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Laboratory technique to multiply a DNA sample for study

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Charlottesville Community Engagement
May 19, 2022: New Jaunt CEO reintroduces agency to Charlottesville City Council; Albemarle preparing for affordable dwelling unit ordinance

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 19:13


The heat is on, on the street, and this installment of Charlottesville Community Engagement is ready to get inside your head, on every beat. With apologies to Glenn Frey, this is not an 80’s music nostalgia newsletter and podcast, but the idea is to look back at some of what’s happened recently while anticipating the changes that will come this summer. It’s May 19, 2022, and I’m your host, Sean Tubbs. Sign up today to not miss a beat! On today’s show:The annual median income in the Charlottesville area has increased 19 percent over last yearAlbemarle Supervisors further discusses ways to incentivize developers to build housing for those with lower than that median incomeThe new CEO of Jaunt explains that a new page is turning toward cooperation with Charlottesville Area TransitA Pittsylvania County group seeks a second referendum on sales tax increase for education Shout-out: RCA seeks input on the restoration of Riverview ParkThe first Patreon-fueled shout-out today is for the Rivanna Conservation Alliance and their work with the City of Charlottesville on the restoration of Riverview Park. The RCA aims to restore a 600-foot section of the Rivanna riverbank in an area that’s designated for public access to the waterway as well as a 200-foot section of a dangerously eroding stormwater channel nearby. Another community meeting will be held in the near future to get your feedback on the work should be prioritized. Visit rivannariver.org to learn more about the project, which seeks to help Riverview Park continue to be a welcoming place to exercise, cool off, paddle, fish, play, explore, observe nature, and escape from the day-to-day stresses of life. Spring COVID-19 surge continuesTo begin today, a quick look at the latest COVID numbers from the Virginia Department of Health. Today the VDH reports another 3,836 positive COVID tests done through the PCR method, and a number that does not count at-home tests. The seven-day positivity rate for tests has increased to 15.2 percent. The seven-day average for new cases is now at 3,078. This surge of cases has so far not resulted in fatalities anywhere near what was seen in previous ones before vaccines were easily available. The seven-day average for new daily deaths is at three per day. According to the Virginia Healthcare and Hospital Association, there are 60 COVID patients in intensive care in Virginia, with 23 of them on ventilators. Pittsylvania County group wants to try again on sales tax referendum Last November, voters in Pittsylvania County on the south side of Virginia’s Fifth Congressional District had on their ballot a referendum on whether or not to approve a one percent sales tax increase to fund school improvement projects. The measure failed on a 23-vote margin according to election night results from the State Board of Elections. This Tuesday, the seven-member Board of Supervisors got an update on a campaign to try hold the referendum again this year, based on enabling authority that passed the General Assembly in 2020. Martha Walker is the chair of Pittsylvanians for a Brighter Future, an advocacy group that seeks passage this time around.“One cent, one penny, will generate $3.8 million each year for the 19 years that we will be allowed to have that one cent sales tax added,” Walker said. Under the same enabling authority, Danville voters voted in favor of the referendum and the sales tax increase has gone into effect. Speaking directly to the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday, Walker said her organization will be seeking to educate the public on what improvements would be funded. “You know that ten elementary schools will be focused on safety and getting rid of those trailers by building those new classrooms,” Walker said. Charlottesville asked the General Assembly to be allowed to hold a referendum for its school system. Legislation passed the Democrat-controlled Senate, but failed to get out of a committee in the Republican-controlled House of Delegates. There is still no state budget, an issue of increasing concern to school systems throughout the Commonwealth. Jaunt CEO talks transit with Charlottesville City CouncilThe relatively new CEO of the transit agency Jaunt introduced himself to the Charlottesville City Council Monday and also had the chance to re-introduce a public service organization plagued by recent controversy. Ted Rieck started with fundamentals. “Our basic goal is to enable people to live their lives independently and with dignity and we’ve been doing this for about 42 years,” Rieck said. (view his presentation)Jaunt serves the six localities of the Thomas Jefferson Planning District Commission as well as Buckingham County. The Americans with Disabilities Act requires equivalent service to fixed route transit for disabled individuals, and Rieck said Jaunt performs this role for CAT for those who live within three-fourths of a mile of a bus stop. “We also provide in some of the outlying counties circulator or intra-county service,” Rieck said. “We also provide links from the counties to Charlottesville and then we also provide commuter services into Charlottesville and [the University of Virginia].”Rieck was hired last October by Jaunt. The agency’s Board of Directors asked the previous CEO to resign after irregular transactions were reported. That continues to have an impact on Jaunt’s budget. “We had our CEO make some judgment errors in terms of spending money,” Rieck said. “That triggered an audit and that discovered some issues that Jaunt wasn’t doing very well.” Rieck said Jaunt was making progress in correcting the errors pointed out in the audit, including misapplication of funds intended for rural use for urban purposes. There were also questions about administrative costs. “We overstated some of our statistics which allowed us to get more state funding and federal funding that we were entitled to,” Rieck said. “This was an error that the prior CEO basically hoarded the data and did not share that with anybody.”Rieck said Jaunt had to pay Virginia back a over a million dollars and that has happened. Record-keeping has now been improved. The previous CEO was Brad Sheffield, who also served one term on the Albemarle Board of Supervisors. During that time, he was hired on as Jaunt’s director. Rieck said other anomalies have been discovered and Jaunt is cooperating with the ongoing investigation. He said Virginia Department of Rail and Public Transportation officials will visit Jaunt’s headquarters next week for further discussions. Better cooperation?Rieck said as the legacy of the Sheffield era continues to play out, he wants to build a partnership with Charlottesville Area Transit, and he’s in close contact with CAT Director Garland Williams.“We are working together,” Rieck said. “I don’t believe Jaunt and CAT have played very well together in the past. We are turning a new page on that I believe.” That includes more frequent meetings to discuss common issues, such as driver shortages. Another issue is how to transition to a fleet that doesn’t run on fossil fuels to meet the community’s expectations on reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Jaunt is also seeking members to join an Alternative Fuel Advisory Committee to oversee a study for which Kimley Horn has been hired to run. Applications are due May 27, and the process will build off of a study that Charlottesville Area Transit is also running for their fleet. (apply)They are also building off of conversations that have been taking place at the Jefferson Area Regional Transit Partnership. In April, that group heard from transit officials in Burlington, Vermont about how fixed-route transit can carry students to public schools. Those conversations are now occurring here, according to Rieck. “Today we discussed opportunities where we could see CAT bus routes overlapping areas where Albemarle County students live,” Rieck said. “Many of these people could conceivably take a bus to the high school, other schools as well. If that works out, we could save five or six bus operators for the school district. Doesn’t sound like much, but it’s really huge.”Other avenues of regional exploration include the creation of a Regional Transit Authority and development of an app to help people navigate public transportation. Rieck said Jaunt could also play a role in addressing the need for service to Crescent Halls, a Charlottesville Redevelopment and Housing Authority property whose residents have demanded door-to-door service be restored when the building reopens. He said the current service by Route 6 sees a large bus trying to navigate a small access road for which it was not designed. “And my understanding is that’s an awkward movement for a larger vehicle to do so the thought would be to have Jaunt provide that service instead of the main route,” Rieck said. Details to come in the future as Rieck said detailed conversations had not yet occurred. Council pressed Rieck on whether Jaunt’s troubles with the Virginia Department and Rail and Public Transportation were over. “First of all, are there any more shoes about to drop, and second, do you have a sense of when you will be past the shoe-dropping phase?” asked Charlottesville Mayor Lloyd Snook. Rieck said the long-standing issue is a pattern of mixing rural and urban funds that dates further back into Jaunt’s recent history. He said he’s being transparent with city, county, and state officials, as well as his board of directors. “So I don’t think that there’s any more shoes to drop and if there is, that’s the one,” Rieck said. Second shout-out: The Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign It’s springtime, and one Patreon subscriber wants you to know the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign is a grassroots initiative of motivated citizens, volunteers, partner organizations, and local governments who want to promote the use of native plants. This spring the group is working with retailers across the region to encourage purchase of plants that belong here and are part of an ecosystem that depends on pollination. There are plenty of resources on the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Facebook page, so sign up to be notified of lectures, plant sales, and more!Albemarle Supervisors discuss incentives for housing planThe Albemarle County Board of Supervisors continued a conversation earlier this month about how to incentivize developers to build units to be sold below market value. The six-member Board last discussed the matter in February and pushed back on the idea of creating an overlay district in the county’s zoning ordinance. (previous coverage)“The main question today that we would like some feedback on after listening to the information that’s provided is [whether] an affordable dwelling unit program something the Board would be interested in and staff reviewing?” asked Stacy Pethia, the county’s Housing Policy Manager. (view her presentation)The General Assembly has already granted Albemarle enabling authority to pursue such a program, which would allow the county to require a certain percentage of units be rented or sold at affordable prices to households at 80 percent or lower than the median income. This requirement would be triggered by a rezoning or a special use permit. Supervisors adopted the Housing Albemarle plan last July but delayed much of the implementation until these details could be worked out. Before they got too deep into the conversation, Pethia said the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has now released updated calculations for area median income for 2022. “That is now $111,200 annually and to put that into perspective, that is a 19 percent increase over last year’s area median income increase,” Pethia said. The median income for the Washington metropolitan area is $142,300 and the median income for the Lynchburg metro is $78,900.  We’ll come back to this in future stories about housing. (find the calculations for your favorite metro area)Pethia said after the work session in February, staff opted to come forward with the affordable dwelling unit program that is authorized under state code. “And the enabling legislation really doesn’t place many restrictions on what the county can do and what that program looks like,” Pethia said. “It does require we provide density bonuses but beyond that we are pretty open in the percentage of the affordable unit set-asides that we may require, the depth of that unit affordability, the length of the affordability for those units, and we also have the opportunity to include additional incentives within that ordinance above and beyond the density increases.”Pethia said there are about 500 such programs across the United States. Commonalities between them include: An identification of how many units the locality needs to be affordable standardized amount per unit for developers to pay into a fund rather than build units The right for the locality or its designee to purchase or rent affordable units that are actually constructed. Several localities in Virginia have such a program, such as Loudoun County. “They adopted their ordinance in 1999 and do require 6.25 to 12.5 percent of the units in projects to be affordable housing,” Pethis said. “Those units need to be affordable for 15 to 20 years depending on whether they are for sale or rent.” Pethia said around 2,500 units have been created under this policy in Loudoun. Fairfax County has a similar ordinance and has created nearly 3,000 units. For Albemarle, Pethia said county staff are recommending density bonuses, requiring 20 percent of total new units to be affordable as per Housing Albemarle, allowing non-profits to purchase “affordable” units for which the developer can’t find a qualified buyer, and a cash-in-lieu fee is a developer doesn’t want to build the units. Such a program is not yet ready and Pethia wanted feedback on whether they should proceed. Supervisor Ann Mallek had this question. “Is there a way that we can put a hold on new applications until we get this process adopted?” Mallek said. “I’m very concerned that another 5,000 units will come in in application that we will somehow be forced to accept the applications and then we will lose the opportunity to get a much better result.” Supervisor Bea LaPisto-Kirtley said she supported the idea of the creation of a waiting list of people and families who are eligible to rent or purchase affordable units due to their income level. “The waiting list would be extremely important to have a waiting list otherwise I can see this whole project failing if we don’t have a waiting list of qualified income buyers,” LaPisto-Kirtley said. Supervisor Ned Gallaway said that he did not want to see a list of stiffly-written incentives that might preclude flexibility. “I hope we don’t get caught in the trap of saying that even if we put an example of incentives our, or encouraged incentives, or whatever the wording is, that we’re saying that that’s it, and that we have a process in place that allows for consideration of other incentives,” Gallaway said. “Each project will be different. Each spreadsheet is different.” Gallaway also supported the cash-in-lieu program in order to be able to pay more funds into the county’s affordable housing trust rather than rely on surpluses. A more detailed plan will come before the Board of Supervisors for a work session in August followed by a public hearing in September. Help Ting help support Town Crier productions!For one year now, Town Crier Productions has had a promotional offering through Ting!Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

有話好說
+9萬331例59死!防疫保單再添混亂!排擠醫療資源?業者不願認帳?​(2022/05/19)

有話好說

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 56:01


TRAICY(トライシー)
インドネシア、渡航前のPCR検査を撤廃

TRAICY(トライシー)

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022


「インドネシア、渡航前のPCR検査を撤廃」

Curiosity Daily
De-agin' Sensation, Indiana Jones Needs A.I., Rapid-est Test

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 14:24


Today, you'll learn about a new process that can make cells younger by up to thirty years, the incredible artificial intelligence that is helping piece together the puzzles of ancient texts, and how researchers have developed a rapid test for viruses like coronavirus that is just as accurate as PCR tests and takes only thirty minutes.The fountain of youth may be closer than we think.“‘Time Jump' by 30 Years: Old Skins Cells Reprogrammed To Regain Youthful Function” by Babraham Institutehttps://scitechdaily.com/time-jump-by-30-years-old-skins-cells-reprogrammed-to-regain-youthful-function/“Multi-Omic Rejuvenation of Human Cells by Maturation Phase Transient Reprogramming” by Diljeet Gill, et al.https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.71624“Aging Changes in Organs - Tissue - Cells” by Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinaihttps://www.mountsinai.org/health-library/special-topic/aging-changes-in-organs-tissue-cellsThe overlap between artificial intelligence and the ancient world.“DeepMind's new AI model helps decipher, date, and locate ancient inscriptions” By James Vincenthttps://www.theverge.com/2022/3/9/22968773/ai-machine-learning-ancient-inscriptions-texts-deepmind-ithaca-model“Radiocarbon Dating” by Oxford Radiocarbon Accelerator Unithttps://c14.arch.ox.ac.uk/dating.html#:~:text=For%20radiocarbon%20dating%20to%20be,or%20left%20as%20a%20residue.“A New A.I. Can Help Historians Decipher Damaged Ancient Greek Texts” by Jane Reckerhttps://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/a-new-ai-can-help-historians-decipher-damaged-ancient-greek-texts-180979736/“AI could decipher gaps in ancient Greek texts, say researchers” by Nicola Davishttps://www.theguardian.com/science/2022/mar/09/ai-could-decipher-gaps-in-ancient-greek-texts-say-researchersTurns out some things can actually be good, fast, and cheap.“UT Dallas researchers develop accurate rapid test for viruses” By EurekaAlerthttps://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/950413“UT Dallas Researchers Create High-Accuracy Rapid Virus Test” by Marin Wolfhttps://www.govtech.com/education/higher-ed/ut-dallas-researchers-create-high-accuracy-rapid-virus-testFollow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to get smarter with Calli and Nate — for free! Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers.Find episode transcripts here: https://curiosity-daily-4e53644e.simplecast.com/episodes/de-agin-sensation-indiana-jones-needs-ai-rapid-est-test

Sustainable Winegrowing with Vineyard Team
133: A Quest for Virus Negative Plant Material

