Podcasts about Someday

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Best podcasts about Someday

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Latest podcast episodes about Someday

Sarah's Book Shelves Live
Ep. 128: Best Books of 2022 Superlatives with Susie (@NovelVisits)

Sarah's Book Shelves Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 54:37


Our 2022 year-end reading roundup starts today with Best Books of 2022 Superlatives with Susie Boutry (@NovelVisits). This year, we're splitting our wrap-up into two episodes: Superlatives and Genre Awards (coming in mid-December). We have 17 Superlatives categories for you, including Most and Least Deserving of the Hype, Biggest Surprise, the Book I Hated that Everyone Else Loved, and more! This post contains affiliate links through which I make a small commission when you make a purchase (at no cost to you!). Announcements Check out my 2022 Holiday Gift Guide! My 2023 Reading Tracker will be coming out in early December! This year, the Tracker will ONLY be available to $7/month Superstars patrons (i.e. I will no longer be selling it for $14.99 here on my website). Become a Superstars Patron here! Highlights Our best books of the year from 17 categories, including: Most and Least Deserving of the Hype Underrated Gems Favorite Fiction and Nonfiction on Audio The Book You Flew Through Biggest Surprise Best Heartwarming Book A 2022 Book You Missed, but Plan to Read 2022 Superlatives [5:27] Sarah Carris Soto is Back by Taylor Jenkins Reid | Amazon | Bookshop.org [7:13] Lessons in Chemistry by Bonnie Garmus | Amazon | Bookshop.org [7:16] Any Other Family by Eleanor Brown | Amazon | Bookshop.org [9:39] Bad City by Paul Pringle | Amazon | Bookshop.org [13:30] More Than You'll Ever Know by Katie Gutierrez | Amazon | Bookshop.org [17:33] Cover Story by Susan Rigetti | Amazon | Bookshop.org [20:08] Finding Me by Viola Davis | Amazon | Bookshop.org [24:07] The Winners by Fredrik Backman | Amazon | Bookshop.org [28:20] Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow by Gabrielle Zevin | Amazon | Bookshop.org [31:09] The Violin Conspiracy by Brendan Slocumb | Amazon | Bookshop.org [34:27] The Local by Joey Hartstone | Amazon | Bookshop.org [37:31] Someday, Maybe by Onyi Nwabineli | Amazon | Bookshop.org [41:48] People Person by Candice Carty-Williams | Amazon | Bookshop.org [42:18] Unlikely Animals by Annie Hartnett | Amazon | Bookshop.org [43:53] Olga Dies Dreaming by Xochitl Gonzalez | Amazon | Bookshop.org [45:51] Love and Saffron by Kim Fay | Amazon | Bookshop.org [48:47] Demon Copperhead by Barbara Kingsolver | Amazon | Bookshop.org [52:08] Susie Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow by Gabrielle Zevin | Amazon | Bookshop.org [6:17] The Younger Wife by Sally Hepworth | Amazon | Bookshop.org [8:12] When We Were Bright and Beautiful by Jillian Medoff | Amazon | Bookshop.org [8:17] Cleopatra and Frankenstein by Coco Mellors | Amazon | Bookshop.org [11:21] Trust by Hernan Diaz | Amazon | Bookshop.org [15:31] Every Summer After by Carley Fortune | Amazon | Bookshop.org [19:23] Solito by Javier Zamora | Amazon | Bookshop.org [25:28] We Spread by Iain Reid | Amazon | Bookshop.org [26:48] Can't Look Away by Carola Lovering | Amazon | Bookshop.org [32:37] The Light Pirate by Lily Brooks-Dalton (December 6, 2022) | Amazon | Bookshop.org [35:52] The Winners by Fredrik Backman | Amazon | Bookshop.org [39:44] Demon Copperhead by Barbara Kingsolver | Amazon | Bookshop.org [40:40] Nightcrawling by Leila Mottley | Amazon | Bookshop.org [42:54] We All Want Impossible Things by Catherine Newman | Amazon | Bookshop.org [47:11] Unlikely Animals by Annie Hartnett | Amazon | Bookshop.org [47:14] Someday, Maybe by Onyi Nwabineli | Amazon | Bookshop.org [47:17] This Time Tomorrow by Emma Straub | Amazon | Bookshop.org [47:57] Babel by R. F. Kuang | Amazon | Bookshop.org [50:44] Other Books Mentioned Malibu Rising by Taylor Jenkins Reid [7:24] The Ingenue by Rachel Kapelke-Dale (December 6, 2022) [12:51] Vladimir by Julia May Jonas [19:10] The Measure by Nikki Erlick [23:30] Beartown by Fredrik Backman [28:39] Tell Me Lies by Carola Lovering [32:42] Too Good to Be True by Carola Lovering [32:43] The Latecomer by Jean Hanff Korelitz [33:31] The Plot by Jean Hanff Korelitz [33:33] Good Morning, Midnight by Lily Brooks-Dalton [36:00] Thirteen by Steve Cavanagh [38:30] About Susie Boutry Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram Susie has loved reading for as long as she can remember. Some of her fondest childhood memories involve long afternoons at the library and then reading late into the night. More than ten years ago, she began journaling about the books she read and turned that passion into writing about books. Her first forays were as a guest reviewer on a friend's blog, but she soon realized she wanted to be reviewing and talking about books on a blog of her own. From there, Novel Visits was born. That was in 2016 and, though the learning curve was steep, she loves being a part of the book community. Novel Visits focuses on new novel reviews (print and audio), previews of upcoming releases, and musings on all things bookish.

StarTalk Radio
Could We Someday Live Forever? With Ray Kurzweil

StarTalk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 52:40


Would you want to live forever? On this episode, Neil deGrasse Tyson and author, inventor, and futurist Ray Kurzweil discuss immortality, longevity escape velocity, the singularity, and the future of technology. What will life be like in 10 years? NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://startalkmedia.com/show/could-we-someday-live-forever-with-ray-kurzweil/Thanks to our Patrons Johan Svensson, Galen J., Kellen Bolander, Sunshine, and Brian White for supporting us this week.Photo Credit: Jon Manning, CC0, via Wikimedia Commons

Burn the Boats
Jinho ‘Piper' Ferreira: Hip-Hop, Community, and Policing

Burn the Boats

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 42:44


Flipsyde member Jinho ‘Piper' Ferreira talks about how his experiences as a police officer, rapper, and artist have influenced him. Piper was born and raised in Oakland, California. During his childhood in the 80's and 90's, Oakland was rife with crime, and police/community relations were at an all-time low.  In 2002, Piper's childhood friend Jihad Akbar was killed by police. This inspired him to create Flipsyde, a successful Hip-Hop group that toured worldwide in the early 2000's. Their song Someday was chosen by NBC as the theme of the 2006 Winter Olympics.  In 2009, Oscar Grant was killed by an Oakland police officer. The story resonated with Piper, and he decided the only way he could make an impact was if he was the one making the life or death decisions.  During the interview, Piper had this to say about the difference between his reaction to the death of Jihad, and the death of Grant: “I didn't have any control over the cop that pulled the trigger. I initially put that pain into my music and ended up touring the world with my band. I tried what I could, according to the rules that I had known growing up and according to my values, until it became apparent that I needed to try something else.”  Piper became an Alameda County Deputy Sheriff, and served in law enforcement for eight years. During that time, he helped create the Deputy Sheriff's Activities League, which addresses policing problems by focusing on social equity and community-led economic empowerment.  In 2014, he wrote a one man play titled Cops and Robbers that “highlights the frequently fraught relationship between police officers, the communities they serve, and the media.” It received critical acclaim.  Check out the website for Marcus Books, which is mentioned in the episode, here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Tom and Curley Show
Hour 3: Could planes only have one pilot someday?

The Tom and Curley Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 30:47


5pm - Talking Sports with Ry // Could planes only have one pilot someday? // Florida Woman Sues Kraft Over Velveeta Shells & Cheese ‘Ready Time,' Asks for Over $5 Million // LETTERSSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Passive Income Examiner- Work From Home, Freelancers, Affiliate Marketers, Passive Revenue, Blogging, Passive Income Strategi
Live Your "Someday Dream" Today - 3 steps to create your dream life

Passive Income Examiner- Work From Home, Freelancers, Affiliate Marketers, Passive Revenue, Blogging, Passive Income Strategi

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 21:05 Transcription Available


Register for the FREE Training on How to build 6 streams of income around 1 topic HERE - www.lindsaysutherland.com/passive-income-machine3 Steps To Create Your Dream Life Course: https://www.lindsaysutherland.com/3-Steps-To-Dream-LifeMoving to a log cabin in the woods was not an easy feat. With a family of 7, a non-transferrable career, and no idea how to make it happen my family and I embarked on a mission to live our someday dream life sooner rather than later.After losing both of my parents before they hit retirement I knew that life is short and there is no guarantee of someday. I couldn't fathom working another 20, 30, or 40 years and THEN getting to live my dream life. I wanted my cake and I wanted to eat it too.My husband and I made a promise to chase the dream (after ten years of talking about it) and that is when the magic finally started. In fact, there was a specific turning point that later became clear to me was extremely significant to leveraging the power of my will; the free will that God has blessed us all with.Looking back, I realized there were three specific steps we took to create our dream life. Since then I have tried this formula on other areas of my life. I've manifested a horse (a dream I've had in my heart for years and kept putting off), $10,000 surprise check in the mail, and countless less noteworthy things that make my life simpler!Now, I'm offering a course to help you create the life of your dreams too. Follow the three steps I outline and practice the specific mindset strategies I detail in the course to achieve your someday life sooner too!Want more episodes like this?Passive Income for Network Marketers: https://player.captivate.fm/episode/d18ffcb6-a848-4bf0-9885-480fe3c451a7Amazon retail stores - Can you really make money? https://player.captivate.fm/episode/e168113b-da6c-4204-871b-de0e61d9ce46What should I do with my passive income? https://player.captivate.fm/episode/28c8b93f-5797-4325-b08d-190f8ccae7f7This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

Meteor City
Season 2 | Episode 6 - Someday

Meteor City

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 43:01


This episode's featured artist was Regina Del Carmen  Bianca feels haunted by everything that is happening around her and it begins taking its toll. Plus, the Diaz siblings are in for an overdue dinner.  In this episode you heard: Daisy Guevara as Bianca Diaz Ernesto Valentin as Malcolm Diaz Jarred Worley as Wes Cambell Leslie Gideon as Bethany Cain-Cambell Madelyn Dorta as Krystal Mendoza Sam Kim as Antoine Kim Hotline callers: Reeko Brooks  Tiger Oakes Tal Minear  Lindsay Zana  This episode's featured artist was Regina Del Carmen link to the full song in the show notes. Original theme song by Angel Dorta Meteor City is a Wrightwood Studios production  Written and Directed by Madelyn Dorta and Produced by Angel Dorta and Ernesto Valentine To see the full cast list, transcripts, and more behind-the-scenes content please visit www.wrightwoodstudios.com and follow us on Twitter and Instagram at meteorcitypod   Thanks for listening!

Broad Street Hockey: for Philadelphia Flyers fans
Checking out the competition: Someday this team will not be good

Broad Street Hockey: for Philadelphia Flyers fans

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 23:20


Everyone enjoy their turkey? We've got a 5:30pm Black Friday showdown against the Pittsburgh Penguins; the first meeting of these two teams this year. Jim Rixner of Pensburgh was kind enough to take us inside the Pens season so far. Spoiler alert: they're still good. It's annoying. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Dear Young Rocker
E47: Lemonworld

Dear Young Rocker

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 40:11


Dear Young Rocker: the most challenging times can also be the most beautiful times. Someday you'll look back and realize it all passed so quickly, just like youth. Nadia reflects on her time spent in New York City and how she ended up finding exactly what she needed - herself and music. This season of Dear Young Rocker is written and hosted by Nadia Marie. Want to share your own Young Rocker experience? Connect with Nadia on Instagram and TikTok @NadiaMarieForever. You can also follow the show on Instagram @DearYoungRocker and @DoubleElvis.  Dear Young Rocker was created by, and is executive produced by, Chelsea Ursin. The show is executive produced by Jake Brennan, Brady Sadler, and Carly Carioli for Double Elvis.  Script editing on this episode by Chelsea Ursin and James Sullivan. Production by Sean Cahalin and Lea Tatoris. Music for this episode was composed and performed by Nadia Marie. To hear more of her music, follow Nadia Marie on all streaming platforms. Additional music and score elements by Sean Cahalin, Ryan Spraker, and James Bridges.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Straight Outta Vegas with RJ Bell
Hour 1 - Someday, USA. Someday.

Straight Outta Vegas with RJ Bell

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 41:32


Steve Covino and Rich Davis talk about the NFL's growing international  presence, whether or not the USA would dominate soccer if their best athletes chose to play it, the guys take your calls, and more!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Raw Data By P3
Something Bigger than Yourself, w/ Microsoft's Miguel Escobar

Raw Data By P3

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 68:41


Today, we reunite two old friends with a penchant for writing books for people adjacent to tech as we welcome Miguel Escobar to the show. If you use Power Query or Power BI, you might have heard of Miguel. He is the co-author of several books on Power Query, Power BI, Power Pivot, and DAX. He is also part of the expert trifecta that created Skill Wave training and he is now an integral part of Microsoft working to make Power Query better for all users. He and Rob reminisce about book deals, DAX, training, and writing in a voice for the people, instead of for the tech giants. But, most importantly, you get the inside scoop on the data-cleaning drudgery that was Excel and analytics before the DAX and Power Query data revolution.  Miguel and Rob trade entertaining stories of how Excel gives people a competitive edge in the job market but somehow remains a fundamentally underappreciated skill during the educational years. After all, it's not just about the tool, what matters is what people do with it, how they use it, and how it has changed the trajectory of their careers. After hearing a few of these stories, you're going to want to send a tweet to Tom to encourage him to finally admit that Power Query deserves a spot in the Software Hall of Fame. This episode isn't all about Power Query, though as we also learn a little about the eclectic taste in music our hosts share as well as some interesting tidbits regarding songwriting and the musical process. Miguel opens up about his passion for music and composition as he shares some personal insight into the process of collaborating and creating music in the digital world. If you listen closely, you can even hear some of his work spliced into this podcast in a musical first for us. Of course, you can hear Miguel's song: Someday, Somehow (feat. Chris Cron) in its entirety across multiple musical platforms. Be sure to give it a listen and share it with a friend. As always, if you enjoyed this episode, be sure to leave us a review on your favorite podcast platform to help others find us.   Also in this episode: Good Will Hunting – I don't understand the piano Jerry was a race car driver Miguel Escobar: Geo Flow using Panama's Census Data DAX formulas for power pivot: A Simple Guide to the Excel Revolution Major Key / Minor Key culturally different Box Office Mojo Mr. Excel M is for (Data) Monkey Bell Biv DeVoe Johnny Cash: Hurt Blues Traveler: Hook Rocksmith Guitar Pro Power Query online Software Hall of Fame Podcast Power Query Saves Christmas w/ Gus Miranda

Virtual Book Tour
Onyi Nwabineli thinks closure is overrated.

