Podcasts about Someday

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  • 1,589PODCASTS
  • 1,981EPISODES
  • 40mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Nov 20, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Someday

Latest podcast episodes about Someday

The FORM show Podcast
169. Someday isn't on the calendar...so do it today!

The FORM show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 26:01


Do it now. "Someday" isn't on the calendar. If you're serious about going on that trip, taking your Mom out to this particular play, going to Europe or writing a book, then you have to MAKE the time. "Maybe sometime" or "when you have time" is never going to happen. Why is it we don't have time to take Mom out to lunch, but we somehow find time to go to her funeral? Jesus said to "work while you can." That includes doing EVERYTHING. Do it now, while you can. It doesn't have to be the tribulation period before we're not able to do anything. LIFE has a way of getting in the way. You have to make the time and just do it. Guest: Beth Compton See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Media Path Podcast
Fathers, Sons & Motown featuring Mark Arthur Miller

Media Path Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 58:03


Singer/Actor/Tennis Player Mark Arthur Miller was the only white boy growing up in his south side Chicago neighborhood, only to discover that his estranged father, Ron Miller was the only white songwriter at Motown. The two reconnected when Mark was 16 and were able to share 20 years of connection, forgiveness and love. Mark has fashioned his story into a musical stage show that audiences are finding as unique as it is universal. Mark is in-studio to talk all about it. Plus Fritz and Weezy are recommending the film Spencer, the book into limited series, One of Us is Lying and with an assist from engineer, Mason Brown, the Japanese film, Shoplifters.Path Points of Interest:Mark Arthur MillerMark Arthur Miller InterviewSoul Searching TrailerMark Arthur Miller - Soul Searching AlbumMark Arthur Miller on SpotifyMark Arthur Miller on YoutubeRon Miller Hits Include: His hits for the label include “A Place in the Sun,” “For Once in My Life,” “Yester-me, Yester-you, Yester-day,” “Heaven Help Us All,” “Touch Me in the Morning,” “Someday at Christmas” and “Don't Burn Down the BridgeRon Miller PublishingSpencer - Movie in Theatershttps://www.amctheatres.com/movies/spencer-67242tt12536294https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/spencer_2021https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/spencer-movie-review-2021https://www.nytimes.com/2021/11/12/movies/kristen-stewart-princess-diana-spencer.htmlhttps://deadline.com/2021/11/spencer-kristen-stewart-pablo-larrain-contenders-los-angeles-1234871069/One of Us is Lying by Karen McManusKaren McManusOne of Us is Lying on PeacockShoplifters Fritz Coleman - Race and Old White Guys

Shows – SSRadio
Funk and Disorderly 14th Nov 2021

Shows – SSRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 1:01


T.Markakis – “Marvins Touch” (Original Mix) [LW Recordings] Ce Ce Rogers – “Someday” (Club Mix) [Hed Kandi] Artwork Sounds, V.underground, NutownSoul – “Time Is Now” (Original Mix) [Pasqua Records S.A] Bobby D'Ambrosio, Michelle Weeks, Joey Negro – “Moment Of My Life” (Main Mix) [Z Records] Michele Chiavarini, DJ Spen, Gary Hudgins – “1 World” (Dj […] The post Funk and Disorderly 14th Nov 2021 appeared first on SSRadio.

The Dentist Freedom Blueprint
Ep #353: Jim Rachor - Family, Legacy, and Freedom - How to Get There Sooner, Not Someday

The Dentist Freedom Blueprint

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 30:44


For those who are looking for a different path to their freedom and retirement goals, this episode will be extremely insightful and helpful. Today I'm joined by Jim Rachor, a Freedom Founders member who decided to take things into his own hands rather than abdicate that to other platforms and institutions. You will hear about his incredible journey to finding a new way to tackle his goals and gain true financial freedom. Check out the show notes for more information!

Talk Me Into
Cowboy Bebop

Talk Me Into

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 74:38


“We had our day in the sun, when a horse wants to run ain't no sense in closing the gate. So you can have your space… Cowboy!” This episode Jimmy is talking Jeff and Dan into the incredibly popular anime series Cowboy Bebop just in time for the Netflix live action series starring John Cho! To watch along with us stream the first five episodes on Hulu or Netflix. See you cowgirl. Someday, somewhere!   On the next episode Jeff is talking Jimmy and Dan into the fantasy series The Wheel of Time. To prepare for the Amazon live action series starring Rosamund Pike, read the prologue and the first 10 chapters of The Eye of the World, the first novel in the Wheel of Time Series.   Please remember to subscribe, rate and review or send us an email (talkmeinto@gmail.com) and we will read it on the next episode. For more Talk Me Into content become a patron! www.patreon.com/talkmeinto. Check out our merchandise here: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/talk-me-into?ref_id=24475.  For updates and generally joyful humor, follow the show (@talkmeinto) or the hosts (@sonnavafitch @danny_breakdown @JEFFFFF27) on Twitter. Artwork provided by Twitter user @wikirascals. Theme provided by Hostage Calm. Additional music provided by Disqualifier (https://disqualifier.bandcamp.com).   00:00 - Intro 06:50 - Talking Ourselves Into 19:50 - Prewatch: Cowboy Bebop 25:20 - Postwatch: Cowboy Bebop 64:25 - Outro/Next Episode: Wheel of Time

Hound PodCast: Double U Hunting Supply
EP 87: Gone to the Dogs with Trent Williams

Hound PodCast: Double U Hunting Supply

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 77:02


After meeting at Autumn Oaks and spending an hour or more talking dogs, Steve and his guest for this episode discovered common ground outside the world of coonhounds and coon hunting, their mutual love for bluegrass music.  Trent Williams, an electrical engineer living and working in southern Ohio, has been playing and performing bluegrass music in church, at home with talented members of his family and at a multitude of festivals, beginning at six years of age.  Williams sent Steve a copy of his CD titled Someday which included several of his own songs and it blew our host away.  The idea of having Williams on the podcast "someday" gave way to an urgency to record the Buckeye coon hunter right away.  The result is a conversation, supplemented by William's tunes, two of which he wrote himself, that is bound to be a toe-tapping success.  Beyond the music, Steve and Trent discuss Trent's coon-hunting upbringing, his affinity for hard-hunting hounds and competition hunting, and a secret reveal about a breed that's near and dear to Steve's heart.  In this one, the listener gets a buy-one-get-one deal with great conversation and equally great bluegrass music in one sitting.  Steve Fielder's book Gone To The Dogs – A Coon Hunter's Journey is available at:@dusupply.com@stevefielderbooks.com  Trent William's CD Someday is available on iTunes, Amazon and 

Happy Single MOM
Jen McGuire- Retired Breeder. What to do when your children Leave the NEST

Happy Single MOM

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 41:40


Jen McGuire a retired single mom with 4 boys shared her story of finding herself after raising her sons Her book Nest: Letting Go from Italy, France and Ireland Paperback At 46, Jen McGuire made good on a daydream. A little whisper of something that had sustained her through 25 years of raising four boys alone. She would sit in a broken down car in the school line up and think, "Europe." Pick nits our of her kids' hair, then her own afterwards and think, "Alone." Move from one rental home to another, and another, and think, "Someday." Someday she could go places. Beyond No Frills. Beyond the schoolyard. Beyond the park and the laundromat. Here are some of the questions i asked in the podcast Tell me about your single mom's story? How have you coped with 4 grown sons? Tell me about 'NEST' how you came up with the concept? Do you believe we can get lost time back? How do you cope with having grown boys? What advice would you give your younger self? What is your hope for other single moms? Follow her on Instagram : https://www.instagram.com/p/COdeznqFf53/ Follow me on Instagram : https://www.instagram.com/happy_singlemompodcast/ Support this podcast

UPROAR
Everybody Goes Someday with JOSHUA DAVIS!

UPROAR

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 18:05


Performing songwriter, teaching artist and finalist on NBC's The Voice - Joshua Davis (joshuadavismusic.com) joins us to reflect on his song "Everybody Goes Someday" from the album A Miracle Of Birds.We talk about death, All Saints Day, and the biblical witness encouraging us to live everyday as if God's full goodness is present now - not just after you die.

Let's talk Mercedes
#16 Just think and drive? – Sid Kouider and Maxine Benz

Let's talk Mercedes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 24:35


Of all the science-fiction clichés, brain-computer-interfaces – or BCIs – might be among the most fascinating. In recent years, neuroscientists have taken the first steps towards letting external devices and the human brain communicate. While medical applications are surely the focus of making use of BCIs, research has also started at Mercedes-Benz. After all, the future of driving offers some mind-blowing areas for the application of this futuristic technology. The good news is: This leap won't involve a chip under your skin. On the contrary: Someday, BCIs could free your body from having to physically interact with your car – and make driving safer than ever before. Until that time comes, Maxine Benz, Future Research expert at Mercedes-Benz, and Sid Kouider, neuroscientist and founder of NextMind, explain the fundamental technological hurdles that still need to be overcome – and why, with the right technical breakthroughs, mental symbiosis with your vehicle may not be decades away. In the latest episode of Let's talk Mercedes – the Mercedes-Benz podcast – they talk with host Yasmine Blair about the technology's different operating principles, its unique virtues for future mobility, and when we can expect to start our favorite podcast in the car simply with the power of our minds. Visit us on Mercedes me Media: https://media.mercedes-benz.com/letstalkmercedes

Your Daily Revolution
419: Mohawk, Permission and Ownership

Your Daily Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 10:16


Is there a place in your world today where you can stop asking for permission from others? Just give yourself permission to go do the thing that you want to do. Ask yourself: *Where in your life today are you still asking for permission versus just having 100% ownership of your life? *Do you know what you want for your marriage and your family? Give yourself permission or just ask for forgiveness and go get what you want. Someday is today or it is never. Start living your life.

Wilde On
Season 3 - Episode 6: Ray Lyn

Wilde On

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 22:48


Today's guest is a superstar on the rise. Her love for wrestling budded during a traumatic time in her young life. Like a phoenix rising from the ashes she has followed her dreams regardless of the hurdles in her way. Ladies and gentleman, my girl, Ray Lyn. Special thanks to sound editor Matteo Sessa and Kris Chambers @superkickd Wrestling, Toronto, Canada. IG: @raystar5 Twitter: @ray_lyn T-shirts: www.prowrestlingtees.com/taylorwilde Twitter & IG: @realtaylorwilde Tiktok: @thetaylorwilde YouTube: “WILDE ON” https://youtube.com/channel/UCHWVrVFFUxC_5skpP4UN7vQ Cameo: https://www.cameo.com/ogtaylorwilde Music Credits: “Let's Get Wilde” by Samantha Smith/Written by Andrew Moore & Rochelle Douris; ©2021 Wilde On. “Ray Of Light” by Madonna/Written by Dave Curtiss, Clive Maldoon, Christine Leach, Madonna Ciccone and William Orbit; ©1998 Warner Chappell Music, Inc, Downtown Music Publishing. “Someday” by Sugar Ray/Written by Chad Kroeger, Ryan Peake, Ryan Vikedal, Michael Kroeger; ©1999 Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp., Grave Lack Of Talent Music, E Equals Music, Joseph "MCG" Nichol Pub Designee. “Cray Cray” by Young Dolph/Written by Adolph Thornton Jr.; ©2020 Kobalt Music Publishing Ltd. Additional music by Jason Shaw at audionautix.com.

Andrew Petty is Dying
We All Leave in a Hearse

Andrew Petty is Dying

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 68:30


Life and Death exist side-by-side every day in the ER. Veteran ER physician and life philosopher, David Talbott, has spent almost 30 years in those trenches.  In this episode, David shares what he's learned about how to live well, how to die well, and how to use Mortality to your advantage.  But it's not just his time in the ER that has taught David what he shares with us today. His personal life has had its fair share of heartache and tragedy, and David draws vulnerably from those experiences, too, as he exhorts us to make the most of our one-and-only lives.  MY exhortation to you? Tune in to the full episode, and don't let it go in one ear and out the other or simply entertain your curiosity about what it's like to do the work that David does. It's more than dramatic stories from the frontlines of medicine. It's a study in the human condition derived from one man's encounters with thousands of people staring Death in the face. Someday, maybe even some day soon, YOU will stare death in the face. Paint yourself into these stories. Imagine that it's YOU approaching your final breath. Pull Mortality CLOSE and accept its inevitability. Let David's hard-won wisdom sink deep into your soul and show up in the way you live so that when it's your time to die, you can die courageously, graciously, and free of regrets.    Remembering Dennis Franks, My Guest on Episode 034 I pushed pause on the interview to bring listeners some sad news.  Dennis Franks, my guest on episode 034, died suddenly on Saturday, October 16, at the age of 68. He leaves behind his wife, Nancy--who played a life-saving role in Dennis' life-changing encounter with Mortality many years ago--two grown daughters, and three grandkids.  I didn't know Dennis well, but the time I did spend with him for the podcast made it clear to me that he had a huge heart and a voracious appetite for life. He was laser-focused on making every day count and making his life matter. He loved his family deeply. And he served thousands in their pursuit of financial independence through his work at Market America--which he saw as more of a mission than a profession. And one thing's for certain: Dennis had a lot more living he wanted to do.  If you haven't tuned in to Dennis' episode, I hope you will. After you listen, take a minute to share what his Story meant to you on one of my social media posts created in his honor on Facebook, Instagram, or LinkedIn. Life is short, folks.    Memorable Quotes from David Talbott I think that when you look at life, you can say why me, but the reality is, why not you? The reality is from the day we're born, we're all a statistic waiting to happen. We just haven't been introduced to the lethal details. Did you live, did you love, did you matter? Too many of us focus on longevity and we forget the quality of our lives. The quality of our life is predicated so much on what we focus on. I think the most important conversations are the ones you have with yourself in the mirror every day. There is no growth without friction. So many times we as humans put ourselves in our own prison, and we're the only one with the key, and we don't even realize it. That which is gained with little effort is esteemed of little value. You can come to the ER in a Lamborghini or a taxi, but we all eventually leave in a hearse.  In life it's not so much when and how you die; it's how you live. It's a courageous thing to allow somebody to die with dignity and grace. Discipline is weighed in ounces, but regret is weighed in pounds.   Making It Matter in Your Life Today What will it take for you to take the reality of your Mortality even more seriously and let it begin to change your life today?  Don't let it take an actual crisis.  Instead, create a life-saving crisis within yourself today by courageously embracing the Mortality Mindset. Commit to it as a discipline. With practice, we can approximate the impact of a real encounter with Mortality by continually reminding ourselves of its inevitability and making day-to-day real-world decisions in light of it. As David said, "discipline is weighed in ounces, but regret is weighed in pounds." Here's one simple exercise to get you started: Read at least 10 obituaries from various sources. Mix it up: read a few from the New York Times, a few from your local paper, and a few from small-town papers, too. What sticks out to you? How does it affect you to read about other people's deaths and the lives they lived? Next, write your own obituary as if you'd lived the best life you can imagine, a life you are immensely proud of. Then, begin to make adjustments in your life RIGHT NOW that will increase the likelihood that THAT obituary will become a reality.  This is your one and only life. Make it count.    Your Opinion Matters If this show has been meaningful to you, please rate it and leave a review on your favorite podcast app. Your feedback encourages others to tune in to this life-affirming, world-changing message. Thank you!   Let's Create Your Best Life Together Connect with me to learn more about how a powerful, confidential 1-1 coaching partnership or participation in a Graveyard Group can help you live even more courageously and die regret-free.  Find me on Facebook, Instagram and LinkedIn, visit my website, or email me.    Connect with David Talbott Email | LinkedIn    Follow Andrew Petty is Dying & Leave a Review Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Google Podcasts | Stitcher   If You Liked This Episode, I Think You'll Like These, Too Ep. 034 | Lessons from the Chair: Redefining Disability, Avoiding the Victim Cave, and the Path to Personal Power Ep. 018 | Life's 3 Big Questions: A Conversation with the Coroner

