very practical, wonderful women, but they were very grounded and of the earth. And you had a textbook pregnancy and a textbook birth, well done? And I was like, "Yeah, but what about all this cool stuff that's happening to me?" And they were like, "We don't want to talk about that stuff." I was like, "Okay."   Eva Williams: (31:33) It's a shame actually because it's weird thing-   Tahnee: (31:35) I'm glad you're here.   Eva Williams: (31:35) What did you say?   Tahnee: (31:38) That I'm glad you're here in the world.   Eva Williams: (31:41) Dolphins are so important in birth. That's so important. People who are not getting this message, I'm like, "You guys have to... " I always tell my clients, I'm like, "Just Google." I'll be like, "Yeah, the dolphin midwives." And then everyone at the table laughed. I'm like, "Huh." Wait until you see it.   Tahnee: (31:57) It's true, Hawaii.   Eva Williams: (31:57) I know. And then I'm like, "Google it. You Google dolphin midwife." And people come back, "Whoa." I'm like, "Yeah, that's actually a"-   Tahnee: (32:01) And wasn't they doing it in Russia, the Google something?   Eva Williams: (32:05) They did, yes. Birthing to being, Alana's work was incredible.   Tahnee: (32:08) Because Jeannine Parvati Baker talks about it a lot in her work, and some other people have talked about studying.   Eva Williams: (32:16) I think the woman who found a birth into being, she had a centre in the Caspian sea where the dolphins would come in and people would just be freebirthing in the water, which is wild. And so we have over here, birth it's a very obstetric-run American imported system. It's pretty brutal. So we are looking at different birth centres talk of shifting some things around birth here because Dubai is like a playground in terms of, they're so open to new ideas. And people may not think of them like that from the outside, but they really are.   Eva Williams: (32:56) They're so innovative and there's some very special, very, very, very special energy to the Emiratis to the Bedouin people, just something very special. So we were looking at working with a very beautiful woman whose work I incorporate a lot into mine, her name's Dr. Gallery. And she has some beautiful, gentle birth clinics in London and things like this. And she said, "Oh yes, I'd love to come out and do something with you guys in Dubai, but I only want to work with the dolphins." And she's a full OB/GYN. And I was like, "You and me, this is going to work so well." I was like, "Scrap all the land we've found, we're going to the ocean."   Eva Williams: (33:43) I was like, "This is the future of it. This is the future of birth." And I think that there's a lot of beautiful places in Cairo and around Egypt as well like in Sharm El Sheikh and in the Red Sea that we might begin to also see really beautiful work with the dolphins popping up. And I know that a couple of people that I know have wanted to do things like this in the North of Ibiza, and South, but the problem is the water's very cold over there, so it's not really something that can work as well. But in these waters, when the dolphin comes to the baby, it is telling you that you are going to give birth soon. Maybe in this instance, I don't know where you were in your pregnancy.   Tahnee: (34:18) No. I was heavily pregnant. My husband I got engaged there, and we got married there. It's this very special spot for us. And I was standing probably naval deep in water and it came, honestly, I was terrified. I was not like, "Oh my God." I was like, "Ah, I think a dolphin is coming at me." And it whooshed so close to me. My husband was out deep and he turned around and saw the dolphin and was like, "Whoa." And then there was a whole pod behind him. But it broke off and came and checked me out. And they can sonar heartbeats and stuff so I was thinking it must have been checking me out and being like, "What are you doing?"   Eva Williams: (35:00) So what they do is when you're very heavily pregnant, if they come towards you and if they put the nose toward the belly or come very close to you, usually you're always going to give birth.   Tahnee: (35:08) I thought it was going to scare me.   Eva Williams: (35:08) Oh, what a lovely experience.   Tahnee: (35:14) I was not like, "Oh my God." Seriously, I was like, "Holy crap, is this safe?"   Eva Williams: (35:18) I know. Every time I was in New Zealand and dolphins came as well, I was swimming in the water and I just shot bowl upright and I was standing and I was like, "There's something in the water." And I'd hear these voices like, "It's okay." I'm like, "It's definitely not fucking okay." My instinct body was like, "This is not okay." And my spiritual body was like, "It's going to be okay." And every part of me was like, "That's fine, but I'm still going to stand because I can run, and those, they can swim. This is not my territory."   Tahnee: (35:45) It's true.   Eva Williams: (35:49) It's so true. But they can activate the labour. They can do this really strongly by communicating with the child as well. It's something very, very powerful.   Tahnee: (35:58) Super cool. And the indigenous people here where we are, they believe that they are their people. Every time I've been in any ceremony or anything they will speak to the whales and the dolphins here as being ancestors.   Eva Williams: (36:10) Yeah. They bring children.   Tahnee: (36:14) Yeah. It makes a lot of sense.   Eva Williams: (36:18) I believe they bring the children because they don't just turn up when a woman's very pregnant to assist in the physiological activation of the hormonal aspects of labour, many, many women will see dolphins on the night they conceive or at the time or just before conception. And whenever a woman's like, "Yeah, we're trying to get pregnant. Oh, I saw dolphins." I'm like, "You go have baby." I had a friend and she saw porpoises. They're not even dolphins, I was like, "You go have a baby." And they did the ultrasound and they tuned it back to that time.   Tahnee: (36:49) Perhaps they're related to a dolphin somehow.   Eva Williams: (36:51) I'm like, "It could be a manatees, I don't care, you're having a baby." I'm joking.   Tahnee: (36:59) An orca. Let's not get too crazy. But it's okay. Tell me about this primary thing. That's interesting, because I know if you're not aware of this, I don't know if we've spoken about this on the podcast yet, so the hormonal cascade that the baby triggers in the mother, this is all these beautiful juicy hormones like oxytocin and things that, A, make birth less painful, which is a good thing. And B, obviously also the whole cascade of uterine contractions, breast milk coming in, all of these things. So the baby actually triggers that. And one of the things that happens a lot in our culture is we induce, or if there's an obstetrician that my midwife shared with me who wants to induce everyone at 38 weeks in a hospital near us.   Tahnee: (37:40) And this kind of thing just terrifies me, and I have friends who've waited 43 weeks plus for their babies to come.   Eva Williams: (37:48) Especially plus babies.   Tahnee: (37:51) My daughter was 42 weeks on the day. And I just think, can you speak a little bit to women who might have fear around, "I'm getting pressure from my OB/GYN or my midwife to induce." I know it's a real slippery topic, but at least speak to that.   Eva Williams: (38:06) No, no. It's not. I don't think it's slippery at all, I think it's underdressed. And it's interesting, I remember, so here they've got DHA, the Dubai Health Authority, has a policy around a certain time. Even if your OB/GYN is more liberal, there's a certain red tape that they can't really cross. And so I remember the first hospital birth I did in Dubai, home birth is illegal here by the way. It's actually not illegal to give birth at home, it's illegal for anyone to assist, anyone who has a licence issued by the government could get it taken away if they assist you.   Eva Williams: (38:44) So if you bring in a midwife from overseas or for me, I'm not an OB/GYN or a midwife, so I'm also not really assisting people with home births here because I don't think that's necessarily a great thing to do. But if someone were in labour and it was progressing really quickly, rather than stress them out and shove them into a car, I think I know what I'd probably end up doing. But it's an interesting thing because I remember the very first one I attended, the OB/GYN was just pressuring my clients so hard and she was outside and afterwards she was crying.   Eva Williams: (39:20) She's like, "I don't know what to do." And so obviously, as a birth worker, I've got 117 different things to pull out of the cupboard because I'm acupuncture, Im like okay acupuncture, we've been doing Homoeopathy week, 36 or 38 at that point, let's try some different homoeopathy, maybe something that's addressing more of the fears and emotions. Let's do massage, let's do the dirty three, hot food, a glass of wine and have some sex, all of that. And then also internal work, massage the cervix, check how it phased someone is, just at that stage of pregnancy. So we did a really beautiful ceremony of her husband and her on the bed, and I did the internal work. It was very dark. We put on music.   Eva Williams: (40:10) And we just really checked out what was happening, what the engagement was. So not a vaginal exam, but just to actually see, and definitely not a sweep or something, none of that stuff I'm trained in, but just really actually to feel how the effacement was going, how the pelvis was feeling, what was actually getting caught up in the pelvic. Was there something caught up there or was she just not ready? And for me, it was really clear that she's just not ready. It's her first baby, it's 39 weeks and the baby is just not ready. It's not coming yet.   Eva Williams: (40:38) I think that what's difficult about getting pressure... I remember after this situation, I gave them all these techniques. I said, "We're going to make a plan. Don't worry." And they felt better, and I went to my car and I just fucking sat in my car and cried for 20 minutes. The sense of stress and pressure, and it's not even my baby, that happens in that room when a doctor strong arms you and tells you that what they know is right, when it may not feel right for you, is so intense. And I know that doctors don't fully understand that. I know that OB/GYNs, not all of them fully understand that. I have the great privilege of working with many who do.   Eva Williams: (41:17) And I remember during this labour, I was sitting out in the hallway and I was just crying. And the doctor came to me and she's like, "Why are you crying?" I'm like, "Dude, you're pushing so hard. This is ridiculous. This is going to end really not well." And then she started tearing up and sat down next to me. And she's like, "It's just a lot of pressure." And we were just having this full heart to heart, just weeping in the hallway. Like, "What the fuck?" But it managed to buy me another 48 hours for my clients, which is amazing.   Tahnee: (41:46) Good work.   Eva Williams: (41:52) It's so much pressure. It's so much pressure. The thing is that there's very little that actually requires induction. Things that do not require induction, your baby is too big for your pelvis, it's a big baby, your baby has passed 40 weeks, meconium has passed, the cord is around the neck. These are not reasons for induction and they're not reasons for C-sections either. It's just very intense. I think some something that people don't understand is that an OB/GYN or a medical professional on your birth is someone that you want there in an emergency situation, they have no requirement to witness physiological birth. They have none. They do not have to witness a single, natural, physiological birth as part of their training, they have to do surgery.   Eva Williams: (42:48) So their whole frame of reference is coming that birth as an emergency. They have never had to sit. If you ask an OB/GYN what's a normal to long labour, I had an OB/GYN tell me that 10 hours was a long labour. I'm like, "Jesus Christ, what are you guys having? Have you got a slip slide set up out here." I was on a midwife tour recently in Aspen, someone's like, "How does labour take?" And the midwife's like, "It can take up to two hours." I was like, "What?" If it's your fourth baby and you're at nine centimetres. It's just ridiculous.   Tahnee: (43:19) Wow.   Eva Williams: (43:19) Yeah, I know. I know. And I always think to myself like, "Wow, I think that 40 hours of fairly active labour is long." I think that labour from early labour onward can go on for a week. That's the sort of time I'm willing to just give a woman and her body to just dilate at its pace and do its thing, and it's just unheard of. So if people are getting pressure to induce and it's funny, because we've made this thing over here and we're not doing it yet, but it's a couple of doulas and I have this, it's kind of our joke, but I also want to do it. And it's going to be for women who for partners, 36 and 37 weeks onward, and it's going to be the induction group.   Eva Williams: (44:01) Basically, you all come together and we watch a funny movie or a beautiful movie about birth, and you get a glass of red wine. We're not getting hammered over here, but you get a glass of red wine. We have some food, whether it's Indian or Thai, something with a little bit of spice, a little bit Mexican or something, and you just share. And you can share if it's stressful, you can share if it's funny, we share content and information. And then if you want to stay for the second part, we teach something like certain techniques, maybe not actually internal, but certain techniques like clitoral stroking or labial massage or hip massage or things like that that your partner can do that will assist in your hips getting ready and things like that.   Eva Williams: (44:42) And just from 37 weeks on, everyone is welcome to just join, come, have that glass of wine, just get a move on. Do a bit of dancing, have a bit of laughter. Because the group, you share more pheromonal energy. Because that's something that isn't readily shared, adrenaline and cortisol inhibit oxytocin. So if you're stressed, you cannot go into natural labour, they inhibit one another. So if women are feeling stressed about being induced, the thing that they really need is they need to disconnect from the timeline of intensity, they really need the opportunity to disconnect from that.   Eva Williams: (45:17) So if the doctor's pressuring you and says, "Okay, well take your time, but I need to see you again in two or three days." Don't go, don't go in two or three days. If they need to see you again, they can see you in a week. All they're going to do is an ultrasound and whatever, maybe a sweep. Give yourself the space that your body needs. And also, really, really, really take your homoeopathy from 36 weeks, from 36 weeks, be taking your homoeopathy and be taking just this very gentle way of beginning to release the stress on the system. Take the aconite, take the arnica.   Eva Williams: (46:00) Another thing that's really important, and again, this all goes back to prep, because if you're doing everything at the last moment, you're going to be dealing with a lot. In the programme that I run, around third 30 to 34 weeks, in between this time before your GBS test, we explore different internal works. And not necessarily me doing that, but maybe it's related to sex with the husband, maybe it's related to self-pleasure, maybe it's just internal gaze and interception kind of meditation, but we start unblocking and unlocking anything that might be held in the pelvis.   Eva Williams: (46:37) And then also, if you have a chiro, there's the Webster technique, or if you have a Bowen therapist who can do the sacral... There's a series of sacral releases that they can do. Anything you can do to prepare your body, to feel really good and open, speak to your cervix, ripen your cervix, yourself, speak to it, see beautiful pink light moving through it. All of these things work, they really, really work. And what doesn't work is being pressured into having a baby, it just doesn't fucking work. There's no evidence to support that it's ever worked.   Eva Williams: (47:11) It's insane, even with the foetal monitoring, even that, there's the only proof that it actually has any benefit is it there's no proof. The only thing that it's actually done is increased C-section rates. And so, these sorts of things, we have to just be really mindful of what the outcome is. Is the outcome an alive baby or is the outcome an empowered woman who knows herself and knows her body and can recover in the postpartum process because she's actually connected to the child, because oxytocin is also a huge part of recovery. It's what's bringing the colostrum and the breast milk, it's what's actually involuting the uterus.   Eva Williams: (47:52) So if we don't have this connection from the outside, if we're having those issues, then we also face a much longer recovery period. And that's when you really begin to see from an emotional perspective, from a body work perspective. If I see diastasis, like a herniated diastasis or something like this, for me, that's always that the woman has been opened in the birth process, but she hasn't had the closing afterwards, so she has no centre. Can you imagine what it would be doing to your back, to not have your rectus abdominis working? Basically, your back would be as stiff as a board, and that's a woman who feels that she's not supported. She hasn't been supported through that process.   Eva Williams: (48:37) I don't know, this stuff is so intuitive and natural, it feels so natural to say, but we aren't there as a culture of medicine and we're not there as a culture of birth yet either, and it's difficult. And there's a way I just want to say to people, just protect kept yourself. But I actually love working with OB/GYNs and I do love working with the medical system when they get it right, and they very often, if you find the right people and places, they do get it right. I had a doula complain to me the other day about how, at this one hospital that's really great here, the midwife didn't even turn up and the baby just came out.   Eva Williams: (49:17) And I was like, "Is this a complaint? This is a complaint that the baby just naturally came out and the mother caught her home own baby?" I'm sorry, I don't feel the same level of stress around this that you feel. It's so beautiful to hear about less managed births. And this is for those people who are being pushed toward induction, this is called active management, basically, of expectations in relationship to doctors. And another thing to understand is that 40 weeks doesn't really mean much.   Tahnee: (49:52) So arbitrary.   Eva Williams: (49:54) It's insane. I'm not standardised by that. Some hospitals do it from the first day of your last period, some do it from the last day of your last period? It's just ridiculous and there's no evidence that proves that. I think of 10% of children come on their due day.   Tahnee: (50:11) Not good odds-   Eva Williams: (50:12) I know, right. Yes. And everyone wants to be fucking Natalie Portman or Kate Moss or something. And guess what, 1%. You know what I mean? It's one of these expectations that we set up. We are lying to women when we tell them that they should be fitting that mould, and we are taking away from them the opportunity for them to make their own mould of what it looks like. So contentious. It doesn't actually feel that contentious, it feels really straightforward, but whatever.   Tahnee: (50:39) Well, it's interesting because I think one thing for me with birth too, it felt like... I don't want to be in the feminine/masculine, for me, time when I'm in a feminine space, linear time is not a thing. It's not real, it doesn't exist and there's this just natural unfolding of things as they are. My feeling around birth was very much like we're trying to apply this very linear masculine dimension to it and it doesn't exist like that. I think this idea of 10 moons or being able to see it in this sense of it's with them and it's a flow, but it's not something that's going to happen on a day. I'm struggling with it right now, people are like, "What's your due date?"   Tahnee: (51:33) And I'm, "Well, I don't know, sometime in April." And they want a due date. Well, I do know it's April 1st, but I don't believe my baby's going to come on April 1st.   Eva Williams: (51:44) I can tell you what I do always is I just take the full moon of that month. And I was like, "She's not due, then she's due in the beginning of the month." I'm like, "I don't care."   Tahnee: (51:56) That's when they come.   Eva Williams: (51:57) The baby is now officially due on the full moon. Baby's like a full moon, that's what's happening. It doesn't mean we won't prepare and I don't necessarily calculate my weeks from that, I'll do it from that ultrasound or whatever. And the programme that we are doing is a 10-moon programme, it's 10 modules and they're 10 moons. Yeah, it's just recognising that children have a rhythm, it's not something that we can set or determine. That rhythm is related to obviously the tides of our own life. Some babies like a new moon. There's no set rules, you can't apply them one way or another, like you said.   Eva Williams: (52:33) And I love this idea that, look, birth is very much about learning about abundance, about our own abundance, that we can actually create a whole other being. It's this radiant space that we enter into. Adding scarcity of time to that means that a woman feels a scarcity of space. And if she's feeling a scarcity of time and space, as these two things do manifest together within her own body, you're taking away the whole dimension and realm that she needs to live inside of during her birth, like you said. It's this feminine space. And that doesn't mean that we can't have a plan during pregnancy, it doesn't mean that certain practises won't be better at different times.   Eva Williams: (53:12) It doesn't mean any of that, but it's the invasiveness of how we treat birth needs to stop. I'm working on a new project right now, and I'm very excited about it and I can't say much about it, but what I can say is that one of the main focuses of it is the removal of incredibly invasive techniques. And some of them aren't even necessarily invasive, they're just fucking disgusting like the gestational diabetes test.   Tahnee: (53:40) Oh, that was the only fucking thing I did last time. And I was like, "This is the most sugar I've had in my entire adult life." Maybe as a kid, I gorged on Lollies, but other than that." That's the only time I was sick in my pregnancy was after that.   Eva Williams: (53:54) Yes, so many women have said to me like, "Oh yeah, definitely, the most traumatic thing of my pregnancy was that time."   Tahnee: (54:01) I was like, "Fucking hell, guys." It's like nine Coca-Colas or something. I'm like, "Great."   Eva Williams: (54:07) And it's not necessary. It's not necessary because there's so many other ways to remediate or even to tell. And what was so funny is, I was with a client recently and she had to shift OB/GYNs because on her due date, the original OB/GYN is not going to be there. And so we had just gone to that OB/GYN and said, "Look, we're opting out of this." And she was ready to fight. She's like, "I don't want this person." I was like, "Just chill. I'm sure they'll be fine with it." Don't go in for a battle, that's one thing. All birth workers, everyone, just don't go in for a battle. If you have to put your armour on, do it, but don't go in for a battle. And the doctor was like, "Huh. I've been in birth for a long time and I've seen a lot of incredible advancements and devices and ultrasound and all sorts of things really. And yet they still haven't managed to make something less disgusting than that drink. That's okay. Don't worry about it."   Eva Williams: (55:01) Even an OB/GYN was like, "Yeah, you'd think we'd gotten to this level, but really it's just Lucozade, sugar." And then we had to go to this other one and really communicate once again like, "Hey, the preference is for this off the table." And she just was like, "That's the most disgusting drink in the world, I wouldn't push that test on anyone." I was like, "Wow."   Tahnee: (55:19) Amazing. That's a good change in culture. [crosstalk 00:55:22]. What's your rate on ultrasounds in general? I haven't spoken about this much on the podcast either, but I do get asked about it a lot, and there's the one side of it where people are like, "It's good to know and it gives you that reassurance." And then there's the other side, which is probably more of the side I'm on where it's like, "What would it tell me that actually... What benefit would that information actually give me?" So I'm curious as to your take on that as a birth keeper.   Eva Williams: (55:53) Well, it's a great topic. One thing I can definitely say is, you know your body, you've done a lot of work with your body. I have also clients who are just super on it, and yet sometimes, and I'm thinking of one person specific, that if a woman, for example, has a miscarriage or something like this, even if she isn't someone who would naturally or usually lean toward wanting ultrasound or something like that in that early part of the next pregnancy, it brings an enormous amount of relief to know that everything's going healthy.   Tahnee: (56:38) Reinsurance.   Eva Williams: (56:38) Exactly. If you have chromosomal issues in your life, those 12 week tests, in your family, for example, or even the 20-week morphology exams, they can bring a lot of knowledge. So from my perspective, what I usually say to women when they say, "What do you think is necessary, blah, blah." I said, "The first thing that's necessary is anything that will bring you comfort. If your level of comfort and certainty and anxiety will drop with each or any of those visits, then those are the ones that are necessary, because your emotional and mental wellbeing is more important to the baby's health and growth than anything that an ultrasound is going to do to your body. That's my perspective.   Eva Williams: (57:25) And then usually, they just say that the main tests that are important are your morphology, your 20, 21-week scan, and that's really just to see if there's any... For those of you who don't know, that's not really an ultrasound, it's a full building out of, they check all of the different organs.   Tahnee: (57:44) It's pretty cool. I was like, "Whoa. There's a kidney and there's a... "   Eva Williams: (57:53) They go in, they check all the tissues, they check the formation of the organs. This is technology that I'm grateful that we have because it can put a lot of decision making power into people's hands. And simultaneously, I know a lot of people who aren't down for it, they're like, "No way, that's even worse than an ultrasound. That's super intense for the baby, blah, blah, blah." For me, it's all about comfort. And I have had a couple birth workers recently and clients saying, they're like, "Well, I know you're very pro natural birth and this is not."   Eva Williams: (58:26) I'm like, "Hang on a minute. I'm not really for or against anything, I just don't really have a role to play. If you're planning a C-section... " I know what the body is capable of, and those are personal experiences that I've had. You can't take that away from me or I cannot pretend that I don't know what the physical body can do and what we may need to train for, but can actually get what this experience can be. So I can't take that out of my being that if you know that that's available, that you gravitate toward it, but it doesn't necessarily mean that I am anti anything."   Eva Williams: (59:03) I've had my time being anti epidural, and then I saw a series of Pilates teachers and yoga teachers who had super tight pelvic floors get an epidural after like 36 hours of labour, and just one hour, boom, baby was out. Really incredible experiences. Legs were still working, everything. So I can't go through the level of experience that I've had, I can't afford to fight anyone. I hate it in the birth world, I hate this, the fight that happens when people are... I believe in advocating that there's a point where if you can change that inside of yourself, you stop attracting moments to have those conversations. That's what I have found in my personal experience.   Eva Williams: (59:45) And so I try to just be very, very open, and the reason is because I don't necessarily need to specify what I will and won't work with, because I really only attract people that I really will be the right person for. But I would say, if someone is just like, "I don't know what to get and when." I would just say, "Look, the most standard thing is that you have a 12-week ultrasound, you have your 21 week morphology. That puts a lot of power in your hands. Look it up, do a little bit of research." And then usually, there'll be something as a bare minimum right before your birth, like a 36-week thing, and then we'll do a GBS swab."   Eva Williams: (01:00:21) And you don't have to do your GBS swab, you don't have to get that scan. You can just wait and go into labour naturally as well. But those are some of the options. And I don't believe that you need anything more than that, but I've been with women who are going every third day in the end of their pregnancy just to sit in a room for 20 minutes just to hear if the baby's safe and good. If that's wh