Virtual Book Tour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 30:05


We're taking an emotional journey with our next guest, Onyi Nwabineli. Her debut novel Someday, Maybe tackles some really tough subjects like suicide, grief, and guilt. Onyi shares what it was like to dive deep into these emotions, what sparked the idea for this story, and we even play a little game where we learn what the being 'Keeper of the Cup' entails. Someday, Maybe tells the story of Eve, who has suffered the unimaginable. In the aftermath of her husband's suicide, she is battling with feelings of grief and guilt. But through the transformative power of love, Eve starts to grow stronger and more hopeful. This emotional, devastatingly frank account of grief's many faces will have you in your feelings.Get Someday, Maybe at bookofthemonth.com. New members get their first book for just $9.99 with code VBT at checkout. Learn more about Virtual Book Tour at virtualbooktour.com

The TechEd Podcast
Hybrid Autonomous Manufacturing: Next-Gen Research Led by Ohio State - Glenn Daehn, Director of the HAMMER Engineering Research Center

The TechEd Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 38:16


The Hybrid Autonomous Manufacturing Moving from Evolution to Revolution (HAMMER) Engineering Research Center at the Ohio State University is developing next-gen processes and systems for what the future of manufacturing will look like.A $26 million grant from the National Science Foundation is enabling Ohio State and its partner network to carry out research and education around hybrid autonomous manufacturing.Glenn Daehn, a professor of metallurgical engineering, is Director of the HAMMER Engineering Research Center and joins us to talk about the hybridization of manufacturing processes, how we move from automation to autonomy, the role of creativity and art in STEM, and so much more!3 Big Takeaways from this episode:What is hybrid autonomous manufacturing? Hybrid is about using all kinds of manufacturing processes, like subtractive manufacturing (removing material), additive manufacturing (adding material), deformation (reshaping material). As part of this project, the center seeks to develop numerically controlled systems for deformation that don't currently exist. Autonomous means those different processes can be used in tandem in a full system, where you don't need a human in the loop. It's moving from manual to automated to autonomous where the process is being sensed and monitored and controlled autonomously - one example Glenn shares would be a robotic blacksmith.Manufacturing for design - not design for manufacturing: Glenn and his team are working to flip the model. Right now, the focus is on design for manufacturability. In the future, we'll have the ideal design we want and AI will enable us to develop the tools and processes to manufacture in the way we need to manufacture to get to that ideal design, and do it efficiently and with high quality.Future-thinking manufacturing relies on creativity and artistry: Just as a skilled blacksmith has the perfect combination of art and skill, future manufacturing processes will require both creativity and engineering. Someday, AI will be sophisticated enough to creatively develop new ways to manufacture for design. To ensure creativity is carried into the future of manufacturing, we need to encourage hands-on learning, give students the chance to build things, and spark their creativity and curiosity in STEM.ResourcesTo learn more about the HAMMER Engineering Research Center, visit: https://hammer.osu.edu/Episode page: https://techedpodcast.com/hammer/Instagram - Facebook - YouTube - TikTok - Twitter - LinkedIn

The Powerful Man Show
Are You Living For Someday?

The Powerful Man Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 23:31


Episode #591 Do you want to know the 2 reasons why men are joining the brotherhood? Well, it starts by answering the question 'What's holding you back from doing what you love?' Don't waste your time waiting for someday because it may never come, it's time to create a better version of yourself to fulfill your life goals. In this episode, we talk about why you should not live for someday and what to do to upgrade your 5 territories so you can live your best life today. ————- Hungry for more? Head over to our BONUS page for special access to some of the deeper tactics and techniques we've developed at The Powerful Man.

Art of the Cut
The Alan Smithee Round Table (“Using NFTs for Good”)

Art of the Cut

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 44:20


Welcome to our monthly round table podcast where hosts Scott Simmons, Katie Hinsen & Michael Kammes discuss the latest news on production, post production, entertainment tech and beyond. This week the gang also talks about Davinci Resolve for the iPad Pro 2, NAB and why they each love it, the effect of the economy on production, how NFT's and Blockchain will shape the future of collaboration during which Katie tells us 'what real art is' and they each share their 'one cool thing'. Enjoy the episode and don't forget to subscribe. Topics Discussed Today: https://www.provideocoalition.com/new-apple-ipad-pro-m2-will-run-an-upcoming-version-of-davinci-resolve/ https://www.nab.org/documents/newsRoom/pressRelease.asp?id=6581 https://www.axios.com/2022/10/25/media-layoffs-2022-ad-market-decline One Cool Thing: Scott - https://www.provideocoalition.com/dont-give-up-on-postchat-twitter-yet/ https://postchat.io/explore Michael - https://www.makingthecut.net/ https://movielabs.com/ Katie - https://web3.wb.com/warnermedia/movieverse https://live.eluv.io/ A bit about the hosts: Scott Simmons @editblog Scott was born in rural West Tennessee and didn't really realize that movies and tv had to be made by actual people until he went to college. After getting degrees in both Television Production and Graphic Design he was in one of the early graduating classes at the Watkins Film School in Nashville, Tennessee. During that time at Watkins he discovered editing. In 1999, Scott took the leap into freelancing and in 2007 accepted a position as an editor at Filmworkers - Nashville. In 2005 Scott created The Editblog a website dedicated to all things editing and post-production which is now housed here at PVC. Someday he hopes to edit on a beach with a touch screen device, a wireless hard drive and a Red Stripe. Katie Hinsen @katiehinsen Katie is an international award-winning film and television executive with credits on over 100 major productions. Her background as a Finishing Artist has allowed her to make waves through Editorial, Color, Engineering, VFX and Leadership. She has spent much of her career focussed on the forecasting and implementation of emerging technologies and, is a passionate mentor and advocate for emerging talent. Michael Kammes @michaelkammes Michael is the Senior Director of Innovation at Shift Media. He consults on the latest in technology and best practices in the digital media creation and communication space. Specialties: Workflows and Technology in Production and Post Production: Cloud/SaaS, Acquisition, VR/360, HDR, Storage, Asset Management, Automation, Archival, Editorial, Post Audio, Finishing, Encoding/Transcoding and Distribution. Michael incorporates this deep knowledge into his technical infotainment series "5 THINGS" plus various podcasts, panels and user groups. Plus he really really digs Post. http:/5thingsseries.com http:/michaelkammes.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/artofthecut/support

The 5 Minute Discipleship Podcast

Do you have a dream? Do you have a God-given dream? Is there something God has put into your heart to do, accomplish, and fulfill? Does the dream stay with you and never seem to leave? Is there something God is calling you to do? Main Points:1. Maybe you need a little encouragement. What God has called you to do, you need to do it. Do it now. Don't put it off. Don't say someday. Someday may not come, but you do have today. What action step can you take today?2. We take time for granted. We live as if our time is unlimited, but we know deep down inside that is not true. We only have a limited amount of time and we don't know how much. 3. We always have plenty of time to do everything we need to do. This means that all of my time belongs to God, and therefore how I spend my days is a sacred issue. Someday I will answer for what I did today.Today's Scripture Verses:Ecclesiastes 3:1-4 - "There is a time for everything, And a season for every activity under heaven: A time to be born and a time to die, A time to plant and a time to uproot, A time to kill and a time to heal, A time to tear down and a time to build, A time to weep and a time to laugh, A time to mourn and a time to dance."Proverbs 27:1 - “Do not boast about tomorrow, for you do not know what a day may bring.”James 4:13-15 - “ Look here, you who say, “Today or tomorrow we are going to a certain town and will stay there a year. We will do business there and make a profit.” How do you know what your life will be like tomorrow? Your life is like the morning fog—it's here a little while, then it's gone. What you ought to say is, “If the Lord wants us to, we will live and do this or that.”Ecclesiastes 9:10 – “Whatever you do, do well. For when you go to the grave, there will be no work or planning or knowledge or wisdom.”Quick Links:Subscribe to The 5 Minute Discipleship NewsletterDonate to support this podcastLeave a review on Apple PodcastsGet a copy of The 5 Minute Discipleship JournalConnect on SocialJoin The 5 Minute Discipleship Facebook Group5 Minute Discipleship on Instagram

Book Bistro
Queer Romance

Book Bistro

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 70:41


This week, Sara, Shannon, and guest presenter Robin are recommending queer romances. Titles mentioned include: Patricia D. Eddy, Braving His Past (Away From Keyboard #8) Erica Ridley, The Perks of Loving a Wallflower (The Wild Wynchesters #2) E.E. Ottoman, The Companion Talia Hibbert, Work for It (Just for Him #4) Alyssa Cole, How To Find a Princess (Runaway Royals #2) Cole McCade, Just Like This (Albin Academy #2) Emma Scott, Someday, Someday Gregory Ashe, Pretty Pretty Boys (Hazard and Somerset #1) Jane Walsh, The Inconvenient Heiress (Spinsters of Inverley #1) Chloe Liese, Everything for You (Bergman Brothers #5) Anita Kelly, Love & Other Disasters Harper Fox, Priddy's Tale You can always contact the Book Bistro team by searching @BookBistroPodcast on facebook, or visiting: https://www.facebook.com/BookBistroPodcast/ You can also send an email to: TheBookBistroPodcast@gmail.com For more information on the podcast and the team behind it, please visit: http://anchor.fm/book-bistro

Punch Up The Jam
'You're Still The One' by Shania Twain (w/ Jiji Lee)

Punch Up The Jam

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 66:33


Ever thought about how making a billion dollars would ruin your life? Maybe you pondered a lot of options (revolutionary coup, botched CoolSculpting, basic bitch drug cartel kidnapping), but you MIGHT have missed an obvious one if you haven't read all the People mag listicles about Shania Twain's divorce-slash-husband-swap! Long story short, do NOT hire someone to be your best friend and then leave them alone in a palatial Swiss chalet with your superproducer husband while you go on tour. Evan, Andrew, and friend of the pod Jiji Lee discuss how Shania and Mutt Lange's ballad remains the most perfect ballad of all time even after their gruesome divorce, and also how paradoxically it could be improved by leaning into Shania's sheer fury over being spurned, with an added bonus of it being very hard to extradite criminals from Switzerland. Guest: Jiji Lee You can now watch the video version of this episode HERE! Walk-in music: ‘(Everything I Do) I Do It For You' by Bryan Adams; ‘Highway To Hell' by ACDC; ‘Someday' by Mariah Carey. Follow Punch Up The Jam on Twitter and Instagram Get the punch-ups for yourself and support the show on Patreon Like the show? Rate Punch Up The Jam 5 stars on Spotify and Apple Podcasts and leave a review for Andrew and Evan. Advertise on Punch Up The Jam via Gumball.fmSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Walk Boldly With Jesus
Why Does Jesus Speak In Parables?