Unlocked: Daily Devotions for Teens

**Editor's note: Today's reading discusses suicide*** If you ever want to see God's power and glory right by His compassion and gentleness, read 1 Kings 17-19. Elijah experienced the full gamut of God's character in these chapters. Elijah was a prophet (someone who spoke to God's people on His behalf) in Israel at a time when Israel was praising the false god, Baal. In chapter 18, Elijah challenged the prophets of Baal to an epic showdown on a mountaintop to prove who was the true god—Baal or the Lord. So 450 prophets of Baal built an altar, put a bull on it as an offering, and asked Baal to send down fire to burn up the offering. They danced, begged, and yelled for hours, but nothing happened. Then, Elijah built an altar to the Lord, put a bull on it, drenched it with water, and prayed a simple prayer. God immediately poured out fire from heaven, consuming not just the bull but also the wet wood and stone of the altar, definitively proving that the Lord, and He alone, is God. Then God sent down rain, ending a three-year drought Elijah had prophesied. The queen, who worshipped Baal, threatened to kill Elijah. He ran for his life. Exhausted and terrified, he prayed, but not for God to save him. He prayed for God to end his life (19:4). Elijah, who had just seen God's amazing power at work in one of the most epic good vs. evil showdowns in history, felt suicidal. He felt alone, hopeless, and empty (19:4, 10). And here we see God's tenderhearted compassion and gentleness. He gave Elijah food, water, and rest (19:5-6). God gave Elijah His very own presence, showing Elijah that, while He can and does reveal Himself in earth-shattering miracles, His presence is also a gentle whisper (19:11-12). When Elijah felt utterly alone, God showed him there were others who love God and follow Him (19:18), and He provided Elijah with a successor named Elisha (19:16). When Elijah felt suicidal, God did not berate him or tell him to pull himself up by his bootstraps and move on. Instead, He lovingly provided for Elijah's needs, reminded Elijah of His gentle presence, and provided him with community. Sadly, suicide is prevalent in our world because sin has broken God's good creation. If you struggle with suicidal thoughts, know that you are not alone. Jesus is right there with you in your hurt. He hurts with you, and through His life, death, and resurrection, He offers hope, even in situations that seem hopeless. Jesus feels all of your deepest hurts, and He came to heal those hurts. He cares for you, and He sees you with compassion, gentleness, and overwhelming love. If you are experiencing feelings of hopelessness or suicidal thoughts, tell a trusted adult immediately. One important way God brings healing to our hearts is through Christian counseling. The path to healing is long and sometimes painful, but Jesus will walk every step with you. Don't try to walk this path alone. Find loving, supportive people to help you through this process. We aren't supposed to endure our pain alone—we were designed for community. If you feel like you can't reach out to others because you are a burden, know that this feeling is a lie from the pit of hell. The enemy wants to isolate us from community, but God's truth is so much more powerful than the enemy's lies. The truth is this: you are made in God's glorious image, and for that reason you are beloved and incomparably valuable, and there is nothing you can do to change that. You are worth people's time, attention, and care—even when the people around you don't act like it. You are so precious to God that He sent Jesus to give you new life so that you could live in loving relationship with Him. Jesus did this by dying and raising again. You are an important part of His kingdom. Someday, Jesus will return to remove all hurt and death from our world permanently. Until then, we can rest, knowing that the God who sent down fire from heaven to show us His glory and power is the same God who lovingly sits beside us in our hurt, weeping with us and providing us with healing and help. • Taylor Eising • If you or someone you know is thinking about suicide, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255). You can also talk with someone via web chat at suicidepreventionlifeline.org/chat • If your situation is potentially life-threatening, call 911 (or the emergency number for your area) or go to the local hospital emergency room right away. • If you need someone to talk to but are not in need of immediate help, you can set up an appointment for a one-time complimentary phone consultation with a Christian counselor through the Focus on the Family Counseling Service. In the United States, call 1-855-771-HELP (4357) weekdays 6:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. (Mountain Time) to set up an appointment. In Canada, book your appointment by calling 1-800-661-9800 between 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. (Pacific Time) and ask to speak with the care associate. • How have you seen God's gentleness in Scripture, in your own life, or in the lives of others? • If you are feeling depressed or suicidal, usually something in your circumstances has to change to help you heal, like how God gave Elijah community and rest. If you are feeling discouraged and burnt out, what are some circumstances in your life that might have to change? I lie in the dust; revive me by your word. Psalm 119:25 (NLT)

Audio Book on SermonAudio
Payday Someday! As Narrated by T M S

Audio Book on SermonAudio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 74:00


A new MP3 sermon from The Narrated Puritan is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Payday Someday! As Narrated by T M S Subtitle: Christianity in America Speaker: Robert G. Lee Broadcaster: The Narrated Puritan Event: Audio Book Date: 10/29/2021 Length: 74 min.

Heritage Baptist Church
Payday Someday! As Narrated by T M S

Heritage Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 74:00


Harvard College Faith and Action - Doxa
Payday Someday! As Narrated by T M S

Harvard College Faith and Action - Doxa

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 74:00


Highlands Christian Church
Payday Someday! As Narrated by T M S

Highlands Christian Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 74:00


Tablestory Specials -  One Shots, Mini-Series, & Other Short Actual Play TTRPGs
Feint Dawn - Ep. 4 - Someday, Someone Will Be Lying

Tablestory Specials - One Shots, Mini-Series, & Other Short Actual Play TTRPGs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 188:04


A city of beauty, Helios has a brutal and cruel underbelly. You need guile and wit to survive, or you’ll be forced to become a citizen, unable to leave. The only thing harder than getting out… is getting in. The post Feint Dawn – Ep. 4 – Someday, Someone Will Be Lying appeared first on Tablestory.

Thought Leaders Business Lab Podcast
321: Execute Your “Someday When” Projects with Kristin Swanson

Thought Leaders Business Lab Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 27:23


In this episode, Samantha is joined by Kristin Swanson, a coach, consultant, and breast cancer survivor who teaches clients how to execute their “someday when” projects with ease, and turn procrastion initiatives into profit.

The Roads Church Podcast
Kingdom Culture Part 17 | Chad Everett | The Roads Church

The Roads Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 37:34


The Church of Revelation - we're getting our focus back to the Kingdom of God vs the Kingdom of Darkness. We need to study the Word. Jesus wrote the Bible just for us to know what's coming! There's a weakness in the church due to biblical illiteracy and a lack of discipleship. As things move toward the end times, be ready for a discrediting of biblical world views. Those who have been born again, will NOT worship the anti-Christ. Everyone else will. Why? Because they don't know. The only way we will know, is because we have the knowledge of God given to us that we will see things that other people don't see. We'll be awakened to things, and have revelation of things that they will not have. The anti-Christ will have the authority of Satan, but we have the authority of Jesus! Are there any sons and daughters willing to know and exercise their authority in the face of adversity? Is there anyone that's going to say, "I'm on Team Jesus" the victorious side? Someday, Revelation 13 will happen - we better be paying attention! We invite you to explore our Podcast for more teachings, visit our website and come join us for one of our services. Subscribe to our Roads Church YouTube Channel for live stream notifications of our services every Sunday morning at 8 :30 & 10 :30 CT. If you would like to give to the ministry of The Roads Church visit: https://theroads.church/giving/ Or text: Amount NC or Amount MTC to 84321 (ex. 50 NC) Follow The Roads Church on social media: Roads App: https://subsplash.com/theroadschurch/app Website: https://theroads.church Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theroadschurch Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theroadschurch YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/theroadschurch #mtcarmelchurch #norriscitychurch #chadeverett #theroadschurch

Her Confidence Her Way |アメリカ発、女性のワークライフ|

今日のエピソードは無料Facebookグループで行っている『Wow Wednesday』の音声をお届けします。 今日のエピソードは『Someday or Nowadays』について。 いつかやろう、ということを、今やろう、に変えるには何をするかというと 決断なんですよね。 そして決断の後ろには「熱い思い」です。 ビジネスをやりたいことがみなさんの目的ではないはずです。 ビジネスを作ることによって本当にやりたい自分のパッションをやっていくことです。 そして、お客様を増やすことがゴールではないということです。 自分の熱い熱意って何だろう?って考えてみてください。 「いつか本業になればいいな」ではなく、コミットする決意をすることです。 「明日やればいいや」「今日お休みする」OK, think about it. Facebook創立者のマークザッカーバーグさんを考えてみてほしい。 今彼はチームがいる。そのような彼でさえ、初めはチームがない状態から始まった。 ここでのポイントっていうのは、「今日やらない」っていう感情に対して彼、やらないか? ― やっています。 今ここでコミットする、決心するということは、時間がかかることたくさんあるし、大変なことがたくさんあるし、やりたくないって思うこともやる!って決心しないといけない。 みんなさんどうでしょう? みなさんは、Somedayのままにしておく?それともNowadaysにして行動する? IG:@emikorasmussen HP:https://www.herconfidenceherway.com 無料FBグループ『Her way collective』はこちら:https://www.facebook.com/groups/HerConfidenceHerWay 無料F Bグループでは毎週日本の木曜日、アメリカの水曜日に『Wow Wednesday』を開催しています。

Love Bachually
Someday my (Persian) Prince will come

Love Bachually

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 50:12


This week Aimee and Geena discussed how Channel 10 is breaking b0uNdArIe$, Holly is the queen of consent and that Darvid is smi(r)tten. Subscribe to us on ITUNES, SPOTIFY, RADIOPUBLIC, STITCHER or your podcaster of choice! You can find us on Instagram @lovebachually and send us love letters and only praise to lovebachually@gmail.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Offstage With Dave Styles
Ryan Tedder Talks New OneRepublic Song "Someday", Upcoming Show, Hearing His Songs On The Radio, And More

Offstage With Dave Styles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 18:49


Ryan Tedder talks to iHeartRadio's Dave Styles about the new OneRepublic song "Someday", upcoming streaming show, the band nearly splitting, hearing his songs on MyFM, and more!

Oh F*ck Yeah with Ruan Willow
Ep 85: Someday Erotica Excerpt Male/Female Food as Foreplay plus Ava Fox Author Interview

Oh F*ck Yeah with Ruan Willow

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 114:59


Ep 85: Someday Erotica Excerpt Male/Female Food as Foreplay plus Ava Fox Author Interview. In this steamy erotica excerpt, we get Ava Fox's amazingly sensuous and sexy scene where food is foreplay. It's a very hot scene with heightened senses where a couple meets at a cabin and the food prep and even the evening become the sensual foreplay for their impending union. After the excerpt, stay to listen to the interview. Ava and I connected so well on so many levels, I called her my "sexual soul twin". We chatted openly about sexuality in general, growing up and sexuality, female sexuality, human sexuality, sexual exploration (including a discussion on sex toys), writing erotica plus writing tips, her YouTube channel where she focuses on writing and helping others, and we talk about how amazing and special dogs (especially Malamutes) are to her and to the world. We have a great chat and we had such amazing instant rapport. Have a listen!Check out all of Ava's links here, including her TikTok, YouTube, Instagram, her website, her book, her Discord Community and more: https://linktr.ee/DanaGaulinWrites_Ava_FoxConnect with Ava on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/AvaFox301Ava's Book: affiliate link https://amzn.to/3vygLqlHello, I'm Ruan! :)Welcome to my podcast!Listen to this reading to rage up your sexuality, entertain your brain, and enjoy!On my podcast, you will find romance, topics on relationships, romance and love, self-care,  intimacy for adults only,  and it is intended for the purposes of entertainment, your fantasy life, and the arts. Sexual health and fitness are important parts for a healthy sex life.Thank you for listening!Have a fabulously sexy day!love ya,RuanFind all my links here:https://linktr.ee/RuanWillowSupport my podcast by joining my membership on Patreon that will give you extra content and early access to certain works.https://www.patreon.com/ruanwillowListen to my audiobook for free with a free trial of Amazon Audible in this affiliate link, works for those in the US only: https://www.audible.com/pd/B09D29TYSY/?source_code=AUDFPWS0223189MWU-BK-ACX0-274038&ref=acx_bty_BK_ACX0_274038_pd_usRuan's Books: affiliate linksRuan's Cabin Getaway: An Explicit Age Gap Romance: https://books2read.com/u/mB2A7DAffiliate link: https://amzn.to/3trZVshThe Mardi Gras Unmasking by Ruan Willow book link: https://books2read.com/u/mZeWpEAffiliate link: https://amzn.to/3eAtUsgInside Ruan Willow written with BD Hamptonhttps://amzn.to/3uPHjlJWant to start a podcast yourself? Check out Buzzsprout! Following this link lets Buzzsprout know I sent you, gets you a $20 Amazon gift card if you sign up for a paid plan, and helps my show too! https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=1573090Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/ruanwillow)

More Than Mommy
273 | Responsibility - The Key to Freedom

More Than Mommy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 13:08


Do you ever tell yourself, someday I'm going to do this (fill in the blank)? Someday is never going to come if we never take responsibility to make someday come. Before I decided to start my own business, I always had excuses or someone else to blame for the reason why I wasn't getting what it was that I wanted. But really, no one else is responsible for your life but you.   Responsibility is a choice. If we don't take responsibility we can't see possibility for change. And I want to help you see it's possible! Take a listen to this episode for more tips and also how you can get your hands on an article about Responsibility from my mentor Bob Proctor.   Join the IGNITE Her Society our free exclusive text community. Click here for more info: julieciardi.com/text   If you want more help on how to create your new business, join us in a 2 weeks at a free online virtual conference! Position, Package, Price for Profit virtual conference is October 26th! Register HERE.   More info on Julie: Join the IGNITE Her Squad Facebook Group HERE.  Questions? Email team@julieciardi.com  Website-www.julieciardi.com Instagram- @julieciardi

Going Rogue With Caitlin Johnstone
Hackers, Havana Syndrome, And Other Invisible Russian Aggressions That Only The CIA Can See

Going Rogue With Caitlin Johnstone

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 6:31


It's just so interesting how Russia keeps attacking America in unverifiable and invisible ways that only the US intelligence community can see. First it was plot hole-riddled claims that Russian hackers attacked American democracy in 2016, and now it's invisible microwave beams from secret Kremlin ray guns. Someday soon we may turn on the news to see footage of an empty Capitol Building while a reporter solemnly tells us that it has just been stormed by GRU agents injected with invisibility serum. Reading by Tim Foley.

Keys For Kids Ministries

Bible Reading: Matthew 24:37-44; James 4:13-15"Mom," said Julian, "isn't that where we picked blackberries one day last summer?" He pointed out the car window to a field that looked familiar to him.Mom glanced over. "Sure is," she said."You know what else?" added Julian. "Driving home from picking berries that day was the last time I rode in the blue car.""The day before the accident," Mom said thoughtfully. Julian nodded. He remembered what had happened the day after they picked berries--his dad had gotten into an accident while driving the blue car. Thankfully, Dad had not been badly hurt, but the car had looked like a crushed tin can."The phone call we got that day sure was a surprise, wasn't it?" Julian said. "When we were driving home from picking berries, I had no idea that Dad would be hit by a truck the next day and the car would be smashed and I'd never ride in it again.""I'm sure that didn't occur to any of us," said Mom. "The Bible reminds us that we never know what will happen from day to day.""Yeah, it started out like an ordinary day," Julian said. "I had breakfast, and then I played outside. We were having lunch when--surprise! The day wasn't ordinary anymore."Mom smiled at Julian. "There's going to be a big surprise on another ordinary day," she said. "People will be doing ordinary, everyday things, expecting life to go on as it always has, and then suddenly" Mom snapped her fingers. "Jesus will come back."Julian nodded. "It could happen any day, couldn't it?""Yes, it could," said Mom. "It will be a terrible time for those who haven't put their trust in Jesus, but a great and wonderful event for those who are ready--for all who know Him as their Savior.""Which is why we need to tell others about Him," said Julian. "So they can be ready when He comes too."Mom nodded. "Exactly. Let's pray for those who don't knowJesus and tell them that they can be ready for His return by trusting in Him." -Violet E. NesdolyHow About You?If Jesus comes back today, will you be ready? Someday--some ordinary day--He will come again to judge the world and make everything new. Sin--the bad things you've done or thought--cannot be part of that new world, but Jesus took the punishment for all those bad things. Trust in Him so your sins can be forgiven. Then you can eagerly look forward to living with Him forever when He returns. Today's Key Verse:Be ready, for the Son of Man is coming at an hour you do not expect. (NKJV) (Matthew 24:44)Today's Key Thought:Jesus may come today--be ready

Nick's Non-fiction
Nick's Non-fiction | A Clone of Your Own

Nick's Non-fiction

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 67:21


Welcome back for another episode of Nick's Non-fiction with your host Nick Muniz! Someday soon (if it has not happened already in secret), the first cloned human being will be born and mankind will embark on a scientific and moral journey whose destination cannot be foretold. In a lucid and engaging narrative, Judith Klotzko explains that the technology to create clones of living beings already exists, inaugurated in 1996 by Dolly, the sheep, the first mammal clone formed from a single adult cell. The human fascination with cloning goes beyond science and its extraordinary medical implications. In riveting prose full of allusions to art, music, and theatre, Klotzko explains why the prospect of human cloning triggers our deepest hopes and our darkest fears and forces us to ponder what it would mean to have a "clone of our own." Subscribe, Share, Mobile Links and Time-stamps below! 0:00 Introduction 5:15 About the Author 6:55 Ch1: Creating Life in the Lab 16:40 Ch2: The Science of Cloning 28:00 Ch3: Cloning Applications 38:35 Ch4: Cell Therapies 49:00 Ch5: Cloning and Reproduction 1:01:00 Ch6: Double Trouble 1:06:10 Next Time & Goodbye! YouTube: https://youtu.be/D7_98RmJJYM Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/TheNiche

Talking Like A Teen
Conversing With An Adult 01: I'll Be Back Someday

Talking Like A Teen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 12:28


This week we low-key introduced our mini-episode series entitled Conversing With An Adult. Ashley takes a brief moment to give listeners a heads up with what we've been up to plus get a little real about burnout and content creation. Thank you for sticking with us. It means more than you'll ever know.