La ContraCrónica
El pánico ómicron

La ContraCrónica

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 42:22


El Reino Unido, Alemania, Italia, Holanda y otros países europeos han detectado la variante ómicron, una cepa del SARS-CoV-2 que, según las autoridades sanitarias, podría ser más transmisible que las anteriores y que ya ha provocado un notable aumento de las infecciones en Sudáfrica. Desde su detección a principios de este mes, la variante ómicron ha provocado un fuerte aumento en los casos dentro de Sudáfrica, de los 246 que se registraron el día 9 de noviembre a los 3.220 del domingo 27, un incremento del 1.200% en sólo dos semanas. El Gobierno británico ha endurecido las restricciones. Desde esta semana volverán las mascarillas al transporte público y a interiores y será imprescindible una prueba PCR para entrar en el país. Los vuelos con Sudáfrica, entretanto, han quedado cancelados en Europa y EEUU. La Organización Mundial de la Salud declaró el viernes a ómicron como una "variante preocupante", lo que indica que implica mayores riesgos que otras variantes de virus. Este sábado, las autoridades holandesas detectaron 61 casos entre los 600 pasajeros que llegaron ese día desde Sudáfrica en dos vuelos de KLM. El Gobierno holandés ha decretado el cierre de todos los comercios no esenciales. En Alemania, las autoridades del estado de Hesse, que es donde se encuentra el aeropuerto internacional de Fráncfort, identificaron este fin de semana varias mutaciones presentes en la variante ómicron en muestras tomadas de un viajero que regresaba de Sudáfrica. Se han encontrado dos casos sospechosos más en el estado de Baviera en personas que volvió de Sudáfrica el 24 de noviembre. En EEUU, el gobernador de Nueva York ha declarado el estado de emergencia, lo que permitirá a los hospitales rechazar a los pacientes que no presenten un cuadro de urgencia. Por ahora no sabemos el nivel de protección que ofrecen las vacunas con respecto a esta variante. Lo que si sabemos es que dejarnos contagiar por el pánico es la peor alternativa. Las restricciones de viaje no impidieron a la variante delta extenderse por todo el mundo hace unos meses. Los confinamientos consiguieron ralentizar el contagio, pero a un coste altísimo que todavía estamos pagando y que seguiremos haciéndolo durante mucho tiempo. El coronavirus, además, no es nuevo, lleva ya dos años entre nosotros. Dos años en los que hemos encontrado mejores métodos para combatirle como las vacunas y los tratamientos antivirales que están ya muy avanzados y que deberían ser aprobados cuanto antes. En La ContraRéplica: - Vacunación obligatoria - Razones de una no vacunada - Prioridad en un colapso en la UCI >>> “La ContraHistoria de España. Auge, caída y vuelta a empezar de un país en 28 episodios”… https://amzn.to/3kXcZ6i Apoya La Contra en: · Patreon... https://www.patreon.com/diazvillanueva · iVoox... https://www.ivoox.com/podcast-contracronica_sq_f1267769_1.html · Paypal... https://www.paypal.me/diazvillanueva Sígueme en: · Web... https://diazvillanueva.com · Twitter... https://twitter.com/diazvillanueva · Facebook... https://www.facebook.com/fernandodiazvillanueva1/ · Instagram... https://www.instagram.com/diazvillanueva · Linkedin… https://www.linkedin.com/in/fernando-d%C3%ADaz-villanueva-7303865/ · Flickr... https://www.flickr.com/photos/147276463@N05/?/ · Pinterest... https://www.pinterest.com/fernandodiazvillanueva Encuentra mis libros en: · Amazon... https://www.amazon.es/Fernando-Diaz-Villanueva/e/B00J2ASBXM Escucha el episodio completo en la app de iVoox, o descubre todo el catálogo de iVoox Originals

RNZ: Morning Report
England confirms cases of new variant Omicron

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 4:51


England has two confirmed cases of the newly discovered Covid-19 variant Omicron. The government has introduced new rules to combat the spread. Face coverings will be compulsory in shops and on public transport, all contacts of suspected Omicron cases will have to self-isolate for 10 days - regardless of vaccination status and anyone entering the UK will require a PCR test. But it is yet to be seen if the world is confident in Downing's Street ability to contain Omnicron. Our UK correspondent Vincent McAviney spoke to Susie Ferguson

Por fin no es lunes
Hosteleros y Pasaporte Covid: cómo les afecta y a qué se enfrentan si no lo piden

Por fin no es lunes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 15:51


El repunte de casos del coronavirus ha llevado a muchos países a implementar nuevamente restricciones de movilidad, a volver a exigir PCR negativas o a solicitar el Pasaporte Covid para entrar en bares y restaurantes.

Jutranja kronika
Seznam držav s koronavirusno različico omikron vse daljši

Jutranja kronika

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 20:16


Seznam držav, kjer so potrdili okužbe z novo različico koronavirusa omikron je vse daljši. Na njem so tudi Italija, Nemčija, Belgija in Združeno kraljestvo. Novo različico sumijo tudi pri primerih v Avsrtiji in na Danskem. Številne države ob tem zaostrujejo ukrepe za vse, ki prihajajo iz držav, v katerih so odkrili različico omikron. Druge teme: - Izrael napovedal 14-dnevno prepoved vstopa tujcem, v Združenem kraljestvu karantena do izvida PCR testa - Po tragičnem brodolomu migrantskega čolna v Rokavskem prelivu danes izredni sestanek - Kristjani z današnjo prvo adventno nedeljo začenjajo čas priprav na božič

DVC Newscast by My DVC Points
N062 WDW Annual Pass Sales Halted, Destination D23 Announcements

DVC Newscast by My DVC Points

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 36:51


Shannon and Pete discuss DVC Disneyland Tower concept art, WDW annual pass sales temporarily paused, another Disneyland Magic Key sold out, updated Disney Cruise Line vaccination requirements, and announcements from Destination D23. Episode N062 Season 6 of the My DVC Points Podcast was brought to you by: DVC Resale Market - Industry Leader in DVC ResalesDVC Rental Store - DVC Point Rental and Swap PartnerMonera Financial - Exclusively Financing DVC ContractsPatreon supporters in the My DVC Points VIP Producer Club. D23 event releases new images of Disneyland Tower rooms At the Destination D23 event held at Walt Disney World today, Imagineer Bhavna Mistry and Disney Parks President Josh D'Amaro presented some additional concept art for the DVC Disneyland tower rooms and pool area. The rooms will be themed to the colors of Sleeping Beauty, while the pool will have the theme of an artist's palette. No further details on opening were provided, but the concept art did indicate a 2023 opening date was still the target. Older concept art and more details can also be found on the DVCHelp page for the resort, linked here. Source: WDWNT Disneyland and Disney World annual pass sales are restricted Bad news if you've been waiting to buy your annual pass. On Monday, November 22nd, Disney quietly removed sales of three of the four annual passes from their website. Only the $399 Pixie Dust pass for Florida residents and very limited is still available. DVC members are not allowed to buy passes either at this time. When the new pass program was rolled out, Disney indicated that pass sales could be suspended at any time, but this is the first time that it has occurred. It appears pass renewals are still an option for existing passes. Then on Wednesday, November 24th, Disneyland announced that the ”Believe” Magic Key was sold out, making the top two tiers at Disneyland unavailable. Source: Walt Disney World Website Disneyland Resort Website Disney Cruise Line Requiring Full Vaccinations for All Guests Ages 5 years and Older Starting January 13, 2022 Currently, Disney Cruise Line continues to require all vaccine-eligible Guests (based on US eligibility requirements) to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19, as defined by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), at the time of sailing. This will be a requirement for all Guests (US and international) ages 5 and up for sailings beginning on or after January 13, 2022. Guests who are not vaccine-eligible because of age must provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test result (paid for by the Guest) taken between 3 days and 24 hours before their sail date. Guests ages 5 through 11 may complete this testing requirement in lieu of being fully vaccinated for sailings that depart before January 13, 2022. Guests 4 years of age and under must complete the testing requirements. The test should be a NAAT test, rapid PCR test or lab-based PCR test. Rapid antigen tests are not accepted. Source: Disney Cruise Line Blog Other D23 Announcements Following announcements were made around US parks: Fantasmic and Festival of Fantasy Parade will return to Walt Disney World in 2022Guardians of the Galaxy: Cosmic Rewind opens at Epcot Summer 2022Fantasmic, Main Street Electrical Parade, and World of Color return to Disneyland Resort in 2022Mickey's Toontown closing in Disneyland Resort in March 2022, and will reopen with redesign in 2023Downtown Disney re-imagining starting in January 2022Connections Cafe name of new Epcot Quick Service eateryTRON Lightcycle run still in the works, but no opening date providedDisney Wish will have two new shows - Seas the Adventure and The Little MermaidA few more details on Galactic Starcruiser - entertainment, lightsaber training demonstration, and castmember costume reveal Source: Disney Parks Blog Today's show was edited by Jennifer Wagner. Show notes by Jennifer Wagner. My DVC Points is an awesome community of DVC members. Our positive, respectful, and authentic conversations about Disney Vacation Club are designed to help people make informed and educated decisions about what's best for their families. Please join us to continue the conversations on our Facebook Group, Discord Server, and YouTube channel. It takes an awesome community of DVC members to produce our content. We're always recruiting people to help research, produce, edit, or join our shows to share their stories. Thus far, we've had over 225 DVC members on our shows. If our content has been a blessing to your family, please consider supporting our show through our VIP Producer's Club at Patreon.com and join us for the Patreon After-Party from our live shows. Facebook admins and moderators of the My DVC Points Community Group: Sandy Symianick, Gina Grotsky, Shannon Ford, Caleb Allison, and Mary Anne Tracy. "Take Flight" music by Martinrowberry1 on Pond5.

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, coronavirus variants, and vaccine updates for 11-26-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 5:28


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest COVID-19 info and new hotspots for November 26th, 2021. The news we've been dreading, another variant of COVID-19 that is more mutated, more contagious, and more capable of evading the vaccines we have thus far. It's called B.1.1.529 and it's been identified in South Africa, Hong Kong, and Botswana. Senior scientists describe it as the worst variant they'd seen since the start of the pandemic with 32 mutations in the spike protein. That's twice as many as in the Delta variant. Because of the new variant, South Africa has been placed under England's red list travel restrictions. About 500 to 700 people usually go to the UK from South Africa every day. The ban will also cover flights from Namibia, Botswana, and Zimbabwe. Scotland says all arrivals from the countries must self-isolate and take two PCR tests, then starting 4am tomorrow, stay at a managed quarantine hotel. And Israel is banning citizens from traveling to southern Africa and barring the entry of foreign travelers from the region. If you're still arguing with a friend over which is the better vaccine, Pfizer or Moderna, a large scale study out of Hungary says Moderna beats Pfizer in effectiveness. In fact, so does Russia's Sputnik V vaccine. Moderna was 88.7% effective in protecting against infection vs Pfizer's 83.3%, and Moderna was 93.6% effective against COVID mortality vs Pfizer's 90.6%. As expected, the EU authorized Pfizer's vaccine for use on kids aged 5 to 11 years old. That means shots are coming to millions of elementary school pupils. Of course, at least one country didn't wait for authorization. Vienna, Austria had already started vaccinating 5 to 11-year-olds. So with cases surging, ICU's full, and staff vaccine mandates going into place, surely more healthcare workers are getting fully vaccinated, right? At the moment, as much as 30% of healthcare practitioners remain unvaccinated. HCPs working in children's hospitals had the highest vaccination rates at 77%, followed by short- and long-term care ACHs at 70.1% and 68.8%, respectively. Critical access hospitals had vaccination rates of just 64%. In the United States cases were up 20%, deaths are down 10%, and hospitalizations are up 11% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending up since November 3. The five states that had the most daily deaths per 100,000 are Montana, Kentucky, West Virginia, Oregon, and Michigan. There are 9,401,200 active cases in the United States. The five states with the greatest increase in hospitalizations per capita: New Hampshire 54%, Michigan 46%, Massachusetts 42%, Indiana 36%, and Illinois and Maine 31%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Big Horn, MT. Nome Census Area, AK. Scurry, TX. Dodge, MN. Mason, MI. Shiawassee, MI. Bethel Census Area, AK. Crawford, PA. Nodaway, MO. And Goodhue, MN. There have been at least 775,785 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related. The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont at 72.7%, Rhode Island unchanged at 72.2%, and Maine at 72.1%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are West Virginia unchanged at 41.5%, Wyoming unchanged at 45.3%, and Alabama at 46%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is unchanged at 59%. Globally, cases were up 16% and deaths were down 3% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending up since October 15. There are 19,855,847 active cases around the world. With U.S. reporting affected by the Thanksgiving holiday, the five countries with the most new cases: Germany 76,132. The U.K. 47,240. Russia 33,796. France 33,464. And Poland 28,128. There have been at least 5,181,949 deaths reported as... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

RNZ: Morning Report
Covid-19: Scientist on rapid antigen tests

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 5:38


Rapid antigen tests are being rolled out to pharmacies and businesses from next month as part of a raft of Covid-19 mitigation measures. These tests, which detect the presence of specific proteins rather than the virus's genetic material, can miss up to 44 percent of positive Covid-19 cases, according to a new study out in the New Zealand Medical Journal. In places with relatively little Covid-19 spread, a positive result from a rapid antigen test can in fact be more likely be a false positive than an actual case of the virus. In New Zealand, any positive result from a rapid antigen test will require confirmation with a PCR test. Rapid PCR tests, meanwhile, are just as accurate as the standard PCR tests which currently take between 24 to 72 hours to get results back. University of Otago microbiologist Dr James Ussher spoke to Guyon Espiner.

中廣流行網
2021.11.25【蘭萱時間】

中廣流行網

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 43:53


*今晨13.1℃ 下周恐有強烈冷氣團探12℃ 估創入冬最低溫 *全球超過2億5933萬人染疫 病殁人數已逾517.3萬 *沒人敢帶頭封鎖 德國疫情再飆 重症醫批政府缺領導力 *俄羅斯新增確診病例3萬3558例、1240死 *波蘭面臨第四波疫情 24日新增確診病例2萬8380例 *義大利24日收緊對不接種疫苗者的限制 並強制更廣泛的公務員接種疫苗 *梅克爾老公罕見公開發言 批評德國人「懶惰與自滿」不打疫苗 *WHO:疫苗減少Delta變異株40%傳播 但人們正產生錯誤安全感 *德國組閣談判落幕 將開記者會公布聯合執政協議 *南韓單日新增確診首破4000創新高 危重症人數也升至高點 *BLACKPINK成員Lisa確診 3團員PCR採檢 *疫苗一劑覆蓋率77% 被質疑灌水 *歐盟疾管中心喊話:40歲以上優先打加強針 *〈美股盤後〉Fed會議紀要偏鷹 科技股領那指標普收紅 *歐股多收跌 倫敦股市收紅 *美上周初領失業金跌破20萬人 寫逾52年新低 *11月會議紀要:Fed官員對加速Taper升息持開放態度 *〈能源盤後〉美庫存增加 市場靜待OPEC+回擊 原油小幅收低 *配合監管整改 螞蟻集團將小額信貸「借唄」更名 *英吉利海峽移民船沉沒 至少釀27死 *台灣代表處在立陶宛掛牌:中國與歐盟的關係是否會進一步生變 *台受邀美國民主峰會 蕭美琴.唐鳳代表出席 *美國民主峰會邀台灣 趙立堅崩潰嗆美:終將引火燒身

SBS Korean - SBS 한국어 프로그램
퀸즐랜드 국내 여행자 필수 PCR 검사 비용, 앞으로도 '무료'

SBS Korean - SBS 한국어 프로그램

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 1:20


연방 정부의 주정부 자금 지원 협정이 합의에 이르면서 국내 여행시에 150달러에 이르는 PCR 검사 비용을 누가 부담할 것인지에 대한 논쟁이 마무리됐다.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.22.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 53:56


Hyperbaric oxygen therapy may alleviate symptoms of Alzheimer's Disease Tel Aviv University (Israel) A new Tel Aviv University study reveals that hyperbaric oxygen treatments may ameliorate symptoms experienced by patients with Alzheimer's disease. "This revolutionary treatment for Alzheimer's disease uses a hyperbaric oxygen chamber, which has been shown in the past to be extremely effective in treating wounds that were slow to heal," says Prof. Uri Ashery of TAU's Sagol School of Neuroscience and the Faculty of Life Sciences, who led the research for the study. "We have now shown for the first time that hyperbaric oxygen therapy can actually improve the pathology of Alzheimer's disease and correct behavioral deficits associated with the disease. (NEXT) Scientists discover that CoQ10 can program cancer cells to self-destruct A promising study shows that this nutrient causes cancer cells to self-destruct before they can multiply – giving rise to hopes that it can be utilized as an important integrative therapy for cancer patients.  Let's take a closer look at this wonderful scientific work. CoQ10 “reminds” cancer cells to die Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) – which supports many indispensable biochemical reactions – is also called “ubiquinone.”  This is due to its ubiquitous nature – CoQ10 is found in nearly every human cell, with particularly high concentrations in the mitochondria, the powerhouses of the cell. Researchers report that the out-of-control replication characteristic of cancer cells is a result of the cells' lost capacity to respond to programmed cell death, or apoptosis.  (NEXT) Study suggests hot flashes could be precursor to diabetes Analysis of Women's Health Initiative data demonstrates effect of severity and duration of hot flashes on risk of developing diabetes The North American Menopause Society Hot flashes, undoubtedly the most common symptom of menopause, are not just uncomfortable and inconvenient, but numerous studies demonstrate they may increase the risk of serious health problems, including heart disease. A new study suggests that hot flashes (especially when accompanied by night sweats) also may increase the risk of developing diabetes. Results are being published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). "This study showed that, after adjustment for obesity and race, women with more severe night sweats, with or without hot flashes, still had a higher risk of diabetes," says Dr. JoAnn Pinkerton, NAMS executive director. "Menopause is a perfect time to encourage behavior changes that reduce menopause symptoms, as well as the risk of diabetes and heart disease. Suggestions include getting regular exercise and adequate sleep, avoiding excess alcohol, stopping smoking, and eating a heart- healthy diet. For symptomatic women, hormone therapy started near menopause improves menopause symptoms and reduces the risk of diabetes." (NEXT) Garlic extract may help obese adults combat inflammation University of Florida Aged garlic extract may help obese people ward off painful inflammation and lower cholesterol levels, a new University of Florida study shows. In the UF/IFAS study, scientists divided 51 obese people who were otherwise healthy into two groups ? those who took the aged garlic extract for six weeks and those who took a placebo. Researchers encouraged participants to continue their regular diet and exercise routine during the experiment. Research showed the garlic extract helped regulate immune-cell distribution and reduced blood LDL ? or "bad" ? cholesterol in the obese adults. Aged garlic extract modified the secretion of inflammatory proteins from immune cells, Percival said. (NEXT) Having children can make women's telomeres seem 11 years older George Mason University A recent study by George Mason University researchers in the Department of Global and Community Health found that women who have given birth have shorter telomeres compared to women who have not given birth. Telomeres are the end caps of DNA on our chromosomes, which help in DNA replication and get shorter over time. The length of telomeres has been associated with morbidity and mortality previously, but this is the first study to examine links with having children. (NEXT) Scientists uncover why sauna bathing is good for your health UNIVERSITY OF EASTERN FINLAND Over the past couple of years, scientists at the University of Eastern Finland have shown that sauna bathing is associated with a variety of health benefits. Using an experimental setting this time, the research group now investigated the physiological mechanisms through which the heat exposure of sauna may influence a person's health. Their latest study with 100 test subjects shows that taking a sauna bath of 30 minutes reduces blood pressure and increases vascular compliance, while also increasing heart rate similarly to medium-intensity exercise. (OTHER NEWS NEXT) Biden's Bounty on Your Life: Hospitals' Incentive Payments for COVID-19 By Elizabeth Lee Vliet, M.D. and Ali Shultz, J.D. – ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS. November 17, 2021 Upon admission to a once-trusted hospital, American patients with COVID-19 become virtual prisoners, subjected to a rigid treatment protocol with roots in Ezekiel Emanuel's “Complete Lives System” for rationing medical care in those over age 50. They have a shockingly high mortality rate. How and why is this happening, and what can be done about it? As exposed in audio recordings, hospital executives in Arizona admitted meeting several times a week to lower standards of care, with coordinated restrictions on visitation rights. Most COVID-19 patients' families are deliberately kept in the dark about what is really being done to their loved ones. The combination that enables this tragic and avoidable loss of hundreds of thousands of lives includes (1) The CARES Act, which provides hospitals with bonus incentive payments for all things related to COVID-19 (testing, diagnosing, admitting to hospital, use of remdesivir and ventilators, reporting COVID-19 deaths, and vaccinations) and (2) waivers of customary and long-standing patient rights by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). In 2020, the Texas Hospital Association submitted requests for waivers to  CMS. According to Texas attorney Jerri Ward, “CMS has granted ‘waivers' of federal law regarding patient rights. Specifically, CMS purports to allow hospitals to violate the rights of patients or their surrogates with regard to medical record access, to have patient visitation, and to be free from seclusion.” She notes that “rights do not come from the hospital or CMS and cannot be waived, as that is the antithesis of a ‘right.' The purported waivers are meant to isolate and gain total control over the patient and to deny patient and patient's decision-maker the ability to exercise informed consent.” Creating a “National Pandemic Emergency” provided justification for such sweeping actions that override individual physician medical decision-making and patients' rights. The CARES Act provides incentives for hospitals to use treatments dictated solely by the federal government under the auspices of the NIH. These “bounties” must paid back if not “earned” by making the COVID-19 diagnosis and following the COVID-19 protocol. The hospital payments include: A “free” required PCR test in the Emergency Room or upon admission for every patient, with government-paid fee to hospital. Added bonus payment for each positive COVID-19 diagnosis. Another bonus for a COVID-19 admission to the hospital. A 20 percent “boost” bonus payment from Medicare on the entire hospital bill for use of remdesivir instead of medicines such as Ivermectin. Another and larger bonus payment to the hospital if a COVID-19 patient is mechanically ventilated. More money to the hospital if cause of death is listed as COVID-19, even if patient did not die directly of COVID-19. A COVID-19 diagnosis also provides extra payments to coroners.