Walk Boldly With Jesus

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 13:47


Why Does Jesus Speak in Parables?Matthew 13:10-13 “The disciples came to him and asked, “Why do you speak to the people in parables?”He replied, “Because the knowledge of the secrets of the kingdom of heaven has been given to you, but not to them. Whoever has will be given more, and they will have an abundance. Whoever does not have, even what they have will be taken from them. This is why I speak to them in parables:“Though seeing, they do not see; though hearing, they do not hear or understand.”Last week in class we talked about the different ways that God communicates with us.  One of those ways is through parables. I never really completely understood why Jesus had to talk in parables.  I didn't understand why he couldn't just tell everyone what He was telling his   apostles.  In class they mentioned the goal of a parable was not only to teach but also to conceal.  Jesus taught in parables to conceal the powerful knowledge from the proud but reveal it to the childlike.  For some reason, this sentence seemed to put things into perspective for me.  I now understood a little better why everyone couldn't hear what Jesus was saying.  They weren't spiritually ready to hear what Jesus had to say.  Then they gave us the scripture verse Luke 10:21, "At that time Jesus, full of joy through the Holy Spirit, said, “I praise you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because you have hidden these things from the wise and learned, and revealed them to little children. Yes, Father, for this is what you were pleased to do.”  This reinforces what the teacher was saying.  Some understanding is hidden from those who do not believe or are not ready to hear what God has to say.  We must learn to be childlike when we approach God if we wish to have a greater understanding of Him.  Then they pointed us to Proverbs 25:2, “It is the glory of God to conceal a matter; to search out a matter is the glory of kings.”  Then I was confused again.  Why would God conceal a matter and why would that be a good thing?The next morning while I was reading my devotional this is what it said:As you look at the day before you, you see a twisted, complicated path, with branches going off in all directions. You wonder how you can possibly find your way through that maze. Then you remember the One who is with you always, holding you by your right hand. You recall my promise to guide you with my counsel, and you begin to relax. As you look again at the path ahead you notice that a peaceful fog has settled over it obscuring your view. You can see only a few steps in front of you, so you turn your attention more fully to me and begin to enjoy my presence. The fog is a protection from you, calling you back into the present moment. Although I inhabit all space and time, you can communicate with me only here and now. Someday that fog will no longer be necessary, for you will have learned to keep your focus on me and on the path just ahead of you.”Proverbs 25:2 says, "It is the glory of God to conceal a matter; to search out a matter is the glory of kings.”  They reminded us in class that we are kings through our Baptism.  What this verse is telling us is that as we explore God's Word, we uncover more and more revelations about God.  As we do this, we mature into a deeper intimacy with God.  God conceals things from us that we are not ready to hear or to know.  However, as we dive into Scripture and as we work on growing closer to Him, he slowly reveals all we need to know.  How many of us can look back over our lives and say with certainty we would have gone down the path we did if we knew all we would go through at the beginning of the path?  If new parents new exactly what they were getting into, if they knew all the challenges their child would go through, would anyone choose to have a baby?  If you knew could see a movie of your life, all the challenges you were going to face, before you started down the path you started down, would you still chose it?  If we look back over our life usually we can see how one experience prepared us for another experience.  Our difficult times are so hard while we are going through them and yet often times, when we look back, many years later, we can see how they were necessary.  If we can't see why they were necessary, we can at least see what we learned from them and how they prepared us for the next thing we were going to have to face.  If we think of it in terms of school.  If you show a first grader an algebra problem and tell them they are going to be expected to know how to do that that, they won't know what you are talking about. They may feel overwhelmed because that seems so far from where they are right now.  However, if you don't show them what they need to know in several years, but you show them what they will be learning that year, they won't be so overwhelmed.  This is the same with us when it comes to our faith.  Jesus knew that if He told people everything they needed to know about God, we would be overwhelmed.  Developing an intimate relationship with God has to be developed over time, step by step.  We would get overwhelmed if everything was revealed to us at once.  There was a statement made in class that I loved.  The teacher said, “God speaks to us in parables not to hide things from us, but to hide things for us.”  This is something important for us all to remember.  This is the way God works.  He does all things for us, not to us.  He is working all things for our good.  If we are going through a difficult time, it is not because God is doing something to us, He is doing it for us.  The difficult could be of your own making and yet God can use it for your good.  He can use it for your growth.  I loved in the devotional above how it says a “a peaceful fog has settled over it obscuring your view.”  Even just that description brings me peace.  It doesn't say you are plunged into darkness, it doesn't say I have taken away all light so you can't see, it says a peaceful fog settles over it, meaning the path ahead.  Sometimes knowing too much in advance can be a bad thing.  It can cause us not to do something because we don't think we are strong enough.  Yet, God knows by the time we get there, we will be strong enough.  I recently ran a trail fest with my friend Ashley.  She had always wanted to do one and so we decided for her birthday this year, we would sign up.  A trail fest is three days of running in a row.  You are camping in a tent at night and then getting up early and running three beautiful runs each day.  I knew going into this that it would be difficult.  It was going to be running 34 miles in three days and it would be running at an elevation we were not used to.  We knew it would be difficult and yet we were willing to give it a try.  However, what we didn't know was that sleeping on the ground with only a sleeping bag is really uncomfortable.  We didn't know that when we got to the highest point of the run it would be really hard to breathe.  We didn't know that compost toilets were really tall and when we sat on them our feet would be off the ground.  We didn't know that the last day was less of a trail run and more of a rock climbing experience.  We didn't know we would be trying to walk in deep sand during parts of it.  If we had known exactly what we were getting into, I am not sure we would have signed up.  If we knew all of that, we might not have gotten to enjoy the awesome experience.  That trip was a once in a lifetime trip that we will always remember.  Those things I mentioned above, didn't ruin our trip, they only made it more challenging, and yet we still succeeded.  If we had known exactly what we were getting into we would have told ourselves we couldn't do it.  We would have thought we weren't strong enough.  God knew this and in His infinite wisdom concealed some of that information from us and I am so thankful!  I am grateful I now have this amazing experience to look back upon.  The same is true for my spiritual life.  If you would have asked me years ago if I would ever be in a charismatic prayer group I would have said no way.  I could never speak in tongues, I could never pray over people out loud, unscripted.  I could never praise God out loud.  Even now, after all the growth I have made, I still get nervous when I get a glimpse into the future God has planned for me.  I know I am not ready to see all He has planned because I will count myself out.  God knows exactly what we need to know and when we need to know it and I am so grateful for that.  We are so lucky to have a God that cares so much for us and that knows us so well.  Trust that God will reveal to you what you need to know when you need to know it.  I know it is frustrating when we don't know what is coming next.  I know we want to see the whole path right now, or at least I know I do.  However, learning that God is hiding things for me, not from me, gives me a whole new way to look at it.  Dear Heavenly Father, I ask you to bless all those listening to this episode today.  Lord, we thank you for protecting us from ourselves.  We thank you for knowing exactly what we need.  You are so good to us.  We don't want to be anxious about the future.  We want to be able to stay in the present moment and to keep our eyes fixed on you.  Lord, please give us the patience to wait for you to reveal things when we are ready.  help us to see you are doing this for us and not to us.  Help us to understand why we can't know everything up front.  Lord, help us to be ok with the not knowing.  Help us to learn to stay in this moment and enjoy it instead of constantly thinking about what comes next.  We love you Lord and we ask all of this in accordance with your will and in Jesus' holy name, Amen.Thank you so much for joining me on this journey to walk boldly with Jesus.  In case you haven't listened to the other episodes this week I wanted to share the news that my book is finally out there in the world! I am so excited to share it with all of you.  It is called Total Trust in God's Safe Embrace and it can be found only on Amazon right now.  It is in paperback or ebook format with the audio book coming soon.  Please check it out and please pass it along to anyone you think might benefit from a deeper, more intimate relationship with God and also could use a little more trust in God's plan for their life.  Thank you for all your support.  I look forward to spending time with you again tomorrow.  Remember, Jesus loves you and so do I.  Have a blessed day!

Today Daily Devotional

Our citizenship is in heaven. And we eagerly await a Savior from there, the Lord Jesus Christ. . . . — Philippians 3:20 One of my favorite movies is the animated film Up. In this film, an old man named Carl attaches thousands of helium filled balloons to his house, which then takes him and his young friend Russell up and away to fantastical adventures. Before eating the Lord's Sup­per, Christians in some traditions pray these words, “We lift up our hearts to the Lord.” After Jesus died and was raised to life again, he ascended up and away to heaven. But Jesus is never far away from his people, especially when they worship, hear God's Word, and eat the meal he gave them. But this leads to a practical question: when we eat this meal together, does Jesus come down from heaven to meet with us on earth? John Calvin, a French pastor who lived 500 years ago, answered, “No. Actual­ly, through the mysterious power of the Holy Spirit, we, the church, are pulled up to heaven to meet with Jesus.” So even as we sit in worship, somehow our space has been pulled up to overlap with heaven. Some theologians have called this Calvin's “vir­tual” theory of the Lord's Supper. Someday, when Jesus comes again, heaven will come down to earth with him, and all who believe in him will be able to live with him. Then, with heaven and earth completely overlapping, all creation will be renewed, and we will enjoy full life with the Lord forever (Revelation 21-22). Lord, may your kingdom fully come on earth as it is in heaven. Till then, draw us up to you by your Spirit. Amen.

The Sports Physical Therapy Academy Podcast
EP092: “How To Avoid The Someday Syndrome”

The Sports Physical Therapy Academy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 28:07


Today, I share the syndrome that will limit the professional growth of physical therapists in their careers.  All too often, physical therapists become complacent in their career and find themselves stuck in a rut, depending on annual CEU course to motivate or inspire them.  In this episode I share this unique syndrome, what it is, why it happens, and what to do to avoid it. If you're a PT who wants to be known as the best in your career and avoid being stuck, you need to tune into this episode. Enjoy! _____________________________________ Are you a physical therapist or physiotherapist looking for tips, tools, and strategies to work with more athletes, become a sports specialist or get a job in a sports setting...so you can finally enjoy the career that you've always dreamed of? If so, you're in the right place...this podcast is for you. Your host is Dr. Chris Garcia, a physical therapist, business owner, entrepreneur, nationally recognized public speaker, and residency-trained sports specialist.  Dr. Chris Garcia, PT, DPT, SCS, CSCS, USAW has worked in professional sports and traveled around the world working with elite athletes throughout his career, and he's learned a lot of lessons along the way. He created this podcast to share his experiences and give you everything you need to know to help YOU become a successful clinician. Dr. Chris Garcia talks about everything from sports rehab and injury prevention to developing athletic performance and the path to getting your dream job...even if it is in professional sports. If you want to become a successful clinician so you can finally enjoy the career you've always dreamed of, visit www.DrChrisGarcia.com. LINKS: www.DrChrisGarcia.com www.Instagram.com/ChrisGarciaDPT www.Facebook.com/ChrisGarciaDPT ***DISCLAIMER: This content is for educational & informational use only and & does not constitute medical advice. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice or medical recommendations, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a qualified medical professional for proper evaluation & treatment, or beginning any exercises or activity in this content. Chris Garcia Academy, Inc. and The Sports PT Academy Podcast are not responsible for any harm caused by the use of this content.***

Our Golden 20s
Rooting For The Anti-Hero, Limiting Beliefs, and Someday Syndrome

Our Golden 20s

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 53:52


Season 2 Episode 42. It's me, hi, I'm the problem, it's me. Today's podcast episode is inspired by none other than Taylor Swift. With over 175 million plays on Spotify, you're probably familiar with her new single Anti-Hero. We're breaking down the lyrics and talking about what it really means to root for the anti-hero and how to change your inner narrative to address limiting beliefs and someday syndrome. Support us on Patreon @ourgolden20s Follow us on: TikTok @ourgolden20s Instagram @ourgolden20s Pinterest @ourgolden20s Facebook @ourgolden20s Spotify @ourgolden20s --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/our-golden-20s/message

The Michael Berry Show
COMEDY - KENDALL JENNER WILL BE PRESIDENT SOMEDAY

The Michael Berry Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 1:37


Tranquility du Jour
Tranquility du Jour #593: Someday is Today

Tranquility du Jour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 48:49


In this week's edition of Tranquility du Jour, I chat with Matthew Dicks about his new book Someday is Today: 22 Simple, Actionable Ways to Propel Your Creative Life. Learn about his One-Hundred-Year-Old plan and how it can help us live without fear of regret, how to maximize task efficiency, his thoughts on social media, how he likes to "sleep sacredly," and more. Direct download: Tranquility du Jour #593: Someday is Today Subscribe in your favorite podcast app such as Spotify, Apple Podcast, Amazon. Visit kimberlywilson.com/podcast for more. New to Tranquility du Jour? Learn more here. Upcoming Events 11/14 Hip Tranquil Chick Sweet 16 12/12 Tranquil Holidays Pop-UpCoterie Waitlist {Opens late 2022} Video Interview https://youtu.be/Tw_04fGfrns Our Guest Matthew Dicks is the author of Someday Is Today and nine other books. A bestselling novelist, nationally recognized storyteller, and award-winning elementary schoolteacher, he teaches storytelling and communications at universities, corporate workplaces, and community organizations. Dicks has won multiple Moth GrandSLAM story competitions and, together with his wife, created the organization Speak Up to help others share their stories. They also cohost the Speak Up Storytelling podcast. He lives in Connecticut with his family. Visit him online at http://www.MatthewDicks.com.         Find Our Guest Book: https://www.newworldlibrary.com/Literature-and-Writing/SOMEDAY-IS-TODAY Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/matthewdicks Twitter: https://twitter.com/MatthewDicks YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC4K0fcEJkzJLso5h6CN00LQ Let's Connect Receive inbox love through Love Notes: invites, inspiration, and more. Browse my 6 Books and planner. Follow along on Instagram and YouTube. Shop seasonless, vegan, locally-made, eco-friendly fashion: TDJ by Kimberly. Share a review on Apple Podcasts, Amazon, or Goodreads and you may hear it shared on the show.

Hardcore Husky Football Podcast
Someday there'll be a way to locate Roadkill

Hardcore Husky Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 56:36


With all the precision of a 5-year old telling you about their trip to the zoo, Derek and JoeEDangerously describe Washington's 24-21 win over Oregon State... and a bunch of other Husky-related stuff too. Shout outs go to Dennis_DeYoung, Joey's cousins, Joey's younger brother, LawDawg1, Sources, SwisherSweetboy and TheKnowledge. Come register for free and join the malarkey at HardcoreHusky.com

The Fierce Female Network
Indie Artist Cities You Wish You We're From Is On Air!

The Fierce Female Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 27:00


Cities is a two-man supergroup consisting of producer Eli Jenkins and percussionist Tyler Downie. Their new album, ‘Someday this Pain Will Be Useful' was born out of loss and struggle including Downie's own battle with brain cancer in 2021 as well as the sudden passing of the bands longtime producer, Gray Griggs, the same year. They make loud music about love, loss and aggressive victory.

The Fierce Female Network
Cities Are On Air!

The Fierce Female Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 19:00


Cities is a two-man supergroup consisting of producer Eli Jenkins and percussionist Tyler Downie. Their new album, ‘Someday this Pain Will Be Useful' was born out of loss and struggle including Downie's own battle with brain cancer in 2021 as well as the sudden passing of the bands longtime producer, Gray Griggs, the same year. They make loud music about love, loss and aggressive victory.  

The Fierce Female Network
Cities You Wish You We're From Are On Air!

The Fierce Female Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 25:00


Cities is a two-man supergroup consisting of producer Eli Jenkins and percussionist Tyler Downie. Their new album, ‘Someday this Pain Will Be Useful' was born out of loss and struggle including Downie's own battle with brain cancer in 2021 as well as the sudden passing of the bands longtime producer, Gray Griggs, the same year. They make loud music about love, loss and aggressive victory.