Make Sh*t Happen
Monday Motivation ( Its Monday not Someday )

Make Sh*t Happen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 0:37


Good morning, MondayMotivation, guys. Monday, this is Monday today. And you know what? It's Monday. There is no day in the week that is called Sunday. A lot of people say, oh, someday I'm going to start this Sunday. I'm going to do this one day. Oh, yeah. Going to start saving soon. Listen, today's, Monday, man, the first day of the week, I want to give you a chance. And I want to challenge you whatever you have been putting off, whatever you've been thinking about, let's start doing it today day. Let's start getting it done today because Sunday is not a day. Happy Monday. Let's get it done now. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sammyz/message

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 133 - Part 1: The “Simply Brilliant” Jewelry of the 1960s and 1970s with Kimberly Klosterman, of Kimberly Klosterman Jewelry

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 23:09


What you'll learn in this episode: Why jewelry artists from the 60s and 70s, such as Andrew Grima and Arthur King, are gaining more appreciation today The difference between artist jewelers and jewelry by artists What a jewelry lover should do to refine their taste and start their collection What defines a passionate collector What to expect from the Kimberly's upcoming exhibition “Simply Brilliant: Artist-Jewelers of the 1960s and 1970s” About Kimberly Klosterman A graduate of Stephens College with a BFA in design, Kimberly Klosterman was always interested in art, antiques and design. After graduation she studied Decorative Arts at Sotheby's London, where she was exposed to the world of antique jewelry. Upon return to Cincinnati, she and her Husband, Michael Lowe, opened their first gallery selling art and antiques. At this time, she also began her search for fine jewelry. To make ends meet for the new business, Klosterman went to work in the family company, Klosterman Baking Company, in 1982 where she currently moonlights as C.E.O. Her jewelry business, established after another Sotheby's course, Understanding Jewelry, was opened in 1996. Her love of 1960s and 70s jewelry developed through the tutelage of Amanda Triossi, whose own collection thrilled Klosterman. After living in Amsterdam and London, she returned to Cincinnati where she continues to collect fine jewelry.  Klosterman has given gallery talks at the Cincinnati Art Museum, the Taft Museum, the American Society of Jewelry Historians, and the American Society of Jewelry Appraisers, NYC Jewelry Week, Christies Auction, Bonhams Auction, etc.   The current exhibition “Simply Brilliant: Artist-Jewelers of the 1960s and 1970s,” organized by Cynthia Amnéus, Chief Curator and Curator of Fashion at the Cincinnati Art Museum, is a result of Klosterman's passion for collecting. Her goal, to help preserve the legacy of these bold men and women who were jewelers to the jet-set. The exhibition, which opened at DIVA in Antwerp, Belgum and traveled to the Schmuckmuseum in Pforzhiem, Germany, will be on view in Cincinnati Oct 22- Feb 6. A catalog complete with biographies and makers' marks accompanies the exhibition. Additional Resources: Website Facebook Instagram Pintrest Photos: This is the cover of the book, which is also the catalog and a listing of where the exhibit has been. Roger Lucas for Cartier astronaut ring Romolo Grassi Gold and emerald pendant. Gilbert Albert ammonite and pearl Bracelet Brooch Cedars Devecchi carved coral and gold brooch. Arthur king Brooch Collection of Andy Warhol and Kim Klosterman Andrew Grima amethyst ring. Andrew Grima agate and tourmaline necklace. Transcript: What makes a passionate collector? For Kimberly Klosterman, it's someone who can't get enough of the objects they love, no matter what they are. She herself became a passionate collector of 1960s and 70s jewelry long before it became popular. Her collection is now being featured in a traveling exhibition, “Simply Brilliant: Artist-Jewelers of the 1960s and 1970s.” She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about the qualities that draw her to 60s and 70s jewelry; why the unique jewelry of this period has come back in style; and what aspiring collectors should do to create a thoughtful collection. Read the episode transcript here.  Sharon: Today, my guest is Kimberly Klosterman of Kimberly Klosterman Jewelry. While she's dealt in jewelry across a number of periods, she's recognized for her collection of designer jewels from the 60s and 70s. Her collection is currently being featured in the museum exhibit “Simply Brilliant,” scheduled to open at the Cincinnati Art Museum on October 21. The show has already been at DIVA, which is the new diamond museum in Antwerp, as well as at Pforzheim in Germany. We'll hear all about Kimberly's jewelry journey today as well as about the museum exhibit. Kimberly, welcome to the program. Kimberly: Thank you. I'm so happy to be here, Sharon. Sharon: Tell us about your jewelry journey. I was looking at this beautiful catalogue, “Simply Brilliant.” It's a standalone book, but it's a catalogue of the show. I'm reading the review that Ruth Peltason, I think, did with you. You've really had such a journey if you'd tell us about that. Kimberly: I've been interested in jewelry for a long time and started collecting Art Deco things and different kinds of jewelry earlier on. I decided if I'm going to do this, I'd better learn a little more about what I'm getting myself into. So in 1996, I went to London and found out there was a course called “Understanding Jewelry” at Sotheby's. I thought, “This might be a great thing for me to do. I've been a Sotheby's student before, and I learned a lot the first time around.” This was a course that lasted five or six weeks and Amanda Triosi was teaching it. So, my husband and I went to London and I took the course. It was great. It was the history of jewelry. It was a lot of fun. I do have an art background, so it was easy to pick up on the jewelry she was talking about. We had great speakers, but one thing that stood out for me was that I was exposed to the artists' jewelry of the 1960s and 1970s, and that happened in two ways.  One of our projects for extra points was to go see a show at Hancocks in London, and that was an Andrew Grima retrospective. I went to the show, and I was completely bowled over. I was almost shaking when I saw the jewelry there. I walked in, looked at it, and the man behind the counter was very tall and dapper, a really elegant man, and he looked at me and saw my enthusiasm and said, “Would you like to meet the artist?” I said, “Oh yes, that would be fantastic,” and he extended his hand. It was Andrew Grima. That was my first exposure to that kind of jewelry. Up until then, if you think about what was happening the mid-90s, everybody was into white gold and small jewelry and little, tiny things. Here were pieces that were big and bold and gold, and all kinds of materials were used instead of precious and semiprecious stones. It was a real eye-opener. The other thing is Amanda, who has become a very close friend, at the time when I was her student, she took some of us back to her little apartment in London and said, “Would you like to see my jewels?” I said, “Oh sure, that would be great.” So, she reached behind the radiator and pulled out these hot jewels, and they were incredible. She had a necklace by Gilbert Albert and Andrew Grima pieces and a host of things I had never laid my eyes on. The other few students that were with us didn't get it at all. I immediately responded to it, and I knew that was a path I wanted to carve out for myself.  At the time, I was taking a bit of a break from my family business, which is Klosterman Baking Company. My husband and I were in Europe, and I didn't know what I was going to do. I woke up one morning and said, “I know; I'm going to sell jewelry.” I took the previous stuff I had collected, which actually turned out to be a lot better than I thought, and started selling that, but with an eye to look for these other jewels. I think one thing that was so amazing to me is how difficult it was to source that material from the 60s and 70s. I didn't realize until some years later that the reason was because it simply wasn't out of the jewelry boxes yet. It hadn't come into the marketplace, and if it did, it was probably scrapped pretty quickly, as they were heavy pieces of gold. So I went on this quest, but it took quite a while to build a collection. If you are thinking about this jewelry in today's marketplace, say for the past four or five years, it's everywhere, but it was very difficult to source in the beginning. I made a little booklet on my iMac that I used to take to shows on the jewelry I was collecting. This was before we had cellphones. I would take it around with me to shows and show various dealers, “If you get anything like this, call me. Here's my card.” That's how I started collecting. Sharon: Did you get a response from dealers? Did they say, “Oh, I've had that in my drawer for ages”? Kimberly: I did have a funny thing happen one time in Miami. I was wearing a piece of jewelry by Arthur King, and I really like King's work. He's an American jeweler that started working in the late 40s. He started out as a studio jeweler making his own jewelry in Greenwich Village, right on the same street as Sam Kramer and— Sharon: Art Smith? Kimberly: Art Smith, yes. He was right in that group. I think he went to Florida right after that and eventually started working in gold. He started hiring other bench jewelers to help him as well. He had a place in Cuba. He had a couple of different stores in Florida, and he was also showing at Fortnum & Mason in London. He's a very interesting jeweler to me, but anyway, back to the Miami Beach, Florida Antique Show. I was wearing an Arthur King piece, and one of the dealers looked at me and said, “Do you like that stuff?” and I said, “Yeah, I do.” She said, “I have these things in my safe.” It ended up being a number of pieces that came directly from Louise King, Arthur's wife, and she had them on consignment. I bought those pieces and started my friendship with that dealer, who down the road would show me things like that when she got them.  Sharon: I'm sure people were surprised because that stuff was so out of fashion when you started collecting it. Kimberly: It really was. The other dealer stories are a total crackup. I say my best pieces came out of people's big and ugly boxes. You would go to the show, and they'd have this box, big and ugly.  Sharon: Today it's not white gold, but it's still tiny, little pieces. I call it Brentwood jewelry.  That's an affluent area near here. I'm knocking somebody's jewelry, not any particular designer, but I don't understand; it doesn't show up. Why are you wearing it? That's all. Kimberly: I've always said it's funny about jewelry. I learned a long time ago that people that wear big jewelry don't necessarily have to be big people. A lot of times different jewelers would say, “Oh well, you need a big woman for that,” and I said, “No, you need a big personality.” Some of the people I know that wear the biggest jewelry happen be to the tiniest people. Sharon: That's true with art jewelry being made out of plastic or wood. It's big, but it may be a little more out there, avant garde. I remember at a gallery, there was a small, very elegant woman telling me how she would have to convince her clients they could wear this stuff. They didn't have to be big women, like you're saying. You mentioned Graham Hughes. Tell us who this is and how he influenced your collecting or your path. Kimberly: Graham Hughes was in the late 50s at Goldsmiths' Hall. His father had been at Goldsmiths' Hall and Graham followed in his father's footsteps. This is in London. Graham was initially involved with the silver department there, but he had a real love of jewelry and decided this would be a good avenue for Goldsmiths' Hall to go down to start a collection of jewelry. He was very passionate about it and has written a number of books on the history of jewelry. I always liked his take on things. We just seemed to have the same taste. Even in his historic collection of jewels that he chose to picture in his books, they were always the best; they're just great. He was a bit of a character, from what I understand.  I never did get to meet him, but he got together with some people at the V&A. They started talking in the late 50s about putting an exhibition of jewelry together, and they didn't want to do just any jewelry. They thought jewelry was boring, staid; “What can we do to shake it up?” This little group initially said, “I know. We'll get artists to make jewelry. We'll commission artists to make jewelry and we'll have this exhibition.” They talked about that, and the more they talked about it—it was actually Graham, I believe, that said, “No, we can't do that, because artists don't always understand how jewelry hangs on the body or how it attaches to clothing because they're artists; they're not jewelers.” He said, “We need to reach out to people that are jewelers making amazing jewelry already, people making one-of-a-kind pieces of jewelry that are thinking outside the box.”  There were a couple of different reasons; I don't know exactly what they were. Health was one issue. One of the people had a health issue, and something else happened at the V&A where they were going to cancel the show. Instead, Graham proposed that they have the show at Goldsmiths' Hall, and everything came together. They started reaching out to people all over the world for this proposed show. I can't remember how many countries; maybe 80 countries, something like that. Just under a thousand pieces, 900 and some odd pieces were exhibited in the show when it happened in 1961. It was also a historic show because it showed works by René Lalique, Chaumet, some other big houses. It was kind of a survey in that area, but the idea was modern jewelry, 1890-1961. Sharon: I want to make sure everybody knows that the V&A is the Victoria and Albert Museum. Kimberly: Anyway, this put a lot of people in the limelight. People like Arthur King exhibited from America in that show; Andrew Grima exhibited; just a whole host of people. Those people helped inform my collection. The catalogue he wrote that accompanied the exhibition as well as the book that followed it became the Bible for my collection, my wish book. Sharon: I want to ask you something else, a small detail. Amanda Triosi's class, was that every day for five or six weeks or once or twice a week? Because if it was every day, wow!  Kimberly: It was five days, and it was great. We had the best speakers and great field trips. It was really wonderful. Sharon: Wow! I'm ready. Sign me up. That sounds wonderful. I'm curious if today you go to some social event and wear your jewelry, do people understand it more than they did 10, 15 years ago? Kimberly: I think so, absolutely! If you look in today's marketplace, heck, go to TJ Maxx and look in the case. So much jewelry is influenced by what was happening in the 60s and 70s, whether these contemporary jewelers know it or not. It has definitely come back around. Uncut stones, rough diamonds, textured gold, bigger, bolder items; all of these things have come back into the marketplace, and yellow gold again as opposed to white gold. Sharon: Was there a time, maybe 20, 25 years ago, when friends, people at social events, would say, “What is that?” Was there no understanding or appreciation? Kimberly: I think overall people do appreciate it more than they did. To my face they didn't tell me they didn't get it, but it's been interesting working with different people on the exhibition that maybe weren't exposed to this kind of jewelry before, even possibly the curator at the art museum, Cynthia Amnéus, who wrote the book, or Ruth Peltason, who's also writing a book on 1960s and 1970s jewelry and did the interview with me in our book. I have educated them to the point where they really like the jewelry now.  Sharon: It definitely grows on you. Kimberly: It does, and I think that's true with anything. People tend to like what they know, not know what they like. Sharon: That's interesting. That could lead into a whole different discussion. Did somebody have to teach us to love Art Deco jewelry, or is that just something that is beautiful? Kimberly: You know what? I think it's just beautiful. I remember declaring, after I graduated from my “Understanding Jewelry” course at Sotheby's, that I knew what I was going to sell: Cartier Art Deco, because it's the best. Well yeah, everybody else thought so, too. So, I carved out a niche for myself that was remotely different. Sharon: It must have been easier to source at least, Cartier Art Deco. A lot pricier I would think, but easier to source. Kimberly: Easier to source, but out of reach for me at the time. Sharon: In some of the literature I was reading about you, it says you sell to the passionate collector. What is the passionate collector to you? Kimberly: It's anyone that can't enough of anything. I have one friend I sell to and they're—you know what? I think you should answer that question. You're the collector. Sharon: I was thinking about that. Is that somebody like me who occasionally will buy—let's say it's out of my budget; it's out of my reach, but it's so beautiful I have to have it. There are a lot of things I don't think about that way. I don't need sports cars. I don't need a boat. I don't need a horse. Kimberly: I think it's when you can't stop. I know from my own self I'm a passionate collector. I keep thinking, “I don't need that, but that's fantastic.” You try to say, “Hey, I've got all this. I don't need another example of this, but I need an example of this.” Sharon: I's like as my mother used to say to me, “You have a black blouse.” Yes, I have a black blouse, but does it have short sleeves? Does it have a bow? Anyway, the other thing you talked about is jewelry by artists versus artists' jewelry. Can you tell us a little bit more? Kimberly: The difference between an artist jeweler and jewelry by an artist is this: an artist like Calder, Goya, Dalí, etc. makes other art. They're more passionate—I don't know about passionate, but— Sharon: They're artists in that way. Kimberly: They're artists in a bigger realm. They're making paintings and sculptures and different things, and jewelry is just a small portion of what their oeuvre is. Whereas an artist jeweler is a jeweler by trade or in the jewelry industry by trade, making one-of-a-kind pieces of jewelry that are in that marketplace. It's almost like a marketplace situation. You've got jewelers and you have artists, but certain jewelers that we call artist jewelers are making one-of-a-kind pieces, usually, or limited pieces for the jewelry market. Does that make sense? Sharon: Yes, it is hard to define. I've talked to a lot of different people about what a passionate collector is and what collecting is. Someday somebody will come up with some definition that's definite. What you're saying makes sense. I understand what you're saying.

Bulletproof Radio
How Measuring Brain Function Leads to Performance Upgrades – David Oakley, Ph.D., with Dave Asprey : 867

Bulletproof Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 74:34


SPECIAL OFFERS FOR BULLETPROOF RADIO LISTENERSMeasure Brain Function: Learn more and get a special discounted package at https://wavimed.com/, use code DAVEWE APPRECIATE OUR PARTNERS. CHECK THEM OUT!Non-Tobacco Nicotine Alternative: https://lucy.co, use code DAVE20 to get 20% off your first order of pouches, gums, or lozengesRevitalize Your Mitochondria: https://www.timelinenutrition.com, use code ASPREY10 to get 10% off the plan of your choiceEat Good Keto Bread: https://www.uprisingfood.com/DAVE, use code DAVE to get $10 off the starter bundle. That includes two superfood cubes and a four pack of freedom chips!IN THIS EPISODE OF BULLETPROOF RADIO... I talked to the co-founder of WAVi at the 7th Annual Biohacking Conference in Orlando, Florida. Physicist David Oakley created a device that's used to directly measure brain function and gives you a 360-degree assessment of your brain performance.WAVi is an all-in-one measurement platform. Users get objective information about brain function through EEG, visual ERP, auditory ERP, heart rate variability (HRV), Trail Making, standard assessments and more. This full FDA-regulated Class II device measures biomarkers of your brain with detail and precision in under 15 minutes.“People measure their weight every day, right?” David says. “Step on the scale, “Where am I at today?” So, we should be measuring our brains regularly. Someday there will be WAVi in doctors' offices and you'll check your brain like you check your weight.”For an introduction to WAVi, listen to Bulletproof Radio episode #619: Your Brain Voltage: Measure It, Raise It, Control It. In this interview, David and I go really deep into the science behind WAVi's development. We get into physics, neuroscience, brain data, scientific inquiry and what's exciting about the future of brain performance research. David comes from a long family line of inventors and creators. His own career as a physicist includes research and teaching at universities. He was also a researcher at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and has analyzed data within neutrino astrophysics, a branch of astronomy that observes astronomical objects with neutrino detectors in special observatories.He has published research and articles in the areas of physics, medicine, and art. At mid-life he turned to brain data and created WAVi: a mix of art, science, commerce, and public service.He made the move to study the brain when he met a fellow scientist David B. Jaffe. “He started showing all the [brain] patterns, and I thought, “This is beautiful,” David says. “It's beautiful waves. You can do a lot with it. You can help people. It's about the same as physics, though. It's the same, just voltage versus time series data.”David's now exploring multiple brain topics, including concussions, Alzheimer's, Dementia, and mental health.You'll also find out why P300 continues to be an important signature of cognitive processes. It's a 300 millisecond time frame that measures brain activity. This includes attention, working memory and dysfunction in neurologic and mental disorders. Ongoing research sees it as a potential genetic marker of mental disorders.“As you age this performance drops and the speed drops,” David explains.And then there's voltage activity that's happening in the brain. And if you can assess and measure what's going on in your brain, you can do something about it.So, this is a really big thing. And I want you guys to think about this. Right now you might be saying, "I'm not a brain scientist, I'm just listening to this." But there's, how fast does the brain respond? And how strongly does the brain respond? Because those are different things. And the reason my brain does what it does, I would say is clearly nutrition and mitochondrial enhancement and supplements and all that kind of stuff.It's a fascinating time to be upgrading your brain! “So, 10 years from now, the happy path is that with the brain scan, the artificial intelligence will know you and know what you need to optimize your brain,” David says. “There won't be a question of, in the ideal world, it's not a question of your brain is slowing down. It will know you on day one and say, “This is what you need to do. As long as you stay with this program, you're going to have an optimized brain. It's not going to slow.” That's my 10-year future.”See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Daily Pep! | Rebel-Rousing, Encouragement, & Inspiration for Creative & Multi-Passionate Women

We all have things that get bumped to the someday pile - today we're looking at how we can start those things today, no matter what we've got going on in our lives. **Sign up for my weekly Letters of Rebellion here!**  They're free, they come straight to your inbox every Sunday and they're full of the bits I don't share anywhere else! About Meg & The Daily Pep! The Daily Pep! is the short, snappy and sassy podcast for creative + multi-passionate women, designed to start your day off with a compassionate bang! I'm Meg and I'm the host of The Daily Pep! and The Couragemakers Podcast and founder of The Rebel Rousers. I'm a coach, writer and all-round rebel-rouser for creative and multi-passionate women to do the things only they can do and build a wholehearted life. When I'm not recording episodes, writing bullshit-free Sunday Pep Talks to my wonderful Couragemakers community or working 1:1 with coaching clients, I'm usually covered in paint or walking my wonderfully weird cockapoo Merlin.