Plus
Hlavní zprávy - rozhovory a komentáře: Odpolední publicistka: Vláda zvažuje nouzový stav. PCR testy. Účty za elektřinu

Plus

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 19:46


Vláda uvažuje o nouzovém stavu a povolání mediků do nemocnic. Co udělat pro to, aby se na PCR test nečekalo i několik dní? Jak se rekordní ceny emisních povolenek odrazí v účtech za elektřinu?

Cave Crew Radio
CCR Season 8 Bull penis soup

Cave Crew Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021


We are back in the cave with DK and Big B. This week Big B is the epicenter of all things angry turkey birthday weekend, DK on the other hand is very happy he can cross the boarder, without a PCR test. With the holidays fast approaching we have list of 10 cures for hang overs. Trust us you may want to deal with the headache. Speculating on the Believe it or What tournament, when do we think a wild card contestant will enter? Also this week A man doses himself in hand sanitizer and is hit with a taser gun. A husband sues a physic for not removing a witches curse. We discuss who would win the battle between a physic and witch. Walmart is introducing driverless delivery trucks. We have the exclusive on airport assault masturbation guy, and of course this weeks installment of Mike reads the news. Next weeks show will be a Saturday special because Big B has a black Friday wedding. Cave Crew Radio airs live every Friday on http://www.cavecrewradio.com Also on our YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/c/CaveCrewRadio and on Facebook. You can download the podcast anywhere here https://gopod.me/cavecrewradio Click here for all our social media links and to buy exclusive merchandise https://linktr.ee/cavecrewradio

Scott and Kat After 9
A Parent Needs Advice On Disciplining His Kids

Scott and Kat After 9

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 49:35


Today: Scott got a weird notification from Amazon, A Dad is struggling with how to disciplining his kids, Using passwords that are not secure, Shawn Mendes & Camilla Cabello split up, The federal government is (kind of) scrapping the PCR test to re-enter Canada, Testing symptomatic people at pharmacies, and new stats on working from home.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Winged Wheel Podcast
MO'd DOWN (Seider Hits and Raymond Scores) - Nov. 17th, 2021

Winged Wheel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 68:41


Moritz Seider has demolished his first NHL player. Tune in as we discuss the recent Detroit Red Wings losses, including stellar play from Nedeljkovic, Lucas Raymond, & Moritz Seider, Zadina's goal, defensive woes, & more (5:40)! Also: Department of Player Safety inconsistency (37:50), Ken Holland in the Hockey Hall of Fame (44:20), & Overtime, including the Larkin positive PCR story (56:05). Head over to wingedwheelpodcast.com to find all the ways to listen, how to support the show, and so much more.

The Patriotically Correct Radio Show with Stew Peters | #PCRadio
Young Girl BADLY Injured by ”Shedding” - Wife: Hospital KILLING My Husband - PROOF: Pfizer KNEW!

The Patriotically Correct Radio Show with Stew Peters | #PCRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 55:52


 If you watch fake news on TV, they'll tell you that the Covid 19 vaccines are 100 percent safe and anything suggesting otherwise is “misinformation.” Sarah Steadman KNOWS they aren't safe. A holistic medicine specialist says bleeding her daughter is experiencing is caused by transmission of the vaccine through “vaccine shedding," from her own dad. She joins Stew today to discuss how the vaxxed truly are a threat to the unvaxxed. Things are getting worse and worse every day in America. The U.S. military is falling apart. Infrastructure is decaying. The murder rate was up 30 percent last year and it will be up again this year. Our elites are egging on violent riots, and then sending prosecutors to arrest people who defend themselves from the mob. Paul Haulinski with GunsAmerica.com, America's oldest online platform for buying and selling guns, joins Stew to discuss the shortages and how to prepare for them. We've received letter after letter telling us horrifying stories of what's going on in the nation's hospitals. One letter was from Erin Jones, who is desperately trying to save her husband Jason, after he was placed on a ventilator, now, for more than a month. The doctors of Hugly Memorial Hospital in Texas have refused alternative treatments, and is essentially being killed by lack of care. The vaccines haven't worked the way our leaders told us they would. Now, they need to force them into our children. It's a religious imperative for the left, in their new coronavirus death cult. The CEO of Pfizer is going around saying that people who question the official story on the vaccines are “criminals.” Karen Kingston joins Stew to discuss who the real criminals are, especially those involved in disabling and killing kids through vaccine trials. Today on ASK DR. JANE, we address whether Covid and election fraud tie together through the same group of criminals. We also discuss when Dr. Jane believes all mandates will be done with, and which cities will keep them, as well as what will happen to the PCR test when it loses its emergency use authorization status at the end of the year. Get Dr. Zelenko's Anti-Shedding Treatment, NOW AVAILABLE FOR KIDS: www.zStackProtocol.com Go Ad-Free, Get Exclusive Content, Become a Premium user: https://redvoicemedia.com/premium Follow Stew on social media: http://evrl.ink/StewPeters See all of Stew's content at https://StewPeters.TV Watch full episodes here: https://redvoicemedia.net/stew-full-shows Check out Stew's store: http://StewPeters.shop Support our efforts to keep truth alive: https://www.redvoicemedia.com/support-red-voice-media/ Advertise with Red Voice Media: https://redvoicemedia.net/ads

The Todd Herman Show
Hour 3: A Man Forced Out of Hospital Room Where His Baby Was to be Born

The Todd Herman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 37:04


 Sen. Durbin says the pathway to citizenship for undocumented immigrants is a critical component of our economic recovery, small business are not critical but big business are, it is only critical when it comes to a massive vote for communists, a man was being forced out of his wife's room prior to child birth due to a positive PCR test somewhere in the hospital // TEXTS & WRAP //  PERSONAL NOTE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Mendelspod Podcast
DNA Script Takes DNA Synthesis Back to the Bench with Enzymatic Tech: Thomas Ybert, CEO

Mendelspod Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021


DNA is a multibillion-dollar industry in 2021 and satisfies many life science applications, including drugs, reagents, siRNA, PCR, diagnostics, synthetic biology, and many others. Enzymatic DNA synthesis, or EDS, is a new approach to manufacturing DNA that is much more efficient and user-friendly and could disrupt the current market.

BrentonOnTour
Dr. Sam Gutman MD (Rockdoc Consulting Inc)

BrentonOnTour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 71:47


Dr. Sam Gutman MD stops by this week to talk Rockdoc Consulting Inc; his Event Medical Consulting Company, shares some stories from treating artists backstage, talks about his favourite shows, what started it all for him and more! Plus, we discuss COVID19 travel testing, the difference between PCR & Rapid Antigen testing, vaccine hesitancy and offers his thoughts on how to get through the pandemic.

SuperFeast Podcast
#142 Honouring Masculine Strength and Spirit with Aaron Schultz

SuperFeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 59:06


Today's episode is one of the most important conversations we've had on the podcast all year. In this first of our Brovember episodes, Mason chats with Aaron Schultz, the founder of Outback Mind, A mental health and wellbeing programme that helps men from regional Australia manage anxiety and develop the right skills to stay healthy in the body, mind, and spirit. Growing up in regional Australia himself, experiencing the downward spiral of mental health issues, unfulfillment, and toxic environments, Aaron knows first hand the challenges men can face. A healing journey ignited by an introduction to Buddhism and self-love, Aaron has spent the past 20 years building a career around helping men to become more conscious and connected to their true selves. Today, Aaron is a leading Anxiety Management teacher, meditation/yoga teacher, and a specialised mind/body coach, with a great ambition to help others; Particularly men from regional areas. Aaron works to bring about a level of consciousness and understanding to a whole collective of men, born into an environment where a natural trajectory is to work for the economy and serve the colonial system; With little to no cultural ideologies in place that nurture them connecting to their true purpose. His organisation, Outback Mind; Focuses on creating a culture and lifestyle that gives these men the tools and solid foundation needed to deal with emotions and realise their heart purpose. In this soul-centred conversation, Aaron talks a lot about untying the embedded emotion of fear in society. An emotional response instilled in most of us; Fear permeates the colonial structure and has become a default operating system for so many. Fear of judgment, being different, or being vulnerable inhibits a lot of men from discovering their true purpose and potential. This is a beautiful conversation about masculinity, vulnerability, and the destructive cultural ideologies placed upon men. Mason and Aaron dive into Men's holistic health, the changes we need to make in society so men can thrive, and why we can't wait for a system that's not serving us to bring about the changes we need. If we want to change, we have to activate it ourselves by supporting each other and our communities in the areas that matter. This episode honours the strength, spirit, and wellbeing of men and is a much larger conversation about humanity. Tune in.     "It's so important to be able to give guidance and be strong within yourself so you can be a light to others, because that's really what the world needs right now more than ever. I believe my job here is to try and create light so these men can start to become more conscious and take autonomy within themselves". -Aaron Schultz     Host and Guest discuss:   Men's circles Yin Yoga for men. Men's mental health Self love and acceptance. Resources for a purposeful life. Processing anger in a healthy way. Learning from indigenous cultures. Using physical exercise to process anger. Compassion for ourselves and each other. The prison system as an industry to make money. Developing a relationship with the masculine and feminine. The power of daily routine for a purposeful and productive life. Getting in flow with the seasons, cycles and our circadian rhythm.   Who is Aaron Schultz? Aaron Schultz is a leading anxiety management teacher, speaker, and private coach. He focuses on practical solutions to help individuals improve mental wellbeing and overcome anxiety. Aarons vision is to empower people to take a proactive approach to wellbeing, feel safe and supported, and become free of physical and mental illness by building healthy lifestyle behaviours that help individuals become self-aware, live more consciously, and thrive. Aaron is the founder of Outback Mind, a yoga, and meditation teacher (with over 5000 hours of practical teaching experience) specialising in Yin, Hatha, and Kundalini Yoga and transcendental meditation. Aaron also has extensive experience training individuals and groups in high-stress industries to manage anxiety in and out of the workplace. Aaron was recently awarded the People's Choice Award at the Queensland Men's Health Awards for his work creating a healthier future for men and boys.   CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ON APPLE PODCAST    Resources: Shen blend Cordyceps Deer Antler Ashwagandha Eucommia Bark Outback Mind website Outback Mind podcast Yin Yoga with Anatomist Paul Grilley     Q: How Can I Support The SuperFeast Podcast? A: Tell all your friends and family and share online! We'd also love it if you could subscribe and review this podcast on iTunes. Or  check us out on Stitcher, CastBox, iHeart RADIO:)! Plus  we're on Spotify!   Check Out The Transcript Here:   Mason: (00:00) Aaron, thanks so much for joining me, mate.   Aaron Schultz: (00:02) Pleasure, Mason. Thank you for having me.   Mason: (00:03) Yeah, well, yeah, my pleasure. My pleasure. Good. Do you want to just like give everyone a little up to date, little download on what you're doing at the moment, where you're focused at the moment is, and what the grander vision is for yourself and likewise, Outback Mind.   Aaron Schultz: (00:19) Yeah, thank you. I guess I come from a rural background in country Victoria. I was brought up traditionally, getting all the trauma that the education system sort of laid upon me, and that took me into poor lifestyle behaviours and believing what the TV told me. So, I started drinking and doing all the wrong things, and I disconnected from my real purpose and my soul pretty early because of the way society was sort of gearing me. So, sort of went into those poor lifestyle behaviours, and I knew underneath all that there was something greater, but I had to follow the breadcrumbs society had sort of laid out for me and worked hard, did all the things, bought the houses, and had the material stuff, and all that too.   Aaron Schultz: (01:15) And yeah, basically ended up a bit of a mess in my thirties and had to redirect myself. But following that, I've sort of had a real vision to be able to help guys like myself from rural communities to be able to find out who they really are and follow that. Everyone's got something inside them that maybe they haven't had the courage to dive into. So, I've been able to help others through my own experience to fast track that basically by giving them some tools and some guidance and advice around following their true purpose in this lifetime, I guess, at the end of the day, and not having to go through all the shit that I went through, but that's also beautiful in its own essence because we do learn from that sort of stuff. But to be able to help a young man or to help someone get some direction, I think's my real purpose here, and to be able to explore all the beautiful things that humanity has to offer without going into all the negative stuff that takes us away from our true alignment at the end of the day.   Mason: (02:27) With this young, colonised Australian culture that we've got here, I mean, especially in the tribe, what do you see as the biggest thing? You are a part of that culture, and you and others are emerging to fill these gaps that are allowing such big mental health challenges, or just generally not being able to get onto your purpose and everything that kind of comes with that. If you look overall at our culture, what do you think is the biggest thing that we're yearning for, or that's lacking, or there's a blockage around that's enabling all these things that you're solving? What's enabling it to become an issue to start with?   Aaron Schultz: (03:11) Yeah, really. I always say to people "What are traps that are holding you back?" And it's primarily the underlying fact that is fear. We get put into fear early and that pretty much becomes our default. You always keep going back to fear all the time. But to be able to help people understand what helps them feel calm, I need to be able to create a culture and a lifestyle around that because that's really the heart purpose and the soul journey, I guess, at the end of the day which a lot of guys, including myself, never understood or don't understand, and I don't like seeing people go through the whole lifetime without having that connection.   Aaron Schultz: (03:58) I think we've all got something within us which is our true purpose and our true calling. We've got a job here to do, many of us, and to be able to find what that is, to be able to direct your life around that I think's really, really important to be able to make it simple to people. I go back to my own sort of journey. I was sort of messed up in my thirties, and I went to a doctor, and all he wanted to do was tie me up in knots. But I basically just had to take direction for myself and then start to work on myself again and get back to that little boy that was never really nourished, I suppose, at the end of the day.   Aaron Schultz: (04:35) So, that sort of resonates with guys when you talk to them because they sort of see that within them when you're done, and to be able to give them real-life experiences and stories about it but to do it vulnerably I think's really important. I was never courageous enough to be vulnerable about the way I felt as a human, come from a very judgemental environment which most rural communities are. It can be very much like that. And you touch on the colonial model. The colonial model is pretty much all about fear, force, and control, and ourselves are really penetrated with that early on. To be able to release that I think is really important. It's our birthright to feel that freedom, I guess, at the end of the day.   Mason: (05:23) When you work, so especially, I mean this isn't just going to be rural community, but that's where you are predominantly working, when you're working in rural communities with the lads and you start looking at purposefulness, soul journey, I'm sure there's different for them, they resonate with different ways of the connecting with that, and talking about that, I'm sure you've got lots of ways of approaching, what's the outcome? Do you find that it's different where you go? Everything's going to be unique, but for some people, is that purposefulness something that's a big life goal? Are you seeing at the moment, is it just them dealing with some inner turmoil so that they can just do their job purposefully and enjoy where they're at? What do you see the biggest outcome of how they actually feel their purpose, and what does it look like? I'm just thinking for some blokes and women, but blokes that are listening that are like, "What is that?" Is that, all of a sudden, I know my purpose is ABC or how does it look?   Aaron Schultz: (06:23) Yeah, yeah.   Aaron Schultz: (06:25) Men are confused, to be perfectly honest to you. We're educated to support the economy really at the end of the day. We come out of school, we go into uni or work, and we sort of have lost that real connection with our true self. That takes us into poor lifestyle behaviours, getting into relationships which we aren't aligned with. Really, once you start to explain this to people in a men's circle or one on one or whatever it is, people start to actually realise that not so much that they're fucked up, but they've actually taken themselves away from their true alignment to be able to do what society's expected of them or what their community's expected of them, and I was very much like that. I was always trapped in this thing of what other people thought about me and a lot of guys are the same.   Aaron Schultz: (07:21) They're very much at that entrapment of expectation of others. To be able to start to give them tools, to unpack that so they can feel safe within themselves because a man very, very rarely feels safe with who he actually is, to be able to develop a relationship with this masculine, feminine energy too, which took me a lot of work to be able to understand that as well, to be able to release anger, but then also to be comfortable with that anger too so you can develop a relationship with both sides of you and humanity, I guess, at the end of the day. But I think we have this lack of awareness within ourselves about who we truly are, and we're not just put in on this planet to be able to work, pay taxes, get a super, and die, and to be able to bring that back into real-time for people so they can start to work towards their true alignment.   Aaron Schultz: (08:24) One thing that really changed me a few years ago was going and talking to old men at the end of their life about had they had a successful life and nine out of 10 said no because they were never able to reach not so much their potential, but who they really wanted to be and be able to follow their passions because of expectation of fear, judgement , all that type of stuff in these rural communities where I come from. So, that's been said to me. I'm not going to wait. I want to try and fulfil my life well and truly before then, but also to help others do the same. We've all got that ability within us. It's just about sort of untying the knots and the tangles to be able to get some structure on how we live our lives a bit more functionally and freely moving forward, I guess, yeah.   Mason: (09:11) You brought up men's circles. It's an offering. It's an ancient happening. It's something logical, and to be honest, something I've been engaged in a lot, but have kind of just a bit, I think, steered clear of a little bit, while especially the Byron Bay scene kind of figures out without the political correctness, just open a space where you can truly explore what it is for you as a man, without dictating the outcomes and trying to say what a man is necessarily. But just how important are these, not just in rural communities, in metropolitan cities? Is this just a novelty, something we're doing in Bali and Byron? Just how important is this to the emerging and evolving culture of Australia and around the world?   Aaron Schultz: (10:10) Yeah, and you think about it because I had a good core group of friends in primary school, right? It's just been high school, the egos and everything open up, right? You just become cynical, critical, judgemental, all those sorts of things, right? But at the end of the day, strip everything away, you've got a heart connection with your brotherhood, I guess. When you see the egos of others and their judgements and opinions of the mind and all those sort of things, but once you strip away that, all the work's got to be done in the privacy of their own heart.   Aaron Schultz: (10:47) I start a men's circle with a meditation, and I take them on a journey for 11 minutes, and I stripped them away from big citation of the mind and all the things that are going on. We get back to this true purpose again. Okay. After that 10 minutes, we're de-escalated and we're right, and then we can start to open up about what's going on here. So, what I'll do is I'll talk, I'll bring a topic in. I'll pair people up. They'll go and talk about that topic, come back, then they're de-escalated even further. Then we go into a circle and we talk about what's going on in our lives to be able to unpack that and have that support of others as well. So, the vulnerability is the biggest thing for a man actually be able to be vulnerable. As I said, it was a tough thing for me.   Aaron Schultz: (11:33) When new people come along, I'll talk about that sort of stuff so they actually feel safe. That's the thing with a man. We're in this protection mode consistently. We're in this fight and flight, this fight mode. Once we can be free of that protection and start to open up, that's when we can start to unload and start to unpack some of the challenges that we have going on within ourselves, and a great way to do that is to express that around other men, to be able to be vulnerable, but also to be able to tap into the feminine side which we don't understand, which can really help us create great levels of self-awareness at the end of the day which many of just don't have.   Aaron Schultz: (12:13) As I said, we're constantly on chasing the bread crumbs and all the material things that society now thinks that we need to help us feel good. But once we sort of get away from that and start to talk about the way things are and the way things are going on with us, I just think we can start to be more conscious about the way we live our lives at the end of the day.   Mason: (12:36) I mean, it is quite simple. It's amazing, but when you dip in, when you sink into that space, even just that intention, and you can just see. Sometimes, yes, whether it's a group of mates that we have, or if you have a partner, it's incredible to be able to be vulnerable to that partner and share. There's sometimes so much to unpack, it doesn't feel like it's overly appropriate for your lover to be that person that has to cop all of it and hold it, and that's the biggest thing. Having a group of men, strong men, men that can be soft as well just to feel supported in that, that you don't have to bottle it in to protect the people around you as well.   Mason: (13:21) Then also, you mentioned anger. I think it went from that culture where men are just aggressive and angry to that's bad and that's toxic, and then to this point now where no, it needs to be felt. If you've bottled it up that long, it's going to be raging and wanting to come out, and to know that you're in a space of other men that understand it, and ideally a space where you feel you're not going to get judged for it, it feels, yeah, it's obviously very sacred. And just going through your website, I've just gone, "You know what? That's really something that could be healthy for me right now."   Aaron Schultz: (14:01) Yeah, yeah. I appreciate that. I just share a bit about my own journey. I had these little traumas going on in my childhood which I've never dealt with, and that sort of took me into drinking and masking all that sort of stuff. When I hit 37, I was at the stage where I could take my life or I could change and move through that. So, I had that seesaw going on, and the easy thing was to go, "Okay, I've had enough of this. I'm out of here." And that's what happens to lot of guys. I lost my job and I felt worthless because I was attached to that title and that outcome, and yeah, as I said, I've never got to know myself.   Aaron Schultz: (14:51) So, put my foot into the gym and fitness, and a lot of that anger came out with the fitness and lifting more and more chin-ups, and all that sort of stuff, and I went from an average body into a pretty strong, fit body, and all the accolades and everything that came with that. Then I started to win things, and then I started to do these unbelievable athletic pursuits. And I had this moment where I could have went further and went to America and done all this sort of great stuff, or I could have said to myself, "Okay, Aaron, you've done well here. You don't need to do that anymore." That's what I did. I didn't keep pushing.   Aaron Schultz: (15:32) So, that took me into Buddhism, and Buddhism taught me to be kind to myself and be vulnerable. That's where the healing started to happen. With men, we'll keep pushing. That masculine side is very strong. That was the opportunity and the learning curve for me to be able to retreat from that, and then start to find that side of myself which had never been explored or never understood. To fast track things a bit, yin yoga was the thing for me which basically helped solve a lot of problems that I had because it just taught me to settle down, slow down, be accepting of myself, and then to be able to, yeah, learn how to use the body to settle the mind at the end of the day, to be able to develop a relationship with yin and the yang of life.   Aaron Schultz: (16:32) So, if I hadn't kept pushing fitness, that would've pushed me into this yang space, and the ego would've been dominant. To be able to understand the ego and become teammates with the ego, rather than just living that mindset consistently because I think that's what a lot of us try to do. We just think we've got to be a performer consistently to be able to have the vulnerability which was very hard for me with yin yoga because my body was so tight and that. But over time, I just had to keep showing up, and now I teach others, but also, it's part of my daily practise to be able to use the yang and use the yin together and have that harmony to develop that neutrality, I guess, at the end of the day and a high level of awareness.   Aaron Schultz: (17:22) Your mind, the way you are feeling on a basis changes, but if you can provide yourself with the practical tools to manage that better, I think you're not only going to be a better individual personally, but that's going to help spread light to others as well.   Mason: (17:41) How does that go down when you... I know we were talking just before we jumped on the podcast and when you're working in the prison system. Are you still working in the prison systems?   Aaron Schultz: (17:49) Oh, well not really. I don't work for the government, but I was going and teaching yoga in the prisons and doing some self-awareness training for prisoners. That may change now that we've got to be double jabbed so I'm not too sure about that one. Yeah. So, what we do is I'll just talk or the guy from WA will go and help guys come out, put them into a job, and then give them that pathway so they haven't got that vulnerability when they're out. The whole system is about bringing people from punishment or trauma, giving them more punishment, and then they're on their own when they get out. That doesn't work. We actually are able to go in, help identify the right people to match them up with the right employer, give them stability, but my role is to be able to keep them self-aware through mindfulness practises before they're released, so they come out and they've got a daily practise they can tap into so they can keep their job, don't get caught up with all the old belief systems and stay on track.   Aaron Schultz: (18:54) So, we don't get funding for any of this. We're trying to create something here which is going to help humanity in many ways, and that's something I'm really passionate about. That's primarily helping guys that have got lots of issues. We're punishing people consistently for trauma that's not their fault. To be able to help guys identify that, to help them feel safe, and it's okay, they can start to rebuild their lives again, this is something that's groundbreaking, that hasn't been explored before. So, to be able to take a young 25-year-old that's had a terrible life to help them reinvert that or a 55-year-old which has had this constant cycle of incarceration to be able to feel sacred in themselves, to learn some of the life skills which can keep them balanced is really beautiful at the end of the day because everyone's got a purpose in this lifetime and be able to help them become more stable and self-aware about their emotions, I think it's really important, and that's something that I want to try and do more of over the next period.   Aaron Schultz: (20:06) But I've got higher things that I want to do later on. It's just the stepping stone, and I keep getting downloads about this when I do my meditation in the morning that this is my journey and this is my purpose for this time. So, trying to be true to that, I guess, at the end of the day, rather than chasing money and all those sorts of things because I think if you're working in alignment with yourself, then everything else will take care of itself.   Mason: (20:33) What do you see is the biggest consequence here with the trauma? Obviously, the same is happening in various ways for women, but sticking to men, this lack of capacity or want or willingness or ability of our culture, the system, especially the corporate system to identify with a lack of initiations, a lack of support to identify traumas, having men being comfortable in themselves, what's the biggest... When you look at our country and our world, what do you see is the consequences that are rolling out of this being the case of us having this unwillingness and deficiency to support men to get in touch and on that path?   Aaron Schultz: (21:19) Yeah, yeah. Yeah, look, I just think that the whole system is working against this at the end of the day. You say, for example, that someone is experiencing self-doubt consistently. Well, as soon as they drive around a corner, they're seeing a billboard to drink beer. It's going around the other side, they're seeing a billboard to eat junk food, all this type of stuff. So, we're getting mixed messages consistently. Your body is smarter than you. Your body's always trying to give you the truth, but we're blocking that consistently because of the domination of the mind. We haven't been taught how to read what's going on below the shoulders and the message that that's consistently sending us.   Aaron Schultz: (22:06) So, yeah, to be able to find ease within yourself and ease with that trauma, some of the things that have held you back, this has happened for a reason, whether it be good or bad, and then to be able to accept that, and self-acceptance is such a hard thing because we are so geared to keep consistently beating ourselves up. We're consistently beating ourselves up, and I have that issue, not so much now, but I know it pops in every now and then. That is not a bad thing because it's there to protect me and keep driving me in some ways, but sometimes I really need to recheck myself and be kind to myself at the end of the day, and that's a skill that we're lost that ability to be able to nurture ourselves and be kind of to ourselves I think's so important because we've got the foot on the pedal consistently where we're not actually taking that off.   Aaron Schultz: (23:03) So, yeah, to be able to dive into some of those traumas, through my meditation practise now, I'll go into some things that happened to me when I was younger which gave me trauma, and then I'll be able to say thank you to that because it actually helps me move forward. That's a big thing for a guy that's new to this sort of stuff to learn, but you can give them simple things that actually help them on a journey of self-acceptance, then all of a sudden, they're on a pathway to transformation rather than being stuck in the old patterns all the time, if that makes sense.   Mason: (23:39) I mean, it completely makes sense. I mean, it's funny. I know I can go really sinister right now and talk about the motives of a keeping a culture this way and keeping everyone kind of huddled down, and kind of like a commodity, as long as they're just designed and as long as it's all working to design, just working, being in the workforce, and doesn't matter. We can deal with all the issues. And then you add the confusion of there's a lot, and some of it kind of rightfully, some that's gone absolutely too far is the bastardization of men and masculinity kind of thrown in there at the moment, and I'm not sure what your position is around this. It's something that's been obviously going on for years and super prevalent at the moment.   Mason: (24:29) I'm just saying with that perfect storm, for the efficiency's sake, for the resources's sake of our country and our culture, it makes complete sense to put energy in into this, and I guess I can just say for people listening as well, I get the sinister intentions and also get the fact that you're looking, I don't know, looking through the matrix and being like... Even if you guys can't see that this is the greatest thing to bring love, getting people on purpose, men on purpose, better for families, better for women, better for everyone yet you're fighting for funding.   Mason: (25:08) I mean, it always perplexes me, but then it doesn't because I go, "I know if I can have a..." I don't know why it's surprising, but it does still. It's baffling because the yield of benefit from... You imagine rolling out what they've done with PCR testing and vaccination, what they've done in such a small amount of time, if they rolled out with half of that, a quarter of that resource and intention towards let's get everyone properly rehabilitated, feeling purposeful, and getting over the traumas, the amount of efficiency that would be put into our culture, the amount of stress that would come off our medical system from all these mental health... Suicide comes off. All of a sudden, you got all the stress that goes into families when that happens. It really kind of brings it. It makes me really quite emotional. With the work you're doing, I'm sure you feel the gravity of it. Just how much, the utopia, that we're knocking on the door of?   Aaron Schultz: (26:20) I don't get angry about it. I see with compassion because I know there's such a better way. So, the whole government model is keeping people DDC which is dumb, docile, and compliant. Right? The whole system is around keeping people unhealthy because it's good for the economy. We've actually fucking become topsy-turvy here with the way that we really should be directing humanity. You're right. Giving people the tools and skills to be able to deal with those things rather than pushing it the other way is really the key to that.   Aaron Schultz: (26:54) Now, I believe that there's going to be a moment in time over the next, maybe 10, 20 years where there will be a real shift. We can't keep going down this role of basically pushing people away from what we're meant to be doing here as humans. You think about it. At the end of the day, it's only been the last 20, 30, 40 years that we've had so much domination. People were living in those days where they were sharing. Things were much more aligned with the way we're meant to be functioning here as humans, but they've taken away our vegetable gardens, our fruit trees, all those sorts of things to direct us to go to the supermarket. Convenient has become so much more common these days because really, at the end of the day, what it is mostly is it's the economical support and stimulus that goes with it.   Aaron Schultz: (27:49) So, if you look at a person that's incarcerated, that's an industry. The prisons have become an industry. The junk food has become an industry. All these different things have popped up. When I was a young fellow, pubs closed at 10 o'clock. Now, they're free for all because they realise they can keep more people employed. There's emergency services that are going to be employed to compliment all the pisspots, all those sorts of things. So, keeping people mentally unbalanced and physically unwell has become an industry, an entity of its own so that's continually stimulating the economy. But you're right, the counterbalance that is to be able to create a wellness culture which is going to be so much more beneficial at the end of the day, they can't see that at that level. The whole draconian thinking and the draconian model is really wrong.   Aaron Schultz: (28:45) My job here and I believe your job here is to try and create light so people can start to become more conscious and take autonomy within themselves so they can actually start to think, "Well, maybe what I've been fed is bullshit. Now, I'm going to put some decent fertiliser onto my body, and around me that's going to help nourish me," rather than sort of punishment at the end of the day because we're really directed into a world now of self-punishment. Most people are feeling like a shithouse on a daily basis, physically and mentally, and that's the only way that they know. So, where I live, there's a coffee cart. People are lining up there consistently to get their energy. I'm going down and I'm doing meditation on the beach and getting energy from the earth and the sun. People don't see that because the TV's telling them to go and get their fill of coffee, and then at the end of the day, drink beer to find that balance, and I was brought up in that.   Aaron Schultz: (29:42) So, I understand what it's like, but I see that with compassion. I see these people that are making decisions with compassion. I spend time in Parliament House in Canberra, and I've been around the government, and I understand how it all works. I have people that are in fairly high-level roles come to me consistently because they're actually empty and lost with themselves. They're putting energy into all the stuff that they think is real and right, but at the end of the day, it's taking away from their true alignment, and I don't want to see them get to the end of their lives and think what if. We can actually create a culture of self-autonomy and well-being now for them. That's why it's so important to be able to give guidance and be strong within yourself so you can be a light to others because that's really what the world needs right now more than ever.   Mason: (30:38) I mean, you brought up again, getting to the end of your life, whether or not there's regret or whatever. I always like to sprinkle in that it's going to be diverse, I imagine very diverse in terms of little regrets and tweaks, or was I on track or not. It's not just black and white. But I was just thinking, for everyone listening, especially the boys listening, tracking to the end of their life which I think you've been with your meditation practise. I'm sure there's a lot of work in acknowledging your death and the impermanence, and I always find that most of the time, ultimately, my most rewarding and favourite part of my own inner practise is facing my own mortality and always going into that darkness and seeing what emerges.   Mason: (31:32) But I always love thinking about that, either that deathbed or my 80-year-old self, and using that as a lighthouse, and that always gives me insights, and can I map somewhat or an understanding of the terrain. Well, I can feel it. I can feel the terrain and how many things are going to change in all those years. For you in your work, for the guys listening, when they think about themselves kind of on that deathbed, or when they're an elder, hopefully an elder, and they're tracking back, what resources would you recommend for them to have in place which would be the fertiliser to give the capacity for that rich garden of a purposeful life to come about?   Aaron Schultz: (32:15) Absolutely. Look, we're only on this journey in this body for a period of time, but primarily, if you can keep yourself in routine on a daily basis, you will not age. Physically, you may change, but mentally and spiritually, you will stay coherent. So, to be able to utilise a physical body in a manner where it's being nourished on a daily basis, externally by movement, those types of things, to be able to nourish it with the right nutrients externally that come into the body to be able to help it survive and thrive really well.   Aaron Schultz: (32:57) But also, to be conscious and connected to nature and all the things that are beyond that, I think that that will hold you in high regard so you don't leave this life feeling unfulfilled because every day for me is an opportunity to have an opportunity that I've ever had before and I've got to remind myself consistently that every day has been different, and I'm grateful for the days that have gone before because yeah, once you've got that, you will not have any regrets, and every opportunity, every moment is unique, and it's something that we've actually become disconnected with because we're so dominated by the mind and what we think is real.   Aaron Schultz: (33:45) Humans are the only creatures on this planet which are working away from our alignment. Look around at everything else and they know what they're doing. They're sourcing the food. They're doing all the things that nature intended and provided for them, but humans have become disconnected and lost from that. There's so much we can learn from our indigenous cultures that can give us that connection again. You and I are on this land through other entities, by people that have come from other lands that have come here and created us so we've actually lost a sense of purpose as men as well because we haven't got that connection with something.   Aaron Schultz: (34:27) I've learned so much of indigenous people from when I was a young boy, but to also what I'm doing now to be able to really connect and learn from them, and I'm helping indigenous guys connect back to their culture because that's the most powerful gift that they could have while they're in these bodies in these times primarily at the end of the day because that is human, isn't it? You know where you're living, you're living in a community, you're sharing, you're in a tribe, all that type of stuff. This is what I believe we're meant to be doing as humans. We're actually just lost touch with that at the end of the day. To be able to be grounded on a daily basis is so important.   Mason: (35:06) Yeah, I think it's kind of one of those things. I've done a few podcasts lately with some... I just did one with Jost. So, I don't know if Jost from-   Aaron Schultz: (35:17) No.   Mason: (35:17) He's a German Daoist and acupuncturist and can go in all kinds of direction. And again, in this podcast, we just came back to sleep in terms of the ultimate thing to bring that armour in terms of what's going on in the world at the moment and love. It's so often, and that racing part of my mind is like, "All right. So, what's that thing?" And asking you that question, you're like, "All right," that consistency through your day, that routine through your day so that you're grounded. It just landed again. I've tightened it up so much this year, and I'm one of those people that I'm like, "Oh no," if I've got that scheduled dialled and I'm refining it and it's all scheduled and locked in, it means I'm not free, and I've got that little Peter Pan syndrome kind of going on.   Mason: (36:03) But I've just watched what happened to my mental health this year when I just dialled in to that calendar and not really respecting, when I have a meeting, respecting the clock, respecting that I've put that in my schedule for a reason, and keep on refining, don't get down on myself. I can't believe what's happened to my mental health and stability just through that, with movement, with breathwork, with meditation. And again, I'm one that stumbles a lot in that and it quite often doesn't go well, but then just to not give up and just remember, that is the key. You've just given us that that's the key for when you're an old codger. That's what will get you feeling really purposeful when you get there. I find that potent.   Aaron Schultz: (36:48) Yeah, absolutely. It's called [inaudible 00:36:53] on a daily basis if you can do something for 10% of your day. I like to do it early in the morning so you can get connected. If you can have a practise every morning which grounds you, then you get rid of all the uncertainty, the fears, the worries, all that sort of stuff, and get back to okay, this is what it's all about, and then you start to live more from your heart. Yeah, I just think that is ancient wisdom which is much needed in modern times. All the ancient traditions talk about it. And in Kundalini yoga, we talk about juts, so just repeat. You repeat on a daily basis., you've got that foundation for your life. It's so important. It's so easy to get up in the morning and go to the coffee machine and get stimulated straightaway. The average man's going to the TV or the radio, and they're putting the fear in the first five minutes of their day, But if you can say, "No, I'm disconnecting from that. I'm going to do something which nourishes myself." That's turning inward primarily to be able to connect.   Aaron Schultz: (37:56) Physical movement is a great way of doing that. I had to do it through fitness to really push my body and learn to connect with myself again. But really, that took me into meditation. It took me into okay, now I've got rid of all my anger, now I can be still. That stillness, it's come from yin yoga now to be able to help the mindset also. I used to be really rigid on a daily basis with regards to what I had to do, but now I wake up and I have all these tools that I can use. So, I wake up and okay, this is how I feel. This is what I'm going to do, and my practise every morning goes for a couple of hours or more, depending on what's happening on that particular day. But that's my rock and my foundation that I've worked on over the last sort of 10 or 12 years.   Aaron Schultz: (38:48) It's a journey because most guys, they want to get to the end of the marathon before they start. The whole thing is to be really in love with the journey. Don't worry about the outcome. Really be in love with the journey and what's happening because every day is unique, and it's a new opportunity to learn about yourself and others. You've got new experiences going on in your day on a daily basis. So, to be able to be in love with that, rather than the outcome, we're so attached to the outcome. I want the beautiful wife. I want this and that and the other, but just be in mind and love with yourself and work within your own truth, and everything else will take care of itself I guess at the end of the day.   Mason: (39:35) And quite often, I mean, in my experience, it's still those things which you perceive to be superficial in terms of your wanting. They're still there. They are created in your life with substance. Beautiful partner, the ability to get on purpose, get some cash in the bank, build some assets, maybe be a provider, maybe not fall into... Whatever it is, it's still that superficial stuff. From what I could see, it's still there. It's just got something in the middle of it.   Aaron Schultz: (40:09) Oh, a hundred percent. It's really interesting. I'm not huge with social media, but I have these memory popups come up, right? And what I was doing three years ago, five years ago, eight years ago, it's amazing. This is one thing that we don't understand as men, right? I believe that we have this cyclic thing going on within us that we're actually engaged in this type of stuff at particular times of the year. I looked at these popups that have been coming out recently. They're exactly how I'm feeling now. These are just reminders of what's happened at the same time throughout a year in years gone. So, these seasons and cycles that we're going through, we actually don't have any awareness and consciousness around that to be able to be in alignment with that.   Aaron Schultz: (41:00) I think that is something that's really powerful and next level with regards to reaching our potential as humans, but also to be able to be more responsive and conscious of what's going on within our lives at any particular moment throughout the calendar year or whatever that may be. It's been a real light bulb for me to actually observe that. That's been a gift as a reminder to show me those sorts of things. And when your emotions and so forth are out of check, it's usually probably a lot to do with what's going on in nature which we don't really understand that much. The mental health industry doesn't probably understand that much about either because it's all about interventions rather than proactive solutions I guess at the end of the day.   Aaron Schultz: (41:50) So, they're the things I want to try and help people understand. Maybe you're feeling like this because of this reason. How many men know about moon cycles and how that works? None. That's the feminine side of them that they don't want to have anything to do with, but if we could start to educate guys more about this sort of stuff, and how this might be affecting their sleep and their circadian rhythm, and all those types of things which we're unconscious of, I think that's really, really important. That's how we can start to be proactive about mental health rather than being reactive like the whole model is currently because that model is about making money out of people.   Mason: (42:34) Isn't it just? So, you've just touched a lot on circadian rhythm connecting to the land. Something I've been, yeah, saying for a few years now is that it's just very obvious and has been obvious for many people for a long time, and there's somewhat many diversions, but there's especially a diversion. I can see a diversion in the genetics and the way that people want to live right now. One I see is those communities wanting to keep at least a foot but two feet grounded on the earth, and then those that I think I kind of see more going up into the cloud, and wanting to plug into a smart city in a technological way of living that doesn't abide by any connection to nature and circadian rhythm.   Mason: (43:20) I mean, we don't have too much longer. I'm sure you've got some resource, or if you want to quickly share your practises for staying tuned in to that natural rhythm so that you can stay tuned into reality, and maybe the reality of what's going on with you. But I also just wanted to touch, and you mentioned mob indigenous culture, any indigenous lads listening, you've already recommended, it's the number one thing. It's kind of in the faces, connect back to culture, connect back to the song and your dance and language. For the Western lads listening because I kind of find it still a little bit icky around here in terms of still a little bit of spiritual just taking of indigenous culture.   Mason: (44:08) Have you got recommendations or just a reminder of how we can also, through connecting with the land, also connect or respect or learn about indigenous culture in a way that... It's energetically. You can feel it's still like a hive there. There's karmic stuff there. Obviously, there's a lot of developing and forming that energetic relationship where we're living harmoniously together. It's still unravelling. Have you got any tips for guys to how approach it, how approach that?   Aaron Schultz: (44:43) Yeah, definitely. A lot of us have had no connection with spirituality because it's combined with religion, and a lot of us have had religious trauma. So, a lot of this stuff that we believed was right about connection is probably not really filling us anymore. So, to be able to, I wouldn't say disregard that, but just to let go of that now what your beliefs probably were, to be able to be more aware of the universal consciousness is key. What's in this life and what's beyond this life is taking your awareness and dimension to another level.   Aaron Schultz: (45:26) And for me, that came from pushing my body really hard and going running early in the morning before the sun come up because I had no noise. It was no life. All you heard or all you saw was the sky and silence. So, I'd go running at 4:00 in the morning, and lot of the ancient traditions talk about the ambrosial hours as being the best time to connect with yourself because you've got no domination from anything. Yeah, so for me as an individual, it was actually using that time in the day to get grounded. You hear a kookaburra wake up at five o'clock, and then all of a sudden, life starts to evolve. You start to realise that life's so much bigger than yourself, once you actually have got that time for connection.   Aaron Schultz: (46:18) So yeah, if anyone's wanting to challenge themselves, let's say get up in the ambrosial hours. Get outside. Do some meditation, whatever it may be. Get connected with the land somehow so that it can actually give you an appreciation of the gift that we've actually in this lifetime. To be human in this lifetime's a pretty unique opportunity and a unique gift. As I mentioned before, we're going about life incoherently to what was really expected of us or what we're meant to be doing here. So, to be able to connect with the fundamental things I think are really key because that'll keep you grounded on a daily basis, and once you've got that foundation, then the rest of your life will evolve around that.   Aaron Schultz: (47:04) We have this innate connection with ourselves, but also humanity. Once you start to get out of the lower levels of consciousness of fear, shame, guilt, greed, and get into the higher levels of consciousness of gratitude, love, kindness, compassion, all those sorts of things, if you can start to tune into those sorts of things on a daily basis early, then that will spread, and you'll have that connection with yourself but also connection with others as well. I think that's really key, and they're the skills that we don't know as men, we don't understand as men because we've been pushed the other way to be sort of in those lower levels of consciousness of society, as I mentioned.   Aaron Schultz: (47:45) But we think that happiness comes from greed and all those sorts of things where really the happiness comes from love and kindness and compassion and all the things that we're meant to be doing here as humans. We're not meant to be in fear all the time. It's a small part of our life, rather being a major part of our life. That fear's here protect us occasionally, but we're not meant to be living in it consistently. So, use the time you have early in the morning if you can to be able to become connected to what's really important. Then, you do this consistently, and over time, you'll develop these habits which become part of your foundation, part of your strength moving forward.   Mason: (48:26) I love it, man. The little simple reminders that are just how profound the outcomes are there. It's just a beautiful, beautiful reminder.   Aaron Schultz: (48:38) Yeah.   Mason: (48:39) For everyone listening. I mean, outbackmind.com.au is your website. Where are you currently at with your offerings and how people can engage with you, besides your podcast, Outback Mind podcast, is that right? Yeah.   Aaron Schultz: (48:55) Yeah. You know, mate, there's not much really. It's something I'm not really strong at. I probably need to be able to do more in this space to offer up things for people. So, really at the moment, we're trying to set up the Outback Minds and foundation side to be not for profit. What we want to do, I've got a friend here that's helping set up a training platform. So, we want to be able to develop men's circles in regional communities throughout all Australia to be able to train guys in those communities so they can run these heart-based circles of men's circles for many years. And I ran them in Victoria and Tassie, and a lot of them are very ego-driven. It's very much in the masculine which is okay, but I just think if we can actually start to build capacity for people through these things, rather than using it as a tool to get things off our chest, to actually be okay to explore what's been going on with their own lives, but also to be able to build our capacity, and that helps us as a man, but also helps us as a family member and members of our community at the end of the day, and that's a proactive way that we approach mental wellbeing, I guess, to be able to provide people with tools.   Aaron Schultz: (50:09) So, yeah, I bring meditation. I bring yin yoga into the men's circles. So, to be able to train guys with some of the simple tools on how to do this, and that I think's really important to be proactive in that space, yeah, so to do that. And I guess I want to get out into regional communities and talk more, try and get into places where they don't have access to great advice or help. The online stuff's been really good for that, but hopefully, once things open up more, I can get out and start to connect with more people out there.   Aaron Schultz: (50:51) Yeah, as I mentioned to you earlier, my real vision is to be able to set up a Vipassanā centre where I can help people come and be still inside for three and 10-day retreats so they can reconnect with themselves because I believe that's a functional thing for humans. It's just to be silent and still for parts of our year. If we can do that twice, three times a year, that's got to be good for our mental wellbeing. We've got to be able to give our mind a rest, and the mind isn't king here. The heart is king. If you can reconnect with the heart, that's really what it's all about. That's how we can improvements health in Australia rather than be too dominated by what's going on above the shoulders.   Mason: (51:30) I love it, man, and I love your work. Encourage everyone to go and at least subscribe to the podcast, stay tuned in on that way, and yeah, it looks like you've got lots of things kind of planned. I can see there's little life experience, adventures there, and workplace wellbeing, all kinds of things. So, yeah, exciting to see the rollout.   Aaron Schultz: (51:51) Yeah. That's the other thing. The workplace has got such a strong opportunity to be able to help people. We're not just going there to get a paycheck. I want to try and engage more with more of our better employers that are ethical to be able to help people, particularly men in their workplace to feel safe, feel secure, feel supported and really valued in the workplace because that's a problem that a trap we've had as humans is to be able to use people by paying them money, but not really give them any care and support, and that's a huge problem with regards to understanding ourselves and our mental health because if we're not feeling good about ourselves in the workplace, then we take that home with us and that creates issues with domestic violence and drinking, and all that sorts of things.   Aaron Schultz: (52:45) So I just think the more employers that I can engage with to be able to help builds a culture I think's really important. My background, I ran labour hire companies. So, I worked with lots of organisations and industries throughout Australia, and I didn't see many employers that were doing it well. So, now, starting to connect with more employers and give them platforms on how to be able to develop a culture which is coherent in the workplace and starting their day with meditation, and all these sorts of things so people can feel grounded before they start their work, rather than just going there, and working to lunchtime, and then going and finishing their day off just to get home, but you actually feel part of something I think's really important. That's [crosstalk 00:53:33] improved capacity for sure.   Mason: (53:36) Yeah. Integrating the workplace back into cultivating a society and a culture that isn't just... Yeah. It's a funny dynamic. I'm an employer, and the amount of energy that needs to go in at each new evolution of the business, all of a sudden, it's not the same as when you were just a small little crew where all your values and these principles just seem automatically known. There needs to start being an unravelling of some structure so that there can be that flow of humanity and that flow of purposefulness, and there needs to be little checks in place. It needs to be integrated into a HR department. For a lot of people, it's beyond what they can handle. I don't endorse it, but I definitely can see how companies get to that point, and they go, "You know what? There's no actual cultural requirement of me to do this. So I'm just going to go to the efficiency route or the easiest route and just do the whatever culture thing." And you just end up using people. It's crazy.   Aaron Schultz: (54:48) Yeah. That's what it's all about. The whole model to do with MBA and human resources, and that's really about what can you get out of people, all the fear you can put into them, all that type of stuff. Oh, there's an EAP at the end of that. If we fuck them up. I'm saying organisations, and I have been for years, that is a last resort. You've got to be really proactive rather than reactive. If you're fair dinkum about what you're doing, if you can look after people, the results will take care of itself.   Aaron Schultz: (55:17) It's the same as with our wellbeing. If we can show up at a value basis as individuals and do things which nourishes, then the results will take care of itself. So, don't worry about the outcome. You worry about the journey. Help people on the journey and then things will evolve. That's where I believe at sports clubs. I've done a lot of work with sports clubs as well to be able to help them become successful, but not worrying about the outcome. If this is the process that we've got to do, so you can start to tune in with what's really real here, and enjoy the process of the journey rather than the outcome at the end of the day.   Aaron Schultz: (55:51) I've worked for businesses. It's all about KPIs and budgets and all that type of stuff. If people are really in flow and intuitive and enjoying what they're doing, then everything will take care of itself because they're engaged, and the output is significant that way rather than sort of worrying about the results so much, you know?   Mason: (56:13) Yeah, and what I've experienced is when the culture is put in place, all of a sudden, something like a KPI or a budget doesn't have that disciplinary... This is a very hard line. To have optics through the business, like a KPI, have them available so that everyone in the team can see what's going on in other departments and for the benefit of the person who's in that, say, my position as a CEO to have those things be present and then to have it entrenched, not just say it, but so it's felt this isn't about making me wrong or bad. This is genuine feedback loop and genuine neurofeedback so that I'm aware of what my team is doing. I'm aware of whether I'm in a place where I'm flowing or not.   Mason: (57:07) And if, this is the hard one, if there's enough trust that you're not getting in trouble, but if there's something starts not going well, it's really great for us to know it so that we can all rally and be like, "What's happening here? Do you need some support?" It seems simple, but my goodness, it's a bit of a difficult task, I think just because we're all so programmed to be like, "I'm being judged. If I don't get the answer right, I'm marked wrong, and I don't get given other opportunities." It's a pretty insidious little parasite of the culture.   Aaron Schultz: (57:54) Get excited, and if you can get rid of that competition or that competitive nature, and give back more compassion, that's where you can grow. I've worked with business. It's all about achievements on a monthly basis and you're competing against others and all those sorts of things. It's really wrong. Yeah, being able be supportive and nourishing of yourself and nourishing your others, I think that's work.   Mason: (58:17) Because when you don't enlist them, them, me, people, whatever in competition, for me, this competitiveness from this jovial place and this playful place, and often, quite a serious place for me, I can drop into the gravity of which I enjoy around, look, in terms of my life vision, this is what's actually on the cards right now in terms of whether I get this project done in time or not. I've only got a certain amount of time here, but that's an emergence, that competitive charge. I'm not trying to beat down anyone else. That's something I think we've got wrong. We try and project something which is going to get us the result, like competition onto a company structure which then brings about reprimanding kind of culture, therefore for fear verse hey, it's really takes a lot of vulnerability to get this feedback and be vulnerable to your team and how you're performing and how you're doing.   Mason: (59:15) But if you come from a place of trust and you give trust willingly or have conversations to get yourself there to where you give trust, all of a sudden, that natural and organic, that's the fertiliser, then that competitive edge, appropriate for you and your nervous system, can rise up and then go back down as well when it starts getting a little unhealthy. It's a hell of a thing, business culture. I'm aware of the time though. I think we'll go on with this for ages.   Aaron Schultz: (59:46) Just remember, it's a friendly universe and everything's trying to work for us, not against us. If we can just work with that, the flow of everything, then everything will be okay, will take care of itself. When we're forcing where we're getting forced against and that's what competition does, it really does put us into a short-term fix, but really the long-term outcome is not great, but the more you can be able to work with the universal charge, if you've got a product, you let products go without any attachment. You've got something great. You're not producing it because you want to get these outcomes. You're producing because it's something which is going to help people. If you've got that belief, that energy goes into that product, and then it goes out and expands.   Mason: (01:00:40) Yeah. That faith, I mean, I've got a bit of trauma around religion, going to a Catholic school as well, but then when I've reconnected to the natural state of faith for me versus institutional faith, as you said, I'm like, "Oh wow. What freedom." I've got an intention and I trust my intention around herbs and education, and I'm sure you have the same experience, and watch it open up as long as you give it... When you keep on turning up and staying consistent within it. Yeah. It's fun. It is fun. It's a great reminder. And I love your work. I really appreciate you coming on and chatting to all of us during Brovember.   Aaron Schultz: (01:01:26) Thank you, mate. I've given a listen to it and we really appreciate what you've done and what you've created here and the great products that you have. I've only started using Mason's Mushrooms and I'm not consistent. I'm only using them every few days. Maybe I need to have it more up, but I like it with cold water rather than hot.   Mason: (01:01:46) In a smoothie. You got the tropical fruit up there I think coming on at the moment. Yeah, it's all good, goes with it. Whatever, a bit of mango, a bit of mango sorbet.   Aaron Schultz: (01:01:57) They'll be out in a couple months so I be into there, I reckon for sure. So, appreciate it.   Mason: (01:02:00) Yeah, well, yeah. It is that consistency with the mushies and the tonic herbs and even do a little bit more than you think you should be doing. Go up the dose a little bit. With your meditation practise, You'll definitely have a greater capacity for the dose.   Aaron Schultz: (01:02:18) Yeah. Yeah, awesome, mate. I appreciate that. I haven't used any drugs for 25 years, marijuana, or any of that sort of stuff. I've never used magic mushrooms and everyone else around the same seems to. Yeah, this sort of stuff is new to me. I was a raw vegan guy for a long time. So, I know it's like to feel dialled in. It felt amazing consistently, but I just couldn't get the product to keep myself sustained. So, I have to find different things now that can help me, I give it a stab.   Mason: (01:02:51) Nice one. Yeah. That was me. I was raw vegan basically, and a yin yoga teacher, funnily, when I was like, yeah, yeah.   Aaron Schultz: (01:03:01) Unreal.   Mason: (01:03:03) Yeah. So, I definitely relate to what you're saying. My wife is a yin yoga teacher and goes over and studies with Paul and Suzee Grilley, yeah.   Aaron Schultz: (01:03:10) Yeah, yeah. Cool. It's interesting. I was to go over there in 2019, but that got stuffed up, and I've done training with four, five other teachers that have all studied with Paul, but I haven't actually gone and studied with him myself. So, yeah. It'll happen at some stage, I reckon, but yeah.   Mason: (01:03:32) For sure.   Aaron Schultz: (01:03:32) Yeah. [inaudible 01:03:33]. It's been something like I come from Bikram yoga to hatha to Kundalini to yin so I've gone through all those journeys. The Kundalini yoga is very powerful as far as creating connections and that type of thing. It's amazing what the energy that comes from the practise actually can do for you. Yeah, so I was really grateful to sort of fall into that too, but it's all these tools that have sort of popped up over the journey.   Mason: (01:04:03) Yeah, they all fit into a piece of the puzzle.   Aaron Schultz: (01:04:06) That's true. Clearly.   Mason: (01:04:09) Beautiful mate. Well, I look forward to chatting to you on your podcast, and yeah. I'll keep an eye up for everything you're up to. Thanks for coming on.   Dive deep into the mystical realms of Tonic Herbalism in the SuperFeast Podcast!