Business with Purpose
When Collaboration Over Competition Really Happens | EP 322: Jessica Honegger & Liz Bohannon, Noonday Collection

Business with Purpose

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 49:45


My guests this week are Jessica Honegger and Liz Bohannon. Jessica is the author of Imperfect Courage and founder of the socially conscious fashion brand Noonday Collection. Liz is the founder of Sseko Designs, an ethical fashion brand that works to educate and empower women. She is also the newly named chief growth officer of Noonday Collection. Today we're talking about the merge heard around the fair trade world that happened this summer when Noonday Collection and Sseko Designs came together. Jessica and Liz have been on the show before, but today's conversation will be extra special. 6:05 – Jessica 201 Jessica's company is a one-stop fully ethical shop that creates opportunities for artisans living in some of the world's most vulnerable places. She is a mom of three and has a book, a podcast and a love of queso and margaritas. 7:20 – Liz 201 She joined Noonday and is working to grow the company's global artisan impact and community of entrepreneurs in the U.S. Liz believes every girl should have the opportunity to learn and to lead. She has three young boys and also loves queso and margaritas. 17:22 – Counterculture Liz and Jessica are living counter culturally by working together instead of competing against each other. They spent many hours having difficult conversations about how to merge their businesses. Their business cares for women around the world. 32:23 – Going into business together Long ago, I felt like Liz and Jessica should go into business together but never told them. Their work is a beautiful testament to who they are. 40:35 – A faithful, consistent partner 11 years ago, Liz hired Agnes “Aggie” Netunze, of Uganda, as an intern. She later became the company's general manager. Aggie has been the most faithful, consistent work partner Liz has ever had. Aggie is now the majority owner of Sseko Uganda. 46:16 – Running a business with purpose Liz and Jessica are leaning into their shared purpose. They are using business to create opportunities for women by staying curious and gritty and open. FEATURED QUOTES Every girl should have the opportunity to learn and to lead. – Liz This is why women should run the world. You can do hard things. – Liz Our business is what cares for so many women around the world. – Jessica You don't know what God is doing. Someday we'll get to see the full picture. – Jessica CONNECT: https://mollystillman.noondaycollection.com/  https://www.jessicahonegger.com/ http://lizbohannon.co/ Thank you to our partners of the show! Are you looking to clean up your household cleaning products this year? MamaSuds would like to help! The best way is to simply start with one product. Every time you run out of a specific cleaning product, replace it with a non-toxic one. Another tip, purchase a product that has multiple uses. The MamaSuds Collection has many multiple use products (castile soap or the toilet bombs are just a few!). Their blog has lots of great tips and a castile soap recipe that you can print and make a lot of your own effective cleaners! Give them a try at www.mamasuds.com and don't forget to use the coupon code MOLLY for 15% off your order! I'd like to thank our other partner of the show and that's Tradlands. Tradlands is an INCREDIBLE sustainable fashion brand that believes in clothing that you can live in NOW and love forever. Clothing that not only makes you feel like your best self, but also fits in a way that flatters. Their gorgeous dresses, pants, tops, and more are designed to move with you throughout your busy days. Their Nico dress is my dress in a love language —not only does it have sleeves, but also POCKETS and you know how I feel about dresses with pockets. I love how comfortable and stylish each piece - and they come in colors like classic neutrals or vibrant hues. One of the things I love most about Tradlands is their focus on sustainability and creating small batch clothing that lasts… they never over produce what they make and focus on only the highest quality materials. And you know how much I love supporting small businesses, too. Check them out at https://tradlands.com/businesswithpurpose and use the code MOLLY20 for 20% off!

Justin, Scott and Spiegel Show Highlights

Scott came to us with this one based off of a Zach Bryan song. The idea is to start living the life that you've always wanted. What are you putting off? What could you do TODAY, instead of someday?

Chapel Probation
S2.E15: Blake Chastain- The ExVangelical Forefather (Indiana Wesleyan)

Chapel Probation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 82:06


Blake Chastain created the ExVangelical hashtag and helped start a movement that has grown into what is now known as the "deconstruction" movement. Through this community on both twitter and in real life, I've met so many super cool people, including Blake, who I consider a friend today. Someday we'll hang in person, but this episode actually has me wondering if we might BE the same person in some sort of mishap with the space/time continuum. Until we get that sorted out, this episode has Blake talking his time at Indiana Wesleyan University where he began deconstructing from evangelical christianity. He had some great professors who challenge him and inspired him, and he had the typical professors who seemed as interested in fundamentalist indoctrination as teaching their subjects. But Blake has forged his own path of not just deconstruction, but decolonization, as he speaks often about his recognition of privilege as a White man and pushes back at White supremacy and complimentarianism. This episode begins with another meeting of the Asian American Secret Society with Brad Onishi and Nate Nakao and I discussing whether or not to let a new member into the group, Veterans of Culture Wars co-host, Zach Malm. I should have probably written a script for this one, but we had fun just vamping improv-style. Chapel Probation is part of the Dauntless Media Collective Music by Scott Okamoto, Jenyi, and Shin Kawasaki and Wingo Shackleford Join the Chapel Probation Patreon to support Scott and for bonus content. Join the Chapel Probation Facebook group to continue the conversations. Follow Scott on Instagram and Twitter You can subscribe to Scott's newsletter and learn more about the book, the blog, and performances at rscottokamoto.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/scott-okamoto/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/scott-okamoto/support

Optimal Health Daily
1919: Realizing I'm Really Going to Die Someday by Shelby Forsythia

Optimal Health Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 12:05


Shelby Forsythia shares her thoughts on mortality. Episode 1919: Realizing I'm Really Going to Die Someday by Shelby Forsythia Shelby Forsythia never intended to study grief, but now she is an Intuitive Grief Guide who speaks, writes, and teaches powerful truths about grief and loss. She is the podcast host of Coming Back: Conversations on Life After Loss where she and her guests tell the truth about life after death, divorce, diagnosis, and more. Find more at ShelbyForsythia.com The original post is located here: https://medium.com/transform-the-pain/realizing-im-really-going-to-die-someday-da0f946d5c1a Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalHealthDailyDietNutritionFitness Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Optimal Health Daily - ARCHIVE 1 - Episodes 1-300 ONLY
1919: Realizing I'm Really Going to Die Someday by Shelby Forsythia

Optimal Health Daily - ARCHIVE 1 - Episodes 1-300 ONLY

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 12:05


Shelby Forsythia shares her thoughts on mortality. Episode 1919: Realizing I'm Really Going to Die Someday by Shelby Forsythia Shelby Forsythia never intended to study grief, but now she is an Intuitive Grief Guide who speaks, writes, and teaches powerful truths about grief and loss. She is the podcast host of Coming Back: Conversations on Life After Loss where she and her guests tell the truth about life after death, divorce, diagnosis, and more. Find more at ShelbyForsythia.com The original post is located here: https://medium.com/transform-the-pain/realizing-im-really-going-to-die-someday-da0f946d5c1a Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalHealthDailyDietNutritionFitness Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Your Daily Revolution
561: Lessons in Leadership Part 5

Your Daily Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 24:56


Do your job. Create a culture of accountability. Do what you said you would do. Ask yourself: *What would happen if you started to cast the bigger vision and you started to win? *Will you answer the call? Someday is today or It's never.

Mercury: A Broadcast of Hope

This episode will expire in 24 hours! Missed an episode? Pick it back up anytime! Want the back catalog? Become a supporter on Patreon! patreon.com/mercuryradio More info about ARTC And Mercury at artc.org/mercury  Follow us on Twitter @mercury870 Script available at http://mercuryradio.libsyn.com

Uplevel Your Relationships
Pleasure on purpose

Uplevel Your Relationships

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 15:57


Want to stop going through the motions and enjoy your life today?So often, we delay pleasure until we:- Get a vacation- Have more money- Lose weight- The kids get older- Someday when...This creates dissatisfaction, a low level of unhappiness and is a set up for burnout.You've worked FAR too hard and life is far too short to just rinse and repeat forever.In today's episode of the podcast, I talk about how to infuse your daily life with pleasure, right now.  I go over ideas for purposefully introducing enjoyment into your day-to-day in 3 categories: sensory/physical, intellectual and spiritual/creative.Take a listen and then send me a message and let me know - how are you going to amp up the pleasure in your life?Want to read my KevinMD article? Here's the link: https://www.kevinmd.com/2022/08/want-to-stop-going-through-the-motions-and-actually-have-the-life-you-dreamed-of-try-this.htmlClick here to download my free 3 part video series > Reignite the Romance This Weekend!xo, Allisonhttp://allisonandersoncoaching.comSign up for a complimentary 30 minute session! Click HERE >Come hang out with me on IG and FB!Send me an email - click here xo...

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 156: “I Was Made to Love Her” by Stevie Wonder