Sustainable Winegrowing with Vineyard Team

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 27:25


All winegrowers are on the same quest to find virus negative plant material. James Stamp, President at Stamp Associates Viticulture, Inc, works with his clients to find the highest quality grapevine plants to establish new vineyards. This thorough process to find virus negative material includes partnering with nurseries that previously delivered good product. There is oversight through all stages of production from testing material to harvesting and grafting, from production to delivery, and the final selection of plants for the vineyard site. The number one tip to get quality grapevines is to pay attention to where the plant material is coming from, have great communication with the nursery, and sample the finished product for Red Blotch and Leaf Roll Three. References: 06-03-2022 | Roller Crimper Demo Tailgate, King City, CA (Event registration) 20: Dr. Mark Fuchs | Red Blotch Virus in Grapevines (podcast) 49: Stopping the Spread of Red Leaf Viruses (podcast) 71: New Techniques to Detect Grapevine Leafroll Disease (podcast) 131: Virus Detection in Grapevines Grape Program at Foundation Plant Services Grapevine propagation: principles and methods for the production of high-quality grapevine planting material Leafroll 3 Virus (GLRaV3) AKA Grapevine Leafroll Disease in Washington Red Blotch Virus SIP Certified Sourcing Grapevines for a New Vineyard Stamp Associates Viticulture, Inc. Sustainable Ag Expo November 14-16, 2022 Virus Disease Guide in Grapes Get More Subscribe wherever you listen so you never miss an episode on the latest science and research with the Sustainable Winegrowing Podcast. Since 1994, Vineyard Team has been your resource for workshops and field demonstrations, research, and events dedicated to the stewardship of our natural resources. Learn more at www.vineyardteam.org. Transcript Craig Macmillan  0:00  My name is Craig Macmillan and I am your host, as always. Today we have with us James Stamp, who is president of Stamp Associates Viticulture, Incorporated. And thanks for being on the show, James. I'm really looking forward to this.   James Stamp  0:13  Yes, thanks for having me, Craig, I'm looking forward to it as well.   Craig Macmillan  0:15  So James, you have a interesting company. And you've had an interesting career over the years. But right now, your company does a number of very interesting kind of things in three different areas. And what I was hoping to do is talk about each of those individually in a little bit of detail and have you explain kind of how those things work. First of all, you folks do independent analysis and quality control for grapevine nursery stock production. Tell me more about that.   James Stamp  0:39  Our clients hire us to find the highest quality grapevine plants for establishing new vineyards. And what we do is to select nurseries that we have previous experience with in terms of delivering good product. And nurseries, where we have previously inspected and tested their increased box and the increase box, as you know, are the rootstock and science sources of materials for propagation. So we, we put together a proposal for our clients to provide the best quality of plant materials that we can. And then we get involved with discussing with nurseries, which materials are best to use. We oversee the testing of those materials, we oversee the harvesting and grafting of those materials. We oversee the production of those materials, that particular nurseries, and we oversee the delivery and final selection of those plants to the vineyard sites. And as part of our, our understanding with our growers, we are available to look at those plants during the course of the vineyard development. We'd like to be there to see how our plants grow. Once they're planted,   Craig Macmillan  1:54  A grower will come to you and say I'm planting a vineyard, I want to make sure that it's virus free, or disease disease free, I would imagine. And you folks start at the very beginning, you go out and look at the blocks where the first cuttings are going to come from the good gonna go into those plants. Is that right?   James Stamp  2:12  Yes. When I first started doing this, in 1999, I was asked to look at finished product. In other words, vines that had already been grafted, already been grown in the field, already been growing the greenhouse. And at that point, it's very difficult to have any real control over the quality of the finished product. So it seemed to me like a good idea to start with the source materials that we use to graph the vines and to make sure the source materials, the root stock on the scion, are of high quality and disease, pathogen test negative and that's exactly how we start by finding the source materials for the production of grape vine plants ultimately to be planted in the vineyards.   Craig Macmillan  2:53  Obviously, if someone's going to plant, let's say hundreds of 1000s of vines, we're talking about hundreds of 1000s of cuttings. Is that right?   James Stamp  3:03  Hundreds of 1000s of vines. Well, yeah, we're talking a lot of cuttings and in generally speaking from an increased block or rootstock increase block, you might expect to get say 100 cuttings from every mother vine or every increased block vine 100 cuttings for the rootstock. And for the scion material, the Cabernet, the Viognier whatever it might be, you're probably going to get somewhere from 50 buds or 50 cuttings per vine up to maybe 500 cuttings per vine for some very vigorous clones such as maybe Pinot Noir or Cabernet, Sauvignon Blanc we sometimes see 500 cuttings per vine.   Craig Macmillan  3:40  How many samples are you taking how many pieces of wood are you taking in? What are you testing them for and how?   James Stamp  3:47  We with the advent or the discovery of Red Blotch, it became clear that the only way to produce vines that are free of Red Blotch disease is to test every plant that is used as a source of materials for that for that finished product. So if you do the math, nurseries will graft anywhere from 1.5 times, one and a half times to two times the amount of vines per finished product. So if you have an order for 10,000 vines, they might refer 20,000 vines. So we have to test enough mother vines or increase block vines which is the correct term, to provide us with 20,000 rootstock cuttings and 20,000, say Cabernet Sauvignon buds. Let's say you've got just for example, a Cab Sauvignon plant that's giving you 500 buds per vine and you want 20,000, you want 20,000 bugs, then you've got to test 40 plants to get 20,000 buds. 40 times 500 is 20,000. Depending on the size of the plant, if its is a large established plant, we want to take more cuttings per vine than if it's a smaller plant, because viruses are not evenly distributed within the mother vine or the increase block vine. So if it's a larger vine, we might take four pieces per vine. If it's a smaller vine we might take two pieces per vine. So that's roughly sort of math that's involved in deciding how many samples we take. We are taking 1000s of pieces of cutting and putting them together into samples that we then test for a range of pathogens. And generally speaking, there are roughly 15 or so, 16 pathogens that fall on our testing list. And they include all the common viruses, the leaf roll viruses, the vitiviruses, A, B, D, Red Blotch virus, Fan Leaf virus, we also test the Pierce's Disease, we also test for Agrobacterium Vits, which is the causative agent of crown gall disease, which is a bacterium. And our pathogen panel depends on really the program that we're involved with. If we're, if we're working with materials where we have a good history of testing, we might adjust the panel slightly. It also depends on the budget, if a client has a limited budget, then we will focus on viruses that we think we'll find or viruses that we have found in the past. So but generally speaking, we have a pathogen panel of roughly 15 to 16 organisms that we look for routinely.   Craig Macmillan  6:27  And in so it sounds like you're using a composite sample, like you may do a composite sample of rootstock and the comparison sample of scion.   James Stamp  6:34  Exactly, yes.   Craig Macmillan  6:36  Does that composite sample comprise a sample from every one of the vines involved?   James Stamp  6:43  Yes.   Craig Macmillan  6:44  So when I get a result back, I can be confident that all the plants that provided the rootstock or the scion are clean.   James Stamp  6:52  Well, clean is, you know, clean is a word that you will not get anybody, you know, real scientists to use. Okay, these are all virus test negative. It's, you know, it's hard to prove a negative, but the sampling that we do shows that the vines, or the pieces of tissue that we've tested are negative for the virus. And they know and we were sampling for a wide range of pathogens, but it's to say it's clean, to say it's 100% guaranteed not to have viruses. It's something that people don't do because you're it's really, it's really hard to prove a negative. But we've we're sampling, we're sampling every plant and every plant is testing negative. And therefore, we can assume that those plants do not contain the viruses that we're testing for or the pathogens that we're testing for.   Craig Macmillan  7:35  Excellent. I think that's a really important distinction to make various negative versus cleaning in quotes. So that's the so the points along the way, we've got the rootstock, we've got the scion, is there inspection, testing, investigation as we go through the grafting process and the callusing process and the greenhouse process?   James Stamp  7:53  Well, really the first, the first step in the process to produce high quality plants is to visually evaluate the scion increase blocks before you test them. So there's no point in spending a lot of money on testing plant materials that don't look good. So we go to the nurseries that we have orders with for the following year, or the year after that. We go to those nurseries and look at their scion increased blocks in October. So we look in October 2021. At the Cab 47, or the Cab 30 or the Sauvignon Blanc 01 or the Pinot Noir, you know 777, and we find contiguous rows and contiguous sets of vines that look healthy. If they look good. In other words, they don't look like the disease, they don't look like they're struggling to grow. Because if a plant is looking diseased, or looking like it's having a hard time growing, that would not be the sort of material you want to select for high quality vine production. So if we see any issues with the vines during our October walkthrough, then we do a couple of things. One, well the nursery is usually with us so the nursery will then want to check those vines and test them or remove them, test them and remove them if necessary, to see if they are virus or there's something else wrong with them. And then once we find clean vines, then we will test them. So the first thing to do is find the clean plants, and this is done in October. Test them. We tag the plants so that we make sure we put our labels on plant materials that we want to graft. And then we see those materials getting harvested and then moved into cold storage and then we're at the nursery when those materials are grafted. So that we can see that the materials we tested and viewed in October and November are now actually on the grafting bench at the nursery February and March of the following year.   Craig Macmillan  9:47  That's impressive. That is very impressive. Yeah, and I'm assuming you've had good luck with it as it sounds like you couldn't be any more fastidious.   James Stamp  9:55  You know, it was really an eye opening moment,  I think for me, when Red Blotch became a problem, as you know, it was in late 2012. And we have a lot of plant materials that we were to test for Red Blotch because the new PCR test was made available at that point in time. And it was clear that sampling increased block vines, on a sort of a random basis, sampling the plants in the nursery, the nursery vineyard that gives you the cuttings, not sampling every plant, but sampling say, even I'd say 95% level of confidence with a 5% confidence interval, you're still only sampling a very small amount of plants that are going to be used to give you the cuttings that you need. So the only way to detect the virus, which might only be present in a few plants, but if you're getting 400 cuttings from those one or two plants are infected, you're actually you know, producing a lot of virus that can be contaminated. So the only way to do it is to test every plant.   Craig Macmillan  10:53  Right. And then is there some additional quality control once they come out of the nursery for you?   James Stamp  10:59  I mean, nursery production is a very primitive craft, if you will. It's still very, very basic. It's basically putting rootstock and science together and allowing them to graft and providing good conditions for that. And what they want is they want to first of all the cuttings should be have high carbohydrate reserves. So they're strong cuttings. They actually have a good wood to pith ratio. So a small amount of pith, a good amount of wood, which represents good carbohydrate reserves. They should be grown in a way that produces cuttings that are good for grafting rather than growing these cuttings in a way that is good for fruit production. And so we want to see what's going on right from the very beginning. So I actually just gave a presentation the other day. And my first slide on the presentation says that what does every grower want? Every grower wants, or what they really want is no surprises. And that is high quality vines being available, in the right amount, on time and of good quality. Because the last thing a grower wants is to hear from a nursery when they call up and say, you know what, my 10,000 grafted vines delivered in a couple of weeks time and they say, well, we've only got 1000. So what we do, and it's really it's really it really sort of comes with the territory that if you're going to be involved in trying to produce high quality, disease test negative vines, then really in a way, it's I feel like it's on us to make sure the plants exist as well. If you will.   Craig Macmillan  12:22  So yeah, absolutely.   James Stamp  12:24  And on the one hand, we you know, we always have this provision that if we do a lot of testing and the plants are diseased at the end of the process, well, then we're not going to plant them. But we do want to make sure that the plants are available for all we can. So we keep we keep very close track on the way these vines are growing after grafting. And so we'd like to see how many plants of the 10,000, that grafted, get grafted, how many get planted up. So maybe in order for 5000 vines 10,000 get grafted, but only 7500 get grafted up. Well, that's actually a good number. But if you graft 10,000 vines, and the only plant 1000 vines up, you know, within four or five weeks of grafting that you've got a problem. And so it's part of our program is to how to solve that problem. So we need to be in touch with the nurseries right, all the time so that if there's a problem, we have time to fix it so that our clients have no surprises. And maybe they have to spend more money perhaps on testing more materials because we found virus, or it may be that the nursery had a bad take, in which case we have to graft more materials. But ultimately, we want to make sure that our clients plant the vines they want on time, and that those vines are of good quality. So what we do is work to solve problems as they develop. And you know, over the years, we haven't had very many problems. But again, I think we paid close attention to what's going on.   Craig Macmillan  13:41  And suddenly, it just occurred to me, so how many tests per 1000 or 10,000 plants when we're when we're talking about the finished product, how many samples went into, how many tests went into per per 1000, or per 10,000, or whatever?   James Stamp  13:55  You know, it's very variable. Let's say if you're, we're testing for 15 to 15, or 16 different pathogens, and we may be testing, one set of testing at least two plants for every 100 finished product. So if you've got say 1000 vines then, we're probably testing protesting 20 upfront vines, for every 1000 vines of finished, but actually 20 times, multiply that by two. So 20 rootstock and 20 scion approximately. So we're testing roughly 40 plants for every 1000 finished plants. Those 40 plants are being tested for, say 16 pathogens. So it's 40 times 60. If you do that multiple it's you know, 3200 or something like that, or whatever it is. That's a rough idea.   Craig Macmillan  14:44  Of actual individual samples, test. I'm gonna pay so much per test, it's going to be 1000s of tests?   James Stamp  14:52  Yeah, I mean, we test 1000s of samples.   Craig Macmillan  14:55  I guess. Wow.   James Stamp  14:56  We have a pretty large business. I think we were probably the The largest business of its kind that does this type of work, I think. Probably anywhere in the world, I guess. And, you know, it involves a lot, it's a lot, it's a lot of work, especially when you're dealing with a biological system like this, which is open to all sorts of climates and you know, biological impact. You know, drought one year can have a, some sort of weird impact the next year. So just like, you know, getting your fruit every year when you're growing your grapevines is difficult, convoluted, it's based on many different parameters. It's the same thing with producing grafted vines. A lot of different parameters affect the look of the finished product. In fact, this year, we looked at a bunch of dormant routings, and they were really super high quality this year did very, very nice, dormant routings this year with just very good internal approach. So not only is the virus testing and the pathogen testing, we've talked about, the other side of what we do is physical quality. We're involved in selecting the best plants that come through the propagation cycle. So for example, if you grafted 10,000 vines, you have an order for 5000 vines, you have 7500 vines that make it through to the finished product line. Well, we want to select the best 5000 of those 7500. And that involves having a good understanding of the parameters that are involved with a grapevine finished product, which include things like does it have a good root system? Does it have a properly healed graft union? Are the wounds on the rootstock shaft properly healed? Do you have good caliper? Do you have good lignification of the shoot spur? And all those, those different facets of the finished product are related to the pathogenic load of the vine when you start off. So if you if you're starting from materials that have high levels of fungal pathogens, and fungal pathogens are everywhere, in the nursery production cycle. And so the way to ensure you have best product is just is to select pathogens that have very good, that have demonstrated very, very good wound healing. Because those vines won't heal their wounds properly, they won't have good graft wounds, they won't have good root systems. They will have rootstock shaft disbudding sites that are not calloused over, they will have lesions running down from the graft union and running up from the base of the plant if they'd been developed or propagated from poor quality plant material. So the physical quality of the vine and vine and the pathogen status of the virus sort of closely interwoven.   Craig Macmillan  17:28  So this involves looking at every single vine?   James Stamp  17:31  No, actually it involves, what we do is we we sample every increase block vine that is used to produce the vine. And then we look at the finished product by sampling the finished product in terms of its physical evaluation. And I've been doing this, I mean, I started doing this in 1999. And in 1999, I looked at 1000s and 1000s and 1000s of finished product. And you know, you look at finished product, and you just like anything else, you really get to know what finished product looks like looks like. You get to know, you know what a batch of plants looks like. You know, you get to know how many vines you need to look at, to know in other words, to feel comfortable that you're looking, that what you're looking at is representative of the rest of it. And so you use that information, that experience to help you to determine how to evaluate finished product.   Craig Macmillan  18:19  And so regarding, actually regarding methodology, it sounds to me like you have a fairly set methodology that you have tested over using years and years. And there's a quantification component to this as well. So you can say we found this percentage of this as opposed to that, as opposed to that.   James Stamp  18:36  That's exactly right. Yeah. So I think if you would, I mean, you know, things have changed. And we today, we don't get to look at much finished product that we haven't been involved with, right from the very beginning. But sometimes we do and it's always interesting to do that. Because I mean, obviously there's different types of finished product, the potted plants, and then there are dormant bareroot, finish plants. Any any batch of vines that get delivered are going to have some type of defect. The question is, what are those defects and what proportion of the finished product has those defects. So for example, if it's if it's a if it's a severe problem, we'll cancel the order. If it's if it's a severe problem, but in a very small amount of plants, and we know how to identify that problem, then we can have the nursery go back and grade out the bad vines, or we can grade out the bad vines ourselves and take the good vines and get rid of the bad vines. Or we can advise our clients who maybe are buying vines from a nursery I will tell them well this is how you identify the problem in these vines by doing this type of physical manipulation of the plant. It'll tell you what's right or what's wrong with it. But generally speaking, our plants when they've been through our program are very high physical quality with a very small amount of defects or zero defects. Obviously, there's always gonna be some defects. And you really are the final line of defense is the guy who's planting the vine. But our goal is to to sell to our clients vines, the pathogen test negative or very high quality, where there will be no rejects or planting time.   Craig Macmillan  20:07  So let's move into the field. So you also conducted valuations of newly planted and established vineyards for their performance, presumably in the face of pathogen load. How do you conduct these kinds of evaluations? What kind of methodology do you use?   James Stamp  20:22  I have to say, I don't do we don't do this, as much as we used to do this was a much bigger part of our portfolio maybe 10, 15 years ago than it is now. And we used to get called out to look at vines, vineyards that have been recently planted. And say, you know, it's a two year old vineyard, and a three year old vineyard. What do we try to do is to, you know, it's important to look at the venue and at the right time of the year. If it's potentially a virus problem, then you want to look at that vineyard in October, when you can see symptoms of virus, they may be well apparent. But the first thing to do is to try and if there's a problem in a vineyard, maybe it's just performing improperly. Is to try and link any visual performance issues with any particular physical attributes that the plant might have, or they may be associated with the site. Simply put, if you've got vines that are growing properly, than those vines that aren't grown properly, have bad graft unions, or have they been planted improperly. And they've got a J rooted root system. I tried to look at the vineyard and say split into say, three into three categories: good vine performance, bad pine vine performance, and say intermediate vine performance. And trying to correlate those different types of wind performance with either a site issue which might be a soil, irrigation, utilization, fungal pathogens, weeds. And then also compare that with just the vine itself. And this oftentimes involves sacrificing vines, but taking, digging that vine up and looking at the root system, looking at the grafting. And it's actually very easy to tell by looking at vines, whether or not the issue that you're seeing is a result of the vine being imperfect at the time of planting, or whether it's more like you know, whether it's related to the way it was planted or where it was planted.   Craig Macmillan  22:09  That is really, really fascinating. We've kind of run out of our time here, I want to thank you again, James Stamp, Stamp Associates, Viticulture Inc,. There's obviously a lot of work to continue to do. And the work that you folks are doing is wonderful. And I hope that more people will start thinking along the same lines, at the very least I hope the philosophy spreads. Is there one thing you would recommend to our listeners?   James Stamp  22:32  Yeah, I think what's it's a, it's a big one thing with with sub parts. It really is to pay attention to where your plant materials coming from. To have a really good communication with the nursery. If nothing else, sample the finished finished product for Red Blotch and Leaf Roll Three, which are the two viruses that have the biggest impact on vine performance. And the two viruses that are very easily vectored in the industry.   Craig Macmillan  22:59  That's great. Where can we find out more about you?   James Stamp  23:02  We have a website, the website is JamesStamp.net. There's all our, that we have. We've written a bunch of articles about what we do. We give presentations fairly frequently. And so some of that information is on there. And we have a website and of course, phone number, email, of course all that's there.   Craig Macmillan  23:20  Perfect. Fantastic. Well, I want to thank you again, James, and I want to thank our listeners for listening to Sustainable Winegrowing with the new team. Again, my name is Craig Mcmillan, your host and we look forward to having you download us again.   Transcribed by https://otter.ai