Victoria's Secrets To Health & Happiness
Do you want your old body back?

Victoria's Secrets To Health & Happiness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 24:52


This episode is for you if you have with a: “Remember when I weighed __ ?” or “Someday when I get down to __” relationship with your body instead of accepting yourself as you are now… Sign up for my free Body Shame to Body Liberation Workshop: https://victoriakleinsman.com/body-liberation-workshop/ Join my world Get FREE access to the first few modules of my paid proven & signature Food & Body Freedom Queen Program: https://victoriakleinsman.com/free-access-to-first-few-modules/ Website: https://victoriakleinsman.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/victoriakleinsman/ FB: https://www.facebook.com/victoriakleinsman YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1g1H40rbSQ6Trmcha59kDg Podcast Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/4iNYvEWvgW9a0wNaj4m9hf?si=caq_P-V2TLSAmx1Swuh3yQ Podcast Apple: https://podcasts.apple.com/nl/podcast/break-free-from-binge-eating-with-victoria-kleinsman/id1464324636?l=en Email: info@victoriakleinsman.com Please rate & review if you enjoy this podcast :) --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/victoria-kleinsman/message

Six Weeks To Fitness
How To Live A Healthy Lifestyle In The Entertainment Industry, Actor Stephen Sorrentino, Ep. 177Stephen Sorrentino

Six Weeks To Fitness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 28:33


Vince Ferguson: Welcome to Six Weeks To Fitness, episode 177. I'm your host Vince Ferguson and joining me today on my Six Weeks To Fitness program is actor, comedian, composer, singer, impressionist, voiceover artist, Stephen Sorrentino. He has appeared on the Las Vegas strip, and has toured well over 25 countries and 43 states. Stephen's long resume has included television, film, and Broadway shows. He has worked with numerous celebrities, such as Patti LaBelle, Dennis Miller, Dana Carvey, and the legendary Debbie Reynolds. And here today to discuss the keys to longevity in the entertainment business and his career is Stephen Sorrentino. Stephen, how are you, bro? Stephen Sorrentino: I'm doing well, Vince. How are you? Vince Ferguson: You look great, man. I'm doing well. Thank you for coming on the show. Stephen Sorrentino: Well, thank you, brother. Vince Ferguson: Yeah, baby. And look at that. Yeah, exactly. Exactly. Vince Ferguson: Now, here at Six Weeks To Fitness, I usually interview fitness and nutrition experts, athletes, some doctors and celebrities, and we talk about the importance of living a healthy lifestyle. That has got to be very important to you. Stephen Sorrentino: It absolutely is. I mean, if you want to... Your brain wants to do a lot of stuff, creativity-wise. So you want to do it as long as possible. And if you don't take care of yourself, you get a short run. I don't want to burn bright and short. I want to burn bright for a very long time. Vince Ferguson: Oh, very well said. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: Now, I interviewed Denise Boutte, Jasper Cole, Kim Coles, and they all talk about the importance of health, because they've been in the business a long time like you. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: So how long have you been in the entertainment business? Stephen Sorrentino: I started when I was five years old, when I was a little boy. But I've been making a living at it, like full-time for 46 years now. So I'm lucky. Vince Ferguson: That's a blessing. That's huge. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: But now, you've also celebrated a birthday this week. Stephen Sorrentino: All right, let's not get crazy now. Vince Ferguson: Did my research, baby. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah, I turned 61. Yeah. Vince Ferguson: What?! What?! That's beautiful. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: But isn't that wonderful? When you don't have to feel that way, but you feel great. You look great. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: Because age, they tell me, is just a number. Stephen Sorrentino: It's just a number. And especially if you're creative and you want to keep well, you have to always think young. My brain always thinks nine years old, so I could be free, and create, and be funny, and be interesting, at least on stage. So if you think old, you're done, man. So you have to continue to just stay vibrant, eat the right foods, exercise as much as you can, and stay engaged with people. You know? Don't just know what you know, learn every day. That's the most important thing. Vince Ferguson: Learn every day. There's something to learn every day. Stephen Sorrentino: I hope so. And you know what? The people that stop learning, I usually find that they kind of just go down the pike and you don't see them anymore. And the older I get, I don't know if you're the same way, the more I don't know. Because I used to know everything when I was 18, and now at 61, I don't know nothing. Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Exactly. The more you know, the more you don't know. Stephen Sorrentino: Uh-huh (affirmative). Vince Ferguson: It's amazing. But now where did it all begin for you, Stephen? Where did you grow up, and what was your childhood like? Stephen Sorrentino: I had a weird childhood, because I was in a third generation show biz family. My grandfather was kind of like a Ricky Ricardo type. He had his own club, and then he would perform after dinner with my mother and my father playing saxophone, my mother was a singer. So I kind of grew up in a box backstage type of a thing. It was a good family life in Long Island, New York. And the weekends, my parents were performing all the time. Sometimes, they'd take me. And then by the time I was like five or six years old, my grandfather would give me the big finger, which meant I needed to come up, and I'd sit on his knee and I'd sing a song with him. Which was frightening for me, but who knew I would make a living at it? Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Stephen Sorrentino: And then at 15, the bug hit me, man. You know? I had the PA system set up, and I played guitar, sax, flute, piano, and I just wanted a band. And you know? I got a record deal by the time I was 26, and I was hitting it and I love it. Every day, every part of it, I love it. So that's me. And then I toured around the world. I got to meet all these beautiful people, eat all these great foods, learn about nutrition…. learn about exercise from Chinese people, meditation. You know? It's a beautiful life if you go out there and you look for it, you know? Vince Ferguson: Yes. The more I speak to people like yourself who've been in the business a long time, they talk about meditation. You know? Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: And believing yourself, and that's so important. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. You have to listen to yourself. You have to listen to your heart, and what your body's telling you, listen to what your creativity is telling you. That's the only way to channel yourself. You know? So mind and body and spirit is all we have, and we put it all together when we make a living at it, and we touch other people. Stephen Sorrentino: And we educate them sometimes, and they say, "Gee, you're 61, and you're running around like you're 20." I'm like, "I know." Because I keep at it. You know? I'm a vegetarian. Vince Ferguson: Yeah, there you go, nutrition. Stephen Sorrentino: I don't drink booze anymore. I did for a long time. I don't touch any drugs or anything like that. So I'm a natural guy, you know? Vince Ferguson: Wow, that's amazing. Vince Ferguson: Now, you wear so many hats, you know? And again, you're vibrant, you're a comedian, you're a singer-composer, actor, everything. But if you could only choose one hat to wear, what would it be? Stephen Sorrentino: You're going to give me that question? Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Stephen Sorrentino: I think the spice of life is all the different things.  I don't think I have been asked that question before. Vince Ferguson: Good! Stephen Sorrentino: I was going to say, I'm going to say actor. Vince Ferguson: Really? Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah, because I think you get to be in as many people as you want to be, and you get to channel all the other personalities that are in you and then bring them out. It's almost like Halloween every day. So you get to wear any mask you want. You pull it out, you play the character, and you put it away. Stephen Sorrentino: But I'm like that with all my stuff, with my comedy, with my composition. Even when I put it to show, the way I design lights and stuff, I just I'll take different ideas, the way I do with nutrition and the way I eat, take everybody else's ideas, and bring them, and make my own. You know? Vince Ferguson: Yes, yes. Stephen Sorrentino: Is that a long answer or what? Vince Ferguson: No, but it makes a lot of sense. It makes a lot of sense. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: Now, to be the person you are today, obviously you had to go through, you learned a lot, you met a lot of people. Who were the most impactful in your life? Who made you who you are today, Stephen? Stephen Sorrentino: Oh, gee, you know what? I'm going to bring it all the way down to my sixth grade teacher. I know it sounds unexceptional. I could say Debbie Reynolds or something like that, or Patti LaBelle. Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Stephen Sorrentino: But there was a person when I was in sixth grade that was a hippie back in the day. He had long hair and a beard, and that was very unlike the school district. And this guy just said, the first day, he goes, "You guys want to do a class, or you want to go outside because it's beautiful and just talk?" And he cared, and he listened to us. And from that moment, it was like a class of... It was like a camp. It almost like a hippie thing. Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Stephen Sorrentino: It felt so good that somebody cared, and we all got to know each other. It wasn't a lesson. It was a lesson in life. It wasn't a book lesson. And I'll never forget him, so he touched my life. Stephen Sorrentino: And I'm going to say Patti. Not to be stupid, but Debbie Reynolds also. I learned so much from being positive about everything. Even when negative stuff was happening, say it in a positive way. "I don't want to do that." You know? With a smile. So you know? So I think being positive, and gleaning something from the people that you meet, especially on stage. Like George Carlin, hanging out with George Carlin and talking to him. Vince Ferguson: George Carlin? Stephen Sorrentino: Jerry Lewis. I mean, these are people that affected me as a kid, and then seeing what they're like in real life. So another person, Leslie Jordan. I don't know if you know the actor, he was on Will and Grace, he's little gay dude. Vince Ferguson: Oh. Stephen Sorrentino: I read his book, and I stopped drinking. Because I read his book, and it touched me somehow. And I called him, we had a mutual friend. I said, "How's that non-drinking thing?" Because I used to like my wine and it was affecting me at one point. And I said, "How's the non-drinking thing happen?" He goes, "Well, I won an Emmy." I said, "Well, I want an Emmy." He goes, "Then quit." And he made it so simple. And I went, "Yeah." And so I called him every day for 30 days just to say how I was doing, and I never had another drink. That was like 13 years ago. I never touched the booze again. Vince Ferguson: Really? Stephen Sorrentino: So that those are the people that touch you. Vince Ferguson: Yes. Stephen Sorrentino: And you never forget them. Vince Ferguson: Most definitely. Oh, that's amazing. And you mentioned Patti LaBelle. What was that experience like? Stephen Sorrentino: Oh, my God. I mean, that's the queen. I got called because she was having some problems. As a comedian, she was having some vocal problems. So they said, "Would you come in and do an audition for Patti LaBelle" I'm like, "For who?" And they said, "Patti LaBelle. And I'm like, "Wait, I'm going to sing in front of Patti LaBelle?" You know? Stephen Sorrentino: So I went there. And I got the job, because my comedy is a lot of singing impressions. I do like Sammy Davis and all that stuff, so I sing a lot. Vince Ferguson: Nice! Stephen Sorrentino: And so I'm looking. She walks in, and there's Miss Patti with the entourage. And I'm like, "Oh, my..." And I started getting weird. You know? Because it's Patti LaBelle. And I'm looking at the microphone and I said, "Okay, I can't do this. Because that's Patti LaBelle, I'm going to flip out. I'm going to pass out. I'm going to throw up. Whatever's going to happen." And then I just went through this little process that we all do when we try to take care of ourself. I said, I looked at the stage, and I looked at Patti, Miss Patti. And I took the microphone. I know a microphone. There's a stage. There's a monitor. That's an audience. I'm familiar with all of that. I'm just going to do it. And I went out and I killed. Stephen Sorrentino: And on the way out, I introduced her. She grabbed my shoulder with her beautiful nails, and she goes, "You're with me forever." Vince Ferguson: Really? Stephen Sorrentino: And she said that. Yeah. And that, just got the chills talking about it because I just believed in myself at that moment. I put all the crap aside, and all the negativity that what could happen, and just said, "Yeah, I'm doing this." And I did 69 dates over the years with Miss Patti, so it was just wonderful. Vince Ferguson: How many dates? 69? Stephen Sorrentino: 69 dates, I think. Yeah, probably all together in Las Vegas for many, many times, and then a couple of road dates. I was there for her 60th birthday. Yeah. Yeah, I've been around, man. Vince Ferguson: Yeah. No, yeah, you've been around. But also, you really mixed it up with these people, too, which is great, you know? Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Yes. Yeah. Vince Ferguson: And I'm sure they speak highly of you, as well, so that's amazing. Stephen Sorrentino: You know what? If you're smart, you get a lot from people. You don't just try to tell them who you are, but you listen. That's the biggest thing I ever could tell young people, because I mentor young people in the arts and I teach in China, as well. I mean, I'm a little nuts with that. I just tell them to listen. Because if you listen, you're going to hear everybody's story. You put it into your own little mix master, you make it, and then it becomes your story. You know? But listen, if we listen, we hear a lot. You know? Vince Ferguson: I think the problem to a lot of us today is that we don't listen. Right? We want to talk about what we know, who we are instead of listening- Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: ... to what someone else knows- Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: ... that might help us to become better than what we are today. Stephen Sorrentino: You know what? I don't know you very long, but I bet you I got months of stuff to learn from you. You know what I mean? And people don't take the time to listen. Especially when it comes to age, too. People, "Oh, he's old." When people, some young people say, "What song is that? Oh, I wasn't even born when that was written." Well, the world didn't start when you were born. I don't know if you got the memo. Vince Ferguson: Thank you. Thank you. It's so true, man. Vince Ferguson: I want to talk to you briefly about a movie. I just saw this movie, and you're in it, and it's called A Tale of Redemption and Regret. It was hilarious, but tell my viewers about it. Stephen Sorrentino: Well, it's you know? I got this script. I was in Las Vegas, and then COVID happened, so I moved back. I have a farm in the east coast of Virginia, and I just went to the farm just to be safe, and there's not going to be any work. And this young guy sent me script and said, "Look, I saw you perform a long time ago. I want you to do this character." So I'm like, "All right." Stephen Sorrentino: I read the script, and I loved it. It was a mafia guy that was down on his luck. It was like he wasn't going to win it at the end. He's actually kind of a loser. And I had a lot of empathy for him, because he's past his prime. Yeah, the '80s are over, and he's still trying to do the same thing, which is the mistake we all make. You have to roll, and change and evolve. Well, he can't, and I loved it. Stephen Sorrentino: So I called him up and I said, "If I give this guy a real personality ... I'll play the thing." And he did. So I produced the movie, I starred in it, and I also wrote the music for it. And it's just a really great romp of this... It's comedy, but it's dark comedy. Because he's kind of a murderer, but he's funny. Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Yeah. You mix it all. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. You can see it on YouTube. It's also just won today... Or last night, I should say we won the London Short Film festival, the London Film Festival, and we won three other ones last week. So this movie is touching on something. I think all of us, as we get older, want to stay relevant. Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Stephen Sorrentino: And some of us that can't, we fall through the cracks ... and this is touching on it. It's called A Tale of Redemption and Regret with Sunny the Heat. Vince Ferguson: Sunny the Heat? Stephen Sorrentino: It's a fun movie. Vince Ferguson: It really is. Stephen Sorrentino: I'm Sunny the Heat. Vince Ferguson: Yes. It really, it really, truly is, man. Stephen Sorrentino: Thanks. Vince Ferguson: And you say co-produced it. Now, also in the theme was about, as you said, getting older. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: And does Stephen Sorrentino worry about getting older? Stephen Sorrentino: Of course. You know? You want to stay relevant. And like last night, I'm on stage, and I'm playing the piano, and the recorder's rocking. You know? We're doing shows here in Las Vegas. And I said to myself, "Do I want to stand on the piano bench and jump off?" Well, at 30, that was easy. But at 61, I'll blow a hip. You know? Vince Ferguson: Yeah Stephen Sorrentino: I did it, because I did my running yesterday and I feel good. But what happens if? So you stuck getting that self-doubt thing, and you try to talk yourself out of it if you stay in shape. Vince Ferguson: Wow, exactly. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: Exactly. That's why being healthy is so important, right? So- Stephen Sorrentino: It's all you got, man. Vince Ferguson: I know. But do you think acting today is more of a young man's game, or does it make a difference? Stephen Sorrentino: No, I think acting, I think it... Well, the thing is, here's the way I look at it. At 22, there's 9,000 other guys that want the job and that could do it, because they're good looking and they want it badly. At 45 there's 500 guys because they want it pretty much. But at 60, there's only four guys. I'm going to get the part. You know? Vince Ferguson: Great way of looking at it. Less competition, you're saying, huh? Stephen Sorrentino: That's right. Yeah. Well, the thing is I'm a character actor, so I'm not going to be the leading man anymore. That ship sailed in the '70s, so... Or the '80s. So for me, I love to play older. I mean, to get into an old character, to play someone maybe from Ireland, then you really can get yourself all crazy. You know? It's great. Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Stephen Sorrentino: You know? As long as I can pop out of it and run around the room a little bit, you know? Vince Ferguson: Yeah, yeah. Exactly, exactly. Very, very funny, man. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: But now, what advice would you give a young actor? Because you said you mentor actors, right? Young actors. Stephen Sorrentino: I do, yeah. Vince Ferguson: What advice do you give them if they want to get into the business? Stephen Sorrentino: Well, this movie is playing at all the film festivals worldwide, so I'm getting a multitude of people reaching out to me saying, "Help me." So I can't help everybody. But the first thing I said is, "Do you want to be an actor, or do you want to famous?" And if the answer is, "I want to be a star, I want to be famous," then I can't help you. But if you want to learn the craft and get famous because you're awesome, I can help you with that. You know what I mean? Stephen Sorrentino: So learn the craft. Don't just want to be... Anybody can be famous taking a picture of their hinny on Instagram and putting it out, and everybody looks at it. Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Stephen Sorrentino: But to have a career like me for 46 years of getting paid, having homes around America, touring the world, that's really seeing the world on other people's dime because of the business, that's a real gift, man. So you have to put your work in. You know? As a musician, as an artist, as a comedian, as whatever it is that you do, put it all in. And this may sound weird to you. I don't have it B plan, I never did. I don't have a backup plan. Because if I have a backup plan, then I'm telling the universe or whatever I believe in that it may not work out. So my thing has always been A plan, and it always worked out. Vince Ferguson: And do you recommend that for most people? Stephen Sorrentino: I do. I have to. when you say I have a B, I'm going to have something to fall back on, you already fell back. Because you just said that you don't believe that it's going to work out for you. So I don't have a plumber thing, or a... You know? I did jobs when I was a kid. But I'm going to be an actor, comedian, composer until the minute I die. Vince Ferguson: Wow. Stephen Sorrentino: And that's the way it's going to be. Because I said so. You know what I mean? It sounds arrogant, but it's like the world, the universe is a restaurant. You got to tell the waiter what you want. Tell them exactly what you want. But you also have, you have the patience to wait for it and do the work. You know? Tell them what you want, like working on your body, working on your nutrition, be prepared, and then it will come to you. It's guaranteed. But if you say, "Eh, it's not coming. I'm going somewhere else," then you're not there for the food. And they show up with the hamburger for you, and you're not there to eat it. So stick with it, know your stuff, take care of yourself, and it'll come to you. That's what I tell my young people. Vince Ferguson: That sounds great, man. That's great advice. But now, what are the keys, in your opinion, to longevity in the entertainment business. I say entertainment business, because you're more than just an actor. Okay? Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: So what's the keys to longevity? Stephen Sorrentino: Evolve. Learn that- Vince Ferguson: Evolve. Stephen Sorrentino: You know? Your body, when you're 21, you could do certain weights. You could do certain fitness. Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Stephen Sorrentino: But when you're 55, you're not going to do the same exercises. It's the same with the arts. You have to evolve. At 21, I looked young and handsome ... I had tight jeans on, long hair. You can't play that guy when you're 40. So you have to change, and evolve, and roll with the punches, and roll with what life brings you. I embrace the fact that I'm not 21. I'm glad, because now I'm playing this guy, the older mafia died. I'll be doing a play this summer in New York City. I forget the name of it right now because it's early here. It Could Be Worse, it's called. And I'm playing an Italian guy, and his daughter comes, and she's got a girlfriend and this whole... But it's two hours of non-stop, like manic energy. And I'll be able to do it because that guy, I took care of myself. So maybe he didn't take care of himself for the story. But for me to play him, I have to have taken care of myself. No drinking, no meat for me, no booze. You know? No anything. Just rest, exercise. Vince Ferguson: So those are the keys. Evolving, not drinking, not abusing your body, proper nutrition. Okay. When did you become a vegetarian? Stephen Sorrentino: Oh, my God, about 10 years ago. I'm an animal rights activist, and I didn't like meat as it was, the concept of it. And when I stopped eating red meat and pork, I felt better. And then I just said, "You know what? One day a week, I'm going to eat no meat at all." And eventually, it just went away. I just felt better and better. So I take protein shakes sometimes, and I have a lot of nuts. And I know that nutrition-wise, a lot of fruits. Yeah, you know? I try to eat right, man. Vince Ferguson: Yeah, man. Stephen Sorrentino: You're the vehicle? You know? You have to... Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Stephen Sorrentino: We want our car to go somewhere. So our brain is the map, and our body is the car, and if you don't put new tires on and take care of the oil and gas, it won't go anywhere. Vince Ferguson: It just doesn't work right. Exactly. Exactly. Stephen Sorrentino: You know? Vince Ferguson: That's good wisdom. What about exercise now? What exercises do you do on a regular basis that keep you going? Stephen Sorrentino: Well, jumping around on stage every night helps because you're sweating it out all the time. Vince Ferguson: Sure. Stephen Sorrentino: But I run three miles a day, three to six miles a day. A slow run, because I'm older, so my hips are not what it used to be. I do pushups every day, and if I can get to the gym twice a week and just do a whole, like a universal circuit, I'm good. Vince Ferguson: Nice. Stephen Sorrentino: I sweat it out. Got to sweat every day. Vince Ferguson: Nice. That's good to hear that. Stephen Sorrentino: Definitely Vince Ferguson: And also, good advice for other people to know that you have to move your body, right? Stephen Sorrentino: Have to. Yeah, as you get older, too- Vince Ferguson: Yes. Stephen Sorrentino: ... if you stop using it, you will lose it. Vince Ferguson: Exactly. I agree. Vince Ferguson: I don't lift as much now. I just want to be healthy. To me, it's about being fit. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah, but you look... Exactly. And you look good, so hello. Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Stephen Sorrentino: That's the game. Vince Ferguson: And you want to be around long time, right? Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. I want to play an 80-year old in a play someday, and I'll be 80. That's cool. Vince Ferguson: Yeah. But you won't look 80. Stephen Sorrentino: No, I will look 70. Vince Ferguson: It's all good, it's all good. Vince Ferguson: I read a personal quote of yours, and it said- Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: It said, "I'm not afraid of dying. I'm afraid of living with no purpose." That was awesome. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: Explain that to my listeners and viewers. Stephen Sorrentino: You know? I said that as a mentor thing to a Chinese medical student, that he posted that somewhere. It became like this thing. I'm not afraid of dying. I mean, for me, living is the whole thing. Dying, I don't believe anything negative about it ... I think it's a positive thing. You just move into the next thing. I just don't want to be on this planet and not touch another person, not change another person's life, or leave a legacy. Even if it's just a song, or a performance that somebody said, "Gee, you really touched my heart." Or a song that somebody used for their wedding because it meant something. So we have a short time here relatively in this world, and I think our job is not to make money, and to buy stuff, and boast. But it's to touch as many people positively as possible and change their lives. That's it. I don't want to live without purpose. That's my purpose. Vince Ferguson: That is so well put, you know? Stephen Sorrentino: I didn't mean to be so profound. But it came out good, and when he posted it everywhere, I'm like, "Oh." Vince Ferguson: Yeah, man, it's like, "This guy's got a lot of wisdom to share. You know? He's really deep." Stephen Sorrentino: I'm the Dalai Lama. Vince Ferguson: Right. Exactly, exactly. Which is cool. Because someone needs to hear that, man. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah, that's cool. That's my life. I mean, when people reach out to me, I do the best I can. There a lot of people that... I was in a film festival in India recently, and all these Indian actors, young dude actors wanted to talk to me, and I'm getting like 13, 14 requests every day, "Hey, can I speak to you?" And I do the best I can. But at one point, I'm like, "I can't." You know? "Take a number," so to speak. So I want to give positive energy to anybody I can. You know? Someday, on a world platform, if I can. You know? Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Stephen Sorrentino: But we'll see. Vince Ferguson: That's awesome. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah, man. I mean, isn't that our job? Vince Ferguson: I think so. To give back and to help those who are around us. I believe that. Stephen Sorrentino: Isn't that what you're doing? Yeah, but look what you're doing. You are. Vince Ferguson: I believe, yes. And it feels good to do it, to share information. You bring on people like yourself who can also share uplifting and positive information, man. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: You know? It's a beautiful thing. Vince Ferguson: But now, I also know that you are in a film that's coming out the end of the year. It was directed by Victoria Rowell? Stephen Sorrentino: Yes! Vince Ferguson: ... of Young and Restless? Stephen Sorrentino: Yes! Young and Restless. Victoria's a like rockstar, you know? Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Stephen Sorrentino: First of all, I was excited because I'm the only white dude in the movie, which is freaking awesome. Vince Ferguson: Really? Oh, wow. A token. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah, I'm the token white dude, which is fine with me. Equal time, finally. And she's a great director. Actually, Denise Bute is in it, also as well. Vince Ferguson: Denise is in it? Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Blair Underwood, Bill Bellamy, and it's called- Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Stephen Sorrentino: ... A Rich Christmas. And I play a small part, but I play an English butler. Very, very different, you know? I've got my glasses like this. You know? One of those guys. And I had played Annie, I played Drake in Annie, which is a butler, with Sally Struthers- Vince Ferguson: Yes! Stephen Sorrentino: ... the year before. And Victoria saw a video of mine, and she goes, "You're hired." And it was so cool. So it's called A Rich Christmas. You know? It's a Christmastime movie on BET- Vince Ferguson: Yes. Stephen Sorrentino: ... and look for me. Yeah. And Victoria's again, you walk in the room, her positive energy fills the room- Stephen Sorrentino: ... and you just get taken over by her. Yes, strong, strong woman director, so unique. And great that we're starting to see more women, more people of color directing. It's wonderful. Vince Ferguson: Yes. Wonderful. Stephen Sorrentino: I'm inspired. Vince Ferguson: Where do you see yourself, Stephen Sorrentino? You've done so much, but where do you see yourself in next five years? Stephen Sorrentino: I'd like to have a regular show, like on a Netflix type of platform. Maybe the Sunny the Heat thing. I don't know. On whatever platform. Vince Ferguson: That's awesome! Stephen Sorrentino: And just have a steady job on television. And then on my off months, I'd love to tour a little bit to do my comedy, and then have enough time to mentor and teach young people. That's it. Vince Ferguson: That's it? Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: That's a lot, man. That's a lot. Stephen Sorrentino: That's okay. I got a lot. You know? Like I said, I got a lot of energy, so... Vince Ferguson: So how do you rest though? How do you take it down? Stephen Sorrentino: I shut off. So it's no people. Because anytime I'm around people, I kind of somewhat perform. I don't know. I can't really shut down. So what I do is I close everybody off, I go away, and I just rest. I just I do nothing. I try that. A little meditation. Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Stephen Sorrentino: And can I be honest with you? When I'm back in Virginia on my ranch, I mow the lawn. Vince Ferguson: You mow the lawn? Stephen Sorrentino: For eight hours. It's 13 acres of mowing- Vince Ferguson: Oh! Stephen Sorrentino: Because it's a 50 acre estate. Vince Ferguson: Whoa! Stephen Sorrentino: So I mow Vince Ferguson: Whoa, really? Really? Stephen Sorrentino: It's I can't. It sounds stupid, but it's very zen, man. Vince Ferguson: Very zen, unbelievable. Stephen Sorrentino: Zen mowing. I don't know what to tell you, but that helps to slow me down. Vince Ferguson: Because you're such an outgoing person, and I would imagine that you're always around people. But for you, get away from people. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah, I have to shut completely off. And I think, and somebody pointed this out, a psychologist friend of mine said, "You're not an extrovert. You're an extrovert for a living, but you're actually an introvert." And I think he's right. So I do this Mr. Personality thing. Vince Ferguson: Yes. Stephen Sorrentino: But my real person is a very quiet, inside thing. So it's kind of strange. Vince Ferguson: It is kind of strange, man. But how can my listeners and viewers find out more about Stephen Sorrentino? Stephen Sorrentino: You can go to Stephensorrentino.com. It's Stephen with a P-H. You can go to my Instagram, follow. There's a lot of awards being posted on that, which is New York actor or Stephen.Sorrentino. Or on Twitter, I'm Sorrentino. Easy. Vince Ferguson: Amazing. Definitely easy. Vince Ferguson: But one more thing about Tales of Redemption, right? Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: It was only 14 minutes. It was a very short movie. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Yeah, it's a short movie. We wanted to make an impact and show everybody what we could do. And now we're developing it as a series. Like I said, I want that series. So we've got 13 episodes written, and then we're going to start pitching it all over the world to whoever will look at it, and whoever will give us the most platforms that we can see it. And you people can watch Sunny, because he's a very interesting character. Vince Ferguson: Most definitely. I wanted more, man. I wanted more. How it ended, I wanted more Sunny the Heat. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. A lot of people say, at the festivals that I went to in New York, they came up to me and said, "We want more of Sunny." And I'm like, "That's great." Vince Ferguson: Thank you. Thank you, man. Stephen Sorrentino: You know? No, thank you. Vince Ferguson: You can identify with Sunny, man. You know? Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: You really could. Vince Ferguson: Well, look, Stephen Sorrentino, on behalf of Body Sculpt of New York, that's my non-profit fitness program for kids, and Six Weeks to Fitness, I truly want to thank you for coming on my show today. Stephen Sorrentino: It's my pleasure. This has been a blessing. Thank you so much. Vince Ferguson: And to my listeners and viewers, I truly hope this program was informative, encouraging, and inspiring, and that you will continue listening in and watching our Six Weeks to Fitness program. If you have any questions or comments for the show, please leave them below. And don't forget to subscribe, so you don't miss any future episodes. And remember, you don't stop exercising because you are getting old. You're getting old because you stopped exercising.  www.6weekstofitness.com  