Barbarian Noetics with Conan Tanner
Resist the Great Reset w/ Dr. Sylvie Salinger, PhD (Part 2 of 2)

Barbarian Noetics with Conan Tanner

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 123:01


What's up to my quirky quarks and elegiac electrons!Welcome back to the BNP my lovable loonies and thank you for joining! Shout out to my patrons- y'all are the intra-muscular ketamine in my depression treatment!  Strap in, lean back, crack a booch and spark up, because you're about to dive into Part 2 of an elucidating chat with the inimitable independent researcher and destroyer of fabricated data, Dr. Sylvie Salinger, PhD.  In Part 2 we continue to break down the forces and ideas behind The Great Reset agenda (Santa Klaus Schwab is coming), what it is the parasitic global capitalist Davos crowd are planning and what we can all do to resist. Hint: Never stop using cash. Boycott businesses that don't accept cash. Say NO to Central Bank Digital Currencies.   We also dive into the flaws of using the PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) test kit as a tool for diagnosing infectious disease. We hear from the inventor of the PCR test himself, Kary Mullis, who sadly passed on in 2019, but who declared openly that with a PCR test, you can "find anything in anyone." This is important because the PCR test was the instrument by which "cases" were calculated. It raises the question of a casedemic vs. a pandemic.  Mullis' statement jives with the assertions of wildly popular Tanzanian president John Magafuli, who used the PCR test to find Covid-19 in a papaya and a pineapple. Magafuli died very recently under suspicious circumstances ("heart complications"), and he was promptly replaced by a Big Pharma shilling member of the World Economic Forum.  Tragic coincidences always seem to benefit the Gates Foundation. Just sayin. According to Jason Hommel, author of the article: “Scientists Say the COVID19 Test Kits Do Not Work, Are Worthless, and Give Impossible Results”:“PCR basically takes a sample of your cells and amplifies any DNA to look for ‘viral sequences', i.e. bits of non-human DNA that seem to match parts of a known viral genome. The problem is the test is known not to work. It uses ‘amplification' which means taking a very very tiny amount of DNA and growing it exponentially until it can be analyzed. Obviously any minute contaminations in the sample will also be amplified leading to potentially gross errors of discovery. The idea these kits can isolate a specific virus like COVID-19 is nonsense.” Follow the BNP on IG @conantanner. I post pictures of my cat sometimes.  Thank you for spreading the word and telling a friend about the BNP!Help keep the BNP on the air by becoming a patron for as little as $1/month at: www.patreon.com/noetics. You receive a dream interpretation when you sign up at any tier, and you also gain access to original poems, such as one I just posted called Cloud Cuneiform. Until next week, be good to yourselvesand to each other.One Love,ConanTRACKLIST FOR THIS EPISODEMSTRKRFT - Fist of God Dykotomi - Corvid CrunkChillhop Radio - 2 AM Study Session Lo Fi Mix Rebel Diaz - Crazy feat. C. Rayz WalzPowerThoughts Meditation Club - 432 Hz Raise Positive VibrationsOrichaoco · Conjunto Obaoso de Onelio ScullDead Prez - Malcolm Garvey HueyLINKS:Digital ID etc:https://www3.weforum.org/docs/Unlocking_Technology_for_the_Global_Goals.pdfSweden: https://richardlyon.substack.com/p/sweden-1-faith-0Support the show (http://www.patreon.com/noetics)

Wise Traditions
339: Covid: No Record Found of SARS-COV-2

Wise Traditions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 39:42


Curiosity led a biostatistician down an unusual path. Intrigued by the concept that the SARS-COV-2 virus has not been isolated ever, our guest began inquiring of health departments around the world: Do you have evidence of an isolated virus? To date, over 100 institutions from all over the globe have responded...and there has been no evidence in sight of SARS-COV-2.  Christine Massey, a former biostatistician for cancer researchers, today discusses her research on the concept of viruses (and this “virus” in particular) and what she's learned through hundreds of FOIA requests (freedom of information act) from health departments all over the world.  She goes over how the cultures or samples used to "isolate the virus" are actually interfering with the process. She exposes the flaws in this methodology and the problem with PCR testing. She also explains why talk of “variants” is essentially nonsense.  Visit Christine's website: fluoridefreepeel.ca  Check out our website: westonaprice.org  Thank you to sponsors: Primal Pastures,  Paleo Valley,  BetterHelp 

Rants About Humanity
Sam Brokken - COVID And The Measures: A Review (#046)

Rants About Humanity

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 105:06


In this podcast episode we talked about : The effectiveness of PCR test, masks, lockdown and ccavines  Better ways to manage the ‘crisis' Side effects of the ccavines Propaganda and the social engineering of public opinion The difference between the old ccavines and the new ‘ccavines'   Sam Brokken is a Public Health expert with a background in global health and viral transmissions and an ex-Lecturer and head of research in Healthcare at different University Colleges.   ☟ Find out more about Sam Brokken at ☟ https://www.linkedin.com/in/sam-l-brokken-81611057/   ☞ SUBSCRIBE, SHARE OR LEAVE A REVIEW ON APPLE PODCASTS ☜ If you like this podcast, don't forget to subscribe and support our mission of freedom of speech.

The Megyn Kelly Show
Explosive Rittenhouse Trial Moments and COVID Testing and Vaccines, with Robert Gruler, Dr. Michael Mina, and Brian Dressen | Ep. 201

The Megyn Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 93:44


Megyn Kelly is joined by Robert Gruler, criminal defense attorney, Dr. Michael Mina of the Harvard School of Public Health, and chemist Brian Dressen, to talk about the facts in the Kyle Rittenhouse trial and the case, the judge vs. prosecutor in the trial, the attacks in the media on the Rittenhouse judge, the attacks in the media on the judge, how testing can help end the COVID pandemic, why testing is not more prioritized by our government and health experts, the difference between antigen, antibody, and PCR tests, the latest on vaccines and therapeutics for kids and adults, one chemist's wife's serious adverse vaccine reaction, and more.Follow The Megyn Kelly Show on all social platforms: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/MegynKellyTwitter: http://Twitter.com/MegynKellyShowInstagram: http://Instagram.com/MegynKellyShowFacebook: http://Facebook.com/MegynKellyShow Find out more information at: https://www.devilmaycaremedia.com/megynkellyshow

FULCRUM News with David Seaman
NASA Pushes Back Crewed Moon Landing To 2025 At Earliest, Internet Outages In US - News 11.11.2021

FULCRUM News with David Seaman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021


Comcast Internet customers across the US are complaining of degraded service quality and speed. Comcast has acknowledged and apologized for widespread outages, which began Monday evening according to reports. The company is working to restore service, but as of Wednesday evening some customers on the east coast were still experiencing issues.And in depressing news, NASA has said its moon mission Artemis will now be pushed back to at least 2025. Yet another win for the Biden administration, it would seem - all the money in the world for lockdowns and nasal swab PCR tests, but not enough money to lead in space.Learn more about FULCRUM https://www.fulcrumnews.com/about Get the membership! https://www.fulcrumnews.com/subscribe Show community & discussion https://facebook.com/FulcrumNews https://minds.com/fulcrum_news

ASCO Guidelines Podcast Series
Nervous System Toxicities: Management of irAEs Guideline (Part 9)