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022


Episode one hundred and fifty-six of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “I Was Made to Love Her", the early career of Stevie Wonder, and the Detroit riots of 1967. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-minute bonus episode available, on "Groovin'" by the Young Rascals. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources As usual, I've put together a Mixcloud playlist of all the recordings excerpted in this episode. The best value way to get all of Stevie Wonder's early singles is this MP3 collection, which has the original mono single mixes of fifty-five tracks for a very reasonable price. For those who prefer physical media, this is a decent single-CD collection of his early work at a very low price indeed. As well as the general Motown information listed below, I've also referred to Signed, Sealed, and Delivered: The Soulful Journey of Stevie Wonder by Mark Ribowsky, which rather astonishingly is the only full-length biography of Wonder, to Higher Ground: Stevie Wonder, Aretha Franklin, Curtis Mayfield, and the Rise and Fall of American Soul by Craig Werner, and to Detroit 67: The Year That Changed Soul by Stuart Cosgrove. For Motown-related information in this and other Motown episodes, I've used the following resources: Where Did Our Love Go? The Rise and Fall of the Motown Sound by Nelson George is an excellent popular history of the various companies that became Motown. To Be Loved by Berry Gordy is Gordy's own, understandably one-sided, but relatively well-written, autobiography. Women of Motown: An Oral History by Susan Whitall is a collection of interviews with women involved in Motown. I Hear a Symphony: Motown and Crossover R&B by J. Andrew Flory is an academic look at Motown. The Motown Encyclopaedia by Graham Betts is an exhaustive look at the people and records involved in Motown's thirty-year history. How Sweet It Is by Lamont Dozier and Scott B. Bomar is Dozier's autobiography, while Come and Get These Memories by Brian and Eddie Holland and Dave Thompson is the Holland brothers'. Standing in the Shadows of Motown: The Life and Music of Legendary Bassist James Jamerson by "Dr Licks" is a mixture of a short biography of the great bass player, and tablature of his most impressive bass parts. And Motown Junkies is an infrequently-updated blog looking at (so far) the first 694 tracks released on Motown singles. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A quick note before I begin -- this episode deals with disability and racism, and also deals from the very beginning with sex work and domestic violence. It also has some discussion of police violence and sexual assault. As always I will try to deal with those subjects as non-judgementally and sensitively as possible, but if you worry that anything about those subjects might disturb you, please check the transcript. Calvin Judkins was not a good man. Lula Mae Hardaway thought at first he might be, when he took her in, with her infant son whose father had left before the boy was born. He was someone who seemed, when he played the piano, to be deeply sensitive and emotional, and he even did the decent thing and married her when he got her pregnant. She thought she could save him, even though he was a street hustler and not even very good at it, and thirty years older than her -- she was only nineteen, he was nearly fifty. But she soon discovered that he wasn't interested in being saved, and instead he was interested in hurting her. He became physically and financially abusive, and started pimping her out. Lula would eventually realise that Calvin Judkins was no good, but not until she got pregnant again, shortly after the birth of her second son. Her third son was born premature -- different sources give different numbers for how premature, with some saying four months and others six weeks -- and while he apparently went by Stevland Judkins throughout his early childhood, the name on his birth certificate was apparently Stevland Morris, Lula having decided not to give another child the surname of her abuser, though nobody has ever properly explained where she got the surname "Morris" from. Little Stevland was put in an incubator with an oxygen mask, which saved the tiny child's life but destroyed his sight, giving him a condition called retinopathy of prematurity -- a condition which nowadays can be prevented and cured, but in 1951 was just an unavoidable consequence for some portion of premature babies. Shortly after the family moved from Saginaw to Detroit, Lula kicked Calvin out, and he would remain only a peripheral figure in his children's lives, but one thing he did do was notice young Stevland's interest in music, and on his increasingly infrequent visits to his wife and kids -- visits that usually ended with violence -- he would bring along toy instruments for the young child to play, like a harmonica and a set of bongos. Stevie was a real prodigy, and by the time he was nine he had a collection of real musical instruments, because everyone could see that the kid was something special. A neighbour who owned a piano gave it to Stevie when she moved out and couldn't take it with her. A local Lions Club gave him a drum kit at a party they organised for local blind children, and a barber gave him a chromatic harmonica after seeing him play his toy one. Stevie gave his first professional performance when he was eight. His mother had taken him to a picnic in the park, and there was a band playing, and the little boy got as close to the stage as he could and started dancing wildly. The MC of the show asked the child who he was, and he said "My name is Stevie, and I can sing and play drums", so of course they got the cute kid up on stage behind the drum kit while the band played Johnny Ace's "Pledging My Love": [Excerpt: Johnny Ace, "Pledging My Love"] He did well enough that they paid him seventy-five cents -- an enormous amount for a small child at that time -- though he was disappointed afterwards that they hadn't played something faster that would really allow him to show off his drumming skills. After that he would perform semi-regularly at small events, and always ask to be paid in quarters rather than paper money, because he liked the sound of the coins -- one of his party tricks was to be able to tell one coin from another by the sound of them hitting a table. Soon he formed a duo with a neighbourhood friend, John Glover, who was a couple of years older and could play guitar while Stevie sang and played harmonica and bongos. The two were friends, and both accomplished musicians for their age, but that wasn't the only reason Stevie latched on to Glover. Even as young as he was, he knew that Motown was soon going to be the place to be in Detroit if you were a musician, and Glover had an in -- his cousin was Ronnie White of the Miracles. Stevie and John performed as a duo everywhere they could and honed their act, performing particularly at the talent shows which were such an incubator of Black musical talent at the time, and they also at this point seem to have got the attention of Clarence Paul, but it was White who brought the duo to Motown. Stevie and John first played for White and Bobby Rodgers, another of the Miracles, then when they were impressed they took them through the several layers of Motown people who would have to sign off on signing a new act. First they were taken to see Brian Holland, who was a rising star within Motown as "Please Mr. Postman" was just entering the charts. They impressed him with a performance of the Miracles song "Bad Girl": [Excerpt: The Miracles, "Bad Girl"] After that, Stevie and John went to see Mickey Stevenson, who was at first sceptical, thinking that a kid so young -- Stevie was only eleven at the time -- must be some kind of novelty act rather than a serious musician. He said later "It was like, what's next, the singing mouse?" But Stevenson was won over by the child's talent. Normally, Stevenson had the power to sign whoever he liked to the label, but given the extra legal complications involved in signing someone under-age, he had to get Berry Gordy's permission. Gordy didn't even like signing teenagers because of all the extra paperwork that would be involved, and he certainly wasn't interested in signing pre-teens. But he came down to the studio to see what Stevie could do, and was amazed, not by his singing -- Gordy didn't think much of that -- but by his instrumental ability. First Stevie played harmonica and bongos as proficiently as an adult professional, and then he made his way around the studio playing on every other instrument in the place -- often only a few notes, but competent on them all. Gordy decided to sign the duo -- and the initial contract was for an act named "Steve and John" -- but it was soon decided to separate them. Glover would be allowed to hang around Motown while he was finishing school, and there would be a place for him when he finished -- he later became a staff songwriter, working on tracks for the Four Tops and the Miracles among others, and he would even later write a number one hit, "You Don't Have to be a Star (to be in My Show)" for Marilyn McCoo and Billy Davis Jr -- but they were going to make Stevie a star right now. The man put in charge of that was Clarence Paul. Paul, under his birth name of Clarence Pauling, had started his career in the "5" Royales, a vocal group he formed with his brother Lowman Pauling that had been signed to Apollo Records by Ralph Bass, and later to King Records. Paul seems to have been on at least some of the earliest recordings by the group, so is likely on their first single, "Give Me One More Chance": [Excerpt: The "5" Royales, "Give Me One More Chance"] But Paul was drafted to go and fight in the Korean War, and so wasn't part of the group's string of hit singles, mostly written by his brother Lowman, like "Think", which later became better known in James Brown's cover version, or "Dedicated to the One I Love", later covered by the Shirelles, but in its original version dominated by Lowman's stinging guitar playing: [Excerpt: The "5" Royales, "Dedicated to the One I Love"] After being discharged, Clarence had shortened his name to Clarence Paul, and had started recording for all the usual R&B labels like Roulette and Federal, with little success: [Excerpt: Clarence Paul, "I'm Gonna Love You, Love You Til I Die"] He'd also co-written "I Need Your Lovin'", which had been an R&B hit for Roy Hamilton: [Excerpt: Roy Hamilton, "I Need Your Lovin'"] Paul had recently come to work for Motown – one of the things Berry Gordy did to try to make his label more attractive was to hire the relatives of R&B stars on other labels, in the hopes of getting them to switch to Motown – and he was the new man on the team, not given any of the important work to do. He was working with acts like Henry Lumpkin and the Valladiers, and had also been the producer of "Mind Over Matter", the single the Temptations had released as The Pirates in a desperate attempt to get a hit: [Excerpt: The Pirates, "Mind Over Matter"] Paul was the person you turned to when no-one else was interested, and who would come up with bizarre ideas. A year or so after the time period we're talking about, it was him who produced an album of country music for the Supremes, before they'd had a hit, and came up with "The Man With the Rock and Roll Banjo Band" for them: [Excerpt: The Supremes, "The Man With The Rock and Roll Banjo Band"] So, Paul was the perfect person to give a child -- by this time twelve years old -- who had the triple novelties of being a multi-instrumentalist, a child, and blind. Stevie started spending all his time around the Motown studios, partly because he was eager to learn everything about making records and partly because his home life wasn't particularly great and he wanted to be somewhere else. He earned the affection and irritation, in equal measure, of people at Motown both for his habit of wandering into the middle of sessions because he couldn't see the light that showed that the studio was in use, and for his practical joking. He was a great mimic, and would do things like phoning one of the engineers and imitating Berry Gordy's voice, telling the engineer that Stevie would be coming down, and to give him studio equipment to take home. He'd also astonish women by complimenting them, in detail, on their dresses, having been told in advance what they looked like by an accomplice. But other "jokes" were less welcome -- he would regularly sexually assault women working at Motown, grabbing their breasts or buttocks and then claiming it was an accident because he couldn't see what he was doing. Most of the women he molested still speak of him fondly, and say everybody loved him, and this may even be the case -- and certainly I don't think any of us should be judged too harshly for what we did when we were twelve -- but this kind of thing led to a certain amount of pressure to make Stevie's career worth the extra effort he was causing everyone at Motown. Because Berry Gordy was not impressed with Stevie's vocals, the decision was made to promote him as a jazz instrumentalist, and so Clarence Paul insisted that his first release be an album, rather than doing what everyone would normally do and only put out an album after a hit single. Paul reasoned that there was no way on Earth they were going to be able to get a hit single with a jazz instrumental by a twelve-year-old kid, and eventually persuaded Gordy of the wisdom of this idea. So they started work on The Jazz Soul of Little Stevie, released under his new stagename of Little Stevie Wonder, supposedly a name given to him after Berry Gordy said "That kid's a wonder!", though Mickey Stevenson always said that the name came from a brainstorming session between him and Clarence Paul. The album featured Stevie on harmonica, piano, and organ on different tracks, but on the opening track, "Fingertips", he's playing the bongos that give the track its name: [Excerpt: Little Stevie Wonder, "Fingertips (studio version)"] The composition of that track is credited to Paul and the arranger Hank Cosby, but Beans Bowles, who played flute on the track, always claimed that he came up with the melody, and it seems quite likely to me that most of the tracks on the album were created more or less as jam sessions -- though Wonder's contributions were all overdubbed later. The album sat in the can for several months -- Berry Gordy was not at all sure of its commercial potential. Instead, he told Paul to go in another direction -- focusing on Wonder's blindness, he decided that what they needed to do was create an association in listeners' minds with Ray Charles, who at this point was at the peak of his commercial power. So back into the studio went Wonder and Paul, to record an album made up almost entirely of Ray Charles covers, titled Tribute to Uncle Ray. (Some sources have the Ray Charles tribute album recorded first -- and given Motown's lax record-keeping at this time it may be impossible to know for sure -- but this is the way round that Mark Ribowsky's biography of Wonder has it). But at Motown's regular quality control meeting it was decided that there wasn't a single on the album, and you didn't release an album like that without having a hit single first. By this point, Clarence Paul was convinced that Berry Gordy was just looking for excuses not to do anything with Wonder -- and there may have been a grain of truth to that. There's some evidence that Gordy was worried that the kid wouldn't be able to sing once his voice broke, and was scared of having another Frankie Lymon on his hands. But the decision was made that rather than put out either of those albums, they would put out a single. The A-side was a song called "I Call it Pretty Music But the Old People Call it the Blues, Part 1", which very much played on Wonder's image as a loveable naive kid: [Excerpt: Little Stevie Wonder, "I Call it Pretty Music But the Old People Call it the Blues, Part 1"] The B-side, meanwhile, was part two -- a slowed-down, near instrumental, version of the song, reframed as an actual blues, and as a showcase for Wonder's harmonica playing rather than his vocals. The single wasn't a hit, but it made number 101 on the Billboard charts, just missing the Hot One Hundred, which for the debut single of a new artist wasn't too bad, especially for Motown at this point in time, when most of its releases were flopping. That was good enough that Gordy authorised the release of the two albums that they had in the can. The next single, "Little Water Boy", was a rather baffling duet with Clarence Paul, which did nothing at all on the charts. [Excerpt: Clarence Paul and Little Stevie Wonder, "Little Water Boy"] After this came another flop single, written by Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier, and Janie Bradford, before the record that finally broke Little Stevie Wonder out into the mainstream in a big way. While Wonder hadn't had a hit yet, he was sent out on the first Motortown Revue tour, along with almost every other act on the label. Because he hadn't had a hit, he was supposed to only play one song per show, but nobody had told him how long that song should be. He had quickly become a great live performer, and the audiences were excited to watch him, so when he went into extended harmonica solos rather than quickly finishing the song, the audience would be with him. Clarence Paul, who came along on the tour, would have to motion to the onstage bandleader to stop the music, but the bandleader would know that the audiences were with Stevie, and so would just keep the song going as long as Stevie was playing. Often Paul would have to go on to the stage and shout in Wonder's ear to stop playing -- and often Wonder would ignore him, and have to be physically dragged off stage by Paul, still playing, causing the audience to boo Paul for stopping him from playing. Wonder would complain off-stage that the audience had been enjoying it, and didn't seem to get it into his head that he wasn't the star of the show, that the audiences *were* enjoying him, but were *there* to see the Miracles and Mary Wells and the Marvelettes and Marvin Gaye. This made all the acts who had to go on after him, and who were running late as a result, furious at him -- especially since one aspect of Wonder's blindness was that his circadian rhythms weren't regulated by sunlight in the same way that the sighted members of the tour's were. He would often wake up the entire tour bus by playing his harmonica at two or three in the morning, while they were all trying to sleep. Soon Berry Gordy insisted that Clarence Paul be on stage with Wonder throughout his performance, ready to drag him off stage, so that he wouldn't have to come out onto the stage to do it. But one of the first times he had done this had been on one of the very first Motortown Revue shows, before any of his records had come out. There he'd done a performance of "Fingertips", playing the flute part on harmonica rather than only playing bongos throughout as he had on the studio version -- leaving the percussion to Marvin Gaye, who was playing drums for Wonder's set: [Excerpt: Little Stevie Wonder, "Fingertips (Parts 1 & 2)"] But he'd extended the song with a little bit of call-and-response vocalising: [Excerpt: Little Stevie Wonder, "Fingertips (Parts 1 & 2)"] After the long performance ended, Clarence Paul dragged Wonder off-stage and the MC asked the audience to give him a round of applause -- but then Stevie came running back on and carried on playing: [Excerpt: Little Stevie Wonder, "Fingertips (Parts 1 & 2)"] By this point, though, the musicians had started to change over -- Mary Wells, who was on after Wonder, was using different musicians from his, and some of her players were already on stage. You can hear Joe Swift, who was playing bass for Wells, asking what key he was meant to be playing in: [Excerpt: Little Stevie Wonder, "Fingertips (Parts 1 & 2)"] Eventually, after six and a half minutes, they got Wonder off stage, but that performance became the two sides of Wonder's next single, with "Fingertips Part 2", the part with the ad lib singing and the false ending, rather than the instrumental part one, being labelled as the side the DJs should play. When it was released, the song started a slow climb up the charts, and by August 1963, three months after it came out, it was at number one -- only the second ever Motown number one, and the first ever live single to get there. Not only that, but Motown released a live album -- Recorded Live, the Twelve-Year-Old Genius (though as many people point out he was thirteen when it was released -- he was twelve when it was recorded though) and that made number one on the albums chart, becoming the first Motown album ever to do so. They followed up "Fingertips" with a similar sounding track, "Workout, Stevie, Workout", which made number thirty-three. After that, his albums -- though not yet his singles -- started to be released as by "Stevie Wonder" with no "Little" -- he'd had a bit of a growth spurt and his voice was breaking, and so marketing him as a child prodigy was not going to work much longer and they needed to transition him into a star with adult potential. In the Motown of 1963 that meant cutting an album of standards, because the belief at the time in Motown was that the future for their entertainers was doing show tunes at the Copacabana. But for some reason the audience who had wanted an R&B harmonica instrumental with call-and-response improvised gospel-influenced yelling was not in the mood for a thirteen year old singing "Put on a Happy Face" and "When You Wish Upon a Star", and especially not when the instrumental tracks were recorded in a key that suited him at age twelve but not thirteen, so he was clearly straining. "Fingertips" being a massive hit also meant Stevie was now near the top of the bill on the Motortown Revue when it went on its second tour. But this actually put him in a precarious position. When he had been down at the bottom of the bill and unknown, nobody expected anything from him, and he was following other minor acts, so when he was surprisingly good the audiences went wild. Now, near the top of the bill, he had to go on after Marvin Gaye, and he was not nearly so impressive in that context. The audiences were polite enough, but not in the raptures he was used to. Although Stevie could still beat Gaye in some circumstances. At Motown staff parties, Berry Gordy would always have a contest where he'd pit two artists against each other to see who could win the crowd over, something he thought instilled a fun and useful competitive spirit in his artists. They'd alternate songs, two songs each, and Gordy would decide on the winner based on audience response. For the 1963 Motown Christmas party, it was Stevie versus Marvin. Wonder went first, with "Workout, Stevie, Workout", and was apparently impressive, but then Gaye topped him with a version of "Hitch-Hike". So Stevie had to top that, and apparently did, with a hugely extended version of "I Call it Pretty Music", reworked in the Ray Charles style he'd used for "Fingertips". So Marvin Gaye had to top that with the final song of the contest, and he did, performing "Stubborn Kind of Fellow": [Excerpt: Marvin Gaye, "Stubborn Kind of Fellow"] And he was great. So great, it turned the crowd against him. They started booing, and someone in the audience shouted "Marvin, you should be ashamed of yourself, taking advantage of a little blind kid!" The crowd got so hostile Berry Gordy had to stop the performance and end the party early. He never had another contest like that again. There were other problems, as well. Wonder had been assigned a tutor, a young man named Ted Hull, who began to take serious control over his life. Hull was legally blind, so could teach Wonder using Braille, but unlike Wonder had some sight -- enough that he was even able to get a drivers' license and a co-pilot license for planes. Hull was put in loco parentis on most of Stevie's tours, and soon became basically inseparable from him, but this caused a lot of problems, not least because Hull was a conservative white man, while almost everyone else at Motown was Black, and Stevie was socially liberal and on the side of the civil rights and anti-Vietnam movements. Hull started to collaborate on songwriting with Wonder, which most people at Motown were OK with but which now seems like a serious conflict of interest, and he also started calling himself Stevie's "manager" -- which did *not* impress the people at Motown, who had their own conflict of interest because with Stevie, like with all their artists, they were his management company and agents as well as his record label and publishers. Motown grudgingly tolerated Hull, though, mostly because he was someone they could pass Lula Mae Hardaway to to deal with her complaints. Stevie's mother was not very impressed with the way that Motown were handling her son, and would make her opinion known to anyone who would listen. Hull and Hardaway did not get on at all, but he could be relied on to save the Gordy family members from having to deal with her. Wonder was sent over to Europe for Christmas 1963, to perform shows at the Paris Olympia and do some British media appearances. But both his mother and Hull had come along, and their clear dislike for each other was making him stressed. He started to get pains in his throat whenever he sang -- pains which everyone assumed were a stress reaction to the unhealthy atmosphere that happened whenever Hull and his mother were in the same room together, but which later turned out to be throat nodules that required surgery. Because of this, his singing was generally not up to standard, which meant he was moved to a less prominent place on the bill, which in turn led to his mother accusing the Gordy family of being against him and trying to stop him becoming a star. Wonder started to take her side and believe that Motown were conspiring against him, and at one point he even "accidentally" dropped a bottle of wine on Ted Hull's foot, breaking one of his toes, because he saw Hull as part of the enemy that was Motown. Before leaving for those shows, he had recorded the album he later considered the worst of his career. While he was now just plain Stevie on albums, he wasn't for his single releases, or in his first film appearance, where he was still Little Stevie Wonder. Berry Gordy was already trying to get a foot in the door in Hollywood -- by the end of the decade Motown would be moving from Detroit to LA -- and his first real connections there were with American International Pictures, the low-budget film-makers who have come up a lot in connection with the LA scene. AIP were the producers of the successful low-budget series of beach party films, which combined appearances by teen heartthrobs Frankie Avalon and Annette Funicello in swimsuits with cameo appearances by old film stars fallen on hard times, and with musical performances by bands like the Bobby Fuller Four. There would be a couple of Motown connections to these films -- most notably, the Supremes would do the theme tune for Dr. Goldfoot and the Bikini Machine -- but Muscle Beach Party was to be the first. Most of the music for Muscle Beach Party was written by Brian Wilson, Roger Christian, and Gary Usher, as one might expect for a film about surfing, and was performed by Dick Dale and the Del-Tones, the film's major musical guests, with Annette, Frankie, and Donna Loren [pron Lorren] adding vocals, on songs like "Muscle Bustle": [Excerpt: Donna Loren with Dick Dale and the Del-Tones, "Muscle Bustle"] The film followed the formula in every way -- it also had a cameo appearance by Peter Lorre, his last film appearance before his death, and it featured Little Stevie Wonder playing one of the few songs not written by the surf and car writers, a piece of nothing called "Happy Street". Stevie also featured in the follow-up, Bikini Beach, which came out a little under four months later, again doing a single number, "Happy Feelin'". To cash in on his appearances in these films, and having tried releasing albums of Little Stevie as jazz multi-instrumentalist, Ray Charles tribute act, live soulman and Andy Williams-style crooner, they now decided to see if they could sell him as a surf singer. Or at least, as Motown's idea of a surf singer, which meant a lot of songs about the beach and the sea -- mostly old standards like "Red Sails in the Sunset" and "Ebb Tide" -- backed by rather schlocky Wrecking Crew arrangements. And this is as good a place as any to take on one of the bits of disinformation that goes around about Motown. I've addressed this before, but it's worth repeating here in slightly more detail. Carol Kaye, one of the go-to Wrecking Crew bass players, is a known credit thief, and claims to have played on hundreds of records she didn't -- claims which too many people take seriously because she is a genuine pioneer and was for a long time undercredited on many records she *did* play on. In particular, she claims to have played on almost all the classic Motown hits that James Jamerson of the Funk Brothers played on, like the title track for this episode, and she claims this despite evidence including notarised statements from everyone involved in the records, the release of session recordings that show producers talking to the Funk Brothers, and most importantly the evidence of the recordings themselves, which have all the characteristics of the Detroit studio and sound like the Funk Brothers playing, and have absolutely nothing in common, sonically, with the records the Wrecking Crew played on at Gold Star, Western, and other LA studios. The Wrecking Crew *did* play on a lot of Motown records, but with a handful of exceptions, mostly by Brenda Holloway, the records they played on were quickie knock-off album tracks and potboiler albums made to tie in with film or TV work -- soundtracks to TV specials the acts did, and that kind of thing. And in this case, the Wrecking Crew played on the entire Stevie at the Beach album, including the last single to be