Losing a Child: Always Andy's Mom
Episode 108: David's Mom

Losing a Child: Always Andy's Mom

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 58:37


Parenting can never be described as easy, but parenting when your family is suffering after the death of a child is beyond difficult. Grief is everywhere, surrounding the family in all that they do. Simple tasks are suddenly not at all simple. In many ways, just getting up every day to get through the day is a huge accomplishment. Adding on the task of trying to raise children and guide them through their own grief seems almost impossible. When Michele's almost 7 year old son David died after a long battle with cancer, his 3 year old sister, Deanna, said something that affected Michele deeply. Deanna said, "Mommy, half of me is gone." From the outside, Deanna played as other children played. She did not spend her days crying and staying in bed. Others likely thought she was doing 'quite well', but inside, she was grieving deeply. If she had not said that simple sentence, Michele would have likely not known that she even felt this way. Given the fact that Michele had a background in early childhood education, she knew from that very moment that her mission in life would be to help Deanna grieve the death of her brother. At the same time that she worked through her own grief, she would learn about how to guide her daughter through her own grief as well. Someday, however, she hoped to use her knowledge to help other grieving children as well.  Now, many years later, Michele is doing just that. She started Good Grief Parenting in order to help parents and friends and family members who work with grieving children. Her goal is to help people learn that grieving is a good thing and not something to be avoided. Grieve openly with children and show them that you are a safe person to talk to about all of the messy emotions of grief. Sadness is ok; anger is ok, fear is ok, relief is ok. In fact, it is more than just ok; it is necessary to feel all of that in order to really understand and get through grief. These are lessons we can all learn and grow from as well.