M觀點 | 科技X商業X投資
【MiuLive】#207 防疫保單輸不起、網飛對抗覺醒病毒、遊戲也要政治正確?

M觀點 | 科技X商業X投資

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 73:53


全方位股票分析法:基本 x 籌碼 x 技術應用 課程介紹: https://bit.ly/3PFE2k7 優惠碼 (miula100) 領取: https://bit.ly/3NpwjVl 優惠日期到 5/23 --- Topics - 防疫保單輸不起、網飛對抗覺醒病毒、遊戲也要政治正確? --- M觀點資訊 --- 科技巨頭解碼 - https://bit.ly/2XupBZa M觀點 Telegram - https://t.me/miulaviewpoint M觀點 IG - https://www.instagram.com/miulaviewpoint/ M觀點Podcast - https://bit.ly/34fV7so M報 - https://bit.ly/345gBbA M觀點YouTube頻道訂閱 - https://bit.ly/2nxHnp9 M觀點粉絲團 - https://www.facebook.com/miulaperspective/ 任何合作邀約請洽 miula@outlook.com

Chewing the Fat with Jeff Fisher
Ep 875 | It Was On Purpose…

Chewing the Fat with Jeff Fisher

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 41:10


Candy recalls...  New staircase in NYC on time and under budget…  Do we care more about Depp-Heard trial?  Harrison Ford & Helen Mirren in new series by Taylor Sheridan…  Product placement could take over shows…  Disney ad supported tier won't allow some clients…  Facebook claims I violated “community standards”  Subscribe to the YouTube Channel…  Subscribe www.blazetv.com/jeffy / Promo code jeffy…  Email Chewingthefat@theblaze.com  Headlines: FDA clears Booster for kids / More “free” PCR tests from government available / New variant undetected by PCR tests / Gas prices up / Mastercard begins facial recognition / Chinese plane crash in March was not technical failure…  Who Died Today: Maggie Peterson-81… Stranger Things Store coming to Dallas… Dinosaur bones at a record price… Jurassic World / Park / number six Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

有話好說
+8萬確診41死 長者超額死亡!醫療量能警訊?(2022/05/18)

有話好說

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 23:04


Barbarian Noetics with Conan Tanner
Exposing the Medical Cartel and Asking Forbidden Questions

Barbarian Noetics with Conan Tanner

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 102:07


What's up to my demagogic drum fish and disputatious dunkers!   Welcome back to the BNP everyone and thank you for joining! To my patrons, you all are the spiral arms of my galaxy and the selenium in my brazil nuts- you are appreciated! Well friends, hold onto your butts, because this one's a doozy. In addition to the audio tidbits you know and love, I dive into some heady and provocative topics this week. In weeks past I've discussed a concept I refer to as "The Adversary," or the spirit of negative disruption and darkness that causes unnecessary suffering here on Earth. This week I was moved to dive into one particular aspect of this Adversary: the International Biomedical Cartel. Science only operates cleanly when there is room for dissenting opinions and troublesome hypotheses. When you are no longer allowed to question certain scientific dogmas, then it becomes a kind of religion. Hence we see the rise of Scientism and its attendant high priests' rule by fiat, selective funding and intimidation of dissent to preserve the hegemony of the establishment plunderbund.Featured in this week's episode is an interview with Kary Mullis, published in Spin magazine in July of 1994 and conducted by Celia Farber. Mullis won a Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1993 for the invention of the PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) test. He became a controversial figure for refusing to stop asking pesky questions of Fauci, Gallo, and the medical establishment. Finally, I explore the potential links between the meteoric rise of peanut allergies and the use of peanut oil as an "excipient," (or adjuvant) in inoculations. Adjuvants are ingredients added to shots which compel a more intense immune response by the body. Aluminum is another commonly utilized adjuvant. Help keep the BNP on the air by becoming a patron at www.patreon.com/noetics. For as little as $1/month, you become a partner in the BNP. Help make the magic happen (and help me to afford groceries!) You also receive a dream interpretation and an original haiku when you sign up.  Let's elevate the human spirit y'all!You can also make a small one-time donation at: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/noeticsThank you so much for the support! Thank you for spreading the word and telling a friend about the BNP! Follow the BNP on IG @barbarian_noeticsEmail: barbarian.noetics@gmail.comUntil next week everyone, Be excellent to one another,and kind and loving towards yourself. One Love,Little Raven kaaaawwwwTRACKLIST FOR THIS EPISODE CSPAN Washington Journal Theme MusicRemix Maniacs - Presidential Theme Song (Trap Remix)Dykotomi - Corvid CrunkNoir Deco - Future NoirKainbeats - Atlantis (Lo Fi Mix)Soulection Radio #548 (Hi-Tek & Talib Kwali Edit)Suicide Boys x Pouya - Runnin Thru The 7th With My WoadiesKainbeats - Finding Beauty (Lo Fi Mix)idunnomane - anyways 3001Max Romeo - War Ina BabylonDillon Witherow - Before Sunrise (Lo Fi Mix)Show Dem Camp feat. Buju - Do Me Nice Edvard Grieg - Hall Of The Mountain King (Deficio Remix)The Village People - Macho Man, In The NavyLINKSInterview with Kary Mullis (Spin Magazine, July 1994)https://thedoctorwithin.com/vaccines-and-the-peanut-allergy-epidemic/ Support the show

Coronacast
The BIG COVID challenge facing Australia's next government

Coronacast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 10:47


We are only days away from the 2022 Federal Election, where we'll find out who'll be leading the country for the next few years. But for whoever wins, there's the huge reality of dealing with and managing the ongoing COVID pandemic, which is still killing an average of 40 Australians a day. COVID policy and response hasn't featured much during the election campaign. So on today's Coronacast, what COVID issues will face whoever wins office next? Also on today's show: * Our daughter tested positive on a RAT. We had a PCR test the same day and it came back negative. So we tested again via a RAT and it was positive again. Does this mean the PCR test wasn't done properly? * I have been diagnosed with COVID twice this year. Is this the future, COVID every 4 or 5 months?

有話好說
醫療量能緊繃 民眾就醫指南!電話視訊看診 長者及時給藥 疫情高峰自救救人!(2022/05/17)

有話好說

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 56:01


Liberty Tree
Burning Your [CENSORED] to Stay Warm (and Not Racist)

Liberty Tree

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 84:37


Kelly and Matt talk about how to red-pill your friends, how to hook your toilet to your power meter, and how to differentiate between good turns of history and total socialist domination of the world.  Also, we clarify what exactly is white supremacy (according to Wikipedia). Check out the full interview with Kary Mullis talking about AIDS the inventor of the PCR test https://youtu.be/W1FXbxDrDrY As always check out our website for the best schwas and coffee mugs your money can still buy at libertytreelifestyle.com

辣新聞152
【辣新聞152】2022.05.16 防疫越差聲量越高!?雙北放爛!? 藍營內鬥中!?朱立倫無力整合!?

辣新聞152

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 97:24


有話好說
明起「 0+7 」打 3 劑免居隔!轉院爭議? 2 歲童死亡!給藥保守?快篩陽放寬!(2022/05/16)

有話好說

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 56:00


台灣向前行
【台灣向前行】2022.05.14 免戳鼻苦 唾液快篩今開賣!沒有"類清冠一號"這藥 別上當!柯:保險公司慘了 幸災樂禍?藍民調稱5成民意不滿防疫 以為撿到槍?朝鮮防疫破功 也學中國清零?

台灣向前行

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 95:46


Charlottesville Community Engagement
May 13, 2022: Several vacancies coming up on Charlottesville Planning Commission as city prepares to rewrite zoning code; One million Americans have died of COVID