released as by "Little Stevie Wonder", "Castles in the Sand", which was arranged by Jack Nitzsche: [Excerpt: Little Stevie Wonder, "Castles in the Sand"] Apparently the idea of surfin' Stevie didn't catch on any more than that of swingin' Stevie had earlier. Indeed, throughout 1964 and 65 Motown seem to have had less than no idea what they were doing with Stevie Wonder, and he himself refers to all his recordings from this period as an embarrassment, saving particular scorn for the second single from Stevie at the Beach, "Hey Harmonica Man", possibly because that, unlike most of his other singles around this point, was a minor hit, reaching number twenty-nine on the charts. Motown were still pushing Wonder hard -- he even got an appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show in May 1964, only the second Motown act to appear on it after the Marvelettes -- but Wonder was getting more and more unhappy with the decisions they were making. He loathed the Stevie at the Beach album -- the records he'd made earlier, while patchy and not things he'd chosen, were at least in some way related to his musical interests. He *did* love jazz, and he *did* love Ray Charles, and he *did* love old standards, and the records were made by his friend Clarence Paul and with the studio musicians he'd grown to know in Detroit. But Stevie at the Beach was something that was imposed on Clarence Paul from above, it was cut with unfamiliar musicians, Stevie thought the films he was appearing in were embarrassing, and he wasn't even having much commercial success, which was the whole point of these compromises. He started to get more rebellious against Paul in the studio, though many of these decisions weren't made by Paul, and he would complain to anyone who would listen that if he was just allowed to do the music he wanted to sing, the way he wanted to sing it, he would have more hits. But for nine months he did basically no singing other than that Ed Sullivan Show appearance -- he had to recover from the operation to remove the throat nodules. When he did return to the studio, the first single he cut remained unreleased, and while some stuff from the archives was released between the start of 1964 and March 1965, the first single he recorded and released after the throat nodules, "Kiss Me Baby", which came out in March, was a complete flop. That single was released to coincide with the first Motown tour of Europe, which we looked at in the episode on "Stop! In the Name of Love", and which was mostly set up to promote the Supremes, but which also featured Martha and the Vandellas, the Miracles, and the Temptations. Even though Stevie had not had a major hit in eighteen months by this point, he was still brought along on the tour, the only solo artist to be included -- at this point Gordy thought that solo artists looked outdated compared to vocal groups, in a world dominated by bands, and so other solo artists like Marvin Gaye weren't invited. This was a sign that Gordy was happier with Stevie than his recent lack of chart success might suggest. One of the main reasons that Gordy had been in two minds about him was that he'd had no idea if Wonder would still be able to sing well after his voice broke. But now, as he was about to turn fifteen, his adult voice had more or less stabilised, and Gordy knew that he was capable of having a long career, if they just gave him the proper material. But for now his job on the tour was to do his couple of hits, smile, and be on the lower rungs of the ladder. But even that was still a prominent place to be given the scaled-down nature of this bill compared to the Motortown Revues. While the tour was in England, for example, Dusty Springfield presented a TV special focusing on all the acts on the tour, and while the Supremes were the main stars, Stevie got to do two songs, and also took part in the finale, a version of "Mickey's Monkey" led by Smokey Robinson but with all the performers joining in, with Wonder getting a harmonica solo: [Excerpt: Smokey Robinson and the Motown acts, "Mickey's Monkey"] Sadly, there was one aspect of the trip to the UK that was extremely upsetting for Wonder. Almost all the media attention he got -- which was relatively little, as he wasn't a Supreme -- was about his blindness, and one reporter in particular convinced him that there was an operation he could have to restore his sight, but that Motown were preventing him from finding out about it in order to keep his gimmick going. He was devastated about this, and then further devastated when Ted Hull finally convinced him that it wasn't true, and that he'd been lied to. Meanwhile other newspapers were reporting that he *could* see, and that he was just feigning blindness to boost his record sales. After the tour, a live recording of Wonder singing the blues standard "High Heeled Sneakers" was released as a single, and barely made the R&B top thirty, and didn't hit the top forty on the pop charts. Stevie's initial contract with Motown was going to expire in the middle of 1966, so there was a year to get him back to a point where he was having the kind of hits that other Motown acts were regularly getting at this point. Otherwise, it looked like his career might end by the time he was sixteen. The B-side to "High Heeled Sneakers" was another duet with Clarence Paul, who dominates the vocal sound for much of it -- a version of Willie Nelson's country classic "Funny How Time Slips Away": [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder and Clarence Paul, "Funny How Time Slips Away"] There are a few of these duet records scattered through Wonder's early career -- we'll hear another one a little later -- and they're mostly dismissed as Paul trying to muscle his way into a revival of his own recording career as an artist, and there may be some truth in that. But they're also a natural extension of the way the two of them worked in the studio. Motown didn't have the facilities to give Wonder Braille lyric sheets, and Paul didn't trust him to be able to remember the lyrics, so often when they made a record, Paul would be just off-mic, reciting the lyrics to Wonder fractionally ahead of him singing them. So it was more or less natural that this dynamic would leak out onto records, but not everyone saw it that way. But at the same time, there has been some suggestion that Paul was among those manoeuvring to get rid of Wonder from Motown as soon as his contract was finished -- despite the fact that Wonder was the only act Paul had worked on any big hits for. Either way, Paul and Wonder were starting to chafe at working with each other in the studio, and while Paul remained his on-stage musical director, the opportunity to work on Wonder's singles for what would surely be his last few months at Motown was given to Hank Cosby and Sylvia Moy. Cosby was a saxophone player and staff songwriter who had been working with Wonder and Paul for years -- he'd co-written "Fingertips" and several other tracks -- while Moy was a staff songwriter who was working as an apprentice to Cosby. Basically, at this point, nobody else wanted the job of writing for Wonder, and as Moy was having no luck getting songs cut by any other artists and her career was looking about as dead as Wonder's, they started working together. Wonder was, at this point, full of musical ideas but with absolutely no discipline. He's said in interviews that at this point he was writing a hundred and fifty songs a month, but these were often not full songs -- they were fragments, hooks, or a single verse, or a few lines, which he would pass on to Moy, who would turn his ideas into structured songs that fit the Motown hit template, usually with the assistance of Cosby. Then Cosby would come up with an arrangement, and would co-produce with Mickey Stevenson. The first song they came up with in this manner was a sign of how Wonder was looking outside the world of Motown to the rock music that was starting to dominate the US charts -- but which was itself inspired by Motown music. We heard in the last episode on the Rolling Stones how "Nowhere to Run" by the Vandellas: [Excerpt: Martha and the Vandellas, "Nowhere to Run"] had inspired the Stones' "Satisfaction": [Excerpt: The Rolling Stones, "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction"] And Wonder in turn was inspired by "Satisfaction" to come up with his own song -- though again, much of the work making it into an actual finished song was done by Sylvia Moy. They took the four-on-the-floor beat and basic melody of "Satisfaction" and brought it back to Motown, where those things had originated -- though they hadn't originated with Stevie, and this was his first record to sound like a Motown record in the way we think of those things. As a sign of how, despite the way these stories are usually told, the histories of rock and soul were completely and complexly intertwined, that four-on-the-floor beat itself was a conscious attempt by Holland, Dozier, and Holland to appeal to white listeners -- on the grounds that while Black people generally clapped on the backbeat, white people didn't, and so having a four-on-the-floor beat wouldn't throw them off. So Cosby, Moy, and Wonder, in trying to come up with a "Satisfaction" soundalike were Black Motown writers trying to copy a white rock band trying to copy Black Motown writers trying to appeal to a white rock audience. Wonder came up with the basic chorus hook, which was based around a lot of current slang terms he was fond of: [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "Uptight"] Then Moy, with some assistance from Cosby, filled it out into a full song. Lyrically, it was as close to social comment as Motown had come at this point -- Wonder was, like many of his peers in soul music, interested in the power of popular music to make political statements, and he would become a much more political artist in the next few years, but at this point it's still couched in the acceptable boy-meets-girl romantic love song that Motown specialised in. But in 1965 a story about a boy from the wrong side of the tracks dating a rich girl inevitably raised the idea that the boy and girl might be of different races -- a subject that was very, very, controversial in the mid-sixties. [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "Uptight"] "Uptight" made number three on the pop charts and number one on the R&B charts, and saved Stevie Wonder's career. And this is where, for all that I've criticised Motown in this episode, their strategy paid off. Mickey Stevenson talked a lot about how in the early sixties Motown didn't give up on artists -- if someone had potential but was not yet having hits or finding the right approach, they would keep putting out singles in a holding pattern, trying different things and seeing what would work, rather than toss them aside. It had already worked for the Temptations and the Supremes, and now it had worked for Stevie Wonder. He would be the last beneficiary of this policy -- soon things would change, and Motown would become increasingly focused on trying to get the maximum returns out of a small number of stars, rather than building careers for a range of artists -- but it paid off brilliantly for Wonder. "Uptight" was such a reinvention of Wonder's career, sound, and image that many of his fans consider it the real start of his career -- everything before it only counting as prologue. The follow-up, "Nothing's Too Good For My Baby", was an "Uptight" soundalike, and as with Motown soundalike follow-ups in general, it didn't do quite as well, but it still made the top twenty on the pop chart and got to number four on the R&B chart. Stevie Wonder was now safe at Motown, and so he was going to do something no other Motown act had ever done before -- he was going to record a protest song and release it as a single. For about a year he'd been ending his shows with a version of Bob Dylan's "Blowin' in the Wind", sung as a duet with Clarence Paul, who was still his on stage bandleader even though the two weren't working together in the studio as much. Wonder brought that into the studio, and recorded it with Paul back as the producer, and as his duet partner. Berry Gordy wasn't happy with the choice of single, but Wonder pushed, and Gordy knew that Wonder was on a winning streak and gave in, and so "Blowin' in the Wind" became Stevie Wonder's next single: [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder and Clarence Paul, "Blowin' in the Wind"] "Blowin' in the Wind" made the top ten, and number one on the R&B charts, and convinced Gordy that there was some commercial potential in going after the socially aware market, and over the next few years Motown would start putting out more and more political records. Because Motown convention was to have the producer of a hit record produce the next hit for that artist, and keep doing so until they had a flop, Paul was given the opportunity to produce the next single. "A Place in the Sun" was another ambiguously socially-aware song, co-written by the only white writer on Motown staff, Ron Miller, who happened to live in the same building as Stevie's tutor-cum-manager Ted Hull. "A Place in the Sun" was a pleasant enough song, inspired by "A Change is Gonna Come", but with a more watered-down, generic, message of hope, but the record was lifted by Stevie's voice, and again made the top ten. This meant that Paul and Miller, and Miller's writing partner Bryan Mills, got to work on his next  two singles -- his 1966 Christmas song "Someday at Christmas", which made number twenty-four, and the ballad "Travellin' Man" which made thirty-two. The downward trajectory with Paul meant that Wonder was soon working with other producers again. Harvey Fuqua and Johnny Bristol cut another Miller and Mills song with him, "Yester-Me, Yester-You, Yesterday": [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "Yester-Me, Yester-You, Yesterday"] But that was left in the can, as not good enough to release, and Stevie was soon back working with Cosby. The two of them had come up with an instrumental together in late 1966, but had not been able to come up with any words for it, so they played it for Smokey Robinson, who said their instrumental sounded like circus music, and wrote lyrics about a clown: [Excerpt: The Miracles, "The Tears of a Clown"] The Miracles cut that as album filler, but it was released three years later as a single and became the Miracles' only number one hit with Smokey Robinson as lead singer. So Wonder and Cosby definitely still had their commercial touch, even if their renewed collaboration with Moy, who they started working with again, took a while to find a hit. To start with, Wonder returned to the idea of taking inspiration from a hit by a white British group, as he had with "Uptight". This time it was the Beatles, and the track "Michelle", from the Rubber Soul album: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Michelle"] Wonder took the idea of a song with some French lyrics, and a melody with some similarities to the Beatles song, and came up with "My Cherie Amour", which Cosby and Moy finished off. [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "My Cherie Amour"] Gordy wouldn't allow that to be released, saying it was too close to "Michelle" and people would think it was a rip-off, and it stayed in the vaults for several years. Cosby also produced a version of a song Ron Miller had written with Orlando Murden, "For Once in My Life", which pretty much every other Motown act was recording versions of -- the Four Tops, the Temptations, Billy Eckstine, Martha and the Vandellas and Barbra McNair all cut versions of it in 1967, and Gordy wouldn't let Wonder's version be put out either. So they had to return to the drawing board. But in truth, Stevie Wonder was not the biggest thing worrying Berry Gordy at this point. He was dealing with problems in the Supremes, which we'll look at in a future episode -- they were about to get rid of Florence Ballard, and thus possibly destroy one of the biggest acts in the world, but Gordy thought that if they *didn't* get rid of her they would be destroying themselves even more certainly. Not only that, but Gordy was in the midst of a secret affair with Diana Ross, Holland, Dozier, and Holland were getting restless about their contracts, and his producers kept bringing him unlistenable garbage that would never be a hit. Like Norman Whitfield, insisting that this track he'd cut with Marvin Gaye, "I Heard it Through the Grapevine", should be a single. Gordy had put his foot down about that one too, just like he had about "My Cherie Amour", and wouldn't allow it to be released. Meanwhile, many of the smaller acts on the label were starting to feel like they were being ignored by Gordy, and had formed what amounted to a union, having regular meetings at Clarence Paul's house to discuss how they could pressure the label to put the same effort into their careers as into those of the big stars. And the Funk Brothers, the musicians who played on all of Motown's hits, were also getting restless -- they contributed to the arrangements, and they did more for the sound of the records than half the credited producers; why weren't they getting production credits and royalties? Harvey Fuqua had divorced Gordy's sister Gwen, and so became persona non grata at the label and was in the process of leaving Motown, and so was Mickey Stevenson, Gordy's second in command, because Gordy wouldn't give him any stock in the company. And Detroit itself was on edge. The crime rate in the city had started to go up, but even worse, the *perception* of crime was going up. The Detroit News had been running a campaign to whip up fear, which it called its Secret Witness campaign, and running constant headlines about rapes, murders, and muggings. These in turn had led to increased calls for more funds for the police, calls which inevitably contained a strong racial element and at least implicitly linked the perceived rise in crime to the ongoing Civil Rights movement. At this point the police in Detroit were ninety-three percent white, even though Detroit's population was over thirty percent Black. The Mayor and Police Commissioner were trying to bring in some modest reforms, but they weren't going anywhere near fast enough for the Black population who felt harassed and attacked by the police, but were still going too fast for the white people who were being whipped up into a state of terror about supposedly soft-on-crime policies, and for the police who felt under siege and betrayed by the politicians. And this wasn't the only problem affecting the city, and especially affecting Black people. Redlining and underfunded housing projects meant that the large Black population was being crammed into smaller and smaller spaces with fewer local amenities. A few Black people who were lucky enough to become rich -- many of them associated with Motown -- were able to move into majority-white areas, but that was just leading to white flight, and to an increase in racial tensions. The police were on edge after the murder of George Overman Jr, the son of a policeman, and though they arrested the killers that was just another sign that they weren't being shown enough respect. They started organising "blu flu"s -- the police weren't allowed to strike, so they'd claim en masse that they were off sick, as a protest against the supposed soft-on-crime administration. Meanwhile John Sinclair was organising "love-ins", gatherings of hippies at which new bands like the MC5 played, which were being invaded by gangs of bikers who were there to beat up the hippies. And the Detroit auto industry was on its knees -- working conditions had got bad enough that the mostly Black workforce organised a series of wildcat strikes. All in all, Detroit was looking less and less like somewhere that Berry Gordy wanted to stay, and the small LA subsidiary of Motown was rapidly becoming, in his head if nowhere else, the more important part of the company, and its future. He was starting to think that maybe he should leave all these ungrateful people behind in their dangerous city, and move the parts of the operation that actually mattered out to Hollywood. Stevie Wonder was, of course, one of the parts that mattered, but the pressure was on in 1967 to come up with a hit as big as his records from 1965 and early 66, before he'd been sidetracked down the ballad route. The song that was eventually released was one on which Stevie's mother, Lula Mae Hardaway, had a co-writing credit: [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "I Was Made to Love Her"] "I Was Made to Love Her" was inspired by Wonder's first love, a girl from the same housing projects as him, and he talked about the song being special to him because it was true, saying it "kind of speaks of my first love to a girl named Angie, who was a very beautiful woman... Actually, she was my third girlfriend but my first love. I used to call Angie up and, like, we would talk and say, 'I love you, I love you,' and we'd talk and we'd both go to sleep on the phone. And this was like from Detroit to California, right? You know, mother said, 'Boy, what you doing - get off the phone!' Boy, I tell you, it was ridiculous." But while it was inspired by her, like with many of the songs from this period, much of the lyric came from Moy -- her mother grew up in Arkansas, and that's why the lyric started "I was born in Little Rock", as *her* inspiration came from stories told by her parents. But truth be told, the lyrics weren't particularly detailed or impressive, just a standard story of young love. Rather what mattered in the record was the music. The song was structured differently from many Motown records, including most of Wonder's earlier ones. Most Motown records had a huge amount of dynamic variation, and a clear demarcation between verse and chorus. Even a record like "Dancing in the Street", which took most of its power from the tension and release caused by spending most of the track on one chord, had the release that came with the line "All we need is music", and could be clearly subdivided into different sections. "I Was Made to Love Her" wasn't like that. There was a tiny section which functioned as a middle eight -- and which cover versions like the one by the Beach Boys later that year tend to cut out, because it disrupts the song's flow: [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "I Was Made to Love Her"] But other than that, the song has no verse or chorus, no distinct sections, it's just a series of lyrical couplets over the same four chords, repeating over and over, an incessant groove that could really go on indefinitely: [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "I Was Made to Love Her"] This is as close as Motown had come at this point to the new genre of funk, of records that were just staying with one groove throughout. It wasn't a funk record, not yet -- it was still a pop-soul record, But what made it extraordinary was the bass line, and this is why I had to emphasise earlier that this was a record by the Funk Brothers, not the Wrecking Crew, no matter how much some Crew members may claim otherwise. As on most of Cosby's sessions, James Jamerson was given free reign to come up with his own part with little guidance, and what he came up with is extraordinary. This was at a time when rock and pop basslines were becoming a little more mobile, thanks to the influence of Jamerson in Detroit, Brian Wilson in LA, and Paul McCartney in London.  But for the most part, even those bass parts had been fairly straightforward technically -- often inventive, but usually just crotchets and quavers, still keeping rhythm along with the drums rather than in dialogue with them, roaming free rhythmically. Jamerson had started to change his approach, inspired by the change in studio equipment. Motown had upgraded to eight-track recording in 1965, and once he'd become aware of the possibilities, and of the greater prominence that his bass parts could have if they were recorded on their own track, Jamerson had become a much busier player. Jamerson was a jazz musician by inclination, and so would have been very aware of John Coltrane's legendary "sheets of sound", in which Coltrane would play fast arpeggios and scales, in clusters of five and seven notes, usually in semiquaver runs (though sometimes in even smaller fractions -- his solo in Miles Davis' "Straight, No Chaser" is mostly semiquavers but has a short passage in hemidemisemiquavers): [Excerpt: Miles Davis, "Straight, No Chaser"] Jamerson started to adapt the "sheets of sound" style to bass playing, treating the bass almost as a jazz solo instrument -- though unlike Coltrane he was also very, very concerned with creating something that people could tap their feet to. Much like James Brown, Jamerson was taking jazz techniques and repurposing them for dance music. The most notable example of that up to this point had been in the Four Tops' "Bernadette", where there are a few scuffling semiquaver runs thrown in, and which is a much more fluid part than most of his playing previously: [Excerpt: The Four Tops, "Bernadette"] But on "Bernadette", Jamerson had been limited by Holland, Dozier, and Holland, who liked him to improvise but around a framework they created. Cosby, on the other hand, because he had been a Funk Brother himself, was much more aware of the musicians' improvisational abilities, and would largely give them a free hand. This led to a truly remarkable bass part on "I Was Made to Love Her", which is somewhat buried in the single mix, but Marcus Miller did an isolated recreation of the part for the accompanying CD to a book on Jamerson, Standing in the Shadows of Motown, and listening to that you can hear just how inventive it is: [Excerpt: Marcus Miller, "I Was Made to Love Her"] This was exciting stuff -- though much less so for the touring musicians who went on the road with the Motown revues while Jamerson largely stayed in Detroit recording. Jamerson's family would later talk about him coming home grumbling because complaints from the touring musicians had been brought to him, and he'd been asked to play less difficult parts so they'd find it easier to replicate them on stage. "I Was Made to Love Her" wouldn't exist without Stevie Wonder, Hank Cosby, Sylvia Moy, or Lula Mae Hardaway, but it's James Jamerson's record through and through: [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "I Was Made to Love Her"] It went to number two on the charts, sat between "Light My Fire" at number one, and "All You Need is Love" at number three, with the Beatles song soon to overtake it and make number one itself. But within a few weeks of "I Was Made to Love Her" reaching its chart peak, things in Detroit would change irrevocably. On the 23rd of July, the police busted an illegal drinking den. They thought they were only going to get about twenty-five people there, but there turned out to be a big party on. They tried to arrest seventy-four people, but their wagon wouldn't fit them all in so they had to call reinforcements and make the arrestees wait around til more wagons arrived. A crowd of hundreds gathered while they were waiting. Someone threw a brick at a squad car window, a rumour went round that the police had bayonetted someone, and soon the city was in flames. Riots lasted for days, with people burning down and looting businesses, but what really made the situation bad was the police's overreaction. They basically started shooting at young Black men, using them as target practice, and later claiming they were snipers, arsonists, and looters -- but there were cases like the Algiers Motel incident, where the police raided a motel where several Black men, including the members of the soul group The Dramatics, were hiding out along with a few white women. The police sexually assaulted the women, and then killed three of the men for associating with white women, in what was described as a "lynching with bullets". The policemen in question were later acquitted of all charges. The National Guard were called in, as were Federal troops -- the 82nd Airborne Division, and the 101st Airborne from Clarksville, the division in which Jimi Hendrix had recently served. After four days of rioting, one of the bloodiest riots in US history was at an end, with forty-three people dead (of whom thirty-three were Black and only one was a policeman). Official counts had 1,189 people injured, and over 7,200 arrests, almost all of them of Black people. A lot of the histories written later say that Black-owned businesses were spared during the riots, but that wasn't really the case. For example, Joe's Record Shop, owned by Joe Von Battle, who had put out the first records by C.L. Franklin and his daughter Aretha, was burned down, destroying not only the stock of records for sale but the master tapes of hundreds of recordings of Black artists, many of them unreleased and so now lost forever. John Lee Hooker, one of the artists whose music Von Battle had released, soon put out a song, "The Motor City is Burning", about the events: [Excerpt: John Lee Hooker, "The Motor City is Burning"] But one business that did remain unburned was Motown, with the Hitsville studio going untouched by flames and unlooted. Motown legend has this being down to the rioters showing respect for the studio that had done so much for Detroit, but it seems likely to have just been luck. Although Motown wasn't completely unscathed -- a National Guard tank fired a shell through the building, leaving a gigantic hole, which Berry Gordy saw as soon as he got back from a business trip he'd been on during the rioting. That was what made Berry Gordy decide once and for all that things needed to change. Motown owned a whole row of houses near the studio, which they used as additional office space and for everything other than the core business of making records. Gordy immediately started to sell them, and move the admin work into temporary rented space. He hadn't announced it yet, and it would be a few years before the move was complete, but from that moment on, the die was cast. Motown was going to leave Detroit and move to Hollywood.