ASCO Guidelines Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 20:11


An interview with Dr. Bianca Santomasso from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, author on “Management of Immune-Related Adverse Events in Patients Treated With Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy: ASCO Guideline Update.” She reviews neurologic toxicities in patients receiving ICPis, such as myasthenia gravis, Guillain-Barre Syndrome, peripheral neuropathy, aseptic meningitis & encephalitis in Part 9 of this 13-part series. For more information visit www.asco.org/supportive-care-guidelines   TRANSCRIPT [MUSIC PLAYING] SPEAKER: The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. BRITTANY HARVEY: Hello and welcome to the ASCO Guidelines Podcast series, brought to you by the ASCO Podcast Network, a collection of nine programs covering a range of educational and scientific content, and offering enriching insight into the world of cancer care. You can find all the shows, including this one, at asco.org/podcasts. My name is Brittany Harvey. And today, we're continuing our series on the management of immune related adverse events. I am joined by Dr. Bianca Santomasso from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York, New York, author on Management of Immune Related Adverse Events in Patients Treated with Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy ASCO Guideline Update and Management of Immune Related Adverse Events in patients Treated with Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cell Therapy ASCO Guideline. And today, we're focusing on nervous system toxicities in patients treated with immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy. Thank you for being here, Dr. Santomasso. BIANCA SANTOMASSO: Thank you for having me. BRITTANY HARVEY: Then I'd like to note that ASCO takes great care in the development of its guidelines and ensuring that the ASCO conflict of interest policy is followed for each guideline. The full conflict of interest information for this guideline panel is available online with the publication of the guidelines in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Dr. Santomasso, do you have any relevant disclosures that are directly related to these guidelines? BIANCA SANTOMASSO: Yes, I'd like to disclose that I've served as a paid consultant for Celgene, Janssen Pharmaceutical, and Legend Biotech for advising them on the topics of T cell therapy side effects. BRITTANY HARVEY: Thank you. Then getting into the content of this guideline, what are the immune related nervous system toxicities addressed in this guideline? And what are the overarching recommendations for evaluation of these neurologic immune related adverse events? BIANCA SANTOMASSO: So neurologic immune related adverse events actually encompass a very diverse spectrum of neurologic syndromes that can occur as a complication of treatment with checkpoint inhibitors. So the spectrum that is covered by this guideline includes myasthenia gravis, Guillain-Barre syndrome, polyneuropathy, aseptic meningitis, and encephalitis. And although these are rarer than many of the other immune related adverse event types affecting other organ systems, they're increasingly being encountered due to more patients being treated with novel combinations of immunotherapies. And they're important to recognize, because along with myocarditis, they have generally more morbidity and even more mortality than irAEs affecting other organ systems. So it's important for clinical care providers to have a high index of suspicion for these events. Studies have suggested that these tend to occur in about 3% to 12% of patients, probably between 1% and 2% of patients developing severe events. So they're rare. But again, the events are probably more commonly seen in patients treated with combination checkpoint blockade. And we're increasingly seeing more combinations. So we should be on the lookout for these. Neurologic immune related adverse events can be divided into syndromes that affect the peripheral nervous system, so meaning the peripheral nerves, the neuromuscular junction, and muscle. So that would be Guillain-Barre syndrome, myasthenia gravis, and myositis. And those that affect the central nervous system, such as the brain, spinal cord, or leptomeninges. So those would be aseptic meningitis and encephalitis. The peripheral nervous system irAE appear to be more common than those affecting the central nervous system. And patients can present with a number of different symptoms that kind of relate to these syndromes. That can be as diverse as a headache to numbness, tingling, or focal weakness, such as a foot drop or facial weakness. You may see patients with severe altered mental status or personality changes or gait difficulty, walking difficulty, which could actually mean any number of syndromes. It's generally important to be aware that the timing of onset is generally early, a median of four weeks after the start of treatment, but can range anywhere from one week after the start of treatment to greater than a year. And because we know that cancer can spread to many parts of the nervous system, neurologic toxicity should be considered a diagnosis of exclusion. So that means that as part of the workup for neurologic immune related adverse events, it's imperative to rule out nervous system metastasis, stroke, and infection, which we know can occur at higher rates in patients with cancer. So for most neurologic immune related adverse events, diagnostic workup is similar. It should include MRI brain and/or of the spine, with and without contrast, and often a lumbar puncture for cerebrospinal fluid analysis, including cytology to rule out leptomeningeal metastasis. BRITTANY HARVEY: Thank you for that overview. In addition to those points for evaluation for all nervous system toxicities, what are the key recommendations for identification, evaluation, and management of myasthenia gravis? BIANCA SANTOMASSO: So for myasthenia gravis, presenting symptoms usually include fatiguable or fluctuating muscle weakness. It's generally more proximal than distal. And there's frequently ocular and/or bulbar involvement. So that means either ptosis, like a droopy eyelid, diplopia, or double vision, difficulty swallowing, dysarthria, facial muscle weakness, and/or head drop or neck weakness. Again, for any patient with new neurologic symptoms, an MRI of the brain or spine should be performed depending upon the symptoms to rule out central nervous system involvement by disease or some alternative diagnosis. And similar to idiopathic myasthenia gravis, acetylcholine receptor antibodies can be positive. So these should be checked. This is a blood test. But it's important to note that while these antibodies may be confirmatory, their absence does not rule out the syndrome. The rate of acetylcholine receptor antibody positivity in immune related myasthenia gravis has not been definitively established. So depending on the presentation, one might also consider sending a paraneoplastic panel for Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome. The single most important point I'd like to make regarding suspected immune related myasthenia gravis is that orbital myositis and generalized myositis from immune checkpoint inhibitors can present similarly. For this reason, early neurology consultation and electrodiagnostic testing with repetitive stimulation or single fiber EMG becomes important and helpful to distinguish the two. And to make matters even more complicated, we've learned that there's an overlap syndrome, where patients may develop not only myasthenia gravis, but also myositis and/or myocarditis at the same time. So basically, the neuromuscular junction is affected. But the local muscle and myocardium, which is heart muscle that's kind of related, may be affected all at once. And this overlap of syndromes may increase disease severity and mortality. So they're important to recognize. So what this means is that when you encounter a patient with suspected myasthenia gravis, you should also be checking CPK, muscle enzymes, aldolase to evaluate for myositis, and troponin and electrocardiogram to evaluate for myocarditis. And this should be done even if there are no obvious symptoms. So onto the treatment of myasthenia gravis, this is similar to the management of the idiopathic form. Therefore, it's helpful to have the involvement of a neurologist. The immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy should be held. And patients with mild symptoms are often started on pyridostigmine and corticosteroids. And patients with more severe symptoms should initiate IVIG or plasmapheresis. And patients with more severe symptoms may need to be admitted to the hospital. So that their neurologic and pulmonary status can be monitored closely for improvement. Some patients may require ICU level of monitoring. And considering adding rituximab if symptoms are refractory, and often, as symptoms improve, the steroids can be de-escalated. BRITTANY HARVEY: Understood. Those are all very important points for clinicians to consider. So then following that, what are the key recommendations for identification, evaluation, and management of Guillain-Barre syndrome? BIANCA SANTOMASSO: So Guillain-Barre syndrome, like myasthenia gravis, also presents with weakness. Most often, patients present with a progressive ascending muscle weakness. The syndrome can start with sensory symptoms or neuropathic pain that can be localized to the lower back and thighs. In addition to the classic ascending weakness, there may be facial weakness, double vision, numbness or tingling in the hands or feet, loss of balance, and coordination. And shortness of breath may occur due to respiratory muscle weakness. The autonomic nerves can also be affected and can present as new severe constipation or nausea, urinary problems, or orthostatic hypotension. The reflexes are often reduced or absent, deep tendon reflexes. So again, as for all of the syndromes, early involvement by a neurologist is recommended, if possible. Usually, MRI imaging of the spine is important to rule out spinal cord compression. And it also may show cauda nerve thickening or enhancement, which can occur with this syndrome. And the second aspect is cerebrospinal fluid analysis is important for diagnosis. This is important really for ruling out leptomeningeal metastasis, since that could present similarly. And often, what can be seen in GBS is an elevated protein level in the cerebrospinal fluid. In addition, unlike idiopathic GBS, there can be an elevated white blood cell count in the cerebrospinal fluid. Electrode diagnostic testing can also be helpful for confirmation, and serum tests for antiganglioside antibodies, and a paraneoplastic antibody workup may also be considered. Bedside pulmonary function test and swallowing evaluation should be performed if there's a concern for respiratory or swallowing dysfunction. And some patients do need to have inpatient admission and monitoring if symptoms are severe or if they appear to be progressing from mild. For management, the checkpoint inhibitor therapy should be held. And patients are most often treated with IVIG or plasmapheresis. Corticosteroids can be added to the IVIG or plasmapheresis. These are not usually recommended for idiopathic Guillain-Barre syndrome. However, in immune checkpoint inhibitor related forms, a trial is reasonable. And steroids are usually given at a higher dose for five days and then tapered over several weeks. BRITTANY HARVEY: Understood. I appreciate that overview. So then what are the key recommendations for identification, evaluation, and management of peripheral neuropathy? BIANCA SANTOMASSO: So peripheral neuropathy, or polyneuropathy, is a rare but likely underreported complication of immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy. So in the large databases and meta-analyses, those have really focused on Guillain-Barre syndrome for reporting. But other types of neuropathies, such as painful length dependent sensory and motor axonal neuropathies, or polyradiculopathies or sensory neuropathies do occur after immune checkpoint inhibitors and are probably under-recognized. So evaluation of immune related neuropathy should include neurology consultation to guide the neurology phenotype determination and also the workup. The evaluation primarily relies on a combination of electrodiagnostic studies, serologic tests, and MRI neuroimaging. Because peripheral nervous syndromes can overlap, screening for neuromuscular junction dysfunction with electrodiagnostic testing and myopathy is recommended for any patient who presents with at least motor symptoms that are thought to be peripheral. Serum testing can be helpful for ruling out reversible causes of neuropathy. Spinal imaging is recommended to exclude metastatic disease. And for management, it usually involves holding the checkpoint inhibitor in mild cases, using neuropathic pain medication or steroids in more severe cases. And very severe cases that kind of resembled GBS would be managed as per the GBS algorithm with IVIG or plasmapheresis. BRITTANY HARVEY: Understood. And it's key to look out for those overlapping adverse events. So then following that, what are the key recommendations for aseptic meningitis? BIANCA SANTOMASSO: Right, so now we're getting into the central nervous system toxicity. So aseptic meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges. And it can present with headache, photophobia, neck stiffness. Patients can have nausea, and vomiting, and occasionally fever. The mental status is usually normal. And in patients presenting with headache, which in isolation, could suggest an aseptic meningitis, it's important to evaluate if they have any confusion or altered behavior, which might suggest an encephalitis. And this distinction is important, because suspected encephalitis triggers a different workup, which we'll be discussing later, and also even different management. So the workup for aseptic meningitis includes neuroimaging, usually an MRI of the brain. And on that imaging, we sometimes see abnormal leptomeningeal enhancement. It's important not to assume that this is cancer and to do a lumbar puncture to evaluate cerebrospinal fluid both for inflammation and to exclude other causes of meningeal disease, particularly neoplastic and infectious causes. So cytology, Gram stain, and culture, and other infectious studies should be negative. And it's recommended that empiric antibiotics or antiviral therapy be considered to cover for infectious meningitis until the cerebrospinal fluid results return negative. What's seen in the cerebrospinal fluid in aseptic meningitis is typically reactive lymphocytes, but also neutrophils or histiocytes may be prominent on the cytology. And while the symptoms can be severe, sometimes requiring hospitalization, the management of this entity, these are usually quite treatable. Aseptic meningitis generally responds very well to corticosteroids. So management involves holding the checkpoint inhibitor. And you can often get away with starting a fairly modest dose of corticosteroids, such as oral prednisone, 0.5 to 1 milligram per kilogram or the equivalent. And steroids can usually be tapered over two to four weeks. BRITTANY HARVEY: Great, thank you for reviewing those recommendations. So then you just mentioned the distinction of aseptic meningitis and encephalitis. So what are those key recommendations for identification, evaluation, and management of encephalitis? BIANCA SANTOMASSO: So in encephalitis, the mental status is not normal. It's characterized by, really, an acute or subacute confusion, altered mental status, altered behavior, memory deficits, including working memory and short-term memory. There can be, as associated symptoms, headaches, new onset seizures, psychiatric symptoms, which can include delusions or hallucinations. There could be weakness, sensory changes, imbalance, or gait instability, along with the mental status changes. And so similar to aseptic meningitis, the other central nervous system toxicity, it's important to distinguish encephalitis from other causes of altered mental status, such as CNS metastases, stroke, or infection. And as for the other syndromes, it's very helpful to have neurologic consultation early, if possible. An MRI of the brain is critical. And in addition, MRI of the spine may be obtained to evaluate for inflammatory demyelinating ischemic or metastatic lesions. In immune related encephalitis, MRI brain imaging may reveal T2 flare changes, typical of what can be seen in idiopathic autoimmune or limbic encephalitis. But most often, the MRI imaging is normal. So in this situation, a lumbar puncture for CSF studies to evaluate for evidence of inflammation can be very helpful. You can expect to see either a lymphocytic pleocytosis or an elevated protein, or CSF restricted oligoclonal bands. CSF analysis is also helpful for excluding other causes of encephalitis, particularly viral encephalitis. So HSV, Herpes Simplex Virus, or varicella zoster virus encephalitis should be ruled out and treated with antivirals while the tests are pending. So typically, these entities can be excluded by PCR testing for HSV and VZV. Electroencephalogram, or EEG, can also be helpful for revealing subclinical seizures or status epilepticus, which can occur as a complication of encephalitis or as a cause of persistently depressed sensorium. But these are not specific to encephalitis. Other testing that's done includes screening metabolic tests to look for alternative etiologies. And for this entity, serum and CSF autoimmune antibody evaluation should be sent to assess for malignancy associated neurologic syndromes. And your neurologist can help you with the workup and management, in particular which tests to send. There have been reported cases of antibody positive checkpoint inhibitor related encephalitis. For management, in contrast to aseptic meningitis, these are generally not as steroid sensitive. So you often have to treat with either higher steroid doses, even pulsed steroid doses, along with IVIG or plasmapheresis. If no improvement, escalation to rituximab and cyclophosphamide can be considered, with the assistance of neurology. This management guidance is taken from how to treat autoimmune encephalitities that are not related to checkpoint inhibitors. Unfortunately, these can be difficult to treat. The response may only be partial. So this is one area in need of better understanding of best therapeutics. BRITTANY HARVEY: OK, thank you for reviewing that and pointing out where there's future research needed as well. And I appreciate your reviewing the recommendations for each of these neurologic immune related adverse events. So then to wrap us up, in your view, how will these recommendations for the management of nervous system toxicities impact both clinicians and patients? BIANCA SANTOMASSO: Yeah, so I think this is a daunting list of toxicities. But I'll say that in most situations, the immune checkpoint inhibitor side effects are often manageable and reversible with proper supportive care. They can be serious, and they require close vigilance and prompt treatment and identification. But by knowing what to look for in early identification, that allows early intervention, which is really the key to reversibility and the best outcomes. So having these toxicities on your differential diagnosis is critical. And I think these guidelines really help inform both clinicians, and care providers, and patients on what the possible manifestations are. So we believe this guideline and its recommendations will help members of clinical teams with the recognition and the management of these unique toxicities. And again, it's timely recognition and early intervention that helps patients, really, by increasing their safety with early management. BRITTANY HARVEY: Great, well, thank you for your work on these guidelines and for taking the time to speak with me today, Dr. Santomasso. BIANCA SANTOMASSO: My pleasure. Thank you so much. BRITTANY HARVEY: And thank you to all of our listeners for tuning in to the ASCO Guidelines Podcast series. Stay tuned for additional episodes on the management of immune related adverse events. To read the full guideline, go to www.asco.org/supportive care guidelines. You can also find many of our guidelines and interactive resources in the free ASCO Guidelines app, available in iTunes or the Google Play store. If you have enjoyed what you've heard today, please rate and review the podcast. And be sure to subscribe. So you never miss an episode. [MUSIC PLAYING]

political and spiritual
Dr Robert X….(G Y A I L ) FROM VACCINES TO MACHINES PART (V111)

political and spiritual

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 205:00


Does the PCR Test Affect the Pineal Gland? Humans and “Transhumans”. The pineal gland was described as the “Seat of the Soul” by René Descartes (French 17th Century philosopher) and it is located in the center of the brain. The main function of the pineal gland is to receive information about the state of the light-dark cycle from the environment and convey this information to produce and secrete the hormone melatonin – which is giving humans senses and sensibilities. Reducing or eliminating these unique capacities, makes us humans vulnerable to “robotization”. She asserts that if there wasn't a deeper agenda behind the PCR-test, there would be no need to stick a test-swab deep into your sinuses where it touches a thin membrane that separates the sinus cavity from your brain. A saliva sample would be enough https://gofund.me/69859d89...Dr Robert X https://gofund.me/3f84fb27. ... Thomas m beats

BBC Indonesia
Dunia Pagi Ini BBC Indonesia, Rabu 11 November 2021

BBC Indonesia

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 14:59


Sejumlah kelompok masyarakat mendatangi Badan Pengawas Keuangan (BPK), meminta audit pengelolaan bisnis PCR yang diduga melibatkan kepentingan bisnis dua menteri.

Plus
Interview Plus: Až jedno procento rozpočtu na kulturu a daňové zvýhodnění pro dary, popisuje plány koalice Baxa

Plus

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 25:54


Pandemie covidu-19 měla na kulturní život podobně devastující dopad jako na cestovní ruch nebo školství. Nyní opět sílí, podle Martina Baxy (ODS), o kterém se mluví jako o možném kandidátovi na ministra kultury, ovšem není důvod ke zpřísňování restrikcí v oblasti kultury. „Opatření, které se přijalo v uplynulých dnech, tedy zjednodušeně nad tisíc návštěvníků už každý další jen s PCR testem, je funkční. Kulturní aktéři s ním souhlasili, ale je podle mě úplně hraniční,“ říká.

All the S**t I've Learned Abroad
'New Normal' Travel Planning

All the S**t I've Learned Abroad

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 35:09


As much of the world emerges from lockdowns and border closures, travelers who have been dreaming of beaches, mountains and new adventures are now looking towards their new normal. Even as we celebrate a global reopening, travel now presents new challenges and considerations. From vaccinations to masks to PCR tests and contact tracing requirements, COVID-19 has completely transformed travel planning. As Andrea and Steph have just booked their first international trip together since March 20, they discuss the various new considerations they've already encountered before takeoff. Like what you heard? Please subscribe, leave a 5-star review, follow us on social media and/or become a Patreon donor. Every little bit helps us grow!- Click here for our Patreon- Click here to like us on Facebook- Click here to follow us on Twitter- Click here to follow us on InstagramTheme music by Scott BuckleySupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/allthestivelearnedabroad. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Answers from the Lab
IDENT: Audrey Schuetz, M.D.

Answers from the Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 8:36


(00:32):Today, we will be discussing staphylococcal testing at Mayo Clinic Laboratories. Before we start, Dr. Schuetz, could you please provide our listeners with a little bit about you and your background? (01:02):As we get started on this initiative, can you provide a brief overview of this testing and its intended use? (02:36):Could you describe for us which patients should have this testing and when it should be performed — including how this new testing improves upon previous testing approaches? (04:47):What makes our testing unique? (05:45):How are the results from this PCR testing used in patient care?

Circulation on the Run
Circulation November 9, 2021 Issue

Circulation on the Run

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 21:55


Please join author Maria Nunes and Associate Editor Ntobeko Ntusi as they discuss the article “Incidence and Predictors of Progression to Chaga Cardiomyopathy: Long-Term Follow-Up of Trypanosoma cruzi-Seropositive Individuals.” Dr. Carolyn Lam:             Welcome to Circulation on the Run, your weekly podcast summary and backstage pass to the journal and its editors. We're your co-hosts. I'm Dr. Carolyn Lam, Associate Editor from the National Heart Center and Duke National University of Singapore. Dr. Greg Hundley:           And I'm Dr. Greg Hundley, Associate Editor, director of the Pauley Heart Center at VCU Health in Richmond, Virginia. Well Carolyn, this feature this week, we're going to talk about Chagas disease and we have some really important long-term, really for the first time, observational data and a cohort that's been followed in Brazil. And it's just a wonderful discussion from a team that's been working very hard in this area over an extended period of time. But before we get to that, how about we grab a cup of coffee and get started on some of the other articles in this issue? Would you like to go first? Dr. Carolyn Lam:             I would. And with your coffee, I would like to tell you about non-combustible nicotine or tobacco products. Fancy a smoke with your coffee? Well, you know that those are novel forms of nicotine consumption composed of things like nicotine vaping products that vaporize the nicotine-containing fluids and heated tobacco products that really heat the tobacco products without combustion. Now, these have recently gained popularity because they're portrayed as being safer modes of smoking compared with the traditional combustible cigarettes. However, their associations with subsequent cardiovascular disease risks are still unclear. So Greg, here's today's quiz. Gosh, I miss our quizzes. What do you think? Are they safer or are they not? Dr. Greg Hundley:           Oh, Carolyn, you're catching me on this and I never know which way to go, but I'm going to guess not. How about you tell us? Dr. Carolyn Lam:             Well, the paper will tell us, and this is from co-corresponding authors Dr. Lee from Seoul National University Bundang Hospital and Dr. Park from Seoul National University College of Medicine and their colleagues. And they basically studied more than 5,000,000 adult men who underwent health screening examinations during both a first and second phase of health screening periods from the Korean National Health Insurance Service Database spanning 2014 to 2018. Initial combustible cigarette smokers who subsequently quit that cigarette smoking and converted to a non-combustible nicotine or tobacco product use was associated with a lower incident cardiovascular disease risk compared to those who continue the combustible cigarette use. However, compared with combustible cigarette quitting without using these non-combustible substitutes, those who ceased smoking but continued with the non-combustible products was associated with a higher cardiovascular disease risk. So the take home message is although the non-combustible nicotine or tobacco products may be associated with a lower cardiovascular disease risk compared with continued combustible cigarette smoking, those who quit without using these substitutes may benefit the most in reducing the risk of developing future cardiovascular disease events. And this is discussed in a wonderful editorial by Dr. Auer, Diethelm and Berthet. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Very nice, Carolyn. Great presentation and really new information in this space. Well, my paper comes from the world of preclinical science and it involves long noncoding RNAs. And Carolyn, they are important regulators of biological processes involved in vascular tissue homeostasis and cardiovascular disease development. And so, the current study, led by Professor Lars Maegdefessel from Karolinska Institute, assessed the functional contribution of the long noncoding RNAs myocardial infarction associated transcripts and their relationship to atherosclerosis and carotid artery disease. Dr. Carolyn Lam:             Hmm, interesting. They are the rage, these lncRNAs. So what did they find, Greg? Dr. Greg Hundley:           Right, Carolyn. So long noncoding RNAs possess key regulatory functions directly interacting and mediating expression and functionality of proteins, other RNAs, as well as DNA. Next, the long noncoding RNA myocardial infarction associated transcript plays a key role during atherosclerotic plaque development and lesion destabilization. Its expression becomes highly increased in high risk patients with vulnerable plaques. And so, Carolyn, the take home therapeutic targeting of the long noncoding RNA myocardial infarction associated transcript, using antisense oligonucleotides, well that offers novel treatment options for patients with advanced atherosclerosis in the carotid arteries that are at risk of stroke. Dr. Carolyn Lam:             Oh, very interesting. So from the preclinical world back to the clinical world with an important clinical trial. Now, we know that percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage is an alternative to chronic oral anticoagulation to reduce stroke risk in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. The Amplatzer Amulet Left Atrial Appendage Occluder IDE trial, called the Amulet IDE trial, was designed to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the dual seal mechanism of the Amulet left atrial appendage occluder compared with the WATCHMAN device. And here, 1,878 patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation at increased risk of stroke were randomly assigned to undergo percutaneous implantation of a left atrial appendage occluder with the Amulet occluder or a WATCHMAN device. And the primary end points included safety, which was a composite of procedure-related complications all cause death or major bleeding at 12 months, and effectiveness, which was a composite of ischemic stroke or systemic embolism at 18 months. They also looked at the rate of left atrial appendage occlusion at 45 days. And this paper is from Dr. Lakkireddy and colleagues from Kansas City Heart Rhythm Institute. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Well Carolyn, these devices, they are really being heavily tested in patients with atrial fibrillation. So what did they find? Dr. Carolyn Lam:             The Amulet occluder was non-inferior with respect to safety and effectiveness compared to the WATCHMAN device, and superior with respect to left atrial appendage occlusion; however, procedure-related complications were higher with the Amulet occluder, largely related, perhaps, to more frequent pericardial effusion and device embolization. And the authors noted that the procedure-related complications decreased with operator experience; however, I think all of this still needs to be further investigated. Well, those were really nice original papers, but let's also discuss what else there is in today's issue. There is an exchange of letters between Drs. Mueller and Allen regarding the article “Diagnostic Performance of High Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin T Strategies and Clinical Variables in a Multisite U.S. Cohort.” There's a perspective piece by Dr. Olson, “Toward CRISPR Therapies for Cardiomyopathies.” Dr. Greg Hundley:           And Carolyn, I've got a research letter from Professor Layland entitled “Colchicine in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndromes: Two Year Follow Up of the Australian COPS Randomized Clinical Trial.” Well, what a great set of papers that we've discussed. Now, let's get on to that feature discussion and learn a little bit more about the longitudinal history and progression of cardiovascular disease and patients with Chagas disease. Dr. Carolyn Lam:             Yay. Let's go, Greg. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Well, listeners, we are here for our feature discussion today and a very exciting one we have, pertaining to Chagas disease. And we have with us today Dr. Maria Nunes from Belo Horizonte, Brazil, and also one of our Associate Editors, Dr. Ntobeko Ntusi from Cape Town, South Africa. Welcome to you both. And Maria, we'll start with you. Could you describe for us some of the background information pertaining to your study and what was the hypothesis that you wanted to address? Dr. Maria Nunes:             Yes, thank you for these opportunities. My main hypothesis is that Chagas disease is the major cause of dilated cardiomyopathy in endemic areas. So we selected patients without cardiomyopathy at baseline to see if the Trypanosoma cruzi seropositivity is a predictor of further developing of cardiomyopathy. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Very nice. And so tell us, how did you construct this study? What was your design? And then also, maybe describe for us how you selected the participants for this study. Dr. Maria Nunes:             We selected the participants from two blood donor centers. One in Sao Paulo and one in Montes Claros, which is north of Minas Gerais State. We select blood donors because it's the way that we have Chagas disease's screening tests. And in asymptomatic patients, usually at the hospital, patients comes to us with heart failure or a kind of symptoms related to Chagas disease. Our main goals in this study is to select healthy participants based on the screen test of Trypanosoma cruzi. So the population was blood donors selected from two centers. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Very good. And then again, your study design. So did you follow these two groups of individuals longitudinally over time, and for how long? Dr. Maria Nunes:             Yes, we have different visits of this study with the patients initially was selected at first in 1996 and 2002. At this time, they don't have cardiovascular exams. And our study actually is starting 2008 to 2010, and we select all these patients with all comprehensive cardiovascular evaluation with the clinical examination, echocardiogram and electrocardiogram, and then just the baseline for our patient population. And we follow them 10 years on average until 2018, 2019. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Very nice. So it sounded like from individuals in two regions of Brazil, identified those through screening of the blood, and I guess these were blood donors, and then performed a series of cardiovascular exams 2008 to 2010 and followed them for the next 10 years. And you're going to tell us about the results that occurred 2018 to 2019. And so what were those results? Dr. Maria Nunes:             We found that Trypanosoma cruzi seropositive is a risk factor for developing cardiomyopathy. Nowadays, this is still a risk factor, seropositive without cardiomyopathy at baseline has two times higher risk of developing cardiomyopathy compared to the seronegative controls. And we have also detected that the parasite load or the level of parasite in the blood expressed by antibodies against Trypanosoma cruzi is an important risk factor for disease progression. That means some patients have Chagas disease, but the level of antibodies is not too high. These patients go well. And other hand, the patients with high level antibodies means the parasite load may be higher too. This is the high risk of disease progression to cardiomyopathy or of dying too. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Very nice. And were there any subgroups of patients where you found these relationships to be particularly more striking? So for example, the elderly, or was there a discrepancy based on sex, men versus women? Dr. Maria Nunes:             Yes, other studies has already shown that the male gender is a risk factors in Chagas disease. Usually they progress more, they have more severe clinical presentation, usually die at the age between 30 and 50 years old, the most productive years of the life. That's why Chagas is so important here in Brazil and Argentina, in Latin America countries because people die at early ages. Dr. Greg Hundley:           And your results confirmed what was previously known in that regard. Dr. Maria Nunez:             Yes, patients with developing cardiomyopathy with heart failure has a high mortality rate. And then even patients with cardiomyopathy detected by exams like based on ECG or echo, they asymptomatic, but they progress more for dying or to develop cardiomyopathy compared to seronegative with similar risk effects for cardiovascular disease, such as hypertension, diabetes, smoking. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Very good. Well Ntobeko, you see many papers come across your desk as an Associate Editor for Circulation, and what attracted you to this paper and the results that Maria has described? Dr. Ntobeko Ntusi:          Thank you, Greg. I was attracted to this paper because it's an important natural history study of Chagas disease. But secondly, it's also one of the largest contemporaneous cohorts of Chagas disease which provides important insights and advances in our knowledge with regard to this clinical entity. And for me, there were three things that stood out. The first one was an important description of the outcomes of Chagas cardiomyopathy. The second was the contemporaneous description of the epidemiology in a well-characterized cohort. And the third and novel contribution was the description of the determinants of disease progression. So I thought overall, the really important contribution to the field. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Very good. And for those that might not live in the endemic area, but might occasionally encounter someone with Chagas disease, what results from this paper can we use to help manage patients in this situation? Dr. Ntobeko Ntusi:          Thanks, Greg. So this was a study which had a number of really positives. Firstly, it's a large study, it was non acute [inaudible 00:16:42] design and it used PCR for diagnosis. And unlike many other studies, also ascertained antibody levels and had very good clinical characterization, which included electrocardiographic, echocardiographic assessment, including serum assessment of proBNP and CK-MB. And all really important take home messages are for me. The first one is understanding that the relationship of your antibody levels and baseline LV function to mortality. In other words, are finding that in those with existing LV structural abnormalities, or higher levels of antibody titers, mortality was higher. The second important contribution is a description of the incidence of Trypanosoma cruzi, and this was highest as one would expect in the seropositive donors and much lower in seronegative donors. The third important contribution relates to our improved understanding of the determinants of disease progression, which were related to the Trypanosoma cruzi antibody levels. In other words, the higher your antibody titers, the quicker you progressed to manifest the cardiomyopathic phenotype. And then lastly, the predictors of mortality, which were related to your PCR being positive, as well as your antibody titers. Important is this contribution is there are a number of important caveats. The first is that the study is limited by the huge amount of loss to follow up, which as you can imagine, adds a number of biases to our conclusions. The second is that the observations may of course be confounded by comorbidity in particular because these patients are older and had higher comorbidity. The third is that we assume that the PCR positivity and antibody titers actually correlate with parasite pattern, but in fact, we know that is not always the case. And then lastly, for people who read this paper from non-endemic parts of the world, the result may not be clearly generalizable to those parts of the world. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Very nice. Well, we've had a great discussion, listeners. From Maria and Ntobeko sort of presenting the paper and then what are some of the take home messages. So now I'd like to go back to both of them and Maria, first you and then Ntobeko. Maria, what do you think is the next study to really be performed in this sphere of research? Dr. Maria Nunes:             We may should stratify patients with Chagas disease. Those who have high antibodies titers should refer to a kind of treatment or benznidazole treatment. We should intervene in this subgroup. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Very good. And Ntobeko, anything to add? Dr. Ntobeko Ntusi:          Yes, Greg, I think that there are two important next steps. The first one is that I think we need other large designed prospective studies that will validate the observations by Dr. Nunes and colleagues. And then the second key step for me would be the design of randomized controlled trials to test therapeutic agents with antitrypanosomal activity to demonstrate their ability to retard or completely block disease progression, which would be a nice way to complete the story. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Very nice. Well listeners, we've had a great discussion today and we want to thank Maria Nunes from Brazil and Ntobeko Ntusi from South Africa for bringing these really informative results pertaining to Chagas disease, and highlighting the natural history and showing an association between these high titer values and poor cardiovascular outcomes. Well, on behalf of Carolyn and myself, we want to wish you a great week and we will catch you next week on The Run. This program is copyright of the American Heart Association, 2021. The opinions expressed by speakers in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association. For more, visit ahajournals.org.