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 15:22


Welcome to the only Friday the 13th of all of 2022! Many consider the day to be unlucky, a tradition that goes back many centuries. Rather than go through all of that, I’m more curious to know what you think of this day. Do you take precautions? Did you even notice? Do other days in a Friday the 13th’d month also have powers? In any case, those questions aren’t the purpose of Charlottesville Community Engagement, a podcast and newsletter whose host still wonders why. Charlottesville Community Engagement is mostly free but your financial support will help it growing! On today’s program:Governor Youngkin orders flags at half-mast to commemorate one million Americans who have died from COVIDThere are five vacancies on the Charlottesville Planning Commission, and the city is seeking applicantsAn update on the city’s zoning process as well as an update a lawsuit claiming the Comprehensive Plan is invalid under state lawAnd a quick preview of a conversation between the Reverend Alex Joyner and the author of a book on Virginia’s eugenics movement Shout-out to Charlottesville Area Tree Stewards In today’s subscriber-supported Public Service Announcement, the Charlottesville Area Tree Stewards continues to offer classes this spring and summer to increase your awareness of our wooden neighbors and to prepare for the future. Coming up on June 7 is a tree identification course taught on Zoom by tree steward Elizabeth Ferguson followed by a separate hike on June 11 at the Department of Forestry’s headquarters near the Fontaine Research Park. That’s followed by a tree identification walk at the University of Virginia on June 12 for the public. On June 14, Rachel Keen will give a lecture on Zoom on the Social Life of Trees. Do trees really communicate with one another? What is a 'mother tree'? Can a tree do anything to repel a pest? Learn more at charlottesvilleareatreestewards.org.One million Americans have died of COVID since pandemic beganGovernor Glenn Youngkin has followed the direction of President Joe Biden and has ordered that the United States and Virginia flags be flown at half-mast until Monday to commemorate the milestone of a million Americans who have now died of COVID in the past 26 months. I’ll have more on the pandemic tomorrow.On Thursday, the Virginia Department of Health reported another 3,144 new cases, and the seven-day average for new cases is 2,441. The seven-day percentage for PCR tests is 13.7 percent, up from 11 percent on May 6 and 9.1 percent on April 29. None of those numbers include tests taken at home. This morning the Virginia Healthcare and Hospital Association reports 325 people in hospitals are currently COVID positive, but many of those patients may have been admitted for other reasons. Forty-five COVID patients are currently hospitalized in intensive care units and 20 of those are on ventilators. Nationwide, the trend is toward more cases with 84,778 new cases reported through PCR tests according to data collected by the Centers for Disease Control. Hospitalizations are also trending upward across the country with a seven-day average of 2,603 new admissions a day. It’s important to remember that the number of COVID fatalities continues to trend downward with a current seven-day average of 272 deaths. The highest seven-day average during the pandemic was 3,420 in mid January of 2021 and 2,709 in early February of this year. Charlottesville hires two department headsThe City of Charlottesville has promoted two employees to take over their departments, and has also filled the position of Human Resources Director. Mary Ann Hardie will move to Charlottesville from Washington state to take the human resources position, which has been vacant since November 2020 when Michelle Vineyard left after just over a year of service. Hardie has served for the past three years as human resources director in Lacey, Washington. That’s a suburb of state capital Olympia that grew from 42,393 people to 53,526 from 2010 to 2020 according to the U.S. Census.Hardie starts work on May 16.Misty Graves has been with the city of Charlottesville’s Human Services Department for 16 years and has been the interim director since Kaki Dimock left the city to work for Albemarle County. “I am humbled by the opportunity to build on the existing work of the Department," is quoted in a press release. "Our Department is comprised of dedicated staff that are committed to creating a more equitable and just community so all of our residents may thrive, and it’s my honor to work alongside them.”David Dillehunt has been the interim deputy director of the Office of Communications and Public Engagement since soon after former director Brian Wheeler stepped down late last year. Deputy Director Joe Rice left soon afterwards. Dillehunt began working for Charlottesville in 2005 as a consultant has won two Regional Emmy Awards for work he’s produced for the city. In 2004, Dillehunt also produced a documentary on the children’s program You Can’t Do That On Television. (play the trailer) The city is still looking to fill the director’s position for the Office of Communications and Public Engagement. The position closes May 18 if you want to throw your hat in the ring. (see the vacancy)Vacancies opening up on Charlottesville Planning CommissionIf you have an interest in advising Charlottesville City Council on land use decisions, and have time to devote to the effort, you may get your chance. “There are spots on the Planning Commission that are coming open this summer,” said Missy Creasy, the Deputy Director of the city’s Department of Neighborhood Development Services. “And right now we are in the window for applications.” There are five terms ending this summer, and at least two current members cannot reapply. They are Jody Lahendro and Taneia Dowell. Commissioner Karim Habbab is filling an unexpired term which runs out on August 31. The terms of Hosea Mitchell and Rory Stolzenberg are both running out on that day. Stolzenberg is also filling out the unexpired term vacated when Hunter Smith resigned in 2018 after a handful of months in the position. Apply for the position here.Charlottesville zoning info slightly delayed Work on the next phase of the rewriting of Charlottesville’s zoning ordinance continues, but it’s slightly delayed. Neighborhood Development Services Director James Freas told the Planning Commission Tuesday that a “diagnostic and approach” report was not ready in time for their May meeting, but he hopes it will be out by the end of this month. (previous coverage)“As this point we are anticipating that the joint meeting between the Council and the Planning Commission to eventually make a decision on moving forward with that report, we’re projecting that happening in September at this point in time,” Freas said. Freas is now referring to this report as a conceptual plan for the new zoning ordinance. “It’s going to lay out what the approach is towards bringing our zoning into consistency with our Comprehensive Plan and its meant to include within it both modeling of potential building outcomes, so what type of buildings might be buildable under the policies articulated in the Comprehensive Plan, and how the market might respond to this new zoning,” Freas said. Freas said a public meeting will be held two weeks after the report with other community engagement events happening over the summer. The new Comprehensive Plan was adopted in November 2021. Consult Information Charlottesville for a series of property transactions in city limits since then. That joint City Council and Planning Commission meeting in September will be after a pair of judicial proceedings related to a lawsuit filed by anonymous Charlottesville property owners challenging the validity of the Comprehensive Plan. A hearing on the initial motion will be held in Charlottesville Circuit Court on July 15 with Judge Richard E. Moore presiding. A hearing on a city-filed demurrer to require the plaintiffs to identify themselves will be held on August 26. Alderman Library construction reaches milestoneThe tallest portions of the new Alderman Library have been installed, and the University of Virginia marked the occasion with a “topping out” ceremony. UVA Today reports that over a hundred workers were on hand to witness the placement of two steel beams that had been signed by UVA officials and more. “The two beams are part of the steel-framed clerestory roof structure, an architectural feature that will allow natural light to reach the study and reading rooms inside the library,” writes Matt Kelly in an article posted yesterday. The library itself is only two thirds of the way to being completed. When it’s done, there will be a new entrance that faces University Avenue. Bill Palmer is with the UVA Office of the Architect and he gave an update to the Charlottesville Planning Commission on Tuesday. “That’s a big milestone of a transformative project over there that will really open up the library towards University Avenue as you’re going up and down that thoroughfare,” Palmer said. The original library opened in 1937, but was closed off to University Avenue in 1967 when the “stacks” were built. I’ll have more from the Planning Commission in a future edition of Charlottesville Community Engagement. In today’s other three shout-outsCode for Charlottesville is seeking volunteers with tech, data, design, and research skills to work on community service projects. Founded in September 2019, Code for Charlottesville has worked on projects with the Legal Aid Justice Center, the Charlottesville Fire Department, and the Charlottesville Office of Human Rights. Visit codeforcville.org to learn about those projects. In the middle, I’d like to take the opportunity to wish my brother, Steve Tubbs, a happy birthday for tomorrow. The final comes from another Patreon supporter who wants you to go out and read a local news story written by a local journalist. Whether it be the Daily Progress, Charlottesville Tomorrow, C-Ville Weekly, NBC29, CBS19, WINA, or some other place I’ve not mentioned - the community depends on a network of people writing about the community. Go learn about this place today!Eugenics and the Making of Modern VirginiaThe newsletter and podcast you’re experiencing stems from a website I created in 2005 to bring lectures, interviews, and audio segments to the public as an experiment. The Charlottesville Podcasting Network has been in the hands of my friend Dan Gould for several years, but he recently retired and passed the baton back to me. From time to time, I’ll end this newsletter with a small taste of what you might hear there. The Reverend Alex Joyner is the pastor of Charlottesville First United Methodist Church, and he wants to ask questions about what it takes to make a place more whole. One thread in his questioning is the future of Market Street Park in downtown Charlottesville. In February, he interviewed Elizabeth Catte, the author of Pure America: Eugenics and the Making of Modern Virginia. Catte said she wrote the book after learning about some of the history of Western State Hospital. After the original structure closed in 2005, the site was turned over to the Staunton Industrial Authority for redevelopment as apartments. At one point, the facility was known bluntly as the Western State Lunatic Asylum. “Its history became part of its branding identity and that was a really interesting transformation to me,” Catte said.“Yeah, that’s a long stretch to pull those two things together,” Joyner said. “So 200 years of history had to get condensed into something that could be about two paragraphs on a website and could also be anchored to branding material for tourism, for community development, so it developed this really cozy kind of positive story about early physicians who committed themselves to the humane treatment of mental illnesses,” Catte said. “That was certainly one of the chapters of that sites’ history but the larger chapter that I knew as a historian was the history of the institution during the eugenics era.”Eugenics was the legal practice of sterilizing those thought to be inferior so they would not reproduce. The 1927 United States Supreme Court ruling of Buck v. Bell cleared the way for the practice, with Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes delivering the line “three generations of imbeciles is enough.” The practice was legal until the 1970’s.“At least 1,700 people were sterilized against their will at Western State Hospital,” Catte said. “The longest serving superintendent was a vocal leader of the Virginia eugenics movement and it has a very harrowing history.”To hear more from Alex Joyner’s interview with Elizabeth Catte, visit the Charlottesville Podcasting Network.Or view the interview on YouTube. Help Ting help support Town Crier productions!For one year now, Town Crier Productions has had a promotional offering through Ting!Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Awakening
#157 The Attorney fighting the Plandemic from the Start - Tom Renz

Awakening

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 60:16


Freedom International Livestream On May 5, 2022 ( Grace to 16min 41 sec / Roy to 37 min 39 sec/ Jayne to 1 hr) Guest: Atty. Tom Renz Bio: Attorney Thomas Renz is the lead Attorney in several major cases brought in Ohio, New Mexico, Maine, and Nationally against the CDC, DHHS, Biden & Fauci, regarding forced vaccine mandates, big tech censorship, the COVID-19 lockdowns, hospital murders, mask mandates, business closures, false PCR data, fraudulent death numbers and more. Attorney Thomas Renz works with and represents America's Frontline Doctors, & Make Americans Free Again . If you would like to see Fauci Fired go to Renz website and sign The Renz Letter; www.Renz-Law.com What we Discussed: - The Evil Yuval Noah Harari - The Gene Therapy Poisoned Dart - The Pfizer's Lie - The Court Cases and Current Wins - Why is this taking so long - The Government having 5 Lawyers and 10/15 listening - The Support Tom Gets - Scott Shara's case who's daughter grace was murdered in the hospital - Why this is an International Event - Tom's journey and study of Medical health - Finding the Documentation that show its like a Bad Flu - Health Care Professionals are Regulated to keep them quite and more ===================== Interview Panel Grace Asagra, RN MA Podcast: Quantum Nurse: Out of the Rabbit Hole from Stress www.quantumnurse.life Dr. Jayne Marquis, ND Podcast: INpowered https://linktr.ee/INpoweredhealth Roy Coughlan Podcast: AWAKENING https://www.awakeningpodcast.org/ ============================ More about Awakening: All Podcasts and Social Media https://bio.link/podcaster https://awakeningpodcast.org/ Video https://www.bitchute.com/channel/y2XWI0VCPVqX/

Ta de Clinicagem
Episódio 137 - TdC Lab - PCR, VHS e Procalcitonina

Ta de Clinicagem

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 49:25


Curso TdC de Pronto Atendimento - Inscrições abertas: https://cursotdc.com.br/pagina-de-vendas/ Cupom desconto: TDC300 Nesse episódio, Fred, Iago e Ênio debatem sobre as principais evidências (e da falta delas) para o uso da VHS, PCR e Procalcitonina! Referências: Dima A, Opris D, Jurcut C, Baicus C. Is there still a place for erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein in systemic lupus erythematosus?. Lupus. 2016 Oct;25(11):1173-9. Brigden ML. Clinical utility of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. American family physician. 1999 Oct 1;60(5):1443-50. Bray C, Bell LN, Liang H, Haykal R, Kaiksow F, Mazza JJ, Yale SH. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein measurements and their relevance in clinical medicine. Wmj. 2016 Dec;115(6):317-21. Jurado RL. Why shouldn't we determine the erythrocyte sedimentation rate?. Clinical infectious diseases. 2001 Aug 15;33(4):548-9. Malcolm Brigden MD (1998) The erythrocyte sedimentation rate, Postgraduate Medicine, 103:5, 257-274 Watson J, Jones HE, Banks J, Whiting P, Salisbury C, Hamilton W. Use of multiple inflammatory marker tests in primary care: using Clinical Practice Research Datalink to evaluate accuracy. British journal of general practice. 2019 Jul 1;69(684):e462-9. Batlivala SP. Focus on DiagnosisThe Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate and the C-reactive Protein Test. Pediatrics in Review. 2009 Feb 1;30(2):72-4. Acute phase reactantes. Acesso em uptodate.com Boere, Tjarda M., et al. "Effect of C reactive protein point-of-care testing on antibiotic prescribing for lower respiratory tract infections in nursing home residents: cluster randomised controlled trial." bmj 374 (2021). Santonocito, Cristina, et al. "C-reactive protein kinetics after major surgery." Anesthesia & Analgesia 119.3 (2014): 624-629. Cals, Jochen WL, et al. "Effect of point of care testing for C reactive protein and training in communication skills on antibiotic use in lower respiratory tract infections: cluster randomised trial." Bmj 338 (2009). Butler, Christopher C., et al. "C-reactive protein testing to guide antibiotic prescribing for COPD exacerbations." New England Journal of Medicine 381.2 (2019): 111-120. Llor, Carl, et al. "Efficacy of antibiotic therapy for acute exacerbations of mild to moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease." American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine 186.8 (2012): 716-723. Straatman, Jennifer, et al. "Predictive value of C-reactive protein for major complications after major abdominal surgery: a systematic review and pooled-analysis." PloS one 10.7 (2015): e0132995. Plat, Victor D., et al. "C-reactive protein after major abdominal surgery in daily practice." Surgery 170.4 (2021): 1131-1139. Kang, Byung-Uk, et al. "Surgical site infection in spinal surgery: detection and management based on serial C-reactive protein measurements." Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine 13.2 (2010): 158-164. Andreeva, Elena, and Hasse Melbye. "Usefulness of C-reactive protein testing in acute cough/respiratory tract infection: an open cluster-randomized clinical trial with C-reactive protein testing in the intervention group." BMC family practice 15.1 (2014): 1-9. Prins, H. J., et al. "CRP-guided antibiotic treatment in acute exacerbations of COPD in hospital admissions." European Respiratory Journal 53.5 (2019).

有話好說
本土+5.7萬!第一線醫護現況!重症難控 專責病房苦撐?超額死亡 各縣市危機?(2022/05/11)

有話好說

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 56:00


有話好說
本土確診數破5萬 醫療現況與困境?誰是高風險者?及時用藥標準?致死率如何壓低?(2022/05/10)

有話好說

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 56:01


Aquadocs
59. FishTracker: The Kids Are On The Case

Aquadocs

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 24:49


FishTracker is a student-oriented citizen science project based at Cornell University that records and maps the presence of several species of fish, both endangered and invasive, in New York State. What is awesome about this program is that K-12 students and teachers from New York collect environmental DNA (eDNA) from water samples and send these samples to Cornell for analysis. FishTracker team members then use quantitative PCR to analyze these samples and incorporate their findings into a fish species database and send their results back to the classrooms. This is an incredible program so tune in to learn more and be amazed at ways you can involve young children into important scientific endeavors. Want to get involved, check out their website: https://fishtracker.vet.cornell.edu/. Thank you to the Cornell University Serve in Place Fund for supporting this episode.