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Brilliant Balance
What if someday were today?

Brilliant Balance

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 19:20


Have you ever heard a story about something awe-inspiring someone has done and you think: ‘It would be so amazing to do that someday'... Then end up never doing it? We've all had that experience of looking great experiences square in the eye - ones that are so intensely desirable - and telling ourselves ‘not yet'. Why do we convince ourselves we're not ready for any new challenge and that we don't deserve to achieve our dreams ‘yet'? We tend to romanticize the idea of what we want to do instead of enjoying the experience itself. It's almost like the anticipation of having something is greater than actually having it. It doesn't have to be that way.  In this episode, you'll discover how to break free from the shackles of the limiting beliefs that stop you from experiencing your dreams. We'll dive into the reasons you should think of TODAY as your someday instead of an obscure date in the far future. You'll learn how to take charge of your life and enjoy experiences to the fullest while doing the things you've always wanted to do. Listen in… Show Highlights Include: The (lesser known) limiting beliefs you must break to move yourself closer to climbing your Mount Kilimanjaro (and be happy you did). (1:35) 3 approaches you can take to break free of the limiting mindset that keeps you in a constant state of dreaming (and move to living/ experiencing ) (10:30) How simply saying ‘yes' can rewire your brain and transform your identity to someone with the boldness to try new things (instead of moping from the sidelines). (9:25) The ‘Reallocation Strategy' you can use to smartly allocate your resources so you can fully enjoy your dream experience. (13:17) Interested in coaching with Brilliant Balance? Schedule an exploratory call here: www.brilliant-balance.com/schedule Shop the Brilliant Balance Boutique! www.brilliant-balance.com/shop Subscribe to The Brilliant Balance Weekly and we'll deliver it to your digital doorstep each Tuesday: www.brilliant-balance.com/weekly  Need a few moments of peace? Listen to our free 5 Minute Meditation: www.brilliant-balance.com/breathe/  Follow us on Instagram: www.instagram.com/brilliant_balance  Join our private Facebook Group: www.facebook.com/groups/281949848958057  Join 30 Days to Vibrant Energy: www.brilliant-balance.com/energy

STRAY COUNTRY
Stray Country - Season 1 - A Carousel For Pigs - Chapter 47

STRAY COUNTRY

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 24:32


Portrait of American run to its logical conclusion.  Someday she'll find herself in the same place as Billy, Jack, and the janitor.  Cornered in the storm cellar of an old farmhouse by a white plastic grocery sack.    This is the dead end of the American experience.