The Bike Shed
311: Marketing Matters

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 37:37


Longtime listener and friend of the show, Gio Lodi, released a book y'all should check out and Chris and Steph ruminate on a listener question about tension around marketing in open-source. Say No To More Process, Say Yes To Trust by German Velasco (https://thoughtbot.com/blog/say-no-to-more-process-say-yes-to-trust) Test-Driven Development in Swift with SwiftUI and Combine by Gio Lodi (https://tddinswift.com/) Transcript: CHRIS: Our golden roads. STEPH: All right. I am also golden. CHRIS: [vocalization] STEPH: Oh, I haven't listened to that episode where I just broke out in song in the middle. Oh, you're about to add the [vocalization] [chuckles]. CHRIS: I don't know why, though. Oh, golden roads, Golden Arches. STEPH: Golden Arches, yeah. CHRIS: Man, I did not know that my brain was doing that, but my brain definitely connected those without telling me about it. STEPH: [laughs] CHRIS: It's weird. People talk often about the theory that phones are listening, and then you get targeted ads based on what you said. But I'm almost certain it's actually the algorithms have figured out how to do the same intuitive leaps that your brain does. And so you'll smell something and not make the nine steps in between, but your brain will start singing a song from your childhood. And you're like, what is going on? Oh, right, because when I was watching Jurassic Park that one time, we were eating this type of chicken, and therefore when I smell paprika, Jurassic Park theme song. I got it, of course. STEPH: [laughs] CHRIS: And I think that's actually what's happening with the phones. That's my guess is that you went to a site, and the phones are like, cool, I got it, adjacent to that is this other thing, totally. Because I don't think the phones are listening. Occasionally, I think the phones are listening, but mostly, I don't think the phones are listening. STEPH: I definitely think the phones are listening. CHRIS: Hello and welcome to another episode of The Bike Shed, a weekly podcast from your friends at thoughtbot about developing great software. I'm Chris Toomey. STEPH: And I'm Steph Viccari. CHRIS: And together, we're here to share a bit of what we've learned along the way. So, Steph, what's new in your world? STEPH: Hey. So we have a bit of exciting news where we received an email from Gio Lodi, who is a listener of The Bike Shed. And Gio sent an email sharing with us some really exciting news that they have published a book on Test-Driven Development in Swift. And they acknowledge us in the acknowledgments of the book. Specifically, the acknowledgment says, "I also want to thank Chris Toomey and Steph Viccari, who keep sharing ideas on testing week after week on The Bike Shed Podcast." And that's just incredible. I'm so blown away, and I feel officially very famous. CHRIS: This is how you know you're famous when you're in the acknowledgments of a book. But yeah, Gio is a longtime listener and friend of the show. He's written in many times and given us great tips, and pointers, and questions, and things. And I've so appreciated Gio's voice in the community. And it's so wonderful, frankly, to hear that he has gotten value out of the show and us talking about testing. Because I always feel like I'm just regurgitating things that I've heard other people saying about testing and maybe one or two hard-learned truths that I've found. But it's really wonderful. And thank you so much, Gio. And best of luck for anyone out there who is doing Swift development and cares about testing or test-driven development, which I really think everybody should. Go check out that book. STEPH: I must admit my Swift skills are incredibly rusty, really non-existent at this point. It's been so long since I've been in that world. But I went ahead and purchased a copy just because I think it's really cool. And I suspect there are a lot of testing conversations that, regardless of the specific code examples, still translate. At least, that's the goal that you and I have when we're having these testing conversations. Even if they're not specific to a language, we can still talk about testing paradigms and strategies. So I purchased a copy. I'm really looking forward to reading it. And just to change things up a bit, we're going to start off with a listener question today. So this listener question comes from someone very close to the show. It comes from Thom Obarski. Hi, Thom. And Thom wrote in, "So I heard on a recent podcast I was editing some tension around marketing and open source. Specifically, a little perturbed at ReactJS that not only were people still dependent on a handful of big companies for their frameworks, but they also seem to be implying that the cachet of Facebook and having developer mindshare was not allowing smaller but potentially better solutions to shine through. In your opinion, how much does marketing play in the success of an open-source project framework rather than actually being the best tool for the job?" So a really thoughtful question. Thanks, Thom. Chris, I'm going to kick it over to you. What are your thoughts about this question? CHRIS: Yeah, this is a super interesting one. And thank you so much, Thom, although I'm not sure that you're listening at this point. But we'll send you a note that we are replying to your question. And when I saw this one come through, it was interesting. I really love the kernel of the discussion here, but it is, again, very difficult to tease apart the bits. I think that the way the question was framed is like, oh, there's this bad thing that it's this big company that has this big name, and they're getting by on that. But really, there are these other great frameworks that exist, and they should get more of the mindshare. And honestly, I'm not sure. I think marketing is a critically important aspect of the work that we do both in open source and, frankly, everywhere. And I'm going to clarify what I mean by that because I think it can take different shapes. But in terms of open-source, Facebook has poured a ton of energy and effort and, frankly, work into React as a framework. And they're also battle testing it on facebook.com, a giant website that gets tons of traffic, that sees various use cases, that has all permissions in there. They're really putting it through the wringer in that way. And so there is a ton of value just in terms of this large organization working on and using this framework in the same way that GitHub and using Rails is a thing that is deeply valuable to us as a community. So I think having a large organization associated with something can actually be deeply valuable in terms of what it produces as an outcome for us as consumers of that open-source framework. I think the other idea of sort of the meritocracy of the better framework should win out is, I don't know, it's like a Field of Dreams. Like, if you build it, they will come. It turns out I don't believe that that's actually true. And I think selling is a critical part of everything. And so if I think back to DHH's original video from so many years ago of like, I'm going to make a blog in 15 minutes; look at how much I'm not doing. That was a fantastic sales pitch for this new framework. And he was able to gain a ton of attention by virtue of making this really great sales pitch that sold on the merits of it. But that was marketing. He did the work of marketing there. And I actually think about it in terms of a pull request. So I'm in a small organization. We're in a private repo. There's still marketing. There's still sales to be done there. I have to communicate to someone else the changes that I'm making, why it's valuable to the system, why they should support this change, this code coming into the codebase. And so I think that sort of communication is as critical to the whole conversation. And so the same thing happens at the level of open source. I would love for the best framework to always win, but we also need large communities with Stack Overflow answers and community-supported plugins and things like that. And so it's a really difficult thing to treat marketing as just other, this different, separate thing when, in fact, I think they're all intertwined. And marketing is critically important, and having a giant organization behind something can actually have negative aspects. But I think overall; it really is useful in a lot of cases. Those are some initial thoughts. What do you think, Steph? STEPH: Yeah, those are some great initial thoughts. I really agree with what you said. And I also like how you brought in the comparison of pull requests and how sales is still part of our job as developers, maybe not in the more traditional sense but in the way that we are marketing and communicating with the team. And circling back to what you were saying earlier about a bit how this is phrased, I think I typically agree that there's nothing nefarious that's afoot in regards to just because a larger company is sponsoring an open-source project or they are the ones responsible for it, I don't think there's anything necessarily bad about that. And I agree with the other points that you made where it is helpful that these teams have essentially cultivated a framework or a project that is working for their team, that is helping their company, and then they have decided to open source it. And then, they have the time and energy that they can continue to invest in that project. And it is battle-tested because they are using it for their own projects as well. So it seems pretty natural that a lot of us then would gravitate towards these larger, more heavily supported projects and frameworks. Because then that's going to make our job easier and also give us more trust that we can turn to them when we do need help or have issues. Or, like you mentioned, when we need to look up documentation, we know that that's going to be there versus some of the other smaller projects. They may also be wonderful projects. But if they are someone that's doing this in their spare time just on the weekends and yet I'm looking for something that I need to be incredibly reliable, then it probably makes sense for me to go with something that is supported by a team that's getting essentially paid to work on that project, at least that they're backed by a larger company. Versus if I'm going with a smaller project where someone is doing some wonderful work, but realistically, they're also doing it more on the weekends or in their spare time. So boiling it down, it's similar to what you just said where marketing plays a very big part in open source, and the projects and frameworks that we adopt, and the things that we use. And I don't think that's necessarily a bad thing. CHRIS: Yeah. I think, if anything, it's possibly a double-edged sword. Part of the question was around does React get to benefit just by the cachet of Facebook? But Facebook, as a larger organization sometimes that's a positive thing. Sometimes there's ire that is directed at Facebook as an organization. And as a similar example, my experience with Google and Microsoft as large organizations, particularly backing open-source efforts, has almost sort of swapped over time, where originally, Microsoft there was almost nothing of Microsoft's open-source efforts that I was using. And I saw them as this very different shape of a company that I probably wouldn't be that interested in. And then they have deeply invested in things like GitHub, and VS Code, and TypeScript, and tons of projects that suddenly I'm like, oh, actually, a lot of what I use in the world is coming from Microsoft. That's really interesting. And at the same time, Google has kind of gone in the opposite direction for me. And I've seen some of their movements switch from like, oh Google the underdog to now they're such a large company. And so the idea that the cachet, as the question phrase, of a company is just this uniformly positive thing and that it's perhaps an unfair benefit I don't see that as actually true. But actually, as a more pointed example of this, I recently chose Svelte over React, and that was a conscious choice. And I went back and forth on it a few times, if we're being honest, because Svelte is a much smaller community. It does not have the large organizational backing that React or other frameworks do. And there was a certain marketing effort that was necessary to raise it into my visibility and then for me to be convinced that there is enough there, that there is a team that will maintain it, and that there are reasons to choose that and continue with it. And I've been very happy with it as a choice. But I was very conscious in that choice that I'm choosing something that doesn't have that large organizational backing. Because there's a nicety there of like, I trust that Facebook will probably keep investing in React because it is the fundamental technology of the front end of their platform. So yeah, it's not going to go anywhere. But I made the choice of going with Svelte. So it's an example of where the large organization didn't win out in my particular case. So I think marketing is a part of the work, a part of the conversation. It's part of communication. And so I am less negative on it, I think, than the question perhaps was framed, but as always, it depends. STEPH: Yeah, I'm trying to think of a scenario where I would be concerned about the fact that I'm using open source that's backed by a specific large company or corporation. And the main scenario I can think of is what happens when you conflict or if you have values that conflict with a company that is sponsoring that project? So if you are using an open-source project, but then the main community or the company that then works on that project does something that you really disagree with, then what do you do? How do you feel about that situation? Do you continue to use that open-source project? Do you try to use a different open-source project? And I had that conversation frankly with myself recently, thinking through what to do in that situation and how to view it. And I realize this may not be how everybody views it, and it's not appropriate for all situations. But I do typically look at open-source projects as more than who they are backed by, but the community that's actively working on that project and who it benefits. So even if there is one particular group that is doing something that I don't agree with, that doesn't necessarily mean that wholesale I no longer want to be a part of this community. It just means that I still want to be a part, but I still want to share my concerns that I think a part of our community is going in a direction that I don't agree with or I don't think is a good direction. That's, I guess, how I reason with myself; even if an open-source project is backed by someone that I don't agree with, either one, you can walk away. That seems very complicated, depending on your dependencies. Or two, you find ways to then push back on those values if you feel that the community is headed in a direction that you don't agree with. And that all depends on how comfortable you are and how much power you feel like you have in that situation to express your opinion. So it's a complicated space. CHRIS: Yeah, that is a super subtle edge case of all of this. And I think I aligned with what you said of trying to view an open-source project as more generally the community that's behind it as opposed to even if there's a strong, singular organization behind it. But that said, that's definitely a part of it. And again, it's a double-edged sword. It's not just, oh, giant company; this is great. That giant company now has to consider this. And I think in the case of Facebook and React, that is a wonderful hiring channel for them. Now all the people that use React anywhere are like, "Oh man, I could go work at Facebook on React? That's exciting." That's a thing that's a marketing tool from a hiring perspective for them. But it cuts both ways because suddenly, if the mindshare moves in a different direction, or if Facebook as an organization does something complicated, then React as a community can start to shift away. Maybe you don't move the current project off of it, but perhaps you don't start the next one with it. And so, there are trade-offs and considerations in all directions. And again, it depends. STEPH: Yeah. I think overall, the thing that doesn't depend is marketing matters. It is a real part of the ecosystem, and it will influence our decisions. And so, just circling back to Thom's question, I think it does play a vital role in the choices that we make. CHRIS: Way to stick the landing. STEPH: Thanks. Mid-roll Ad And now a quick break to hear from today's sponsor, Scout APM. Scout APM is leading-edge application performance monitoring that's designed to help Rails developers quickly find and fix performance issues without having to deal with the headache or overhead of enterprise platform feature bloat. With a developer-centric UI and tracing logic that ties bottlenecks to source code, you can quickly pinpoint and resolve those performance abnormalities like N+1 queries, slow database queries, memory bloat, and much more. Scout's real-time alerting and weekly digest emails let you rest easy knowing Scout's on watch and resolving performance issues before your customers ever see them. Scout has also launched its new error monitoring feature add-on for Python applications. Now you can connect your error reporting and application monitoring data on one platform. See for yourself why developers call Scout their best friend and try our error monitoring and APM free for 14 days; no credit card needed. And as an added-on bonus for Bike Shed listeners, Scout will donate $5 to the open-source project of your choice when you deploy. Learn more at scoutapm.com/bikeshed. That's scoutapm.com/bikeshed. STEPH: Changing topics just a bit, what's new in your world? CHRIS: Well, we had what I would call a mini perfect storm this week. We broke the build but in a pretty solid way. And it was a little bit difficult to get it back under control. And it has pushed me ever so slightly forward in my desire to have a fully optimized CI and deploy pipeline. Mostly, I mean that in terms of ratcheting. I'm not actually going to do anything beyond a very small set of configurations. But to describe the context, we use pull requests because that's the way that we communicate. We do code reviews, all that fun stuff. And so there was a particular branch that had a good amount of changes, and then something got merged. And this other pull request was approved. And that person then clicked the rebase and merge button, which I have configured the repository, so that merge commits are not allowed because I'm not interested in that malarkey in our history. But merge commits or rebase and merge. I like that that makes sense. In this particular case, we ran into the very small, subtle edge case of if you click the rebase and merge button, GitHub is now producing a new commit that did not exist before, a new version of the code. So they're taking your changes, and they are rebasing them onto the current main branch. And then they're attempting to merge that in. And A, that was allowed. B, the CI configuration did not require that to be in a passing state. And so basically, in doing that rebase and merge, it produced an artifact in the build that made it fail. And then attempting to unwind that was very complicated. So basically, the rebase produced...there were duplicate changes within a given file. So Git didn't see it as a conflict because the change was made in two different parts of the file, but those were conflicting changes. So Git was like, this seems like it's fine. I can merge this, no problem. But it turns out from a functional perspective; it did not work. The build failed. And so now our main branch was failing and then trying to unwind that it just was surprisingly difficult to unwind that. And it really highlighted the importance of keeping the main branch green, keeping the build always passing. And so, I configured a few things in response to this. There is a branch protection rule that you can enable. And let me actually pull up the specific configuration that I set up. So I now have enabled require status checks to pass before merging, which, if we're being honest, I thought that was the default. It turns out it was not the default. So we are now requiring status checks to pass before merging. I'm fully aware of the awkward, painful like, oh no, the build is failing but also, we have a bug. We need to deploy this. We must get something merged in. So hopefully, if and when that situation presents itself, I will turn this off or somehow otherwise work around it. But for now, I would prefer to have this as a yeah; this is definitely a configuration we want. So require status checks to pass before merging and then require branches to be up to date before merging. So the button that does the rebase and merge, I don't want that to actually do a rebase on GitHub. I want the branch to already be up to date. Basically, I only ever want fast-forward merges on our main branch. So all code should be ahead of main, and we are simply updating what main points at. We are not creating new code. That code has run on CI, that version of the code specifically. We are fully rebased and up to date on top of main, and that's how we're going. STEPH: All of that is super interesting. I have a question about the workflow. I want to make sure I'm understanding it correctly. So let's say that I have issued a PR, and then someone else has merged into the main branch. So now my PR is behind me, and I don't have that latest commit. With the new configuration, can I still use the rebase and merge, or will I need to rebase locally and then push up my branch before I can merge into main but at least using the GitHub UI? CHRIS: I believe that you would be forced to rebase locally, force push, and then CI would rebuild, and that's what it is. So I think that's what require branches to be up to date before merging means. So that's my hope. That is the intention here. I do realize that's complicated. So this requirement, which I like, because again, I really want the idea that no, no, no, we, the developers, are in charge of that final state. That final state should always run as part of a build of CI on our pull request/branch before going into main. So no code should be new. There should be no new commits that have never been tested before going into main. That's my strong belief. I want that world. I realize that's...I don't know. Maybe I'm getting pedantic, or I'm a micromanager of the Git history or whatever. I'm fine with any of those insults that people want to lob at me. That's fine. But that's what I feel. That said, this is a nuisance. I'm fully aware of that. And so imagine the situation where we got a couple of different things that have been in flight. People have been working on different...say there are three pull requests that are all coming to completion at the same time. Then you start to go to merge something, and you realize, oh no, somebody else just merged. So you rebase, and then you wait for CI to build. And just as the CI is completing, somebody else merges something, and you're like, ah, come on. And so then you have to one more time rebase, push, wait for the build to be green. So I get that that is not an ideal situation. Right now, our team is three developers. So there are a few enough of us that I feel like this is okay. We can manage this via human intervention and just deal with the occasional weight. But in the back of my mind, of course, I want to find a better solution to this. So what I've been exploring…there's a handful of different utilities that I'm looking at, but they are basically merged queues as an idea. So there are three that I'm looking at, or maybe just two, but there's mergify.io, which is a hosted solution that does this sort of thing. And then Shopify has a merge queue implementation that they're running. So the idea with this is when you as a developer are ready to merge something, you add a label to it. And when you add that label, there's some GitHub Action or otherwise some workflow in the background that sees that this has happened and now adds it to a merge queue. So it knows all of the different things that might want to be merged. And this is especially important as the team grows so that you don't get that contention. You can just say, "Yes, I would like my changes to go out into production." And so, when you label it, it then goes into this merge queue. And the background system is now going to take care of any necessary rebases. It's going to sequence them, so it's not just constantly churning all of the branches. It's waiting because it knows the order that they're ideally going to go out in. If CI fails for any of them because rebasing suddenly, you're in an inconsistent state; if your build fails, then it will kick you out of the merge queue. It will let you know. So it will send you a notification in some manner and say, "Hey, hey, hey, you got to come look at this again. You've been kicked out of the merge queue. You're not going to production." But ideally, it adds that layer of automation to, frankly, this nuisance of having to keep things up to date and always wanting code to be run on CI and on a pull request before it gets into main. Then the ideal version is when it does actually merge your code, it pings you in Slack or something like that to say, "Hey, your changes just went out to production." Because the other thing I'm hoping for is a continuous deployment. STEPH: The idea of a merge queue sounds really interesting. I've never worked with a process like that. And one of the benefits I can see is if I know I'm ready for something to go like if I'm waiting on a green build and I'm like, hey, as soon as this is green, I'd really like for it to get merged. Then currently, I'm checking in on it, so I will restart the build. And then, every so often, I'm going back to say, "Okay, are you green? Are you green? Can I emerge?" But if I have a merge queue, I can say, "Hey, merge queue, when this is green, please go and merge it for me." If I'm understanding the behavior correctly, that sounds really nifty. CHRIS: I think that's a distinct but useful aspect of this is the idea that when you as a developer decide this PR is ready to go, you don't need to wait for either the current build or any subsequent builds. If there are rebases that need to happen, you basically say, "I think this code's good to go. We've gotten the necessary approvals. We've got the buy-in and the teams into this code." So cool, I now market as good. And you can walk away from it, and you will be notified either if it fails to get merged or if it successfully gets merged and deployed. So yes, that dream of like, you don't have to sit there watching the pot boil anymore. STEPH: Yeah, that sounds nice. I do have to ask you a question. And this is related to one of the blog posts that you and I love deeply and reference fairly frequently. And it's the one that's written by German Velasco about Say No to More Process, and Say Yes to Trust. And I'm wondering, based on the pain that you felt from this new commit, going into main and breaking the main build, how do you feel about that balance of we spent time investigating this issue, and it may or may not happen again, and we're also looking into these new processes to avoid this from happening? I'm curious what your thought process is there because it seems like it's a fair amount of work to invest in the new process, but maybe that's justified based on the pain that you felt from having to fix the build previously. CHRIS: Oh, I love the question. I love the subtle pushback here. I love this frame of mind. I really love that blog post. German writes incredible blog posts. And this is one that I just keep coming back to. In this particular case, when this situation occurred, we had a very brief...well, it wasn't even that brief because actually unwinding the situation was surprisingly painful, and we had some changes that we really wanted to get out, but now the build was broken. And so that churn and slowdown of our build pipeline and of our ability to actually get changes out to production was enough pain that we're like, okay, cool. And then the other thing is we actually all were in agreement that this is the way we want things to work anyway, that idea that things should be rebased and tested on CI as part of a pull request. And then we're essentially only doing fast-forward merges on the main branch, or we're fast forward merging main into this new change. That's the workflow that we wanted. So this configuration was really just adding a little bit of software control to the thing that we wanted. So it was an existing process in our minds. This is the thing we were trying to do. It's just kind of hard to keep up with, frankly. But it turns out GitHub can manage it for us and enforce the process that we wanted. So it wasn't a new process per se. It was new automation to help us hold ourselves to the process that we had chosen. And again, it's minimally painful for the team given the size that we're at now, but I am looking out to the future. And to be clear, this is one of the many things that fall on the list of; man, I would love to have some time to do this, but this is obviously not a priority right now. So I'm not allowed to do this. This is explicitly on the not allowed to touch list, but someday. I'm very excited about this because this does fundamentally introduce some additional work in the pipeline, and I don't want that. Like you said, is this process worth it for the very small set of times that it's going to have a bad outcome? But in my mind, the better version, that down the road version where we have a merge queue, is actually a better version overall, even with just a tiny team of three developers that are maybe never even conflicting in our merges, except for this one standout time that happens once every three months or whatever. This is still nicer. I want to just be able to label a pull request and walk away and have it do the thing that we have decided as a team that we want. So that's the dream. STEPH: Oh, I love that phrasing, to label a pull request and be able to walk away. Going back to our marketing, that really sells that merge queue to me. [laughs] Mid-roll Ad And now we're going to take a quick break to tell you about today's sponsor, Orbit. Orbit is mission control for community builders. Orbit offers data analytics, reporting, and insights across all the places your community exists in a single location. Orbit's origins are in the open-source and developer relations communities. And that continues today with an active open-source culture in an accessible and documented API. With thousands of communities currently relying on Orbit, they are rapidly growing their engineering team. The company is entirely remote-first with team members around the world. You can work from home, from an Orbit outpost in San Francisco or Paris, or find yourself a coworking spot in your city. The tech stack of the main orbit app is Ruby on Rails with JavaScript on the front end. If you're looking for your next role with an empathetic product-driven team that prides itself on work-life balance, professional development, and giving back to the larger community, then consider checking out the Orbit careers page for more information. Bonus points if working in a Ruby codebase with a Ruby-oriented team gives you a lot of joy. Find out more at orbit.love/weloveruby. CHRIS: To be clear, and this is to borrow on some of Charity Majors' comments around continuous deployment and whatnot, is a developer should stay very close to the code if they are merging it. Because if we're doing continuous deployment, that's going to go out to production. If anything's going to happen, I want that individual to be aware. So ideally, there's another set of optimizations that I need to make on top of this. So we've got the merge queue, and that'll be great. Really excited about that. But if we're going to lean into this, I want to optimize our CI pipeline and our deployment pipeline as much as possible such that even in the worst case where there's three different builds that are fighting for contention and trying to get out, the longest any developer might go between labeling a pull request and saying, "This is good to go," and it getting out to production, again, even if they're contending with other PRs, is say 10, 15 minutes, something like that. I want Slack to notify them and them to then re-engage and keep an eye on things, see if any errors pop up, anything like that that they might need to respond to. Because they're the one that's got the context on the code at that point, and that context is decaying. The minute you've just merged a pull request and you're walking away from that code, the next day, you're like, what did I work on? I don't remember that at all. That code doesn't exist anymore in my brain. And so,,, staying close to that context is incredibly important. So there's a handful of optimizations that I've looked at in terms of the CircleCI build. I've talked about my not rebuilding when it actually gets fast-forward merged because we've already done that build on the pull request. I'm being somewhat pointed in saying this has to build on a pull request. So if it did just build on a pull request, let's not rebuild it on main because it's identically the same commit. CircleCI, I'm looking at you. Give me a config button for that, please. I would really love that config button. But there are a couple of other things that I've looked at. There's RSpec::Retry from NoRedInk, which will allow for some retry semantics. Because it will be really frustrating if your build breaks and you fall out of the merge queue. So let's try a little bit of retry logic on there, particularly around feature specs, because that's where this might happen. There's Knapsack Pro which is a really interesting thing that I've looked at, which does parallelization of your RSpec test suite. But it does it in a different way than say Circle does. It actually runs a build queue, and each test gets sent over, and they have build agents on their side. And it's an interesting approach. I'm intrigued. I think it could use some nice speed-ups. There's esbuild on the Heroku side so that our assets build so much more quickly. There are lots of things. I want to make it very fast. But again, this is on the not allowed to do it list. [laughs] STEPH: I love how most of the world has a to-do list, and you have this not-allowed to-do list that you're adding items to. And I'm really curious what all is on the not allowed to touch lists or not allowed to-do list. [laughs] CHRIS: I think this might be inherent to being a developer is like when I see a problem, I want to fix it. I want to optimize it. I want to tweak it. I want to make it so that that never happens again. But plenty of things...coming back to German's post of Say No to More Process, some things shouldn't be fixed, or the cost of fixing is so much higher than the cost of just letting it happen again and dealing with it manually at that moment. And so I think my inherent nature as a developer there's a voice in my head that is like, fix everything that's broken. And I'm like, sorry. Sorry, brain, I do not have that kind of time. And so I have to be really choosy about where the time goes. And this extends to the team as well. We need to be intentional around what we're building. Actually, there's a feeling that I've been feeling more acutely than ever, but it's the idea of this trade-off or optimization between speed and getting features out into the world and laying the right fundamentals. We're still very early on in this project, and I want to make sure we're thinking about things intentionally. I've been on so many projects where it's many years after it started and when I ask someone, "Hey, why do your background jobs work that way? That's a little weird." And they're like, "Yeah, that was just a thing that happened, and then it never changed. And then, we copied it and duplicated, and that pattern just got reinforced deeply within the app. And at this point, it would cost too much to change." I've seen that thing play out so many times at so many different organizations that I'm overwhelmed with that knowledge in the back of my head. And I'm like, okay, I got to get it just right. But I can't take the time that is necessary to get it, quote, unquote, "Just right." I do not have that kind of time. I got to ship some features. And this tension is sort of the name of the game. It's the thing I've been doing for my entire career. But now, given the role that I have with a very early-stage startup, I've never felt it more acutely. I've never had to be equally as concerned with both sides of that. Both matter all the more now than they ever have before, and so I'm kind of existing in that space. STEPH: I really like that phrasing of that space because that deeply resonates with me as well. And that not allowed to-do list I have a similar list. For me, it's just called a wishlist. And so it's a wishlist that I will revisit every so often, but honestly, most things on there don't get done. And then I'll clear it out every so often when I feel it's not likely that I'm going to get to it. And then I'll just start fresh. So I also have a similar this is what I would like to do if I had the time. And I agree that there's this inclination to automate as well. As soon as we have to do something that felt painful once, then we feel like, oh, we should automate it. And that's a conversation that I often have with myself is at what point is the cost of automation worthwhile versus should we just do this manually until we get to that point? So I love those nuanced conversations around when is the right time to invest further in this, and what is the impact? And what is the cost of it? And what are the trade-offs? And making that decision isn't always clear. And so I think that's why I really enjoy these conversations because it's not a clear rubric as to like, this is when you invest, and this is when you don't. But I do feel like being a consultant has helped me hone those skills because I am jumping around to different teams, and I'm recognizing they didn't do this thing. Maybe they didn't address this or invest in it, and it's working for them. There are some oddities. Like you said, maybe I'll ask, "Why is this? It seems a little funky. What's the history?" And they'll be like, "Yeah, it was built in a hurry, but it works. And so there hasn't been any churn. We don't have any issues with it, so we have just left it." And that has helped reinforce the idea that just because something could be improved doesn't mean it's worthwhile to improve it. Circling back to your original quest where you are looking to improve the process for merging and ensuring that CI stays green, I do like that you highlighted the fact that we do need to just be able to override settings. So that's something that has happened recently this week for me and my client work where we have had PRs that didn't have a green build because we have some flaky tests that we are actively working on. But we recognize that they're flaky, and we don't want that to block us. I'm still shipping work. So I really appreciate the consideration where we want to optimize so that everyone has an easy merging experience. We know things are green. It's trustworthy. But then we also have the ability to still say, "No, I am confident that I know what I'm doing here, and I want to merge it anyways, but thank you for the warning." CHRIS: And the constant pendulum swing of over-correcting in various directions I've experienced that. And as you said, in the back of my mind, I'm like, oh, I know that this setting I'm going to need a way to turn this setting off. So I want to make sure that, most importantly, I'm not the only one on the team who can turn that off because the day that I am away on vacation and the build is broken, and we have a critical bug that we need to fix, somebody else needs to be able to do that. So that's sort of the story in my head. At the same time, though, I've worked on so many teams where they're like, oh yeah, the build has been broken for seven weeks. We have a ticket in the backlog to fix that. And it's like, no, the build has to not be broken for that long. And so I agree with what you were saying of consulting has so usefully helped me hone where I fall on these various spectrums. But I do worry that I'm just constantly over-correcting in one direction or the other. I'm never actually at an optimum. I am just constantly whatever the most recent thing was, which is really impacting my thinking on this. And I try to not do that, but it's hard. STEPH: Oh yeah. I'm totally biased towards my most recent experiences, and whatever has caused me the most pain or success recently. I'm definitely skewed in that direction. CHRIS: Yeah, I definitely have the recency bias, and I try to have a holistic view of all of the things I've seen. There's actually a particular one that I don't want to pat myself on the back for because it's not a good thing. But currently, our test suite, when it runs, there's just a bunch of noise. There's a bunch of other stuff that gets printed out, like a bunch of it. And I'm reminded of a tweet from Kevin Newton, a friend of the show, and I just pulled it up here. "Oh, the lengths I will go to avoid warnings in my terminal, especially in the middle of my green dots. Don't touch my dots." It's a beautiful beauty. He actually has a handful about the green dots. And I feel this feel. When I run my test suite, I just want a sea of green dots. That's all I want to see. But right now, our test suite is just noise. It's so much noise. And I am very proud of...I feel like this is a growth moment for me where I've been like, you know what? That is not the thing to fix today. We can deal with some noise amongst the green dots for now. Someday, I'm just going to lose it, and I'm going to fix it, and it's going to come back to green dots. [chuckles] STEPH: That sounds like such a wonderful children's book or Dr. Seuss. Oh, the importance of green dots or, oh, the places green dots will take you. CHRIS: Don't touch my dots. [laughter] STEPH: Okay. Maybe a slightly aggressive Dr. Seuss, but I still really like it. CHRIS: A little more, yeah. STEPH: On that note of our love of green dots, shall we wrap up? CHRIS: Let's wrap up. The show notes for this episode can be found at bikeshed.fm. STEPH: This show is produced and edited by Mandy Moore. CHRIS: If you enjoyed listening, one really easy way to support the show is to leave us a quick rating or even a review in iTunes, as it really helps other folks find the show. STEPH: If you have any feedback for this or any of our other episodes, you can reach us at @_bikeshed or reach me on Twitter @SViccari. CHRIS: And I'm @christoomey STEPH: Or you can reach us at hosts@bikeshed.fm via email. CHRIS: Thanks so much for listening to The Bike Shed, and we'll see you next week. All: Byeeeeeee!!! Announcer: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success.