中廣流行網
2022.05.10【蘭萱時間】

中廣流行網

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 44:07


*梅雨季首波滯留鋒周五報到 各地慎防致災性豪雨 *全台悶熱高溫32度、午後有陣雨 週五東北風增強北台灣轉涼 *陳時中估5/20進入疫情高峰「連燒22天」鬆口「7月可解封口罩」 *5月底至6月初高峰期 要備專責病房 *5/9本土4萬263例 增12人死亡、中重症71例 *8個月大女嬰染疫搶救中 今年以來年紀最小重症 *今增12死創新高 英媒警告「台灣未超前部署」陳時中回應了 *陳建仁坦言「快篩試劑政府準備不足」新台灣模式有效全民沒封城 *民眾湧急診PCR危及醫療量能 陳時中:一週內會廣設篩檢站 *陳時中稱快篩各縣巿都有庫存 鄭文燦傻眼:哪來剩餘 *快篩劑買不到 莊人祥:520之前全台每戶可有一盒 *海外寄回快篩試劑擬免申請 食藥署:一週內有結果 *27萬人份抗病毒口服藥已分送267家藥局、醫院 羅一鈞:已簡化用藥流程 *本土新冠疫情 指揮中心:7月中旬後 降至第四類法定傳染病 *東京都9日新增3011例確診病例 較上週一增加約600例 *泰國9日宣佈新增6488個確診案例及55人死亡 *南韓新增逾2萬宗確診 再多40名患者離世 *〈美股盤後〉道瓊下殺逾650點 標普失守4000點大關 *落漆 俄羅斯勝利日閱兵 空中表演受天氣影響取消 *烏東學校遇俄軍空襲 澤倫斯基證實:校內60人全數喪命 *俄勝利日閱兵 普丁定調對烏行動為「剷除納粹」 *上海封城、通膨升息 恐衝擊科學園區 *中國封城衝擊港口 4月出口跌至2020以來低點 *亞特蘭大Fed總裁:目前可升息2碼兩到三次 再評估是否進一步升息 *美元避險魅力更勝一籌 黃金期貨下跌 延續周線頹勢 *防俄羅斯突斷供天然氣 知情人士:德國擬訂應急方案 *G7矢言斷開俄油 美加碼制裁俄工業銀行 *沙烏地阿拉伯降價 中國出口成長大縮水 原油跌近6% *台積電ADR重摔4.7% 隨費半大跌 *台積電防英特爾搶單 3奈米菁英部隊轉戰1.4奈米開發 *數週抗議活動壓力下 斯里蘭卡總理今辭職

有話好說
+4 萬 263 例 12 死!台灣疫情高峰?還是「 高原曲線 」?醫療量能吃緊 快篩與抗病毒藥須知!(2022/05/09)

有話好說

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 56:01


中廣流行網
2022.05.09【蘭萱時間】

中廣流行網

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 43:24


*變天注意 首波梅雨滯留鋒要來了 全台4天防雨彈 *5/8本土4萬4294例 增12死、中重症118人 *台灣單日確診數「亞洲第一」 網嘆:國外收尾、我們準備高峰 *全球至少625萬1180人病逝 至少5億1727萬4588人確診 *日本各地疫情升溫 東京新增病例連兩天高於上週 *南韓口罩鬆綁驚現「報復性出遊」 單日確診仍有4萬 *澳洲紐西蘭Omicron亞變種入侵 疫情恐升溫 *中國疫情處處復燃 吉林才清零又要全員測核酸 *上海爆「一人陽性、全樓轉運」 強制送進方艙畫面曝 *居家隔離對象放寬 8日起僅匡列同住親友 同學、同事免隔離 *四大超商、全聯、藥妝店開賣亞培快篩劑 售價曝光 *居家照護配套不足 確診28萬送藥不到2千份 *確診請假等嘸通知書 勞動部:健保APP、電子居隔單可作為證明 *「快篩陽性=確診」12日上路 3種人免出門PCR *急診給需要的人 金管會籲別急開證明 *俄羅斯9日慶祝二戰勝利日 普丁演說成原油價漲跌關鍵 *〈美股盤後〉非農續強美股憂鬱 道瓊周線連六黑 *G7宣布將逐步減少或禁止進口俄石油 *保加利亞要求更多時間因應 否則不支持對俄石油禁運 *俄稱摧毀美援武器與軍備 炸毀烏東6彈藥庫1戰機 *G7領袖和澤倫斯基通話前夕 英國加碼16億美元軍援 *美烏第一夫人「烏克蘭會面」 加拿大總理杜魯多也來了 *李家超任香港新特首 僅8票不同意

Sol Luckman Uncensored
Beyond THE VIRAL DELUSION: Director Mike Wallach on Mystery, Mind & Manifestation

Sol Luckman Uncensored

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 84:59


Welcome to Conversations on Sol Luckman Uncensored, sponsored by Snooze2Awaken.com, Resources for Lucidity. For more information about my work, including a lot of cutting-edge free content, check out www.CrowRising.com. I'm also on Telegram, where I'm sharing daily truth bombs at https://t.me/solluckman, and I've just created my own Substack at https://solluckman.substack.com. If you appreciate what I'm doing here in interviewing some of the greatest minds and hearts in the Conscious Resistance, please take a second to subscribe to my channel and give this video some love energy exchange. Today, I have the real pleasure of sharing my recent interview with a next-level force of nature in the whole-truth (as opposed to the half-truth) movement: Mike Wallach, one of the creators of the extraordinary new documentary the VIRAL DELUSION (affiliate link: https://paradigmshift.uscreen.io/?via=regenetics). If you watch one documentary in 2022, please make it THE VIRAL DELUSION. Both skeptics of and believers in germ theory seriously need to watch and digest the game-changing information presented in this film. Aptly subtitled “The Tragic Pseudoscience of SARS-CoV-2 & the Madness of Modern Virology,” this must-see tour de force for science truth features a who's who of distinguished researchers, doctors and informed journalists dissecting the “scientific” papers put forward to justify the wholly fabricated atrocity known as COVID-19. Every single major claim is minutely examined and thoroughly debunked: “isolation” of the so-called virus, its alleged genetic sequencing, fraudulent PCR “tests,” “variants” of the imaginary cause of “COVID” that exist only as a computer simulation. The upshot of this deep journey through the rabbit hole of rabbit holes, one many are so brainwashed by the lies of virology they dare not face, is that SARS-CoV-2 is purely a simulacrum of a virus with no actual physical reality. Moreover, as the documentary painstakingly makes clear, the same appears true for other famous “viruses”—from polio to smallpox. Show Links: Sneak Peak: THE VIRAL DELUSION w/ Dr. Sam Bailey https://odysee.com/@drsambailey:c/sneak-peak-the-viral-delusion:f URGENTLY NEEDED: Truthers to Wake up Half-truthers Capable of Disseminating This Paramount COVID Truth https://snooze2awaken.com/2021/02/21/urgently-needed-truthers-to-wake-up-half-truthers-capable-of-disseminating-this-paramount-covid-truth The Famous 1895 Eighth-grade Test from Kansas https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/answer-sheet/wp/2015/10/16/heres-the-famous-1895-eighth-grade-test-from-kansas-see-how-you-would-do Complete Works of Neville Goddard https://amzn.to/3ydH6xo (affiliate link) CALI THE DESTROYER (new audiobook) https://www.audible.com/pd/Cali-the-Destroyer-Audiobook/B09WZ5VWY8?source_code=AUDFPWS0223189MWT-BK-ACX0-303380&ref=acx_bty_BK_ACX0_303380_rh_us SNOOZE: A STORY OF AWAKENING https://amzn.to/383rDFx (affiliate link) POTENTIATE YOUR DNA https://amzn.to/3LDbCVg (affiliate link) CONSCIOUS HEALING (free online ebook) http://www.phoenixregenetics.org/books/conscious-healing

Charlottesville Community Engagement
May 7, 2022: Greene County Commissioner of Revenue resigns after pleading guilty in witness tampering case; Squire launches campaign for 55th House District

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 13:51


Welcome to Mother’s Day Eve, a holiday that may not exist, but is certainly a possibility in a world that seems to have an occasion for everything. While we wait for Mommoween to be invented, we’ll just have to settle for another installment of Charlottesville Community Engagement, a newsletter and podcast that is most certainly not funded by Big Greeting Card. Find the info worthwhile? Send it on to others! On today’s program:Greene County’s Commissioner of Revenue resigns after pleading guilty to federal charges of witness tampering Kellen Squire officially launches his race to the Democratic nominee for the 55th House District Dr. Denise Bonds is stepping down as director of the Blue Ridge Health DistrictAnother surge of COVID appears to be in the making, but it’s too early to tell how severe it might be And the City of Charlottesville is taking donations to help cover unpaid utility bills Today’s first shout-out goes to WTJUAlgorithms know how to put songs and artists together based on genre or beats per minute. But only people can make connections that engage your mind and warm your heart. The music on WTJU 91.1 FM is chosen by dozens and dozens of volunteer hosts -- music lovers like you who live right here in the Charlottesville area. Listener donations keep WTJU alive and thriving. In this era of algorithm-driven everything, go against the grain. This week is the annual Rock Marathon, so tune in and support freeform community radio on WTJU Consider a donation at wtju.net/donate.Snow resigns as Greene County Commissioner of RevenueLarry Snow has resigned as the Commissioner of Revenue in Greene County after pleading guilty in federal court to tampering with a witness. Snow appeared in the Western District Court in Charlottesville Friday to answer to charges that stemmed from a federal investigation, along with his son who pleaded guilty to a charge of heroin distribution. The elder Snow was caught trying to harass and intimidate a confidential informant involved with the investigation.“Elected officials should hold themselves to a higher standard and serve their community responsibly,” said Stanley M. Meador, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI’s Richmond Division in a release sent out by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Western District of Virginia. “Mr. Snow violated the faith entrusted to him, and with his son criminally used personal information of community members for their own gain,” Snow was first elected to the position in 1987 and was reelected in 2019 while under indictment with three quarters of the vote. In November 2017, Bryant Snow was arrested on two state counts of distribution after selling methamphetamine and heroin to an informant. He plead guilty to the meth charge in April 2018 and was imprisoned at Central Virginia Regional Jail. While there, the father and son discussed ways to intimidate someone referred to as Person A. At one point, the elder Snow sent out over 12,000 pamphlets to Greene County residents describing how the Sheriff’s Department uses informants in an attempt to dissuade Person A. Larry Snow will be sentenced on July 25 and Bryant Snow will be sentenced on August 1 before Senior Judge Norman K. Moon. Bonds stepping down as director of the Blue Ridge Health DistrictA search will soon get underway for a new director of the Blue Ridge Health District now that Dr. Denise Bonds has announced she’ll step down from the position at the end of this month. She’s been the health director since 2015 and led the agency during the COVID-19 pandemic and during a name change. “Under Dr. Bonds’ leadership, BRHD expanded its HIV testing and prevention services, increased access to testing for sexually transmitted diseases, and broadened the size and reach of the Population Health Division, including launching a robust Community Health Worker program,” reads an announcement from the Blue Ridge Health District sent out yesterday afternoon. Dr. Bonds also served as interim director of the Rappahannock Area Health District from August 2020 to April 2021. The Blue Ridge Health District is also closing down its COVID-19 case investigation team. According to the release, they followed 47,274 cases since March 2020. After this weekend, the Mobile Health Unit created during the pandemic has held 200 events at which over 5,000 COVID vaccinations were administered. A memorial to those lost during the COVID-19 pandemic will be held on May 24, 2022 at the Sentara Martha Jefferson Hospital Amphitheater.COVID-19 update A spring surge of COVID-19 continues to rise with the Virginia Department of Health reporting 2,677 new cases on Friday, with a seven-day average for positive tests at 11 percent. That’s about where things were in late February when the Omicron surge was waning. “And that’s up from around three percent, three and a half percent in March, so we have seen an increase in test positivity,” said Dr. Costi Sifri, the director of hospital epidemiology at the University of Virginia Health System. “This is occurring in a background where we’re having less testing in general because of the growth of at-home testing and I would say the vast majority of the people who are testing positive at home through a rapid antigen test are not going on to get a PCR test somewhere else.” The dashboard for the Blue Ridge Health District hasn’t been updated since May 1, and the Virginia Department of Health no longer provides that information in an easily-consumable fashion. The dataset is available here.  The increasing number of cases are not leading to increased hospitalizations. Today the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association reports 30 COVID-positive people in intensive care units and 11 on respirators. At the height of the Omicron surge in late January of this year, that number climbed over 400. Dr. Sifri said the numbers are expected to rise as more people forgo wearing masks indoors and as people move further away from their vaccinations or boosters. “There is some progressive loss of some immune response,” said Dr. Sifri. “And finally, in this background is new subvariants of Omicron.” Dr. Sifri points people to the weekly models produced by the University of Virginia's Biocomplexity Institute. The latest from April 29 predicts a further surge this summer, though with lower death rates due to treatments that are now available, more than two years after the pandemic began. “The open question is how much of an impact will that have on health systems?” Dr. Sifri asked. “Is that going to lead to more hospitalizations? Is that going to lead to more [intensive care unit] hospitalizations and deaths? That’s our concern.”Dr. Sifri said vaccinations may not prevent infection but do limit the severity. City taking donations to cover unpaid utility billsIt’s been nearly a month since the City of Charlottesville announced it would resume the practice of shutting down service for unpaid utility bills. There was a statewide moratorium on such disconnects that expired last September. In all, the city used $557,000 in various federal assistance programs to help some customers.However, they announced in April disconnects would resume. “To date, six accounts have been disconnected and remain out of service,” said Chris Cullinan, the city’s finance director, in an email to Charlottesville Community Engagement. However, the city is taking donations to help prevent further disconnects. Cullinan said that as of Thursday, the city had received $800 from concerned community members. He said checks marked with “Water/WW Assistance” in the memo can be sent to:City of Charlottesville Utility Billing OfficePO Box 911Attn: Water and Wastewater AssistanceCharlottesville, VA  22902Second shout-out goes to a Charlottesville Jazz Society event this weekendIn today’s second subscriber-supported shout-out, the Charlottesville Jazz Society and WTJU are pleased to bring bassist Joe Fonda back to town with his long-standing group the Nu Band. They’ll be appearing Tuesday May 10 at the Bridge at 209 Monticello Road. The Nu Band is a dynamic jazz ensemble from New York City, featuring some of the most unique, compelling and in-demand voices in creative music today. The band was formed in 1999, and since then has released 10 recordings, completed 9 European and several US tours, bringing forward-leaning, provocative and evocative music to the world. All tickets for The Nu Band at The Bridge, May 10th at 7 pm will be $10 at the door. For more information visit cvillejazz.org, Squire launches campaign with ad releaseThere’s still no firm resolution on whether Virginia will elect the next set of members of the next House of Delegates this November or the next, but there are two active candidates seeking the Democratic nomination for the newly drawn 55th District. On Friday, Kellen Squire released a video to launch a campaign for which he filed earlier this spring. He’s an emergency room nurse who ran in the 58th District in 2017 against incumbent Rob Bell. “Just as I believe there’s hope for me when I come home to my family,” Squire narrates in the two-minute video that depicts him driving home from a shift, concluding with him getting out of his vehicle. “I’m Kellen Squire and I’m running for the House of Delegates because as an emergency department nurse, I know that we all do better when we all do better,” Squire continues. “I’ll fight unapologetically for rural Virginia. I’ll put people before party. And I’ll make sure no Virginian gets left behind.” Squire joins Albemarle Supervisor Donna Price in the race for the Democratic nomination, a race in which the winner could take on Republican Rob Bell, who has represented the 58th District since 2002. He’s not yet made an announcement about the next election. The 55th District is geographically different and will consist of most of Albemarle County, western Louisa County, and northeast Nelson County. Price made her announcement on Facebook on Tuesday, a day after someone leaked a draft Supreme Court ruling purporting to overturn Roe v. Wade. (read the story)There is a chance that an election could be held this year due to a federal lawsuit filed by Richmond attorney Paul Goldman arguing that legislators elected in 2021 are in unconstitutional districts. Judge David Novak of the Eastern District of Virginia is expected to rule on whether Goldman has the legal standing to file the case.On Thursday, Novak admonished Goldman for filing a motion to ask the court to consider the draft ruling as evidence for why a House of Delegates race should be run this year. “The Court hereby STRIKES this Motion at patently inappropriate and completely irrelevant to this case,” Novak wrote in an order. “Neither draft opinions nor press reports have any impact on the decisions of this Court.” Novak told Goldman to stop filing additional motions. Help support Town Crier Productions with a paid subscription to this newsletter!For one year now, Town Crier Productions has a promo with Ting!Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