The Nomad Capitalist Audio Experience
Six Countries Open without a PCR Test

The Nomad Capitalist Audio Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 7:46


Looking to travel with fewer restrictions? In this video, Andrew shares six countries that don't require a PCR test for you to enter. 1:20 Mexico 2:16 Colombia 3:01 Costa Rica 3:34 Dominican Republic 6:23 Slovakia 6:39 Romania https://nomadcapitalist.com/ Andrew Henderson and the Nomad Capitalist team are the world's most sought-after experts on legal offshore tax strategies, investment immigration, and global citizenship. We work exclusively with seven- and eight-figure entrepreneurs and investors who want to "go where they're treated best". Work with Andrew: https://nomadcapitalist.com/apply/ Andrew has started offshore companies, opened dozens of offshore bank accounts, obtained multiple second passports, and purchased real estate on four continents. He has spent the last 12 years studying and personally implementing the Nomad Capitalist lifestyle. Our growing team of researchers, strategies, and implementers add to our ever-growing knowledge base of the best options available. In addition, we've spent years studying the behavior of hundreds of clients in order to help people get the results they want faster and with less effort. About Andrew: https://nomadcapitalist.com/about/ Our Website: http://www.nomadcapitalist.com Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=nomadcapitalist Buy Andrew's Book: https://amzn.to/2QKQqR0 DISCLAIMER: The information in this video should not be considered tax, financial, investment, or any kind of professional advice. Only a professional diagnosis of your specific situation can determine which strategies are appropriate for your needs. Nomad Capitalist can and does not provide advice unless/until engaged by you.

大紀元新聞
分析:中共的疫情清零政策還能維持多久 | 大紀元 | 大纪元

大紀元新聞

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 7:27


上週,一名遊客COVID-19檢測呈陽性後,整個上海迪士尼樂園遭關閉,34,000人無法離開。當局急忙派出衛生人員對遊樂設施進行消毒,大批民眾一邊欣賞煙火表演,一邊排著長隊等待PCR測試。 更多內容請見:https://www.epochtimes.com/b5/21/11/6/n13357396.htm 大纪元,大纪元新闻,大紀元,大紀元新聞,中共, 零容忍, COVID-19, 中國疫苗, 清零政策 Support this podcast

This Week in Virology
TWiV 826: COVID-19 clinical update #87 with Dr. Daniel Griffin

This Week in Virology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 48:50


In COVID-19 clinical update #87, Dr. Griffin reviews PCR cycle threshold and RNA copy number, rapid antigen tests, hospitalization rate after infection or vaccination, allergies and vaccination, community transmission and viral RNA load, early treatment with sotrovimab, meta-analysis of tocilizumab treatment, antibiotic overuse, and guidelines on the use of anticoagulation for thromboprophylaxis. Hosts: Daniel Griffin and Vincent Racaniello Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode CDC vaccine nod to 5-11 year olds (CDC) Sensitivity of rapid antigen tests (Front Micro) COVID-19 among infected or vaccinated (MMWR) Allergy and vaccination symptoms (JAMA) Community transmission and viral RNA load (Lancet) Early treatment with sotrovimab (NEJM) Tocilizumab treatment meta-analysis (Leukemia) Antibiotic overuse in COVID-19 (Am J Trop Med Hyg) Anticoagulants for thromboprophylaxis (Blood Adv) Letters read on TWiV 826 Timestamps by Jolene. Thanks! Intro music is by Ronald Jenkees Send your questions for Dr. Griffin to daniel@microbe.tv

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.05.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 59:44


Sins Of Omission: The AZT Scandal By Celia Farber Spin Nov. 1989 On a cold January day in 1987, inside one of the brightly-lit meeting rooms of the monstrous FDA building, a panel of 11 top Aids doctors pondered a very difficult decision. They had been asked by the FDA to consider giving lightning-quick approval to a highly toxic drug about which there was very little information. Clinically called Zidovudine, but nicknamed AZT after its components, the drug was said to have shown a dramatic effect on the survival of Aids patients. The study that had brought the panel together had set the medical community abuzz. It was the first flicker of hope - people were dying much faster on the placebo than on the drug.  But there were tremendous concerns about the new drug. It had actually been developed a quarter of a century earlier as a cancer chemotherapy, but was shelved and forgotten because it was so toxic, very expensive to produce, and totally ineffective against cancer. Powerful, but unspecific, the drug was not selective in its cell destruction.  Drug companies around the world were sifting through hundreds of compounds in the race to find a cure, or at least a treatment, for Aids. Burroughs Wellcome, a subsidiary of Wellcome, a British drug company, emerged as the winner. By chance, they sent the failed cancer drug, then known as Compound S, to the National Cancer Institute along with many others to see if it could slay the Aids dragon, HIV. In the test tube at least, it did.  At the meeting, there was a lot of uncertainty and discomfort with AZT. The doctors who had been consulted knew that the study was flawed and that the long-range effects were completely unknown. But the public was almost literally baying at the door. Understandably, there was immense pressure on the FDA to approve AZT even more quickly than they had approved thalidomide in the mid-60s, which ended up causing drastic birth defects.  Everybody was worried about this one. To approve it, said Ellen Cooper, an FDA director, would represent a "significant and potentially dangerous departure from our normal toxicology requirements."  Just before approving the drug, one doctor on the panel, Calvin Kunin, summed up their dilemma. "On the one hand," he said, "to deny a drug which decreases mortality in a population such as this would be inappropriate. On the other hand, to use this drug widely, for areas where efficacy has not been demonstrated, with a potentially toxic agent, might be disastrous."  "We do not know what will happen a year from now," said panel chairman Dr. Itzhak Brook. "The data is just too premature, and the statistics are not really well done. The drug could actually be detrimental." A little later, he said he was also "struck by the facts that AZT does not stop deaths. Even those who were switched to AZT still kept dying."  "I agree with you," answered another panel member, "There are so many unknowns. Once a drug is approved there is no telling how it could be abused. There's no going back."  Burroughs Wellcome reassured the panel that they would provide detailed two-year follow-up data, and that they would not let the drug get out of its intended parameters: as a stopgap measure for very sick patients.  Dr. Brook was not won over by the promise. "If we approve it today, there will not be much data. There will be a promise of data," he predicted, "but then the production of data will be hampered." Brook's vote was the only one cast against approval.  'There was not enough data, not enough follow-up," Brook recalls. "Many of the questions we asked the company were answered by, 'We have not analyzed the data yet,' or 'We do not know.' I felt that there was some promising data, but I was very worried about the price being paid for it. The side effects were so very severe. It was chemotherapy. Patients were going to need blood transfusions. That's very serious.  "The committee was tending to agree with me," says Brook, "that we should wait a little bit, be more cautious. But once the FDA realized we were intending to reject it, they applied political pressure. At about 4 p.m., the head of the FDA's Center for Drugs and Biologics asked permission to speak, which is extremely unusual. Usually they leave us alone. But he said to us, 'Look, if you approve the drug, we can assure you that we will work together with Burroughs Wellcome and make sure the drug is given to the right people.' It was like saying 'please do it.'"  Brad Stone, FDA press officer, was at that meeting. He says he doesn't recall that particular speech, but that there is nothing 'unusual" about FDA officials making such speeches at advisory meetings. "The people in that meeting approved the drug because the data the company had produced proved it was prolonging life. Sure it was toxic, but they concluded that the benefits clearly outweighed the risks."  The meeting ended. AZT, which several members of the panel still felt uncomfortable with and feared could be a time bomb, was approved.  Flash forward: August 17, 1989. Newspapers across America banner-headlined that AZT had been "proven to be effective in HIV antibody-positive, asymptomatic and early ARC patients," even through one of the panel's main concerns was that the drug should only be used in a last-case scenario for critically-ill AIDS patients, due to the drug's extreme toxicity. Dr. Anthony Fauci, head of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), was now pushing to expand prescription.  The FDA's traditional concern had been thrown to the wind. Already the drug had spread to 60 countries and an estimated 20.000 people. Not only had no new evidence allayed the initial concerns of the panel, but the follow-up data, as Dr. Brook predicted, had fallen by the waysite. The beneficial effects of the drug had been proven to be temporary. The toxicity, however stayed the same.  The majority of those in the AIDS afflicted and medical communities held the drug up as the first breakthrough on AIDS. For better or worse, AZT had been approved faster than any drug in FDA history, and activists considered it a victory. The price paid for the victory, however, was that almost all government drug trials, from then on, focused on AZT - while over 100 other promising drugs were left uninvestigated.  Burroughs Wellcome stock went through the roof when the announcement was made. At a price of $8,000 per patient per year (not including blood work and transfusions), AZT is the most expensive drug ever marketed. Burroughs Wellcome's gross profits for next year are estimated at $230 million. Stock market analysts predict that Burroughs Wellcome may be selling as much as $2 billion worth of AZT, under the brand name Retrovir, each year by the mid-1990s - matching Burroughs Wellcome's total sales for all its products last year.  AZT is the only antiretroviral drug that has received FDA approval for treatment of AIDS since the epidemic began 10 years ago, and the decision to approve it was based on a single study that has long been declared invalid.  The study was intended to be a "double-blind placebo-controlled study," the only kind of study that can effectively prove whether or not a drug works. In such a study, neither patient nor doctor is supposed to know if the patient is getting the drug or a placebo. In the case of AZT, the study became unblinded on all sides, after just a few weeks.  Both sides of the contributed to the unblinding. It became obvious to doctors who was getting what because AZT causes such severe side effects that AIDS per se does not. Furthermore, a routine blood count known as CMV, which clearly shows who is on the drug and who is not, wasn't whited out in the reports. Both of these facts were accepted and confirmed by both the FDA and Burroughs Wellcome, who conducted the study.  Many of the patients who were in the trial admitted that they had analyzed their capsules to find out whether they were getting the drug. If they weren't, some bought the drug on the underground market. Also, the pills were supposed to be indistinguishable by taste, but they were not. Although this was corrected early on, the damage was already done. There were also reports that patients were pooling pills out solidarity to each other. The study was so severely flawed that its conclusions must be considered, by the most basic scientific standards, unproven.  The most serious problem with the original study, however, is that it was never completed. Seventeen weeks in the study, when more patients had died in the placebo group, the study was stopped short, and all subjects were put on AZT, no scientific study can ever be conducted to prove unequivocally whether AZT does prolong life.  Dr. Brook, who voted against approval, warned at the time that AZT, being the only drug available for doctors to prescribe to AIDS patients, would probably have a runaway effect. Approving it prematurely, he said, would be like "letting the genie out of the bottle."  Brook pointed out that since the drug is a form of chemotherapy, it should only be prescribed by doctors who have experience with chemotherapeutic drugs. Because of the most severe toxic effects of AZT - cell depletion of the bone marrow - patients would need frequent blood transfusions. As it happened, AZT was rampantly prescribed as soon as it was released, way beyond its purported parameters. The worst-case scenario had come true: Doctors interviewed by the New York Times later in 1987 revealed that they were already giving AZT to healthy people who had tested positive for antibodies to HIV.  The FDA's function is to weigh a drug's efficacy against its potential hazards. The equation is simple and obvious: A drug must unquestionably repair more than it damages, otherwise the drug itself may cause more harm than the disease it is supposed to fight. Exactly what many doctors and scientists fear is happening with AZT.  AZT was singled out among hundreds of compounds when Dr. Sam Broder, the head of the National Cancer Institutes (NCI), found that it "inhibited HIV viral replication in vitro." AIDS is considered a condition of immune suppression caused by the HIV virus replicating and eating its way into T-4 cells, which are essential to the immune system. HIV is a retrovirus which contains an enzyme called reverse transcriptase that converts viral RNA to DNA. AZT was thought to work by interrupting this DNA synthesis, thus stopping further replication of the virus.  While it was always known that the drug was exceedingly toxic, the first study concluded that 'the risk/benefits ratio was in favour of the patient."  In the study that won FDA approval for AZT, the one fact that swayed the panel of judges was that the AZT group outlived the placebo group by what appeared to be a landslide. The ace card of the study, the one that cancelled out the issue of the drug's enormous toxicity, was that 19 persons had died in the placebo group and only one in the AZT group. The AZT recipients were also showing a lower incidence of opportunistic infections.  While the data staggered the panel that approved the drug, other scientists insisted that it meant nothing - because it was so shabbily gathered, and because of the unblinding. Shortly after the study was stopped, the death rate accelerated in the AZT group. "There was no great difference after a while," says Dr. Brook, "between the treated and the untreated group."  "That study was so sloppily done that it really didn't mean much," says Dr. Joseph Sonnabend, a leading New York City AIDS doctor.  Dr. Harvey Bialy, scientific editor of the journal Biotechnology, is stunned by the low quality of science surrounding AIDS research. When asked if he had seen any evidence of the claims made for AZT, that it "prolongs life" in AIDS patients, Bialy said, "No. I have not seen a published study that is rigorously done, analyzed and objectively reported."  Bialy, who is also a molecular biologist, is horrified by the widespread use of AZT, not just because it is toxic, but because, he insists, the claims its widespread use are based upon are false. "I can't see how this drug could be doing anything other than making people very sick," he says.  The scientific facts about AZT and AIDS are indeed astonishing. Most ironically, the drug has been found to accelerate the very process it was said to prevent: the loss of T-4 cells.  "Undeniably, AZT kills T-4 cells [white blood cells vital to the immune system]" says Bialy. "No one can argue with that. AZT is a chain-terminating nucleotide, which means that it stops DNA replication. It seeks out any cell that is engaged in DNA replication and kills it. The place where most of this replication is taking place is the bone marrow. That's why the most common and severe side effect of the drug is bone marrow toxicity. That is why they [patients] need blood transfusions."  AZT has been aggressively and repeatedly marketed as a drug that prolongs survival in AIDS patients because it stops the HIV virus from replicating and spreading to healthy cells. But, says Bialy: "There is no good evidence that HIV actively replicates in a person with AIDS, and if there's isn't much HIV replication in a person with AIDS, and if there isn't much HIV replication to stop, it's mostly killing healthy cells."  University of California at Berkeley scientist Dr. Peter Duesberg drew the same conclusion in a paper published in the Proceedings, the journal of the National Academy of Sciences. Duesberg, whose paper addressed his contention that HIV is not a sufficient cause for AIDS, wrote: "Even if HIV were to cause AIDS, it would hardly be legitimate target for AZT therapy, because in 70 to 100 percent of antibody positive persons, proviral DNA is not detectable... and its biosynthesis has never been observed."  As a chemotherapeutic drug, explained Duesberg, explained Duesberg, AZT "kills dividing blood cells and other cells," and is thus "directly immunosuppressive."  "The cell is almost a million-fold bigger target than the virus, so the cell will be much, much more sensitive," says Duesberg. "Only very few cells, about one in 10,000 are actively making the virus containing DNA, so you must kill incredibly large numbers of cells to inhibit the virus. This kind of treatment could only theoretically help if you have a massive infection, which is not the case with AIDS. Meanwhile, they're giving this drug that ends up killing millions of lymphocytes [white blood cells]. It's beyond me how that could possibly be beneficial."  "It doesn't really kill them," Burroughs Wellcome scientists Sandra Lehrman argues. "You don't necessarily have to destroy the cell, you can just change the function of it. Furthermore, while the early data said that the only very few cells were infected, new data says that there may be more cells infected. We have more sensitive detection techniques now."  "Changes their function? From what - functioning to not functioning? Another example of mediocre science," says Bialy. "The 'sensitive detection technique' to which Dr. Lehrman refers, PCR, is a notoriously unreliable one upon which to base quantitative conclusions."  When specific questions about the alleged mechanisms of AZT are asked, the answers are long, contradictory, and riddled with unknowns. Every scientific point raised about the drug is eventually answered with the blanket response, "The drug is not perfect, but it's all we have right now." About the depletion of T-4 cells and other white cells, Lehrman says, "We don't know why T-4 cells go up at first, and then go down. That is one of the drug mechanisms that we are trying to understand."  When promoters of AZT are pressed on key scientific points, whether at the NIH, FDA, Burroughs Wellcome or an AIDS organization, they often become angry. The idea that the drug is "doing something," even though this is invariably followed with irritable admissions that there are "mechanisms about the drug and disease we don't understand," is desperately clung to. It is as if, in the eye of the AIDS storm, the official, government-agency sanctioned position is immunized against critique. Skepticism and challenge, so essential to scientific endeavour, is not welcome in the AZT debate, where it is arguably needed more than anywhere else.  The toxic effects of AZT, particularly bone marrow suppression and anemia, are so severe that up to 50 percent of all AIDS and ARC patients cannot tolerate it and have to be taken off it. In the approval letter that Burroughs Wellcome sent to the FDA, all of 50 additional side effects of AZT, aside from the most common ones, were listed. These included: loss of mental acuity, muscle spasms, rectal bleeding and tremors.  Anemia one of AZT's common side effects, is the depletion of red blood cells, and according to Duesberg, "Red blood cells are the one thing you cannot do without. Without red cells, you cannot pick up oxygen."  Fred, a person with AIDS, was put on AZT and suffered such severe anemia from the drug he had to be taken off it. In an interview in the AIDS handbook Surviving and Thriving With AIDS, he described what anemia feels like to the editor Michael Callen: "I live in a studio and my bathroom is a mere five-step walk from my be. I would just lie there for two hours; I couldn't get up to take those five steps. When I was taken to the hospital, I had to have someone come over to dress me. It's that kind of severe fatigue... The quality of my life was pitiful... I've never felt so bad... I stopped the AZT and the mental confusion, the headaches, the pains in the neck, the nausea, all disappeared within a 24-hour period."  "I feel very good at this point," Fred went on. "I feel like the quality of my life was a disaster two weeks ago. And it really was causing a great amount of fear in me, to the point where I was taking sleeping pills to calm down. I was so worried. I would totally lose track of what I was saying in the middle of a sentence. I would lose my directions on the street."  "Many AIDS patients are anemic even before they receive the drug." Says Burroughs Wellcome's Dr. Lehrman, "because HIV itself can infect the bone marrow and cause anemia."  This argument betrays a bizarre reasoning. If AIDS patients are already burdened with the problems such as immune suppression, bone marrow toxicity and anemia, is compounding these problems an improvement?  "Yes AZT is a form of chemotherapy." Says the man who invented the compound a quarter-century ago, Jerome Horowitz. "It is cytotoxic, and as such, it causes bone marrow toxicity and anemia. There are problems with the drug. It's not perfect. But I don't think anybody would agree that AZT is of no use. People can holler from now until doomsday that it is toxic, but you have to go with the results."  The results, finally and ironically, are what damns AZT. Several studies on the clinical effects of AZT - including the one that Burroughs Wellcome's approval was based on - have drawn the same conclusion: that AZT is effective for a few months, but that its effect drops of sharply after that. Even the original AZT study showed that T-4 cells went up for a while and then plummeted. HIV levels went down, and then came back up. This fact was well-known when the advisory panel voted for approval. As panel member Dr. Stanley Lemon said in the meeting, "I am left with the nagging thought after seeing several of these slides, that after 16 to 24 weeks - 12 to 16 weeks, I guess - the effect seems to be declining."  A follow-up meeting, two years after the original Burroughs Wellcome study, was scheduled to discuss the long range effects of AZT, and the survival statistics. As one doctor present at that meeting in May 1988 recall, "They hadn't followed up the study. Anything that looked beneficial was gone within half a year. All they had were some survival statistics averaging 44 weeks. The p24 didn't pan out and there was no persistent improvement in the T-4 cells."  HIV levels in the blood are measured by an antigen called p24. Burroughs Wellcome made the claim that AZT lowered this level, that is, lowered the amount of HIV in the blood. At the first FDA meeting, Burroughs Wellcome emphasized how the drug had "lowered" the p24 levels; at the follow-up meeting, they didn't mention it.  As that meeting was winding down, Dr. Michael Lange, head of the AIDS program at St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital in New York, spoke up about this. "The claim of AZT is made on the fact that it is supposed to have an antiviral effect," he said to Burroughs Wellcome, "and on this we have seen no data at all... Since there is a report in the Lancet [a leading British medical journal] that after 20 weeks or so, in many patients p24 came back, do you have any data on that?"  They didn't.  "What counts is the bottom line," one of the scientists representing Burroughs Wellcome summed up, "the survival, the neurologic function, the absence of progression and the quality of life, all of which are better. Whether you call it better because of some antiviral effect, or some other antibacterial effect, they are still better."  Dr. Lange suggested that the drug may be effective the same way a simple anti-inflammatory, such as aspirin, is effective. An inexpensive, nontoxic drug called Indomecithin, he pointed out, might serve the same function, without the devastating side effects.  One leading AIDS researcher, who was part of the FDA approval process, says today: "Does AZT do anything? Yes, it does. But the evidence that it does something against HIV is really not there."  "There have always been drugs that we use without knowing exactly how they work," says Nobel Prize winner Walter Gilbert. "The really important thing to look at is the clinical effect. Is the drug helping or isn't it?"  "I'm living proof that AZT works," says one person with ARC on AZT. "I've been on it for two years now, and I'm certainly healthier than I was two years ago. It's not a cure-all, it's not a perfect drug, but it is effective. It's slowing down the progression of the disease."  "Sometimes I feel like swallowing Drano," says another. "I mean, sometimes I have problems swallowing. I just don't like the idea of taking something that foreign to my body. But every six hours, I've got to swallow it. Until something better comes along, this is what is available to me."  "I am absolutely convinced that people enjoy a better quality of life and survive longer who do not take AZT," says Gene Fedorko, President of Health Education AIDS Liaison (HEAL). "I think it's horrible the way people are bullied by their doctors to take the drug. We get people coming to us shaking and crying because their doctors said they'll die if they don't take AZT. That is an absolute lie." Fedorko has drawn his conclusion from years of listening to the stories of people struggling to survive AIDS at HEAL's weekly support group.  "I wouldn't take AZT if you paid me," says Michael Callen, cofounder of New York City's PWA coalition, Community Research Initiative, and editor of several AIDS journals. Callen has survived AIDS for over seven years without the help of AZT. "I've gotten the shit kicked out me for saying this, but I think using AZT is like aiming a thermonuclear warhead at a mosquito. The overwhelming majority of long-term survivors I've known have chosen not to take AZT."  The last surviving patient from the original AZT trial, according to Burroughs Wellcome, died recently. When he died, he had been on AZT for three and one-half years. He was the longest surviving AZT recipient. The longest surviving AIDS patient overall, not on AZT, has lived for eight and one-half years.  An informal study of long-term survivors of AIDS followed 24 long-term survivors, all of whom had survived AIDS more than six years. Only one of them had recently begun taking AZT.  In the early days, AZT was said to extend lives. In actual fact, there is simply no solid evidence that AZT prolongs life.  "I think AZT does prolong life in most people," says Dr. Bruce Montgomery of the State University of New York City at Stony Brook, who is completing a study on AZT. "There are not very many long-tern survivors, and we really don't know why they survive. It could be luck. But most people are not so lucky."  "AZT does seem to help many patients," says Dr. Bernard Bahari, a New York City AIDS physician and researcher, "but it's very hard to determine whether it actually prolongs life."  "Many of the patients I see choose not to take AZT," says Dr. Don Abrams of San Francisco General Hospital. "I've been impressed that survival and lifespan are increasing for all people with AIDS. I think it has a lot to do with aerosolized Pentamidine [a drug that treats pneumocystis carinii pneumonia]. There's also the so-called plague effect, the fact that people get stronger and stronger when a disease hits a population. The patients I see today are not as fragile as the early patients were."  "Whether you live or die with AIDS is a function of how well your doctor treats you, not of AZT," says Dr. Joseph Sonnabend, one of New York's City's first and most reputable AIDS doctor, whose patients include many long-term survivors, although he has never prescribed AZT. Sonnabend was one of the first to make the simple observation that AIDS patients should be treated for their diseases, not just for their HIV infection.  Several studies have concluded that AZT has no effect on the two most common opportunistic AIDS infections, Pneumocystic Carinii Pneumonia (PCP) and Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS). The overwhelming majority of AIDS patients die of PCP, for which there has been an effective treatment for decades. This year, the FDA finally approved aerosolized Pentamidine for AIDS. A recent Memorial Sloan Kettering study concluded the following: By 15 months, 80% of people on AZT not receiving Pentamidine had a recurring episode. "All those deaths in the AZT study were treatable," Sonnabend says. "They weren't deaths from AIDS, they were deaths from treatable conditions. They didn't even do autopsies for that study. What kind of faith can one have in these people?"  "If there's any resistance to AZT in the general public at all, it's within the gay community of New York," says the doctor close to the FDA approval, who asked to remain anonymous. "The rest of the country has been brainwashed into thinking this drug really does that much. The data has all been manipulated by people who have a lot vested in AZT."  "If AIDS were not the popular disease that it is - the money-making and career-making machine - these people could not get away with that kind of shoddy science," says Bialy. "In all of my years in science I have never seen anything this atrocious." When asked if he thought it was at all possible that people have been killed as a result of AZT poisoning rather then AIDS he answered: "It's more than possible."  August 17, 1989: The government has announced that 1.4 million healthy, HIV antibody-positive Americans could "benefit" from taking AZT, even though they show no symptoms of disease. New studies have "proven" that AZT is effective in stopping the progression of AIDS in asymptomatic and early ARC cases. Dr. Fauci, the head of NIH, proudly announced that a trial that has been going on for "two years" had "clearly shown" that early intervention will keep AIDS at bay. Anyone who has antibodies to HIV and less than 500 T-4 cells should start taking AZT at once, he said. That is approximately 650,000 people. 1.4 million Americans are assumed HIV antibody-positive, and eventually all of them may need to take AZT so they don't get sick, Fauci contended.  The leading newspapers didn't seem to think it unusual that there was no existing copy of the study, but rather a breezy two-pages press release from the NIH. When SPIN called the NIH asking for a copy of the study, we were told that it was "still being written." We asked a few questions about the numbers. According to the press release, 3,200 early AARC and asymptomatic patients were devided into two groups, one AZT and one placebo, and followed for two years. The two groups were distinguished by T-4 cell counts; one group had less than 500, the other more than 500. These two were then divided into three groups each: high-dose AZT, low-dose AZT, and placebo. In the group with more than 500 T-4 cells, AZT had no effect. In the other group, it was concluded that low-dose AZT was the most effective, followed by high-dose. All in all, 36 out of 900 developed AIDS in the two AZT groups combined, and 38 out of 450 in the placebo group. "HIV-positive patients are twice as likely to get AIDS if they don't take AZT," the press declared.  However, the figures are vastly misleading. When we asked how many patients were actually enrolled for a full two years, the NIH said they did not know, but that the average time of participation was one year, not two.  "It's terribly dishonest the way they portrayed those numbers," says Dr. Sonnabend. "If there were 60 people in the trial those numbers would mean something, but if you calculate what the percentage is out of 3,200, the difference becomes minute between the two groups. It's nothing. It's hit or miss, and they make it look like it's terribly significant."  The study boasted that AZT is much more effective and less toxic at one-third the dosage than has been used for three years. That's the good news. The bad news is that thousands have already been walloped with 1,500 milligrams of AZT and possibly even died of toxic poisoning - and now we're hearing that one third of the dose would have done?  With all that remains so uncertain about the effects of AZT, it seems criminal to advocate expanding its usage to healthy people, particularly since only a minuscule percentage of the HIV-infected population have actually developed ARC or AIDS.  Burroughs Wellcome has already launched testing of AZT in asymptomatic hospital workers, pregnant women, and in children, who are getting liquid AZT. The liquid is left over from an aborted trial, and given to the children because they can mix it with water - children don't like to swallow pills. It has also been proposed that AZT be given to people who do not yet even test positive for HIV antibodies, but are "at risk."  "I'm convinced that if you gave AZT to a perfectly healthy athlete," says Fedorko, "he would be dead in five years."  In December 1988, the Lancet published a study that Burroughs Wellcome and the NIH do not include in their press kits. It was more expansive than the original AZT study and followed patients longer. It was not conducted in the United States, but in France, at the Claude Bernard Hospital in Paris, and concluded the same thing about AZT that Burroughs Wellcome's study did, except Burroughs Wellcome called their results "overwhelmingly positive," and the French doctors called theirs "disappointing." The French study found, once again, that AZT was too toxic for most to tolerate, had no lasting effect on HIV blood levels, and left the patients with fewer T-4 cells than they started with. Although they noticed a clinical improvement at first, they concluded that "by six months, these values had returned to their pretreatment levels and several opportunistic infections, malignancies and deaths occurred."  "Thus the benefits of AZT are limited to a few months for ARC and AIDS patients," the Fench team concluded. After a few months, the study found, AZT was completely ineffective.  The news that AZT will soon be prescribed to asymptomatic people has left many leading AIDS doctors dumbfounded and furious. Every doctor and scientist I asked felt that it was highly unprofessional and reckless to announce a study with no data to look at, making recommendations with such drastic public health implications. "This simply does not happen," says Bialy. "The government is reporting scientific facts before they've been reviewed? It's unheard of."  "It's beyond belief," says Dr. Sonnabend in a voice tinged with desperation. "I don't know what to do. I have to go in and face an office full of patients asking for AZT. I'm terrified. I don't know what to do as a responsible physician. The first study was ridiculous. Margaret Fishl, who has done both of these studies, obviously doesn't know the first thing about clinical trials. I don't trust her. Or the others. They're simply not good enough. We're being held hostage by second-rate scientists. We let them get away with the first disaster; now they're doing it again."  "It's a momentous decision to say to people, 'if you're HIV-positive and your T4-cells are below 500 start taking AZT,'" says the doctor who wished to remain anonymous. "I know dozens of people that I've seen personally every few months for several years now who have been in that state for more than five years, and have not progressed to any disease."  "I'm ashamed of my colleagues," Sonnabend laments. "I'm embarrassed. This is such shoddy science it's hard to believe nobody is protesting. Damned cowards. The name of the game is protect your grants, don't open your mouth. It's all about money... it's grounds for just following the party line and not being critical, when there are obviously financial and political forces that are driving this."  When Duesberg heard the latest announcement, he was particularly stunned over the reaction of Gay Men's Health Crisis President Richard Dunne, who said that GMHC now urged "everybody to get tested," and of course those who test positive to go on AZT. "These people are running into the gas chambers," says Duesberg. "Himmler would have been so happy if only the Jews were this cooperative." 