One Broke Actress Podcast
8.2 - Decision Fatigue + Three Ways to Fight It

One Broke Actress Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 19:08


As actors, we have to make countless decisions every single day. How much energy will I give my day job today? What part of my career am I going to work on when I'm not auditioning? Should I reach out to my representation since I haven't heard from them in a while? The more obligations we have, the more decisions we need to make, and the more drained we become as the day goes on. If we're not careful about pacing ourselves through all of these little choices, we can easily become burnt out and not able to tackle the fun, creative acting decisions asked of us for auditions. In this week's episode, I talk about this exact problem. While there may not be a perfect system that permanently solves decision fatigue, I do have some tips that have helped me. I share my morning routine, how I've streamlined my audition process, and how I use any free time that I may have. I also discuss my "Someday, Maybe" list and how invaluable it has been in organizing all the little things that need to get done (Like uploading my auditions to Dropbox!). We'll always have decisions to make, but I hope that these tips can help give you the mental breathing room that they have given me in my day-to-day actor life. Resources Mentioned in This Episode: Deb Smith's More Than You See Podcast The New Normal — Mental Health with Deb Smith Use BROKE25 on WeAudition for a lifetime discount on membership! Want more? Check out Patreon for bonus episodes, IG Close Friends content, and so much more. And don't miss all the content on IG and as always at, OneBrokeActress.com And if you're needing some personalized help from Sam, you can schedule a chat with her right here. Don't forget to join the mailing list here! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/one-broke-actress-podcast/message

Pursuing God with Gene Appel
Episode 192: “God, Turn My Someday Into Now”

Pursuing God with Gene Appel

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 6:04


 “God, turn my someday into now. Teach me the power of a moment.  Remind me how brief my time on earth will be.  Remind me that my days are numbered—how fleeting my life is.” In today's episode, Gene encourages us to think about what would happen if we prayed this prayer every day.

The G.N.A. Podcast
G.N.A. Podcast Episode 287: Skip This Epsiode

The G.N.A. Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 69:03


Seriously, Skip it. There is probably more skips in this episode than episode. Someday it will be fixed. Until that day, skip this one.

日谈公园
vol.392 Someday in the Sun

日谈公园

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 0:32


主播 | 李叔 受《Someday in the Rain》和《The Double Life of Veronique》启发,有了本期节目的最初创意,随机记录了某个城市人类在某个日子里的生活流水账,平常日子里真实的困顿,迷茫,快乐和空白瞬间。算是个纪念。PS.这期节目是一次声音表达上的探索和实验,通过将其生命周期设定为五天,来一场毫无预警的阅后即焚,实验得以完整。15个小时的生活体验,3个小时的精剪呈现,30秒钟的声音碎片,本质上都指向同一个客体,即无尽日常中的真实瞬间,以及如影随形的无常变幻。感谢所有听到了这期节目的朋友,我们共同创造了这场一期一会。错过的朋友也无需遗憾,生命本是水中之书。感谢本期节目声音设计师mokie的杰出工作。2021.10.02

日谈公园
vol.392 Someday in the Sun

日谈公园

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 176:46


主播 | 李叔 受《Someday in the Rain》和《The Double Life of Veronique》启发,有了本期节目的最初创意,随机记录了某个城市人类在某个日子里的生活流水账,平常日子里真实的困顿,迷茫,快乐和空白瞬间。算是个纪念。

Small Axe Podcast
The Capital Raising Life with Timothy Lyons

Small Axe Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 29:48


For today's episode, we are featuring Timothy Lyons. Tim is the founder and managing partner of Cityside Capital LLC, a real estate syndication and investment company that focuses on multifamily real estate assets that yield strong returns for investors. At the same time, Tim is also a lieutenant in the New York City Fire Department (FDNY) where he has served for 16 years. Until recently, he also worked part-time as an emergency room nurse (RN) at a level 1 trauma center. Tim's initial goal with real estate was to create passive income and in turn, be able to spend more time with his wife and their three little girls. After partnering on a small multifamily property, he saw first-hand the power of real estate investing as an opportunity to create passive income and build wealth for his family. He started Cityside Capital with the goal of not only growing his own portfolio but also to help others realize the power that real estate investing can have on creating wealth. This is an exciting episode especially for those of you who want to know what it is like to live the Capital Raising Life. Just like anything, this life is not easy, but all the while rewarding. If this episode is something that you might be interested in, make sure to tune in until the end or reach out to Tim through the links below to know more about this topic!    [00:01 – 10:55] Opening Segment I announce about our Kentucky offer I introduce our guest, Timothy Lyons Connect with Tim through the links below Tim shares about his background Little man with achieving his fireman dreams The reality of having 24-hour job Someday moments with Real Estate From rock-bottom to Real Estate rockstar Tim's Inspiring Circle His supportive wife, Kristina His brothers whom he does Real Estate with [10:56 – 22:23]  Capital Raising  A Broker Dealer Licensed securities broker Traditionally focuses on Private Equities and Start-ups Law knowledgeable professionals What you should have done has been done for you CitySideCapital does the pre-vetting for the passive investors Indeed, this is the ultimate passive investing opportunity Provides better safety and clarity Some notes for those interested becoming Registered Representatives  Education is a must! Raising own deals Other ways to earn   [22:24 – 25:41]  On Finding New Investors   Small circle to Big Circle Connections + Education + Hard Work + Perseverance Don't forget genuine conversations   [25:42 - 29:47] Closing Segment Tim's vision for the future Tim's biography title and character highlights he wants to see Connect with Tim through the links below Final words   Resources Mentioned: Rich Dad, Poor Dad   Tweetable Quotes: “I think the more educated the investors are going into a deal, the better they feel they understand the process, which I think is a win-win [situation] for everybody.” - Timothy Lyons   “It's funny. When I was in college, I couldn't wait to be out of college and stop taking exams. And as I got older and older, I realized that you are never truly done with education, or learning. It has taken me a while, I'm 39 now, but I can't wait to read the next book, I can't wait to take the next course, I can't wait to go to the next conference.” - Timothy Lyons Find out more and connect Timothy Lyons through his Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, and his email at tlyons234@gmail.com or checkout her website at  https://citysidecap.com/  LEAVE A REVIEW + help someone who wants to explode their business growth by sharing this episode. I believe that you only need a small axe to build a lasting empire. Let's start building yours! To know more about me and all the real estate opportunities you can find, you can connect with me on LinkedIn, Instagram, and Facebook or check out my website https://smallaxecommunities.com/ and book a call with me.