The BoatCast...  this is your TRiBe
"Who is Alison Hammer? (The Sequel)"

The BoatCast... this is your TRiBe

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 36:49


Alison Hammer is a returns to the BoatCast for a Sequel. Ali is an author, reader, blogger, and a staple of the Rock Boat. She is the author of “You and Me and Us” and “Little Pieces of Me”. BoatCast Mark is admittedly a huge fan of Ali's novels and recalls listening along with his wife to the Audible version of “You and Me and Us”. He finished “Little Pieces of Me” since the time of this recording. The BoatCast was thrilled to hear about the upcoming release of “The Beach Trap”, a collaboration written along with her best friend under the name Ali Brady. BoatCast Mark preordered the audible version months ago but Alison is kind enough to donate one advanced copy to our listeners. The BoatCast will match her kindness with a donation of a book to a new subscriber on our BoatCast YouTube channel. Ali relives her favorite moments of TRB XXI - starting with her clever approach to getting a PCR test done at Walgreens, when they didnt allow “walk-ins”. She missed her hugs in the year of the Pandemic but made up for them about The Rock Boat this past year. She recalls the lovely surprise Bday party and talks of the cathartic early morning flag raising ceremony that celebrated of all those Rock Boaters that we've lost. If you have not yet purchase a copy of The Beach Trap, buy your copy today!Alison Hammer can be found at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/alisonhammerInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/stories/thishammer/2377835468227101792/Twitter: https://twitter.com/ThisHammerWebsite: https://www.alisonhammer.com/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/ThisHammerThe BoatCast thanks our sponsors, including NOVITSKY MD boutique mind doctors for hosting our podcast. If you are looking for a child and adolescent psychiatrist in Philadelphia / Chester County, PA then make sure you reach out! They specialize in ADHD, Anxiety, and mood disorders.

Coffee and a Mike
Tracy Beanz #412

Coffee and a Mike

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 72:54


Tracy Beanz is an investigative journalist who places a strong focus on politics, the editor in chief of Uncover DC, and the co-host of the “Dark to Light” podcast. She comes on the podcast to discuss being suspended on twitter, vaccine mandates, faulty PCR tests, Roe v Wade, removing the filibuster, John Durham, and more. PLEASE SUBSCRIBE LIKE AND SHARE this podcast!!!   Website https://uncoverdc.com/   Social Media Gettr https://gettr.com/user/tracybeanz   Rumble https://rumble.com/user/Tracybeanz   Truth Social  https://truthsocial.com/@tracybeanz   Telegram https://t.me/s/TracybeanzOfficial

Linux Action News
Linux Action News 239

Linux Action News

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 16:06


New firmware superpowers are coming to a future Linux kernel, why Google is working on encrypted hibernation support, and a sneak peek at SteamOS 3.

Der Springer Medizin Podcast
PCR – drei Buchstaben schreiben (Medizin-)Geschichte

Der Springer Medizin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 24:17


Bin ich Corona-positiv? Hat die Krebstherapie angeschlagen? Gehört das Haar am Tatort einer verdächtigen Person? Alles Fragen, die mit Hilfe einer biotechnologischen Errungenschaft beantwortet werden können – der Polymerasekettenreaktion kurz PCR. In dieser Folge beleuchten wir, wie das Verfahren funktioniert, wie es entwickelt wurde und warum es dabei um viel mehr geht, als „nur“ Corona-Tests.

CCO Infectious Disease Podcast
RSV in Older Adults: Identification and Impact

CCO Infectious Disease Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 13:56


In this episode, Dexter James Wiseman, MD, discusses the impact and diagnosis of RSV in older adults, including:Risk factors for poor outcomesRSV vs influenza outcomesRSV symptomsRSV diagnosticsPresenter: Dexter James Wiseman, MDClinical Research FellowNHLIImperial CollegePhysicianRespiratory MedicineRoyal Brompton HospitalLondon, United KingdomReview the downloadable slideset and the full program at: https://bit.ly/3ydC8Ri

Quantum Nurse: Out of the rabbit hole from stress to bliss.  http://graceasagra.com/
# 249- Atty. Tom Renz – Exposing Nazi Sympathizer/WEF Top Advisor Yuval Noah Harari

Quantum Nurse: Out of the rabbit hole from stress to bliss. http://graceasagra.com/

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 61:52


Quantum Nurse www.quantumnurse.life presents Freedom International Livestream On May 5, 2022 Tuesday @ 12:15  PM EST 5:15  PM UK 6:15 PM Germany Guest: Atty. Tom Renz – Exposing Nazi Sympathizer/WEF Top Advisor Yuval Noah Harari www.Renz-Law.com Bio: Attorney Thomas Renz is the lead Attorney in several major cases brought in Ohio, New Mexico, Maine, and Nationally against the CDC, DHHS, Biden & Fauci,  regarding forced vaccine mandates, big tech censorship, the COVID-19 lockdowns, hospital murders, mask mandates, business closures, false PCR data, fraudulent death numbers and more. Attorney Thomas Renz works with and represents America's Frontline Doctors, & Make Americans Free Again . If you would like to see Fauci Fired go to Renz website and sign The Renz Letter;  www.Renz-Law.com Interview Panel   Grace Asagra, RN MA Podcast:  Quantum Nurse: Out of the Rabbit Hole from Stress  www.quantumnurse.life https://www.bitchute.com/channel/nDjE6Ciyg0ED/ http://www.earthheroestv.com/categories/the-freedom-broadcasters?via=grace     Dr. Jayne Marquis, ND  Podcast: INpowered  https://linktr.ee/INpoweredhealth Roy Coughlan Podcast: AWAKENING https://www.awakeningpodcast.org/

有話好說
日增 3 萬!5/12 起 快篩陽性視同確診!未見疫情高峰!下週最高 10 萬例?(2022/05/05)

有話好說

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 56:01


TNT Radio
Dr Paul Oosterhuis on An hour with Robert Brennan - 05 May 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 54:52


GUEST OVERVIEW: Dr Paul Oosterhuis is an Australian anaesthetist with over thirty years experience, including in critical care and resuscitation. He has been brought before the Medical Board of NSW for posting information on social media regarding COVID-19. His posts related to early treatment and prophylaxis, PCR tests, and risk-benefit calculations regarding COVID-19 vaccination and lockdowns. Dr Oosterhuis attended a Medical Board hearing on September 3rd, at which the Board suspended his registration. At his hearing, Dr Oosterhuis presented extensive evidence on the accuracy and defensibility of his social media posts, including their public interest value. The Board, however, declined to engage in any discussion regarding the evidence. Instead they enforced the ban on doctors contradicting the government, and suspended him without discussion.