The Coconuts Podcast
The plea for presidential pardon over Malaysian man on death row, with Yeu-Gynn Yeung and Nurul Azliah | The Coconuts Podcast | Oct 29, 2021

The Coconuts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 57:11


Tens of thousands across the world have signed a change.org petition pleading to Singapore President Halimah Yacob for clemency over an intellectually-disabled Malaysian man on death row. Nagaenthran K Dharmalingam was arrested in Singapore for drug trafficking aged 21 and has been on death row for a decade. Now 33, Nagaenthran reportedly suffers from ADHD and has an IQ of 69, which has prompted rights groups across the Singapore-Malaysia border to appeal against the ruling. We spoke to Coconuts' own KL and Singapore editors Yeu-Gynn Yeung and Nurul Azliah to find out more about the case.Other stories include:Russian man and Ukraine woman deported from Indonesia after forging PCR test results | Thailand expands travel green list with 17 more countries | Undercover cops in Squid Game, vampire garb bust taxi drivers for overcharging on Halloween | Premier League star Wilfried Zaha shares racist Insta DM from Indonesian user | KLCC antimasker slapped with RM3,000 fine | Illegally kept monkeys found in Manila | MP Raeesah Khan faces party discipline for distorting rape victim's story | Yangon schools reopen with soldiers – but not many studentsThe Coconuts Podcast delivers impactful, weird, and wonderful reporting by our journalists on the ground in eight cities: Singapore, Bangkok, Hong Kong, Manila, Jakarta, Kuala Lumpur, Yangon, and Bali. Listen to headline news and insightful interviews on matters large and small, designed for people located in – or curious about – Southeast Asia and Hong Kong.

Café Con Nata
Panel Feminista con Valentina Chavarría de Fridays For Future Chile

Café Con Nata

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 78:59


Ayayai, la Región Metropolitana y los menores de 34 años concentran el rebrote de casos COVID-19, lo que ya mantiene en alerta al Minsal. Y en el largo camino de las vacunas y esta pandemia, la revista The Lancet confirmó que una dosis de “Sputnik Light”, de origen ruso, posee un alto nivel de protección y seguridad, incluso contra la variante Delta. Hasta el acontecer nacional está sacudido por el COVID porque el candidato Gabriel Boric confirmó el resultado positivo de su PCR. Además, aprovechamos de echar la talla a propósito de un estudio que vincula el coronavirus con la disfunción eréctil. ¡Vacúnense, gente! En un nuevo Panel Feminista presentado por Corporación Humanas, recibimos desde Valdivia a Valentina Chavarría del movimiento Fridays For Future Chile. Hablamos de por qué esta edición de la COP ha sido tan mediática y cómo podría (o no) ser clave en las decisiones del futuro. Le preguntamos por la importancia del proceso constituyente y la próxima elección presidencial en cuanto a protección del medio ambiente, y nos explicó de qué se trata la eco-ansiedad / eco-depresión en tiempos como los de hoy.

The REAL David Knight Show
Thr 4Nov21 Life Insurance Benefits DENIED to Unvaccinated / EMP & Off Grid Preparation

The REAL David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 181:37


The next step to punish unvaccinated — deny life insurance benefits if they die with a positive PCR test and are unvaccinated INTERVIEW: Jeff Yago, author "The ABCs of EMP: A Practical Guide to Both Understanding and Surviving an EMP" on off-grid power and protection Coming for the kids — the propaganda beings with Pfizer ads, mainstream and government media pushing jabs on kids “to protect grandma”, “to have freedom”, to be a “superhero” that “protects the community”.  Not just 5 yr olds, they're coming for PREGNANT WOMEN Miniature vials and needles — Trump Kool-Aid has been manufactured already for every single child in USA Dems so unpopular in NEW JERSEY that top ranking legislator loses to trucker who spent $153 — wait — here's some MORE votes, the Dem wins! FBI caught hiding evidence that would show Rittenhouse innocent — a longstanding pattern of FBI behavior Washington Post attacks non-partisan group that exposed the hideous beagle experiments, to defend Fauci.  There's a “party” that transcends Democrats & Republicans TOPICS by TIMECODE 3:28 Trucker spent $153 and defeated NJ Senate President — or did he? Progressive Democrats say the problem with the Dem losses was that the party wasn't radical enough. And Biden denies the reports of a negotiated amount of $900,000 per couple for illegal aliens separated at the border 15:00 Kissinger and Eric Schmidt (Google) write an op-ed piece about AI 22:56 LGBT cancel mob — demands you cheer male homecoming “queen” but demands you cancel Chris Pratt for his vaguely Christian sentiments from 2018. They say he is stealing Italian heritage by doing the voice of Mario (Super Mario) and Garfield in animated productions 38:23 FBI has been hiding video that shows Kyle Rittenhouse acted in self-defense.  A long established pattern of behavior for the FBI 50:10 A great resource for learning how to get more self-reliant, especially in food — the ultimate way to rebel against the system that's trying to enslave you 1:00:43 INTERVIEW: Understanding & Surviving an EMP. Jeff Yago, author "The ABCs of EMP: A Practical Guide to Both Understanding and Surviving an EMP” and off-grid power and protection  1:49:49 Kinder Jabs: CNN Says Just in Time for Kwanza. It's festive! It's for “superheroes”, by “superheroes”. Full spectrum propaganda for the cult audience.  If you're 11 yrs, 11 months you get 1/3 dose.  One month later, at 12, you get full adult dose.  And don't forget pregnant woman — too many are skipping the jab! 2:32:39 FDA approved blot clot drug for children (for clotting condition that was rare before the injections) as Pfizer was already manufacturing and stockpiling “kiddy doses” of the injection 2:43:15  Death Benefits Removed If Unvaxed Die with Positive PCR Test. New York, Massachusetts city have already focused on this novel punishment for the unjabbed. But woman fired for refusal to violate her religious beliefs on abortion has finally prevailed in court after 5 yrs — a WARNING to companies and governments that they will eventually pay 2:52:41  Washington Post Defends Fauci Against Puppy Torture. They had previously praised the group that exposed his pointless cruelty but now the whistleblowing group becomes a target to save Fauci   Find out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.com If you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-show Or you can send a donation through Zelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.com Cash App at:  $davidknightshow BTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7 Mail:          David Knight          POB 1323          Elgin, TX 78621

The David Knight Show
Thr 4Nov21 Life Insurance Benefits DENIED to Unvaccinated / EMP & Off Grid Preparation

The David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 181:38


* The next step to punish unvaccinated — deny life insurance benefits if they die with a positive PCR test and are unvaccinated* INTERVIEW: Jeff Yago, author "The ABCs of EMP: A Practical Guide to Both Understanding and Surviving an EMP" on off-grid power and protection* Coming for the kids — the propaganda beings with Pfizer ads, mainstream and government media pushing jabs on kids “to protect grandma”, “to have freedom”, to be a “superhero” that “protects the community”. Not just 5 yr olds, they're coming for PREGNANT WOMEN* Miniature vials and needles — Trump Kool-Aid has been manufactured already for every single child in USA* Dems so unpopular in NEW JERSEY that top ranking legislator loses to trucker who spent $153 — wait — here's some MORE votes, the Dem wins!* FBI caught hiding evidence that would show Rittenhouse innocent — a longstanding pattern of FBI behavior* Washington Post attacks non-partisan group that exposed the hideous beagle experiments, to defend Fauci. There's a “party” that transcends Democrats & RepublicansFind out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.comIf you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-showOr you can send a donation throughZelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.comCash App at:  $davidknightshowBTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7Mail: David Knight POB 1323 Elgin, TX 78621

FULCRUM News with David Seaman
We'll Hold You Filth Accountable

FULCRUM News with David Seaman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021


Just remember, those who supported the old pedophiles in D.C. who are currently shattering our world with a faulty vaccine, forced PCR tests containing numerous poisons, and millions of job losses due to this absolutely un-American and inhumane mandate. Joe Biden is a Predator, not a President. Just remember, 8 billion of us, handfuls of you.Every single one of you modern day Nazis will be held accountable. And there will be nowhere to hide. Try to run to New Zealand or Australia? Their citizenry don't like you either.8 billion of us, handfuls of you.

Vibe
Ep. 249 :Dr Cahill On Conquering Fear. She Updates Us on Traveling with Freedom, Exposes the PCR Test Lies & More

Vibe

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 140:16


Are you still getting sucked into using “their” words like pandemic, positive PCR test, etc? Are you allowing your boss, an airline employee, or a store clerk to rob you...

Dr. Berkson's Best Health Radio Podcast
Breast Implant Illness with Robert Whitfield MD (#231)

Dr. Berkson's Best Health Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 49:49


Breast implants are a very popular surgery, especially for re-construction after breast cancer. Dr. Whitfield is an experienced, Board Certified Plastic Surgeon who specializes in oncologic breast reconstruction. But he was also the doctor to discover that some cases of autoimmunity, chronic fatigue, cognitive decline… start in contaminated breast implants! Dr. Whitfiled completed six years of surgical training at Indiana University Medical Center. Then a Plastic Surgery Residency. And then a Fellowship in Microsurgery and Aesthetic under Dr. William Zamboni. Dr. Whitfield began to have patients that were experiencing systemic illness, and when he removed their implants, called an “explant” procedure, he found identifiable pathogens in the tissue capsule. Treating these infections got rid of many of these systemic problems, such as chronic fatigue. This lead Dr. Whitfield to start to add more services for his clients, including nutritional and nutraceutical advice as well as personal genetic predisposition screening. Dr. Whitfield has completed over 4000 breast procedures since 2004 including over 500 implant removals.  He has the largest series of explant specimens with PCR testing. This tests the genetic sequences of pathogens, so is a highly sensitive test to identify “stealth” infections and find their appropriate medications to eradicate them. While serving as the President Elect of the Research Foundation Dr. Whitfiled also gave testimony at the FDA hearings in 2019 regarding Breast Implant iIlness (BII).

The Stem Cell Podcast
Ep. 205: “Stem Cells in Space” Featuring Dr. Kate Rubins

The Stem Cell Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 64:26


Dr. Kate Rubins is a NASA astronaut and microbiologist. She has completed two expeditions to the International Space Station and spent 300 days in space. She became the first person to sequence DNA in space in 2016, and grew cardiomyocytes (in collaboration with Arun in Joseph Wu's lab at Stanford) in cell culture and performed PCR and microbiome experiments while in orbit. 

political and spiritual
Dr Robert X….(G Y A I L ) FROM VACCINES TO MACHINES PART (V11)

political and spiritual

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 238:00


Does the PCR Test Affect the Pineal Gland? Humans and “Transhumans”. The pineal gland was described as the “Seat of the Soul” by René Descartes (French 17th Century philosopher) and it is located in the center of the brain. The main function of the pineal gland is to receive information about the state of the light-dark cycle from the environment and convey this information to produce and secrete the hormone melatonin – which is giving humans senses and sensibilities. Reducing or eliminating these unique capacities, makes us humans vulnerable to “robotization”. She asserts that if there wasn't a deeper agenda behind the PCR-test, there would be no need to stick a test-swab deep into your sinuses where it touches a thin membrane that separates the sinus cavity from your brain. A saliva sample would be enough https://gofund.me/69859d89...Dr Robert X https://gofund.me/3f84fb27. ... Thomas m beats

Coronacast
Finally we can test ourselves at home!

Coronacast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 11:16


From today, you can buy rapid antigen tests from the shop and use them on yourself to see if you've got COVID-19 or not. Previously, the home, general-public use of antigen tests wasn't available for purchase by the general public. So with a bunch of them on the market for the first time, what should you keep in mind and how do they differ from the usual PCR test we're so used to? That's on today's Coronacast. GUEST: Dr Ian Norton, Managing Director, Respond Global