Breaking Mayberry
92: I'm Ted Koppel, and Someday We Will All Die

Breaking Mayberry

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 49:59


Welcome to our mid-season break, kinda. We're spending half the episode discussing a truly bizarre news piece about Mt. Airy, NC, and then the other half talking about an episode I've already forgotten. Also we go in hard on those punks at NPR. About time someone put them in their place.Watch the CBS News segment on Mt Airy here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iZme-GsKv_gMarty on Twitter: https://twitter.com/SchneidRemarksDan on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theluddsSUPPORT BREAKING MAYBERRY ON PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/breakingmayberryMusic by Max Ludwig: twitter.com/sleeptalkyFollow Breaking Mayberry on Twitter: twitter.com/BreakMayberry, Facebook facebook.com/BreakingMayberry or email us at breakingmayberry@gmail.com

The Second Phase Podcast - Personal Branding & Brand Marketing and Life Strategies for Success for Female Entrepreneurs

Are You Stuck Saying Someday I'll Start a Business? Or, Someday I'll Do That? Maybe I'm Not Ready Yet? Someday is Now! You Just Need to Know How to Set Goals Effectively. In this episode, Stacy Tuschl joins for a conversation on how to stop saying someday and start setting goals that you can achieve without reaching burnout.  We talk about the advantage of setting 90-day goals vs. annual goals, or in addition to annual goals. The key is to have big audacious goals but break them down into bite-size chunks that are manageable and won't overwhelm you.  Think about a list of 3 things for each quarter and how you can prioritize them to ensure that you accomplish them.  Click here to read the full blog post and access links, especially the link to a free copy of Stacy's book, The Implementation Code. 

Prayer 2021
Prayer 2021 - September 15 - Our Rights Under Prayer pt 11

Prayer 2021

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 6:30


Scripture For Today:2 Chronicles 7:15“Now my eyes will be open and my ears attentive to the prayers offered in this place.”Our Rights Under Prayer pt 11We have been talking about “Our Rights Under Prayer” and how important it is that we understand our rights. Just like knowing what are rights are under the Constitution of the United States, we need to know our rights Under Heaven as it concerns prayer as well. Genesis chp 2 talks about the Blessing of the Lord and how He gave us a command to “Have Dominion” over all of creation!  But yet, we allow others and we allow circumstances to have dominion over us!  It's NOT supposed to be like that. Most people, when they pray, they are trying to make deals with God.  They will pray things like, “If you Bless me – then I will do this and that…”  But that's backwards! Find out what God wants you to do – then do it!  Then the Blessing comes upon you and overtakes you….that is what the Blessing is designed to do and how it is designed to work.  For example:  your kids are hungry.  The bread is at the store.  You can say…” I know there is bread at the store.  I know you are hungry.  Someday, if you are really good, perhaps the bread will come to us from the store.”   NO!  You go TO the store – obtain the bread – then feed the kids.  You don't start by trying to “be good” and “hope” the bread comes to you.  You must put forth the effort to go and get it!  Amen! Go to 3 John 2 God wants you well, spirit, soul and body.  He wants to Bless you.  And YOU want to be Blessed – right?  So, you need to find out what God says you should do – and do it!  Then, you WILL be Blessed – you have His Word on it!  And God is not a man that He should lie! Read Matthew21:21-22; Mark 11:24; Luke 18:1 Our struggle is not with God – God is the answer to the problem…not THE Problem!  What would be the use of praying always if could not obtain what we are always praying about? You can't get “good enough” to “get” God to answer  your prayers.  Our prayer life is based upon our covenant with Jesus.  Period!  Nothing else!  It is because of Jesus that God will answer our prayers.  It is because of “Good” Jesus was and is.  Not because of how “good” we try to be.  It is because we have entered into covenant with JESUS and God has entered into covenant with Jesus – so therefore WE have covenant with God! The KEY to all of this – the common denominator in the whole thing – is in BELIEVING.  Believing in our covenant.  Believing in Jesus. Believing in what HE did for US.  Believing that the price of our sin has been paid – in full.  Believing the God will honor His Word, His Promise to Jesus – that He will Bless those who Bless Jesus – how do we do that?  By doing what He told us to do – BELIEVE! That is all we have to do!  Believe!  “But, brother Bob, I just don't know if I can do that. You don't know what my finances are like…you don't know what the doctor told me was wrong…you don't know…you don't know….you don't know”  YOUR RIGHT!  I don't know…but I DO KNOW who has the answer you are looking for!  JESUS! But, you can only know what to believe FOR if you know what the person you are believing has said.  You can only know what they said if you talk to them.  You did not receive Jesus as  your Lord and Savior UNTIL you BELIEVED what God said about Jesus and what He did on the cross. Let's Pray!  Please subscribe to this podcast, leave us a quick 5 star review on Apple Podcasts to help us grow and be sure to visit our website for more information on our...

History That Doesn't Suck
97: The Gilded Age's Robber Barons: John D. Rockefeller & Andrew Carnegie

History That Doesn't Suck

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 71:39


“Someday, some-time, when I am a man, I want to be worth a hundred thousand dollars!” This is the story of two of the United States' most wealthy industrialists. John D. Rockefeller is the son of a con artist; he teaches young John never to trust and leaves the boy wondering if food will or won't be on the table. John will rise from his world of uncertainty to dominate the emerging oil scene. The son of a Scottish weaver, Andrew Carnegie comes from absolutely nothing. But Pennsylvania Railroad exec Tom Scott sees promise in the lad. Tom's mentoring will help Andy emerge as the king of the steel industry. Both men overcome the impossible. But are they inspiring Titans of industry? Or monopolistic robber barons? The beneficiaries of their philanthropy see the former, while workers might see the latter—particularly those at a steel mill in Homestead, Pennsylvania. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Jimmy Rex Show
#297 - Satsang - Drew McManus - Lead Singer Of The Band Satsang Shares Life As A Rockstar, Dad, & Parent

The Jimmy Rex Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 47:29


Guest Bio:“Montana isn't just where I live,” says Satsang's Drew McManus. “It's my heart, my soul. Along with my family, it's my everything.”It's little wonder, then, that the state played such a pivotal role in inspiring ‘All Right Now,' Satsang's extraordinary new album and debut release for venerated indie label Side One Dummy. Written and recorded during an extended hiatus from the road, the record finds McManus reconnecting with his western roots and exploring a whole new palette of sounds and textures, drawing on classic country and modern Americana to forge a joyful, rustic collection all about letting go and living in the moment. McManus produced the album himself, and while the songs here are certainly honest and deeply personal, they're written in a spiritual language that taps into something far more universal, something inherent in the human condition that binds us as brothers and sisters on a shared journey to find ourselves and our place in this world. The performances and arrangements are broad and spacious to match, reflecting the wide-open fields and soaring mountains that surrounded the band during the whirlwind recording process, and the result is a lush, organic collection fueled by acoustic guitars, fiddle, and pedal steel, a warm, inviting record that hints at everything from Uncle Tupelo and The Jayhawks to Gregory Alan Isakov and The Head and the Heart as it meditates on the power—and the pull—of home.“I've been on the road for the last five or six years straight,” says McManus, “so being back in Montana for a whole year was a big change. Having that kind of uninterrupted time at home helped me fall back in love with songwriting in a whole new way.”Though McManus was born in Montana, he actually spent much of his formative years in Des Moines, IA. His childhood was troubled, to say the least, marked by physical abuse at home and a nose for trouble that surrounded him. Music offered an escape, though, and McManus found solace in the punk rock and hip-hop he discovered through his love of skateboarding. Brash and aggressive, the songs were a far cry from the country tunes his mother played on endless loop around the house.“She loved the old stuff like Buck Rogers and Hank Williams,” McManus recalls, “but she was really into that mid-to-late-nineties sound, guys like Garth Brooks and Randy Travis and Travis Tritt. I didn't get it at the time, but she always used to tell me, ‘Someday, when you're older, you'll come back to this music.'”Desperate to escape his surroundings and convinced that he'd wind up in jail like his brother if he stayed, McManus left home as a teenager and moved in with his older sister in Chicago. His first few years there played out like one long party, but as time wore on, it became apparent that the party was spiraling out of control. “It was clear to everyone else around me that I was an alcoholic and a drug addict,” McManus explains. “Eventually, my friends just sat me down and said, ‘We think you're going to die if you keep this up.'”So McManus packed his bags and headed back to Montana, where his biological father worked at a rehab clinic. The road to recovery was a long and arduous one, but McManus eventually got clean and sober, fell in love, and married the woman of his dreams. For the first time in a long time, life was good, and yet it still felt like something was missing, like some fundamental building block of his personality was being neglected. It wasn't until McManus found himself on a backpacking trek in the Himalayas that the final piece of the puzzle fell into place. “I realized on that trip that you only get one shot at life,” says McManus, “and if you've got a chance to utilize your talents and follow your dreams, then you've got to go for it. It gave me this renewed sense of purpose, and within a week of getting back home, I started playing shows and launched the band.”McManus filled notebook after notebook on that Himalayan journey, and the material would eventually go on to form the basis of Satsang's breakout 2016 debut, ‘The Story of You.' Steeped in reggae, hip-hop, and world music, the album was an uplifting affirmation that connected with fans around the world, racking up roughly 15 millions streams on Spotify alone. McManus and his bandmates returned a year later with their similarly successful sophomore effort, ‘Pyramid(s),' which hit #1 on the Billboard Reggae Chart and #2 on iTunes, and pushed their sound even further with 2019's ‘Kulture,' which incorporated a wider swath of influences from Motown to Tom Petty. Relentless road warriors, the group built a devoted following one night at a time, sharing stages with the likes of Michael Franti & Spearhead and Nahko and Medicine for the People as they worked their way up from bars and clubs to massive festivals.

The Marketing Secrets Show
Advanced Funnel Stacking

The Marketing Secrets Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 10:43


Understanding funnel stacking is the key to survival in 2021 and beyond. Hit me up on IG! @russellbrunson Text Me! 208-231-3797 Join my newsletter at marketingsecrets.com ClubHouseWithRussell.com ---Transcript--- Good morning, everybody. This is Russell Brunson. Welcome back to the Marketing Secrets podcast. Today is webinar day. I'm excited. Hopefully it's webinar day for you too, because webinars day, as long as you don't mess it up, it's usually payday. So, got some cool stuff to talk to you about. I'll be right back after the intro. Okay. So, heading to the office today, today is webinar day. That's a special webinar day, and I'm excited. I had a lesson that I want you to learn from this. So, how do I phrase this best? So, I just know when we first launched ClickFunnels, the way we did it was, I did a webinar, every single... Well, I told people I'd do a webinar a week for a year. But I was doing like three to five webinars a week, sometimes two or three a day for a year. And that's how we blew up ClickFunnels initially. That gave us initial momentum to get things into outer space. And then, over time we've got funnels and we do funnel stacking. Someone buys a book and they're pushing a webinar, and then from there, we take them through a whole sequence to get people to ascend and move up. And a couple of years ago I did a funnel hacking lab, I gave a presentation called, "Funnel Stacking," and talked about the importance of it and why it's like, have just a funnel, is not... Some people's business is like one funnel, that's their whole business. I'm like in the future, you got to become better at funnel stacking, which is like taking from funnel one to funnel two, to funnel three and moving them up your value ladder. And back then it was like, because this is how you make more money, but it wasn't like a necessity. And you probably heard me say before, one of my favorite Dan Kennedy quotes, he said, "Whoever can spend the most money to acquire customer wins." So, that's why funnels are so essential. When I got started back in the day, you guys heard of my story, right? I sold a potato gun DVD, and that's all I sold, and I was able to make money on that. But then Google shifted and got more expensive. And so we had to build out funnels to be able to still be profitable. And honestly, for the most part, I think most business owners over the last five or six years can have a funnel and make money and be profitable because just the funnel metrics. But something's happened over the last couple months and you may have heard of this. Our friends over at Google and our friends over at Apple and our friends at Facebook all started hating each other and fighting and battling. And because of these wars, all of our tracking and all sorts of stuff shifted, it changed. And I'm not sure if you've noticed it, we've noticed it, but the cost per acquisition or cost to acquire customers has gone up dramatically in most of the businesses and most of the funnels we have because of these new updates. And it's super annoying. But guess what? For those of you guys who are listening to me who are funnel hackers, who understand this stuff we've been talking about, is a slight annoyance that'll actually yield you more money at the end of the day because you understand these principles. Okay? So, what's going to happen is, first off, everybody who just had a funnel and that was their business, it's going to be harder for them to make money in that funnel. They're going to get closer and closer to break even, or losing money in their funnel. And a lot of people, a lot of your competition, a lot of people around you are going to be out of business. So there's number one. There's the bad news, a lot of people are going out of business. The good news is, most of your competition is going to get out of business, which means eventually at cost is probably going to drop, your ability to serve people is going to be easier. And so, those who stick through this are going to win, and it's going to be better for you in the longterm. So, that's the positive. This is the pattern that I've seen year after year, decade after decade now. This is what happens. And so, I warned you in the beginning of Traffic Secrets, I said, "There's a storm coming." We're in the eye of the storm right now, it's happening. And so, ad costs are going up, most businesses who are not sophisticated, who don't understand funnel hacking, and these principles are going to be gone. But for you guys, it's like, now's the time to start preparing, and so, what that means is, no longer is just your funnel breaking even, like going to be the thing that builds you the right business. That's step number one. Now you have to get into funnel stacking. Some of you guys, it's not the first funnel is going to be the second funnel that breaks you even. Okay? Did you hear that? It's not the first, it's the second funnel that breaks you even. Or some might be the first, the second and the third breaks you even, after that, you're profitable. The biggest companies, they could go the deepest. Now, for us who aren't VC backed, like for example, HubSpot... I think it's HubSpot. We were looking at their metrics and they go like a year or two years in the hole. So, they'll spend $2,000 to get a trial customer and they don't make any money on that person for two years, but they can do that because they've got all these VCs backing them. People like me and you, who are bootstrapping, we don't have unlimited budgets. So, we still have to break even quickly or we can't keep scaling. So the goal always initially was, break even in your first funnel. And then your second funnel is all profit. But now it's going to be going deeper because of just these new changes in how things are playing out. And so, it's important for you to do funnel stacking where it's like, hey, this may be my book funnel. And from there, I push my webinar funnel and from there it's my high ticket funnel and we're taking them through the sequence. And maybe it's like in the middle of the webinar funnels where you break even, or maybe even at the end of the webinar funnel, you're at break even or something, but you got to start figuring those metrics out and start figuring that process out. And so, that's something to think about. One thing people ask me is, "How do you track these things?" And Alex Becker actually has this really good tool now, called Hyros, H-Y-R-O-S, that we're using for our tracking. And it's probably the best thing out there right now. It's still not flawless, no one's flawless. Someday. Someday someone's going to build a flawless system. But it's been super helpful for us to be able to see the tracking from funnel to funnel and kind of see what's happening with people. But anyway, I want you guys to understand that this funnel stacking is a key. So for example, that's why I'm so excited about today's webinar day, because recently we acquired a company and I'm going to give more details, probably Funnel Hacking Live I'll first start talking about it. But we acquired a company that has a whole bunch of front end funnels. And we bought the funnels because they're so profitable. The average cart value is like, I don't know, 130, $140. So, he spent a lot of money to acquire a customer, which is why each of the funnels gets three to 500 new buyers a day, which is awesome. And my goal long-term is to get all those people into ClickFunnels. That's the whole business model. We bought this company because we're buying all their front end funnels so we can push people into ClickFunnels in the backend. Now, in the middle of those acquisitions, when these iOS, Facebook, Apple updates started happening and the cost to acquire a customer went up and all of a sudden these funnels were a 25% profit margin went down to 0% profit margin. And at first, everyone's freaked out like, "Oh, we should cancel the deal. We shouldn't do it." I'm like, "No, you don't understand, this is why we have to do the deal. This is the key." Yes, it sucks that the margin is now gone from these funnels, but the same thing, is like, we're still at break even or maybe a little bit in the hole, but we're acquiring all these customers and then we can put them into our second funnel and that's where it becomes profitable. And so, the question is, what is the second funnel? What's that look like? How is it going to work? And so that's what I'm testing today. So, what I'm doing today is, I'm doing a webinar to the entire buyer list, entire customer list of this company we bought. I think we have seven or almost 8,000 people registered. So it's going to be a big webinar day today and hopefully I don't bomb it. And it's a big payday, but who knows I could bomb. So we do a webinar, and if the webinar goes well, I take that webinar presentation and then we plug it into the back end of every one of these funnels. So, somebody buys the product, they go through the funnel hit the thank you page, thank you page will plug in the actual webinar, gets them on the webinar. And now, the first funnel stack has been completed, and it gets somebody from buying the software, getting thank you page, watch the webinar, buying ClickFunnels. And again, that becomes the first funnel stack. And so, that's the key. That's the thing I want you guys understanding is that, I think a lot of people are like, "Oh, you're going to make a ton of money off the webinar." I'm like, "Not enough money to pay back what we bought this company for." I'm only doing the webinar to be able to create the second piece in this funnel, the funnel stack, thing that's going to plug into the back of all these funnels. So now all these customers coming in every single day, we can transition them from funnel one to funnel two, which gives us profit, but then also plugs people into ClickFunnels, which is our continuity. And that's the beginning of the funnel stack. And then there's things from there, we'll take them on, but that's the key, the principle concept. Does that make sense you guys? Hope it does, because that's the key. I want you guys to understand the funnel stacking is the future. Just like we went from single products to funnel, was the last two decades. The next decade is moving from a funnel to a funnel stack. And so, that's the key. If you want more info, I think I have a book I wrote back in the day called, "Funnel Stacking." And I think I have it as an ebook now. I might mess up my domain. I think if you to funnelstacking secrets.com, there's a free ebook there that shows you my funnel stack from book to webinar to high ticket. And it shows you the email sequences, the numbers, the breakdown, and kind of a cool thing that you can use if you're trying to think through your funnel stack. But anyway, just want you guys getting that in your mindset, and we'll talk more about it, especially Funnel Hacking Live and other places, but the big key right now is, as it was products to funnels, now we're going from funnels to funnel stacking. And those who can spend the most money to acquire customer will win, and those who can't are going to lose. And so, if you want to win this game, it's time to start learning these skills and become more advanced in your marketing. So hope that helps. Thank you guys for listening. That said, it's webinar day, wish me luck. And hopefully it's a webinar day for you wherever you are listening to this. If not, schedule a webinar. It gets people on it because webinar day is payday. It's the best day of the week. Thanks guys. And I'll talk to you soon.