Sustainable Winegrowing with Vineyard Team
131: Virus Detection in Grapevines

Sustainable Winegrowing with Vineyard Team

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 27:46


With the prevalence of Leaf Roll Three, Red Blotch, and other viruses, accurate and timely detection of viruses in grapevines has never been more imperative. Alan Wei, Owner and Lab Manager at Agri-Analysis LLC in Davis California explains how his lab is using next generation sequencing (NGS) to find new viruses. Currently, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is the widely accepted method for testing for viruses. This process tests for one gene at time. Next generation sequencing allows labs to test multiple genes at a time and get results much faster. References: 20: Dr. Mark Fuchs | Red Blotch Virus in Grapevines 49: Stopping the Spread of Red Leaf Viruses 71: New Techniques to Detect Grapevine Leafroll Disease Agri-analysis LLC Donate: Juan Nevarez Memorial Scholarship Grape Program at Foundation Plant Services Leafroll 3 Virus (GLRaV3) AKA Grapevine Leafroll Disease in Washington Next Generation Sequencing (Deep Sequencing) PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) Testing Red Blotch Virus SIP Certified Sustainable Ag Expo November 14-16, 2022 Get More Subscribe wherever you listen so you never miss an episode on the latest science and research with the Sustainable Winegrowing Podcast. Since 1994, Vineyard Team has been your resource for workshops and field demonstrations, research, and events dedicated to the stewardship of our natural resources. Learn more at www.vineyardteam.org. Transcript Craig Macmillan  0:00  My guest today is Alan Wei, who's owner and lab manager of Agri Analysis LLC in Davis, California. Alan, thanks for being on the show. Alan Wei  0:10  Thank you very much, Craig, for hosting me. And I'm very delighted to be here. And I want to use this opportunity to say hello to listeners as well. Craig Macmillan  0:19  So Alan, I want to have you on the show, because I want to talk about anything that's new and exciting in the world of grapevine virology, and a lot of research and a lot of development in industry with labs like your own. So, what's what's what's happening out there, what's going on with detection of viruses these days? Alan Wei  0:36  There is a International conference on grapevine viruses that's held every three years. So last time was 2018, in Chile. And the second, the following time was supposed to be 2021 in Greece, and unfortunately, that was canceled due to the obvious reasons, and then was supposed to be happening this year. And by the way, is not happening, and it's postponed until next year. So as a result, we have not, the researchers in this field have not been able to meet to report the latest grapevine viruses. Just to mention something that in the literature, for example, there are two or three new DNA viruses being discovered and reported. In fact, in grapevines, but their practical consequences are known. So we probably don't want to get in too much into them. Craig Macmillan  1:33  Maybe not, but I think this is an interesting thing because for instance, red blotch, caught everybody by surprise. And so how are these new...how are these these new viruses, how are they found, if you are looking forward, you're looking for other things, what kind of technology they're using to find this new stuff? Alan Wei  1:49  Typically, they're found by deep sequencing, also known as NGS Next Generation Sequencing. Researchers are always trying to look for the frontiers of why viruses virology by applying these methods and find this new viruses, but their practical impact needs to be validated, study to further be before we alarm growers. And red blotch was found a similar way. With the exception that the red blotch phenomena, and the disease was known to growers for years without the assay and the way the branch was first reported, or discovered through NGS that was, you know, the "wow" moment to growers. Yeah, we do now know what is causing this read leaf in my vineyard. Craig Macmillan  2:43  Tell me a little bit more about NGS, it sounds like this is gonna be an important technology for us, this deep sequencing. Alan Wei  2:48  Yeah, definitely. Deep sequencing is very widely used in the research community. And, when was that, in December meeting hosted by FFPS, they reported that NGS is going to be accepted by regulators like APHIS as a alternative way of testing materials coming from overseas. Which means shortened time and rapid, faster deployment of foreign important materials in in this country, or practically to growers hands. Yeah, the technology is definitely upcoming, and we're looking to possibly deploy it for routine use. We need to hear more feedback before we really do it. Craig Macmillan  3:41  This is obviously a very complicated technology, but like in a sense, can you explain what it is? Alan Wei  3:48  PCR is the way that accepted method in testing viruses or microbial in general. Compared to PCR, which tests one gene at a time, NGS would allow you to test multiple genes at a time. Because through the use of small, small redundant primers, which amplify many sometimes millions of hundreds of millions of fragments of the gene, which can parallelize sequenced with that data, and coupled with information, analysis, informatics, you can extract new new information from your sample, including new viruses, new bacteria. Craig Macmillan  4:38  So essentially, I've got a sample of plant material. And I run it through this NGS process, and it comes back and says, hey, there's genetic material in here that doesn't belong here. This is not grapevine, or hey, visit genetic material that's associated with some virus or something like that. And that's the flag that I get. And I get it from the whole picture. I'm not doing it like like you say gene by looking at for specific genes, I'm getting a kickback, I'm saying hey, there's there's a variety of things or whatever genes we weren't, wouldn't even thought to look for. Alan Wei  5:10  Exactly, exactly. You're right. And then that gene can be not not only you find genes and not belong to the grapevine, which we considered as, you know, the background gene, by further analysis of that, that special gene, you can assign them to, to pathogens, basically, different types of pathogens. Craig Macmillan  5:30  Gotcha. Yeah, that definitely speeds up the process a lot and makes it possible to catch things in finer net than we ever would have been able to do before. So that's pretty exciting. Alan Wei  5:38  Yes, def definitely. Craig Macmillan  5:40  Coming to red blotch, this is continues to be, you know, a very hot topic, obviously, it continues to be an issue in the field and continues to be an issue in other places. Is there anything new that we've learned regarding the Red Blotch Virus in any realm, anything about how it moves, its symptomology, new means of detection, anything like that? Alan Wei  6:08  I have a list of articles that just simply published during the past a couple of years, and researchers from you know, several major universities have really dived deep into the physiology, the virology, their impact on wine quality, in aspect of, of a rather large virus. They're really fascinating. From a practical standpoint, though, the progress has been less because what was reported to us few years ago remain the same, which which you know, very well. Which means rogueing, you know, rogueing your infected vines as aggressively as possible. Sourcing for clean materials as diligently as possible to prevent any viruses infecting material being planted. And once they do present in your vineyard take them out as quickly as possible. And also, although we know the Threecornered Alfalfa Hopper is the vector for red blotch. And folks don't recommend you spray against this particular insect because it is not a very efficient transmitter of the virus. Grapevine is not its preferred host. So those information were already known through talks by various speakers in the past. Craig Macmillan  7:33  We were talking about spread. And this is something that is absolutely puzzling to me, in years of field checking, I had never once seen this Threecornered Alfalfa Hopper. But I have talked to people who have. And they apparently are very reclusive, they will move away from you, the signs of the damage and very subtle, they do this little kind of girdling thing in the leaves. I just feel like there's just kind of be another vector. I mean, just I just feel to kind of be another vector. I mean, is there is there anything new in that world? I mean, we've identified the one but it seems kind of mysterious. And I'm thinking about the spread at the Russell Ranch, that finish and plant services ranch where we've not only identified it, but they were able to see that was spreading, attributed to the Threecornered Alfalfa Hopper, correct me? Alan Wei  8:19  I completely agree with you. Yeah, we don't see too many of our tree hoppers in the field. Yet spread in Russell Ranch has been phenomenal. It's more like, more exponential increase year after year, since 2018. So it is a mystery. If some of you, listeners, went to the seminar by UC Davis in early December, particularly the presentation by Professor Kent Daane, then the entomologists have been looking at a number of potential hosts. But unfortunately, they either have not been proven yet or, most of them were disproven to be a potential host. So we're still in that regard., virtually in the context of Russell Ranch, it is a complete mystery. You would think through the very aggressive management by FPS, you know, any presence over vectors were eliminated. And any source of vectors were eliminated. We have but yet they see this exponential growth in terms of infected vines, which, which stopped Russell Ranch from operation, basically. Craig Macmillan  9:40  Yeah, exactly. And I was actually looking at a table for one of your publications earlier today, and it looks like it went from zero to exponential like there was no nothing was detected for a couple of years or two. Then blammo! And I've been thinking about the same thing happening in other vineyards, I'm familiar with. And obviously just underlines how big of a threat red blotch is because we don't understand, you know, a lot, there's a lot we don't understand about it. So that means you got to sample. That you should rogue vines when you see them. But also you got to be sampling. Are there any is there anything new in the way of sampling protocols? Because I know that the distribution of the virus varies quite a bit between different parts of the plant different times of year and whatnot. So it's easy to miss it. What's the what's the best recommendation these days, if I wanted to test some lines, asymptomatic vines for red watch? Alan Wei  10:31  Yeah, we still recommend growers to sample cane materials, because in our analysis, you know, relative concentration in different parts of the vine, the cane materials has highest concentration of virus tighter level. And we also suggest growers to consider combine cuttings from different vines to make a what's called a composite sample. Therefore, they can you know, cost, testing costs can be reduced, and their testing budget can be maximized. And of course, you know, the testing objectives dictate how high your sample. Sometimes growers want to test the individual vines to really zoom in to which vine is exactly is infected, that you can only do that by testing individual vines. But the composite testing gave you the first level of screening. To see if you composite ten vines into one sample, and the entire sample would be positive. But if you want to zoom in which vine, but you're gonna want to use positive so that you can take it out, then you will do individual testing after the first round over the course screen, if you will. Craig Macmillan  11:44  Yeah, so the strategy would be basically like test the vineyard. And then if you find that something, then you drill down, and you can get it down to decide kind of what area where the individual vines are. That's a very, very smart technique. It's a really great idea. How sensitive are the detection techniques these days? So like, if I've got a if I have 10 vines out of 1000, and I sample and I sampled 10 vines, and I hit one of them, one of the infected ones, is that enough to show up in in the in the analysis? Alan Wei  12:15  Yeah, definitely. So if there's only one out of 10 cuttings is positive, and that means practically you're diluting the by 10 times, it is very much detectable. Craig Macmillan  12:27  Is there a lower detection limit? Alan Wei  12:28  Yeah, when there's a theoretical detection limit, and then there's a practical detection limit. If we do a back of the envelope calculation, a PCR method would allow you to detect one copy without the problem. But then of course, practically, there are other considerations such as whether you know, the one copy, you can sample that one copy into your PCR tube to begin with, because you know, if there's a one copy per microliter, and the way you want to use a two microliter in a PCR mix, you may or may not be able to transfer that one copy from a sample to the PCR tube to begin with. And even if you do, there may be potential inhibitors that present in grapevine material that could potentially influence your sensitivity as well. So there's a practical detection limit, and there's their theoretical detection limit issues. But overall, you know, we have found the red blotch detection to be not a problem, because typically the virus titer is high enough to be detected, even if you compounded multiple vines or cuttings into one sample. Craig Macmillan  13:33  That's good. That's very, very useful, very, very useful. I would love to move on to kind of other viruses because it's red blotch is not the only game in town these days. Leaf Roll complexes and Leaf Roll viruses, there's still a problem correct? Alan Wei  13:44  Especially Leaf Roll Three is very much that the top of our problems still and because you know the vaccine is very well known. It's very prevalent. Inoculum widespread to the percentage of vines tested positive for Leaf Roll Three that are coming through our lab is roughly about 15 percent. So Leaf Roll Three is very much prevalent. There have been some really nice talks, organized before the pandemic was by the Lodi growers group. There are some talks from including from South Africa. Recently from Red Blotch symposium where there's some presentations on Leaf Roll Three as well. So Leaf Roll Three is very much a serious problem. And growers need to be very vigilant against the Leaf Roll Three from from new planting materials to management of existing vineyards. Craig Macmillan  14:37  So let's say I've got a vineyard and I'm seeing some symptoms. I'm seeing some red leaves or I'm seeing some bronzing or I'm seeing something, and I've looked at the nutritional situation, I've ruled out either toxicity or deficiency. So I'm not thinking hey, you know, maybe this is a virus issue. Can you take samples of vines and just bring them to a lab and say, please help me? Can you tell me what this might be? I know we just talked about the deep sequencing. Is that, I'm not gonna say that technology. But like if I brought you some material and I said this has got a problem, how would you go about diagnosing it? Alan Wei  15:14  Oh, definitely. That's what we do every day. Most of our work is focused on helping growers find out what is possible cause of a programmatic vine in their vineyard. They will send in the samples, either individual vines or composite samples. We have a panel, what's called a combo panel that covers the 11 viruses, 11 major viruses. Leaf Roll Roll 1, 2, 3, 4, and two or three viruses, and of course, Red Blotch, and Fan Leaf, Pierce's. And then also Pinot Gris virus. That is the most frequently requested a panel. And by doing that panel, we typically find out if it's a virus issue. Craig Macmillan  15:58  That's very useful. It's very, very good to know. In relation to grapevine viruses, or just diseases overall, what is the one thing you would recommend to the listeners that they should keep in mind? Alan Wei  16:08  I think that you already touched on this earlier. You know, one thing is, if they see problems in the vineyard, they should consider the sample and test to validate whether they're viruses or not. And if they're considering to plant new materials, they should be very vigilant to to ask questions of the nurseries, and also do their own independent homework. And the you will be interviewing Dr. James Samp in another session. He can tell you more about how he go about sourcing for cleaning materials for his clients, which are very quality conscious. Craig Macmillan  16:47  Yeah, we're really looking forward to that conversation, Much like I was looking forward to this one. You know, this reminds me of something. You hear the word tighter a lot. And I don't think I fully understand what it means. I know that it's important and seems to be coming up a lot. Can you explain the concept and why it's important and what it means for us practically? Alan Wei  17:09  Yeah, I'm so glad you brought this topic up. You know, you and I have been serving on AVF committee, Grant Review Committee for a number of years. And last week, we had our review meeting for this year, and the subject came up. You know, we can talk about different aspects of Red Blotch impact in wine quality, wine physiology, you know, readily and so on and so forth. If we want to contribute one single factor of all of this different symptomology, it would be the virus tighter level. The virus tighter means the number of particles in the vine. If the vine is only infected with a smaller number of particles, its response to the virus is going to be different than the vines that are infected with larger or large number of particles. In our experience, the virus level in different vines can be very much different. I'm not talking about different by you know, 50 percent, or two or three fold. I'm talking about several orders of magnitude. There is a poster right behind me, which you cannot see. But we did a measurement of three infected vines. One, with clean, non effective. Another one is chosen for medium Red Leaf symptom. Another one, it's very heavily Red Leaf symptom. And virus level, the obviously the non infected vine was zero. And then the mediumly infected vine was about one or 200. And then heavily infected vine, was one hundred thousand in relative copy numbers. So this tells you that you know, this virus kinda level concentration level in the vine, really affect symptomology as well as the vine performance and the barrel quality and obviously, eventually, wine  quality. If we read the scientific literature, lots of studies report Red Blotch positive, Red Blotch negative, they did not talk about the virus tighter level. That's why we were so glad to see last week one of the research proposes to study the virus tighter level on different aspects of vine physiology and berry quality. I just think it was so so so important because the virus tighter will make it make a huge difference. Craig Macmillan  19:39  So we may be moving from a world of infected or not, to not, to more sick, less sick. Alan Wei  19:47  Yes, absolutely right. That is actually how we protect ourselves against the human viruses as well. You know, our vaccine does not completely protect us from infection. But it does protect us from viruses being propagated in high numbers in our body. Therefore, our symptoms of the infection in the individual is much less. And the ability for that individual to infect others are much less. Simply because of the lower virus tighter level in an infected person and similarly is true in grapevines. Craig Macmillan  20:24  So plants and animals are obviously very different organisms and where an animal has an immune system plants do not, they do not have an immune defense system. Is that correct? Alan Wei  20:35  Yes, you're right, correct. But they do have basic defense system against foreign organisms. One of them is the RNAi system. So speaking of that, you know, the simple symptomology in response to Red Blotch, and most of it is a total response, as a result of virus infection. The RNAi defense system gets activated. For example, the accumulation of the sugar of the raisin should be gradually, in a normal process, will be gradually moving towards the berries. But in Red Blotch, in fact, in vines, they are accumulated in leaves. Not moving toward the sugars. And the same for anthocyanins. That's why we see this red leaf. And those red color should be you know, in the berries, but they're not. They get stuck together, accumulating in leaves. It's fascinating. Unfortunately, we are still at the beginning of understanding all of this. Some reports are gradually coming out. Craig Macmillan  21:40  And so I want to make sure that I understand kind of how this works. So there's a grapevine that becomes infected. However way. The virus is very, very tiny bits of genetic material. Unlike, unlike a bacteria, which has a cell wall. Viruses don't have that they're just genetic material. The plant recognizes that somehow. And then RNA is the material that is produced from genes, the genes or have a have a sequence and then when that is reproduced that goes out into the world as RNA. Is that right? Alan Wei  22:17  Yes, the RNA is inside the host. And in response to a virus infection. And the defense mechanism get activated, which involves what is called enzymes. These RNA into smaller pieces, typically 20 nucleotide long. And they are, they are the what's called the interference RNA, or RNAi which inhibit the host from propagation inside the plant. Craig Macmillan  22:48  This is just, we need to wrap up for time, but I just have been thinking about this for years. And that is, where do these viruses come from? Where, how do they, how do they show up? What are these plant viruses? What? Are they jumping from other plants as a mutation of one into another? Or...do we know? Do I have any idea where these things come from? Because it seems like it's not just a question of finding it. Seems it's got to come from someplace. Alan Wei  23:14  Yeah, that's that's a really good question. I you know, you have biology, you have a load viruses, and obviously, RNA. Some viruses are readier to evolve, to change, to mutate. And that's why we see so many different mutants in the COVID virus family. And this is Red Blotch, is a DNA base virus, which have shown less mutation. And so far, we only seen two mutants, two clay types. And they practically they don't have much difference. As far as the, you know, the origin and the evolution. We need to have folks like Mark Fuchs to answer that. Craig Macmillan  23:55  At Cornell. Well, that's fantastic. That's that's our future. That's where, that's where we're going. Well, I think we've covered everything. Where can people find out more about you? Alan Wei  24:03  We have a website, agri-analysis.com. And then they could call us or email us anytime. We're here to help growers to build a better and clean vineyard so that they can make the best wine possible for the for their clients. Yes, sorry, Craig for the background noise. I think folks who are preparing samples as we speak. Craig Macmillan  24:26  I want to thank you Alan, our guest today has been Alan Wei, Owner and Lab Manager at Agri-analysis, David California. Thanks so much. This is really fascinating conversation. Alan Wei  24:35  Thank you very much Craig for hosting me. Continue to the great job. I'm so glad you're back at the Vineyard Team. You guys. You guys are wonderful team and doing great job. I'm very pleased to be here. Craig Macmillan  24:44  Thank you. I appreciate that.   Transcribed by https://otter.ai

有話好說
電子圍籬將退場!+2.8 萬例 77 中重症 5 死!輕重醫療再分配 大疫下自我照護!(2022/05/04)

有話好說

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 56:00


有話好說
單日確診破 2 萬 醫院急診塞爆 基層診所救援!兒童疫苗開打!居隔快篩將判確診(2022/05/03)

有話好說

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 56:01


Spotlight with Laurie Hardie
Spotlighting MicroGenDX DNA

Spotlight with Laurie Hardie

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 25:51


Rick Martin is the CEO of MicroGenDX, a diagnostic laboratory providing DNA sequencing and rapid PCR-based microbial testing for clinical applications. Martin says a new testing protocol for rapidly detecting and identifying infective microbes by their genetic sequence has recently been developed by his biotech laboratory MicroGenDX. The test can identify and list by prevalence more than 50,000 microbial species. Basically rather than growing a culture as labs have done in the past, MicroGenDX uses DNA sequencing to find these problems quicker and more efficiently. https://microgendx.com/

中廣流行網
2022.05.03【蘭萱時間】

中廣流行網

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 42:42


*今起漸回暖 週日第二波梅雨鋒面到 *5/2本土確診增17,801例 增21例中重症含3人死亡 *疫情高峰推估值再調整 陳時中:最高估單日增20萬例 *柯P又贏了 急診塞爆 陳時中宣布:即起「快篩陽才能PCR」 *確診牽連廣…民眾不想篩 醫護不敢篩 *新北盼改「0+7免隔離」 陳時中:貿然實施確診恐驟增 *遍地確診 北市提高住院門檻 再2、3天病床恐不夠 *兒童疫苗今開打父母難抉擇 何美鄉:「這一類」強烈建議打 *上海老人院「活人裝屍袋」險遭火化 問責5官員吊銷醫生執業證 *〈美股盤後〉10年期美債殖利率觸3% 美股驚現V型反彈 *中國經濟疲軟連同美將再升息 歐股收跌 *Fed升息打通膨恐澆熄火熱的就業市場 帶來停滯性通膨風險 *馬力波停火 已20平民成功撤離 亞速鋼鐵廠「轟到焦黑」衛星照曝 *美眾議院長裴洛西抵達基輔會面澤倫斯基 感謝烏克蘭為自由而戰 *烏克蘭可望6月中旬前反攻 俄參謀總長險遭擊斃 *斷俄百億歐元收入 德國有望支持歐盟立即禁運俄石油

Charlottesville Community Engagement
May 2, 2022: Charlottesville City Council to consider Corner apartments conversion to a hotel; COVID cases up sharply today in Virginia