School of Podcasting
You Can Podcast: Lessons From the Erma Bombeck Writer's Workshop

School of Podcasting

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 48:22 Very Popular


We all know that person who is always embarking on new adventures and taking risks. It seems like they were born with an innate sense of courage - but the truth is, everyone has the potential for courage. Doubt is part of the podcasting process. Today I'm back from the Erma Bombeck Writers Workshop with some insights to help you get started and keep going.  I also made some mistakes that I will share and some insights on some tools and strategies.  Ready To Start Your Podcast You may think nobody would listen to you, but I'm here to tell you they will. I have proven strategies to help you identify exactly what your audience wants. You will sound professional, and won't have to spend a million dollars to sound great. Learn through our online tutorials, live group coaching and a private Facebook Group filled with brilliant podcasters. Join worry-free with a 30-day money-back guarantee. See schoolofpodcasting.com/listener QUESTION OF THE MONTH This month the question is from Patrick from the Big Seance www.bigseance.com and he wants to know: What standard or tradition in podcasting do you tend to ignore and why do you do it differently? Don't forget to say the name of your show and website, and a little bit about your show. I need your answer by 10/28/22 Leave Your Answer at  www.schoolofpodcasting.com/question Where I Will Be? I look forward to seeing you all, please come up and say hi. To see my full itinerary, go to schoolofpodcasting.com/where Mentioned In This Episode School of Podcasting Samson Q2U Microphone Zoom Podtrak Recorder/Interface Profit From Your Podcast Book My Spouse Has Dementia Convertkit Email Tool Substack Email List Tool Leighann Lord (Very Funny Lady) Erma Bombeck on Amazon (aff) Erma Bombeck Writers Workshop Elizabeth Gilbert Big Magic book (aff) Katrina Little Harry Durran Episode 767 Podcast Junkies Someday Is Today: 22 Simple, Actionable Ways to Propel Your Creative Life and Storyworthy by Matthew Dicks Time Table 00-00:55 Opening 56:00 Introduction 01:43:00 Because of My Podcast 03:50 Age is a Number 11:13 Join the School of Podcasting 12:36 Follow the Show 12:55 I'll start podcasting as soon as .... 16:18 Not Everyone Will "Get you" 18:00 Creepy Dudes ENOUGH! 19:42 Book Titles 20:15 Make the Podcast You Want to Hear 20:55 Someday is Today Snippet 24:45 Creators Create 25:54 Start where you are... 26:40 What is the worst thing that could happen? 27:06 What is Stopping You? 28:38 Getting Unstuck with Katrina Kittle 35:50 Notes on My Presentation 39:48 Tools and Strategies from The Event 46:13 Question of the Month 47:42 Where will I be? 48:25 Three Magic Words 50:12 Join the School of Podcasting 51:08 Bloopers This podcast is value-for-value enabled which means you can send boosts and boostagrams using a new modern app. You can also Buy Me a Coffee (or 5...). This podcast took 9 hours to research, record, edit, document, and publish.  Follow the Show and Never Miss an Episode on: Apple - Google - Spotify - Amazon      

Todd Coconato Podcast— The Remnant
”Total Reliance on God” Sunday Service @ The Remnant with Pastor Todd

Todd Coconato Podcast— The Remnant

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 59:15


"Total Reliance on God" Sunday Service @ The Remnant with Pastor Todd To give please go to www.ToddCoconato.com/give Here is the post that I believe the Lord inspired for today's service... Transparency and total reliance. I wanted to share with you all that I think I finally hit a point yesterday where my body was literally shutting down in the natural. Even though that sounds really bad, it's not, it needed to happen. Please don't worry about me. I'm ok. I'm great actually!

Keys For Kids Ministries

Bible Reading: Matthew 5:14-16Nora sighed. Everybody's doing something, she thought as she listened to the conversation at the table. Everybody but me. Pastor James had come for dinner, and so far the discussion was all about the events their church was putting together to reach people with the gospel. Mom was going to sing with the choir downtown, Dad was in charge of a men's breakfast, and Nora's older brother offered to make posters to advertise the kids' program. Nora pushed her food around on her plate. I wish I were big enough to help, she thought. Just then Pastor James turned to Nora. "Do you have any friends you can invite to the kids' program?" he asked. Nora nodded. "I guess so," she murmured, still wishing she could have a real job like Mom and Dad and her brother did. As Mom tucked Nora into bed later that night, Nora shared her thoughts. "Honey," said Mom, "inviting friends and praying for them is a real job. It's every bit as important as what any of us are doing." But Nora wasn't convinced. "Do you get enough light in your room from your night-light? Or shall I leave the overhead light on?" Mom asked as she turned to leave. "Or I could get a lamp from the living room. Would you like that?" "No!" exclaimed Nora in surprise. "That would be way too bright and keep me awake. The night-light is perfect." "So both big lights and small lights are needed, right? And I think they're equally important, don't you?" "Yep," said Nora. "When I wake up at night, I like the little night-light. But when I read, I need the bigger lights." Mom nodded. "They just have different purposes. And that's true of people too--and of tasks that need to be done. They're all needed, and big ones and little ones are equally important. They all help more people know about Jesus. And since you know Him as your Savior, you can be a light for Him in whatever tasks He gives you." Nora thought about that. "Okay. I'll invite my friends to the kids' program." She grinned. "I'll be a night-light for Jesus." -Hazel W. MarettHow About You?Are you too young to preach? To organize meetings? To prepare a dinner? That's okay. Someday the Lord may ask you to do those things. But right now, perhaps you--not your parent or your pastor--can be a friend to the new kid at school, or pray for your teacher, or invite your classmates to church. Whatever God asks you to do, be willing to do it. Be a light for Jesus.Today's Key Verse:Whoever is faithful in very little is also faithful in much. (CSB) (Luke 16:10)Today's Key Thought:Your tasks are important

Boiled Sports Podcast Network
A Generational Problem Continues for Purdue's Football Program

Boiled Sports Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022


Someday…this will change. Until then, I need to be reminded that winning against Wisconsin isn't an option.

Keys For Kids Ministries

Bible Reading: Psalm 139:23-24"Honey, would you grab a cart and get started in the produce aisle? I'll meet you there in a few minutes."Sunny gave her mom a thumbs-up and got started on the week's grocery list. To her annoyance, she soon realized she'd picked the loudest cart. One of the wheels was stuck, and every time Sunny turned, the squeaky rubber sound made her cringe.An older gentleman chuckled as he walked by. "Are you trying to start a drag race in here?" he asked. Sunny was hard-pressed to think of a time she'd felt more embarrassed."Well, there you are! I don't know how I was ever able to find you!" Mom said, trying not to laugh. "Mom, I'm so embarrassed! I should've just gone back for another cart." Sunny's blushing cheeks rivaled the apples in the display behind her."Aw, honey. It happens to everyone. In fact, do you know what this reminds me of?"Sunny shook her head, looking around to see if anyone was staring at her."Sure, squeaky wheels can be annoying, but they also alert us to problem areas--sort of like how the Lord alerts us to places in our lives where He wants us to grow. Did you know that in the Bible, King David asked God to highlight the places in his heart that didn't line up with who God was making him to be?" Mom knocked on a watermelon. "Just like I'm testing the integrity of this fruit, our good Father wants to make sure we're strong too. David knew this and wanted to know where in his life he needed to grow. We can also ask the Lord to show us where we're weak, but don't be surprised if you start noticing some squeaky areas needing attention.""Really? Has this happened to you, Mom?""You bet! Many times. It's not always easy to get up close and personal with the squeaky places we're not so proud of, but as we turn them over to the Lord, He shapes those weakened areas and helps us become more like Jesus.""That's pretty cool, Mom. I love that God cares so much about our growth. I think I'll ask Him where I can grow. In the meantime, can we ditch this squeaky cart?"Laughing, Mom said, "Not before we alert the manager about this busted wheel!" -Sara WoodardHow About You?Are you too young to preach? To organize meetings? To prepare a dinner? That's okay. Someday the Lord may ask you to do those things. But right now, perhaps you--not your parent or your pastor--can be a friend to the new kid at school, or pray for your teacher, or invite your classmates to church. Whatever God asks you to do, be willing to do it. Be a light for Jesus.Today's Key Verse:Whoever is faithful in very little is also faithful in much. (CSB) (Luke 16:10)Today's Key Thought:Your tasks are important

The Storytelling Lab
Making Today the Day with Matthew Dicks

The Storytelling Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 62:54 Very Popular


Matthew Dicks is an internationally bestselling author, podcaster, co-founder of Speak Up, and a 53-time Moth StorySLAM champion and 7-time Moth GrandSLAM champion. Many might think he's just an over-achiever, but as he proves in his new book, Someday is Today, it really just comes down to time management. And we all have the same amount of time each day. In this episode of The Storytelling Lab, Matthew gives you all his tips and tricks to making the most out of each minute and moving the needle closer to his goal. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Herd with Colin Cowherd
Boxing with Chris Mannix - How women's boxing could someday surpass men's boxing in popularity

The Herd with Colin Cowherd

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 46:32


Chris is joined by Jamel Herring and Kevin Iole to talk about the latest with Deontay Wilder, the huge weekend in women's boxing coming off the heels of Shields-Marshall and Taylor-Serrano, and should Devin Haney stay at 135 for Loma? #Volume #Herd #ColinCowherdSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

SI Boxing with Chris Mannix
Boxing with Chris Mannix - How women's boxing could someday surpass men's boxing in popularity

SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 46:32


Chris is joined by Jamel Herring and Kevin Iole to talk about the latest with Deontay Wilder, the huge weekend in women's boxing coming off the heels of Shields-Marshall and Taylor-Serrano, and should Devin Haney stay at 135 for Loma? #Volume #Herd #ColinCowherdSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Colin Cowherd Podcast
Boxing with Chris Mannix - How women's boxing could someday surpass men's boxing in popularity

The Colin Cowherd Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 46:32


Chris is joined by Jamel Herring and Kevin Iole to talk about the latest with Deontay Wilder, the huge weekend in women's boxing coming off the heels of Shields-Marshall and Taylor-Serrano, and should Devin Haney stay at 135 for Loma? #Volume #Herd #ColinCowherdSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Art of the Cut
The Alan Smithee Round Table (BCPC Rate Survey, Metaverse Updates, AI Tech and more)

Art of the Cut

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 50:04


Its finally here! Welcome to episode one of our monthly round table podcast where hosts Scott Simmons, Katie Hinsen & Michael Kammes talk about the latest news in production, post production, entertainment tech and beyond. In our inaugural episode the gang talks about the Blue Collar Post Collective rate survey, updates to the Metaverse and how it will effect the world of production, AI technology and a fun segment called One Cool Thing where each host talks about one cool thing they learned or found over the past month. Enjoy the episode and if you have a better name for this round table tweet us @ProVideo! BCPC rate survey: http://bit.ly/2022ratesurvey A bit about the hosts: Scott Simmons @editblog Scott was born in rural West Tennessee and didn't really realize that movies and tv had to be made by actual people until he went to college. After getting degrees in both Television Production and Graphic Design he was in one of the early graduating classes at the Watkins Film School in Nashville, Tennessee. During that time at Watkins he discovered editing. In 1999, Scott took the leap into freelancing and in 2007 accepted a position as an editor at Filmworkers - Nashville. In 2005 Scott created The Editblog a website dedicated to all things editing and post-production which is now housed here at PVC. Someday he hopes to edit on a beach with a touch screen device, a wireless hard drive and a Red Stripe. Katie Hinsen @katiehinsen Katie is an international award-winning film & television executive with credits on over 100 major productions. Her background as a Finishing Artist has allowed her to make waves through Editorial, Color, Engineering, VFX and Leadership. She has spent much of her career focused on the forecasting and implementation of emerging technologies, and is a passionate mentor and advocate for emerging talent. Michael Kammes @michaelkammes Michael is the Senior Director of Innovation at Shift Media. He consults on the latest in technology and best practices in the digital media creation and communications space. Specialties: Workflows and Technology in Production and Post Production: Cloud/SaaS, Acquisition, VR/360, HDR, Storage, Asset Management, Automation, Archival, Editorial, Post Audio, Finishing, Encoding/Transcoding, and Distribution. Michael incorporates this deep knowledge into his technical infotainment series "5 THINGS", plus various podcasts, panels, and user groups. Plus, he just really, really, digs Post. http://5thingsseries.com http://michaelkammes.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/artofthecut/support

FORE the Good of the Game
John Mahaffey - "I Just Hope Someday People Will Remember Me" SHORT TRACK

FORE the Good of the Game

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 2:13


Major Championship winner John Mahaffey is sitting in a bar with Tom Watson in 1973 after John's first win at the Sahara Invitational and worries about his destiny in golf. Remember, this came before Tom's first win the following year at the Western Open, "FORE the Good of the Game."

Business Coaching with Join Up Dots
How To Build Businesses Whilst Working Fulltime

Business Coaching with Join Up Dots

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 58:30


How To Build Businesses Whilst Working Fulltime Matthew Dick is our guest today joining us on the Steve Jobs inspired Join Up Dots business podcast. Matthew is an unusual guest for sure, in fact I can't remember one that manages to do so much in the time available to him every single day. He is an international bestselling author with his books being translated into more than 25 languages worldwide. He is also the co-founder and artistic director of Speak Up, a Hartford-based storytelling organization that produces shows throughout New England. He teaches storytelling and public speaking to individuals, corporations, universities, religious institutions, and school districts around the world. Now here is the unusual bit when not hunched over a computer screen, Matthew fills his days as an elementary school teacher, which he been doing for 24 years and is a former West Hartford Teacher of the Year and a finalist for Connecticut Teacher of the Year. How The Dots Joined Up For Matthew He also has no desire to quit the job and work fulltime on his other ventures. And then around all this he , a storyteller, a marketing and storytelling consultant, a speaking coach, a blogger, a wedding DJ, a minister, and a Lord of Sealand. He grew up in the small town of Blackstone, Massachusetts, where he made a name for himself by dying twice before the age of eighteen and becoming the first student in his high school to be suspended for inciting riot upon himself. So how does he decide what to focus his energies on first and foremost when tackling each new day? And of all the points made in his book Someday is Today what would he say is the one that he loves the most? Well let's find out as we bring onto the show to start joining up dots with the one and only Matthew Dick