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 17:24


It’s been three months since February 2, prompting the question: Has anyone checked to see how the groundhog is doing? Still, May 2 is the 122nd day of 2022, and we are now mathematically one third of the way through. Perhaps nothing is still. In any case, this is Charlottesville Community Engagement and I remain Sean Tubbs, here for another week and another months of newsletters and podcasts that are hopefully informative. On today’s program:Charlottesville crews are taking down dead Ash and Oak trees this yeCOVID cases are up sharply across Virginia this morningCharlottesville has a new Fire MarshalA Buckingham County resident has died following a fatal crash this morning in Albemarle County City Council will take up two land use items tonight, one of which would double the already approved residential density on a property near the University of VirginiaFirst shout-out goes to the Piedmont Master Gardeners for their annual plant saleIn today’s first subscriber-supported shout-out, the Piedmont Master Gardeners are pleased to announce the return of their annual plant sale! That’s happening on Saturday, May 7, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Albemarle Square Shopping Center. The sale will offer thousands of annuals, perennials, shrubs, vegetables, herbs and houseplants, including a large selection of native plants.In addition, shoppers can purchase garden implements, yard ornaments and other “Green Elephants”; have their tools sharpened by an expert; and drop off their surplus plastic nursery pots for recycling. The sale will also feature a Help Desk for gardening questions and information tables on native plants, soil and composting, invasive plants, conservation landscaping and much more.For more information, visit piedmontmastegardeners.org. COVID-19 update: Numbers trending upward again? As the week and month begin, it’s worth checking in with the COVID-19 pandemic statistics in Virginia. Brace yourselves for this number. The Virginia Department of Health reports another 4,192 new cases today, and the seven day average for positive PCR tests is at 9.8 percent. The seven day average for new tests is at 1,870 new cases a day. However, these cases have not yet resulted in a higher number of people in the hospital for COVID. According to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association, there are 166 COVID patients currently in hospital care across Virginia and 28 are in intensive care units. Eleven are on ventilators. Those numbers are drastically lower than three months ago when the Omicron surge was at its peak. On Friday, the VDH reported 1,705 new cases. That’s the same day the UVA Health System held its weekly briefing, which included Chief Executive Officer Wendy Horton. She encouraged vigilance. “Among our employees and our workforce, we are seeing an uptick in community exposure in COVID so it isn’t going away in our community and I think a lot of friends and family are experiencing that this week,” Horton said. Dr. Costi Sifri, the director of hospital epidemiology at the University of Virginia, said the actual case counts are likely higher due to the number of home testing and due to the spread of a variant in Omicron. “They are increasingly more transmissible and because of that it’s very reasonable to take precautions,” Dr. Sifri said. “Masking works. It’s always worked. It will continue to work.” Dr. Sifri also encouraged people to investigate whether it is a good time for them to take an additional booster if eligible. “I think the first and foremost thing is to make sure that you are fully vaccinated and that you have completed what we consider the three dose vaccine series,” Dr. Sifri said.With allergy season in play, Dr. Sifri recommends self-testing to protect those you spend a lot of time around. “Your sniffles or scratchy throat that you may wish to attribute to hay fever may not be that but it could be a sign of COVID and to test yourself,” Dr. Sifri said. The Friday briefing also covered another emerging medical issue across the globe. So far there are no cases at the University of Virginia of severe unexplained cases of hepatitis in children, but doctors are keeping an eye out. Dr. Debbie-Ann Shirley is a pediatric infectious disease specialist who says more study is needed after an alert went out in late April.“Both the Centers for Disease Control and the Virginia Department of Health put out health advisories to notify health care providers about an increase in clusters of cases of severe liver diseases in children which we call hepatitis,” Dr. Shirley said in a briefing last Friday. One potential commonality is an adenovirus which can cause a variety of different ailments. The United Kingdom has seen a relatively high number of cases, some of which have required liver transplants. “It’s really the severity of these cases in young children that is causing concern and alarm and the reason that we want to investigate urgently to find out more information,” Dr. Shirley said. Local physicians are encouraged to reach out to UVA Health officials if they see pediatric patients with elevated levels of liver enzymes that are otherwise unexplained. “For parents who are trying to understand what to do when they hear this message, if they see signs and symptoms of hepatitis then to talk to their health care provider,” Dr. Shirley said. That includes yellowing of the eyes and skin, belly pain, and fatigue. I’ll have more on both issues as time moves on. Fatal crash at Hillsdale and Rio intersection this morningA 20-year-old from Dilwyn has died following a fatal crash this morning at the intersection of Rio Road and Hillsdale Drive. According to the Albemarle County Fire Rescue department, Mr. Kyjuan-Shallah Anthony Maurice Bell died at the scene after a collision with another vehicle. “The cause of the crash remains under investigation by the Albemarle County Police Department’s Fatal Crash Reconstruction Team,” reads the press release. “This is the third traffic fatality investigated by ACPD in 2022.”City to remove dead treesThe biological war between the Emerald Ash Borer and ash trees is still being waged, but it’s very much in the favor of the invasive species. That’s been confirmed by the city’s new urban forester, Steve Gaines.“The beetle larvae tunnel under the bark, and damage nutrient and water flow throughout the tree – basically girdling the tree,” Gaines said in email Friday afternoon. “Once infested, the trees usually die within 2-5 years after initial infection.”This morning, Charlottesville’s Parks and Recreation Department began removing six dead ash trees at the intersection of McIntire Road and West Main Street. That will take place Monday through Wednesday between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. and motorists can expect delays. Gaines said it is hard to tell how many more ash trees across the city will die but there will be a focus on removing ones that can cause harm. “It is safe to say that the city will be removing Ash hazard trees for quite a while,” Gaines said. “Standing dead Ash trees are particularly dangerous because the dead limbs are brittle and can easily break and fall during wind/weather events.”Gaines said the city is seeking to treat some ash trees with injections, but this often requires a landowner or organization to help cover the cost of treatment. Later in the week, crews will remove three dead Oak trees from Belmont Park. Gaines said there are many possibilities for why they have died. The Charlottesville Tree Commission meets virtually Tuesday at 5 p.m. (meeting info)Fire Captain Phillips elevated to Fire MarshalA veteran with 23 years of experience on the Charlottesville Fire Department has been named as the city’s new fire marshal. Joe Phillips will replace Deputy Chief Joe Powers, who had been in charge of Community Risk Reduction. According to a release, Phillips joined the department in January 1999 as a firefighter and medic. He has served as a battalion chief and has been in the Fire Marshal’s office since 2017. That’s where the fire department’s Office of Community Risk Reduction is located. A national search is underway for a new Deputy Chief for risk reduction. In today’s other three shout-outs Code for Charlottesville is seeking volunteers with tech, data, design, and research skills to work on community service projects. Founded in September 2019, Code for Charlottesville has worked on projects with the Legal Aid Justice Center, the Charlottesville Fire Department, and the Charlottesville Office of Human Rights. Visit codeforcville.org to learn about those projects. In the middle, I’d like to take the opportunity to wish my nephew, Ryan Craig, a happy 29th birthday. Where did the time go? The final comes from another Patreon supporter who wants you to go out and read a local news story written by a local journalist. Whether it be the Daily Progress, Charlottesville Tomorrow, C-Ville Weekly, NBC29, CBS19, WINA, or some other place I’ve not mentioned - the community depends on a network of people writing about the community. Go learn about this place today!Council to review two land use items this eveningLast month, the Charlottesville Planning Commission recommended approval of one land use item and recommended the denial of another at a joint public hearing with City Council. Tonight, City Council will hold final votes on both of them.The first is on the consent agenda. Southern Development seeks an increase of residential density at 209 Maury Avenue near the University of Virginia. Here’s city planner Matt Alfele.“The subject properties were rezoned from R-2U (residential two-family University) to R-3 with proffers in December 2019,” Alfele said. “The original plan called for residential development with 33 units. The new proposal calls for the same configuration but removes the parking underneath building 2 to accommodate additional units.”The new maximum count would be 64 units. As part of the proffers, six affordable units would be built by Habitat for Humanity of Greater Charlottesville at the Flint Hill development in the Fry’s Spring neighborhood. Flint Hill is also being developed by Southern Development and that required eight affordable units. Habitat will be building those, as well. Charlie Armstrong is vice president at Southern Development. “Yes, it would create more units if we have more density on this site,” Armstrong said. “It does create more affordable units. Those will need to be off-site and we like the idea of doing them with Habitat at Flint Hill. We need to get Flint Hill through the approval process and built.”Armstrong said University of Virginia students do not drive as much, but the company has agreed to develop a parking plan for the site. They’ll also build a seven-foot sidewalk along Maury Avenue.  An existing structure on the property will be kept as part of the project. The Commission voted unanimously to recommend the increase. Council has opted to put it on their consent agenda rather than discuss it in open session tonight.Planning Commission recommends denial of conversion of apartments to hotel useIn the other matter, developer Bill Chapman sought permission to convert an apartment complex on 14th Street into a hotel. Here’s city planner Dannan O’Connell. “The subject property is currently developed with a 21-unit multifamily condominium use and the applicant wishes to renovate the existing building to accommodate a 19-unit hotel with one residential apartment,” O’Connell said. The structure was originally built as a hotel in 1964 but converted to apartment use some time later. Tonight’s consideration by Council comes just over a year after the city adopted an Affordable Housing Plan that seeks to increase the number of units and nearly six months after a new Comprehensive Plan was adopted.“The proposed redevelopment does meet some of the 2021 Comprehensive Plan’s goals regarding sustainable reuse of existing buildings, protecting the existing identity of city neighborhoods, and retaining successful businesses and jobs,” O’Connell said. “The proposed change of use would also result in a reduction of available rental housing within the city and this area. However, the existing apartment use is non-conforming in nature and located in an area of dense residential apartments geared towards short-term student housing.”Much of the discussion at the Planning Commission was whether the residential units should be removed from circulation. Commissioner Rory Stolzenberg noted that the units rented at what would appear to be what’s known as “naturally occurring affordable housing.” “The studio rents for $770 a month and that includes utilities,” Stolzenberg said. “And then I go look at what that is in terms of [Area Median Income] and it’s right at the 45 percent AMI range for a one-person household.” O’Connell said the application made clear that none of those units were participating in a subsidized program requiring the rents to be that low. “The reason these units are affordable is because they are older and so people can afford to live in them,” said Planning Commissioner Liz Russell. Developer Bill Chapman said the conversion would be similar to what he and his business partners did at the Oakhurst Circle and Inn project at the corner of Jefferson Park Avenue and Jefferson Park Avenue. “My partners and I own nine buildings over here on the south side of UVA in the Oakhurst Gildersleeve Historic District and some of them are apartments and some are private homes and some are hotel rooms,” Chapman said.Chapman said he thought the end result of the renovations of those buildings has made some of those streets better than they been. He said he wants to do the same at 207 14th Street.“The block just down the hill from this property on 14th Street is one of the dirtiest blocks in the whole city in terms of trash and we’re going to transform that a little bit because being in the hospitality business it needs to look good,” Chapman said. Chapman said the apartments are run down and cheap because they are old hotel rooms. He is a contract purchaser, and does not currently own them. He said financing their renovation as an apartment would result in much higher rents. “This property was built as a motel and I think it’s best operated as a hotel especially since it needs this new life brought to it,” Chapman said. “Now, could it go for a few more years as an apartment building? Yeah. Could it go for 20 more years as an apartment building. No.”Russell said she did not think the people living in the apartment were necessarily students. “We have to remember that not just students live in the area around the University but it seems like a pretty great proximity to the UVA Health System,” Russell said. “So many people can’t live in this community let alone proximate to UVA. Russell said she would vote to recommend denial because she housing is more important than hotel rooms. Commissioner Karim Habbab also could not support it.“This is currently exactly the missing middle housing that we are trying to develop in the city and given our affordable housing issue, I cannot see how this would help with that,” Habbab said. The Commission voted 4-2 to recommend denial. Now it’s up to Council to make a decision. Help support Town Crier Productions with a paid subscription to this newsletter!For one year now, Town Crier Productions has a promo with Ting!Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Si tu écoutes, j'annule tout

durée : 00:02:48 - La chanson de Frédéric Fromet - par : Frédéric FROMET - La chanson de Frédéric Fromet

Par Jupiter !
PCR particulier

Par Jupiter !

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 2:48


durée : 00:02:48 - La chanson de Frédéric Fromet - par : Frédéric FROMET - La chanson de Frédéric Fromet

有話好說
急診塞爆採檢人潮!快篩陽 再 PCR 藥物增加配送 慎防輕症變重症!(2022/05/02)

有話好說

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 56:26


RNZ: Morning Report
LAMP test trials should have come earlier - expert

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 3:10


A trial of a new Covid-19 test is on its way but some are asking why it's taken so long. Thirty Air New Zealand staff will take part in LAMP tests - a new system that can detect Covid-19 within thirty minutes. It's said to be faster than a PCR and with more accuracy than a rapid antigen test. Institute of Medical Laboratory Science president Terry Taylor says it's good news, but should have come sooner. He spoke to Corin Dann.

The MAP IT FORWARD Podcast
#600 Madeleine Longoria Garcia: What's Not Being Done to Solve Coffee Leaf Rust

The MAP IT FORWARD Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 26:48


This is the 5th episode in a 5 part series with Madeleine Longoria Garcia of Hawaii's Pacific Coffee Research (PCR). In this series, we will be exploring Coffee Leaf Rust CLR and how it's impacting the coffee supply chain (from producer to consumer) in Hawaii.In this final episode of the series, Madeleine and Lee explore why, given Hawaii is the last coffee-producing country to get CLR, some of the obvious solutions to solve CLR are not being implemented.Throughout this series this content is referenced: 1. Coffee Leaf Rust Article: https://intelligence.coffee/coffee-leaf-rust-climate-change/2. Video explaining what Coffee Lead Rust is: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-bwCxpB3nZk3. "Prevention and Control of Leaf" rust by Elias de Melo Virginio Filho Carlos Astorga Domian in English and Spanish available for download here: https://mapitforward.org/coffeeleafrustYou can connect with Madeleine and PCR go here:https://pacificcoffeeresearch.com/https://www.instagram.com/pcr.coffee/

The MAP IT FORWARD Podcast
#599 Madeleine Longoria Garcia: How is Coffee Leaf Rust Being Addressed in Hawaii

The MAP IT FORWARD Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 29:34


This is the 4th episode in a 5 part series with Madeleine Longoria Garcia of Hawaii's Pacific Coffee Research (PCR). In this series, we will be exploring Coffee Leaf Rust CLR and how it's impacting the coffee supply chain (from producer to consumer) in Hawaii.In this 4th episode, Madeleine explains the associations involved in exploring solutions for the infestation of CLR in Hawaii and what's being done right now by all stakeholders to try to address the challenges of CLR.Throughout this series this content is referenced: 1. Coffee Leaf Rust Article: https://intelligence.coffee/coffee-leaf-rust-climate-change/2. Video explaining what Coffee Lead Rust is: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-bwCxpB3nZk3. "Prevention and Control of Leaf" rust by Elias de Melo Virginio Filho Carlos Astorga Domian in English and Spanish available for download here: https://mapitforward.org/coffeeleafrustYou can connect with Madeleine and PCR go here:https://pacificcoffeeresearch.com/https://www.instagram.com/pcr.coffee/

The MAP IT FORWARD Podcast
#598 Madeleine Longoria Garcia: Coffee Leaf Rust and Hawaiian Coffee Consumers

The MAP IT FORWARD Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 16:32


This is the 3rd episode in a 5 part series with Madeleine Longoria Garcia of Hawaii's Pacific Coffee Research (PCR). In this series, we will be exploring Coffee Leaf Rust CLR and how it's impacting the coffee supply chain (from producer to consumer) in Hawaii.In this 3rd episode, Madeleine explains the flow-on impact of CLR on the consuming end of the coffee supply chain within Hawaii and what the likely causes for the disruptions are.Throughout this series this content is referenced: 1. Coffee Leaf Rust Article: https://intelligence.coffee/coffee-leaf-rust-climate-change/2. Video explaining what Coffee Lead Rust is: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-bwCxpB3nZk3. "Prevention and Control of Leaf" rust by Elias de Melo Virginio Filho Carlos Astorga Domian in English and Spanish available for download here: https://mapitforward.org/coffeeleafrustYou can connect with Madeleine and PCR go here:https://pacificcoffeeresearch.com/https://www.instagram.com/pcr.coffee/